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Sample records for kinase alpha2 activity

  1. The AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 catalytic subunit controls whole-body insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Jørgensen, Sebastian B; Perrin, Christophe; Geloen, Alain; Flamez, Daisy; Mu, James; Lenzner, Claudia; Baud, Olivier; Bennoun, Myriam; Gomas, Emmanuel; Nicolas, Gaël; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Kahn, Axel; Carling, David; Schuit, Frans C; Birnbaum, Morris J; Richter, Erik A; Burcelin, Rémy; Vaulont, Sophie

    2003-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is viewed as a fuel sensor for glucose and lipid metabolism. To better understand the physiological role of AMPK, we generated a knockout mouse model in which the AMPKalpha2 catalytic subunit gene was inactivated. AMPKalpha2(-/-) mice presented high glucose levels in the fed period and during an oral glucose challenge associated with low insulin plasma levels. However, in isolated AMPKalpha2(-/-) pancreatic islets, glucose- and L-arginine-stimulated insulin secretion were not affected. AMPKalpha2(-/-) mice have reduced insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose utilization and muscle glycogen synthesis rates assessed in vivo by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. Surprisingly, both parameters were not altered in mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of AMPK in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, glucose transport was normal in incubated isolated AMPKalpha2(-/-) muscles. These data indicate that AMPKalpha2 in tissues other than skeletal muscles regulates insulin action. Concordantly, we found an increased daily urinary catecholamine excretion in AMPKalpha2(-/-) mice, suggesting altered function of the autonomic nervous system that could explain both the impaired insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity observed in vivo. Therefore, extramuscular AMPKalpha2 catalytic subunit is important for whole-body insulin action in vivo, probably through modulation of sympathetic nervous activity.

  2. Protein kinase C activation increases noradrenaline release from the rat hippocampus and modifies the inhibitory effect of alpha 2-adrenoceptor and adenosine A1-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, B B; Lindgren, E

    1988-05-01

    We have studied the effect of stimulating protein kinase C with phorbol esters on the release of [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) in the absence or presence of presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking agents and compared that to the elevation of cyclic AMP levels more than 10-fold by a combination of rolipram and forskolin. 4-beta-Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDiBu) increased stimulated (3 Hz) [3H]-NA release markedly and in a concentration dependent manner. 4-alpha-Phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was ineffective. The effect of PDiBu was not significantly reduced by nifedipine (1 microM), but was proportionally less in the presence of an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine. PDiBu inhibited the presynaptic effect of alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists clonidine and UK 14304. By contrast, the presynaptic effect of the adenosine analogue R-PIA was not reduced by PDiBu. PDiBu caused an increase in cyclic AMP that depended on adenosine receptor stimulation. Elevation of cyclic AMP had a limited effect on NA release from rat hippocampus, and did not significantly decrease the presynaptic inhibitory effect of UK 14304 (0.1 microM), of morphine (1 microM) or of the adenosine A1-receptor agonist CHA (1 microM). The effect of phorbol esters and several presynaptic inhibitors of NA-release in the rat hippocampus cannot be explained by changes in cyclic AMP levels in the tissue. Phorbol esters that stimulate protein kinase C appear to interact with a target that is the site of action alpha 2-adrenoceptors in this tissue. This site is not a dihydropyridine sensitive Ca-channel and is also different from the target of presynaptic adenosine receptors. Thus, activation of protein kinase C discriminates between apparently similar presynaptic mechanisms.

  3. Ablation of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha1 and alpha2 from mouse pancreatic beta cells and RIP2.Cre neurons suppresses insulin release in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, G; Tarasov, A I; McGinty, J; McDonald, A; da Silva Xavier, G; Gorman, T; Marley, A; French, P M; Parker, H; Gribble, F; Reimann, F; Prendiville, O; Carzaniga, R; Viollet, B; Leclerc, I; Rutter, G A

    2010-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme and a target of glucose-lowering agents, including metformin. However, the precise role or roles of the enzyme in controlling insulin secretion remain uncertain. The catalytic alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK were ablated selectively in mouse pancreatic beta cells and hypothalamic neurons by breeding Ampkalpha1 [also known as Prkaa1]-knockout mice, bearing floxed Ampkalpha2 [also known as Prkaa2] alleles (Ampkalpha1 ( -/- ),alpha2( fl/fl ),), with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the rat insulin promoter (RIP2). RIP2 was used to express constitutively activated AMPK selectively in beta cells in transgenic mice. Food intake, body weight and urinary catecholamines were measured using metabolic cages. Glucose and insulin tolerance were determined after intraperitoneal injection. Beta cell mass and morphology were analysed by optical projection tomography and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. Granule docking, insulin secretion, membrane potential and intracellular free Ca(2+) were measured with standard techniques. Trigenic Ampkalpha1 ( -/- ),alpha2( fl/fl ) expressing Cre recombinase and lacking both AMPKalpha subunits in the beta cell, displayed normal body weight and increased insulin sensitivity, but were profoundly insulin-deficient. Secreted catecholamine levels were unchanged. Total beta cell mass was unaltered, while mean islet and beta cell volume were reduced. AMPK-deficient beta cells displayed normal glucose-induced changes in membrane potential and intracellular free Ca(2+), while granule docking and insulin secretion were enhanced. Conversely, betaAMPK transgenic mice were glucose-intolerant and displayed defective insulin secretion. Inhibition of AMPK activity within the beta cell is necessary, but not sufficient for stimulation of insulin secretion by glucose to occur. AMPK activation in extrapancreatic RIP2.Cre-expressing cells might also influence

  4. Changes in beta-2 adrenergic receptor and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha-2 subunit in the rat vestibular nerve after labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Tadashi; Horii, Arata; Uno, Atsuhiko; Imai, Takao; Okazaki, Suzuyo; Kamakura, Takefumi; Takimoto, Yasumitsu; Inohara, Hidenori

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, to elucidate the role of vestibular ganglion (VG) after the unilateral labyrinthine damage, we examined quantitative changes in mRNA expression of beta-adrenergic receptors (bARs) and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha catalytic subunits (aAMPKs) in VG after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) in rats. Using the real-time PCR method, beta2 AR mRNA expression in bilateral VG and AMPK alpha2 mRNA expression in the ipsilateral VG were significantly up-regulated with the maximum increase at the postoperative 7 day and 1 day, respectively. The up-regulation of beta2 AR in bilateral VG was long-lasting until 28 days after UL and that of AMPK alpha2 in the ipsilateral VG was just transient within 7 days after UL. These mRNA changes were supported by immunohistochemical data. According to previous reports, both of bARs and aAMPKs could regulate mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) mRNA expression in several kinds of tissues and therefore might have thermogenic neurotransmission and antioxidant neuroprotective roles in neuronal tissues. UL requires not only long-lasting response of VG for central vestibular neuro-plasticity around 2-4 weeks but rapid response of VG against apoptosis of peripheral vestibular epithelia-neuronal synapses. The present findings suggest that beta2 AR in bilateral VG and AMPK alpha2 in the ipsilateral VG might play important signaling roles after the unilateral labyrinthine damage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of the alpha2-isoform of AMP-activated protein kinase in the metabolic response of the heart to no-flow ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Carjaval, Karla; Beauloye, Christophe; Ginion, Audrey; Mateo, Philippe; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Horman, Sandrine; Vaulont, Sophie; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Viollet, Benoit; Hue, Louis; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Bertrand, Luc

    2006-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major sensor and regulator of the energetic state of the cell. Little is known about the specific role of AMPKalpha(2), the major AMPK isoform in the heart, in response to global ischemia. We used AMPKalpha(2)-knockout (AMPKalpha(2)(-/-)) mice to evaluate the consequences of AMPKalpha(2) deletion during normoxia and ischemia, with glucose as the sole substrate. Hemodynamic measurements from echocardiography of hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice during normoxia showed no significant modification compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, the response of hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice to no-flow ischemia was characterized by a more rapid onset of ischemia-induced contracture. This ischemic contracture was associated with a decrease in ATP content, lactate production, glycogen content, and AMPKbeta(2) content. Hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice were also characterized by a decreased phosphorylation state of acetyl-CoA carboxylase during normoxia and ischemia. Despite an apparent worse metabolic adaptation during ischemia, the absence of AMPKalpha(2) does not exacerbate impairment of the recovery of postischemic contractile function. In conclusion, AMPKalpha(2) is required for the metabolic response of the heart to no-flow ischemia. The remaining AMPKalpha(1) cannot compensate for the absence of AMPKalpha(2).

  6. A2A adenosine-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery involves protein kinase C activation and betagamma subunits formed after alpha2-adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Fresco, Paula; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Kunc, Filip; Soares, Ana Sofia; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2007-07-01

    This work aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of alpha2-adrenoceptors and adenosine A2A-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery, namely the type of G-protein involved in this effect and the step or steps where the signalling cascades triggered by alpha2-adrenoceptors and A2A-receptors interact. The selective adenosine A2A-receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxy ethyl) phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 100 nM) enhanced tritium overflow evoked by trains of 100 pulses at 5 Hz. This effect was abolished by the selective adenosine A2A-receptor antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenyl ethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo [1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261; 20 nM) and by yohimbine (1 microM). CGS 21680-mediated effects were also abolished by drugs that disrupted G(i/o)-protein coupling with receptors, PTX (2 microg/ml) or NEM (40 microM), by the anti-G(salpha) peptide (2 microg/ml) anti-G(betagamma) peptide (10 microg/ml) indicating coupling of A2A-receptors to G(salpha) and suggesting a crucial role for G(betagamma) subunits in the A(2A)-receptor-mediated enhancement of tritium overflow. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 1 microM) or forskolin (1 microM), direct activators of protein kinase C and of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, also enhanced tritium overflow. In addition, PMA-mediated effects were not observed in the presence of either yohimbine or PTX. Results indicate that facilitatory adenosine A2A-receptors couple to G(salpha) subunits which is essential, but not sufficient, for the release facilitation to occur, requiring the involvement of G(i/o)-protein coupling (it disappears after disruption of G(i/o)-protein coupling, PTX or NEM) and/or G(betagamma) subunits (anti-G(betagamma)). We propose a mechanism for the interaction in study suggesting group 2 AC isoforms as a plausible candidate for the interaction site, as these isoforms can integrate inputs from G

  7. Role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signal transduction cascade in alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in porcine palmar lateral vein.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R E

    2001-07-01

    The mechanism of alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction is unknown, but may involve activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, and/or a protein tyrosine kinase. Recently the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) cascade, often an event downstream of tyrosine kinase activation, has been shown to mediate vasoconstriction to a variety of agents. The aim of this present study was to determine the involvement of the Erk signal transduction cascade in alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction, and to confirm the involvement of activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, and protein tyrosine kinase. Contractions to the alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 in the porcine palmar lateral vein in vitro were reduced 70 - 80% by the MEK inhibitors PD98059 (10 - 50 microM) and U0126 (10 - 50 microM), indicating the involvement of the Erk signal transduction cascade. Immunoblots also demonstrated an increase in the phosphorylated (activated) form of Erk in palmar lateral vein segments after contraction with UK14304, which was inhibited by PD98059 and U0126. The calcium channel blockers nifedipine and verapamil, or removal of extracellular calcium inhibited UK14304-induced contractions and phosphorylation of Erk, demonstrating the importance of an influx of extracellular calcium. UK14304-induced contractions were inhibited by PP2 (1 - 10 microM), a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinases, but not by PP3, an inactive analogue. PP2 also prevented the phosphorylation of Erk by UK14304. These data demonstrate that alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in the porcine palmar lateral vein is dependent upon activation of the Erk signal transduction cascade, which is downstream of an influx of extracellular calcium, and activation of Src tyrosine kinases.

  8. Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin in diabetes: a hyperglycemia related phenomenon associated with reduced antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Stante, A; Dello Russo, P; Torella, R

    1989-01-01

    Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and concentration, and decreased antithrombin III (ATIII) plasma concentration are reported in diabetic subjects. In diabetes an inverse correlation between ATIII activity and blood glucose, HbA1, alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration, and a direct correlation between both alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration with blood glucose and HbA1 are found. Moreover, a direct correlation between alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration fails. In both diabetic and normal subjects induced hyperglycemia increases alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration reduces ATIII activity, while ATIII concentration is not affected. These data which show that hyperglycemia may increase alpha 2M molecule levels while altering only the biological function of ATIII, provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may condition the levels of some risk factors for the development of diabetic complications such as alpha 2M.

  9. Developmental expression of trout egg polysialoglycoproteins and the prerequisite alpha 2,6-, and alpha 2,8-sialyl and alpha 2,8-polysialyltransferase activities required for their synthesis during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kitazume, S; Kitajima, K; Inoue, S; Inoue, Y; Troy, F A

    1994-04-08

    The developmental expression of the alpha 2,6- and alpha 2,8-linked sialic acid (Sia) residues in trout egg polysialoglycoproteins (PSGPs) was studied by correlating the temporal expression of these sugar residues, and the prerequisite sialyltransferases responsible for their synthesis, during oogenesis. The following new findings are reported. 1) Disialylated glycoproteins were identified in ovaries 4-6 months prior to ovulation. Three months prior to ovulation, a second more highly sialylated glycoprotein appeared. Structural studies confirmed that the two glycoproteins were discrete molecular species, designated PSGP(low Sia) and PSGP(high Sia), which differed only in their Sia content. PSGP(low Sia) contained mostly disialyl (Sia alpha 2,8-Sia alpha 2,6-) side chains, whereas PSGP(high Sia) contained alpha 2,8-linked oligo/polySia side chains ranging in length from 2 to over 20 Sia residues. The average degree of polymerization ([DP]av) was 6. 2) Biosynthetic studies using CMP-[14C]Neu5Ac indicated that three sialyltransferase activities were responsible for synthesis of the polysialyl residues of PSGPs: (i) alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminide alpha 2,6-sialyltransferase (alpha 2,6-ST), which catalyzed formation of the Sia residues alpha 2,6-linked to the proximal GalNAc residues in asialo-PSGP; (ii) alpha 2,6-sialoside alpha 2,8-sialyltransferase (alpha 2,8-ST or "initiase"), which catalyzed transfer of the first alpha 2,8-Sia residue to the alpha 2,6-linked Sia residue; and (iii) an alpha 2,8-polysialyltransferase (alpha 2,8-polyST or "polymerase"), responsible for synthesis of the alpha 2,8-linked poly/oligo Sia chains in PSGP(high Sia). Expression of these enzyme activities increased in accordance with the developmental appearance of each PSGP. 3) Structural characterization of the [14C]Sia-labeled side chains of each PSGP at different stages of development confirmed that synthesis of the disialyl unit containing a single alpha 2,8-Sia residue occurred before

  10. The human alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor: identification of a 420-kD cell surface glycoprotein specific for the activated conformation of alpha 2-macroglobulin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Ligand affinity chromatography was used to purify a cell surface alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) receptor. Detergent extracts of human placenta were applied to an affinity matrix consisting of alpha 2M, previously reacted with methylamine, coupled to Sepharose. Elution with EDTA specifically released polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 420 and 39 kD. In some preparations, small amounts of a 90-kD polypeptide were observed. The 420- and 39-kD polypeptides appear specific for the forms of alpha 2M activated by reaction with proteinases or methylamine and do not bind to an affinity matrix consisting of native alpha 2M coupled to Sepharose. Separation of these two polypeptides was accomplished by anion exchange chromatography, and binding activity was exclusively associated with the 420-kD polypeptide. The purified 420-kD protein binds to the conformationally altered forms of alpha 2M that are known to specifically interact with alpha 2M receptors and does not bind to native alpha 2M. Binding of the 420-kD polypeptide to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin indicates that this polypeptide is a glycoprotein. The cell surface localization of the 420-kD glycoprotein was confirmed by affinity chromatography of extracts from surface radioiodinated fibroblasts. These properties suggest that the 420-kD polypeptide is a cell surface receptor for the activated forms of alpha 2M. PMID:1691187

  11. Protein kinase C mediates the synergistic interaction between agonists acting at alpha2-adrenergic and delta-opioid receptors in spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Overland, Aaron C; Kitto, Kelley F; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Rothwell, Patrick E; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Stone, Laura S; Wilcox, George L

    2009-10-21

    Coactivation of spinal alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors (ARs) and opioid receptors produces antinociceptive synergy. Antinociceptive synergy between intrathecally administered alpha(2)AR and opioid agonists is well documented, but the mechanism underlying this synergy remains unclear. The delta-opioid receptor (DOP) and the alpha(2A)ARs are coexpressed on the terminals of primary afferent fibers in the spinal cord where they may mediate this phenomenon. We evaluated the ability of the DOP-selective agonist deltorphin II (DELT), the alpha(2)AR agonist clonidine (CLON) or their combination to inhibit calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from spinal cord slices. We then examined the possible underlying signaling mechanisms involved through coadministration of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC) or protein kinase A (PKA). Potassium-evoked depolarization of spinal cord slices caused concentration-dependent release of CGRP. Coadministration of DELT and CLON inhibited the release of CGRP in a synergistic manner as confirmed statistically by isobolograpic analysis. Synergy was dependent on the activation of PLC and PKC, but not PKA, whereas the effect of agonist administration alone was only dependent on PLC. The importance of these findings was confirmed in vivo, using a thermal nociceptive test, demonstrating the PKC dependence of CLON-DELT antinociceptive synergy in mice. That inhibition of CGRP release by the combination was maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin in spinal cord slices suggests that synergy does not rely on interneuronal signaling and may occur within single subcellular compartments. The present study reveals a novel signaling pathway underlying the synergistic analgesic interaction between DOP and alpha(2)AR agonists in the spinal cord.

  12. alpha 2-adrenoreceptors profile modulation. 2. Biphenyline analogues as tools for selective activation of the alpha 2C-subtype.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Francesco; Ghelfi, Francesca; Giannella, Mario; Piergentili, Alessandro; Pigini, Maria; Quaglia, Wilma; Vesprini, Cristian; Crassous, Pierre-Antoine; Paris, Hervé; Carrieri, Antonio

    2004-12-02

    A series of derivatives structurally related to biphenyline (3) was designed with the aim to modulate selectivity toward the alpha(2)-AR subtypes. The results obtained demonstrated that the presence of a correctly oriented function with positive electronic effect (+sigma) in portion X of the ligands is an important factor for significant alpha(2C)-subtype selectivity (imidazolines 5, 13, 16, and 19). Homology modeling and docking studies support experimental data and highlight the crucial role for the hydrogen bond between the pyridine nitrogen in position 3 of 5 and the NH-indole ring of Trp6.48, which is favorably oriented in the alpha(2C)-subtype, only.

  13. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptors influence tyrosine hydroxylase activity in retinal dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Iuvone, P M; Rauch, A L

    1983-12-12

    Dopamine (DA) is a putative neurotransmitter in a population of interneurons in the mammalian retina that are activated by photic stimulation. Pharmacological studies were conducted to determine if alpha 2-adrenergic receptors influence the activity of retinal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a biochemical indicator of changes in the activity of the DA-containing neurons. TH activity was low in dark-adapted retinas and high in light-exposed retinas. Systemic administration of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists, yohimbine and piperoxane, to dark-adapted rats significantly stimulated TH activity. This effect was apparently mediated locally within the retina because the response could also be elicited by direct injection of yohimbine into the vitreous. The dose-response relationships for the effects of alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists on retinal TH activity were similar to those for the effects on brain noradrenergic neurons, where alpha 2-adrenoceptors have been shown to be involved in the autoregulation of neuronal activity. Clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, had no effect when administered alone to dark-adapted rats, but it attenuated the stimulatory effect of yohimbine. In contrast, clonidine decreased TH activity of light-exposed retinas, an effect that was reversed by yohimbine. These observations suggest that alpha 2-adrenoceptors influence the activity of retinal DA-containing neurons.

  14. Hyperglycemia-conditioned increase in alpha-2-macroglobulin in healthy normal subjects: a phenomenon correlated with deficient antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Giugliano, D

    1989-01-01

    Induced hyperglycemia in normal subjects increases alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and alpha 2M concentration and reduces antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, while it does not affect ATIII plasma concentration. Hyperglycemia-determined variations in ATIII activity and alpha 2M molecules are correlated in an inverse and parallel fashion. A compensatory role for the increase in alpha 2M in the regulation of the coagulation system may be hypothesized. Moreover, these data provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may influence the levels of some risk factors for the development of complications in diabetes.

  15. Release of alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor from plasma fibrin clots by activated coagulation factor XIII. Its effect on fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mimuro, J; Kimura, S; Aoki, N

    1986-01-01

    When blood coagulation takes place in the presence of calcium ions, alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor (alpha 2PI) is cross-linked to fibrin by activated coagulation Factor XIII (XIIIa) and thereby contributes to the resistance of fibrin to fibrinolysis. It was previously shown that the cross-linking reaction is a reversible one, since the alpha 2PI-fibrinogen cross-linked complex could be dissociated. In the present study we have shown that the alpha 2PI-fibrin cross-linking reaction is also a reversible reaction and alpha 2PI which had been cross-linked to fibrin can be released from fibrin by disrupting the equilibrium, resulting in a decrease of its resistance to fibrinolysis. When the fibrin clot formed from normal plasma in the presence of calcium ions was suspended in alpha 2PI-deficient plasma of buffered saline, alpha 2PI was gradually released from fibrin on incubation. When alpha 2PI was present in the suspending milieu, the release was decreased inversely to the concentrations of alpha 2PI in the suspending milieu. The release was accelerated by supplementing XIIIa or the presence of a high concentration of the NH2-terminal 12-residue peptide of alpha 2PI (N-peptide) which is cross-linked to fibrin in exchange for the release of alpha 2PI. When the release of alpha 2PI from fibrin was accelerated by XIIIa or N-peptide, the fibrin became less resistant to the fibrinolytic process, resulting in an acceleration of fibrinolysis which was proportional to the degree of the release of alpha 2PI. These results suggest the possibility that alpha 2PI could be released from fibrin in vivo by disrupting the equilibrium of the alpha 2PI-fibrin cross-linking reaction, and that the release would result in accelerated thrombolysis. Images PMID:2419360

  16. High creatine kinase levels and white matter changes: clinical and genetic spectrum of congenital muscular dystrophies with laminin alpha-2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beytía, Maria de los Angeles; Dekomien, Gabriele; Hoffjan, Sabine; Haug, Verena; Anastasopoulos, Constantin; Kirschner, Janbernd

    2014-08-01

    Primary deficiency of laminin alpha-2 due to mutations in the LAMA2 gene accounts for 30% of all patients with congenital muscular dystrophy. Here, we present seven patients with partial or total laminin alpha-2 deficiency (MDC1A) with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from ambulant patients to patients who were never able to stand or sit. We identified two pathogenic mutations in the LAMA2 gene in all patients except for one patient in whom only one mutation was found. Six of the mutations were previously undescribed. In some of the milder cases, laminin alpha-2 expression in the muscle biopsy was only slightly reduced. These findings emphasize that analysis of the LAMA2 gene might be necessary in patients with muscle weakness, cerebral white matter changes and high creatine kinase levels, even in the presence of laminin alpha-2 in the muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Study of O-glycan sialylation in C6 cultured glioma cells: regulation of a beta-galactoside alpha 2,3 sialyltransferase activity by Ca2+/calmodulin antagonists and phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reboul, P; George, P; Geoffroy, J; Louisot, P; Broquet, P

    1992-08-14

    We have demonstrated that the alpha 2,3 sialyltransferase (alpha 2,3 ST) from C6 cultured glioma cells was inhibited in vivo by W-7 and related Ca2+/Calmodulin (Ca/CaM) antagonists while protein kinase C effectors had no effect. Dephosphorylation of alpha 2,3 ST by the wide specificity alkaline phosphatase led to inactivation indicating that the enzyme is phosphorylated. The serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and Calyculin A led also to an inhibition of alpha 2,3 ST activity. In addition, Ca/CaM antagonists and phosphatase inhibitors led both to an inhibition of a alpha 2,3 sialoglycoprotein from C6 glioma cells as demonstrated with lectin affinity blotting. A concerted regulatory mechanism with phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of alpha 2,3 ST is then postulated.

  18. [Cortical alpha-2a adrenoreceptors involved in the inhibitory control of motor activity in neonatal rats].

    PubMed

    Shishkina, G T; Kalinina, T S; Masnavieva, L B; Dygalo, N N

    2003-01-01

    Involvement of alpha 2A-adrenoceptors in control of motor activity in neonatal rats was investigated using intrabrain injections of antisense deoxyoligonucleotide targeting mRNA of these receptors. Antisense-induced decrease in the receptor expression in the brain accompanied by an augmentation of animal's motor activity, which was evaluated as a number of paddling movements with the right forepaw. This antisense effect was stimulatory and was not related to somatic growth and maturation of reflexes in the animals. The antisensetreated pups differed from controls neither in body weight nor the latency of righting reflex. The data suggest that alpha 2A-adrenoceptors are involved in inhibitory control of motor activity of rat pups from the first day of life.

  19. Signal-transducing mechanisms involved in activation of the platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha(2)beta(1).

    PubMed

    Jung, S M; Moroi, M

    2000-03-17

    Evidence was obtained about the mechanism responsible for platelet integrin alpha(2)beta activation by determining effects of various inhibitors on soluble collagen binding, a parameter to assess integrin alpha(2)beta(1) activation, in stimulated platelets. Agonists that can also activate platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa are able to activate integrin alpha(2)beta(1), but those operating via glycoprotein Ib cannot. Activation of alpha(2)beta(1) induced by low thrombin or collagen-related peptide concentrations was almost completely inhibited by apyrase, and the inhibitors wortmannin, 4-amino-5-(chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine, bisindolylmaleimide I, and SQ29548 significantly inhibited it. Activation induced by high thrombin or collagen-related peptide concentrations was far less sensitive to these inhibitors. However, only wortmannin markedly inhibited ADP-induced integrin alpha(2)beta(1) activation, and this was not ADP concentration-dependent. These results suggest that at the low agonist concentrations, the released ADP would be a primary inducer of integrin alpha(2)beta(1) activation, while at the high agonist concentrations, there would be several pathways through which integrin alpha(2)beta(1) activation can be induced. Kinetic analyses revealed that ADP-induced platelets had about the same number of binding sites (B(max)) as thrombin-induced platelets, but their affinity (K(d)) for soluble collagen was 3.7-12.7-fold lower, suggesting that activated integrin alpha(2)beta(1) induced by ADP is different from that induced by thrombin. The data are consistent with an activation mechanism involving released ADP and in which there exists two different states of activated integrin alpha(2)beta(1); these activated forms of integrin alpha(2)beta(1) would have different conformations that determine their ligand affinity.

  20. Role of the scavenger receptor in the uptake of methylamine-activated alpha 2-macroglobulin by rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, M C; Boers, W; Linthorst, C; van Berkel, T J

    1992-01-01

    Alpha 2-Macroglobulin (alpha 2M) requires activation by small nucleophiles (e.g. methylamine; giving alpha 2M-Me) or proteolytic enzymes (e.g. trypsin; giving alpha 2M-Tr) in order to be rapidly removed from the circulation by the liver. Separation of rat liver cells into parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cells at 10 min after injection indicates that liver uptake of alpha 2M-Me is shared between parenchymal and endothelial cells, with relative contributions of 51.3% and 48.3% respectively of total liver-associated radioactivity. In contrast, alpha 2M-Tr is almost exclusively taken up by the parenchymal cells (90.1% of liver-associated radioactivity). A preinjection of 5 mg of poly(inosinic acid) decreased liver uptake of alpha 2M-Me to 39.9% of the control value, while it had no effect on liver uptake of alpha 2M-Tr. It appears that poly(inosinic acid) specifically reduces the uptake of alpha 2M-Me in vivo by endothelial cells, leaving uptake by parenchymal cells unaffected. In vitro studies with isolated liver cells indicate that the association of alpha 2M-Me with endothelial cells is 21-fold higher per mg of cell protein than with parenchymal cells. The capacity of endothelial cells to degrade alpha 2M-Me appears to be 46 times higher than that of parenchymal cells. Competition studies show that poly(inosinic acid) or acetylated low-density lipoprotein effectively competes with the association of alpha 2M-Me with endothelial and Kupffer cells, but association with parenchymal cells is unaffected. It is suggested that activation of alpha 2M by methylamine induces a charge distribution on the protein which triggers specific uptake by the scavenger receptor on endothelial cells. It is concluded that the uptake of alpha 2M-Me by the scavenger receptor might function as an additional system for the uptake of activated alpha 2M. Images Fig. 11. PMID:1280102

  1. Neuroactive steroid pregnenolone sulphate inhibits long-term potentiation via activation of alpha2-adrenoreceptors at excitatory synapses in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze-Min; Qi, Ying-Jie; Wu, Pei-Ying; Zhu, Yan; Dong, Yan-Lian; Cheng, Zheng-Xiang; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Dong, Yi; Ma, Lan; Zheng, Ping

    2008-08-01

    Pregnenolone sulphate (PREGS) is one of the most important neuroactive steroids. Previous study showed that PREGS enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) via activation of post-synaptic NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus. The present paper studied the effect of PREGS on LTP at excitatory synapses in the pyramidal cells of layers V-VI of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) using whole-cell patch-clamp in slices and made a comparison with that in the hippocampus. We also studied the mechanism of the effect of PREGS in the mPFC. We found that PREGS inhibited induction of LTP in the mPFC and had no influence on NMDA currents, which was different from its effect in the hippocampus. Moreover, the effect of PREGS on LTP in the mPFC was cancelled by alpha2-adrenoreceptor antagonist, alpha2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist, Gi protein inhibitor, adenylate cyclase inhibitor and protein kinase A inhibitor. These results suggest that PREGS inhibits LTP via activation of the alpha2-adrenoreceptor-Gi protein-adenylate cyclase-protein kinase A signalling pathway in the mPFC.

  2. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  3. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2b in the milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Liu, Qingyou; Cui, Kuiqing; Liu, Jinfeng; Ren, Yanping; Shi, Deshun

    2013-02-01

    Interferon alpha 2b (IFNα-2b) is an important immune regulator widely used in clinic, for the treatment of chronic hepatitis, hairy cell leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia and multiple myeloma, etc. The clinically used IFNα-2b is generally produced by E.Coli, which lacks the post-translational O-glycosylation presents on naturally synthesized protein, and has a short serum half-life. In this study, a transgenic cassette pBCN-IFN-pA-CMV-EGFP was constructed, with a 5.2 kb beta-casein regulation fragment from Jersey cow and a 6×His tagged human Interferon alpha 2b (hIFNα-2b) gene fragment. By using pronuclear microinjection technique, transgenic mice were generated and the expression of IFNα-2b in the milk was assayed. The hIFNα-2b was correctly translated in milk of transgenic mice according to Western blot analysis. The expression level of hIFNα-2b was varied among the transgenic mice, and the highest one was about 29.71 μg/L. The recombinant protein exhibited biological activity in vitro by increasing the luminescence value and the MxA gene expression in established WISH cells, and the specific activity is approximately 2.8 × 10(7 )IU/mg. The expression of recombinant hIFNα-2b in mammary glands of transgenic mice constitutes an important step towards low-cost and full biological activity production of this protein drug in mammary gland bioreactor.

  4. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in Aloe vera.

    PubMed

    Lowther, William; Lorick, Kevin; Lawrence, Susan D; Yeow, Wen-Shuz

    2012-12-01

    Methods necessary for the successful transformation and regeneration of Aloe vera were developed and used to express the human protein, interferon alpha 2 (IFNα2). IFNα2 is a secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the cellular response to viral infection. Transgenic plants were regenerated from callus cultures initiated from zygotic embryos. Expression of the IFNA2 transgene in transformed plants was confirmed by RT-PCR and IFNα2 protein was detected by immunoblot analysis. Human A549 cells treated with transgenic aloe extracts for 6 h induced expression of the interferon stimulated gene 54, indicating activation of the IFN signaling pathway. The biological activity of the aloe produced IFNα2 was assessed using an antiviral assay with A549 cells treated with extracts from both the rind and pulp fractions of the shoot and subsequently infected with the lytic encephalomyocarditis virus. The highest level of activity attributable to recombinant IFNα2 was determined to be 625 IU/mg of total soluble protein (TSP) in the rind and 2,108 IU/mg TSP in the pulp. Two daughter plants that vegetatively budded during the course of this study were also confirmed to express IFNα2. These results confirm that Aloe vera is capable of expressing a human protein with biological activity, and that a secreted protein targeting the apoplast can be detected in the pulp fraction of the plant.

  5. Does alprazolam, in contrast to diazepam, activate alpha 2-adrenoceptors involved in the regulation of rat growth hormone secretion?

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Carlsson, M; Nilsson, C; Söderpalm, B

    1986-04-21

    The conventional benzodiazepine diazepam and the novel triazolobenzodiazepine alprazolam were compared with respect to effects on growth hormone (GH) release in reserpine pretreated rats. The reserpine pretreatment was undertaken to eliminate brain monoaminergic influence on GH secretion, hence obtaining a low GH baseline from which a drug induced increase could be easily detected. Previous studies have indicated that activation of brain alpha 2-adrenoceptors is an indispensable prerequisite for GH release induced by other agents such as serotonin and opiate receptor agonists. In line with these findings, diazepam was found to induce GH release in reserpine pretreated rats only when the alpha 2-receptor agonist clonidine was simultaneously administered. In contrast, alprazolam caused a dose-dependent increase in plasma GH when given alone to reserpine pretreated rats. This effect of alprazolam was effectively antagonized by either of the two selective alpha 2-receptor antagonists yohimbine or idazoxane. The data indicate that alprazolam, but not diazepam, activates brain alpha 2-adrenoceptors involved in rat GH regulation. The possibility that an alpha 2-agonistic profile of alprazolam may contribute to the suggested effectiveness of the drug in the treatment of panic disorder is discussed.

  6. Cooling augments vasoconstriction mediated by 5-HT1 and alpha2-adrenoceptors in the isolated equine digital vein: involvement of Rho kinase.

    PubMed

    Zerpa, Hector; Berhane, Yoel; Elliott, Jonathan; Bailey, Simon R

    2007-08-27

    The vasculature of the equine digit fulfils an important role in thermoregulation. In other species, it has been found that cooling may enhance the response of cutaneous vessels to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. Translocation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors to the smooth muscle cell membrane, mediated by Rho kinase, is thought to be involved in the cooling-enhanced response in mouse tail arteries. However, little is known about the effect of cooling on 5-HT receptor function. The present investigation compared the response of 5-bromo-6-(2-imidazolin-2-ylamino) quinoxaline (UK14304:1 nM to 30 microM), methoxamine (0.1 nM to 30 microM; in the presence of yohimbine 0.1 microM), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 0.1 nM to 10 microM) and alpha-methyl 5-HT (0.1 nM to 10 microM) in the isolated equine digital vein at 30 degrees C and 22 degrees C. The effect of the Rho kinase inhibitor, fasudil (1 microM), and the recovery of the response after the irreversible blockade of surface receptors with phenoxybenzamine (10 microM) or 2-ethoxy-1-ethoxycarbonyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ;10 microM), was established. Moderate cooling significantly increased the maximum response to alpha-methyl 5-HT, 5-CT and UK14304 and shifted their response curves to the left. Cooling also augmented the phenoxybenzamine- and EEDQ-resistant response to UK14304 and 5-CT, respectively. Fasudil had no effect on the contractile response at 30 degrees C, but completely abrogated the effect of cooling on the response to 5-CT and UK14304. The response to methoxamine was not significantly affected by cooling. These results suggest that Rho kinase plays an important role in the cooling-enhanced response mediated by 5-HT(1B/D) receptors and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. The exact mechanism by which Rho/Rho kinase enhances the functional responses mediated by these receptors in these vessels has yet to be determined.

  7. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  8. Activation of human alpha1 and alpha2 homomeric glycine receptors by taurine and GABA.

    PubMed

    De Saint Jan, D; David-Watine, B; Korn, H; Bregestovski, P

    2001-09-15

    1. Two ligand binding alpha subunits, alpha1 and alpha2, of the human (H) glycine receptor (GlyR) are involved at inhibitory synapses in the adult and neonatal spinal cord, respectively. The ability of homomeric alphaH1 and alphaH2 GlyRs to be activated by glycine, taurine and GABA was studied in Xenopus oocytes or in the human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cell line. 2. In outside-out patches from HEK cells, glycine, taurine and GABA activated both GlyRs with the same main unitary conductance, i.e. 85 +/- 3 pS (n = 6) for alphaH1, and 95 +/- 5 pS (n = 4) for alphaH2. 3. The sensitivity of both alphaH1 and alphaH2 GlyRs to glycine was highly variable. In Xenopus oocytes the EC50 for glycine (EC50gly) was between 25 and 280 microM for alphaH1 (n = 44) and between 46 and 541 microM for alphaH2 (n = 52). For both receptors, the highest EC50gly values were found on cells with low maximal glycine responses. 4. The actions of taurine and GABA were dependent on the EC50gly: (i) their EC50 values were linearly correlated to EC50gly, with EC50tau approximately 10 EC50gly and EC50GABA approximately 500-800 EC50gly; (ii) they could act either as full or weak agonists depending on the EC50gly. 5. The Hill coefficient (n(H)) of glycine remained stable regardless of the EC50gly whereas n(H) for taurine decreased with increasing EC50tau. 6. The degree of desensitization, evaluated by fast application of saturating concentrations of agonist on outside-out patches from Xenopus oocytes, was similar for glycine and taurine on both GlyRs and did not exceed 50 %. 7. Our data concerning the variations of EC50gly and the subsequent behaviour of taurine and GABA could be qualitatively described by the simple del Castillo-Katz scheme, assuming that the agonist gating constant varies whereas the binding constants are stable. However, the stability of the Hill coefficient for glycine was not explained by this model, suggesting that other mechanisms are involved in the modulation of EC50.

  9. Platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha2beta1 activation involves differential participation of ADP-receptor subtypes P2Y1 and P2Y12 but not intracellular calcium change.

    PubMed

    Jung, S M; Moroi, M

    2001-06-01

    In agonist-induced platelet activation, the collagen platelet receptor integrin alpha2beta1 is activated to high-affinity states through ADP involvement [Jung, S.M. & Moroi, M. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 8016-8026]. Here we determined the ADP-receptor subtypes involved and their relative contributions to alpha2beta1 activation (assessed by soluble-collagen binding) using the P2Y12 antagonist AR-C69931MX and P2Y1 antagonists adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate (Ado(3,5)PP) and adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate (AdoPPS). All three inhibited alpha2beta1 activation induced by low or high ADP, low thrombin, or low collagen-related peptide (CRP) concentrations; however, AR-C69931MX was markedly more inhibitory than the P2Y1 antagonists, suggesting the greater contribution of P2Y12. Inhibition patterns by various combinations of AR-C69931MX, AdoPPS, and wortmannin suggested that P2Y1 and P2Y12 mediate alpha2beta1 activation through different pathways, with possible involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in both. Low concentrations of the acetoxy-methyl derivative of 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid (calcium chelator) markedly decreased alpha2beta1 activation by low thrombin or CRP, but did not affect that by low or high ADP. Measurements of intracellular Ca2+ level (fluorimetric method) and alpha2beta1 activation (soluble-collagen binding) in the same platelet preparation indicated that alpha2beta1 activation via ADP receptors was independent of intracellular Ca2+ release. Our data indicate that integrin alpha2beta1 activation by ADP occurs through an inside-out signaling mechanism involving differential contributions by P2Y1 and P2Y12 wherein each contributes to some portion of the activation, with the stronger contribution of P2Y12. Furthermore, intracellular Ca2+ increase is not directly related to integrin alpha2beta1 activation, meaning that it is separate from the calcium mobilization pathways that these two ADP receptors are involved in.

  10. Protein kinase Cε is required for spinal analgesic synergy between delta opioid and alpha-2A adrenergic receptor agonist pairs.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniel J; Kitto, Kelley F; Overland, Aaron C; Messing, Robert O; Stone, Laura S; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Wilcox, George L

    2013-08-14

    We recently showed that spinal synergistic interactions between δ opioid receptors (δORs) and α2A adrenergic receptors (α2AARs) require protein kinase C (PKC). To identify which PKC isoforms contribute to analgesic synergy, we evaluated the effects of various PKC-isoform-specific peptide inhibitors on synergy between δORs and α2AARs using the tail flick assay of thermal nociception in mice. Only a PKCε inhibitor abolished synergy between a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist. We tested a panel of combinations of opioid and adrenergic agonists in PKCε knock-out mice and found that all four combinations of a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist required PKCε for antinociceptive synergy. None of the combinations of a μOR agonist with an α2AR agonist required PKCε. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that PKCε could be found in the population of peptidergic primary afferent nociceptors where δORs and α2AARs have been found to extensively colocalize. Immunoreactivity for PKCε was found in the majority of dorsal root ganglion neurons and intensely labeled laminae I and II of the spinal cord dorsal horn. PKCε is widespread in the spinal nociceptive system and in peptidergic primary afferents it appears to be specifically involved in mediating the synergistic interaction between δORs and α2AARs.

  11. Protein Kinase Cϵ Is Required for Spinal Analgesic Synergy between Delta Opioid and Alpha-2A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Daniel J.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Overland, Aaron C.; Messing, Robert O.; Stone, Laura S.; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that spinal synergistic interactions between δ opioid receptors (δORs) and α2A adrenergic receptors (α2AARs) require protein kinase C (PKC). To identify which PKC isoforms contribute to analgesic synergy, we evaluated the effects of various PKC-isoform-specific peptide inhibitors on synergy between δORs and α2AARs using the tail flick assay of thermal nociception in mice. Only a PKCϵ inhibitor abolished synergy between a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist. We tested a panel of combinations of opioid and adrenergic agonists in PKCϵ knock-out mice and found that all four combinations of a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist required PKCϵ for antinociceptive synergy. None of the combinations of a μOR agonist with an α2AR agonist required PKCϵ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that PKCϵ could be found in the population of peptidergic primary afferent nociceptors where δORs and α2AARs have been found to extensively colocalize. Immunoreactivity for PKCϵ was found in the majority of dorsal root ganglion neurons and intensely labeled laminae I and II of the spinal cord dorsal horn. PKCϵ is widespread in the spinal nociceptive system and in peptidergic primary afferents it appears to be specifically involved in mediating the synergistic interaction between δORs and α2AARs. PMID:23946412

  12. Opioid-induced prejunctional inhibition of vasoconstriction in the rabbit ear artery: alpha-2 adrenoceptor activation and external calcium.

    PubMed

    Budai, D; Duckles, S P

    1989-11-01

    Inhibition of norepinephrine release by opioid agonists is inversely related to the stimulation train length. The possible interaction between activation of prejunctional alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and the release-inhibiting opioid receptors as well as the effect of changes in Ca++ entry into adrenergic varicosities during repetitive stimulation were investigated by recording vasoconstriction of the rabbit ear artery perfused in vitro. Neither the activation of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated negative feedback by clonidine nor its inhibition by yohimbine altered the neuroinhibitory potency for dynorphin 1-13 or Met-enkephalin at any stimulus train length. Experimental conditions known to increase the entry of calcium into the varicosities mimicked the effect of the increase in the stimulation train length on the modulation of norepinephrine release by opioids. Increasing the extracellular calcium concentration (from 1.6-5 or 8 mM) diminished the inhibitory effect of opioids and tended to abolish the dependence on stimulation train length. Conversely, lowering the calcium concentration (from 1.6-1 mM) increased the inhibition by opioids and enhanced the dependence on train length. These results do not suggest a direct interaction between activation of opioid receptors and alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Rather, they indicate the role of opioid receptor activation in a primary modulation of Ca++ influx which becomes masked by the high levels of axoplasmic calcium which are achieved during a continued stimulation train.

  13. Alpha2-adrenoreceptors profile modulation and high antinociceptive activity of (S)-(-)-2-[1-(biphenyl-2-yloxy)ethyl]-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Francesco; Bousquet, Pascal; Brasili, Livio; Caretto, Mariangela; Carrieri, Antonio; Dontenwill, Monique; Giannella, Mario; Marucci, Gabriella; Perfumi, Marina; Piergentili, Alessandro; Quaglia, Wilma; Rascente, Carla; Pigini, Maria

    2002-01-03

    A number of derivatives structurally related to cirazoline (1) were synthesized and studied with the purpose of modulating alpha2-adrenoreceptors selectivity versus both alpha1-adrenoreceptors and I2 imidazoline binding sites. The most potent alpha2-agonist was 2-[1-(biphenyl-2-yloxy)ethyl]-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole (7), whose key pharmacophoric features closely matched those found in the alpha2-agonist 2-(3-exo-(3-phenylprop-1-yl)-2-exo-norbornyl)amino-2-oxazoline (15). (S)-(-)-7 was the most potent of the two enantiomers, confirming the stereospecificity of the interaction with alpha2-adrenoreceptors. This eutomer was tested on two algesiometric paradigms and, because of the interaction with alpha2-adrenoreceptors, showed a potent and long-lasting antinociceptive activity, since it was abolished by the selective alpha2-antagonist RX821002.

  14. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  15. Alpha 2-chimerin, an SH2-containing GTPase-activating protein for the ras-related protein p21rac derived by alternate splicing of the human n-chimerin gene, is selectively expressed in brain regions and testes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, C; Sin, W C; Teo, M; Michael, G J; Smith, P; Dong, J M; Lim, H H; Manser, E; Spurr, N K; Jones, T A

    1993-01-01

    n-Chimerin (alpha 1-chimerin) is a brain GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for the ras-related p21rac. We now report the occurrence of another form of chimerin, termed alpha 2-chimerin. This is the product of an alternately spliced transcript of the human n-chimerin gene encoding an N-terminal SH2 (src homology 2) domain in addition to the phorbol ester receptor and GAP domains. alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin mRNAs were expressed differently. In the rat brain, only alpha 1-chimerin mRNA was expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, although both alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin mRNAs occurred in neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. Only alpha 2-chimerin RNA was expressed in rat testes, in early pachytene spermatocytes. A 45-kDa SH2-containing chimerin corresponding to the alpha 2 form was purified from rat brain. As with Escherichia coli 45-kDa recombinant alpha 2-chimerin, purified brain alpha 2-chimerin exhibited racGAP activity which was stimulated by phosphatidylserine. The recombinant SH2 domain bound several 32P-labelled phosphoproteins of PC12 cells, whose phosphorylation increased in response to trophic factors, including nerve growth factor. To examine the relationships of alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin transcripts, human genomic DNA clones were characterized. In alpha 2-chimerin mRNA, a 3' splice acceptor site within exon 1 of alpha 1-chimerin mRNA was used, replacing its 5' untranslated region and N-terminal coding sequence. The single human n-chimerin gene was mapped to chromosome 2q31-q32.1, colocalizing with the CRE-BP1 transcription factor gene (2q32). It contained several splice junctions conserved with the sequence-related protein kinase C and bcr genes. alpha 2-Chimerin is only the second SH2-containing GAP and the first example of an SH2 domain generated by alternate splicing. Images PMID:8336731

  16. P21 activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Chetan K; Minden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The p21 activated kinases (Paks) are well known effector proteins for the Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac. The Paks contain 6 members, which fall into 2 families of proteins. The first family consists of Paks 1, 2, and 3, and the second consists of Paks 4, 5, and 6. While some of the Paks are ubiquitously expressed, others have more restrictive tissue specificity. All of them are found in the nervous system. Studies using cell culture, transgenic mice, and knockout mice, have revealed important roles for the Paks in cytoskeletal organization and in many aspects of cell growth and development. This review discusses the basic structures of the Paks, and their roles in cell growth, development, and in cancer. PMID:24658305

  17. Distinct determinants on collagen support alpha 2 beta 1 integrin-mediated platelet adhesion and platelet activation.

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, S A; Walsh, J J; Staatz, W D; Baranski, K J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the sequence of amino acids asp-gly-glu-ala represents an essential determinant of the site within the alpha 1(I)-CB3 fragment of collagen recognized by the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin cell surface collagen receptor (Staatz et al., 1991). Studies employing chemical modifications of collagen amino acid side chains confirm both the essential nature of the acidic side chains of aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues and the nonessentiality of lysine epsilon-amino groups in supporting adhesion mediated by the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin. The approach also indicates the presence of a distinct determinant on collagen separate from the alpha 2 beta 1 recognition site that contains essential lysine side chains and that is necessary for subsequent interactions with the platelet surface that give rise to collagen-induced platelet activation and secretion. The two-step, two-site model for cellular signaling involving both an integrin and a signal-transducing coreceptor suggested by these data may be common to other integrin-mediated processes. PMID:1809397

  18. Modulation of kidney urea transporter UT-A3 activity by alpha2,6-sialylation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoqian; Sands, Jeff M; Song, Xiang; Chen, Guangping

    2016-07-01

    Two urea transporters, UT-A1 and UT-A3, are expressed in the kidney terminal inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) and are important for the production of concentrated urine. UT-A1, as the largest isoform of all UT-A urea transporters, has gained much attention and been extensively studied; however, the role and the regulation of UT-A3 are less explored. In this study, we investigated UT-A3 regulation by glycosylation modification. A site-directed mutagenesis verified a single glycosylation site in UT-A3 at Asn279. Loss of the glycosylation reduced forskolin-stimulated UT-A3 cell membrane expression and urea transport activity. UT-A3 has two glycosylation forms, 45 and 65 kDa. Using sugar-specific binding lectins, the UT-A3 glycosylation profile was examined. The 45-kDa form was pulled down by lectin concanavalin A (Con A) and Galant husnivalis lectin (GNL), indicating an immature glycan with a high amount of mannose (Man), whereas the 65-kDa form is a mature glycan composed of acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and poly-N-acetyllactosame (poly-LacNAc) that was pulled down by wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and tomato lectin, respectively. Interestingly, the mature form of UT-A3 glycan contains significant amounts of sialic acid. We explored the enzymes responsible for directing UT-A3 sialylation. Sialyltransferase ST6GalI, but not ST3GalIV, catabolizes UT-A3 α2,6-sialylation. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by PDB treatment promoted UT-A3 glycan sialylation and membrane surface expression. The PKC inhibitor chelerythrine blocks ST6GalI-induced UT-A3 sialylation. Increased sialylation by ST6GalI increased UT-A3 protein stability and urea transport activity. Collectively, our study reveals a novel mechanism of UT-A3 regulation by ST6GalI-mediated sialylation modification that may play an important role in kidney urea reabsorption and the urinary concentrating mechanism.

  19. Effect of retinal laser photocoagulation on the activity of metalloproteinases and the alpha(2)-macroglobulin proteolytic state in the vitreous of eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María C; Luna, Jose D; Barcelona, Pablo F; Gramajo, Ana L; Juarez, Patricio C; Riera, Clelia M; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2007-11-01

    Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) reduces the incidence of severe visual loss in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The aim of the study was to determine the effect of PRP on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, and also on the alpha(2)-Macroglobulin (alpha(2)M) proteolytic state in the vitreous of eyes with PDR. Vitreous samples were obtained from patients undergoing vitrectomy for the treatment of retinal diseases: 17 with PDR and eight with idiopathic macular hole (MH). Qualitative evaluation of the MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation status was performed by gelatin zymography and quantitative assay was carried out for vitreous total protein content and alpha(2)M. The proteolytic state of alpha(2)M was evaluated by Western blotting. Although all vitreous samples contained proMMP-2, increased proMMP-9 and active MMP-9 were detected in PDR samples without PRP. In addition, after PRP the proMMP-9 activity was significantly decreased, whereas the proMMP-2 activity was not affected. Enhanced total protein and alpha(2)M concentrations were observed in all vitreous samples from PDR patients with and without previous PRP compared with samples from patients with MH. However, a differential proteolytic state of alpha(2)M, expressed as 180/85-90kDa ratio, was detected among PDR patients with and without PRP treatment. Whereas a low 180/85-90kDa ratio of alpha(2)M in vitreous of PDR patients without PRP was observed, a high proportion of 180kDa subunit was principally detected in PDR with PRP. These results demonstrate that PDR occurs with an enhanced activity of MMP-9 and activation of alpha(2)M by proteinases, which is reversed after PRP. In addition, we suggest that alpha(2)M plays a key role in the control and regulation of the ocular neovascularization involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic retinal diseases such as PDR.

  20. An alpha2,6-sialyltransferase cloned from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 shows both sialyltransferase and neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Mine, Toshiki; Katayama, Sakurako; Kajiwara, Hitomi; Tsunashima, Masako; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2010-02-01

    We cloned, expressed, and characterized a novel beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119. The protein showed 56-96% identity to the marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases classified into glycosyltransferase family 80. The sialyltransferase activity of the N-terminal truncated form of the recombinant enzyme was 1477 U/L of Escherichia coli culture. The truncated recombinant enzyme was purified as a single band by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis through 3 column chromatography steps. The enzyme had distinct activity compared with known marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases. Although alpha2,6-sialyltransferases cloned from marine bacteria, such as Photobacterium damselae strain JT0160, P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-145, and Photobacterium sp. strain JT-ISH-224, show only alpha2,6-sialyltransferase activity, the recombinant enzyme cloned from P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 showed both alpha2,6-sialyltransferase and alpha2,6-linkage-specific neuraminidase activity. Our results provide important information toward a comprehensive understanding of the bacterial sialyltransferases belonging to the group 80 glycosyltransferase family in the CAZy database.

  1. Computer-assisted determination of minimum energy conformations. 7: A pharmacophore model of the active region of the alpha2-adrenoceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashman, William P.; Mickiewicz, A. P.; Nelson, Todd M.

    1992-09-01

    Molecular modeling and computational chemistry techniques are used to analyze compounds in developing pharmacophores of biological receptors to use as templates in structure activity relationship studies and to design new chemicals having physiological activity of interest. In this study, the results of x-ray crystal analyses and PM3 semi-empirical molecular orbital conformational analyses are used to determine the three-dimensional representations of selected adrenergic compounds known to be agonists with the alpha2-adrenoceptor in achieving optimized geometries and electrostatic parameters. The alpha2-adrenergic agonists interact with the adrenergic system receptors to produce various increases or decreases in hemodynamic responses (i.e., hypertension, hypotension, and bradycardia) and sedation. A pharmacophore model of the active region of the alpha2-adrenoceptor is described based on the superimposition of common structural, electrostatic, and physicochemical features of the compounds. Using the model to predict compound adrenergic activity and to design alpha2-adrenergic compounds is discussed.

  2. Activation of alpha2-adrenoreceptors suppresses the excitability of C1 spinal neurons having convergent inputs from tooth pulp and superior sagittal sinus in rats.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Tanimoto, T; Takahashi, M; Kadoi, J; Nasu, M; Matsumoto, S

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that activation of alpha(2)-adrenoreceptors modulates the excitability of C1 neurons having convergent inputs from both the tooth pulp (TP) and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), by using the microiontophoretic techniques of drug application and immunohistochemical approaches. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made from 38 C1 neurons responding to electrical stimulation of TP under pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Seventy-one percent of C1 neurons (27/38) that responded to TP stimulation also responded to electrical stimulation of the SSS. In these neurons, L: -glutamate-evoked C1 neuronal discharge firings were increased in a dose-dependent manner. The mean glutamate-evoked firing rates were dose-dependently inhibited after microiontophoretic application of clonidine (alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor/imidazoline I(1) receptor agonist). The inhibition of glutamate-evoked C1 mean firings by clonidine was antagonized by the co-application of idazoxan (alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor/imidazoline I(2) receptor antagonist), yohimbine (alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor) but not the alpha(1)-adrenoreceptor antagonist, prazosin with affinity for alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoreceptors. The mean spontaneous discharge frequencies were significantly inhibited by the microiontophoretic application of clonidine and this inhibition was reversed by the co-application of idazoxan, yohimbine. Microiontophoresis of clonidine also resulted in a reduction of TP-/SSS-evoked activity and this effect was reversed by the co-application of yohimbine. Immunoreactivity for alpha(2A)-adrenoreceptor was found in the superficial layers of I-III in the C1 region. These results suggest that alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor agonist clonidine inhibits the excitability of C1 neurons having convergent inputs from TP and SSS afferents, and that the activation of alpha(2A)-adrenoreceptors onto C1 dorsal horn neurons may contribute as a useful therapeutic target for the

  3. The regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, S C; Woods, A; Jones, N A; Davison, M D; Carling, D

    2000-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade is activated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio within the cell. AMPK is regulated allosterically by AMP and by reversible phosphorylation. Threonine-172 within the catalytic subunit (alpha) of AMPK (Thr(172)) was identified as the major site phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase kinase (AMPKK) in vitro. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to study the role of phosphorylation of Thr(172) on AMPK activity. Mutation of Thr(172) to an aspartic acid residue (T172D) in either alpha1 or alpha2 resulted in a kinase complex with approx. 50% the activity of the corresponding wild-type complex. The activity of wild-type AMPK decreased by greater than 90% following treatment with protein phosphatases, whereas the activity of the T172D mutant complex fell by only 10-15%. Mutation of Thr(172) to an alanine residue (T172A) almost completely abolished kinase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation of Thr(172) accounts for most of the activation by AMPKK, but that other sites are involved. In support of this we have shown that AMPKK phosphorylates at least two other sites on the alpha subunit and one site on the beta subunit. Furthermore, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of Thr(172) may be involved in the sensitivity of the AMPK complex to AMP. PMID:10642499

  4. Evidence for activation of both adrenergic and cholinergic nervous pathways by yohimbine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, H; Chale, J J; Guyen, L N; Tran, M A; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1995-01-01

    Adrenoceptors are involved in the control of the activity of the autonomic nervous system and especially the sympathetic nervous system. Activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors decreases sympathetic tone whereas their blockade has an opposite effect. However, previous investigations have shown that yohimbine (a potent alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist) increases salivary secretion through activation of cholinergic pathways. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the involvement of both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system in several pharmacological effects of yohimbine. For this purpose, salivary secretion and various endocrino-metabolic parameters (noradrenaline and insulin secretions, lipomobilization) were evaluated in conscious fasting dogs before and after blockade of either the sympathetic (with the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist agent nadolol) or the parasympathetic (with the anticholinergic agent atropine) systems. Yohimbine alone (0.4 mg.kg-1, i.v.) increased within 5-15 minutes, plasma noradrenaline (600%), insulin levels (300%), free-fatty acids (79%) and salivary secretion (143%). Atropine (0.2 mg.kg-1, i.v.) suppressed yohimbine-induced salivary secretion (90%) but did not significantly modify the yohimbine induced changes in noradrenaline (312%), insulin (277%) and free-fatty acids (102%) plasma levels. Administration of nadolol (1 mg.kg-1, i.v.) did not change the magnitude of the increase in both noradrenaline plasma levels (550%) and salivary secretion (300%) induced by yohimbine. However, nadolol totally blunted the increase in insulin (15%) and free-fatty acids (4%) plasma levels. These results show that yohimbine-induced increase in salivary secretion is a cholinergic effect whereas the increase in insulin and free fatty acids can be explained by an increase in sympathetic tone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Integrin alpha 2 beta 1-independent activation of platelets by simple collagen-like peptides: collagen tertiary (triple-helical) and quaternary (polymeric) structures are sufficient alone for alpha 2 beta 1-independent platelet reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, L F; Hargreaves, P G; Farndale, R W; Young, R D; Barnes, M J

    1995-01-01

    The platelet reactivities of two simple collagen-like synthetic peptides, Gly-Lys-Hyp-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)10-Gly-Lys-Hyp-Gly and Gly-Cys-Hyp-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)10-Gly-Cys-Hyp-Gly, were investigated. Both peptides adopted a stable triple-helical conformation in solution. Following cross-linking, both peptides proved to be highly platelet-aggregatory, more active than collagen fibres, inducing aggregation at concentrations as low as 20 ng/ml. These peptides formed microaggregates in solution, and cross-linking was thought to stabilize these structures, allowing expression of their platelet reactivity at 37 degrees C. Like collagen fibres, the peptides caused platelet secretion and release of arachidonate from platelet membrane lipids as well as activation of integrin alpha IIb beta 3 culminating in aggregation. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the integrin alpha 2 beta 1 failed to prevent aggregation release of arachidonate or platelet adhesion to the peptides. Our results indicate that collagen can activate platelets by a mechanism that is independent of integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and for which collagen tertiary and quaternary structures are sufficient alone for activity without the involvement of highly specific cell-recognition sequences. Images Figure 5 PMID:7534064

  6. Activation of the platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha(2)beta(1): its mechanism and participation in the physiological functions of platelets.

    PubMed

    Jung, S M; Moroi, M

    2000-10-01

    When platelets are stimulated by agonists, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) (GP Ia/IIa), one of the platelet collagen receptors, is activated to forms with high affinities for its ligand collagen. Here we describe our studies to characterize the binding kinetics of the activated integrin forms and the activation mechanism. Under low agonist concentrations, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) is activated through a mechanism involving ADP/ADP receptors; and under high agonist concentrations, multiple signaling pathways are involved in its activation. Such differences in mechanism at low and high agonist concentrations are also suggested in the activation of integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), the platelet fibrinogen receptor. We describe our flow adhesion studies, from which evidence was obtained about the involvement of integrin alpha(2)beta(1) activation in the physiological function of platelets, adhesion and thrombus formation.

  7. Induced keratinocyte hyper-proliferation in alpha2beta1 integrin transgenic mice results in systemic immune cell activation.

    PubMed

    Teige, Ingrid; Bäcklund, Alexandra; Svensson, Lars; Kvist, Peter Helding; Petersen, Thomas Kongstad; Kemp, Kåre

    2010-01-01

    alpha2beta1 integrins are normally confined to the proliferating basal layers of the epidermis. However, during wound healing and in psoriasis, these integrins are expressed on keratinocytes in suprabasal layers correlating with a less differentiated phenotype. Transgenic mice expressing alpha2beta1 integrins under the involucrine promoter have previously been demonstrated, to various degrees, spontaneously develop a skin disorder resembling psoriasis. Herein, we show that a mild epidermal wounding induces a uniform acanthosis together with an influx of immune cells. The disease initiates as a normal wound healing process and is completely restored in wildtype mice by day 14. However, in the integrin transgenic mice a chronic inflammation develops, a process that can be compared to the Koebner phenomenon in psoriatic patients. In this study, we have followed the integrin transgenic mice for five weeks, where substantial keratinocyte hyper-proliferation, inflammatory infiltration and high cytokine levels within the skin can still be observed. In addition, draining lymph nodes were dramatically increased in size and contained highly activated T cells, as well as APCs secreting large amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, the systemic immune response was affected with increased spleen size, elevated cytokine levels in the serum and altered lymphocyte trafficking patterns, very much resembling what is seen in psoriasis patients. Finally, CD4(+) T cell depletion was not able to affect the onset or progression of skin inflammation. This suggests that altered keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation can drive a skin inflammation and cause chronic immune cell activation both at a local and systemic level.

  8. Alpha-2 noradrenergic receptor activation inhibits the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih ) in neurons of the ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Inyushin, Mikhail U.; Arencibia-Albite, Francisco; Vázquez-Torres, Rafael; Vélez-Hernández, María E.; Jiménez-Rivera, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is the source of dopaminergic projections innervating cortical structures and ventral forebrain. Dysfunction of this mesocorticolimbic system is critically involved in psychiatric disorders such as addiction and schizophrenia. Changes in VTA dopamine (DA) neuronal activity can alter neurotransmitter release at target regions which modify information processing in the reward circuit. Here we studied the effect of α-2 noradrenergic receptor activation on the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih ) in DA neurons of the rat VTA. Brain slice preparations using whole-cell current and voltage-clamp techniques were employed. Clonidine and UK14304 (α-2 receptor selective agonists) were found to decrease Ih amplitude and to slow its rate of activation indicating a negative shift in the current’s voltage dependence. Two non-subtype-selective α-2 receptor antagonists, yohimbine and RS79948, prevented the effects of α-2 receptor activation. RX821002, a noradrenergic antagonist specific for α-2A and α-2D did not prevent Ih inhibition. This result suggests that clonidine might be acting via an α-2C subtype since this receptor is the most abundant variant in the VTA. Analysis of a second messenger system associated with the α-2 receptor revealed that Ih inhibition is independent of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and resulted from the activation of protein kinase C. It is suggested that the α-2 mediated hyperpolarizing shift in Ih voltage dependence can facilitate the transition from pacemaker firing to afferent-driven burst activity. This transition may play a key role on the changes in synaptic plasticity that occurs in the mesocorticolimbic system under pathological conditions. PMID:20122999

  9. Guinea pig macroalbumin. A major inhibitor of activated Hageman factor in plasma with an alpha 2-macroglobulin-like nature.

    PubMed Central

    Ishimatsu, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Kozono, K.; Kambara, T.

    1984-01-01

    A major inhibitor of the beta form of activated Hageman factor (beta-HFa) with an apparent molecular weight of 28,000, which was reported as a strong permeability factor (Yamamoto and Cochrane, Am J Pathol 1981, 105: 164-175), was purified from guinea pig plasma. When it was depleted in vitro, the plasma lost 71% of the total inhibitory activity toward beta-HFa. The inhibitor, termed "macroalbumin," with an apparent molecular weight of 720,000 and an apparent pI of 4.6, seemed to be an inhibitor similar to alpha 1- or alpha 2-macroglobulin of man and other mammalian species in physicochemical characteristics and in enzymologic properties. Though the inhibitory activity to beta-HFa was negligible in normal skin extract, a significant inhibitory activity appeared in extracts of permeability-enhanced skin sites which were induced by intradermal beta-HFa injection. The inhibitory activity that appeared was macroalbumin-dependent, with more than a 10-fold increase in the concentration. These results indicate the roles of macroalbumin as a negative feedback regulator in situ to the Hageman-factor-dependent pathway in a permeability enhancement system. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6201075

  10. UV activation of receptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Coffer, P J; Burgering, B M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Bos, J L; Kruijer, W

    1995-08-03

    The exposure of mammalian cells to ultraviolet radiation (UV) may lead to DNA damage resulting in mutation and thus possibly cancer, while irradiation can further act as a potent tumor promoter. In addition UV induces p21ras-mediated signalling leading to activation of transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappa B, as well as activation of the Src tyrosine kinase. This 'UV-response' has been well studied in mammalian cells and furthermore is conserved in yeast, however the most upstream components of this signal transduction pathway have remained elusive. Here we show that UV rapidly activates both the EGF receptor and insulin receptor, as shown by tyrosine phosphorylation of these receptors. We demonstrate that this activation is due to autophosphorylation as it only occurs in cells containing receptors with a functional kinase domain. We have further analysed the propagation of the UV-induced signal to downstream events such as, IRS-1 and Shc tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and gene induction all of which are activated by UV irradiation. Importantly, we demonstrate that in cells expressing a 'kinase-dead' receptor mutant the UV-response is inhibited, blocking leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and transcriptional induction. Furthermore, prior-stimulation of cells with UV appears to reduce further responsiveness to addition of growth factor suggesting a common signaling pathway. These data demonstrate a critical role for receptor-mediated events in regulating the response mammalian cells to UV exposure.

  11. Alpha-2 adrenergic activity of bromocriptine and quinpirole in chicken pineal gland. Effects on melatonin synthesis and ( sup 3 H)rauwolscine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Zawilska, J.; Iuvone, P.M. )

    1990-12-01

    In the pineal gland and retina of chickens, serotonin N-acetyl-transferase (NAT) activity and melatonin content are modulated by different receptors, alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland and D2-dopamine receptors in retina. The effect of two D2-dopamine receptor agonists, bromocriptine and quinpirole (LY 171555), on melatonin synthesis in these tissues was investigated. Systemic administrations of bromocriptine and quinpirole decreased nocturnal NAT activity and melatonin content of both pineal gland and retina. Bromocriptine was equipotent in the two tissues, whereas quinpirole was approximately 100-fold more potent in retina than in pineal gland. In pineal gland, the suppressive effects of bromocriptine and quinpirole on NAT activity were blocked by yohimbine, a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, but not by spiperone, a D2-dopamine receptor antagonist. In contrast, bromocriptine- and quinpirole-induced decreases of the enzyme activity in retina were antagonized by spiperone, and not affected by yohimbine. The nocturnal increase of NAT activity of pineal glands in vitro was inhibited with an order of potency clonidine greater than bromocriptine greater than quinpirole. Additionally, bromocriptine and quinpirole displaced the specific binding of (3H)rauwolscine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, to membranes from chicken pineal gland, with potencies comparable to those observed for inhibition of NAT activity in vitro. It is suggested that bromocriptine and quinpirole, in addition to their D2-dopaminergic activity, can stimulate alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland of chicken.

  12. Protein Kinase C Mediates the Synergistic Interaction Between Agonists Acting at Alpha-2-Adrenergic and Delta-Opioid Receptors in Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Overland, Aaron C.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Rothwell, Patrick E.; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Stone, Laura S.; Wilcox, George L.

    2009-01-01

    Co-activation of spinal α2-adrenergic receptors (AR) and opioid receptors (OR) produces antinociceptive synergy. Antinociceptive synergy between intrathecally (i.t.) administered α2AR and OR agonists is well documented, but the mechanism underlying this synergy remains unclear. The delta-opioid receptor (DOP) and the α2AAR are co-expressed on the terminals of primary afferent fibers in the spinal cord where they may mediate this phenomenon. We evaluated the ability of the DOP-selective agonist deltorphin II (DELT), the α2AR agonist clonidine (CLON) or their combination to inhibit calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from spinal cord slices. We then examined the possible underlying signaling mechanisms involved through co-administration of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC) or protein kinase A (PKA). Potassium-evoked depolarization of spinal cord slices caused concentration-dependent release of CGRP. Co-administration of DELT and CLON inhibited the release of CGRP in a synergistic manner as confirmed statistically by isobolograpic analysis. Synergy was dependent on the activation of PLC and PKC, but not PKA, while the effect of agonist administration alone was only dependent on PLC. The importance of these findings was confirmed in vivo, demonstrating the PKC-dependence on CLON-DELT antinociceptive synergy in mice. That inhibition of CGRP release by the combination was maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin in spinal cord slices suggests that synergy does not rely on interneuronal signaling and may occur within single subcellular compartments. The present study reveals a novel signaling pathway underlying the synergistic analgesic interaction between DOP and α2AR agonists in the spinal cord. PMID:19846714

  13. alpha-2-Adrenergic activation of proopiomelanocortin-containing neurons in the arcuate nucleus causes opioid-mediated hypotension and bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Li, S J; Scanlon, M N; Járai, Z; Varga, K; Gantenberg, N S; Lazar-Wesley, E; Kunos, G

    1996-03-01

    Treatment of rats for 4 days with alpha-methyldopa, 200 mg/kg/day i.p., increases steady state levels of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA in the mediobasal hypothalamus, as measured by DNA excess solution hybridization. The increase is prevented by parallel treatment with yohimbine, 2 mg/kg/day i.p., but not by naltrexone, 2 mg/kg/day i.p. Treatment with the peripheral vasodilator hydralazine, 2 mg/kg/day, does not affect POMC mRNA levels. In situ hybridization histochemistry with a cRNA probe for POMC indicates that POMC-containing cells are located within the confines of the arcuate nucleus both in control and in alpha-methyldopa-treated rats, and confirms the increase in POMC mRNA in the latter. Microinjection of 2 micrograms of alpha-methylnorepinephrine unilaterally into the arcuate nucleus of urethane-anesthetized rats causes hypotension and bradycardia, which can be inhibited by 200 ng of yohimbine microinjected into the same site, or by 100 ng l-naloxone microinjected into the ipsilateral nucleus tractus solitarii, but not into the arcuate nucleus. These findings are interpreted to indicate that activation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors located on POMC-containing neurons in the arcuate nucleus causes beta-endorphin release and stimulation of opiate receptors in the NTS, which results in hypotension and bradycardia, and that this mechanism contributes to the hypotensive action of alpha-methyldopa.

  14. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases. PMID:19489726

  15. Evaluation of Fibrinolytic Inhibitors: Alpha-2-Antiplasmin and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Kiciński, Paweł; Przybylska-Kuć, Sylwia; Dybała, Andrzej; Myśliński, Wojciech; Pastryk, Jolanta; Tomaszewski, Tomasz; Mosiewicz, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) induces thrombophilia and reduces fibrinolysis. Alpha-2-antiplasmin (a-2-AP) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) are major inhibitors of the fibrinolytic system. Increased concentrations of these factors are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to assess plasma a-2-AP and PAI-1 in patients with OSA and evaluate correlations with the polysomnographic record and selected risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. The study group comprised 45 patients with OSA, and the control group consisted of 19 patients who did not meet the diagnostic criteria of OSA. Plasma a-2-AP and PAI-1 concentrations were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the study group, the median value of plasma a-2-AP was higher than that of the control group (157.34 vs. 11.89 pg/ml, respectively, P<0.0001). A-2-AP concentration increased proportionally to the severity of OSA. The concentration of a-2-AP was positively correlated with the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), apnoea index (AI), respiratory disturbances time (RDT), and desaturaion index (DI), and negatively correlated with mean and minimal oxygen saturation (SpO2 mean, SpO2 min, respectively). The median value of PAI-1 was higher in the study group than the control group (12.55 vs. 5.40 ng/ml, respectively, P = 0.006) and increased along with OSA severity. PAI-1 concentration was positively correlated with AHI, AI, RDT, DI, and body mass index (BMI) and negatively correlated with SpO2 mean and SpO2 min. Higher plasma concentrations of a-2-AP and PAI-1 in patients with OSA indicated that these patients had increased prothrombotic activity. OSA increases the risk of cardiovascular complications as it enhances prothrombotic activity. PMID:27861608

  16. NAK is an IkappaB kinase-activating kinase.

    PubMed

    Tojima, Y; Fujimoto, A; Delhase, M; Chen, Y; Hatakeyama, S; Nakayama, K; Kaneko, Y; Nimura, Y; Motoyama, N; Ikeda, K; Karin, M; Nakanishi, M

    2000-04-13

    Phosphorylation of IkappaB by the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex is a critical step leading to IkappaB degradation and activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB. The IKK complex contains two catalytic subunits, IKKalpha and IKKbeta, the latter being indispensable for NF-kappaB activation by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Although IKK is activated by phosphorylation of the IKKbeta activation loop, the physiological IKK kinases that mediate responses to extracellular stimuli remain obscure. Here we describe an IKK-related kinase, named NAK (NF-kappaB-activating kinase), that can activate IKK through direct phosphorylation. NAK induces IkappaB degradation and NF-kappaB activity through IKKbeta. Endogenous NAK is activated by phorbol ester tumour promoters and growth factors, whereas catalytically inactive NAK specifically inhibits activation of NF-kappaB by protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCepsilon). Thus, NAK is an IKK kinase that may mediate IKK and NF-kappaB activation in response to growth factors that stimulate PKCepsilon activity.

  17. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  18. Insulin antagonizes ischemia-induced Thr172 phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha-subunits in heart via hierarchical phosphorylation of Ser485/491.

    PubMed

    Horman, Sandrine; Vertommen, Didier; Heath, Richard; Neumann, Dietbert; Mouton, Véronique; Woods, Angela; Schlattner, Uwe; Wallimann, Theo; Carling, David; Hue, Louis; Rider, Mark H

    2006-03-03

    Previous studies showed that insulin antagonizes AMP-activated protein kinase activation by ischemia and that protein kinase B might be implicated. Here we investigated whether the direct phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase by protein kinase B might participate in this effect. Protein kinase B phosphorylated recombinant bacterially expressed AMP-activated protein kinase heterotrimers at Ser(485) of the alpha1-subunits. In perfused rat hearts, phosphorylation of the alpha1/alpha2 AMP-activated protein kinase subunits on Ser(485)/Ser(491) was increased by insulin and insulin pretreatment decreased the phosphorylation of the alpha-subunits at Thr(172) in a subsequent ischemic episode. It is proposed that the effect of insulin to antagonize AMP-activated protein kinase activation involves a hierarchical mechanism whereby Ser(485)/Ser(491) phosphorylation by protein kinase B reduces subsequent phosphorylation of Thr(172) by LKB1 and the resulting activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  19. Alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists as analgesics.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R E

    2001-08-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists are analgesic agents, and the alpha2-adrenergic agonist clonidine has been used in clinical studies for regional analgesia after intrathecal administration. We review here recent developments concerning the structure activity relationships of a new class of potent alpha2-adrenergic agonists and their use as analgesic agents. The effect of structure upon cardiovascular side-effects is also monitored, such as the prolongation of the QT portion of the cardiac action potential.

  20. Activation of the alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor mediates deceleration of the deaggregation component of the response to ADP or 5-HT in human platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maayani, S; Schwarz, T; Craddock-Royal, B; Tagliente, T M

    2001-09-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the concomitant activation of at least one G(i)- and one G(q)-coupled receptor. Epinephrine (EPI) amplifies the response elicited by a number of agonists for platelet aggregation. This study tested the hypothesis that platelet alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor activation causes deceleration of the deaggregation component of the platelet aggregation response when activated concomitantly with the G(q)-coupled adenosine diphosphate (ADP) P2Y(1) or 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor. The time course of the aggregation response of human platelet-rich plasma following activation of combinations of two or three receptors was assessed by turbidometry using lepirudin anticoagulation. Simultaneous activation of specific two- and three-receptor combinations was achieved using selective antagonists for the P2Y(12) and P2Y(1) receptor subtypes. Steady-state and kinetic parameters, obtained using a four-compartment kinetic model, were used to assess the effects on the net aggregation response. Graded alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor activation was associated with a concentration-dependent decrease of the rate constant of deaggregation. Activation of both ADP receptor subtypes and the alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor produced a concentration-dependent, mutual amplification of the aggregation response. In addition, when three receptors were simultaneously activated, mutual amplification of the aggregation response was observed at physiologically relevant concentrations of epinephrine or norepinephrine (NE) and ADP. We propose that similar to the P2Y(12) receptor, activation of the alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor decelerates the deaggregation component shifting the balance toward increased net aggregation. The effects of EPI and NE on the aggregation response may contribute to the mechanism of increased thrombotic risk present in certain pathophysiological and disease states.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor expressed by primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells is regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Renauld, A E; Spengler, R N

    2002-01-15

    Neuron expression of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and the regulation of the levels of TNF by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation were investigated. Adult rat hippocampal neurons and phorbol ester (PMA)-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells were examined. Intracellular levels of TNF mRNA accumulation, as well as TNF protein and that released into the supernatant were quantified by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and bioanalysis, respectively. Both neuron cultures demonstrated constitutive production of TNF. Activation of the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor increased intracellular levels of TNF mRNA and protein in SH-SY5Y cells after addition of graded concentrations of the selective agonist, Brimonidine (UK-14304) to parallel cultures. Intracellular levels of mRNA were increased in a concentration-dependent fashion within 15 min of UK-14304 addition and were sustained during 24 hr of receptor activation. In addition, the levels of TNF in the supernatant were increased in both types of neuron cultures within 15 min of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation. Furthermore, levels of TNF significantly increased in the supernatants of both neuron cultures after potassium-induced depolarization. A reduction in this depolarization-induced release occurred in hippocampal neuron cultures after exposure to the sympathomimetic tyramine with media replacement to deplete endogenous catecholamines. This finding reveals a role for endogenous catecholamines in the regulation of TNF production. Potassium-induced depolarization resulted in the release of TNF in hippocampal neuron cultures within 15 min but not until 24 hr in SH-SY5Y cultures demonstrating a temporally mediated event dependent upon cell type. Neuron expression of TNF, regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation demonstrates not only how a neuron controls its own production of this pleiotropic cytokine, but also displays a normal role for neurons in directing the many functions of TNF.

  2. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  3. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  4. A tyrosine kinase regulates alpha-adrenoceptor-stimulated contraction and phospholipase D activation in the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Jinsi, A; Paradise, J; Deth, R C

    1996-04-29

    Since previous studies had indicated a role for tyrosine kinases in alpha 2-adrenoceptor-induced contractile responses in other blood vessels, as well as in the activation of phospholipase D, we examined the sensitivity of these responses in rat aorta to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Contractions induced by both noradrenaline and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor-selective agonist UK14304 (5-bromo-6-[2-imidazolin-2-yl-amino]-quinoxaline) were fully inhibited by genistein, with the latter responses being more sensitive. Contractions induced by high K+ buffer were also inhibited, but to a lesser extent. Both agonists caused a stimulation of phospholipase D activity, which could be blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating involvement of either Gi or Go. Genistein completely inhibited the agonist-induced phospholipase D activity and also substantially reduced the basal level of phospholipase D activity. Pretreatment with either the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin or the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine was also effective in eliminating the agonist-induced increase of phospholipase D. These results indicate that a tyrosine kinase-regulated phospholipase D plays a critical role in alpha-adrenoceptor-induced contractions of the rat aorta and that stimulation of both alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors is essential to allow phospholipase activation.

  5. Karyopherin alpha2: a control step of glucose-sensitive gene expression in hepatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemain, Ghislaine; Muñoz-Alonso, Maria J; Cassany, Aurélia; Loizeau, Martine; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Leturque, Armelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose is required for an efficient expression of the glucose transporter GLUT2 and other genes. We have shown previously that the intracytoplasmic loop of GLUT2 can divert a signal, resulting in the stimulation of glucose-sensitive gene transcription. In the present study, by interaction with the GLUT2 loop, we have cloned the rat karyopherin alpha2, a receptor involved in nuclear import. The specificity of the binding was restricted to GLUT2, and not GLUT1 or GLUT4, and to karyopherin alpha2, not alpha1. When rendered irreversible by a cross-linking agent, this transitory interaction was detected in vivo in hepatocytes. A role for karyopherin alpha2 in the transcription of two glucose-sensitive genes was investigated by transfection of native and inactive green fluorescent protein-karyopherin alpha2 in GLUT2-expressing hepatoma cells. The amount of inactive karyopherin alpha2 receptor reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA levels by competition with endogenous active receptor. In contrast, the overexpression of karyopherin alpha2 did not significantly stimulate GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA accumulation in green fluorescent protein-sorted cells. The present study suggests that, in concert with glucose metabolism, karyopherin alpha2 transmits a signal to the nucleus to regulate glucose-sensitive gene expression. The transitory tethering of karyopherin alpha2 to GLUT2 at the plasma membrane might indicate that the receptor can load the cargo to be imported locally. PMID:11988093

  6. Karyopherin alpha2: a control step of glucose-sensitive gene expression in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Guillemain, Ghislaine; Muñoz-Alonso, Maria J; Cassany, Aurélia; Loizeau, Martine; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Leturque, Armelle

    2002-05-15

    Glucose is required for an efficient expression of the glucose transporter GLUT2 and other genes. We have shown previously that the intracytoplasmic loop of GLUT2 can divert a signal, resulting in the stimulation of glucose-sensitive gene transcription. In the present study, by interaction with the GLUT2 loop, we have cloned the rat karyopherin alpha2, a receptor involved in nuclear import. The specificity of the binding was restricted to GLUT2, and not GLUT1 or GLUT4, and to karyopherin alpha2, not alpha1. When rendered irreversible by a cross-linking agent, this transitory interaction was detected in vivo in hepatocytes. A role for karyopherin alpha2 in the transcription of two glucose-sensitive genes was investigated by transfection of native and inactive green fluorescent protein-karyopherin alpha2 in GLUT2-expressing hepatoma cells. The amount of inactive karyopherin alpha2 receptor reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA levels by competition with endogenous active receptor. In contrast, the overexpression of karyopherin alpha2 did not significantly stimulate GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA accumulation in green fluorescent protein-sorted cells. The present study suggests that, in concert with glucose metabolism, karyopherin alpha2 transmits a signal to the nucleus to regulate glucose-sensitive gene expression. The transitory tethering of karyopherin alpha2 to GLUT2 at the plasma membrane might indicate that the receptor can load the cargo to be imported locally.

  7. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Danai, Laura V.; DiStefano, Marina T.; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B.; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C.; Czech, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo. After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  9. Induction of endothelial cell activation by a triple helical alpha2beta integrin ligand, derived from type I collagen alpha1(I)496-507.

    PubMed

    Baronas-Lowell, Diane; Lauer-Fields, Janelle L; Fields, Gregg B

    2004-01-09

    Endothelial cell activation involves the elevated expression of cell adhesion molecules, chemoattractants, chemokines, and cytokines. These expression profiles may be regulated by integrin-mediated cell signaling pathways. In the current study, an alpha2beta1 integrin triple helical peptide ligand derived from type I collagen residues alpha1(I)496-507 was examined for induction of human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) activation. In addition, a "miniextracellular matrix" composed of a mixture of the alpha1(I)496-507 ligand and a second, alpha-helical ligand incorporating the endothelial cell proliferating region of SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) was studied for induction of HAEC activation. Following HAEC adhesion to alpha1(I)496-507, mRNA expression of E-selectin-1, vascular and intercellular cell adhesion molecules-1, and monocytic chemoattractant protein-1 was stimulated, whereas that of endothelin-1 was inhibited. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis demonstrated that E-selectin-1 and monocytic chemoattractant protein-1 expression was also stimulated, whereas endothelin-1 protein expression diminished. Engagement of the alpha2beta1 integrin initiated a HAEC response similar to that of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced HAECs but was not sufficient to induce an inflammatory response. Addition of the SPARC119-122 region had only a slight effect on HAEC activation. Other cell-extracellular matrix interactions appear to be required to elicit an inflammatory response. The alpha2beta1 integrin specific triple helical peptide ligand described herein represents a more general in vitro model system by which gene expression and protein production profiles induced by binding to a single cellular receptor type can be quantified.

  10. Removing a Cystein Group On Interferon Alpha 2b at Position 2 and 99 does Not Diminish Antitumor Activity of the Protein, Even Better.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Heni; Jessica, Adhitya; Sumirtaputra, Yeyet Cahyati; Retnoningrum, Debbie Sofie; Adlia, Amirah; Ningrum, Ratih Asmana

    2016-01-01

    Interferon alpha 2b is the only standard therapeutic protein for hepatitis virus infections. Further study demonstrated that this protein also posseses antitumor activity in several cancerous organs. One main pathway of this antitumor activity is mediated through antiproliferation as well as proapoptotic effects. Previously, we have successfully developed recombinant human interferon alpha 2b (rhIFNα2b) by using a synthetic gene. In addition, two mutein forms of rhIFNα2b were generated to improve the characteristics of this protein. Two point mutations showed better pharmacokinetic profiles than one point mutation as well as the native form. In the present study, this mutein form was studied for ist antitumor effect in vitro using HepG2 cells. As a comparison, the native form as well as a commercial rIFNα2b were used. Several parameters were investigated including the MTT assay, cell viability test, cell cycle using flow cytometric analysis, and the genes and protein expressions involved in cell growth. The latest was observed to study the mechanism of rhIFNα2b. There was no significant difference in the MTT assay and cell viability after cells were treated with both forms of rhIFNα2b. However, the mutein rhIFNα2b tended to show better proapoptotic activity reflected by flow cytometric data, protein expression of pSTAT1, and DNA expression of caspase 3.

  11. Effect of potassium channel blockade and alpha 2-adrenoceptor activation on the release of nitric oxide from non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerves.

    PubMed

    De Man, J G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A

    1994-05-01

    1. Using a superfusion bioassay cascade, we studied the effect of K+ channel blockers and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agents on the release of a transferable factor, previously characterized as nitric oxide (NO) or a nitric oxide-related substance (NO-R), in response to non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) nerve stimulation in the canine ileocolonic junction (ICJ). 2. The non-selective K+ channel blockers, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 50 microM) and tetraethylammonium (TEA, 1 mM) and the more selective blocker of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, charybdotoxin (Leiurus quinquestriatus venom (LQV), 0.4 microgram ml-1), significantly enhanced the release of NO-R induced by low frequency stimulation (2-4 Hz). In the presence of 4-AP and TEA, the release of NO-R was nearly abolished by tetrodotoxin (2 microM), and by L-NG-nitroarginine (L-NOARG, 0.1 mM). Relaxations induced by direct injection of exogenous NO (5-50 pmol) or nitroglycerin (GTN, 10-30 pmol) onto the rabbit aortic detector ring were not affected. 3. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK-14,304 (0.3 microM) inhibited the release of NO-R induced by low (2-4 Hz), but not that induced by high (16 Hz), frequency stimulation. This inhibitory effect was completely reversed by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine (0.3 microM). Neither UK-14,304 nor yohimbine affected the relaxations induced by exogenous NO (5 pmol) or GTN (10 pmol) on the aortic detector ring.3+

  12. A beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase produced by a marine bacterium, Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145, is active at pH 8.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masako; Kajiwara, Hitomi; Mine, Toshiki; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshimitsu

    2007-11-01

    A gene encoding a sialyltransferase produced by Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The sialyltransferase gene contained an open reading frame of 1494 base pairs (bp) encoding a predicted protein of 497 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the sialyltransferase had no significant similarity to mammalian sialyltransferases and did not contain sialyl motifs, but did show high homology to another marine bacterial sialyltransferase, a beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase produced by P. damselae JT0160. The acceptor substrate specificity of the new enzyme was similar to that of the alpha2,6-sialyltransferase from P. damselae JT0160, but its activity was maximal at pH 8. This property is quite different from the properties of all mammalian and bacterial sialyltransferases reported previously, which have maximal activity at acidic pH. In general, both sialosides and cytidine-5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid, the common donor substrate of sialyltransferases, are more stable under basic conditions. Therefore, a sialyltransferase with an optimum pH in the basic range should be useful for the preparation of sialosides and the modification of glycoconjugates, such as asialo-glycoproteins and asialo-glycolipids. Thus, the sialyltransferase obtained from P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 is a promising tool for the efficient production of sialosides.

  13. Kinase Activity Profiling of Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hoogendijk, Arie J.; Diks, Sander H.; van der Poll, Tom; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Wieland, Catharina W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pneumonia represents a major health burden. Previous work demonstrated that although the induction of inflammation is important for adequate host defense against pneumonia, an inability to regulate the host's inflammatory response within the lung later during infection can be detrimental. Intracellular signaling pathways commonly rely on activation of kinases, and kinases play an essential role in the regulation of the inflammatory response of immune cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Pneumonia was induced in mice via intranasal instillation of Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae. Kinomics peptide arrays, exhibiting 1024 specific consensus sequences for protein kinases, were used to produce a systems biology analysis of cellular kinase activity during the course of pneumonia. Several differences in kinase activity revealed by the arrays were validated in lung homogenates of individual mice using western blot. We identified cascades of activated kinases showing that chemotoxic stress and a T helper 1 response were induced during the course of pneumococcal pneumonia. In addition, our data point to a reduction in WNT activity in lungs of S. pneumoniae infected mice. Moreover, this study demonstrated a reduction in overall CDK activity implying alterations in cell cycle biology. Conclusions/Significance This study utilizes systems biology to provide insight into the signaling events occurring during lung infection with the common cause of community acquired pneumonia, and may assist in identifying novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of bacterial pneumonia. PMID:21483672

  14. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  15. Cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Li, H; Lohmann, S M; Boss, G R; Pilz, R B

    1998-12-01

    Agents which increase the intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) concentration and cGMP analogs inhibit cell growth in several different cell types, but it is not known which of the intracellular target proteins of cGMP is (are) responsible for the growth-suppressive effects of cGMP. Using baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which are deficient in cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase), we show that 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate and 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate inhibit cell growth in cells stably transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector but not in untransfected cells or in cells transfected with a catalytically inactive G-kinase. We found that the cGMP analogs inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and nuclear translocation of MAP kinase in G-kinase-expressing cells but not in G-kinase-deficient cells. Ras activation by EGF was not impaired in G-kinase-expressing cells treated with cGMP analogs. We show that activation of G-kinase inhibited c-Raf kinase activation and that G-kinase phosphorylated c-Raf kinase on Ser43, both in vitro and in vivo; phosphorylation of c-Raf kinase on Ser43 uncouples the Ras-Raf kinase interaction. A mutant c-Raf kinase with an Ala substitution for Ser43 was insensitive to inhibition by cGMP and G-kinase, and expression of this mutant kinase protected cells from inhibition of EGF-induced MAP kinase activity by cGMP and G-kinase, suggesting that Ser43 in c-Raf is the major target for regulation by G-kinase. Similarly, B-Raf kinase was not inhibited by G-kinase; the Ser43 phosphorylation site of c-Raf is not conserved in B-Raf. Activation of G-kinase induced MAP kinase phosphatase 1 expression, but this occurred later than the inhibition of MAP kinase activation. Thus, in BHK cells, inhibition of cell growth by cGMP analogs is strictly dependent on G-kinase and G-kinase activation inhibits the Ras/MAP kinase pathway (i) by

  16. Activation of histamine H3-receptors inhibits carrier-mediated norepinephrine release during protracted myocardial ischemia. Comparison with adenosine A1-receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Imamura, M; Lander, H M; Levi, R

    1996-03-01

    We previously showed that prejunctional histamine H3-receptors downregulate norepinephrine exocytosis, which is markedly enhanced in early myocardial ischemia. In the present study, we investigated whether H3-receptors modulate nonexocytotic norepinephrine release during protracted myocardial ischemia. In this setting, decreased pH(i) in sympathetic nerve endings sequentially leads to a compensatory activation of the Na+-H+ antiporter (NHE), accumulation of intracellular Na+, reversal of the neuronal uptake of norepinephrine, and thus carrier-mediated release of norepinephrine. Accordingly, norepinephrine overflow from isolated guinea pig hearts undergoing 20-minute global ischemia and 45-minute reperfusion was attenuated approximately 80% by desipramine (10 nmol/L) and 70% by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA, 10 micromol/L), inhibitors of norepinephrine uptake and NHE, respectively. The H3-receptor agonist imetit (0.1 micromol/L) decreased carrier-mediated norepinephrine release by approximately 50%. This effect was blocked by the H3-receptor antagonist thioperamide (0.3 micromol/L), indicating that H-receptor activation inhibits carrier-mediated norepinephrine release. At lower concentrations, imetit (10 nmol/L) or EIPA (3 micromol/L) did not inhibit carrier-mediated norepinephrine release. However, a 25% inhibition occurred with imetit (10 nmol/L) and EIPA (3 micromol/L) combined. This synergism suggests an association between H-receptors and NHE. Conceivably, activation of H-receptors may lead to inhibition of NHE. In fact, alpha2-adrenoceptor activation, which is known to stimulate NHE, enhanced norepinephrine release, whereas alpha2-adrenoceptor blockade attenuated it. Furthermore, activation of adenosine A1-receptors markedly attenuated norepinephrine release, whereas their inhibition potentiated it. Because norepinephrine directly correlated with the severity of reperfusion arrhythmia and imetit reduced the incidence of ventricular fibrillation by 50

  17. A monoclonal antibody to the alpha2 domain of murine major histocompatibility complex class I that specifically kills activated lymphocytes and blocks liver damage in the concanavalin A hepatitis model.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shuji; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Abe, Masaaki; Terashima, Kazuo; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Hamano, Yoshitomo; Ohtsuji, Mareki; Honma, Nakayuki; Serizawa, Isao; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Hirose, Sachiko; Shirai, Toshikazu

    2003-08-04

    We earlier found that a rat monoclonal antibody (mAb) RE2 can induce rapid death of murine activated, but not resting, lymphocytes and lymphocyte cell lines, in a complement-independent manner, a cell death differing from typical apoptosis or necrosis. We here found that this cell death is independent of pathways involving Fas, caspase, and phosphoinositide-3 kinase. With the advantage of producing human B cell line transfectants with stable expression of human/mouse xeno-chimeric MHC class I genes, we found that RE2 epitope resides on the murine class I alpha2 domain. However, the alpha3 domain plays a key role in transducing the death signal, which mediates extensive aggregation of the MHC class I-integrin-actin filament system, giving rise to membrane blebs and pores. In mouse models with T/NKT cell activation-associated fulminant hepatitis, administration of mAb RE2 almost completely inhibited the development of liver cell injuries. Taken collectively, this form of cell death may be involved in homeostatic immune regulation, and induction of this form of cell death using the mAbs may be potentially therapeutic for subjects with immunological diseases mediated by activated lymphocytes.

  18. Secretion of laminin alpha 2 chain in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Hori, H; Tanaka, T; Fujita, S; Fukuta-Ohi, H; Hojo, S; Tamura, A; Shimizu, T; Matsumura, K

    1995-11-27

    The absence of laminin alpha 2 chain causes muscle cell degeneration and peripheral dysmyelination in congenital muscular dystrophy patients and dy mice, suggesting its role in the maintenance of sarcolemmal architecture and peripheral myelinogenesis. Here we demonstrate the secretion of laminin alpha 2 chain in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Laminin alpha 2 chain was detected as a minor component of the total CSF proteins or glycoproteins. Laminin alpha 2 chain was localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of choroid plexus, suggesting active secretion. Our results suggest that immunochemical analysis of CSF laminin alpha 2 chain could be useful as an aid for the diagnosis of congenital muscular dystrophy.

  19. Differential regulation of rice mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MKK) by abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kundan; Rao, Kudupudi Prabhakara; Sharma, Pallavi; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2008-10-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinase cascade plays a crucial role in various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormones, cell division and developmental processes. MAP kinase kinase being integral part of this cascade performs an important function of integrating upstream signals to mitogen activated protein kinase for further appropriate cellular responses. We here report cloning of five MAP kinase kinase members from Oryza sativa indica cultivar var. Pusa Basmati 1, namely MAP kinase kinases 1, 3, 4, 6 and 10-2. All these members, except MKK10-2 possess fully canonical motif structures of MAP kinase kinase. The deduced amino acid sequence showed changes at certain position within japonica and indica variety of rice. Analysis of transcript regulation by quantitative real time PCR revealed that these five members are differentially regulated by cold, heat, salinity and drought stresses. MAP kinase kinases 4 and 6 are strongly regulated by cold and salt stresses while MAP kinase kinase 1 is regulated by salt and drought stresses. MAP kinase kinase 10-2 is regulated only by cold stress. The study provides the indication of involvement of specific MAP kinase kinase in different abiotic stress signaling and also possible cross talks that exist during the signaling processes.

  20. Characterization of P1 promoter activity of the beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase I gene (siat 1) in cervical and hepatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Milflores-Flores, Lorena; Millán-Pérez, Lourdes; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2012-06-01

    The level of beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase I (ST6Gal I) mRNA, encoded by the gene siat1, is increased in malignant tissues. Expression is regulated by different promoters - P1, P2 and P3 - generating three mRNA isoforms H, X and YZ. In cervical cancer tissue the mRNA isoform H, which results from P1 promoter activity, is increased. To study the regulation of P1 promoter, different constructs from P1 promoter were evaluated by luciferase assays in cervical and hepatic cell lines. Deletion of a fragment of 1048 bp (-89 to +24 bp) increased 5- and 3-fold the promoter activity in C33A and HepG2 cell lines, respectively. The minimal region with promoter activity was a 37 bp fragment in C33A cells. The activity of this region does not require the presence of an initiator sequence. In HepG2 cells the minimal promoter activity was detected in the 66 bp fragment. Sp1 (-32) mutation increased the promoter activity only in HepG2 cells. HNF1 mutation decreased promoter activity in HepG2 cell line but not in C33A cells. We identified a large region that plays a negative regulation role. The regulation of promoter activity is cell type specific. Our study provides new insights into the complex transcriptional regulation of siat1 gene.

  1. Myosin 3A Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Phosphorylation of the Kinase Domain Activation Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Omar A.; Unrath, William C.; Stevens, Stanley M.; Manor, Uri; Kachar, Bechara; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Class III myosins are unique members of the myosin superfamily in that they contain both a motor and kinase domain. We have found that motor activity is decreased by autophosphorylation, although little is known about the regulation of the kinase domain. We demonstrate by mass spectrometry that Thr-178 and Thr-184 in the kinase domain activation loop and two threonines in the loop 2 region of the motor domain are autophosphorylated (Thr-908 and Thr-919). The kinase activity of MYO3A 2IQ with the phosphomimic (T184E) or phosphoblock (T184A) mutations demonstrates that kinase activity is reduced 30-fold as a result of the T184A mutation, although the Thr-178 site only had a minor impact on kinase activity. Interestingly, the actin-activated ATPase activity of MYO3A 2IQ is slightly reduced as a result of the T178A and T184A mutations suggesting coupling between motor and kinase domains. Full-length GFP-tagged T184A and T184E MYO3A constructs transfected into COS7 cells do not disrupt the ability of MYO3A to localize to filopodia structures. In addition, we demonstrate that T184E MYO3A reduces filopodia elongation in the presence of espin-1, whereas T184A enhances filopodia elongation in a similar fashion to kinase-dead MYO3A. Our results suggest that as MYO3A accumulates at the tips of actin protrusions, autophosphorylation of Thr-184 enhances kinase activity resulting in phosphorylation of the MYO3A motor and reducing motor activity. The differential regulation of the kinase and motor activities allows for MYO3A to precisely self-regulate its concentration in the actin bundle-based structures of cells. PMID:24214986

  2. Cadmium activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene and MBP kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Hsiao, Lin-June; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are modules involved in the transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular targets in all eukaryotes. In plants, it has been evidenced that MAPKs play a role in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stresses, plant hormones, and cell cycle cues. However, the effect of heavy metals on plant MAPKs has not been well examined. The Northern blot analysis of OsMAPK mRNA levels has shown that only OsMAPK2, but not OsMAPK3 and OsMAPK4, expressed in suspension-cultured cells in response to 100-400 microM Cd treatments. The OsMAPK2 transcripts increased within 12 h upon 400 microM Cd treatment. In addition, we found that 42- and 50-kDa MBP kinases were significantly activated by Cd treatment in rice suspension-cultured cells. And 40-, 42-, 50- and 64-kDa MBP kinases were activated in rice roots. Furthermore, GSH inhibits Cd-induced 40-kDa MBP kinase activation. By immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by in-gel kinase assay, we confirmed that Cd-activated 42-kDa MBP kinase is a MAP kinase. Our results suggest that a MAP kinase cascade may function in the Cd-signalling pathway in rice.

  3. Physical and chemical properties of human plasma alpha2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, P K; Roberts, R C

    1978-01-01

    Alpha2-M (alpha2-macroglobulin) was purified from human plasma by two different procedures. As well as having no detectable impurities by the usual criteria for testing the homogeneity of protein preparations, these alpha2M preparations showed a single component, after reduction in urea, of 185000 daltons by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of the alpha2M was found to be 718000 by sedimentation equilibrium experiments using the gravimetrically determined -v of 0.731 ml/g. The interaction of several proteinases with alpha2M was studied by using a novel discontinuous polyacrylamide-gel system, which showed clear separation of the enzyme-complexed alpha2M from the free alpha2M. These studies indicated that urokinase, as well as trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin and thrombin forms complexes with alphaM. The cleavage of the 185000-dalton subunit to a 85000-dalton species on interaction of trypsin with alpha2M was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis after reduction of the alpha2M-trypsin complex in urea. The amino acid composition, carbohydrate content, absorption coefficient at 280 nm, the specific refractive increment and the sedimentation coefficient for these alpha2M preparations were measured. The stability of the trypsin-binding activity of the alpha2M preparations was also studied under several storage situations. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 6. PMID:80217

  4. Endothelial Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 Is Critical for Lymphatic Vascular Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-An; Danai, Laura V.; Yawe, Joseph C.; Gujja, Sharvari; Edwards, Yvonne J. K.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying lymphatic vascular development and function are not well understood. Recent studies have suggested a role for endothelial cell (EC) mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) in developmental angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. Here, we show that constitutive loss of EC Map4k4 in mice causes postnatal lethality due to chylothorax, suggesting that Map4k4 is required for normal lymphatic vascular function. Mice constitutively lacking EC Map4k4 displayed dilated lymphatic capillaries, insufficient lymphatic valves, and impaired lymphatic flow; furthermore, primary ECs derived from these animals displayed enhanced proliferation compared with controls. Yeast 2-hybrid analyses identified the Ras GTPase-activating protein Rasa1, a known regulator of lymphatic development and lymphatic endothelial cell fate, as a direct interacting partner for Map4k4. Map4k4 silencing in ECs enhanced basal Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activities, and primary ECs lacking Map4k4 displayed enhanced lymphatic EC marker expression. Taken together, these results reveal that EC Map4k4 is critical for lymphatic vascular development by regulating EC quiescence and lymphatic EC fate. PMID:27044870

  5. Protein kinase activity of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gammeltoft, S; Van Obberghen, E

    1986-01-01

    The insulin receptor is an integral membrane glycoprotein (Mr approximately 300,000) composed of two alpha-subunits (Mr approximately 130,000) and two beta-subunits (Mr approximately 95,000) linked by disulphide bonds. This oligomeric structure divides the receptor into two functional domains such that alpha-subunits bind insulin and beta-subunits possess tyrosine kinase activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the single polypeptide chain precursor of human placental insulin receptor revealed that alpha- and beta-subunits consist of 735 and 620 residues, respectively. The alpha-subunit is hydrophilic, disulphide-bonded, glycosylated and probably extracellular. The beta-subunit consists of a short extracellular region which links the alpha-subunit through disulphide bridges, a hydrophobic transmembrane region and a longer cytoplasmic region which is structurally homologous with other tyrosine kinases like the src oncogene product and EGF receptor kinases. The cellular function of insulin receptors is dual: transmembrane signalling and endocytosis of hormone. The binding of insulin to its receptor on the cell membrane induces transfer of signal from extracellular to cytoplasmic receptor domains leading to activation of cell metabolism and growth. In addition, hormone-receptor complexes are internalized leading to intracellular proteolysis of insulin, whereas receptors are recycled to the membrane. These phenomena are kinetically well-characterized, but their molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Insulin receptor in different tissues and animal species are homologous in their structure and function, but show also significant differences regarding size of alpha-subunits, binding kinetics, insulin specificity and receptor-mediated degradation. We suggest that this heterogeneity of receptors may be linked to the diversity in insulin effects on metabolism and growth in various cell types. The purified insulin receptor phosphorylates its own beta-subunit and

  6. An interferon alpha2 mutant optimized by phage display for IFNAR1 binding confers specifically enhanced antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Kalie, Eyal; Jaitin, Diego A; Abramovich, Renne; Schreiber, Gideon

    2007-04-13

    All alpha-interferons (IFNalpha) bind the IFNAR1 receptor subunit with low affinity. Increasing the binding affinity was shown to specifically increase the antiproliferative potency of IFNalpha2. Here, we constructed a phage display library by randomizing three positions on IFNalpha2 previously shown to confer weak binding to IFNAR1. The tightest binding variant selected, comprised of mutations H57Y, E58N, and Q61S (YNS), was shown to bind IFNAR1 60-fold tighter compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, and 3-fold tighter compared with IFNbeta. Binding of YNS to IFNAR2 was comparable with wild-type IFNalpha2. The YNS mutant conferred a 150-fold higher antiproliferative potency in WISH cells compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, whereas its antiviral activity was increased by only 3.5-fold. The high antiproliferative activity was related to an induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding assays, and to specific gene induction, particularly TRAIL. To determine the potency of the YNS mutant in a xenograft cancer model, we injected it twice a week to nude mice carrying transplanted MDA231 human breast cancer cells. After 5 weeks, no tumors remained in mice treated with YNS, whereas most mice treated with wild-type IFNalpha2 showed visible tumors. Histological analysis of these tumors showed a significant anti-angiogenic effect of YNS, compared with wild-type IFNalpha2. This work demonstrates the application of detailed biophysical understanding in the process of protein engineering, yielding an interferon variant with highly increased biological potency.

  7. MAP kinase activator from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle is a protein threonine/tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Wu, J; Sturgill, T

    1992-01-01

    A 'MAP kinase activator' was purified several thousand-fold from insulin-stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle, which resembled the 'activator' from nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells in that it could be inactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase 2A, but not by protein tyrosine phosphatases and its apparent molecular mass was 45-50 kDa. In the presence of MgATP, 'MAP kinase activator' converted the normal 'wild-type' 42 kDa MAP kinase from an inactive dephosphorylated form to the fully active diphosphorylated species. Phosphorylation occurred on the same threonine and tyrosine residues which are phosphorylated in vivo in response to growth factors or phorbol esters. A mutant MAP kinase produced by changing a lysine at the active centre to arginine was phosphorylated in an identical manner by the 'MAP kinase activator', but no activity was generated. The results demonstrate that 'MAP kinase activator' is a protein kinase (MAP kinase kinase) and not a protein that stimulates the autophosphorylation of MAP kinase. MAP kinase kinase is the first established example of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate an exogenous protein on threonine as well as tyrosine residues. Images PMID:1318193

  8. Comprehensive assay of kinase catalytic activity reveals features of kinase inhibitor selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiadis, Theonie; Deacon, Sean W.; Devarajan, Karthik; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors are central tools for elucidating cellular signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic agents. Due to evolutionary conservation of the ATP-binding site, most kinase inhibitors that target this site promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases. Interpretation of experiments utilizing these compounds is confounded by a lack of data on the comprehensive kinase selectivity of most inhibitors. Here we profiled the activity of 178 commercially available kinase inhibitors against a panel of 300 recombinant protein kinases using a functional assay. Quantitative analysis revealed complex and often unexpected kinase-inhibitor interactions, with a wide spectrum of promiscuity. Many off-target interactions occur with seemingly unrelated kinases, revealing how large-scale profiling can be used to identify multi-targeted inhibitors of specific, diverse kinases. The results have significant implications for drug development and provide a resource for selecting compounds to elucidate kinase function and for interpreting the results of experiments that use them. PMID:22037377

  9. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Terence M.; Nyati, Shyam; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  10. Increased numbers of motor activity peaks during light cycle are associated with reductions in adrenergic alpha(2)-receptor levels in a transgenic Huntington's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Bode, Felix J; Stephan, Michael; Wiehager, Sara; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Björkqvist, Maria; von Hörsten, Stephan; Bauer, Andreas; Petersén, Asa

    2009-12-14

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene. Besides psychiatric, motor and cognitive symptoms, HD patients suffer from sleep disturbances. In order to screen a rat model transgenic for HD (tgHD rats) for sleep-wake cycle dysregulation, we monitored their circadian activity peaks in the present study. TgHD rats of both sexes showed hyperactivity during the dark cycle and more frequent light cycle activity peaks indicative for a disturbed sleep-wake cycle. Focusing on males at the age of 4 and 14 months, analyses of receptor levels in the hypothalamus and the basal forebrain revealed that 5-HT(2A)- and adrenergic alpha(2)-receptor densities in these regions were significantly altered in tgHD rats compared to their wild-type littermates. Adrenergic receptor densities correlated negatively with the light cycle hyperactivity peaks at later stages of the disease in male tgHD rats. Furthermore, reduced leptin levels, a feature associated with circadian misalignment, were present. Our study demonstrates that the male tgHD rat is a suitable model to investigate HD associated sleep alterations. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the role of adrenergic- and 5-HT(2A)-receptors as therapeutic targets for dysregulation of the circadian activity in HD.

  11. 1-[(Imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]indazole. Highly alpha 2/I1 selective agonist: synthesis, X-ray structure, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Saczewski, Franciszek; Kornicka, Anita; Rybczyńska, Apolonia; Hudson, Alan L; Miao, Shu Sean; Gdaniec, Maria; Boblewski, Konrad; Lehmann, Artur

    2008-06-26

    Novel benzazole derivatives bearing a (imidazolidin-2-yl)imino moiety at position 1 or 2 were synthesized by reacting 1-amino- or 2-aminobenzazoles with N, N'-bis( tert-butoxycarbonyl)imidazolidine-2-thione in the presence of HgCl 2. Structures of 1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]indazole (marsanidine, 13a) and free base of the 4-Cl derivative 12e were confirmed by X-ray single crystal structure analysis. Compound 13a was found to be the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor ligand with alpha 2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline I 1 receptor selectivity ratio of 3879, while 1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]-7-methylindazole ( 13k) proved to be a mixed alpha 2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline I 1 receptor agonist with alpha 2/I 1 selectivity ratio of 7.2. Compound 13k when administered intravenously to male Wistar rats induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (ED50 = 0.6 microg/kg) and heart rate, which was attenuated following pretreatment with alpha 2A-adrenoceptor antagonist RX821002. Compound 13a may find a variety of medical uses ascribed to alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists, and its 7-methyl derivative 13k is a good candidate for development as a centrally acting antihypertensive drug.

  12. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  13. Increased antiviral activity of microscale-purified HuIFN alpha 8 (human interferon alpha 8) over HuIFN alpha 2b in Hep-2 cells challenged with Mengo virus.

    PubMed

    García, Julio César Sánchez; Ariza, Alejandro Miranda; Lasa, Alexis Musacchio; González, Luis Javier; Perez, Vladimir Besada

    2007-11-01

    Human proteins are not routinely expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli for, among other reasons, different codon usage. Several purification procedures have been applied to recover recombinant proteins for further biological characterization. However, the vast majority involve costly chromatography procedures. In the present study, both (Hu)IFN(alpha 2b) (human interferon alpha 2b) and (Hu)IFN(alpha 8) were expressed efficiently in E. coli BL21-codonplus-RIL. Subsequently, both recombinant proteins were purified to homogeneity by passive elution from reverse-stained SDS/PAGE gels, a cost-effective purification procedure. After purification, both recovered proteins were biologically active. The (Hu)IFN(alpha 8) subtype induced 1.46-fold more antiviral activity than (Hu)IFN(alpha 2b) using Hep-2 human laryngeal carcinoma cell challenged with Mengo virus.

  14. Tremor in Parkinson's disease patients can be induced by uncontrolled activation and uninhibited synchronization of alpha2-motoneuron firing to which alpha1-motoneuron firing synchronizes.

    PubMed

    Schalow, Giselher

    2005-12-01

    With the surface electromyography (sEMG) and the single nerve-fibre action potential recording method a mechanism is measured how rhythmic muscle contraction and tremor in Parkinson's disease patients is generated. With sEMG it could be shown that the tremor started when alpha2-motor units (FR-type) spontaneously began to fire synchronizedly oscillatory. Two possibilities of alpha2-motor unit synchronization were observed. In one case one alpha2-motor unit started to fire oscillatory and other alpha2-motor units started to fire oscillatory in synchronization with the first alpha2-motor unit. In a second case several alpha2-motor units fired oscillatory, but not in a synchronized manner. With the synchronization of the oscillatory firing alpha2-motor units again synchronizedly oscillatory firing of several alpha2-motor units appeared. When later on, several additional alpha1-motor units (FF-type) started to fire and in synchrony with the synchronizedly oscillatory firing alpha2-motor units (FR-type), rhythmic muscle contraction and tremor were observed. Visible muscle contraction and tremor stopped, when the alpha1-motor units stopped firing, which could a.o. be achieved by the patient concentrating on the tremor. The single nerve-fibre action potential recording method showed that alpha1 and alpha2-motoneurons in the cauda equine nerve roots fired oscillatory, that they could synchronize their firing and that these oscillatory firing motoneurons could build up an external loop to the periphery in the way that gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents were included in the rhythmic coordinated firing But the synchronization of oscillatory firing was only transient and the building up of an external loop to the periphery only occurred in non-Parkinson patients upon strong repetitive reflex stimulation. It is therefore concluded that in patients with Parkinson's disease there is firstly a lack of inhibition, so that motoneurons can start to fire oscillatory upon

  15. Protein kinase C-associated kinase regulates NF-κB activation through inducing IKK activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Schifano, Matthew; Oleksyn, David; Jordan, Craig T; Ryan, Daniel; Insel, Richard; Zhao, Jiyong; Chen, Luojing

    2014-10-01

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-κB induced by extracellular stimuli requires IKKα and IKKβ kinase activity. How IKKα and IKKβ are activated by various upstream signaling molecules is not fully understood. We previously showed that protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK, also known as DIK/RIP4), which belongs to the receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family, mediates the B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF)-induced NF-κB activation in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines. Here we have investigated the mechanism underlying NF-κB activation regulated by PKK. Our results suggest that PKK can activate both the classical and the alternative NF-κB activation pathways. PKK associates with IKKα and IKKβ in mammalian cells and induces activation of both IKKα and IKKβ via phosphorylation of their serine residues 176/180 and 177/181, respectively. Unlike other members of the RIP family that activate NF-κB through a kinase-independent pathway, PKK appears to activate IKK and NF-κB mainly in a kinase-dependent manner. Suppression of PKK expression by RNA interference inhibits phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ as well as activation of NF-κB in human cancer cell lines. Thus, PKK regulates NF-κB activation by modulating activation of IKKα and IKKβ in mammalian cells. We propose that PKK may provide a critical link between IKK activation and various upstream signaling cascades, and may represent a potential target for inhibiting abnormal NF-κB activation in human cancers.

  16. Phosphorylation and activation of p40 tyrosine kinase by casein kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Vila, J; Payne, D M; Zioncheck, T F; Harrison, M L; Itarte, E; Weber, M J

    1990-05-07

    Because examination of regulatory trans-phosphorylations can help elucidate the cellular functions of tyrosyl protein kinases, we have investigated the effects of phosphorylation by casein kinase-1 on the activity of the p40 tyrosyl protein kinase. We find that casein kinase-1 can phosphorylate the p40 tyrosyl kinase on serine and threonine residues, in part on a unique tryptic peptide. The phosphorylation induces a substantial increase in the tyrosyl protein kinase activity of p40, in contrast to most instances in which serine/threonine phosphorylation inhibits activity of tyrosyl protein kinases. These findings raise the possibility that p40 might be part of a protein phosphorylation network in which casein kinase-1 participates.

  17. Presynaptic Inhibition of Glutamate Transmission by Alpha-2 Receptors in the VTA

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rivera, Carlos A.; Figueroa, Johnny; Vázquez, Rafael; Vélez, María; Schwarz, David; Velásquez-Martinez, María C.; Arencibia-Albite, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) forms part of the mesocorticolimbic system and plays a pivotal role in reward and reinforcing actions of drugs of abuse. Glutamate transmission within the VTA controls important aspects of goal-directed behavior and motivation. Noradrenergic receptors also present in the VTA have important functions in the modulation of neuronal activity. Here we studied the effects of alpha-2 noradrenergic receptor activation in the alteration of glutamate neurotransmission in VTA dopaminergic neurons from male Sprague-Dawley rats. We used whole cell patch clamp recordings from putative VTA dopaminergic neurons and measured excitatory postsynaptic currents. Clonidine (40 μM) and UK 13,408 (40 μM), both alpha-2 receptor agonists, reduced (~ 40%) the amplitude of glutamate-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents. After clonidine administration, there was a dose-dependent reduction over the concentration range of 15–40 μM. Using yohimbine (20μM) and two other alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, idaxozan (40 μM) and atipemazole (20μM), we demonstrated that the inhibitory action is specifically mediated by alpha-2 receptors. Moreover, by inhibiting protein kinases with H-7 (75 μM), Rp-adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic (11 μM) and chelerythrine (1 μM) it was shown that the clonidine-induced inhibition seems to involve a selective activation of the protein kinase C intracellular pathway. An increased paired-pulse ratios and changes in spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents frequencies but not amplitudes indicated that the alpha-2 agonist’s effect was presynaptically mediated. It is suggested that the suppression of glutamate excitatory inputs onto VTA dopaminergic neurons might be relevant in the regulation of reward and drug seeking behaviors. PMID:22564071

  18. Neuroprotection by Alpha 2-Adrenergic Agonists in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghua; Kimelberg, Harold K.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is implicated in the pathophysiology of stroke and brain trauma, which are among the top killers worldwide, and intensive studies have been performed to reduce neural cell death after cerebral ischemia. Alpha 2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to improve the histomorphological and neurological outcome after cerebral ischemic injury when administered during ischemia, and recent studies have provided considerable evidence that alpha 2-adrenergic agonists can protect the brain from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, alpha 2-adrenergic agonists are promising potential drugs in preventing cerebral ischemic injury, but the mechanisms by which alpha 2-adrenergic agonists exert their neuroprotective effect are unclear. Activation of both the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor and imidazoline receptor may be involved. This mini review examines the recent progress in alpha 2-adrenergic agonists - induced neuroprotection and its proposed mechanisms in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:18369397

  19. Phosphatidylinositol kinase activities in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Gesumaría, María Celeste; Schoijet, Alejandra C; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Racagni, Graciela E; Machado, Estela E

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) metabolism through phosphatidylinositol kinase (PIKs) activities plays a central role in different signaling pathways. In Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, PIKs have been proposed as target for drug design in order to combat this pathogen. In this work, we studied the classes of PI4K, PIPK and PI3K that could participate in signaling pathways in T. cruzi epimastigote forms. For this reason, we analyzed their enzymatic parameters and detailed responses to avowed kinase inhibitors (adenosine, sodium deoxycholate, wortmannin and LY294002) and activators (Ca(2+), phosphatidic acid, spermine and heparin). Our results suggest the presence and activity of a class III PI4K, a class I PIPK, a class III PI3K previously described (TcVps34) and a class I PI3K. Class I PI3K enzyme, here named TcPI3K, was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and their product was tested for kinase activity. The possible participation of TcPI3K in central cellular events of the parasite is also discussed.

  20. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  1. Discovery of Type II Inhibitors of TGFβ-Activated Kinase 1 (TAK1) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 2 (MAP4K2)

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Li; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Gurbani, Deepak; ...

    2014-07-17

    Here, we developed a pharmacophore model for type II inhibitors that was used to guide the construction of a library of kinase inhibitors. Kinome-wide selectivity profiling of the library resulted in the identification of a series of 4-substituted 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines that exhibited potent inhibitory activity against two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), TAK1 (MAP3K7) and MAP4K2, as well as pharmacologically well interrogated kinases such as p38α (MAPK14) and ABL. Further investigation of the structure–activity relationship (SAR) resulted in the identification of potent dual TAK1 and MAP4K2 inhibitors such as 1 (NG25) and 2 as well as MAP4K2 selective inhibitors such as 16more » and 17. Some of these inhibitors possess good pharmacokinetic properties that will enable their use in pharmacological studies in vivo. Lastly, a 2.4 Å cocrystal structure of TAK1 in complex with 1 confirms that the activation loop of TAK1 assumes the DFG-out conformation characteristic of type II inhibitors.« less

  2. New substituted 1-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[1, 4]dioxin-2-ylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl derivatives with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Brunel, P; Chaplain, C; Piedecoq, C; Calmel, F; Schambel, P; Chopin, P; Wurch, T; Pauwels, P J; Marien, M; Vidaluc, J L; Imbert, T

    2000-10-05

    The emergence of a novel theory concerning the role of noradrenaline in the progression and the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has provided a new impetus toward the discovery of novel compounds acting at alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. A series of substituted 1-(2, 3-dihydrobenzo[1,4]dioxin-2-ylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl derivatives bearing an amide, urea, or imidazolidinone moiety was studied. Some members of this series of compounds proved to be potent alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonists with good selectivity versus alpha(1)-adrenergic and D(2)-dopamine receptors. Particular emphasis is given to compound 33g which displays potent alpha(2)-adrenoceptor binding affinity in vitro and central effects in vivo following oral administration.

  3. Effects of wortmannin on alpha-1/alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated contractile responses in rabbit vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Waen-Safranchik, V I; Deth, R C

    1994-06-01

    The inhibitory effect of wortmannin (WO), a fungus-derived protein kinase inhibitor, was assessed on contractile responses elicited by phenylephrine-induced alpha 1-(alpha 1 R) and UK 14304-induced alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2R) stimulation in the rabbit aorta and saphenous vein, respectively. In agonist dose-response studies, WO caused a noncompetitive inhibition of both alpha 1R and alpha 2R responses, but was more potent against alpha 2R. Maximally effective single-dose responses at both receptors were less sensitive to WO. The initial alpha 1R contractile response, associated with intracellular Ca2+ release and myosin light chain kinase activation, was relatively insensitive to WO, while the Ca2+ influx-dependent tonic contraction was more sensitive. Contractions induced by high K+ buffer were relatively insensitive to WO in both the aorta and saphenous vein. These results indicate that WO inhibits receptor-initiated Ca2+ influx-dependent contractile responses such as those caused by alpha 2R stimulation and the sustained phase of alpha 1R stimulation more readily than Ca2+ release-dependent responses.

  4. Protein kinase C-associated kinase can activate NFkappaB in both a kinase-dependent and a kinase-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Moran, Stewart T; Haider, Khaleda; Ow, Yongkai; Milton, Peter; Chen, Luojing; Pillai, Shiv

    2003-06-13

    Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK, also known as RIP4/DIK) activates NFkappaB when overexpressed in cell lines and is required for keratinocyte differentiation in vivo. However, very little is understood about the factors upstream of PKK or how PKK activates NFkappaB. Here we show that certain catalytically inactive mutants of PKK can activate NFkappaB, although to a lesser degree than wild type PKK. The deletion of specific domains of wild type PKK diminishes the ability of this enzyme to activate NFkappaB; the same deletions made on a catalytically inactive PKK background completely ablate NFkappaB activation. PKK may be phosphorylated by two specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases, MEKK2 and MEKK3, and this interaction may in part be mediated through a critical activation loop residue, Thr184. Catalytically inactive PKK mutants that block phorbol ester-induced NFkappaB activation do not interfere with, but unexpectedly enhance, the activation of NFkappaB by these two mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases. Taken together, these data indicate that PKK may function in both a kinase-dependent as well as a kinase-independent manner to activate NFkappaB.

  5. Kinase activity profiling of gram-negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Diks, Sander H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Van Der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonia is a severe disease with high morbidity and mortality. A major causative pathogen is the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae. Kinases play an integral role in the transduction of intracellular signaling cascades and regulate a diverse array of biological processes essential to immune cells. The current study explored signal transduction events during murine Gram-negative pneumonia using a systems biology approach. Kinase activity arrays enable the analysis of 1,024 consensus sequences of protein kinase substrates. Using a kinase activity array on whole lung lysates, cellular kinase activities were determined in a mouse model of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Notable kinase activities also were validated with phospho-specific Western blots. On the basis of the profiling data, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling via p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) activity were reduced during infection, whereas v-src sarcoma (Schmidt-Ruppin A-2) viral oncogene homolog (avian) (SRC) activity generally was enhanced. AKT signaling was represented in both metabolic and inflammatory (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 [MKK], apoptosis signal-regulating kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 [ASK] and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 [b-RAF]) context. This study reaffirms the importance of classic inflammation pathways, such as MAPK and TGFβ signaling and reveals less known involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), AKT and SRC signaling cassettes in pneumonia.

  6. Polo-like kinase-activating kinases: Aurora A, Aurora B and what else?

    PubMed

    Archambault, Vincent; Carmena, Mar

    2012-04-15

    The events of cell division are regulated by a complex interplay between kinases and phosphatases. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), polo-like kinases (Plks) and Aurora kinases play central roles in this process. Polo kinase (Plk1 in humans) regulates a wide range of events in mitosis and cytokinesis. To ensure the accuracy of these processes, polo activity itself is subject to complex regulation. Phosphorylation of polo in its T loop (or activation loop) increases its kinase activity several-fold. It has been shown that Aurora A kinase, with its co-factor Bora, activates Plk1 in G(2), and that this is essential for recovery from cell cycle arrest induced by DNA damage. In a recent article published in PLoS Biology, we report that Drosophila polo is activated by Aurora B kinase at centromeres, and that this is crucial for polo function in regulating chromosome dynamics in prometaphase. Our results suggest that this regulatory pathway is conserved in humans. Here, we propose a model for the collaboration between Aurora B and polo in the regulation of kinetochore attachment to microtubules in early mitosis. Moreover, we suggest that Aurora B could also function to activate Polo/Plk1 in cytokinesis. Finally, we discuss recent findings and open questions regarding the activation of polo and polo-like kinases by different kinases in mitosis, cytokinesis and other processes.

  7. Dealing with osmostress through MAP kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    de Nadal, Eulàlia; Alepuz, Paula M.; Posas, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    In response to changes in the extracellular environment, cells coordinate intracellular activities to maximize their probability of survival and proliferation. Eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, transduce diverse extracellular stimuli through the cell by multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. Exposure of cells to increases in extracellular osmolarity results in rapid activation of a highly conserved family of MAPKs, known as stress-activated MAPKs (SAPKs). Activation of SAPKs is essential for the induction of adaptive responses required for cell survival upon osmostress. Recent studies have begun to shed light on the broad effects of SAPK activation in the modulation of several aspects of cell physiology, ranging from the control of gene expression to the regulation of cell division. PMID:12151331

  8. Reusable amperometric biosensor for measuring protein tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Liang; Wei, Lan-Yi; Yuan, Chiun-Jye; Hwang, Kuo Chu

    2012-01-17

    This work presents a simple, low-cost and reusable label-free method for detecting protein tyrosine kinase activity using a tyrosinase-based amperometric biosensor (tyrosine kinase biosensor). This method is based on the observation that phosphorylation can block the tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation of tyrosine or tyrosyl residue in peptides. Therefore, the activity of p60c-src protein tyrosine kinase (Src) on the developed tyrosine kinase biosensor could be quickly determined when its specific peptide substrate, p60c-src substrate I, was used. The tyrosine kinase biosensor was highly sensitive to the activity of Src with a linear dynamic range of 1.9-237.6 U/mL and the lowest detection limit of 0.23 U/mL. Interestingly, the tyrosine kinase activity can be measured using the developed tyrosine kinase biosensor repetitively without regeneration. The inhibitory effect of various kinase inhibitors on the Src activity could be determined on the tyrosine kinase biosensor. Src-specific inhibitors, PP2 and Src inhibitor I, effectively suppressed Src activity, whereas PD153035, an inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, was ineffective. Staurosporine, a universal kinase inhibitor, inhibited Src activity in an ATP concentration-dependent manner. These results suggests that the activities of tyrosine kinases and their behaviors toward various reagents can be effectively measured using the developed tyrosine kinase biosensor.

  9. The behavior of alpha2-plasmin inhibitor in fibrinolytic states.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, N; Moroi, M; Matsuda, M; Tachiya, K

    1977-01-01

    Human plasma alpha2-plasmin inhibitor in fibrinolytic states was studied using immunochemical methods and radioiodinated plasminogen. The concentration and activity of plasma alpha2-plasmin inhibitor decreased when urokinase was added to plasma in vitro or infused intravenously in man. The decrease was associated with the appearance of plasmin-alpha2-plasmin inhibitor complex which subsequently disappeared from the circulation in a short time. A decrease of other major inhibitors, such as alpha2-macroglobulin and alpha1-antitrypsin, was not observed when the amount of urokinase added or infused was relatively small, and conversion of plasminogen to plasmin was not extensive. The formation of plasmin-alpha2-macroglobulin complex was observed only when plasma plasminogen was activated with a larger amount of urokinase, and after most of the alpha2-plasmin inhibitor was consumed by forming complexes with plasmin. The formation of plasmin-alpha1-antitrypsin complex was not observed even in the highly activated plasma unless exogenous plasmin was added to the plasma. alpha2-Plasmin inhibitor was the only inhibitor of which the concentration in plasma was significantly decreased in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis among the major plasmin inhibitors in plasma. The most reactive inhibitor for regulating plasma fibrinolysis very likely is alpha2-plasmin inhibitor. Images PMID:68962

  10. [Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay for in vitro determination of PKA activity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Yan-lin; Liu, Qian; Chen, Chen; Qin, Yuan-yuan; Wu, Gui-yan; Gao, Hua

    2012-07-01

    To establish a simple, convenient and harmless non-radioactive method of determining protein kinase A (PKA) activity in vitro. Human PKAα cDNA was amplified from total RNA of HEK293 cells using RT-PCR method and then cloned into pGEX-6p-1 vector. In vitro purified GST-PKAα protein was identified by Western blot analysis. Finally, a non-radioactive method, Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay, was employed to determine the kinase activity of purified GST-PKAα. After the optimization of the induction conditions, we purified GST-PKAα protein successfully. We then determined GST-PKAα activity using Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay. We also further confirmed the kinase activity of GST-PKAα using H-89, a specific PKA inhibitor, and determined its IC(50); value (35.2±3.97) nmol/L which is consistent with reported value. The non-radioactive Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay is a simple, convenient and harmless method of determining the kinase activity of PKA. This method is effective for pre-clinical high-throughput screening of PKA inhibitor, discovering novel target proteins of PKA and investigating PKA phosphorylation sites in target proteins.

  11. Effects of butyltins on mitogen-activated-protein kinase kinase kinase and Ras activity in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Celada, Lindsay J; Whalen, Margaret M

    2014-09-01

    Butyltins (BTs) contaminate the environment and are found in human blood. BTs, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) diminish the cytotoxic function and levels of key proteins of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against tumors, virally infected cells and antibody-coated cells and thus critical to human health. The signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions include mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Studies have shown that exposure to BTs leads to activation of specific MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks) in human NK cells. MAP2K kinases (MAP3Ks) are upstream activators of MAP2Ks, which then activate MAPKs. The current study examined if BT-induced activation of MAP3Ks was responsible for MAP2K and thus, MAPK activation. This study examines the effects of TBT and DBT on the total levels of two MAP3Ks, c-Raf and ASK1, as well as activating and inhibitory phosphorylation sites on these MAP3Ks. In addition, the immediate upstream activator of c-Raf, Ras, was examined for BT-induced alterations. Our results show significant activation of the MAP3K, c-Raf, in human NK cells within 10 min of TBT exposure and the MAP3K, ASK1, after 1 h exposures to TBT. In addition, our results suggest that both TBT and DBT affect the regulation of c-Raf.

  12. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  13. The anticonvulsant and proconvulsant effects of alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonists are mediated by distinct populations of alpha2A-adrenoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Szot, P; Lester, M; Laughlin, M L; Palmiter, R D; Liles, L C; Weinshenker, D

    2004-01-01

    The alpha2-adrenoreceptor (AR) is the most investigated noradrenergic receptor with regard to modulation of seizure activity. However, because of the complexity of multiple alpha2-AR subtypes and their distribution, the exact role of this receptor in modulating seizure activity is not clear. alpha2A- and alpha2C-ARs function as both autoreceptors (presynaptic) on noradrenergic neurons, where they regulate norepinephrine (NE) release, and as postsynaptic receptors on neurons that receive noradrenergic innervation, where they regulate the release of other neurotransmitters (heteroreceptor). The nonselective alpha2-AR agonist clonidine produced a proconvulsant effect on seizure susceptibility, while the selective alpha2A-AR agonist guanfacine was anticonvulsant. The effects of both alpha2-AR agonists were absent in alpha2a knockout mice, suggesting that the alpha2A-AR mediates the proconvulsant and anticonvulsant effect of alpha2-AR agonists on seizure susceptibility. To determine whether the alpha2-AR agonists were acting on inhibitory presynaptic autoreceptors to decrease NE release or on postsynaptic receptors on NE target neurons, the effects of clonidine and guanfacine were determined in dopamine beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE. The anticonvulsant effect of guanfacine persisted in Dbh -/- mice, suggesting that guanfacine may act preferentially on alpha2A-postsynaptic receptors that regulate the action of NE on target neurons. In contrast, the proconvulsant effect of clonidine was lost in Dbh -/- mice, suggesting that clonidine may act on presynaptic autoreceptors to decrease NE release. We hypothesize that the alpha2A-presynaptic autoreceptor is responsible for the proconvulsant effect of alpha2-AR agonists, while the alpha2A-postsynaptic receptor is responsible for the anticonvulsant effect of alpha2-AR agonists. These data help to clarify the inconsistent effects of alpha2-AR agonists on seizure activity.

  14. Dominant Mutations of Drosophila Map Kinase Kinase and Their Activities in Drosophila and Yeast Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y. M.; Tsuda, L.; Inoue, Y. H.; Irie, K.; Adachi-Yamada, T.; Hata, M.; Nishi, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Nishida, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Eight alleles of Dsor1 encoding a Drosophila homologue of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase were obtained as dominant suppressors of the MAP kinase kinase kinase D-raf. These Dsor1 alleles themselves showed no obvious phenotypic consequences nor any effect on the viability of the flies, although they were highly sensitive to upstream signals and strongly interacted with gain-of-function mutations of upstream factors. They suppressed mutations for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs); torso (tor), sevenless (sev) and to a lesser extent Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). Furthermore, the Dsor1 alleles showed no significant interaction with gain-of-function mutations of DER. The observed difference in activity of the Dsor1 alleles among the RTK pathways suggests Dsor1 is one of the components of the pathway that regulates signal specificity. Expression of Dsor1 in budding yeast demonstrated that Dsor1 can activate yeast MAP kinase homologues if a proper activator of Dsor1 is coexpressed. Nucleotide sequencing of the Dsor1 mutant genes revealed that most of the mutations are associated with amino acid changes at highly conserved residues in the kinase domain. The results suggest that they function as suppressors due to increased reactivity to upstream factors. PMID:9136016

  15. Alpha 2 LASSO Data Bundles

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gustafson, William Jr; Vogelmann, Andrew; Endo, Satoshi; Toto, Tami; Xiao, Heng; Li, Zhijin; Cheng, Xiaoping; Kim, Jinwon; Krishna, Bhargavi

    2015-08-31

    The Alpha 2 release is the second release from the LASSO Pilot Phase that builds upon the Alpha 1 release. Alpha 2 contains additional diagnostics in the data bundles and focuses on cases from spring-summer 2016. A data bundle is a unified package consisting of LASSO LES input and output, observations, evaluation diagnostics, and model skill scores. LES input include model configuration information and forcing data. LES output includes profile statistics and full domain fields of cloud and environmental variables. Model evaluation data consists of LES output and ARM observations co-registered on the same grid and sampling frequency. Model performance is quantified by skill scores and diagnostics in terms of cloud and environmental variables.

  16. A Molecular Brake in the Kinase Hinge Region Regulates the Activity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Ma, J.; Li, W.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Miller, W.; Mohammadi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) cause cancer and skeletal disorders. Comparison of the crystal structures of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated wild-type FGFR2 kinase domains with those of seven unphosphorylated pathogenic mutants reveals an autoinhibitory 'molecular brake' mediated by a triad of residues in the kinase hinge region of all FGFRs. Structural analysis shows that many other RTKs, including PDGFRs, VEGFRs, KIT, CSF1R, FLT3, TEK, and TIE, are also subject to regulation by this brake. Pathogenic mutations activate FGFRs and other RTKs by disengaging the brake either directly or indirectly.

  17. Protein Kinase Activity of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Regulates Cytokine-Dependent Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Green, Benjamin D.; Barry, Emma F.; Ma, Yuefang; Woodcock, Joanna; Fitter, Stephen; Zannettino, Andrew C. W.; Pitson, Stuart M.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Lopez, Angel F.; Shepherd, Peter R.; Wei, Andrew H.; Ekert, Paul G.; Guthridge, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The dual specificity protein/lipid kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), promotes growth factor-mediated cell survival and is frequently deregulated in cancer. However, in contrast to canonical lipid-kinase functions, the role of PI3K protein kinase activity in regulating cell survival is unknown. We have employed a novel approach to purify and pharmacologically profile protein kinases from primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that phosphorylate serine residues in the cytoplasmic portion of cytokine receptors to promote hemopoietic cell survival. We have isolated a kinase activity that is able to directly phosphorylate Ser585 in the cytoplasmic domain of the interleukin 3 (IL-3) and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptors and shown it to be PI3K. Physiological concentrations of cytokine in the picomolar range were sufficient for activating the protein kinase activity of PI3K leading to Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival but did not activate PI3K lipid kinase signaling or promote proliferation. Blockade of PI3K lipid signaling by expression of the pleckstrin homology of Akt1 had no significant impact on the ability of picomolar concentrations of cytokine to promote hemopoietic cell survival. Furthermore, inducible expression of a mutant form of PI3K that is defective in lipid kinase activity but retains protein kinase activity was able to promote Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival in the absence of cytokine. Blockade of p110α by RNA interference or multiple independent PI3K inhibitors not only blocked Ser585 phosphorylation in cytokine-dependent cells and primary human AML blasts, but also resulted in a block in survival signaling and cell death. Our findings demonstrate a new role for the protein kinase activity of PI3K in phosphorylating the cytoplasmic tail of the GM-CSF and IL-3 receptors to selectively regulate cell survival highlighting the importance of targeting such pathways in

  18. Assembly and activation of a kinase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Donald H.; Rhee, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    RNA activities can be regulated by modulating the relative energies of all conformations in a folding landscape; however, it is often unknown precisely how peripheral elements perturb the overall landscape in the absence of discrete alternative folds (inactive ensemble). This work explores the effects of sequence and secondary structure in governing kinase ribozyme activity. Kin.46 catalyzes thiophosphoryl transfer from ATPγS onto the 5′ hydroxyl of polynucleotide substrates, and is regulated 10,000-fold by annealing an effector oligonucleotide to form activator helix P4. Transfer kinetics for an extensive series of ribozyme variants identified several dispensable internal single-stranded segments, in addition to a potential pseudoknot at the active site between segments J1/4 and J3/2 that is partially supported by compensatory rescue. Standard allosteric mechanisms were ruled out, such as formation of discrete repressive structures or docking P4 into the rest of the ribozyme via backbone 2′ hydroxyls. Instead, P4 serves both to complete an important structural element (100-fold contribution to the reaction relative to a P4-deleted variant) and to mitigate nonspecific, inhibitory effects of the single-stranded tail (an additional 100-fold contribution to the apparent rate constant, kobs). Thermodynamic activation parameters ΔH‡ and ΔS‡, calculated from the temperature dependence of kobs, varied with tail length and sequence. Inhibitory effects of the unpaired tail are largely enthalpic for short tails and are both enthalpic and entropic for longer tails. These results refine the structural view of this kinase ribozyme and highlight the importance of nonspecific ensemble effects in conformational regulation by peripheral elements. PMID:20935068

  19. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Man-Ho; Wu, Xia; Kim, Hyoung Seok; Harper, Jeffrey F; Zielinski, Raymond E; Clouse, Steven D; Huber, Steven C

    2012-11-30

    Although calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases, autophosphorylation on tyrosine residues was observed for soybean CDPKβ and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34). We identified Ser-8, Thr-17, Tyr-24 (in the kinase domain), Ser-304, and Ser-358 as autophosphorylation sites of His(6)-GmCDPKβ. Overall autophosphorylation increased kinase activity with synthetic peptides, but autophosphorylation of Tyr-24 appears to attenuate kinase activity based on studies with the Y24F directed mutant. While much remains to be done, it is clear that several CDPKs are dual-specificity kinases, which raises the possibility that phosphotyrosine signaling may play a role in Ca(2+)/CDPK-mediated processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Interaction of SNF1 Protein Kinase with Its Activating Kinase Sak1▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Xinjing; Carlson, Marian

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF1 protein kinase, a member of the SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family, is activated by three kinases, Sak1, Tos3, and Elm1, which phosphorylate the Snf1 catalytic subunit on Thr-210 in response to glucose limitation and other stresses. Sak1 is the primary Snf1-activating kinase and is associated with Snf1 in a complex. Here we examine the interaction of Sak1 with SNF1. We report that Sak1 coimmunopurifies with the Snf1 catalytic subunit from extracts of both glucose-replete and glucose-limited cultures and that interaction occurs independently of the phosphorylation state of Snf1 Thr-210, Snf1 catalytic activity, and other SNF1 subunits. Sak1 interacts with the Snf1 kinase domain, and nonconserved sequences C terminal to the Sak1 kinase domain mediate interaction with Snf1 and augment the phosphorylation and activation of Snf1. The Sak1 C terminus is modified in response to glucose depletion, dependent on SNF1 activity. Replacement of the C terminus of Elm1 (or Tos3) with that of Sak1 enhanced the ability of the Elm1 kinase domain to interact with and phosphorylate Snf1. These findings indicate that the C terminus of Sak1 confers its function as the primary Snf1-activating kinase and suggest that the physical association of Sak1 with SNF1 facilitates responses to environmental change. PMID:21216941

  1. AKAP-Lbc nucleates a protein kinase D activation scaffold.

    PubMed

    Carnegie, Graeme K; Smith, F Donelson; McConnachie, George; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D

    2004-09-24

    The transmission of cellular signals often proceeds through multiprotein complexes where enzymes are positioned in proximity to their upstream activators and downstream substrates. In this report we demonstrate that the A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP-Lbc assembles an activation complex for the lipid-dependent enzyme protein kinase D (PKD). Using a combination of biochemical, enzymatic, and immunofluorescence techniques, we show that the anchoring protein contributes to PKD activation in two ways: it recruits an upstream kinase PKCeta and coordinates PKA phosphorylation events that release activated protein kinase D. Thus, AKAP-Lbc synchronizes PKA and PKC activities in a manner that leads to the activation of a third kinase. This configuration illustrates the utility of kinase anchoring as a mechanism to constrain the action of broad-spectrum enzymes.

  2. Heterologous expression of the cloned guinea pig alpha 2A, alpha 2B, and alpha 2C adrenoceptor subtypes. Radioligand binding and functional coupling to a CAMP-responsive reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Svensson, S P; Bailey, T J; Porter, A C; Richman, J G; Regan, J W

    1996-02-09

    Functional studies have shown that 6-chloro-9-[(3-methyl-2-butenyl)oxy]-3-methyl-1H-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3- benzazepine (SKF 104078) has very low affinity for prejunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors (alpha 2-AR) in the guinea pig atrium. In this study, we have cloned guinea pig homologues of the human alpha 2-C10, alpha 2-C4 AR subtypes and have studied them in isolation by heterologous expression in cultured mammalian cells. Oligonucleotide primers, designed from conserved areas of the human alpha 2-ARs were used in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with template cDNA synthesized from guinea pig atrial mRNA. Three PCR products were obtained that shared identity with the three human alpha 2-AR subtypes. A guinea pig (gp) genomic library was screened with a cDNA clone encoding a portion of the gp-alpha 2A, and genes containing the complete coding sequences of the guinea pig alpha 2A, alpha 2B, and alpha 2C AR subtypes were obtained. These guinea pig genes were subcloned into a eukaryotic expression plasmid and were expressed transiently in COS-7 cells. The binding of the alpha 2-selective antagonist [3H]MK-912 to membranes prepared from these cells was specific and of high affinity with Kd values of 810 pM for gp-alpha 2A, 2700 pM for gp-alpha 2B and 110 pM for gp-alpha 2C. Competition for the binding of [3H]MK-912 by SKF 104078 indicated that it was of moderately high affinity (approximately 100 nM) but that it was not selective for any of the guinea pig alpha 2-AR subtypes. Co-expression of guinea pig alpha 2-AR subtypes with a cyclicAMP-responsive chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene resulted in agonist-dependent modulation of CAT activity. For the gp-alpha 2 A, a biphasic response was obtained with low concentrations of noradrenaline (NE) decreasing forskolin-stimulated CAT activity and high concentrations causing a reversal. For the gp-alpha 2B, NE produced mostly potentiation of forskolin-stimulated activity, and for the gp-alpha 2C, NE caused

  3. Protein kinase C activity in boar sperm.

    PubMed

    Teijeiro, J M; Marini, P E; Bragado, M J; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2017-03-01

    Male germ cells undergo different processes within the female reproductive tract to successfully fertilize the oocyte. These processes are triggered by different extracellular stimuli leading to activation of protein phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key regulatory enzyme in signal transduction mechanisms involved in many cellular processes. Studies in boar sperm demonstrated a role for PKC in the intracellular signaling involved in motility and cellular volume regulation. Experiments using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) showed increases in the Serine/Threonine phosphorylation of substrates downstream of PKC in boar sperm. In order to gain knowledge about those cellular processes regulated by PKC, we evaluate the effects of PMA on boar sperm motility, lipid organization of plasma membrane, integrity of acrosome membrane and sperm agglutination. Also, we investigate the crosstalk between PKA and PKC intracellular pathways in spermatozoa from this species. The results presented here reveal a participation of PKC in sperm motility regulation and membrane fluidity changes, which is probably associated to acrosome reaction and to agglutination. Also, we show the existence of a hierarchy in the kinases pathway. Previous works on boar sperm suggest a pathway in which PKA is positioned upstream to PKC and this new results support such model.

  4. Activation of fat cell adenylate cyclase by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, S.; Noguchi, M.; Huang, K.P.; Londos, C.

    1986-05-01

    Purified protein kinase C (C-kinase) from guinea pig pancreas and rat brain stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in purified rat adipocyte membranes. Cyclase stimulation occurred over 100 to 1000 mU/ml of C-kinase activity, required greater than 10 ..mu..M calcium, proceeded without a lag, was not readily reversible, and required no exogenous phospholipid. Moreover, C-kinase inhibitors, such as chlorpromazine and palmitoyl carnitine, inhibited selectively adenylate cyclase which was activated by C-kinase and calcium. Depending on assay conditions, 10 nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either enhanced or was required for kinase action on cyclase. Also, TPA plus calcium promoted the quantitative association of C-kinase with membranes. Adenylate cyclase activation by C-kinase was seen both in the presence and absence of exogenous GTP, indicating that the kinase effect does not result from an action on the GTP-binding, inhibitory regulatory component (N/sub i/) of the cyclase system. Moreover, the kinase effect was seen in the presence of non-phosphorylating ATP analogs, such as AppNHp and AppCH/sub 2/p, suggesting that the effects of C-kinase described herein may result from association with, rather than phosphorylation of, adenylate cyclase.

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Luo; Bo, Wan; Li, Ruwei; Chen, Xinya; Wang, Yingli; Jun, Zhou; Yu, Long

    2010-07-01

    As an important cellular energy regulation kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated as a key molecule in the development of tolerance to nutrient starvation. Activation of AMPK includes the phosphorylation of Thr172 of the alpha-subunit. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally isolated for its ability to stimulate both survival and differentiation in peripheral neurons, but many investigations have shown that the NGF also plays an important role in survival, growth and invasion of many human cancers. In this study, we used CCK-8 cell viability assay to find that NGF could facilitate the viability of HeLa cells following glucose deprivation while not in glucose-normal control groups. This effect of NGF-induced viability promotion to glucose starvation can be suppressed by Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK. Meanwhile, western blot analysis showed that AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level in HeLa cells was up-regulated after NGF treatment under glucose starvation, and Compound C was able to reduce the AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level which was up-regulated by NGF in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results indicate that AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  7. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C.; Muskal, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  8. Musk Kinase Activity is Modulated By A Serine Phosphorylation Site in The Kinase Loop

    PubMed Central

    Camurdanoglu, B. Z.; Hrovat, C.; Dürnberger, G.; Madalinski, M.; Mechtler, K.; Herbst, R.

    2016-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) forms when a motor neuron contacts a muscle fibre. A reciprocal exchange of signals initiates a cascade of signalling events that result in pre- and postsynaptic differentiation. At the centre of these signalling events stands muscle specific kinase (MuSK). MuSK activation, kinase activity and subsequent downstream signalling are crucial for NMJ formation as well as maintenance. Therefore MuSK kinase activity is tightly regulated to ensure proper NMJ development. We have identified a novel serine phosphorylation site at position 751 in MuSK that is increasingly phosphorylated upon agrin stimulation. S751 is also phosphorylated in muscle tissue and its phosphorylation depends on MuSK kinase activity. A phosphomimetic mutant of S751 increases MuSK kinase activity in response to non-saturating agrin concentrations . In addition, basal MuSK and AChR phosphorylation as well as AChR cluster size are increased. We believe that the phosphorylation of S751 provides a novel mechanism to relief the autoinhibition of the MuSK activation loop. Such a lower autoinhibition could foster or stabilize MuSK kinase activation, especially during stages when no or low level of agrin are present. Phosphorylation of S751 might therefore represent a novel mechanism to modulate MuSK kinase activity during prepatterning or NMJ maintenance. PMID:27666825

  9. Musk Kinase Activity is Modulated By A Serine Phosphorylation Site in The Kinase Loop.

    PubMed

    Camurdanoglu, B Z; Hrovat, C; Dürnberger, G; Madalinski, M; Mechtler, K; Herbst, R

    2016-09-26

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) forms when a motor neuron contacts a muscle fibre. A reciprocal exchange of signals initiates a cascade of signalling events that result in pre- and postsynaptic differentiation. At the centre of these signalling events stands muscle specific kinase (MuSK). MuSK activation, kinase activity and subsequent downstream signalling are crucial for NMJ formation as well as maintenance. Therefore MuSK kinase activity is tightly regulated to ensure proper NMJ development. We have identified a novel serine phosphorylation site at position 751 in MuSK that is increasingly phosphorylated upon agrin stimulation. S751 is also phosphorylated in muscle tissue and its phosphorylation depends on MuSK kinase activity. A phosphomimetic mutant of S751 increases MuSK kinase activity in response to non-saturating agrin concentrations . In addition, basal MuSK and AChR phosphorylation as well as AChR cluster size are increased. We believe that the phosphorylation of S751 provides a novel mechanism to relief the autoinhibition of the MuSK activation loop. Such a lower autoinhibition could foster or stabilize MuSK kinase activation, especially during stages when no or low level of agrin are present. Phosphorylation of S751 might therefore represent a novel mechanism to modulate MuSK kinase activity during prepatterning or NMJ maintenance.

  10. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα.

  11. Structural and mechanistic insights into Mps1 kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuting; Gao, Yuefeng; Xu, Quanbin; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Songcheng; Old, William; Resing, Katheryn; Ahn, Natalie; Lei, Ming; Liu, Xuedong

    2010-11-05

    Mps1 is one of the several essential kinases whose activation is required for robust mitotic spindle checkpoint signalling. The activity of Mps1 is tightly regulated and increases dramatically during mitosis or in response to spindle damage. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying Mps1 regulation, we determined the crystal structure of the kinase domain of Mps1. The 2.7-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure shows that the Mps1 kinase domain adopts a unique inactive conformation. Intramolecular interactions between the key Glu residue in the {alpha}C helix of the N-terminal lobe and the backbone amides in the catalytic loop lock the kinase in the inactive conformation. Autophosphorylation appears to be a priming event for kinase activation. We identified Mps1 autophosphorylation sites in the activation and the P+1 loops. Whereas activation loop autophosphorylation enhances kinase activity, autophosphorylation at the P+1 loop (T686) is associated with the active kinase. Mutation of T686 autophosphorylation site impairs both autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of T676 may be a priming event for phosphorylation at T686. Finally, we identified two critical lysine residues in the loop between helices {alpha}EF and {alpha}F that are essential for substrate recruitment and maintaining high levels of kinase activity. Our studies reveal critical biochemical mechanisms for Mps1 kinase regulation.

  12. Relationship of CDK-activating kinase and RNA polymerase II CTD kinase TFIIH/TFIIK.

    PubMed

    Feaver, W J; Svejstrup, J Q; Henry, N L; Kornberg, R D

    1994-12-16

    KIN28, a member of the p34cdc2/CDC28 family of protein kinases, is identified as a subunit of yeast RNA polymerase transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) on the basis of sequence determination, immunological reactivity, and copurification. KIN28 is, moreover, one of three subunits of TFIIK, a subassembly of TFIIH with protein kinase activity directed toward the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Itself a phosphoprotein, KIN28 interacts specifically with the two largest subunits of RNA polymerase II. Previous work of others points to two further associations: KIN28 interacts in vivo with the cyclin CCL1, and KIN28 and CCL1 are homologous to human MO15 and cyclin H, which form the cyclin-dependent kinase-activating kinase (CAK). We show that human CAK possesses the CTD kinase activity characteristic of TFIIH.

  13. Activation of AMP kinase alpha1 subunit induces aortic vasorelaxation in mice.

    PubMed

    Goirand, Françoise; Solar, Myriam; Athea, Yoni; Viollet, Benoit; Mateo, Philippe; Fortin, Dominique; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne

    2007-06-15

    Vasodilatation is a vital mechanism of systemic blood flow regulation that occurs during periods of increased energy demand. The AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by conditions that increase the AMP-to-ATP ratio, such as exercise and metabolic stress. We hypothesized that AMPK could trigger vasodilatation and participate in blood flow regulation. Rings of thoracic aorta were isolated from C57Bl6 mice and mice deficient in the AMPK catalytic alpha1 (AMPKalpha1-/-) or alpha2 (AMPKalpha2-/-) subunit and their littermate controls, and mounted in an organ bath. Aortas were preconstricted with phenylephrine (1 microM) and activation of AMPK was induced by addition of increasing concentrations of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR (0.1-3 mM) dose-dependently induced relaxation of precontracted C57BL6, AMPKalpha1+/+ and alpha2+/+ aorta (P<0.001, n=5-7 per group). This AICAR induced vasorelaxation was not inhibited by the addition of adenosine receptor antagonists. Moreover, when aortic rings were freed of endothelium by gentle rubbing, AICAR still induced aortic ring relaxation, suggesting a direct effect of AICAR on smooth muscle cells. When aortic rings were pretreated with L-NMMA (30 microM) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity, AICAR still induced relaxation. Western blot analysis of C57Bl6 mice denuded aorta showed that AMPK was phosphorylated after incubation with AICAR and that AMPKalpha1 was the main catalytic subunit expressed. Finally, AICAR-induced relaxation of aortic rings was completely abolished in AMPKalpha1-/- but not AMPKalpha2-/- mice. Taken together, the results show that activation of AMPKalpha1 but not AMPKalpha2 is able to induce aortic relaxation in mice, in an endothelium- and eNOS-independent manner.

  14. Human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptors. I. Functional exploration and pharmacological definition with selected alpha-2 agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Galitzky, J.; Mauriege, P.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1989-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate more fully the pharmacological characteristics of the human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Biological assays were performed on intact isolated fat cells while radioligand binding studies were carried out with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine in membranes. These pharmacological studies brought: (1) a critical definition of the limits of the experimental conditions required for the exploration of alpha-2 adrenergic responsiveness on human fat cells and membranes; (2) an improvement in the pharmacological definition of the human fat cell postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Among alpha-2 agonists, UK-14,304 was the most potent and the relative order of potency was: UK-14,304 greater than p-aminoclonidine greater than clonidine = B-HT 920 greater than rilmenidine. For alpha-2 antagonists, the potency order was: yohimbine greater than idazoxan greater than SK F-86,466 much greater than benextramine; (3) a description of the impact of benextramine (irreversible alpha-1/alpha-2 antagonist) on human fat cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and on human fat cell function; the drug inactivates the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors with a minor impact on beta adrenergic receptors and without noticeable alterations of fat cell function as assessed by preservation of beta adrenergic and Al-adenosine receptor-mediated lipolytic responses; and (4) a definition of the relationship existing between alpha-2 adrenergic receptor occupancy, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and antilipolysis with full and partial agonists. The existence of a receptor reserve must be taken into account when evaluating alpha-2 adrenergic receptor distribution and regulation of human fat cells.

  15. Activation of Phosphorylase Kinase by Physiological Temperature.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Julio E; Thompson, Jackie A; Rimmer, Mary Ashley; Nadeau, Owen W; Carlson, Gerald M

    2015-12-29

    In the six decades since its discovery, phosphorylase kinase (PhK) from rabbit skeletal muscle has usually been studied at 30 °C; in fact, not a single study has examined functions of PhK at a rabbit's body temperature, which is nearly 10 °C greater. Thus, we have examined aspects of the activity, regulation, and structure of PhK at temperatures between 0 and 40 °C. Between 0 and 30 °C, the activity at pH 6.8 of nonphosphorylated PhK predictably increased; however, between 30 and 40 °C, there was a dramatic jump in its activity, resulting in the nonactivated enzyme having a far greater activity at body temperature than was previously realized. This anomalous change in properties between 30 and 40 °C was observed for multiple functions, and both stimulation (by ADP and phosphorylation) and inhibition (by orthophosphate) were considerably less pronounced at 40 °C than at 30 °C. In general, the allosteric control of PhK's activity is definitely more subtle at body temperature. Changes in behavior related to activity at 40 °C and its control can be explained by the near disappearance of hysteresis at physiological temperature. In important ways, the picture of PhK that has emerged from six decades of study at temperatures of ≤30 °C does not coincide with that of the enzyme studied at physiological temperature. The probable underlying mechanism for the dramatic increase in PhK's activity between 30 and 40 °C is an abrupt change in the conformations of the regulatory β and catalytic γ subunits between these two temperatures.

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase--an archetypal protein kinase cascade?

    PubMed

    Hardie, D G; MacKintosh, R W

    1992-10-01

    Mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is the central component of a protein kinase cascade which inactivates three key enzymes involved in the synthesis or release of free fatty acids and cholesterol inside the cell. The kinase cascade is activated by elevation of AMP, and perhaps also by fatty acid and cholesterol metabolites. The system may fulfil a protective function, preventing damage caused by depletion of ATP or excessive intracellular release of free lipids, a type of stress response. Recent evidence suggests that it may have been in existence for at least a billion years, since a very similar protein kinase cascade is present in higher plants. This system therefore represents an early eukaryotic protein kinase cascade, which is unique in that it is regulated by intracellular metabolites rather than extracellular signals or cell cycle events.

  17. The ErbB Kinase Domain: Structural Perspectives into Kinase Activation and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Zhang, Xuewu

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its family members, ErbB2, ErB3 and ErB4, are receptor tyrosine kinases which send signals into the cell to regulate many critical processes including development, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. Central to the signaling of these receptors is their intracellular kinase domain, which is activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptor and phosphorylates several tyrosine residues in the C-terminal tail. The phosphorylated tail then recruits other signaling molecules and relays the signal to downstream pathways. A model of the autoinhibition, activation and feedback inhibition mechanisms for the ErbB kinase domain has emerged from a number of recent structural studies. Meanwhile, recent clinical studies have revealed the relationship between specific ErbB kinase mutations and the responsiveness to kinase inhibitor drugs. We will review these regulation mechanisms of the ErbB kinase domain, and discuss the binding specificity of kinase inhibitors and the effects of kinase domain mutations found in cancer patients from a structural perspective. PMID:18761339

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is required for integrin-stimulated AKT and Raf-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.

    PubMed Central

    King, W G; Mattaliano, M D; Chan, T O; Tsichlis, P N; Brugge, J S

    1997-01-01

    Cell attachment to fibronectin stimulates the integrin-dependent interaction of p85-associated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase with integrin-dependent focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as activation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. However, it is not known if this PI 3-kinase-FAK interaction increases the synthesis of the 3-phosphorylated phosphoinositides (3-PPIs) or what role, if any, is played by activated PI 3-kinase in integrin signaling. We demonstrate here the integrin-dependent accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products, PI 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3, as well as activation of AKT kinase, a serine/threonine kinase that can be stimulated by binding of PI(3,4)P2. The PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 significantly decreased the integrin-induced accumulation of the 3-PPIs and activation of AKT kinase, without having significant effects on the levels of PI(4,5)P2 or tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin. These inhibitors also reduced cell adhesion/spreading onto fibronectin but had no effect on attachment to polylysine. Interestingly, integrin-mediated Erk-2, Mek-1, and Raf-1 activation, but not Ras-GTP loading, was inhibited at least 80% by wortmannin and LY294002. In support of the pharmacologic results, fibronectin activation of Erk-2 and AKT kinases was completely inhibited by overexpression of a dominant interfering p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. We conclude that integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin results in the accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as the PI 3-kinase-dependent activation of the kinases Raf-1, Mek-1, Erk-2, and AKT and that PI 3-kinase may function upstream of Raf-1 but downstream of Ras in integrin activation of Erk-2 MAP and AKT kinases. PMID:9234699

  19. Elm1 kinase activates the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Orrico, Maria I L; Hofmann, Astrid; Ibrahim, Bashar; Pereira, Gislene

    2010-09-20

    Budding yeast asymmetric cell division relies upon the precise coordination of spindle orientation and cell cycle progression. The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a surveillance mechanism that prevents cells with misoriented spindles from exiting mitosis. The cortical kinase Kin4 acts near the top of this network. How Kin4 kinase activity is regulated and maintained in respect to spindle positional cues remains to be established. Here, we show that the bud neck-associated kinase Elm1 participates in Kin4 activation and SPOC signaling by phosphorylating a conserved residue within the activation loop of Kin4. Blocking Elm1 function abolishes Kin4 kinase activity in vivo and eliminates the SPOC response to spindle misalignment. These findings establish a novel function for Elm1 in the coordination of spindle positioning with cell cycle progression via its control of Kin4.

  20. Elm1 kinase activates the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4

    PubMed Central

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Orrico, Maria I.L.; Hofmann, Astrid; Ibrahim, Bashar

    2010-01-01

    Budding yeast asymmetric cell division relies upon the precise coordination of spindle orientation and cell cycle progression. The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a surveillance mechanism that prevents cells with misoriented spindles from exiting mitosis. The cortical kinase Kin4 acts near the top of this network. How Kin4 kinase activity is regulated and maintained in respect to spindle positional cues remains to be established. Here, we show that the bud neck–associated kinase Elm1 participates in Kin4 activation and SPOC signaling by phosphorylating a conserved residue within the activation loop of Kin4. Blocking Elm1 function abolishes Kin4 kinase activity in vivo and eliminates the SPOC response to spindle misalignment. These findings establish a novel function for Elm1 in the coordination of spindle positioning with cell cycle progression via its control of Kin4. PMID:20855503

  1. A semisynthetic Eph receptor tyrosine kinase provides insight into ligand-induced kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nikhil; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Himanen, Juha P.; Muir, Tom W.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a methodology for generating milligram amounts of functional Eph tyrosine kinase receptor using the protein engineering approach of expressed protein ligation. Stimulation with ligand induces efficient autophosphorylation of the semisynthetic Eph construct. The in vitro phosphorylation of key Eph tyrosine residues upon ligand-induced activation was monitored via time-resolved, quantitative phosphoproteomics, suggesting a precise and unique order of phosphorylation of the Eph tyrosines in the kinase activation process. To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported semisynthesis of a receptor tyrosine kinase and provides a potentially general method for producing single-pass membrane proteins for structural and biochemical characterization. PMID:21439481

  2. Constitutive Activity in an Ancestral Form of Abl Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Saadat U; Craddock, Barbara P; Miller, W Todd

    2015-01-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that is found in all metazoans, and is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues. The Abl tyrosine kinase plays important roles in the regulation of mammalian cell physiology. Abl-like kinases have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates, the closest relatives to the Metazoa, and in related unicellular organisms. Here, we have carried out the first characterization of a premetazoan Abl kinase, MbAbl2, from the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis. The enzyme possesses SH3, SH2, and kinase domains in a similar arrangement to its mammalian counterparts, and is an active tyrosine kinase. MbAbl2 lacks the N-terminal myristoylation and cap sequences that are critical regulators of mammalian Abl kinase activity, and we show that MbAbl2 is constitutively active. When expressed in mammalian cells, MbAbl2 strongly phosphorylates cellular proteins on tyrosine, and transforms cells much more potently than mammalian Abl kinase. Thus, MbAbl2 appears to lack the autoinhibitory mechanism that tightly constrains the activity of mammalian Abl kinases, suggesting that this regulatory apparatus arose more recently in metazoan evolution.

  3. Constitutive Activity in an Ancestral Form of Abl Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that is found in all metazoans, and is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues. The Abl tyrosine kinase plays important roles in the regulation of mammalian cell physiology. Abl-like kinases have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates, the closest relatives to the Metazoa, and in related unicellular organisms. Here, we have carried out the first characterization of a premetazoan Abl kinase, MbAbl2, from the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis. The enzyme possesses SH3, SH2, and kinase domains in a similar arrangement to its mammalian counterparts, and is an active tyrosine kinase. MbAbl2 lacks the N-terminal myristoylation and cap sequences that are critical regulators of mammalian Abl kinase activity, and we show that MbAbl2 is constitutively active. When expressed in mammalian cells, MbAbl2 strongly phosphorylates cellular proteins on tyrosine, and transforms cells much more potently than mammalian Abl kinase. Thus, MbAbl2 appears to lack the autoinhibitory mechanism that tightly constrains the activity of mammalian Abl kinases, suggesting that this regulatory apparatus arose more recently in metazoan evolution. PMID:26090675

  4. Activation of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ALK by zinc.

    PubMed

    Bennasroune, Aline; Mazot, Pierre; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Vigny, Marc

    2010-08-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development of the central and peripheral nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in Vertebrates is still a matter of debate. During synaptic transmission the release of ionic zinc found in vesicles of certain glutamatergic and gabaergic terminals may act as a neuromodulator by binding to pre- or post-synaptic receptors. Recently, zinc has been shown to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, independently of neurotrophins. This activation occurs via increasing the Src family kinase activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the ALK activity could be modulated by extracellular zinc. We first showed that zinc alone rapidly activates ALK. This activation is dependent of ALK tyrosine kinase activity and dimerization of the receptor but is independent of Src family kinase activity. In contrast, addition of sodium pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, led to a further activation of ALK. This stronger activation is dependent of Src family kinase but independent of ALK activity and dimerization. In conclusion, zinc could constitute an endogenous ligand of ALK in vertebrates.

  5. The alpha2beta1 isoform of guanylyl cyclase mediates plasma membrane localized nitric oxide signalling.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, Michelle; Evans, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a mediator of copious biological processes, in many cases through the production of cGMP from the enzyme nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase. Natriuretic peptides also elevate cGMP, often with distinct biological effects, raising the issue of how specificity is achieved. Here we show that a recently described alpha(2)beta(1) isoform of guanylyl cyclase is expressed in a number of epithelia, where it is localized to the apical plasma membrane. We measured the functional properties of the alpha(2)beta(1) isoform by utilizing the NO-dependent activation of the ion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which occurs by phosphorylation via the membrane-bound type II isoform of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. We found that cGMP generated by NO activation of the alpha(2)beta(1) isoform of guanylyl cyclase is an exceptionally efficient mediator of nitric oxide action on membrane targets, activating CFTR far more effectively than the cytoplasmically located alpha(1)beta(1) guanylyl cyclase isoform. Targeting the alpha(1)beta(1) isoform of guanylyl cyclase to the membrane also dramatically enhanced the effects of nitric oxide on CFTR within the membrane. This was not due to increased enzymatic activity of guanylyl cyclase in a membrane location, but to production of a localised membrane pool of cGMP by membrane-localized NO-dependent guanylyl cyclase that was resistant to degradation by phosphodiesterases. Selective effects of cGMP produced from this enzyme in response to NO are directed at membrane targets and suggest that drugs selectively activating or inhibiting this alpha(2)beta(1) isoform of guanylyl cyclase may have unique pharmacological properties.

  6. The influence of the time course of inflammation and spinalization on the antinociceptive activity of the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine.

    PubMed

    Molina, Carlos; Herrero, Juan F

    2006-02-17

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of the time course of inflammation and the implication of spinal and supraspinal sites on the antihyperalgesic effects of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine. Behavioral experiments showed a more intense antihyperalgesia in the phase of maintenance of inflammation than in the early or resolution stages. Maximum effect, without sedation, was observed with a dose of 40 microg/kg (66+/-12% and 76+/-15% reduction of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia). No change was observed in the paw swelling, indicating that its effects were not secondary to a reduction of inflammation. In electrophysiological experiments, the effect was more pronounced in animals with an intact spinal cord than in spinalized animals (max. effects of 2+/-0.7% vs. 48+/-11% of control, noxious mechanical stimulation). We conclude that the antihyperalgesic effect of medetomidine depends on the time course of inflammation and that it is mainly located supraspinally.

  7. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R G; Sadler, Anthony J

    2017-03-10

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity.

  8. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A.; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Sadler, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity. PMID:28281686

  9. Endorepellin causes endothelial cell disassembly of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions through alpha2beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Bix, Gregory; Fu, Jian; Gonzalez, Eva M; Macro, Laura; Barker, Amy; Campbell, Shelly; Zutter, Mary M; Santoro, Samuel A; Kim, Jiyeun K; Höök, Magnus; Reed, Charles C; Iozzo, Renato V

    2004-07-05

    Endorepellin, the COOH-terminal domain of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan, inhibits several aspects of angiogenesis. We provide evidence for a novel biological axis that links a soluble fragment of perlecan protein core to the major cell surface receptor for collagen I, alpha2beta1 integrin, and provide an initial investigation of the intracellular signaling events that lead to endorepellin antiangiogenic activity. The interaction between endorepellin and alpha2beta1 integrin triggers a unique signaling pathway that causes an increase in the second messenger cAMP; activation of two proximal kinases, protein kinase A and focal adhesion kinase; transient activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27, followed by a rapid down-regulation of the latter two proteins; and ultimately disassembly of actin stress fibers and focal adhesions. The end result is a profound block of endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Because perlecan is present in both endothelial and smooth muscle cell basement membranes, proteolytic activity during the initial stages of angiogenesis could liberate antiangiogenic fragments from blood vessels' walls, including endorepellin.

  10. Multiple host kinases contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Roppenser, Bernhard; Kwon, Hyunwoo; Canadien, Veronica; Xu, Risheng; Devreotes, Peter N; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H

    2013-01-01

    SopB is a type 3 secreted effector with phosphatase activity that Salmonella employs to manipulate host cellular processes, allowing the bacteria to establish their intracellular niche. One important function of SopB is activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt/protein kinase B in the infected host cell. Here, we examine the mechanism of Akt activation by SopB during Salmonella infection. We show that SopB-mediated Akt activation is only partially sensitive to PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin in HeLa cells, suggesting that Class I PI3-kinases play only a minor role in this process. However, depletion of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 by expression of the phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase PTEN inhibits Akt activation during Salmonella invasion. Therefore, production of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 appears to be a necessary event for Akt activation by SopB and suggests that non-canonical kinases mediate production of these phosphoinositides during Salmonella infection. We report that Class II PI3-kinase beta isoform, IPMK and other kinases identified from a kinase screen all contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection. In addition, the kinases required for SopB-mediated activation of Akt vary depending on the type of infected host cell. Together, our data suggest that Salmonella has evolved to use a single effector, SopB, to manipulate a remarkably large repertoire of host kinases to activate Akt for the purpose of optimizing bacterial replication in its host.

  11. Type-II Kinase Inhibitor Docking, Screening, and Profiling Using Modified Structures of Active Kinase States

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Type-II kinase inhibitors represent a class of chemicals that trap their target kinases in an inactive, so-called DFG-out, state, occupying a hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the ATP binding site. These compounds are often more specific than those targeting active, DFG-in, kinase conformations. Unfortunately, the discovery of novel type-II scaffolds presents a considerable challenge, partly because the lack of compatible kinase structures makes structure-based methods inapplicable. We present a computational protocol for converting multiple available DFG-in structures of various kinases (∼70% of mammalian structural kinome) into accurate and specific models of their type-II-bound state. The models, described as Deletion-Of-Loop asp-PHe-gly-IN (DOLPHIN) kinase models, demonstrate exceptional performance in various inhibitor discovery applications, including compound pose prediction, screening, and in silico activity profiling. Given the abundance of the DFG-in structures, the presented approach opens possibilities for kinome-wide discovery of specific molecules targeting inactive kinase states. PMID:19053777

  12. Dual activators of Protein Kinase R (PKR) and Protein Kinase R Like Kinase (PERK) Identify Common and Divergent Catalytic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Jie; Sun, Hong; Cao, Peng; Fusco, Dahlene N.; Chung, Raymond T.; Chorev, Michael; Jin, Qi; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical genetics has evolved into a powerful tool for studying gene function in normal- and patho-biology. PKR and PERK, two eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) kinases, play critical roles in maintenance of cellular hemostasis, metabolic stability, and anti-viral defenses. Both kinases interact with and phosphorylate additional substrates including tumor suppressor p53 and nuclear protein 90. Loss of function of both kinases has been studied by reverse genetics and recently identified inhibitors. In contrast, activating probes for studying the role of catalytic activity of these kinases are not available. We identified a 3-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxin-6-yl)-5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one (DHBDC) as specific dual activator of PKR and PERK by screening a chemical library of 20,000 small molecules in a dual luciferase surrogate eIF2α phosphorylation assay. We present here extensive biological characterization and preliminary structure-activity relationship of DHBDC, which phosphorylate eIF2α by activating PKR and PERK but no other eIF2α kinases. These agents also activate downstream effectors of eIF2α phosphorylation; inducing CHOP and suppressing cyclin D1 expression and inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, all in a manner dependent on PKR and PERK. Consistent with the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in viral infection, DHBDC inhibits proliferation of human hepatitis C virus. Finally, DHBDC induces phosphorylation of Ikβα, and activates NF-κB pathway. Surprisingly, activation of NF-κB pathway is dependent on PERK but independent of PKR activity. These data indicate that DHBDC is an invaluable probe for elucidating the role of PKR and PERK in normal- and patho-biology. PMID:23784735

  13. Creatine kinase activity is associated with blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Lizzy M; Mairuhu, Gideon; Bindraban, Navin R; Koopmans, Richard P; Clark, Joseph F; van Montfrans, Gert A

    2006-11-07

    We previously hypothesized that high activity of creatine kinase, the central regulatory enzyme of energy metabolism, facilitates the development of high blood pressure. Creatine kinase rapidly provides adenosine triphosphate to highly energy-demanding processes, including cardiovascular contraction, and antagonizes nitric oxide-mediated functions. Relatively high activity of the enzyme, particularly in resistance arteries, is thought to enhance pressor responses and increase blood pressure. Tissue creatine kinase activity is reported to be high in black people, a population subgroup with greater hypertension risk; the proposed effects of high creatine kinase activity, however, are not "race dependent." We therefore assessed whether creatine kinase is associated with blood pressure in a multiethnic population. We analyzed a stratified random sample of the population of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, consisting of 1444 citizens (503 white European, 292 South Asian, 580 black, and 69 of other ethnicity) aged 34 to 60 years. We used linear regression analysis to investigate the association between blood pressure and normal serum creatine kinase after rest, as a substitute measure of tissue activity. Creatine kinase was independently associated with blood pressure, with an increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, respectively, of 8.0 (95% CI, 3.3 to 12.7) and 4.7 (95% CI, 1.9 to 7.5) mm Hg per log creatine kinase increase after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and ethnicity. Creatine kinase is associated with blood pressure. Further studies are needed to explore the nature of this association, including how variation in cardiovascular creatine kinase activity may affect pressor responses.

  14. Protein kinase Calpha activation by RET: evidence for a negative feedback mechanism controlling RET tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Francesco; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Carlomagno, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Miele, Claudia; Fiory, Francesca; Santopietro, Stefania; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Beguinot, Francesco; Santoro, Massimo; Formisano, Pietro

    2003-05-15

    We have studied the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in signaling of the RET tyrosine kinase receptor. By using a chimeric receptor (E/R) in which RET kinase can be tightly controlled by the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF), we have found that RET triggering induces a strong increase of PKCalpha, PKCdelta and PKCzeta activity and that PKCalpha, not PKCdelta and PKCzeta, forms a ligand-dependent protein complex with E/R. We have identified tyrosine 1062 in the RET carboxyl-terminal tail as the docking site for PKCalpha. Block of PKC activity by bisindolylmaleimide or chronic phorbol esters treatment decreased EGF-induced serine/threonine phosphorylation of E/R, while it caused a similarly sized increase of EGF-induced E/R tyrosine kinase activity and mitogenic signaling. Conversely, acute phorbol esters treatment, which promotes PKC activity, increased the levels of E/R serine/threonine phosphorylation and significantly decreased its phosphotyrosine content. A threefold reduction of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of the constitutively active RET/MEN2A oncoprotein was observed upon coexpression with PKCalpha. We conclude that RET binds to and activates PKCalpha. PKCalpha, in turn, causes RET phosphorylation and downregulates RET tyrosine kinase and downstream signaling, thus functioning as a negative feedback loop to modulate RET activity.

  15. Cell cycle dependent regulation of deoxycytidine kinase, deoxyguanosine kinase, and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase I activity in MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Fyrberg, A; Mirzaee, S; Lotfi, K

    2006-01-01

    Activation of nucleoside analogues is dependent on kinases and 5'-nucleotidases and the balance between the activity of these enzymes. The purpose of this study was to analyze deoxycytidine kinase, deoxyguanosine kinase, and 4 different 5'-nucleotidases during cell cycle progression in MOLT-4 cells. The activity of both kinases was cell cycle dependent and increased during proliferation while the activity of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase I decreased. We could show that the kinase activity was higher than the total nucleotidase activity, which was unchanged or decreased during cell cycle progression. These data may be important in designing modern combination therapy with nucleoside analogues.

  16. Thrombin activates MAPKAP2 kinase in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Brophy, C M; Woodrum, D; Dickinson, M; Beall, A

    1998-05-01

    Thrombin mediates hemostasis by promoting thrombus development and vasospasm, which reduces the size of the arterial injury. Thrombin stimulation of vascular smooth muscle is associated with activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the subsequent cellular signaling events in thrombin-stimulated vascular smooth muscle contraction. Contractile responses of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle were determined in a muscle bath and compared with phosphorylation events with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The activity of a novel kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein-2 kinase (MAPKAP2 kinase), was determined by immunoprecipitation and a phosphotransferase assay. A small heat shock protein, HSP27, was identified with immunoblotting. Thrombin induces contraction of vascular smooth muscle and is associated with increased activity of MAPKAP2 kinase and increased phosphorylation of HSP27. Multiple isoforms of HSP27 are the predominant phosphoproteins in vascular smooth muscle, and peptide mapping suggests that the isoforms of HSP27 are structurally related and phosphorylated within similar peptide sequences. Activation of the MAPKAP2 kinase pathway and phosphorylation of HSP27 are associated with thrombin-induced contraction of vascular smooth muscle.

  17. The alpha2beta1 integrin inhibitor rhodocetin binds to the A-domain of the integrin alpha2 subunit proximal to the collagen-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Eble, Johannes A; Tuckwell, Danny S

    2003-01-01

    Rhodocetin is a snake venom protein that binds to alpha2beta1 integrin, inhibiting its interaction with its endogenous ligand collagen. We have determined the mechanism by which rhodocetin inhibits the function of alpha2beta1. The interaction of alpha2beta1 with collagen and rhodocetin differed: Ca(2+) ions and slightly acidic pH values increased the binding of alpha2beta1 integrin to rhodocetin in contrast with their attenuating effect on collagen binding, suggesting that rhodocetin preferentially binds to a less active conformation of alpha2beta1 integrin. The alpha2A-domain [von Willebrand factor domain A homology domain (A-domain) of the integrin alpha2 subunit] is the major site for collagen binding to alpha2beta1. Recombinant alpha2A-domain bound rhodocetin, demonstrating that the A-domain is also the rhodocetin-binding domain. Although the interaction of alpha2beta1 with rhodocetin is affected by altering divalent cations, the interaction of the A-domain was divalent-cation-independent. The rhodocetin-binding site on the alpha2A-domain was mapped first by identifying an anti-alpha2 antibody that blocked rhodocetin binding and then mapping the epitope of the antibody using human-mouse alpha2A-domain chimaeras; and secondly, by binding studies with alpha2A-domain, which bear point mutations in the vicinity of the mapped epitope. In this way, the rhodocetin-binding site was identified as the alpha3-alpha4 loop plus adjacent alpha-helices. This region is known to form part of the collagen-binding site, thus attaining a mainly competitive mode of inhibition by rhodocetin. PMID:12871211

  18. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-08-24

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.

  19. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    DOE PAGES

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; ...

    2015-08-24

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics,more » the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.« less

  20. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  1. The chromosomal passenger complex activates Polo kinase at centromeres.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Mar; Pinson, Xavier; Platani, Melpi; Salloum, Zeina; Xu, Zhenjie; Clark, Anthony; Macisaac, Fiona; Ogawa, Hiromi; Eggert, Ulrike; Glover, David M; Archambault, Vincent; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-01-01

    The coordinated activities at centromeres of two key cell cycle kinases, Polo and Aurora B, are critical for ensuring that the two sister kinetochores of each chromosome are attached to microtubules from opposite spindle poles prior to chromosome segregation at anaphase. Initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle involve random interactions between kinetochores and dynamic microtubules, and errors occur frequently during early stages of the process. The balance between microtubule binding and error correction (e.g., release of bound microtubules) requires the activities of Polo and Aurora B kinases, with Polo promoting stable attachments and Aurora B promoting detachment. Our study concerns the coordination of the activities of these two kinases in vivo. We show that INCENP, a key scaffolding subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which consists of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin, and Borealin/Dasra B, also interacts with Polo kinase in Drosophila cells. It was known that Aurora A/Bora activates Polo at centrosomes during late G2. However, the kinase that activates Polo on chromosomes for its critical functions at kinetochores was not known. We show here that Aurora B kinase phosphorylates Polo on its activation loop at the centromere in early mitosis. This phosphorylation requires both INCENP and Aurora B activity (but not Aurora A activity) and is critical for Polo function at kinetochores. Our results demonstrate clearly that Polo kinase is regulated differently at centrosomes and centromeres and suggest that INCENP acts as a platform for kinase crosstalk at the centromere. This crosstalk may enable Polo and Aurora B to achieve a balance wherein microtubule mis-attachments are corrected, but proper attachments are stabilized allowing proper chromosome segregation.

  2. Rho kinase activation and ROS production contributes to the cooling enhanced contraction in cutaneous equine digital veins.

    PubMed

    Zerpa, H; Berhane, Y; Woodcock, H; Elliott, J; Bailey, S R

    2010-07-01

    A decrease in environmental temperature can directly affect the contractility of cutaneous vasculature, mediated in part by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Most of the cellular mechanisms underlying the cooling-enhanced contractility to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists have been reported in cutaneous arteries but little information is available on cutaneous veins. To investigate the cellular mechanisms associated with the cooling-enhanced contraction to UK-14304 (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist), isolated equine digital veins (EDVs) were studied at 30 degrees C and 22 degrees C. The effects of inhibitors were studied on the contractile response to UK-14304 (0.1 microM). The cooling-enhanced responses were inhibited by Rho kinase inhibitors [maximum response to UK-14304 95.2 +/- 8% of response to depolarizing Krebs solution (DKS) in control vessels cooled to 22 degrees C, compared with 31.4 +/- 6% in the presence of fasudil 1 microM and 75.8 +/- 6% with Y-27632 0.1 microM] and the effects of these inhibitors were considerably less at 30 degrees C (control response 56.4 +/- 5% of DKS; 34.9 +/- 6% with fasudil 1 microM and 50.6 +/- 9% with Y-27632 0.1 microM). Furthermore, Western blotting showed that one of the downstream targets for Rho kinase activity, ezrin/radixin/moesin, was phosphorylated after cooling and reduced by fasudil (1 microM) only at 22 degrees C. The activation of protein kinase C contributed to the contractile response, but predominantly at 30 degrees C (maximum response 82.3 +/- 9% of DKS for control; 57.7 +/- 10% in the presence of chelerythrine 10 microM) with no significant effect at 22 degrees C. The reduction of the response at 22 degrees C by antioxidants, rotenone (14% reduction), and tempol (21% reduction) suggested the contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS). No evidence was obtained to support the participation of tyrosine kinase. These data demonstrate that Rho kinase activation and the production of ROS contributes to the cooling

  3. NAD kinase activity in wheat leaves under water deficit.

    PubMed

    Zagdańska, B

    1990-01-01

    Total NAD kinase activity remained unaltered in the drought non-adapted wheat leaves under water deficit, but gradually decreased with water deficit in the adapted ones. The share of the calmodulin-dependent enzyme was significantly higher in the drought-hardened than in non-hardened plants; however, under severe water deficit the activity of the enzyme dropped by half. It seems, therefore, that NAD kinase activity does not limit phosphorylation of NAD in dehydrated plant tissues.

  4. Irreversible Nek2 kinase inhibitors with cellular activity

    PubMed Central

    Henise, Jeffrey C.; Taunton, Jack

    2013-01-01

    A structure-based approach was used to design irreversible, cysteine-targeted inhibitors of the human centrosomal kinase, Nek2. Potent inhibition of Nek2 kinase activity in biochemical and cell-based assays required a noncatalytic cysteine residue (Cys22), located near the glycine-rich loop in a subset of human kinases. Elaboration of an oxindole scaffold led to our most selective compound, oxindole propynamide 16 (JH295). Propynamide 16 irreversibly inhibited cellular Nek2 without affecting the mitotic kinases, Cdk1, Aurora B, or Plk1. Moreover, 16 did not perturb bipolar spindle assembly or the spindle assembly checkpoint. To our knowledge, 16 is the first small molecule shown to inactivate Nek2 kinase activity in cells. PMID:21627121

  5. The assay of pyruvate kinase activity in gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Orwell, R L; Thornton, H C; Piper, D W

    1975-05-01

    Pyruvate kinase activity in gastric mucosal supernatant preparations shows large responses to exogenous effectors. At pH 7.5, fructose 1,6-diphosphate can cause large stimulations in activity. Alanine inhibits the reaction but this effect is partially reversed by fructose 1,6-diphosphate. In the absence of these compounds, 4.0-5.0 mM phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is required to generate maximal activity in the assay system used. Electrophoresis reveals an isoenzyme pattern containing only one form of pyruvate kinase, an M isoenzyme, in both fundic and antral mucosa. The pyruvate kinase of gastric mucosa thus resembles the M-type enzymes of leucocytes and liver. Measurements of activity at both 1.0 mM PEP and 4.0--5.0 mM PEP, with and without additions of fructose 1,6-diphosphate, are recommended for the reliable estimation of pyruvate kinase activity in this tissue.

  6. Protein kinase C activators inhibit capillary endothelial cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binds specifically to bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells (K/sub d/ = 8nM) and inhibits the proliferation (K/sub 50/ = 6 +/- 4 nM). Under similar conditions, PDBu does not inhibit the growth of bovine aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells. PDBu markedly attenuates the response of BCE cells to purified human hepatoma-derived growth factor which, in the absence of PDBu, stimulates BCE cell growth by about 3-fold. Several observations suggest that the inhibition of BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated by protein kinase C: (1) different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to the relative potencies as protein kinase C activators (12-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate > PDBu >> phorbol 12,13-diacetate >>>..beta..-phorbol; ..cap alpha..-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). (2) Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/), a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2-dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. (3) A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a Ca/sup 2 +//phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase that is activated by diC/sub 8/ and PDBu, but not by ..beta..-phorbol. These results support a role for protein kinase C in suppressing capillary endothelial cell growth and may therefore have implications in the intracellular regulation of angiogenesis.

  7. The phosphatase activity of mammalian polynucleotide kinase takes precedence over its kinase activity in repair of single strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Caroline J; Allinson, Sarah L

    2006-01-01

    The dual function mammalian DNA repair enzyme, polynucleotide kinase (PNK), facilitates strand break repair through catalysis of 5'-hydroxyl phosphorylation and 3'-phosphate dephosphorylation. We have examined the relative activities of the kinase and phosphatase functions of PNK using a novel assay, which allows the simultaneous characterization of both activities in processing nicks and gaps containing both 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl. Under multiple turnover conditions the phosphatase activity of the purified enzyme is significantly more active than its kinase activity. Consistent with this result, phosphorylation of the 5'-hydroxyl is rate limiting in cell extract mediated-repair of a nicked substrate. On characterizing the effects of individually mutating the two active sites of PNK we find that while site-directed mutagenesis of the kinase domain of PNK does not affect its phosphatase activity, disruption of the phosphatase domain also abrogates kinase function. This loss of kinase function requires the presence of a 3'-phosphate, but it need not be present in the same strand break as the 5'-hydroxyl. PNK preferentially binds 3'-phosphorylated substrates and DNA binding to the phosphatase domain blocks further DNA binding by the kinase domain.

  8. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as selective human alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Bavadekar, Supriya A; Hong, Seoung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ii; Miller, Duane D; Feller, Dennis R

    2008-08-20

    Phentolamine is known to act as a competitive, non-subtype-selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist. In an attempt to improve alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor selectivity and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtype-selectivity, two new chemical series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs were prepared and evaluated. These compounds were evaluated for binding affinities on alpha(1)- (alpha(1A)-, alpha(1B)-, alpha(1D)-) and alpha(2)- (alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)-, alpha(2C)-) adrenoceptor subtypes that had been stably expressed in human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, respectively. Methylation of the phenolic hydroxy group and replacement of the 4-methyl group of phentolamine with varying lipophilic substituents yielded bioisosteric analogs selective for the alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Within the alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, these analogs bound with higher affinity at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-subtypes as compared to the alpha(2B)-subtype. In particular, the t-butyl analog was found to be the most selective, its binding at the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor (Ki=3.6 nM) being 37- to 173-fold higher than that at the alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, and around 2- and 19-fold higher than at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2B)-adrenoceptors, respectively. Data from luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the functional antagonist activities of selected compounds from the bioisosteric series on human alpha(1A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. Thus, the results with these bioisosteric analogs of phentolamine provide a lead to the rational design of potent and selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor ligands that may be useful in improving the therapeutic profile of this drug class for human disorders.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  10. Gene transfer mediated by alpha2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H; Huse, K; Birkenmeier, G; Otto, A; Scholz, G H

    1996-01-01

    alpha2-Macroglobulin covalently linked to poly(L)-lysine can be used as a vehicle for receptor-mediated gene transfer. This modified alpha2-macroglobulin maintains its ability to bind to the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor, and was shown to introduce a luciferase reporter gene plasmid into HepG2 human hepatoma cells in vitro. The alpha2-macroglobulin receptor is a very large and multifunctional cell surface receptor, whose rapid and efficient internalization rate makes it attractive for gene therapy, e.g. for hepatic gene targeting via injection into the portal vein. PMID:8871570

  11. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling of Kinase Selectivity Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar; Borza, Corina; Pozzi, Ambra; Meiler, Jens

    2017-09-19

    The discovery of selective inhibitors of biological target proteins is the primary goal of many drug discovery campaigns. However, this goal has proven elusive, especially for inhibitors targeting the well-conserved orthosteric adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding pocket of kinase enzymes. The human kinome is large and it is rather difficult to profile early lead compounds against around 500 targets to gain an upfront knowledge on selectivity. Further, selectivity can change drastically during derivatization of an initial lead compound. Here, we have introduced a computational model to support the profiling of compounds early in the drug discovery pipeline. On the basis of the extensive profiled activity of 70 kinase inhibitors against 379 kinases, including 81 tyrosine kinases, we developed a quantitative structure-activity relation (QSAR) model using artificial neural networks, to predict the activity of these kinase inhibitors against the panel of 379 kinases. The model's performance in predicting activity ranges from 0.6 to 0.8 depending on the kinase, from the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC). The profiler is available online at http://www.meilerlab.org/index.php/servers/show?s_id=23.

  12. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Douglas J.; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M.; Hession, Catherine A.; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P.; Cullen, Patrick F.; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T.; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J.; Romanowski, Michael J.; Baker, Darren P.; Silvian, Laura F.

    2010-11-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members.

  13. Alpha2-adrenoreceptors profile modulation. 3.1 (R)-(+)-m-nitrobiphenyline, a new efficient and alpha2C-subtype selective agonist.

    PubMed

    Crassous, Pierre-Antoine; Cardinaletti, Claudia; Carrieri, Antonio; Bruni, Bruno; Di Vaira, Massimo; Gentili, Francesco; Ghelfi, Francesca; Giannella, Mario; Paris, Hervé; Piergentili, Alessandro; Quaglia, Wilma; Schaak, Stéphane; Vesprini, Cristian; Pigini, Maria

    2007-08-09

    To assess the stereochemical requirements for efficient alpha2C-adrenoreceptor activation, the enantiomeric forms of m-nitrobiphenyline [(+/-)-5] were prepared and tested on cells expressing the human alpha2-adrenoreceptor subtypes. The importance of chirality was confirmed, since the enantiomer (R)-(+)-5 was much more efficient than (S)-(-)-5 in producing alpha2C-activation. Surprising reversal of enantioselectivity was observed with respect to structurally similar biphenyline [(+/-)-1] whose (S)-(-)-form proved the preferred alpha2C-configuration.

  14. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  15. Kinase activity ranking using phosphoproteomics data (KARP) quantifies the contribution of protein kinases to the regulation of cell viability.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Edmund H; Casado, Pedro; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Cutillas, Pedro R

    2017-09-01

    Cell survival is regulated by a signaling network driven by the activity of protein kinases; however, determining the contribution that each kinase in the network makes to such regulation remains challenging. Here, we report a computational approach that uses mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics data to rank protein kinases based on their contribution to cell regulation. We found that the scores returned by this algorithm, which we have termed kinase activity ranking using phosphoproteomics data (KARP), were a quantitative measure of the contribution that individual kinases make to the signaling output. Application of KARP to the analysis of eight hematological cell lines revealed that cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1/2, casein kinase (CK) 2, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), and p21-activated kinase (PAK) were the most frequently highly ranked kinases in these cell models. The patterns of kinase activation were cell-line specific yet showed a significant association with cell viability as a function of kinase inhibitor treatment. Thus, our study exemplifies KARP as an untargeted approach to empirically and systematically identify regulatory kinases within signaling networks. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Quantitative and Dynamic Imaging of ATM Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nyati, Shyam; Young, Grant; Ross, Brian Dale; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events facilitating DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. Traditionally, protein kinases have been analyzed in vitro using biochemical methods (kinase assays using purified proteins or immunological assays) requiring a large number of cells and cell lysis. Genetically encoded biosensors based on optical molecular imaging such as fluorescence or bioluminescence have been developed to enable interrogation of kinase activities in live cells with a high signal to background. We have genetically engineered a hybrid protein whose bioluminescent activity is dependent on the ATM-mediated phosphorylation of a substrate. The engineered protein consists of the split luciferase-based protein complementation pair with a CHK2 (a substrate for ATM kinase activity) target sequence and a phospho-serine/threonine-binding domain, FHA2, derived from yeast Rad53. Phosphorylation of the serine residue within the target sequence by ATM would lead to its interaction with the phospho-serine-binding domain, thereby preventing complementation of the split luciferase pair and loss of reporter activity. Bioluminescence imaging of reporter expressing cells in cultured plates or as mouse xenografts provides a quantitative surrogate for ATM kinase activity and therefore the cellular DNA damage response in a noninvasive, dynamic fashion.

  17. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  18. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  19. Differential agonist sensitivity of glycine receptor alpha2 subunit splice variants.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul S; Harvey, Robert J; Smart, Trevor G

    2004-09-01

    1. The glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha2A and alpha2B splice variants differ by a dual, adjacent amino acid substitution from alpha2A(V58,T59) to alpha2B(I58,A59) in the N-terminal extracellular domain. 2. Comparing the effects of the GlyR agonists, glycine, beta-alanine and taurine, on the GlyR alpha2 isoforms, revealed a significant increase in potency for all three agonists at the alpha2B variant. 3. The sensitivities of the splice variants to the competitive antagonist, strychnine, and to the biphasic modulator Zn(2+), were comparable. In contrast, the allosteric inhibitor picrotoxin was more potent on GlyR alpha2A compared to GlyR alpha2B receptors. 4. Coexpression of alpha2A or alpha2B subunits with the GlyR beta subunit revealed that the higher agonist potencies observed with the alpha2B homomer were retained for the alpha2Bbeta heteromer. 5. The identical sensitivity to strychnine combined with a reduction in the maximum current induced by the partial agonist taurine at the GlyR alpha2A homomer, suggested that the changed sensitivity to agonists is in accordance with a modulation of agonist efficacy rather than agonist affinity. 6. An effect on agonist efficacy was also supported by using a structural model of the GlyR, localising the region of splice variation to the proposed docking region between GlyR loop 2 and the TM2-3 loop, an area associated with channel activation. 7. The existence of a spasmodic mouse phenotype linked to a GlyR alpha1(A52S) mutation, the equivalent position to the source of the alpha2 splice variation, raises the possibility that the GlyR alpha2 splice variants may be responsible for distinct roles in neuronal function.

  20. Rho-associated kinase ROCK activates LIM-kinase 1 by phosphorylation at threonine 508 within the activation loop.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Nagata, K; Maekawa, M; Ishizaki, T; Narumiya, S; Mizuno, K

    2000-02-04

    LIM-kinase 1 (LIMK1) phosphorylates cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor, and regulates actin cytoskeletal reorganization. LIMK1 is activated by the small GTPase Rho and its downstream protein kinase ROCK. We now report the site of phosphorylation of LIMK1 by ROCK. In vitro kinase reaction revealed that the active forms of ROCK phosphorylated LIMK1 on the threonine residue and markedly increased its cofilin-phosphorylating activity. A LIMK1 mutant (T508A) with replacement of Thr-508 within the activation loop of the kinase domain by alanine was neither phosphorylated nor activated by ROCK. Replacement of Thr-508 by serine changed the ROCK-catalyzed phosphorylation residue from threonine to serine. A LIMK1 mutant with replacement of Thr-508 by two glutamates increased the kinase activity about 2-fold but was not further activated by ROCK. In addition, wild-type LIMK1, but not its T508A mutant, was activated by co-expression with ROCK in cultured cells. These results suggest that ROCK activates LIMK1 in vitro and in vivo by phosphorylation at Thr-508. Together with the recent finding that PAK1, a downstream effector of Rac, also activates LIMK1 by phosphorylation at Thr-508, these results suggest that activation of LIMK1 is one of the common targets for Rho and Rac to reorganize the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Tissue and serum alpha 2-3- and alpha 2-6-linkage specific sialylation changes in oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manisha H; Telang, Shaila D; Shah, Pankaj M; Patel, Prabhudas S

    2008-04-01

    Increased sialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates is among the key molecular changes associated with malignant transformation and cancer progression. We investigated significance of linkage-specific sialylation changes in oral carcinogenesis. Tissue and serum levels of total sialic acid (TSA), linkage-specific sialyltransferases (ST) and sialoproteins were analyzed from patients with oral precancerous conditions (OPC) and oral cancer as well as the post-treatment follow-up blood samples of oral cancer patients. TSA levels were measured using a spectrophotometric method. The linkage-specific lectins, Sambusus nigra (SNA) and Maackia amurensis (MAM) detects alpha 2-6- and alpha 2-3-linked sialic acid, respectively, were used to analyze ST activity and sialoproteins. Malignant tissues showed significantly higher levels of TSA, reactivity of SNA and MAM, and alpha 2,3-ST activity compared to the adjacent normal tissues. alpha 2,6-ST was also higher in malignant tissues. Similarly, the marker levels were higher in precancerous tissues than their adjacent normal tissues. Serum levels of TSA, TSA/ total proteins, alpha 2-6-sialoproteins and alpha 2,6-ST were markedly increased in untreated oral cancer patients compared to the controls and OPC as well as responder (CR) patients. Serum levels of the markers were higher or comparable between untreated oral cancer patients and non-responders (NR). Serum levels of alpha 2-3-sialylation were elevated in non-responders compared with the responders. Further, the observed sialylation changes in tissue and serum were found to be associated with various clinicopathological features and disease progression. Thus, the data suggest potential utility of sialylation markers in early detection, prognostication and treatment monitoring of oral cancer.

  2. Cellular trafficking of the IL-1RI-associated kinase-1 requires intact kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, Gaby-Fleur . E-mail: boel@mail.dife.de; Jurrmann, Nadine; Brigelius-Flohe, Regina

    2005-06-24

    Upon stimulation of cells with interleukin-1 (IL-1) the IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) transiently associates to and dissociates from the IL-1RI and thereafter translocates into the nucleus. Here we show that nuclear translocation of IRAK-1 depends on its kinase activity since translocation was not observed in EL-4 cells overexpressing a kinase negative IRAK-1 mutant (EL-4{sup IRAK-1-K239S}). IRAK-1 itself, an endogenous substrate with an apparent molecular weight of 24 kDa (p24), and exogenous substrates like histone and myelin basic protein are phosphorylated by nuclear located IRAK-1. Phosphorylation of p24 cannot be detected in EL-4{sup IRAK-1-K239S} cells. IL-1-dependent recruitment of IRAK-1 to the IL-1RI and subsequent phosphorylation of IRAK-1 is a prerequisite for nuclear translocation of IRAK-1. It is therefore concluded that intracellular localization of IRAK-1 depends on its kinase activity and that IRAK-1 may also function as a kinase in the nucleus as shown by a new putative endogenous substrate.

  3. Autophosphorylating protein kinase activity in titin-like arthropod projectin.

    PubMed

    Maroto, M; Vinós, J; Marco, R; Cervera, M

    1992-03-20

    The function of the high molecular weight structural proteins from muscle, namely vertebrate titin, arthropod projectin and nematode twitchin, remains to be established. Using a simple method for the purification of projectin from crayfish and Drosophila melanogaster, a polyclonal antibody has been raised against crayfish projectin, and shown to immunocrossreact with Drosophila projectin but not with rat titin. In this study, evidence is presented that projectin and twitchin may share functional protein kinase domains, indicating a possible relationship between them. Projectin has a serine/threonine protein kinase activity. This supports the relationship with twitchin since, in sequence analysis of the latter, a protein-kinase-like domain has been found. Moreover, projectin is capable of autophosphorylation in vitro. These kinase activities imply regulatory functions for this group of proteins, extending its previously assumed structural role in the sarcomere. We also show here that projectin is phosphorylated in vivo at serine residues, as described for titin.

  4. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity from pig kidney cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelczyk, T; Olson, M S

    1992-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase in the purified PDH complex from pig kidney is sensitive to changes in ionic strength. The enzyme has optimum activity within a small range of ionic strength (0.03-0.05 M). An increase in ionic strength from 0.04 M to 0.2 M lowers the activity of PDH kinase by 32% and decreases the Km for ATP from 25 microM to 10 microM. At constant ionic strength (0.15 M) the enzyme has optimum activity over a broad pH range (7.2-8.0). The PDH kinase is stimulated 2.2-fold by 20 mM-K+, whereas Na+ even at high concentration (80 mM) has no effect on the enzyme activity. The stimulation of PDH kinase by K+ is not dependent on pH and ionic strength. PDH kinase is inhibited by HPO4(2-) in the presence of K+, whereas HPO4(2-) has no effect on the activity of this enzyme in the absence of K+. HPO4(2-) at concentrations of 2 and 10 mM inhibits PDH kinase by 28% and 55% respectively. The magnitude of this inhibition is not dependent on the ATP/ADP ratio. Inhibition by HPO4(2-) in the concentration range 0-10 mM is non-competitive with respect to ATP, and becomes mixed-type at concentrations over 10 mM. The Ki for HPO4(2-) is 10 mM. When HPO4(2-) is replaced by SO4(2-), the same effects on the activity of PDH kinase are observed. PDH kinase is also inhibited by Cl-. In the presence of 80 mM-Cl- the PDH kinase is inhibited by 40%. The inhibition by Cl- is not dependent on K+. In conclusion, we postulate that changes in phosphate concentrations may play a significant role in the regulation of PDH kinase activity in vivo. PMID:1463442

  5. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  6. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, Nils Egil; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Willer, Mette; Gojkovic, Zoran

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  7. A Fluorescence-Based Thermal Shift Assay Identifies Inhibitors of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sankar N.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Mishra, Rama K.; Xu, Li; Scheidt, Karl A.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second highest cause of cancer death in United States males. If the metastatic movement of PCa cells could be inhibited, then mortality from PCa could be greatly reduced. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) has previously been shown to activate pro-invasion signaling pathways in human PCa. Recognizing that MAP2K4 represents a novel and validated therapeutic target, we sought to develop and characterize an efficient process for the identification of small molecules that target MAP2K4. Using a fluorescence-based thermal shift assay (FTS) assay, we first evaluated an 80 compound library of known kinase inhibitors, thereby identifying 8 hits that thermally stabilized MAP2K4 in a concentration dependent manner. We then developed an in vitro MAP2K4 kinase assay employing the biologically relevant downstream substrates, JNK1 and p38 MAPK, to evaluate kinase inhibitory function. In this manner, we validated the performance of our initial FTS screen. We next applied this approach to a 2000 compound chemically diverse library, identified 7 hits, and confirmed them in the in vitro kinase assay. Finally, by coupling our structure-activity relationship data to MAP2K4's crystal structure, we constructed a model for ligand binding. It predicts binding of our identified inhibitory compounds to the ATP binding pocket. Herein we report the creation of a robust inhibitor-screening platform with the ability to inform the discovery and design of new and potent MAP2K4 inhibitors. PMID:24339940

  8. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  9. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  10. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  11. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  12. Targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Austin; Kummar, Shivaani

    2009-12-01

    The Raf-mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) protein kinase signaling cascade is an important intracellular pathway whose activation influences many fundamental cellular processes and whose aberrancy is associated with cancer cell growth. In addition to activation from within by, for example, Raf mutations, this pathway is frequently activated from above by mutated Ras or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Given the near ubiquity of derangements affecting at least part of this network in cancer, there is a strong and clear rationale for interrupting it. In recent times, in colorectal and lung cancer, Ras and EGFR mutant status have been shown to be critically important and mutually exclusive predictors of response to anti-EGFR therapies. These developments underline the importance of targeting downstream effectors, and MEK inhibition has been the subject of intense scientific and clinical research for some time now. This article reviews the current status of MEK inhibitors with regard to their clinical development.

  13. ATM kinase activity modulates ITCH E3-ubiquitin ligase activity

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Simonetta; Stagni, Venturina; Giambruno, Roberto; Fianco, Giulia; Di Benedetto, Anna; Mottolese, Marcella; Pellegrini, Manuela; Barilà, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase, a central regulator of the DNA damage response regulates the activity of several E3-ubiquitin ligases and the ubiquitination-proteasome system is a consistent target of ATM. ITCH is an E3-ubiquitin ligase that modulates the ubiquitination of several targets, therefore participating to the regulation of several cellular responses, among which the DNA damage response, TNFα, Notch and Hedgehog signalling and T cell development. Here we uncover ATM as a novel positive modulator of ITCH E3-ubiquitin ligase activity. A single residue on ITCH protein, S161, which is part of an ATM SQ consensus motif, is required for ATM-dependent activation of ITCH. ATM activity enhances ITCH enzymatic activity, which in turn drives the ubiquitination and degradation of c-FLIP-L and c-Jun, previously identified as ITCH substrates. Importantly, Atm deficient mice show resistance to hepatocyte cell death, similarly to Itch deficient animals, providing in vivo genetic evidence for this circuit. Our data identify ITCH as a novel component of the ATM-dependent signaling pathway and suggest that the impairment of the correct functionality of ITCH caused by Atm deficiency may contribute to the complex clinical features linked to Ataxia Telangiectasia. PMID:23435430

  14. Evaluation of the enzyme activity of protozoan protein kinases by using an in vitro kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    The life cycles of parasites are more complicated than those of other biological species. Protein kinases (PKs) encoded by parasites are the main triggers of life stage conversions. Phosphorylation by cellular PKs regulates important cellular processes, and the protozoan genome contains many PKs. Some PK inhibitors inhibit specific parasite life cycle event. In this report, I present a practical approach to expressing and purifying protozoan PKs by using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and I assess the phosphorylation activities of protozoan PKs by using an in vitro kinase assay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  16. The association of phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A with hepatic insulin receptor enhances its kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi Bun; Liu, Xia; He, Kunyan; Qi, Qi; Jung, Dae Y; Kim, Jason K; Ye, Keqiang

    2011-07-01

    Dysfunction of hepatic insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) causes the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism regulating IRTK activity in the liver remains poorly understood. Here, we show that phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A (PIKE-A) is a new insulin-dependent enhancer of hepatic IRTK. Liver-specific Pike-knockout (LPKO) mice display glucose intolerance with impaired hepatic insulin sensitivity. Specifically, insulin-provoked phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signalling is diminished in the liver of LPKO mice, leading to the failure of insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and hyperglycaemia. Thus, hepatic PIKE-A has a key role in mediating insulin signal transduction and regulating glucose homeostasis in the liver.

  17. Suppressive effect of alpha2 Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein on in vitro calcification of osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuji; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yoshikawa, Takafumi; Nonomura, Akitaka; Yoshioka, Akira

    2006-02-01

    alpha(2) Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (alpha(2)HS glycoprotein) is predominantly found in bone. To date, we have investigated plasma alpha(2)HS levels in immature babies and neonates as well as the histological distribution in various neonatal tissues in order to clarify its physiological significance. In an effort to understand the physiological function of alpha(2)HS glycoprotein in bones, we studied the effects of alpha(2)HS glycoprotein in cultured osteogenesis model using rat marrow cells. We added different concentrations of alpha(2)HS glycoprotein to cultured marrow cells, including osteoblasts in the presence of dexamethasone, in an attempt to elucidate the effects of alpha(2)HS glycoprotein on osteoblast growth and bone calcification in vitro. The results showed that total DNA content was significantly increased with 0.2-20 nM (f.c.) alpha(2)HS glycoprotein, but was neither suppressed nor increased with 200 nM (f.c.) alpha(2)HS glycoprotein. Although ALP activity increased with 0.2 or 2 nM (f.c.) alpha(2)HS glycoprotein, it decreased with 20 or 200 nM (f.c.) alpha(2)HS glycoprotein. While 0.2 nM (f.c.) alpha(2)HS glycoprotein had no effect on calcium or osteocalcin content, 2 nM (f.c.) alpha(2)HS glycoprotein decreased both calcium content and osteocalcin content by about half, and no calcium or osteocalcin was observed with 20 or 200 nM (f.c.). Calcium staining of cultured marrow cells revealed that the number of stained cell tubercles decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that alpha(2)HS glycoprotein regulates the growth of osteoblasts and acts as an inhibitory factor in the regulation of bone calcification.

  18. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-08

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD.

  19. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  20. A new mass-spectrometric C-terminal sequencing technique finds a similarity between gamma-interferon and alpha 2-interferon and identifies a proteolytically clipped gamma-interferon that retains full antiviral activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, K; Simona, M G; Offord, R E; Prior, C P; Otto, B; Thatcher, D R

    1983-01-01

    A novel mass-spectrometric technique is described that permits the identification of the C-terminal peptide of a protein. The technique involves the incorporation of 18O into all alpha-carboxy groups liberated during enzyme-catalysed partial hydrolysis of the protein, followed by mass spectrometry to identify as the C-terminal peptide the only peptide that did not incorporate any 18O. The technique has been used to identify the true C-terminal tryptic peptide of a bacterially produced gamma-interferon and to distinguish it from a peptide produced by anomalous tryptic cleavage. It was found that a closely similar sequence segment of bacterially produced alpha 2-interferon undergoes an analogous cleavage. The technique was also used to identify the C-terminus of a clipped gamma-interferon that retains full antiviral activity. PMID:6418141

  1. alpha2-Adrenoceptor-mediated potassium currents in acutely dissociated rat locus coeruleus neurones.

    PubMed

    Arima, J; Kubo, C; Ishibashi, H; Akaike, N

    1998-04-01

    1. The noradrenaline (NA)-activated response was investigated in neurones acutely dissociated from the rat locus coeruleus (LC) using nystatin-perforated, conventional whole-cell and inside-out patch recording modes under current- and voltage-clamp conditions. 2. Under current-clamp conditions, NA hyperpolarized the LC neurones, abolishing the spontaneous action potentials. In voltage-clamp studies, NA induced an inwardly rectifying K+ current (INA) in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximum effective concentration of 2.2 x 10(-7) M. 3. INA was mimicked by the alpha2-agonist UK14304 but was inhibited by either the alpha2B/alpha2C antagonist ARC239 or the alpha1- and alpha2B/alpha2C antagonist prazosin, suggesting the contribution of alpha2B/alpha2C adrenoceptors. 4. INA was inhibited by the intracellular application of GDPbetaS but fully activated by intracellular perfusion of GTPgammaS. 5. In the inside-out recording mode, the application of GTP to the cytoplasmic side of the patch membrane markedly enhanced the open probability of the NA-activated single channels which represented the inwardly rectifying properties. 6. These results indicate that the activation of alpha2B/alpha2C adrenoceptors coupled with GTP-binding protein directly activates the inwardly rectifying K+ currents in rat LC neurones, thus resulting in a decrease in the spontaneous firing activities.

  2. DHEA improves glucose uptake via activations of protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, T; Kajita, K; Miura, A; Ishizawa, M; Kanoh, Y; Itaya, S; Kimura, M; Muto, N; Mune, T; Morita, H; Yasuda, K

    1999-01-01

    We have examined the effect of adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), on glucose uptake, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC) activity in rat adipocytes. DHEA (1 microM) provoked a twofold increase in 2-[3H]deoxyglucose (DG) uptake for 30 min. Pretreatment with DHEA increased insulin-induced 2-[3H]DG uptake without alterations of insulin specific binding and autophosphorylation of insulin receptor. DHEA also stimulated PI 3-kinase activity. [3H]DHEA bound to purified PKC containing PKC-alpha, -beta, and -gamma. DHEA provoked the translocation of PKC-beta and -zeta from the cytosol to the membrane in rat adipocytes. These results suggest that DHEA stimulates both PI 3-kinase and PKCs and subsequently stimulates glucose uptake. Moreover, to clarify the in vivo effect of DHEA on Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and Otsuka Long-Evans fatty (OLETF) rats, animal models of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) were treated with 0.4% DHEA for 2 wk. Insulin- and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-induced 2-[3H]DG uptakes of adipocytes were significantly increased, but there was no significant increase in the soleus muscles in DHEA-treated GK/Wistar or OLETF/Long-Evans Tokushima (LETO) rats when compared with untreated GK/Wistar or OLETF/LETO rats. These results indicate that in vivo DHEA treatment can result in increased insulin-induced glucose uptake in two different NIDDM rat models.

  3. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  4. Protein kinase C phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase α1 Ser487

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Helen R.; Mancini, Sarah J.; Strembitska, Anastasiya; Jamal, Kunzah; Reihill, James A.; Palmer, Timothy M.; Gould, Gwyn W.; Salt, Ian P.

    2016-01-01

    The key metabolic regulator, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), is reported to be down-regulated in metabolic disorders, but the mechanisms are poorly characterised. Recent studies have identified phosphorylation of the AMPKα1/α2 catalytic subunit isoforms at Ser487/491, respectively, as an inhibitory regulation mechanism. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates AMPK and protein kinase B (Akt) in cultured human endothelial cells. As Akt has been demonstrated to be an AMPKα1 Ser487 kinase, the effect of VEGF on inhibitory AMPK phosphorylation in cultured primary human endothelial cells was examined. Stimulation of endothelial cells with VEGF rapidly increased AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation in an Akt-independent manner, without altering AMPKα2 Ser491 phosphorylation. In contrast, VEGF-stimulated AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and PKC activation using phorbol esters or overexpression of PKC-stimulated AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation. Purified PKC and Akt both phosphorylated AMPKα1 Ser487 in vitro with similar efficiency. PKC activation was associated with reduced AMPK activity, as inhibition of PKC increased AMPK activity and phorbol esters inhibited AMPK, an effect lost in cells expressing mutant AMPKα1 Ser487Ala. Consistent with a pathophysiological role for this modification, AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity in human muscle. These data indicate a novel regulatory role of PKC to inhibit AMPKα1 in human cells. As PKC activation is associated with insulin resistance and obesity, PKC may underlie the reduced AMPK activity reported in response to overnutrition in insulin-resistant metabolic and vascular tissues. PMID:27784766

  5. p21-activated kinase signaling in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gururaj, Anupama E; Rayala, Suresh K; Kumar, Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases signal through a number of cellular pathways fundamental to growth, differentiation and apoptosis. A wealth of information has accumulated at an impressive pace in the recent past, both with regard to previously identified targets for p21-activated kinases that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and cellular stress pathways and with regard to newly identified targets and their role in cancer. Emerging data also provide new clues towards a previously unappreciated link between these various cellular processes. The present review attempts to provide a quick tutorial to the reader about the evolving significance of p21-activated kinases and small GTPases in breast cancer, using information from mouse models, tissue culture studies, and human materials. PMID:15642175

  6. [Mivazerol and other benzylimidazoles with alpha-2 adrenergic properties].

    PubMed

    Cossement, E; Geerts, J P; Michel, P; Motte, G; Noyer, M

    1994-01-01

    4-Benzyl-imidazole compounds derived from Salbutanol are evaluated for potential adrenergic activities. The prevalent property of a series of new bioisosteres of catecholamines either of the saligenol-(ucb LO61) or benzamide-(Mivazerol) type is a selective alpha-adrenergic agonism, at the presynaptic level. The present study stresses the structural features responsible for the alpha-2-agonistic property.

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  9. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  10. Activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yali; Lascola, Judith; Dulin, Nickolai O; Ye, Richard D; Browning, Darren D

    2003-05-09

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG) are emerging as important components of mainstream signal transduction pathways. Nitric oxide-induced cGMP formation by stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase is generally accepted as being the most widespread mechanism underlying PKG activation. In the present study, PKG was found to be a target for phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-responsive protein kinase C (PKC). PKG1alpha became phosphorylated in HEK-293 cells stimulated with PMA and also in vitro using purified components. PKC-dependent phosphorylation was found to activate PKG as measured by phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, and by in vitro kinase assays. Although there are 11 potential PKC substrate recognition sites in PKG1alpha, threonine 58 was examined due to its proximity to the pseudosubstrate domain. Antibodies generated against the phosphorylated form of this region were used to demonstrate phosphorylation in response to PMA treatment of the cells with kinetics similar to vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation. A phospho-mimetic mutation at this site (T58E) generated a partially activated PKG that was more sensitive to cGMP levels. A phospho-null mutation (T58A) revealed that this residue is important but not sufficient for PKG activation by PKC. Taken together, these findings outline a novel signal transduction pathway that links PKC stimulation with cyclic nucleotide-independent activation of PKG.

  11. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  12. Role of alpha2C-adrenoceptors in the reduction of skin blood flow induced by local cooling in mice.

    PubMed

    Honda, M; Suzuki, M; Nakayama, K; Ishikawa, T

    2007-09-01

    The reduction of skin blood flow induced by local cooling results from a reflex increase in sympathetic output and an enhanced vasoconstrictor activity of cutaneous vessels. The present study investigated the latter local response in vivo in tetrodotoxin-treated mice, in which the sympathetic nerve tone was abolished. Male ddY mice, anaesthetized with pentobarbitone, were treated with tetrodotoxin and artificially ventilated. The plantar skin blood flow (PSBF) was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Cooling the air temperature around the left foot from 25 to 10 degrees C decreased the PSBF of the left foot. Bunazosin, an alpha (1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, RS79948, an alpha (2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, and MK-912, an alpha (2C)-adrenoceptor antagonist, all significantly inhibited the cooling-induced reduction of PSBF; the inhibition by bunazosin was relatively small compared with that by RS79948 and MK-912. The response was not affected by guanethidine or bretylium, but was diminished in adrenalectomized mice. An intra-arterial injection of clonidine, an alpha (2)-adrenoceptor agonist, to the left iliac artery of adrenalectomized mice caused a transient decrease in PSBF, which was significantly augmented at 10 degrees C. MK-912 suppressed only the augmented portion at 10 degrees C. Y-27632, H-1152 and fasudil, Rho kinase inhibitors, also inhibited the cooling-induced reduction of PSBF. RS79948 caused no further reduction of the cooling-induced response after the inhibition by Y-27632. Local cooling-induced reduction of skin blood flow in mice primarily results from increased reactivity of alpha (2C)-adrenoceptors to circulating catecholamines, in which the Rho/Rho kinase pathway is involved.

  13. STAT1, STAT3 and p38MAPK are involved in the apoptotic effect induced by a chimeric cyclic interferon-{alpha}2b peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Viviana C.; Pena, Clara; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2010-02-15

    In the search of mimetic peptides of the interferon-{alpha}2b molecule (IFN-{alpha}2b), we have previously designed and synthesized a chimeric cyclic peptide of the IFN-{alpha}2b that inhibits WISH cell proliferation by inducing an apoptotic response. Here, we first studied the ability of this peptide to activate intracellular signaling pathways and then evaluated the participation of some signals in the induction of apoptosis. Stimulation of WISH cells with the cyclic peptide showed tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1 and Tyk2 kinases, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 transcription factors and activation of p38 MAPK pathway, although phosphorylation levels or kinetics were in some conditions different to those obtained under IFN-{alpha}2b stimulus. JNK and p44/42 pathways were not activated by the peptide in WISH cells. We also showed that STAT1 and STAT3 downregulation by RNA interference decreased the antiproliferative activity and the amount of apoptotic cells induced by the peptide. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK also reduced the peptide growth inhibitory activity and the apoptotic effect. Thus, we demonstrated that the cyclic peptide regulates WISH cell proliferation through the activation of Jak/STAT signaling pathway. In addition, our results indicate that p38 MAPK may also be involved in cell growth regulation. This study suggests that STAT1, STAT3 and p38 MAPK would be mediating the antitumor and apoptotic response triggered by the cyclic peptide in WISH cells.

  14. The electrophoretically 'slow' and 'fast' forms of the alpha 2-macroglobulin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A J; Brown, M A; Sayers, C A

    1979-01-01

    alpha 2-Macroglobulin (alpha 2M) was isolated from human plasma by a four-step procedure: poly(ethylene glyco) fractionation, gel chromatography, euglobulin precipitation and immunoadsorption. No contaminants were detected in the final preparations by electrophoresis or immunoprecipitation. The protein ran as a single slow band in gel electrophoresis, and was designated 'S-alpha 2M'. S-alpha 2M bound about 2 mol of trypsin/mol. Treatment of S-alpha 2M with a proteinase or ammonium salts produced a form of the molecule more mobile in electrophoresis, and lacking proteinase-binding activity (F-alpha 2M). The electrophoretic mobility of the F-alpha 2M resulting from reaction with NH4+ salts was identical with that of proteinase complexes. We attribute the change in electrophoretic mobility of the alpha 2M to a conformation change, but there was no evidence of a change in pI or Strokes radius. Electrophoresis of S-alpha 2M in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate gave results consistent with the view that the alpha 2M molecule is a tetramer of identical subunits, assembled as a non-covalent pair of disulphide-linked dimers. Some of the subunits seemed to be 'nicked' into two-thires-length and one-third-length chains, however. This was not apparent with F-alpha 2M produced by ammonium salts. F-alpha 2M produced by trypsin showed two new bands attributable to cleavage of the subunit polypeptide chain near the middle. Immunoassays of F-alpha 2M gave 'rockets' 12-29% lower than those with S-alpha 2M. The nature of the interactions between subunits in S-alpha 2M and F-alpha 2M was investigated by treating each form with glutaraldehyde before electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate. A much greater degree of cross-linking was observed with the F-alpha 2M, indicating that the subunits interact most closely in this form of the molecule. Exposure of S-alpha 2M to 3 M-urea or pH3 resulted in dissociation to the disulphide-bonded half-molecules; these did not

  15. Identification and Targeting of Upstream Tyrosine Kinases Mediating PI3 Kinase Activation in PTEN-Deficient Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    by Ras, and is amplified by PTEN loss in the majority of advanced prostate cancers (PCa). We found that RTK inhibitors lapatinib and sorafenib could...PI3 kinase activity, but combined treatment with lapatinib and sorafenib (a multi-kinase inhibitor) was as effective as a direct PI3 kinase... sorafenib , contributed to PI3K pathway activation in PTEN deficient LNCaP cells. Moreover, this inhibition correlated with loss of tyrosine

  16. Protein kinase D activity controls endothelial nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Zaragoza, Carlos; Iglesias, Teresa; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates key functions of the endothelium, such as angiogenesis or vessel repair in processes involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. One of the effector kinases that become activated in endothelial cells upon VEGF treatment is protein kinase D (PKD). Here, we show that PKD phosphorylates eNOS, leading to its activation and a concomitant increase in NO synthesis. Using mass spectrometry, we show that the purified active kinase specifically phosphorylates recombinant eNOS on Ser1179. Treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activates PKD and increases eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKD and gene silencing of both PKD1 and PKD2 abrogate VEGF signaling, resulting in a clear diminished migration of endothelial cells in a wound healing assay. Finally, inhibition of PKD in mice results in an almost complete disappearance of the VEGF-induced vasodilatation, as monitored through determination of the diameter of the carotid artery. Hence, our data indicate that PKD is a new regulatory kinase of eNOS in endothelial cells whose activity orchestrates mammalian vascular tone. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Design of an encodable tyrosine kinase-inducible domain: detection of tyrosine kinase activity by terbium luminescence.

    PubMed

    Zondlo, Susan Carr; Gao, Feng; Zondlo, Neal J

    2010-04-28

    Tyrosine kinases are critical mediators of intracellular signaling and of intracellular responses to extracellular signaling. Changes in tyrosine kinase activity are implicated in numerous human diseases, including cancers, diabetes, and pathogen infectivity. To address questions in tyrosine phosphorylation, we have designed a protein tyrosine kinase-inducible domain, a small, genetically encodable protein motif whose structure is dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation state. Tyrosine kinase-inducible domain peptides are based on EF-hand loops in which a structurally critical Glu12 residue is replaced by tyrosine at residue 11 or at residue 15 of the protein. Tyrosine kinase-inducible domain peptides bind terbium(III) in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, showing strong terbium luminescence when phosphorylated but weak terbium luminescence when not phosphorylated. Lanthanide binding was confirmed by NMR. A tyrosine kinase-inducible domain peptide, pKID-Abl, was designed to incorporate a recognition sequence of the Abl kinase. Incubation of pKID-Abl with Abl kinase resulted in a large increase in terbium luminescence. This increase in luminescence was abolished when pKID-Abl and Abl kinase were incubated with the Abl kinase inhibitor Gleevec. In addition, incubation of phosphorylated pKID-Abl with the tyrosine phosphatase YOP resulted in a large reduction in terbium luminescence. pKID-Abl was employed as a fluorescent sensor of Abl tyrosine kinase activity in HeLa cell extracts, exhibiting low luminescence with extracts from serum-starved cells and increased luminescence using extracts from EGF-treated cells. These results indicate that tyrosine kinase-inducible domains may be used as sensors of tyrosine kinase and tyrosine phosphatase activity and in the detection of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  18. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  19. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways used by interleukin 1 in tissues in vivo: activation of hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1 and 2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, A; Davis, W; Carter, W G; Saklatvala, J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of interleukin 1 (IL-1) are mediated by the activation of protein kinase signalling pathways, which have been well characterized in cultured cells. We have investigated the activation of these pathways in rabbit liver and other tissues after the systemic administration of IL-1alpha. In liver there was 30-40-fold activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and 5-fold activation of both JNK kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MKK)4 and MKK7. IL-1alpha also caused 2-3-fold activation of p38 MAPK and degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB ('IkappaB'), although no activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) (p42/44 MAPK) was observed. The use of antibodies against specific JNK isoforms showed that, in liver, short (p46) JNK1 and long (p54) JNK2 are the predominant forms activated, with smaller amounts of long JNK1 and short JNK2. No active JNK3 was detected. A similar pattern of JNK activation was seen in lung, spleen, skeletal muscle and kidney. Significant JNK3 activity was detectable only in the brain, although little activation of the JNK pathway in response to IL-1alpha was observed in this tissue. This distribution of active JNK isoforms probably results from a different expression of JNKs within the tissues, rather than from a selective activation of isoforms. We conclude that IL-1alpha might activate a more restricted set of signalling pathways in tissues in vivo than it does in cultured cells, where ERK and JNK3 activation are often observed. Cultured cells might represent a 'repair' phenotype that undergoes a broader set of responses to the cytokine. PMID:11139391

  20. Prostaglandin E2 negatively regulates AMP-activated protein kinase via protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Koji; Cao, Xia; Yamauchi, Masako; Kozaki, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kambe, Fukushi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated possible involvement of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). When osteoblastic MG63 cells were cultured in serum-deprived media, Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK alpha-subunit was markedly increased. Treatment of the cells with PGE2 significantly reduced the phosphorylation. Ser-79 phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a direct target for AMPK, was also reduced by PGE2. On the other hand, PGE2 reciprocally increased Ser-485 phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit that could be associated with inhibition of AMPK activity. These effects of PGE2 were mimicked by PGE2 receptor EP2 and EP4 agonists and forskolin, but not by EP1 and EP3 agonists, and the effects were suppressed by an adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 and a protein kinase A inhibitor H89. Additionally, the PGE2 effects were duplicated in primary calvarial osteoblasts. Together, the present study demonstrates that PGE2 negatively regulates AMPK activity via activation of protein kinase A signaling pathway.

  1. Coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase activity in ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos-Karoly, Andrea; Vogel, Ramona; Nöll, Anne; Tampé, Robert; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2016-12-22

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a superfamily of integral membrane proteins, catalyse the translocation of substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. Here we demonstrate by nucleotide turnover and binding studies based on (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy that the ABC exporter and lipid A flippase MsbA can couple ATP hydrolysis to an adenylate kinase activity, where ADP is converted into AMP and ATP. Single-point mutations reveal that both ATPase and adenylate kinase mechanisms are associated with the same conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding domain. Based on these results, we propose a model for the coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase mechanism, involving the canonical and an additional nucleotide-binding site. We extend these findings to other prokaryotic ABC exporters, namely LmrA and TmrAB, suggesting that the coupled activities are a general feature of ABC exporters.

  2. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Beale, Elmus G

    2008-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been called "the metabolic master switch" because of its central role in regulating fuel homeostasis. AMPK, a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase composed of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, is activated by upstream kinases and by 5'-AMP in response to various nutritional and stress signals. Downstream effects include regulation of metabolism, protein synthesis, cell growth, and mediation of the actions of a number of hormones, including leptin. However, AMPK research represents a young and growing field; hence, there are many unanswered questions regarding the control and action of AMPK. This review presents evidence for the existence of AMPK signaling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, a genetically tractable model organism that has yet to be fully exploited to elucidate AMPK signaling mechanisms.

  3. Coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase activity in ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos-Karoly, Andrea; Vogel, Ramona; Nöll, Anne; Tampé, Robert; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a superfamily of integral membrane proteins, catalyse the translocation of substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. Here we demonstrate by nucleotide turnover and binding studies based on 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy that the ABC exporter and lipid A flippase MsbA can couple ATP hydrolysis to an adenylate kinase activity, where ADP is converted into AMP and ATP. Single-point mutations reveal that both ATPase and adenylate kinase mechanisms are associated with the same conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding domain. Based on these results, we propose a model for the coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase mechanism, involving the canonical and an additional nucleotide-binding site. We extend these findings to other prokaryotic ABC exporters, namely LmrA and TmrAB, suggesting that the coupled activities are a general feature of ABC exporters. PMID:28004795

  4. Glycerol kinase activities in muscles from vertebrates and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Newsholme, E A; Taylor, K

    1969-05-01

    1. Glycerol kinase (EC 2.7.1.30) activity was measured in crude extracts of skeletal muscles by a radiochemical method. The properties of the enzyme from a number of different muscles are very similar to those of the enzyme from rat liver. Glycerol kinase from locust flight muscle was inhibited competitively by l-3-glycerophosphate with a K(i) of 4.0x10(-4)m. 2. The activity of glycerol kinase was measured in a variety of muscles from vertebrates and invertebrates in an attempt to explain the large variation in the activity of this enzyme in different muscles. 3. In vertebrates glycerol kinase activities were generally higher in red muscle than in white muscle; the highest activities (approx. 0.2mumole/min./g. fresh wt.) were found in the red breast muscle of some birds (e.g. pigeon, duck, blue tit) whereas the activities in the white breast muscle of the pheasant and domestic fowl were very low (approx. 0.02mumole/min./g.). 4. On the basis of glycerol kinase activities, muscles from insects can be classified into three groups: muscles that have a low enzyme activity, i.e. <0.3mumole/min./g. (leg muscles of all insects studied and the flight muscles of cockroaches and the tsetse fly); muscles that have an intermediate enzyme activity, i.e. 0.3-1.5mumoles/min./g. (e.g. locusts, cockchafers, moths, water-bugs); and muscles that have a high enzyme activity, i.e. >1.5mumoles/min./g. (e.g. bees, wasps, some blowflies). 5. The function of glycerol kinase in vertebrate and insect muscles that possess a low or intermediate activity is considered to be the removal of glycerol that is produced from lipolysis of triglyceride or diglyceride by the muscle. Therefore in these muscles the activity of glycerol kinase is related to the metabolism of fat, which is used to support sustained muscular activity. A possible regulatory role of glycerol kinase in the initiation of triglyceride or diglyceride lipolysis is discussed. 6. The function of glycerol kinase in the insect muscles

  5. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  6. Inhibition of a signaling pathway in cardiac muscle cells by active mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, J; Carlson, M; Mansour, S J; Chien, K R; Ahn, N G; Thorburn, A

    1995-01-01

    Signaling via the Ras pathway involves sequential activation of Ras, Raf-1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MKK), and the extracellular signal-regulated (ERK) group of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Expression from the c-Fos, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), and myosin light chain-2 (MLC-2) promoters during phenylephrine-induced cardiac muscle cell hypertrophy requires activation of this pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Ras or Raf-1 can mimic the action of phenylephrine in inducing expression from these promoters. In this study, we tested whether constitutively active MKK, the molecule immediately downstream of Raf, was sufficient to induce expression. Expression of constitutively active MKK induce ERK2 kinase activity and caused expression from the c-Fos promoter, but did not significantly activate expression of reporter genes under the control of either the ANF or MLC-2 promoters. Expression of CL100, a phosphatase that inactivates ERKs, prevented expression from all of the promoters. Taken together, these data suggest that ERK activation is required for expression from the Fos, ANF, and MLC-2 promoters but MKK and ERK activation is sufficient for expression only from the Fos promoter. Constitutively active MKK synergized with phenylephrine to increase expression from a c-Fos- or an AP1-driven reporter. However, active MKK inhibited phenylephrine- and Raf-1-induced expression from the ANF and MLC-2 promoters. A DNA sequence in the MLC-2 promoter that is a target for inhibition by active MKK, but not CL100, was mapped to a previously characterized DNA element (HF1) that is responsible for cardiac specificity. Thus, activation of cardiac gene expression during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy requires ERK activation but constitutive activation by MKK can inhibit expression by targeting a DNA element that controls the cardiac specificity of gene expression. PMID:8589450

  7. Arginine kinase shows nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity toward deoxythymidine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Hernandez-Flores, Jose M; Lugo-Sanchez, Maria E; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) (ATP: L-arginine phosphotransferase, E.C. 2.7.3.3) catalyzes the reversible transfer of ATP γ-phosphate group to L-arginine to synthetize phospho-arginine as a high-energy storage. Previous studies suggest additional roles for AK in cellular processes. Since AK is found only in invertebrates and it is homologous to creatine kinase from vertebrates, the objective of this work was to demonstrate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for shrimp AK. For this, AK from marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvAK) was purified and its activity was assayed for phosphorylation of TDP using ATP as phosphate donor. Moreover, by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) the phosphate transfer reaction was followed. Also, LvAK tryptophan fluorescence emission changes were detected by dTDP titration, suggesting that the hydrophobic environment of Trp 221, which is located in the top of the active site, is perturbed upon dTDP binding. The kinetic constants for both substrates Arg and dTDP were calculated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Besides, docking calculations suggested that dTDP could bind LvAK in the same cavity where ATP bind, and LvAK basic residues (Arg124, 126 and 309) stabilize the dTDP phosphate groups and the pyrimidine base interact with His284 and Ser122. These results suggest that LvAK bind and phosphorylate dTDP being ATP the phosphate donor, thus describing a novel alternate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for this enzyme.

  8. Cbk1 kinase and Bck2 control MAP kinase activation and inactivation during heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Kuravi, Venkata K.; Kurischko, Cornelia; Puri, Manasi; Luca, Francis C.

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cbk1 kinase is a LATS/NDR tumor suppressor orthologue and component of the Regulation of Ace2 and Morphogenesis signaling network. Cbk1 was previously implicated in regulating polarized morphogenesis, gene expression, and cell integrity. Here we establish that Cbk1 is critical for heat shock and cell wall stress signaling via Bck2, a protein associated with the Pkc1-Mpk1 cell integrity pathway. We demonstrate that cbk1 and bck2 loss-of-function mutations prevent Mpk1 kinase activation and Mpk1-dependent gene expression but do not disrupt Mpk1 Thr-190/Tyr-192 phosphorylation. Bck2 overexpression partially restores Mpk1-dependent Rlm1 transcription factor activity in cbk1 mutants, suggesting that Bck2 functions downstream of Cbk1. We demonstrate that Bck2 precisely colocalizes with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase Sdp1. During heat shock, Bck2 and Sdp1 transiently redistribute from nuclei and the cytosol to mitochondria and other cytoplasmic puncta before returning to their pre-stressed localization patterns. Significantly, Cbk1 inhibition delays the return of Bck2 and Sdp1 to their pre-stressed localization patterns and delays Mpk1 Thr-190/Tyr-192 dephosphorylation upon heat shock adaptation. We conclude that Cbk1 and Bck2 are required for Mpk1 activation during heat shock and cell wall stress and for Mpk1 dephosphorylation during heat shock adaptation. These data provide the first evidence that Cbk1 kinase regulates MAPK-dependent stress signaling and provide mechanistic insight into Sdp1 phosphatase regulation. PMID:22031291

  9. [Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists for the treatment of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Kulka, P J

    1996-04-25

    The antinociceptive effect of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists is mediated by activation of descending inhibiting noradrenergic systems, which modulates 'wide-dynamic-range' neurones. Furthermore, they inhibit the liberation of substance P and endorphines and activate serotoninergic neurones. Despite this variety of antinociceptive actions, there is still little experience with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists as therapeutic agents for use in chronic pain syndromes. Studies in animals and patients have shown that the transdermal, epidural and intravenous administration of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine reduces pain intensity in neuropathic pain syndromes for periods varying from some hours up to 1 month. Patients suffering from lancinating or sharp pain respond best to this therapy. Topically applied clonidine (200-300 microg) relieves hyperalgesia in sympathetically maintained pain. Epidural administration of 300 microg clonidine dissolved in 5 ml NaCl 0.9 % has also been shown to be effective. In patients suffering from cancer pain tolerant to opioids, pain control has proved possible again with combinations of opioids and clonidine. In isolated cases clonidine has been administered epidurally at a dose of 1500 microg/day for almost 5 months without evidence for any histotoxic property of clonidine. Side effects often observed during administration of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists are dry mouth, sedation, hypotension and bradycardia. Therapeutic interventions are usually not required.

  10. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  11. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kung, Charles; Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-09-14

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A.; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. PMID:28760888

  13. Activation and Function of the MAPKs and Their Substrates, the MAPK-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Cargnello, Marie; Roux, Philippe P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate diverse cellular programs by relaying extracellular signals to intracellular responses. In mammals, there are more than a dozen MAPK enzymes that coordinately regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. The best known are the conventional MAPKs, which include the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinases 1 to 3 (JNK1 to -3), p38 (α, β, γ, and δ), and ERK5 families. There are additional, atypical MAPK enzymes, including ERK3/4, ERK7/8, and Nemo-like kinase (NLK), which have distinct regulation and functions. Together, the MAPKs regulate a large number of substrates, including members of a family of protein Ser/Thr kinases termed MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). The MAPKAPKs are related enzymes that respond to extracellular stimulation through direct MAPK-dependent activation loop phosphorylation and kinase activation. There are five MAPKAPK subfamilies: the p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), the mitogen- and stress-activated kinase (MSK), the MAPK-interacting kinase (MNK), the MAPK-activated protein kinase 2/3 (MK2/3), and MK5 (also known as p38-regulated/activated protein kinase [PRAK]). These enzymes have diverse biological functions, including regulation of nucleosome and gene expression, mRNA stability and translation, and cell proliferation and survival. Here we review the mechanisms of MAPKAPK activation by the different MAPKs and discuss their physiological roles based on established substrates and recent discoveries. PMID:21372320

  14. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  15. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Janus Kinase (JAK) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2, was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organisation of the component FERM-SH2, pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain containing proteins, SOCS (Suppressors of Cytokine Signalling) proteins and Lnk. These recent advances highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilised by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. PMID:25057888

  16. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-01-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis. PMID:7693593

  17. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-12-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis.

  18. Improving nucleoside diphosphate kinase for antiviral nucleotide analogs activation.

    PubMed

    Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Schneider, Benoit; Chen, Yuxing; Giacomoni-Fernandes, Veronique; Mulard, Laurence; Morera, Solange; Janin, Joel; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Veron, Michel

    2002-10-18

    Antiviral nucleoside analog therapies rely on their incorporation by viral DNA polymerases/reverse transcriptase leading to chain termination. The analogs (3'-deoxy-3'-azidothymidine (AZT), 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (d4T), and other dideoxynucleosides) are sequentially converted into triphosphate by cellular kinases of the nucleoside salvage pathway and are often poor substrates of these enzymes. Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase phosphorylates the diphosphate derivatives of the analogs with an efficiency some 10(4) lower than for its natural substrates. Kinetic and structural studies of Dictyostelium and human NDP kinases show that the sugar 3'-OH, absent from all antiviral analogs, is required for catalysis. To improve the catalytic efficiency of NDP kinase on the analogs, we engineered several mutants with a protein OH group replacing the sugar 3'-OH. The substitution of Asn-115 in Ser and Leu-55 in His results in an NDP kinase mutant with an enhanced ability to phosphorylate antiviral derivatives. Transfection of the mutant enzyme in Escherichia coli results in an increased sensitivity to AZT. An x-ray structure at 2.15-A resolution of the Dictyostelium enzyme bearing the serine substitution in complex with the R(p)-alpha-borano-triphosphate derivative of AZT shows that the enhanced activity reflects an improved geometry of binding and a favorable interaction of the 3'-azido group with the engineered serine.

  19. Parkinson's disease-associated mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 augment kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew B.; Moore, Darren J.; Biskup, Saskia; Bugayenko, Artem; Smith, Wanli W.; Ross, Christopher A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) cause late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Initial studies suggest that LRRK2 mutations are the most common yet identified determinant of PD susceptibility, transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Herein, we characterize the LRRK2 gene and transcript in human brain and subclone the predominant ORF. Exogenously expressed LRRK2 protein migrates at ≈280 kDa and is present largely in the cytoplasm but also associates with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Familial-linked mutations G2019S or R1441C do not have an obvious effect on protein steady-state levels, turnover, or localization. However, in vitro kinase assays using full-length recombinant LRRK2 reveal an increase in activity caused by familial-linked mutations in both autophosphorylation and the phosphorylation of a generic substrate. These results suggest a gain-of-function mechanism for LRRK2-linked disease with a central role for kinase activity in the development of PD. PMID:16269541

  20. Arrestin-Dependent Activation of JNK Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xuanzhi; Kook, Seunghyi; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of all mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) is stimulated via phosphorylation by upstream MAPK kinases (MAPKK), which are in their turn activated via phosphorylation by MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs). The cells ensure the specificity of signaling in these cascades by employing a variety of scaffolding proteins that bind matching MAPKKKs, MAPKKs, and MAPKs. All four vertebrate arrestin subtypes bind JNK3, but only arrestin-3 serves as a scaffold, promoting JNK3 activation in intact cells. Arrestin-3-mediated JNK3 activation does not depend on arrestin-3 interaction with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as demonstrated by the ability of some arrestin mutants that cannot bind receptors to activate JNK3, whereas certain mutants with enhanced GPCR binding fail to promote JNK3 activation. Recent findings suggest that arrestin-3 directly binds both MAPKKs necessary for JNK activation and facilitates JNK3 phosphorylation at both Thr (by MKK4) and Tyr (by MKK7). JNK3 is expressed in a limited set of cell types, whereas JNK1 and JNK2 isoforms are as ubiquitous as arrestin-3. Recent study showed that arrestin-3 facilitates the activation of JNK1 and JNK2, scaffolding MKK4/7-JNK1/2/3 signaling complexes. In all cases, arrestin-3 acts by bringing the kinases together: JNK phosphorylation shows biphasic dependence on arrestin-3, being enhanced at lower and suppressed at supraoptimal concentrations. Thus, arrestin-3 regulates the activity of multiple JNK isoforms, suggesting that it might play a role in survival and apoptosis of all cell types. PMID:24292834

  1. Ligand binding to the AMP-activated protein kinase active site mediates protection of the activation loop from dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini G; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2013-01-04

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a conserved signaling molecule in a pathway that maintains adenosine triphosphate homeostasis. Recent studies have suggested that low energy adenylate ligands bound to one or more sites in the γ subunit of AMPK promote the formation of an active, phosphatase-resistant conformation. We propose an alternative model in which the kinase domain association with the heterotrimer core results in activation of the kinase catalytic activity, whereas low energy adenylate ligands bound in the kinase active site promote phosphatase resistance. Purified Snf1 α subunit with a conservative, single amino acid substitution in the kinase domain is protected from dephosphorylation by adenosine diphosphate in the complete absence of the β and γ subunits. Staurosporine, a compound known to bind to the active site of many protein kinases, mediates strong protection from dephosphorylation to yeast and mammalian AMPK enzymes. The analog-sensitive Snf1-I132G protein but not wild type Snf1 exhibits protection from dephosphorylation when bound by the adenosine analog 2NM-PP1 in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ligand binding to the Snf1 active site can mediate phosphatase resistance. Finally, Snf1 kinase with an amino acid substitution at the interface of the kinase domain and the heterotrimer core exhibits normal regulation of phosphorylation in vivo but greatly reduced Snf1 kinase activity, supporting a model in which kinase domain association with the heterotrimer core is needed for kinase activation.

  2. Interleukin 1 stimulates phosphatidylinositol kinase activity in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, L R; Barker, S C; Postlethwaite, A E; Kang, A H

    1991-01-01

    IL-1 mediates multiple cellular immune and inflammatory responses, but little is known of the intracellular biochemical mechanisms involved in IL-1 actions. We studied the effects of IL-1 on phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) metabolism and confirmed reports indicating that IL-1 does not stimulate increased PtdIns turnover; however, we observed the accumulation of PtdIns-4-phosphate (PtdInsP) in response to IL-1. Using a fibroblast membrane preparation, we were able to detect stimulated PtdInsP accumulation within 10 s of IL-1 addition. Increased PtdInsP accumulation was due to stimulated PtdIns kinase activity, not the inhibition of PtdInsP hydrolysis by phospholipase(s). PtdIns kinase activity was magnesium dependent, increased as a function of IL-1 concentration, and specifically phosphorylated the D4 position of inositol. Stimulated PtdIns kinase activity could be detected at 10(-12) M IL-1 in fibroblast membranes, a concentration within the physiological range for IL-1 action; half-maximal activity was reached at approximately 10(-10) M IL-1. Heat denaturation of IL-1 or treatment of IL-1 with anti-IL-1 antibody abrogated the IL-1 effect. These findings demonstrate the direct, IL-1-mediated, stimulation of PtdIns kinase. IL-1-stimulated PtdIns kinase activity represents an important physiological regulatory effect by IL-1 as it could control the synthesis and/or maintenance of phosphorylated derivatives of PtdIns which comprise only a very small pool of substrates for the generation of the second messengers inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglycerol. PMID:1845871

  3. Regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 Thr-160 phosphorylation and activity by mitogen-activated protein kinase in late G1 phase.

    PubMed Central

    Chiariello, M; Gomez, E; Gutkind, J S

    2000-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, p42(MAPK) and p44(MAPK), are central components of growth-promoting signalling pathways. However, how stimulation of MAP kinases culminates in cell-cycle progression is still poorly understood. Here we show that mitogenic stimulation of NIH 3T3 cells causes a sustained activation of MAP kinases, which lasts until cells begin progressing through the G(1)/S boundary. Furthermore, we observed that disruption of the MAP-kinase pathway with a selective MEK (MAP kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor, PD98059, prevents the activation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and DNA synthesis, even when added during late G(1) phase, once the known mechanisms by which MAP kinase controls G(1) progression, accumulation of G(1) cyclins and degradation of Cdk inhibitors have already taken place. Moreover, we provide evidence indicating that MAP kinases control Cdk2 Thr-160 activating phosphorylation and function, possibly by regulating the activity of a Cdk-activating kinase, thus promoting the re-initiation of DNA synthesis. These findings suggest the existence of a novel mechanism whereby signal-transducing pathways converging on MAP kinases can affect the cell-cycle machinery and, ultimately, participate in cell-growth control. PMID:10903150

  4. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein–protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  5. Implications of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in glioma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vimal; Bhaskara, Vasantha Kumar; Babu, Phanithi Prakash

    2016-02-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary central nervous system tumors. Gliomas originate from astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neural stem cells or their precursors. According to WHO classification, gliomas are classified into four different malignant grades ranging from grade I to grade IV based on histopathological features and related molecular aberrations. The induction and maintenance of these tumors can be attributed largely to aberrant signaling networks. In this regard, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network has been widely studied and is reported to be severely altered in glial tumors. Mutations in MAPK pathways most frequently affect RAS and B-RAF in the ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 pathways leading to malignant transformation. Also, it is linked to both inherited and sequential accumulations of mutations that control receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-activated signal transduction pathways, cell cycle growth arrest pathways, and nonresponsive cell death pathways. Genetic alterations that modulate RTK signaling can also alter several downstream pathways, including RAS-mediated MAP kinases along with JNK pathways, which ultimately regulate cell proliferation and cell death. The present review focuses on recent literature regarding important deregulations in the RTK-activated MAPK pathway during gliomagenesis and progression.

  6. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein-protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients.

  7. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  8. Alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonists as potential analgesic agents. 3. Imidazolylmethylthiophenes.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R E; Press, J B; Rasmussen, C R; Raffa, R B; Codd, E E; Connelly, C D; Li, Q S; Martinez, R P; Lewis, M A; Almond, H R; Reitz, A B

    2001-03-15

    A series of imidazolylmethylthiophenes has been prepared and evaluated as ligands for the alpha(2) adrenoceptor. These compounds were tested in two animal models that are predictive of analgesic activity in humans. The 3-thienyl compounds were generally the most potent, particularly those with substitution in the 4-position. A subset of the most active compounds was further evaluated for adverse cardiovascular effects in the anesthetized rat model. In addition to excellent binding at the alpha(2D) adrenoceptor, the 4-bromo analogues 20e and 21e were very active in the rat abdominal irritant test (RAIT) with ED(50) doses of 0.38 and 0.31 mg/kg, respectively. We constructed a pharmacophore model based on the biological activity of the present series, dexmedetomidine (1), and conformationally restrained analogues 3 and 4.

  9. Glucose regulates diacylglycerol intracellular levels and protein kinase C activity by modulating diacylglycerol kinase subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Miele, Claudia; Paturzo, Flora; Teperino, Raffaele; Sakane, Fumio; Fiory, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Ungaro, Paola; Valentino, Rossella; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2007-11-02

    Although chronic hyperglycemia reduces insulin sensitivity and leads to impaired glucose utilization, short term exposure to high glucose causes cellular responses positively regulating its own metabolism. We show that exposure of L6 myotubes overexpressing human insulin receptors to 25 mm glucose for 5 min decreased the intracellular levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). This was paralleled by transient activation of diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) and of insulin receptor signaling. Following 30-min exposure, however, both DAG levels and DGK activity returned close to basal levels. Moreover, the acute effect of glucose on DAG removal was inhibited by >85% by the DGK inhibitor R59949. DGK inhibition was also accompanied by increased protein kinase C-alpha (PKCalpha) activity, reduced glucose-induced insulin receptor activation, and GLUT4 translocation. Glucose exposure transiently redistributed DGK isoforms alpha and delta, from the prevalent cytosolic localization to the plasma membrane fraction. However, antisense silencing of DGKdelta, but not of DGKalpha expression, was sufficient to prevent the effect of high glucose on PKCalpha activity, insulin receptor signaling, and glucose uptake. Thus, the short term exposure of skeletal muscle cells to glucose causes a rapid induction of DGK, followed by a reduction of PKCalpha activity and transactivation of the insulin receptor signaling. The latter may mediate, at least in part, glucose induction of its own metabolism.

  10. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kappaB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chk1 and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  12. Focal Adhesion Kinase Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening via Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Kristin E.; Dumbauld, David W.; Burns, Kellie L.; Hanks, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase regulating cell migration, adhesive signaling, and mechanosensing. Using FAK-null cells expressing FAK under an inducible promoter, we demonstrate that FAK regulates the time-dependent generation of adhesive forces. During the early stages of adhesion, FAK expression in FAK-null cells enhances integrin activation to promote integrin binding and, hence, the adhesion strengthening rate. Importantly, FAK expression regulated integrin activation, and talin was required for the FAK-dependent effects. A role for FAK in integrin activation was confirmed in human fibroblasts with knocked-down FAK expression. The FAK autophosphorylation Y397 site was required for the enhancements in adhesion strengthening and integrin-binding responses. This work demonstrates a novel role for FAK in integrin activation and the time-dependent generation of cell–ECM forces. PMID:19297531

  13. p21-Activated Kinase 1 Plays a Critical Role in Cellular Activation by Nef

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, Oliver T.; Lu, Xiaobin; Frost, Jeffrey A.; Geyer, Matthias; Jiang, Bing; Luo, Wen; Abo, Arie; Alberts, Arthur S.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2000-01-01

    The activation of Nef-associated kinase (NAK) by Nef from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses is critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. This induction occurs via the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav and the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. In this study, we identified NAK as p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). PAK1 bound to Nef in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the induction of cytoskeletal rearrangements such as the formation of trichopodia, the activation of Jun N-terminal kinase, and the increase of viral production were blocked by an inhibitory peptide that targets the kinase activity of PAK1 (PAK1 83-149). These results identify NAK as PAK1 and emphasize the central role its kinase activity plays in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cellular signaling by Nef. PMID:10713183

  14. Activation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase by divalent metal ions: comparison of holoreceptor and isolated kinase domain properties.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1990-05-22

    The activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase activity is thought to represent a key initial step in EGF-mediated mitogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity were examined through comparisons of the holoreceptor, purified from human placenta, and a soluble 42 kDa tyrosine kinase domain (TKD), generated by the limited trypsin proteolysis of the holoreceptor. The results of these studies highlight the importance of divalent metal ions (Me2+), i.e., Mn2+ and Mg2+, as activators of the tyrosine kinase activity. Manganese is an extremely effective activator of the holoreceptor tyrosine kinase, and under some conditions (low ionic strength) it completely alleviates the need for EGF to stimulate activity. In contrast, Mg2+ only weakly stimulates the holoreceptor tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of EGF, but promotes essentially full activity in the presence of the growth factor. Like the holoreceptor, the soluble TKD is highly active in the presence of Mn2+. However, the isolated TKD is completely inactive in the presence of Mg2+, and, in fact, Mg2+ inhibits the Mn2(+)-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity. The differences in the effects of Mn2+ and Mg2+ on the isolated TKD were further demonstrated by monitoring the effects of Me2+ on the modification of a reactive cysteine residue(s) on the TKD. While Mn2+ potentiates the inhibition by cysteine-directed reagents of the tyrosine kinase activity, Mg2+ has no effect on either the rate or the extent of the inhibition. Both the regulation by Mn2+ of the kinase activity of the TKD and the potentiation by Mn2+ of the cysteine reactivity of the TKD occur over a millimolar concentration range, which implicates a direct binding interaction by the metal ion. Overall, these results demonstrate that there are two key activator sites on the EGF receptor, i.e., the EGF binding site on the extracellular domain and a Me2+ binding site on the

  15. Ethanol Metabolism Activates Cell Cycle Checkpoint Kinase, Chk2

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L.; Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Nuss, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse results in hepatocyte injury and impairs hepatocyte replication. We have previously shown that ethanol metabolism results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition, which is partially mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2. To further delineate the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates this G2/M arrest, we investigated the involvement of upstream regulators of Cdc2 activity. Cdc2 is activated by the phosphatase Cdc25C. The activity of Cdc25C can, in turn, be regulated by the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, which is regulated by the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). To investigate the involvement of these regulators of Cdc2 activity, VA-13 cells, which are Hep G2 cells modified to efficiently express alcohol dehydrogenase, were cultured in the presence or absence of 25 mM ethanol. Immunoblots were performed to determine the effects of ethanol metabolism on the activation of Cdc25C, Chk2, and ATM. Ethanol metabolism increased the active forms of ATM, and Chk2, as well as the phosphorylated form of Cdc25C. Additionally, inhibition of ATM resulted in approximately 50% of the cells being rescued from the G2/M cell cycle arrest, and ameliorated the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Our findings demonstrate that ethanol metabolism activates ATM. ATM can activate the checkpoint kinase Chk2, resulting in phosphorylation of Cdc25C, and ultimately in the accumulation of inactive Cdc2. This may, in part, explain the ethanol metabolism-mediated impairment in hepatocyte replication, which may be important in the initiation and progression of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:21924579

  16. Lysophosphatidylcholine potentiates vascular contractile responses in rat aorta via activation of tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hiroshi; Kamata, Katsuo

    2002-02-01

    We previously reported that while lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) does not itself produce contraction, it significantly potentiates the contractile responses induced by high-K(+), UK14,304 (a selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist) and phorbol ester in the endothelium-denuded rat aorta. To further investigate this phenomenon, we examined the effects of genistein and tyrphostin B42 (both tyrosine kinase inhibitors) on the LPC-induced potentiation of the contractile responses to high-K(+) and UK14,304 in the endothelium-denuded rat aorta. Although genistein (3 x 10(-6) M, 10(-5) M) did not affect the high-K(+)-induced contractile response, it selectively inhibited the potentiating effect of LPC on the contraction and it strongly inhibited the LPC-induced augmentation of the associated increases in [Ca(2+)](i). Genistein also attenuated the LPC-induced augmentation effects on both the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and contractile response induced by the UK14,304. In contrast, daidzein (10(-5) M) did not inhibit the potentiating effect of LPC. Tyrphostin B42 (3 x 10(-5) M) attenuated the potentiating effect of LPC on high K(+)-induced contractions. Western blot analysis showed that LPC increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins, including 42 and 44 kDa proteins and 53 - 64 kDa proteins. These protein phosphorylations were inhibited by genistein. Sodium orthovanadate (10(-4) M), a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, also markedly enhanced the high-K(+)-induced contractile responses. This enhancing effect was attenuated by genistein. These results suggest that the LPC-induced augmentation of contractile responses in the rat aorta is due to activation of tyrosine kinase, which in turn regulates Ca(2+) influx.

  17. Caffeine acutely activates 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and increases insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Tatsuro; Hamada, Taku; Kameda, Naoko; Karaike, Kouhei; Ma, Xiao; Masuda, Shinya; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2009-11-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) has been implicated in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism including actions such as insulin-independent glucose transport, glucose transporter 4 expression, and fatty acid utilization in skeletal muscle. These effects are similar to the exercise-induced and 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated metabolic changes in skeletal muscle, suggesting that caffeine is involved in the regulation of muscle metabolism through AMPK activation. We explored whether caffeine acts on skeletal muscle to stimulate AMPK. Incubation of rat epitrochlearis and soleus muscles with Krebs buffer containing caffeine (> or =3 mmol/L, > or =15 minutes) increased the phosphorylation of AMPKalpha Thr(172), an essential step for full kinase activation, and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase Ser(79), a downstream target of AMPK, in dose- and time-dependent manners. Analysis of isoform-specific AMPK activity revealed that both AMPKalpha1 and alpha2 activities increased significantly. This enzyme activation was associated with a reduction in phosphocreatine content and an increased rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport activity in the absence of insulin. These results suggest that caffeine has similar actions to exercise by acutely stimulating skeletal muscle AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport with a reduction of the intracellular energy status.

  18. Spotlight on peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) in chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Perry, Caroline M; Jarvis, Blair

    2002-01-01

    Peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) is a new 'pegylated' subcutaneous formulation of interferon-alpha-2a that has been developed to improve on the pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic efficacy of interferon-alpha-2a. Peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) is produced by the covalent attachment of recombinant interferon-alpha-2a to a branched mobile 40KD polyethylene glycol moiety, which shields the interferon-alpha-2a molecule from enzymatic degradation, reduces systemic clearance and enables once-weekly administration. Peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) was significantly more effective than interferon-alpha-2a in interferon-alpha therapy-naive adults with chronic hepatitis C in three nonblind, randomised, multicentre trials. Virological responses (intention-to-treat results) were achieved in 44 to 69% of patients with or without cirrhosis after 48 weeks of treatment with peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) 180 microg/week; sustained virological responses 24 weeks after the end of treatment occurred in 30 to 39% of patients. Virological responses at the end of treatment and at long-term follow-up were significantly higher than those achieved with interferon-alpha-2a. Peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) was significantly more effective than interferon-alpha in patients with or without cirrhosis infected with HCV genotype 1. Sustained biochemical responses achieved with peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) 180 microg/week ranged from 34 to 45% and were significantly higher than with interferon-alpha-2a. Recipients of peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) also experienced histological improvements; 24 weeks after discontinuation of treatment with peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) 180 microg/week, 54% to 63% of patients had a >/=2-point improvement in histological activity index score. Peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) produced histological responses in patients (with or without cirrhosis) with or without a sustained virological response. Peginterferon-alpha-2a (40KD) produced better results than interferon-alpha-2a

  19. Exploiting receptor tyrosine kinase co-activation for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Aik-Choon; Vyse, Simon; Huang, Paul H

    2017-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have shown that Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK) co-activation is prevalent in many cancer types. Compelling data demonstrates that cancers are likely to have evolved RTK co-activation as a generic means for driving tumour growth and providing a buffering system to limit the lethal effects of microenvironmental insults including therapy. In this review, we summarise the general principles of RTK co-activation gleaned from key studies over the last decade. We discuss direct and indirect approaches to exploit RTK co-activation for cancer therapy and describe recent developments in computational approaches to predict kinase co-dependencies by integrating drug screening data and kinase inhibitor selectivity profiles. We offer a perspective on the outstanding questions in the field focusing on the implications of RTK co-activation on tumour heterogeneity and cancer evolution and conclude by surveying emerging computational and experimental approaches that will provide further insights into the biology of RTK co-activation and deliver new developments in effective cancer therapies. PMID:27452454

  20. Sphingosine Kinase Protects Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Macrophages from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weicheng; Mosteller, Raymond D.; Broek, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling is critical for the innate immune response to gram-negative bacteria. Here, evidence is presented for LPS stimulation of sphingosine kinase (SPK) in the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line and rat primary hepatic macrophages (HMs). LPS treatment of RAW 264.7 cells resulted in a time- and dose-dependent activation of SPK and membrane translocation of SPK1. Further, LPS-induced SPK activation was blocked by SPK1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Overexpression of Toll-like receptor 4 and MD2, the receptor and coreceptor of LPS, in HEK 293 cells activated SPK activity in the absence of LPS treatment. Inhibition of SPK by the pharmacological inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS) or SPK1-specific siRNA blocked LPS stimulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 but enhanced LPS-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation. The SPK inhibitor DMS and dominant-negative SPK1 also blocked LPS activation of Elk-1 and NF-κB reporters in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibition of SPK sensitized RAW 264.7 cells and HMs to LPS-induced apoptosis. These data demonstrate the critical role of SPK1 in LPS signaling in macrophages and suggest that SPK1 is a potential therapeutic target to block hyperimmune responses induced by gram-negative bacteria. PMID:15314148

  1. Motogenic and morphogenic activity of epithelial receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases play essential roles in morphogenesis and differentiation of epithelia. Here we examined various tyrosine kinase receptors, which are preferentially expressed in epithelia (c-met, c- ros, c-neu, and the keratin growth factor [KGF] receptor), for their capacity to induce cell motility and branching morphogenesis of epithelial cells. We exchanged the ligand-binding domain of these receptors by the ectodomain of trkA and could thus control signaling by the new ligand, NGF. We demonstrate here that the tyrosine kinases of c- met, c-ros, c-neu, the KGF receptor, and trkA, but not the insulin receptor, induced scattering and increased motility of kidney epithelial cells in tissue culture. Mutational analysis suggests that SHC binding is essential for scattering and increased cell motility induced by trkA. The induction of motility in epithelial cells is thus an important feature of various receptor tyrosine kinases, which in vivo play a role in embryogenesis and metastasis. In contrast, only the c-met receptor promoted branching morphogenesis of kidney epithelial cells in three-dimensional matrices, which resemble the formation of tubular epithelia in development. Interestingly, the ability of c-met to induce morphogenesis could be transferred to trkA, when in a novel receptor hybrid COOH-terminal sequences of c-met (including Y14 to Y16) were fused to the trkA kinase domain. These data demonstrate that tubulogenesis of epithelia is a restricted activity of tyrosine kinases, as yet only demonstrated for the c-met receptor. We predict the existence of specific substrates that mediate this morphogenesis signal. PMID:8655582

  2. Timeless Links Replication Termination to Mitotic Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L.; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication. PMID:21573113

  3. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-05-06

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  4. The structures of the kinase domain and UBA domain of MPK38 suggest the activation mechanism for kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Soon; Yoo, Jiho; Park, Soomin; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Murine protein serine/threonine kinase 38 (MPK38) is the murine orthologue of human maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), which belongs to the SNF1/AMPK family. MELK is considered to be a promising drug target for anticancer therapy because overexpression and hyperactivation of MELK is correlated with several human cancers. Activation of MPK38 requires the extended sequence (ExS) containing the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) linker and UBA domain and phosphorylation of the activation loop. However, the activation mechanism of MPK38 is unknown. This paper reports the crystal structure of MPK38 (T167E), which mimics a phosphorylated state of the activation loop, in complex with AMP-PNP. In the MPK38 structure, the UBA linker forces an inward movement of the αC helix. Phosphorylation of the activation loop then induces movement of the activation loop towards the C-lobe and results in interlobar cleft closure. These processes generate a fully active state of MPK38. This structure suggests that MPK38 has a similar molecular mechanism regulating activation as in other kinases of the SNF1/AMPK family. PMID:24531485

  5. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activity].

    PubMed

    Haga, T; Haga, K; Kameyama, K; Nakata, H

    1994-09-01

    Recent progress on the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases is reviewed. beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is activated by G protein beta gamma -subunits, which interact with the carboxyl terminal portion of beta ARK. Muscarinic receptor m2-subtypes are phosphorylated by beta ARK1 in the central part of the third intracellular loop (I3). Phosphorylation of I3-GST fusion protein by beta ARK1 is synergistically stimulated by the beta gamma -subunits and mastoparan or a peptide corresponding to portions adjacent to the transmembrane segments of m2-receptors or by beta gamma -subunits and the agonist-bound I3-deleted m2 variant. These results indicate that agonist-bound receptors serve as both substrates and activators of beta ARK.

  6. Kinase inhibitors with redox and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, Nina; Saso, Luciano; Dimitrov, Petya

    2015-01-01

    The development of inflammatory immune response is related to an activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling. The intracellular molecules from this pathway are sensitive to the alterations in the microenvironment. The changes in cellular redox state, proliferation, gene expression pattern and genomic stability during inflammation induce the activation of non-canonical and atypical NK-κB signaling increasing the crosstalk with molecules involved in neddylation, cell cycle checkpoints regulation and DNA repair. This review article describes the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive kinases from the NF-κB pathway and presents the effects of their suppression by small kinase inhibitors. It illustrates that selective targeting of the redox sensor molecules from the inflammatory NK- κB cascades can influence cell survival and metabolism as well. We think that this issue is important when evaluating the drug efficacy in clinical studies and their side effects.

  7. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2004-01-01

    The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy. PMID:15219238

  8. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Is Required for Berberine-Induced Reduction of Atherosclerosis in Mice: The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilong; Zhang, Miao; Liang, Bin; Shirwany, Najeeb; Zhu, Yi; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Aims Berberine, a botanical alkaloid purified from Coptidis rhizoma, is reported to activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Whether AMPK is required for the protective effects of berberine in cardiovascular diseases remains unknown. This study was designed to determine whether AMPK is required for berberine-induced reduction of oxidative stress and atherosclerosis in vivo. Methods ApoE (ApoE-/-) mice and ApoE-/-/AMPK alpha 2-/- mice that were fed Western diets were treated with berberine for 8 weeks. Atherosclerotic aortic lesions, expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and markers of oxidative stress were evaluated in isolated aortas. Results In ApoE-/- mice, chronic administration of berberine significantly reduced aortic lesions, markedly reduced oxidative stress and expression of adhesion molecules in aorta, and significantly increased UCP2 levels. In contrast, in ApoE-/-/AMPK alpha 2-/- mice, berberine had little effect on those endpoints. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), berberine significantly increased UCP2 mRNA and protein expression in an AMPK-dependent manner. Transfection of HUVECs with nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1)-specific siRNA attenuated berberine-induced expression of UCP2, whereas transfection with control siRNA did not. Finally, berberine promoted mitochondrial biogenesis that contributed to up-regulation of UCP2 expression. Conclusion We conclude that berberine reduces oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, and suppresses atherogenesis via a mechanism that includes stimulation of AMPK-dependent UCP2 expression. PMID:21980456

  9. Pivotal Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Inflammatory Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Wang, Gang; Ye, Richard D.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) is exclusively regulated by p38 MAPK in vivo. Upon activation of p38 MAPK, MK2 binds with p38 MAPK, leading to phosphorylation of TTP, Hsp27, Akt and Cdc25 that are involved in regulation of various essential cellular functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of MK2 in regulation of TNF-α production, NADPH oxidase activation, neutrophil migration, and DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest which are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Collectively current and emerging new information indicate that developing MK2 inhibitors and blocking MK2-mediated signal pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases and lung cancer. PMID:26119506

  10. Regulation of macropinocytosis by p21-activated kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Dharmawardhane, S; Schürmann, A; Sells, M A; Chernoff, J; Schmid, S L; Bokoch, G M

    2000-10-01

    The process of macropinocytosis is an essential aspect of normal cell function, contributing to both growth and motile processes of cells. p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are targets for activated Rac and Cdc42 guanosine 5'-triphosphatases and have been shown to regulate the actin-myosin cytoskeleton. In fibroblasts PAK1 localizes to areas of membrane ruffling, as well as to amiloride-sensitive pinocytic vesicles. Expression of a PAK1 kinase autoinhibitory domain blocked both platelet-derived growth factor- and RacQ61L-stimulated uptake of 70-kDa dextran particles, whereas an inactive version of this domain did not, indicating that PAK kinase activity is required for normal growth factor-induced macropinocytosis. The mechanisms by which PAK modulate macropinocytosis were examined in NIH3T3 cell lines expressing various PAK1 constructs under the control of a tetracycline-responsive transactivator. Cells expressing PAK1 (H83,86L), a mutant that dramatically stimulates formation of dorsal membrane ruffles, exhibited increased macropinocytic uptake of 70-kDa dextran particles in the absence of additional stimulation. This effect was not antagonized by coexpression of dominant-negative Rac1-T17N. In the presence of platelet-derived growth factor, both PAK1 (H83,86L) and a highly kinase active PAK1 (T423E) mutant dramatically enhanced the uptake of 70-kDa dextran. Neither wild-type PAK1 nor vector controls exhibited enhanced macropinocytosis, nor did PAK1 (H83,86L) affect clathrin-dependent endocytic mechanisms. Active versions of PAK1 enhanced both growth factor-stimulated 70-kDa dextran uptake and efflux, suggesting that PAK1 activity modulated pinocytic vesicle cycling. These data indicate that PAK1 plays an important regulatory role in the process of macropinocytosis, perhaps related to the requirement for PAK in directed cell motility.

  11. Extending Thymidine Kinase Activity to the Catalytic Repertoire of Human Deoxycytidine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Saugata; Sabini, Eliszbetta; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2009-03-04

    Salvage of nucleosides in the cytosol of human cells is carried out by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Whereas TK1 is only responsible for thymidine phosphorylation, dCK is capable of converting dC, dA, and dG into their monophosphate forms. Using structural data on dCK, we predicted that select mutations at the active site would, in addition to making the enzyme faster, expand the catalytic repertoire of dCK to include thymidine. Specifically, we hypothesized that steric repulsion between the methyl group of the thymine base and Arg104 is the main factor preventing the phosphorylation of thymidine by wild-type dCK. Here we present kinetic data on several dCK variants where Arg104 has been replaced by select residues, all performed in combination with the mutation of Asp133 to an alanine. We show that several hydrophobic residues at position 104 endow dCK with thymidine kinase activity. Depending on the exact nature of the mutations, the enzyme's substrate preference is modified. The R104M-D133A double mutant is a pyrimidine-specific enzyme due to large K{sub m} values with purines. The crystal structure of the double mutant R104M-D133A in complex with the L-form of thymidine supplies a structural explanation for the ability of this variant to phosphorylate thymidine and thymidine analogs. The replacement of Arg104 by a smaller residue allows L-dT to bind deeper into the active site, making space for the C5-methyl group of the thymine base. The unique catalytic properties of several of the mutants make them good candidates for suicide-gene/protein-therapy applications.

  12. Ischemia induced activation of heat shock protein 27 kinases and casein kinase 2 in the preconditioned rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Kim, S O; Baines, C P; Critz, S D; Pelech, S L; Katz, S; Downey, J M; Cohen, M V

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC), p38 MAP kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated kinases 2 and 3 (MAPKAPK2 and MAPKAPK3) have been implicated in ischemic preconditioning (PC) of the heart to reduce damage following a myocardial infarct. This study examined whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1, p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6K), casein kinase 2 (CK2), and other hsp27 kinases are also activated by PC, and if they are required for protection in rabbit hearts. CK2 and hsp27 kinase activities declined during global ischemia in control hearts, whereas PC with 5 min ischemia and 10 min reperfusion increased their activities during global ischemia. Resource Q chromatography resolved two distinct peaks of hsp27 phosphotransferase activities; the first peak (at 0.36 M NaCl) appeared to correspond to the 55-kDa MAPKAPK2. Erk1 activity was elevated in both control and PC hearts after post-ischemic reperfusion, but no change was observed in p70 S6K activity. Infarct size (measured by triphenyltetrazolium staining) in isolated rabbit hearts subjected to 30 min regional ischemia and 2 h reperfusion was 31.0+/-2.6% of the risk zone in controls and was 10.3+/-2.2% in PC hearts (p<0.001). Neither the CK2 inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) nor the Mek1/2 inhibitor PD98059 infused during ischemia blocked protection by PC. The activation of CK2 and Erk1 in ischemic preconditioned hearts appear to be epiphenomena and not required for the reduction of infarction from myocardial ischemia.

  13. Synthetic phosphorylation of p38α recapitulates protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chooi, K Phin; Galan, Sébastien R G; Raj, Ritu; McCullagh, James; Mohammed, Shabaz; Jones, Lyn H; Davis, Benjamin G

    2014-02-05

    Through a "tag-and-modify" protein chemical modification strategy, we site-selectively phosphorylated the activation loop of protein kinase p38α. Phosphorylation at natural (180) and unnatural (172) sites created two pure phospho-forms. p38α bearing only a single phosphocysteine (pCys) as a mimic of pThr at 180 was sufficient to switch the kinase to an active state, capable of processing natural protein substrate ATF2; 172 site phosphorylation did not. In this way, we chemically recapitulated triggering of a relevant segment of the MAPK-signaling pathway in vitro. This allowed detailed kinetic analysis of global and stoichiometric phosphorylation events catalyzed by p38α and revealed that site 180 is a sufficient activator alone and engenders dominant mono-phosphorylation activity. Moreover, a survey of kinase inhibition using inhibitors with different (Type I/II) modes (including therapeutically relevant) revealed unambiguously that Type II inhibitors inhibit phosphorylated p38α and allowed discovery of a predictive kinetic analysis based on cooperativity to distinguish Type I vs II.

  14. SKK4, a novel activator of stress-activated protein kinase-1 (SAPK1/JNK).

    PubMed

    Lawler, S; Cuenda, A; Goedert, M; Cohen, P

    1997-09-01

    A cDNA was cloned and expressed that encodes human stress-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (SKK4), a novel MAP kinase kinase family member whose mRNA is widely expressed in human tissues. SKK4 activated SAPK1/JNK in vitro, but not SAPK2a/p38, SAPK2b/p38beta, SAPK3/ERK6 or SAPK4. It appears to be the mammalian homologue of HEP, an activator of SAPK1/JNK in Drosophila. In human epithelial KB cells SKK4 and SKK1/MKK4 (another activator of SAPK1/JNK) were both activated by stressful stimuli, but only SKK4 was activated by proinflammatory cytokines. The identification of SKK4 explains why the major SAPK1/JNK activator detected in many mammalian cell extracts is chromatographically separable from SKK1/MKK4.

  15. Nck-Interacting Ste20 Kinase Couples Eph Receptors to c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase and Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Elena; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Holland, Sacha; Pawson, Tony; Daniel, Tom O.; Skolnik, Edward Y.

    2000-01-01

    The mammalian Ste20 kinase Nck-interacting kinase (NIK) specifically activates the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase module. NIK also binds the SH3 domains of the SH2/SH3 adapter protein Nck. To determine whether Nck functions as an adapter to couple NIK to a receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, we determined whether NIK is activated by Eph receptors (EphR). EphRs constitute the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), and members of this family play important roles in patterning of the nervous and vascular systems. In this report, we show that NIK kinase activity is specifically increased in cells stimulated by two EphRs, EphB1 and EphB2. EphB1 kinase activity and phosphorylation of a juxtamembrane tyrosine (Y594), conserved in all Eph receptors, are both critical for NIK activation by EphB1. Although pY594 in the EphB1R has previously been shown to bind the SH2 domain of Nck, we found that stimulation of EphB1 and EphB2 led predominantly to a complex between NIK/Nck, p62dok, RasGAP, and an unidentified 145-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. Tyrosine-phosphorylated p62dok most probably binds directly to the SH2 domain of Nck and RasGAP and indirectly to NIK bound to the SH3 domain of Nck. We found that NIK activation is also critical for coupling EphB1R to biological responses that include the activation of integrins and JNK by EphB1. Taken together, these findings support a model in which the recruitment of the Ste20 kinase NIK to phosphotyrosine-containing proteins by Nck is an important proximal step in the signaling cascade downstream of EphRs. PMID:10669731

  16. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ regulates RhoA activation via a kinase-independent scaffolding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ard, Ryan; Mulatz, Kirk; Abramovici, Hanan; Maillet, Jean-Christian; Fottinger, Alexandra; Foley, Tanya; Byham, Michèle-Renée; Iqbal, Tasfia Ahmed; Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R; Parks, Robin J; Gee, Stephen H

    2012-10-01

    Rho GTPases share a common inhibitor, Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI), which regulates their expression levels, membrane localization, and activation state. The selective dissociation of individual Rho GTPases from RhoGDI ensures appropriate responses to cellular signals, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, selectively dissociates Rac1 by stimulating PAK1-mediated phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-101/174. Similarly, phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-34 by protein kinase Cα (PKCα) selectively releases RhoA. Here we show DGKζ is required for RhoA activation and Ser-34 phosphorylation, which were decreased in DGKζ-deficient fibroblasts and rescued by wild-type DGKζ or a catalytically inactive mutant. DGKζ bound directly to the C-terminus of RhoA and the regulatory arm of RhoGDI and was required for efficient interaction of PKCα and RhoA. DGKζ-null fibroblasts had condensed F-actin bundles and altered focal adhesion distribution, indicative of aberrant RhoA signaling. Two targets of the RhoA effector ROCK showed reduced phosphorylation in DGKζ-null cells. Collectively our findings suggest DGKζ functions as a scaffold to assemble a signaling complex that functions as a RhoA-selective, GDI dissociation factor. As a regulator of Rac1 and RhoA activity, DGKζ is a critical factor linking changes in lipid signaling to actin reorganization.

  17. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation interaction network in Bacillus subtilis reveals new substrates, kinase activators and kinase cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ventroux, Magali; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Signal transduction in eukaryotes is generally transmitted through phosphorylation cascades that involve a complex interplay of transmembrane receptors, protein kinases, phosphatases and their targets. Our previous work indicated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases may exhibit similar properties, since they act on many different substrates. To capture the complexity of this phosphorylation-based network, we performed a comprehensive interactome study focused on the protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The resulting network identified many potential new substrates of kinases and phosphatases, some of which were experimentally validated. Our study highlighted the role of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases in DNA metabolism, transcriptional control and cell division. This interaction network reveals significant crosstalk among different classes of kinases. We found that tyrosine kinases can bind to several modulators, transmembrane or cytosolic, consistent with a branching of signaling pathways. Most particularly, we found that the division site regulator MinD can form a complex with the tyrosine kinase PtkA and modulate its activity in vitro. In vivo, it acts as a scaffold protein which anchors the kinase at the cell pole. This network highlighted a role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the spatial regulation of the Z-ring during cytokinesis. PMID:25374563

  18. K63-Linked Ubiquitination in Kinase Activation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guocan; Gao, Yuan; Li, Liren; Jin, Guoxiang; Cai, Zhen; Chao, Jui-I; Lin, Hui-Kuan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitination has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in multiple biological functions, which include cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, innate immune response, and neuronal degeneration. Although the role of ubiquitination in targeting proteins for proteasome-dependent degradation have been extensively studied and well-characterized, the critical non-proteolytic functions of ubiquitination, such as protein trafficking and kinase activation, involved in cell survival and cancer development, just start to emerge, In this review, we will summarize recent progresses in elucidating the non-proteolytic function of ubiquitination signaling in protein kinase activation and its implications in human cancers. The advancement in the understanding of the novel functions of ubiquitination in signal transduction pathways downstream of growth factor receptors may provide novel paradigms for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:22649774

  19. Protein kinase A regulates the osteogenic activity of Osterix.

    PubMed

    He, Siyuan; Choi, You Hee; Choi, Joong-Kook; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Chun, ChangJu; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2014-10-01

    Osterix belongs to the SP gene family and is a core transcription factor responsible for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Activation of protein kinase A (PKA), a serine/threonine kinase, is essential for controlling bone formation and BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation. However, the relationship between Osterix and PKA is still unclear. In this report, we investigated the precise role of the PKA pathway in regulating Osterix during osteoblast differentiation. We found that PKA increased the protein level of Osterix; PKA phosphorylated Osterix, increased protein stability, and enhanced the transcriptional activity of Osterix. These results suggest that Osterix is a novel target of PKA, and PKA modulates osteoblast differentiation partially through the regulation of Osterix.

  20. Meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol but not sufentanil interact with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor knock out mice brain.

    PubMed

    Höcker, Jan; Weber, Bernd; Tonner, Peter H; Scholz, Jens; Brand, Philipp-Alexander; Ohnesorge, Henning; Bein, Berthold

    2008-03-17

    alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists like clonidine or dexmedetomidine increase the sedative and analgesic actions of opioids. Furthermore opioids like meperidine show potent anti-shivering effects like alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. The underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects are still poorly defined. The authors therefore studied the ability of four different opioids (meperidine, remifentanil, sufentanil and tramadol) to interact with different alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in mice lacking individual alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- or alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor knock out (alpha(2)-AR KO) mice)). The interaction of opioids with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors was investigated by quantitative receptor autoradiography in brain slices of alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- or alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor deficient mice. Displacement of the radiolabelled alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist [(125)I]-paraiodoclonidine ([(125)I]-PIC) from alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in different brain regions by increasing opioid concentrations was measured, and binding affinity of the analysed opioids to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in different brain regions was quantified. Meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol but not sufentanil provoked dose dependent displacement of specifically bound [(125)I]-PIC from all alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in cortex, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, thalamus, hippocampus and pons. Required concentrations of meperidine and remifentanil for [(125)I]-PIC displacement from alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors were lower than from alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors, indicating higher binding affinity for alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. In contrast, [(125)I]-PIC displacement by tramadol indicated higher binding affinity to alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors than to alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. Our results indicate that meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol interact with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in mouse brain showing different affinity for alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Regulates Seed Dormancy in Barley.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingo; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Morishige, Hiromi; Kubo, Yuta; Nakamura, Masako; Ichimura, Kazuya; Seo, Shigemi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ando, Tsuyu; Hensel, Goetz; Sameri, Mohammad; Stein, Nils; Sato, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-03-21

    Seed dormancy has fundamental importance in plant survival and crop production; however, the mechanisms regulating dormancy remain unclear [1-3]. Seed dormancy levels generally decrease during domestication to ensure that crops successfully germinate in the field. However, reduction of seed dormancy can cause devastating losses in cereals like wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) due to pre-harvest sprouting, the germination of mature seed (grain) on the mother plant when rain occurs before harvest. Understanding the mechanisms of dormancy can facilitate breeding of crop varieties with the appropriate levels of seed dormancy [4-8]. Barley is a model crop [9, 10] and has two major seed dormancy quantitative trait loci (QTLs), SD1 and SD2, on chromosome 5H [11-19]. We detected a QTL designated Qsd2-AK at SD2 as the single major determinant explaining the difference in seed dormancy between the dormant cultivar "Azumamugi" (Az) and the non-dormant cultivar "Kanto Nakate Gold" (KNG). Using map-based cloning, we identified the causal gene for Qsd2-AK as Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3). The dormant Az allele of MKK3 is recessive; the N260T substitution in this allele decreases MKK3 kinase activity and appears to be causal for Qsd2-AK. The N260T substitution occurred in the immediate ancestor allele of the dormant allele, and the established dormant allele became prevalent in barley cultivars grown in East Asia, where the rainy season and harvest season often overlap. Our findings show fine-tuning of seed dormancy during domestication and provide key information for improving pre-harvest sprouting tolerance in barley and wheat.

  2. Salicylic acid activates a 48-kD MAP kinase in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Klessig, D F

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway leading to pathogenesis-related gene induction has previously been demonstrated using kinase and phosphatase inhibitors. Here, we show that in tobacco suspension cells, SA induced a rapid and transient activation of a 48-kD kinase that uses myelin basic protein as a substrate. This kinase is called the p48 SIP kinase (for SA-Induced Protein kinase). Biologically active analogs of SA, which induce pathogenesis-related genes and enhanced resistance, also activated this kinase, whereas inactive analogs did not. Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue(s) in the SIP kinase was associated with its activation. The SIP kinase was purified to homogeneity from SA-treated tobacco suspension culture cells. The purified SIP kinase is strongly phosphorylated on a tyrosine residue(s), and treatment with either protein tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphatases abolished its activity. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, we cloned the SIP kinase gene. Analysis of the SIP kinase sequence indicates that it belongs to the MAP kinase family and that it is distinct from the other plant MAP kinases previously implicated in stress responses, suggesting that different members of the MAP kinase family are activated by different stresses. PMID:9165755

  3. Alpha2-adrenoreceptors profile modulation. 4. From antagonist to agonist behavior.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Francesco; Cardinaletti, Claudia; Vesprini, Cristian; Carrieri, Antonio; Ghelfi, Francesca; Farande, Aniket; Giannella, Mario; Piergentili, Alessandro; Quaglia, Wilma; Laurila, Jonne M; Huhtinen, Anna; Scheinin, Mika; Pigini, Maria

    2008-07-24

    The goal of the present study was to modulate the receptor interaction properties of known alpha 2-adrenoreceptor (AR) antagonists to obtain novel alpha 2-AR agonists with desirable subtype selectivity. Therefore, a phenyl group or one of its bioisosteres or aliphatic moieties with similar steric hindrance were introduced into the aromatic ring of the antagonist lead basic structure. The functional properties of the novel compounds allowed our previous observations to be confirmed. The high efficacy of 7, 12, and 13 as alpha 2-AR agonists and the significant alpha 2C-AR subtype selective activation displayed by 11 and 15 demonstrated that favorable interactions to induce alpha 2-AR activation were formed between the pendant groups of the ligands and the aromatic cluster present in transmembrane domain 6 of the binding site cavity of the receptors.

  4. Inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity stimulates macroautophagy☆

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Claudia; Mamais, Adamantios; Dihanich, Sybille; Abeti, Rosella; Soutar, Marc P.M.; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Giunti, Paola; Tooze, Sharon A.; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Leucine Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) is one of the most important genetic contributors to Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has been implicated in a number of cellular processes, including macroautophagy. To test whether LRRK2 has a role in regulating autophagy, a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of LRRK2 was applied to human neuroglioma cells and downstream readouts of autophagy examined. The resulting data demonstrate that inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity stimulates macroautophagy in the absence of any alteration in the translational targets of mTORC1, suggesting that LRRK2 regulates autophagic vesicle formation independent of canonical mTORC1 signaling. This study represents the first pharmacological dissection of the role LRRK2 plays in the autophagy/lysosomal pathway, emphasizing the importance of this pathway as a marker for LRRK2 physiological function. Moreover it highlights the need to dissect autophagy and lysosomal activities in the context of LRRK2 related pathologies with the final aim of understanding their aetiology and identifying specific targets for disease modifying therapies in patients. PMID:23916833

  5. Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK) mediates Bcl10-independent NF-kappa B activation induced by phorbol ester.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiro; Ruland, Jürgen; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C; Yamaoka, Shoji; Chen, Felicia F; Lin, Amy; Mak, Tak W; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2002-08-30

    Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK) is a recently described kinase of unknown function that was identified on the basis of its specific interaction with PKC beta. PKK contains N-terminal kinase and C-terminal ankyrin repeats domains linked to an intermediate region. Here we report that the kinase domain of PKK is highly homologous to that of two mediators of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation, RICK and RIP, but these related kinases have different C-terminal domains for binding to upstream factors. We find that expression of PKK, like RICK and RIP, induces NF-kappa B activation. Mutational analysis revealed that the kinase domain of PKK is essential for NF-kappa B activation, whereas replacement of serine residues in the putative activation loop did not affect the ability of PKK to activate NF-kappa B. A catalytic inactive PKK mutant inhibited NF-kappa B activation induced by phorbol ester and Ca(2+)-ionophore, but it did not block that mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, or Nod1. Inhibition of NF-kappa B activation by dominant negative PKK was reverted by co-expression of PKC beta I, suggesting a functional association between PKK and PKC beta I. PKK-mediated NF-kappa B activation required IKK alpha and IKK beta but not IKK gamma, the regulatory subunit of the IKK complex. Moreover, NF-kappa B activation induced by PKK was not inhibited by dominant negative Bimp1 and proceeded in the absence of Bcl10, two components of a recently described PKC signaling pathway. These results suggest that PKK is a member of the RICK/RIP family of kinases, which is involved in a PKC-activated NF-kappa B signaling pathway that is independent of Bcl10 and IKK gamma.

  6. High fructose diet increases anterior hypothalamic alpha 2-adrenoceptors responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Marcos A; Höcht, Christian; Opezzo, Javier A; Taira, Carlos A; Fernández, Belisario E; Puyó, Ana M

    2007-08-16

    Activation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in the anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) decreases sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate activity of pre- and postsynaptic alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in the AHA of fructose hypertensive rats (F), an animal model of insulin resistance and hypertension. The AHA of Control (C) and F anaesthetized rats was perfused with Ringer solution in the absence or presence of clonidine (100 or 300 microg ml(-1)) using reverse microdialysis. Clonidine effects on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), and on hypothalamic noradrenaline levels were measured along perfusion time. Noradrenaline extracellular levels in the AHA were significantly diminished in F hypertensive rats compared to C animals. The depressor effect of intrahypothalamic perfusion of clonidine on MAP was enhanced in F rats compared with C animals. Intrahypothalamic perfusion of clonidine reduced HR only in F rats. The effect of clonidine on noradrenaline hypothalamic extracellular levels was enhanced in F rats. These results suggest, in our experimental conditions, the existence of an increased responsiveness of pre- and postsynaptic alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in the AHA of F hypertensive rats. This fact could be a consequence of a compensatory supersensitivity of alpha-adrenoceptors due to a decrease in noradrenaline release from nerve terminals located in the AHA.

  7. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells.

    PubMed

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-09-14

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally replaces the endogenous kinase in cells and allows the activation of the kinase to be followed throughout the cell cycle. Inhibiting the catalytic activity of the kinase prevents the conformational changes of the biosensor. Using this approach, we discover that aurora kinase A activates during G1 to regulate the stability of microtubules in cooperation with TPX2 and CEP192. These results demonstrate that the aurora kinase A biosensor is a powerful tool to identify new regulatory pathways controlling aurora kinase A activation.

  8. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally replaces the endogenous kinase in cells and allows the activation of the kinase to be followed throughout the cell cycle. Inhibiting the catalytic activity of the kinase prevents the conformational changes of the biosensor. Using this approach, we discover that aurora kinase A activates during G1 to regulate the stability of microtubules in cooperation with TPX2 and CEP192. These results demonstrate that the aurora kinase A biosensor is a powerful tool to identify new regulatory pathways controlling aurora kinase A activation. PMID:27624869

  9. RACK1 binds to Smad3 to modulate transforming growth factor-beta1-stimulated alpha2(I) collagen transcription in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kazuhiro; Schnaper, H William; Bomsztyk, Karol; Hayashida, Tomoko

    2006-09-08

    Although it is clear that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is critical for renal fibrogenesis, the complexity of the involved mechanisms is increasingly apparent. TGF-beta1 stimulates phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and activates other signaling molecules as well. The molecular link between these other kinases and Smads is not known. We sought new binding partners for Smad3 in renal cells and identified receptor for activated protein kinase C 1 (RACK1) as a novel binding partner of Smad3. The linker region of Smad3 and the tryptophan-aspartic acid repeat 6 and 7 of RACK1 are sufficient for the association. RACK1 also interacts with Smad3 in the human kidney epithelial cell line, HKC. Silencing RACK1 increases transcriptional activity of TGF-beta1-responsive promoter sequences of the Smad binding element (SBE), p3TP-Lux, and alpha2(I) collagen. Conversely, overexpressed RACK1 negatively modulates alpha2(I) collagen transcriptional activity in TGF-beta1-stimulated cells. RACK1 did not affect phosphorylation of Smad3 at the C terminus or in the linker region. However, RACK1 reduced direct binding of Smad3 to the SBE motif. Mutating a RACK1 tyrosine at residue 246, but not at 228, decreased the inhibitory effect of RACK1 on both alpha2(I) collagen promoter activity and Smad binding to SBE induced by TGF-beta1. These results suggest that RACK1 modulates transcription of alpha2(I) collagen by TGF-beta1 through interference with Smad3 binding to the gene promoter.

  10. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  11. Peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated sympathoinhibitory effects of mivazerol.

    PubMed

    Richer, C; Gobert, J; Noyer, M; Wülfert, E; Giudicelli, J F

    1996-01-01

    Mivazerol is a new compound that could potentially reduce perioperative cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with or at risk of coronary disease and submitted to surgery. This action of mivazerol depends on a well documented centrally mediated reduction in sympathetic nerve activity, but a direct peripheral decrease in sympathetic neurotransmitter release induced by activation of prejunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors located on sympathetic nerve endings could also contribute. To investigate this issue, the effects of mivazerol on the pressor, systemic and regional hemodynamic (pulsed Doppler technique) as well as on the cardiac responses to electrical stimulation of the spinal cord (SCS) were measured in pithed rats in the absence and in the presence of mivazerol. Mivazerol exerted strong sympathoinhibitory effects: SCS-induced increases in blood pressure, total peripheral resistance and heart rate were dose-dependently reduced by mivazerol, but among the regional vascular beds investigated, only the hindlimb vasoconstrictor responses were significantly drug-affected. All these sympathoinhibitory effects of mivazerol were abolished by prior yohimbine administration. Simultaneously, mivazerol did not induce any postjunctional adrenoceptor blockade as it did not affect noradrenaline cardiac and hemodynamic effects. On the contrary, through postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptor stimulation, mivazerol, in this pithed preparation, dose-dependently increased blood pressure, total peripheral and hindlimb vascular resistances, but heart rate was not affected. We conclude that, in the pithed rat, mivazerol exerts strong peripheral sympathoinhibitory effects. The mechanism involved is prejunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptor activation as i) mivazerol does not display any postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptor blocking effect--it even behaves as as postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist--and ii) yohimbine abolishes mivazerol's sympathoinhibitory effects. Thus, direct

  12. Functions of AMP-activated protein kinase in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Daval, Marie; Foufelle, Fabienne; Ferré, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is involved in cellular energy homeostasis. Its functions have been extensively studied in muscles and liver. AMPK stimulates pathways which increase energy production (glucose transport, fatty acid oxidation) and switches off pathways which consume energy (lipogenesis, protein synthesis, gluconeogenesis). This has led to the concept that AMPK has an interesting pharmaceutical potential in situations of insulin resistance and it is indeed the target of existing drugs and hormones which improve insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue is a key player in energy metabolism through the release of substrates and hormones involved in metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Activation of AMPK in adipose tissue can be achieved through situations such as fasting and exercise. Leptin and adiponectin as well as hypoglycaemic drugs are activators of adipose tissue AMPK. This activation probably involves changes in the AMP/ATP ratio and the upstream kinase LKB1. When activated, AMPK limits fatty acid efflux from adipocytes and favours local fatty acid oxidation. Since fatty acids have a key role in insulin resistance, especially in muscles, activating AMPK in adipose tissue might be found to be beneficial in insulin-resistant states, particularly as AMPK activation also reduces cytokine secretion in adipocytes. PMID:16709632

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase activates transcription of the UCP3 and HKII genes in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Stoppani, James; Hildebrandt, Audrey L; Sakamoto, Kei; Cameron-Smith, David; Goodyear, Laurie J; Neufer, P Darrell

    2002-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently emerged as a key signaling protein in skeletal muscle, coordinating the activation of both glucose and fatty acid metabolism in response to increased cellular energy demand. To determine whether AMPK signaling may also regulate gene transcription in muscle, rats were given a single subcutaneous injection (1 mg/g) of the AMP analog 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribonucleoside (AICAR). AICAR injection activated (P < 0.05) AMPK-alpha 2 ( approximately 2.5-fold) and transcription of the uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3, approximately 4-fold) and hexokinase II (HKII, approximately 10-fold) genes in both red and white skeletal muscle. However, AICAR injection also elicited (P < 0.05) an acute drop (60%) in blood glucose and a sustained (2-h) increase in blood lactate, prompting concern regarding the specificity of AICAR on transcription. To maximize AMPK activation in muscle while minimizing potential systemic counterregulatory responses, a single-leg arterial infusion technique was employed in fully conscious rats. Relative to saline-infused controls, single-leg arterial infusion of AICAR (0.125, 0.5, and 2.5 micro g. g(-1). min(-1) for 60 min) induced a dose-dependent increase (2- to 4-fold, P < 0.05) in UCP3 and HKII transcription in both red and white skeletal muscle. Importantly, AICAR infusion activated transcription only in muscle from the infused leg and had no effect on blood glucose or lactate levels. These data provide evidence that AMPK signaling is linked to the transcriptional regulation of select metabolic genes in skeletal muscle.

  14. AMP kinase activation with AICAR further increases fatty acid oxidation and blunts triacylglycerol hydrolysis in contracting rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela C; Bruce, Clinton R; Dyck, David J

    2005-06-01

    Muscle contraction increases glucose uptake and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in isolated rat skeletal muscle, due at least in part to an increase in AMP-activated kinase activity (AMPK). However, the extent to which AMPK plays a role in the regulation of substrate utilization during contraction is not fully understood. We examined the acute effects of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR; 2 mm), a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on FA metabolism and glucose oxidation during high intensity tetanic contraction in isolated rat soleus muscle strips. Muscle strips were exposed to two different FA concentrations (low fatty acid, LFA, 0.2 mm; high fatty acid, HFA, 1 mm) to examine the role that FA availability may play in both exogenous and endogenous FA metabolism with contraction and AICAR. Synergistic increases in AMPK alpha2 activity (+45%; P<0.05) were observed after 30 min of contraction with AICAR, which further increased exogenous FA oxidation (LFA: +71%, P<0.05; HFA: +46%, P<0.05) regardless of FA availability. While there were no changes in triacylglycerol (TAG) esterification, AICAR did increase the ratio of FA partitioned to oxidation relative to TAG esterification (LFA: +65%, P<0.05). AICAR significantly blunted endogenous TAG hydrolysis (LFA: -294%, P<0.001; HFA: -117%, P<0.05), but had no effect on endogenous oxidation rates, suggesting a better matching between TAG hydrolysis and subsequent oxidative needs of the muscle. There was no effect of AICAR on the already elevated rates of glucose oxidation during contraction. These results suggest that FA metabolism is very sensitive to AMPK alpha2 stimulation during contraction.

  15. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  16. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554) in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins) as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression—including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding, and degradation) steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:26579181

  17. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Activated Protein Kinase 2 Regulates Actin Polymerization and Vascular Leak in Ventilator Associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Damarla, Mahendra; Hasan, Emile; Boueiz, Adel; Le, Anne; Pae, Hyun Hae; Montouchet, Calypso; Kolb, Todd; Simms, Tiffany; Myers, Allen; Kayyali, Usamah S.; Gaestel, Matthias; Peng, Xinqi; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Damico, Rachel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation, a fundamental therapy for acute lung injury, worsens pulmonary vascular permeability by exacting mechanical stress on various components of the respiratory system causing ventilator associated lung injury. We postulated that MK2 activation via p38 MAP kinase induced HSP25 phosphorylation, in response to mechanical stress, leading to actin stress fiber formation and endothelial barrier dysfunction. We sought to determine the role of p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 on HSP25 phosphorylation and actin stress fiber formation in ventilator associated lung injury. Wild type and MK2−/− mice received mechanical ventilation with high (20 ml/kg) or low (7 ml/kg) tidal volumes up to 4 hrs, after which lungs were harvested for immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and lung permeability assays. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation resulted in significant phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, MK2, HSP25, actin polymerization, and an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability in wild type mice as compared to spontaneous breathing or low tidal volume mechanical ventilation. However, pretreatment of wild type mice with specific p38 MAP kinase or MK2 inhibitors abrogated HSP25 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, and protected against increased lung permeability. Finally, MK2−/− mice were unable to phosphorylate HSP25 or increase actin polymerization from baseline, and were resistant to increases in lung permeability in response to HVT MV. Our results suggest that p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 mediate lung permeability in ventilator associated lung injury by regulating HSP25 phosphorylation and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:19240800

  18. Arenavirus nucleoprotein targets interferon regulatory factor-activating kinase IKKε.

    PubMed

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Pasqual, Giulia; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Arenaviruses perturb innate antiviral defense by blocking induction of type I interferon (IFN) production. Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) was shown to block activation and nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to virus infection. Here, we sought to identify cellular factors involved in innate antiviral signaling targeted by arenavirus NP. Consistent with previous studies, infection with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) prevented phosphorylation of IRF3 in response to infection with Sendai virus, a strong inducer of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway of innate antiviral signaling. Using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, we found that LCMV NP associates with the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase IKKε but that, rather unexpectedly, LCMV NP did not bind to the closely related TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1). The NP-IKKε interaction was highly conserved among arenaviruses from different clades. In LCMV-infected cells, IKKε colocalized with NP but not with MAVS located on the outer membrane of mitochondria. LCMV NP bound the kinase domain (KD) of IKKε (IKBKE) and blocked its autocatalytic activity and its ability to phosphorylate IRF3, without undergoing phosphorylation. Together, our data identify IKKε as a novel target of arenavirus NP. Engagement of NP seems to sequester IKKε in an inactive complex. Considering the important functions of IKKε in innate antiviral immunity and other cellular processes, the NP-IKKε interaction likely plays a crucial role in arenavirus-host interaction.

  19. Identification and characterization of a novel sucrose-non-fermenting protein kinase/AMP-activated protein kinase-related protein kinase, SNARK.

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, D L; Bai, Y; Shahmolky, N; Sharma, M; Poon, R; Drucker, D J; Rosen, C F

    2001-01-01

    Subtraction hybridization after the exposure of keratinocytes to ultraviolet radiation identified a differentially expressed cDNA that encodes a protein of 630 amino acid residues possessing significant similarity to the catalytic domain of the sucrose-non-fermenting protein kinase (SNF1)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of serine/threonine protein kinases. Northern blotting and reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the SNF1/AMPK-related kinase (SNARK) were widely expressed in rodent tissues. The SNARK gene was localized to human chromosome 1q32 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. SNARK was translated in vitro to yield a single protein band of approx. 76 kDa; Western analysis of transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells detected two SNARK-immunoreactive bands of approx. 76-80 kDa. SNARK was capable of autophosphorylation in vitro; immunoprecipitated SNARK exhibited phosphotransferase activity with the synthetic peptide substrate HMRSAMSGLHLVKRR (SAMS) as a kinase substrate. SNARK activity was significantly increased by AMP and 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside (AICAriboside) in rat keratinocyte cells, implying that SNARK might be activated by an AMPK kinase-dependent pathway. Furthermore, glucose deprivation increased SNARK activity 3-fold in BHK fibroblasts. These findings identify SNARK as a glucose- and AICAriboside-regulated member of the AMPK-related gene family that represents a new candidate mediator of the cellular response to metabolic stress. PMID:11284715

  20. Transition path theory analysis of c-Src kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yilin; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Nonreceptor tyrosine kinases of the Src family are large multidomain allosteric proteins that are crucial to cellular signaling pathways. In a previous study, we generated a Markov state model (MSM) to simulate the activation of c-Src catalytic domain, used as a prototypical tyrosine kinase. The long-time kinetics of transition predicted by the MSM was in agreement with experimental observations. In the present study, we apply the framework of transition path theory (TPT) to the previously constructed MSM to characterize the main features of the activation pathway. The analysis indicates that the activating transition, in which the activation loop first opens up followed by an inward rotation of the αC-helix, takes place via a dense set of intermediate microstates distributed within a fairly broad “transition tube” in a multidimensional conformational subspace connecting the two end-point conformations. Multiple microstates with negligible equilibrium probabilities carry a large transition flux associated with the activating transition, which explains why extensive conformational sampling is necessary to accurately determine the kinetics of activation. Our results suggest that the combination of MSM with TPT provides an effective framework to represent conformational transitions in complex biomolecular systems. PMID:27482115

  1. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  2. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  3. Substitutional and Interstitial Diffusion in alpha2-Ti3Al(O)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan; Young, David J.; Gleeson, Brian; Jacobson, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    The reaction between Al2O3 and alpha2-Ti3Al was studied with a series of Al2O3/alpha2-Ti3Al multiphase diffusion couples annealed at 900, 1000 and 1100 C. The diffusion-paths were found to strongly depend on alpha2- Ti3Al(O) composition. For alloys with low oxygen concentrations the reaction involved the reduction of Al2O3, the formation of a gamma-TiAl reaction-layer and diffusion of Al and O into the alpha2-Ti3Al substrate. Measured concentration profiles across the interaction-zone showed "up-hill" diffusion of O in alpha2-Ti3Al(O) indicating a significant thermodynamic interaction between O and Al, Ti or both. Diffusion coefficients for the interstitial O in alpha2-Ti3Al(O) were determined independently from the interdiffusion of Ti and Al on the substitutional lattice. Diffusion coefficients are reported for alpha2-Ti3Al(O) as well as gamma-TiAl. Interpretation of the results were aided with the subsequent measurement of the activities of Al, Ti and O in alpha 2-Ti3Al(O) by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry.

  4. alpha 2-Macroglobulin binding to cultured fibroblasts. Solubilization and partial purification of binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hanover, J A; Cheng, S; Willingham, M C; Pastan, I H

    1983-01-10

    Binding sites having the characteristics of receptors for "activated" alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) have been solubilized with octyl-beta-D-glucoside from fibroblast membranes. When the detergent was removed by dialysis, the resulting insoluble extract was shown to bind 125I-alpha 2M specifically. Analysis of the binding data using a nonlinear curve-fitting program suggests that the solubilized preparation contains two classes of binding sites (KD = 0.34 nM and KD = 104 nM). Membranes or solubilized extracts from KB cells which lack alpha 2M binding sites did not specifically bind 125I-alpha 2M. The solubilized binding sites from fibroblasts were inactivated by boiling and trypsin treatment, and required Ca+2 for maximal binding. In addition, the high affinity binding of 125I-alpha 2M to the solubilized receptor was inhibited by bacitracin and by alpha-bromo-5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitroacetophenone, two agents which interfere with the uptake of alpha 2M in cultured fibroblasts. Using a combination of ion exchange and gel permeation chromatography, we have purified the high affinity alpha 2M binding site approximately 100-fold from membrane derived from NIH-3T3 (spontaneously transformed) fibroblasts grown as tumors in mice. The receptor is apparently an acidic protein and the receptor octyl-beta-D-glucoside complex has a Stokes radius of 45-50 A as measured by gel filtration.

  5. Neutralising antibodies in patients with multiple myeloma receiving maintenance therapy with interferon alpha 2b.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J. B.; Barfoot, R.; Iveson, T.; Powles, R. L.; Millar, B. C.

    1994-01-01

    In a study of 29 patients who were receiving or had received interferon alpha 2b (IFN-alpha 2b) as maintenance therapy for multiple myeloma, antibodies were detected in 58% (17/29) of patients measured by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only 7/17 patients who were positive for antibody in the ELISA had neutralising antibody to IFN-alpha 2b, measured by virus growth inhibition. These patients comprised six who were receiving IFN-alpha 2b at the time of assessment and one who had finished treatment. Among patients who were receiving the cytokine, four had progressive disease, one was in complete remission and one in partial remission. Neutralising activity was also detected to natural human leucocyte IFN-alpha in the same patients. Two patients who were positive for neutralising antibody remain in remission and are continuing to receive IFN-alpha 2b. These two patients have since lost their neutralising titre. No neutralising antibody to IFN-alpha 2b or natural human leucocyte IFN-alpha was detected in serum from six normal donors. The data suggest that neutralising antibody formation in patients with multiple myeloma is not responsible for relapse in patients receiving IFN-alpha 2b. The transient nature of neutralising antibody production in patients who remain in remission suggests that this response to IFN-alpha 2b is not associated with memory B cells. PMID:7917911

  6. Glucagon receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 via cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youwei; Cypess, Aaron M.; Muse, Evan D.; Wu, Cui-Rong; Unson, Cecilia G.; Merrifield, R. B.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    We prepared a stable cell line expressing the glucagon receptor to characterize the effect of Gs-coupled receptor stimulation on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Glucagon treatment of the cell line caused a dose-dependent increase in cAMP concentration, activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and transient release of intracellular calcium. Glucagon treatment also caused rapid dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Inhibition of either PKA or MEK1/2 blocked ERK1/2 activation by glucagon. However, no significant activation of several upstream activators of MEK, including Ras, Rap1, and Raf, was observed in response to glucagon treatment. In addition, chelation of intracellular calcium reduced glucagon-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In transient transfection experiments, glucagon receptor mutants that bound glucagon but failed to increase intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations showed no glucagon-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We conclude that glucagon-induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation is mediated by PKA and that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is required for maximal ERK activation. PMID:11517300

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase is rapidly and efficiently inactivated in human plasma by alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Kisselev, A F; von der Helm, K

    1994-10-01

    Human plasma impairs the activity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) proteinase to cleave the HIV-1 gag-polyprotein precursor. The inhibition is due to the entrapment of the proteinase by plasma alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). In methylamine-treated plasma, where alpha 2M is inactivated, HIV proteinase is not blocked. The interaction of alpha 2M and HIV-1 proteinase resulting in covalent complexes of proteinase and alpha 2M was demonstrated by immunoblotting with antiserum either to alpha 2M or to the HIV proteinase. We suggest if HIV-1 proteinase would be released in vivo from infected patients' cells, alpha 2M entrapment may prevent or minimize a conceivable cleavage of extracellular matrix or plasma proteins by the HIV-1 enzyme.

  8. Characterization of alpha-2-macroglobulin from groupers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Hsiao; Lee, Kuo-Kau; Liu, Ping-Chung

    2013-08-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (α-2-M) is a protease inhibitor broadly present in the plasma of vertebrates and invertebrates, and is an important non-specific humoral factor in defence system of the animals. This study conducted the immuno-analysis and mass spectrometric analysis methods to investigate the characteristics of the protease inhibitor, α-2-M, among groupers and related species. Rabbit antiserum to the purified α-2-M of Epinephelus coioides was used in different immunological methods to determine the immune cross-reactions of the α-2-M in samples. Plasma of Epinephelus bruneus, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, Epinephelus lanceolatus, and Epinephelus quoyanus exhibited high protease inhibitory activities by BAPNA-trypsin assay. To purify the α-2-M protein, plasma protein of grouper E. coioides was first precipitated by using PEG 6000, then Blue Sepharose 6 Fast Flow, DEAE Sephacel, Con A Separose 4B and Phenyl Sepharose High Performance columns were used on FPLC system for purification. The molecular mass of grouper plasma α-2-M was determined as a 180 kDa protein on non-reduced SDS-PAGE. In addition, it was determined as 97 and 80 kDa protein on reduced SDS-PAGE. Enzymatic and chemical deglycosylation of glycogen revealed that the contents of glycogen in 97 and 80 kDa subunits were 12.4% and 15%, respectively, and were all belonging to N-linked type. Only one precipitation arc was visualized in all plasma of Epinephelus spp. using the rabbit antiserum to the purified α-2-M of E. coioides, on crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) gels. The plasma of Epinephelus spp. and seawater fish species showed stronger responses than freshwater fish species while that of other animal species showed no response by dot-blot assay. One single band was detected on Native PAGE-Western blotting assay, one single 180 kDa band was detected on non-reduced SDS-PAGE-Western blotting, and four bands (80, 97, 160, 250 kDa) were detected on reduced SDS-PAGE when various grouper plasma

  9. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  10. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by ultraviolet A radiation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Dubertret, Louis; Coulomb, Bernard

    2003-08-01

    UVA radiation penetrates deeply into the skin reaching both the epidermis and the dermis. We thus investigated the effects of naturally occurring doses of UVA radiation on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities in human dermal fibroblasts. We demonstrated that UVA selectively activates p38 MAPK with no effect on extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK1-ERK2) or JNK-SAPK (cJun NH2-terminal kinase-stress-activated protein kinase) activities. We then investigated the signaling pathway used by UVA to activate p38 MAPK. L-Histidine and sodium azide had an inhibitory effect on UVA activation of p38 MAPK, pointing to a role of singlet oxygen in transduction of the UVA effect. Afterward, using prolonged cell treatments with growth factors to desensitize their signaling pathways or suramin to block growth factor receptors, we demonstrated that UVA signaling pathways shared elements with growth factor signaling pathways. In addition, using emetine (a translation inhibitor altering ribosome functioning) we detected the involvement of ribotoxic stress in p38 MAPK activation by UVA. Our observations suggest that p38 activation by UVA in dermal fibroblasts involves singlet oxygen-dependent activation of ligand-receptor signaling pathways or ribotoxic stress mechanism (or both). Despite the activation of these two distinct signaling mechanisms, the selective activation of p38 MAPK suggests a critical role of this kinase in the effects of UVA radiation.

  11. Autophosphorylation in the Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) GTPase Domain Modifies Kinase and GTP-Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Philip J.; Smith, Archer D.; Sen, Saurabh; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Mobley, James A.; West, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    The LRRK2 protein has both GTPase and kinase activities and mutation in either enzymatic domain can cause late-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Nucleotide binding in the GTPase domain may be required for kinase activity and residues in the GTPase domain are potential sites for autophosphorylation, suggesting a complex mechanism of intrinsic regulation. To further define the effects of LRRK2 autophosphorylation, we applied a technique optimal for detection of protein phosphorylation, electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and identified autophosphorylation events exclusively nearby the nucleotide binding pocket in the GTPase domain. PD-linked mutations alter kinase activity but did not alter autophosphorylation site specificity or sites of phosphorylation in a robust in vitro substrate myelin basic protein. Amino-acid substitutions in the GTPase domain have large effects on kinase activity, as insertion of the GTPase-associated R1441C pathogenic mutation together with the G2019S kinase-domain mutation resulted in a multiplicative increase (~7-fold) in activity. Removal of a conserved autophosphorylation site (T1503) by mutation to an alanine residue resulted in greatly decreased GTP-binding and kinase activity. While autophosphorylation likely serves to potentiate kinase activity, we find that oligomerization and loss of the active dimer species occurs in an ATP and autophosphorylation independent manner. LRRK2 autophosphorylation sites are overall robustly protected from dephosphorylation in vitro, suggesting tight control over activity in vivo. We developed highly specific antibodies targeting pT1503 but failed to detect endogenous autophosphorylation in protein derived from transgenic mice and cell lines. LRRK2 activity in vivo is unlikely to be constitutive but rather refined to specific responses. PMID:21806997

  12. A developmentally regulated MAP kinase activated by hydration in tobacco pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C; Voronin, V; Touraev, A; Vicente, O; Heberle-Bors, E

    1997-01-01

    A novel mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathway has been identified in tobacco. This pathway is developmentally regulated during pollen maturation and is activated by hydration during pollen germination. Analysis of different stages of pollen development showed that transcriptional and translational induction of MAP kinase synthesis occurs at the mid-bicellular stage of pollen maturation. However, the MAP kinase is stored in an inactive form in the mature, dry pollen grain. Kinase activation is very rapid after hydration of the dry pollen, peaking at approximately 5 min and decreasing thereafter. Immunoprecipitation of the kinase activity by an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody is consistent with the activation of a MAP kinase. The kinetics of activation suggest that the MAP kinase plays a role in the activation of the pollen grain after hydration rather than in pollen tube growth. PMID:9401129

  13. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  14. Activation of Protein Kinase C Triggers Its Ubiquitination and Degradation†

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Liu, David; Hornia, Armand; Devonish, Wayne; Pagano, Michele; Foster, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of cells with tumor-promoting phorbol esters results in the activation but then depletion of phorbol ester-responsive protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in regulating the levels of many cellular proteins, including those involved in cell cycle control. We report here that in 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, proteasome inhibitors prevent the depletion of PKC isoforms α, δ, and ɛ in response to the tumor-promoting phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Proteasome inhibitors also blocked the tumor-promoting effects of TPA on 3Y1 cells overexpressing c-Src, which results from the depletion of PKC δ. Consistent with the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the degradation of PKC isoforms, ubiquitinated PKC α, δ, and ɛ were detected within 30 min of TPA treatment. Diacylglycerol, the physiological activator of PKC, also stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of PKC, suggesting that ubiquitination is a physiological response to PKC activation. Compounds that inhibit activation of PKC prevented both TPA- and diacylglycerol-induced PKC depletion and ubiquitination. Moreover, a kinase-dead ATP-binding mutant of PKC α could not be depleted by TPA treatment. These data are consistent with a suicide model whereby activation of PKC triggers its own degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:9447980

  15. Activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meikrantz, W; Gisselbrecht, S; Tam, S W; Schlegel, R

    1994-01-01

    Apoptosis was induced in S-phase-arrested HeLa cells by staurosporine, caffeine, 6-dimethylaminopurine, and okadaic acid, agents that activate M-phase-promoting factor and induce premature mitosis in similarly treated hamster cell lines. Addition of these agents to asynchronously growing HeLa cells or to cells arrested in early G1 phase with lovastatin had little or no effect. S-phase arrest also promoted tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis, eliminating the normal requirement for simultaneous cycloheximide treatment. For all of the apoptosis-inducing agents tested, the appearance of condensed chromatin was accompanied by 2- to 7-fold increases in cyclin A-associated histone H1 kinase activity, levels approximating the mitotic value. Where examined, both Cdc2 and Cdk2, the catalytic subunits known to associate with cyclin A, were activated. Stable overexpression of bcl-2 suppressed the apoptosis-inducing activity of all agents tested and reduced the amount of Cdc2 and Cdk2 in the nucleus, suggesting a possible mechanism by which bcl-2 inhibits the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These findings suggest that at least one of the biochemical steps required for mitosis, activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases, is also an important event during apoptosis. Images PMID:8170983

  16. Regulation of Cl- secretion by alpha2-adrenergic receptors in mouse colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lam, Rebecca S; App, Ernst M; Nahirney, Drew; Szkotak, Artur J; Vieira-Coelho, Maria A; King, Malcolm; Duszyk, Marek

    2003-04-15

    Previous studies have shown that alpha2 adrenoceptor (alpha2AR) agonists inhibit electrolyte secretion in colonic epithelia, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. In this study we examined the effect of alpha2AR activation on transepithelial anion secretion across isolated murine colonic epithelium. We found that alpha2AR agonists, UK 14,304, clonidine and medetomidine were potent inhibitors of anion secretion, especially in the proximal colon. Short circuit current measurements (Isc) in colonic epithelia from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) mice showed that alpha2AR agonists inhibited basal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated Cl- secretion but had no effect on CFTR activation by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. Apical administration of an ionophore, nystatin (90 microg ml-1), was used to investigate the effect of UK 14,304 on basolateral K+ transport. The Na+-K+-ATPase current, measured as ouabain-sensitive current in the absence of ion gradients, was unaltered by pretreatment of the tissue with UK 14,304 (1 microM). In the presence of a basolaterally directed K+ gradient, UK 14,304 significantly reduced nystatin-activated Isc indicating that activation of alpha2ARs inhibits basolateral K+ channels. Studies with selective K+ channel inhibitors and openers showed that alpha2AR agonists inhibited KATP channels that were tonically active in mouse colonic epithelia. RT-PCR and pharmacological studies suggested that these channels could be similar to vascular smooth muscle KATP channels comprising Kir6.1/SUR2B or Kir6.2/SUR2B subunits. Inhibition of anion secretion by alpha2AR agonists required activation of pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o proteins, but did not involve classical second messengers, such as cAMP or Ca2+. In summary, alpha2ARs inhibit anion secretion in colonic epithelia by acting on basolateral KATP channels, through a process that does not involve classical second messengers.

  17. Rassf Proteins as Modulators of Mst1 Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bitra, Aruna; Sistla, Srinivas; Mariam, Jessy; Malvi, Harshada; Anand, Ruchi

    2017-01-01

    Rassf1A/5 tumor suppressors serve as adaptor proteins possessing a modular architecture with the C-terminal consisting of a coiled-coil SARAH (Salvador-Rassf-Hippo) domain and the central portion being composed of Ras associated (RA) domain. Here, we investigate the effect of Rassf effectors on Mst1 function by mapping the interaction of various domains of Rassf1A/5 and Mst1 kinase using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The results revealed that apart from the C-terminal SARAH domain of Mst1 which interacts to form heterodimers with Rassf1A/5, the N-terminal kinase domain of Mst1 plays a crucial role in the stabilization of this complex. In addition, SPR experiments show that the RA domains play an important role in fine-tuning the Mst1-Rassf interaction, with Rassf5 being a preferred partner over a similar Rassf1A construct. It was also demonstrated that the activity profile of Mst1 in presence of Rassf adaptors completely switches. A Rassf-Mst1 complexed version of the kinase becomes apoptotic by positively regulating Mst1-H2B mediated serine 14 histone H2B phosphorylation, a hallmark of chromatin condensation. In contrast, the heterodimerization of Mst1 with Rassf1A/5 suppresses the phosphorylation of FoxO, thereby inhibiting the downstream Mst1-FoxO signalling pathway. PMID:28327630

  18. Substrate thiophosphorylation by Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Leissing, Franz; Nomoto, Mika; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Tada, Yasuomi; Conrath, Uwe; Beckers, Gerold J M

    2016-02-24

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are important to cellular signaling in eukaryotes. They regulate growth, development and the response to environmental challenges. MPK cascades function via reversible phosphorylation of cascade components, MEKK, MEK, and MPK, but also by MPK substrate phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we previously identified many in vivo MPK3 and MPK6 substrates in Arabidopsis thaliana, and we disclosed their phosphorylation sites. We verified phosphorylation of several of our previously identified MPK3/6 substrates using a nonradioactive in vitro labeling assay. We engineered MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6 to accept bio-orthogonal ATPγS analogs for thiophosphorylating their appropriate substrate proteins. Subsequent alkylation of the thiophosphorylated amino acid residue(s) allows immunodetection using thiophosphate ester-specific antibodies. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids confirmed the protein substrates' site-specific phosphorylation by MPK3 and MPK6. A combined assay with MPK3, MPK6, and MPK4 revealed substrate specificity of the individual kinases. Our work demonstrates that the in vitro-labeling assay represents an effective, specific and highly sensitive test for determining kinase-substrate relationships.

  19. Rassf Proteins as Modulators of Mst1 Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Aruna; Sistla, Srinivas; Mariam, Jessy; Malvi, Harshada; Anand, Ruchi

    2017-03-22

    Rassf1A/5 tumor suppressors serve as adaptor proteins possessing a modular architecture with the C-terminal consisting of a coiled-coil SARAH (Salvador-Rassf-Hippo) domain and the central portion being composed of Ras associated (RA) domain. Here, we investigate the effect of Rassf effectors on Mst1 function by mapping the interaction of various domains of Rassf1A/5 and Mst1 kinase using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The results revealed that apart from the C-terminal SARAH domain of Mst1 which interacts to form heterodimers with Rassf1A/5, the N-terminal kinase domain of Mst1 plays a crucial role in the stabilization of this complex. In addition, SPR experiments show that the RA domains play an important role in fine-tuning the Mst1-Rassf interaction, with Rassf5 being a preferred partner over a similar Rassf1A construct. It was also demonstrated that the activity profile of Mst1 in presence of Rassf adaptors completely switches. A Rassf-Mst1 complexed version of the kinase becomes apoptotic by positively regulating Mst1-H2B mediated serine 14 histone H2B phosphorylation, a hallmark of chromatin condensation. In contrast, the heterodimerization of Mst1 with Rassf1A/5 suppresses the phosphorylation of FoxO, thereby inhibiting the downstream Mst1-FoxO signalling pathway.

  20. Characterization of a Mn sup 2+ -dependent membrane serine kinase that is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is hypothesized that the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase may directly phosphorylate and activate one or more serine kinases. The identities of such serine kinases as well as their modes of activation are unclear. The authors have described a serine kinase from rat liver membranes that copurifies with the IR on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-sepharose. The kinase is activated after phosphorylation of the WGA-sepharose-purified fraction by casein kinase-1, casein kinase-2, or casein kinase-3. A tyrosine kinase, possibly IR tyrosine kinase, also participates in the activation process since a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor such as vanadate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, or phosphotyrosine is required in reaction mixtures for activation to be observed. By contrast, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine do not support activation. The activated kinase can use IR {beta}-subunit, myelin basic protein (MBP), and histones as substrates. IR {beta}-subunit phosphorylation was stimulated by MBP, histones, and polylysine, and inhibited by heparin and poly(glu, tyr). The kinase prefers Mn{sup 2+} over Mg{sup 2+} as a metal cofactor.

  1. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-09-03

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  2. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-05-01

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  3. Identification of an autoinhibitory region in the activation loop of the Mos protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, S C; Donoghue, D J

    1996-01-01

    The Mos protein is a serine/threonine protein kinase which acts to regulate progression through meiosis in vertebrate oocytes. Although Mos function is dependent on its ability to act as a protein kinase, little is known about the factors which regulate Mos kinase activity. To understand the mechanism by which Mos kinase activity is regulated, we have used molecular modeling to construct a three-dimensional model of Mos based on the crystallographic coordinates of cyclic AMP-dependent kinase (PKA). This model identified a loop in Mos which is positioned near the active site and appears capable of blocking substrate access to the active site. Mutagenesis was used to construct altered forms of the Mos protein with deletions of parts or all of the loop. In vitro kinase assays showed that Mos proteins with the loop removed had up to a fourfold increase in kinase activity compared with the wild-type protein, indicating that the loop acts in an autoinhibitory manner for Mos kinase activity. Point mutations were also made on individual residues of the loop which were determined from the molecular model to be capable of reaching the active site. Determination of the kinase activities of these mutants showed that individual mutations in the loop region are capable of either increasing or decreasing kinase activity with regard to the wild-type protein. These data suggest that the loop identified in Mos acts as an autoinhibitor of kinase activity. PMID:8668163

  4. Inhibition of FAK kinase activity preferentially targets cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Vihren N.; Tam, Winnie F.; Wright, Quentin G.; McDermott, Sean P.; Vidal, Christian M.; Shapiro, Irina M.; Xu, Qunli; Wicha, Max S.; Pachter, Jonathan A.; Weaver, David T.

    2017-01-01

    Because cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been implicated in chemo-resistance, metastasis and tumor recurrence, therapeutic targeting of CSCs holds promise to address these clinical challenges to cancer treatment. VS-4718 and VS-6063 are potent inhibitors of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that mediates cell signals transmitted by integrins and growth factor receptors. We report here that inhibition of FAK kinase activity by VS-4718 or VS-6063 preferentially targets CSCs, as demonstrated by a panel of orthogonal CSC assays in cell line models and surgically resected primary breast tumor specimens cultured ex vivo. Oral administration of VS-4718 or VS-6063 to mice bearing xenograft models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) significantly reduced the proportion of CSCs in the tumors, as evidenced by a reduced tumor-initiating capability upon re-implantation in limiting dilutions of cells prepared from these tumors. In contrast, the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, paclitaxel and carboplatin, enriched for CSCs, consistent with previous reports that these cytotoxic agents preferentially target non-CSCs. Importantly, VS-4718 and VS-6063 attenuated the chemotherapy-induced enrichment of CSCs in vitro and delayed tumor regrowth following cessation of chemotherapy. An intriguing crosstalk between FAK and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway was revealed wherein FAK inhibition blocks β-catenin activation by reducing tyrosine 654 phosphorylation of β-catenin. Furthermore, a constitutively active mutant form of β-catenin reversed the preferential targeting of CSCs by FAK inhibition, suggesting that this targeting is mediated, at least in part, through attenuating β-catenin activation. The preferential targeting of cancer stem cells by FAK inhibitors provides a rationale for the clinical development of FAK inhibitors aimed to increase durable responses for cancer patients. PMID:28881682

  5. Mechanical Impact Induces Cartilage Degradation via Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Heying, Emily; Nicholson, Nathan; Stroud, Nicolas J.; Homandberg, Gene A.; Guo, Danping; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the activation of MAP kinases in and around cartilage subjected to mechanical damage and to determine the effects of their inhibitors on impaction induced chondrocyte death and cartilage degeneration. Design The phosphorylation of MAP kinases was examined with confocal microscopy and immunoblotting. The effects of MAP kinase inhibitors on impaction-induced chondrocyte death and proteoglycan loss were determined with fluorescent microscopy and DMMB assay. The expression of catabolic genes at mRNA levels was examined with quantitative real time PCR. Results Early p38 activation was detected at 20 min and 1 hr post-impaction. At 24 hr, enhanced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 was visualized in chondrocytes from in and around impact sites. The phosphorylation of p38 was increased by 3.0-fold in impact sites and 3.3-fold in adjacent cartilage. The phosphorylation of ERK-1 was increased by 5.8-fold in impact zone and 5.4-fold in adjacent cartilage; the phosphorylation of ERK-2 increased by 4.0-fold in impacted zone and 3.6-fold in adjacent cartilage. Furthermore, the blocking of p38 pathway did not inhibit impaction-induced ERK activation. The inhibition of p38 or ERK pathway significantly reduced injury-related chondrocyte death and proteoglycan losses. Quantative Real-time PCR analysis revealed that blunt impaction significantly up-regulated MMP-13, TNF-α, and ADAMTS-5 expression. Conclusion These findings implicate p38 and ERK MAPKs in the post injury spread of cartilage degeneration and suggest that the risk of PTOA following joint trauma could be decreased by blocking their activities, which might be involved in up-regulating expressions of MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, and TNF-α. PMID:20813194

  6. DPI-3290 [(+)-3-((alpha-R)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-(3-fluorophenyl)-N-methylbenzamide]. I. A mixed opioid agonist with potent antinociceptive activity.

    PubMed

    Gengo, Peter J; Pettit, Hugh O; O'Neill, Scott J; Wei, Ke; McNutt, Robert; Bishop, Michael J; Chang, Kwen-Jen

    2003-12-01

    Compound (+)-3-((alpha-R)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-(3-fluorophenyl)-N-methylbenzamide (DPI-3290), is one of a series of novel centrally acting agents with potent antinociceptive activity that binds specifically and with high affinity to opioid receptors. In saturation equilibrium binding studies performed at 25 degrees C using membranes from rat brain or guinea pig cerebellum, the Ki values measured for DPI-3290 at delta-, mu-, and kappa-opioid receptors were 0.18 +/- 0.02, 0.46 +/- 0.05, and 0.62 +/- 0.09 nM, respectively. In vas deferens isolated from laboratory mice, DPI-3290 decreased electrically induced tension development in a concentration-dependent manner with corresponding IC50 values of 1.0 +/- 0.3, 6.2 +/- 2.0, and 25.0 +/- 3.3 nM at delta-, mu-, and kappa-receptors, respectively. The activity of DPI-3290 in isolated vas deferens tissue was approximately 20,000, 175.8, and 1500 times more efficacious than morphine, and 492, 2.5, and 35 times more efficacious than fentanyl at delta-, mu-, and kappa-receptors, respectively. In ileal strips isolated from guinea pigs, DPI-3290 inhibited tension development with a corresponding IC50 value of 3.4 +/- 1.6 nM at mu-opioid receptors and 6.7 +/- 1.6 nM at kappa-opioid receptors. Intravenous administration of 0.05 +/- 0.007 mg/kg DPI-3290 produced a 50% antinociceptive response in rats. The antinociceptive properties of DPI-3290 were blocked by naloxone (0.5 mg/kg s.c.). Compared with morphine, this study demonstrated that DPI-3290 is more potent and elicited a similar magnitude of antinociceptive activity in the rat, actions mediated by its mixed opioid receptor agonist activity. The marked antinociceptive activity of DPI-3290 will likely provide a means for relieving severe pain in patients that require analgesic treatment.

  7. Functional interaction between alpha2-adrenoceptors, mu- and kappa-opioid receptors in the guinea pig myenteric plexus: effect of chronic desipramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Canciani, Luca; Giaroni, Cristina; Zanetti, Elena; Giuliani, Daniela; Pisani, Rossana; Moro, Elisabetta; Trinchera, Marco; Crema, Francesca; Lecchini, Sergio; Frigo, Gianmario

    2006-12-28

    The existence of a functional interplay between alpha(2)-adrenoceptor and opioid receptor inhibitory pathways modulating neurotransmitter release has been demonstrated in the enteric nervous system by development of sensitivity changes to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor, mu- and kappa-opioid receptor agents on enteric cholinergic neurons after chronic sympathetic denervation. In the present study, to further examine this hypothesis we evaluated whether manipulation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor pathways by chronic treatment with the antidepressant drug, desipramine (10 mg/kg i.p. daily, for 21 days), could entail changes in enteric mu- and kappa-opioid receptor pathways in the myenteric plexus of the guinea pig distal colon. In this region, subsensitivity to the inhibitory effect of both UK14,304 and U69,593, respectively alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor and kappa-opioid receptor agonist, on the peristaltic reflex developed after chronic desipramine treatment. On opposite, in these experimental conditions, supersensitivity developed to the inhibitory effect of [D-Ala, N-Me-Phe4-Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), mu-opioid receptor agonist, on propulsion velocity. Immunoreactive expression levels of alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors, mu- and kappa-opioid receptors significantly decreased in the myenteric plexus of the guinea pig colon after chronic desipramine treatment. In these experimental conditions, mRNA levels of alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors, mu- and kappa-opioid receptors significantly increased, excluding a direct involvement of transcription mechanisms in the regulation of receptor expression. Levels of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2/3 and of inhibitory G(i/o) proteins were significantly reduced in the myenteric plexus after chronic treatment with desipramine. Such changes might represent possible molecular mechanisms involved in the development of subsensitivity to UK14,304 and U69,593 on the efficiency of peristalsis. Alternative molecular mechanisms, including a higher efficiency in the

  8. Cycloheximide-induced activation of mouse eggs: effects on cdc2/cyclin B and MAP kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Moos, J; Kopf, G S; Schultz, R M

    1996-04-01

    Fertilization of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs results in resumption of meiosis and a decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities; the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity precedes the decrease in MAP kinase activity. Cycloheximide treatment of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs also results in resumption of meiosis but bypasses the fertilization-induced Ca2+ transient. However, it is not known if cycloheximide treatment results in the same temporal changes in cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that are intimately associated with resumption of meiosis. We report that cycloheximide-treated mouse eggs manifest similar temporal changes in the decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that occur following fertilization, although cortical granule exocytosis is not stimulated. The decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity, however, does not seem to be required for the decrease in MAP kinase activity, since the decrease in MAP kinase activity still occurs in cycloheximide-treated eggs that are also incubated in the presence of nocodazole, which inhibits cyclin B degradation and hence the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase. Following removal of these drugs, cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity remains high, MAP kinase activity increases to levels similar to that in the metaphase II-arrested eggs, and a spindle(s) forms with the chromosomes aligned on a metaphase plate. Results of these experiments suggest that some other protein with a relatively short half-life, e.g. cmos, a known upstream activator of MAP kinase, may be responsible for events leading to the decrease in MAP kinase activity.

  9. Manganese modulation of MAPK pathways: effects on upstream mitogen activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs) and mitogen activated kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Patrick L.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that manganese (Mn) exposure potentiates inflammatory mediator output from activated glia; this increased output is associated with enhanced mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK: p38, ERK, and JNK) activity. We hypothesized that Mn activates MAPK by activating the kinases upstream of MAPK, i.e., MKK-3/6, MKK-1/2, and MKK-4 (responsible for activation of p38, ERK, and JNK, respectively), and/or by inhibiting a major phosphatase responsible for MAPK inactivation, MKP-1. Exposure of N9 microglia to Mn (250μM), LPS (100 ng/ml), or Mn+LPS increased MKK-3/6 and MKK-4 activity at 1 h; the effect of Mn+LPS on MKK-4 activation was greater than the rest. At 4 h, Mn, LPS, and Mn+LPS increased MKK-3/6 and MKK-1/2 phosphorylation, whereas MKK-4 was activated only by Mn and Mn+LPS. Besides activating MKK-4 via Ser257/Thr261 phosphorylation, Mn (4 h) prevented MKK-4’s phosphorylation on Ser80, which negatively regulates MKK-4 activity. Exposure to Mn or Mn+LPS (1 h) decreased both mRNA and protein expression of MKP-1, the negative MAPK regulator. In addition, we observed that at 4 h, but not at 1 h, a time point coinciding with increased MAPK activity, Mn+LPS markedly increased TNF-α , IL-6, and Cox-2 mRNA, suggesting a delayed effect. The fact that all three major groups of MKKs, MKK-1/2, MKK-3/6, and MKK-4 are activated by Mn suggests that Mn-induced activation of MAPK occurs via traditional mechanisms, which perhaps involve the MAPKs farthest upstream, MKKKs (MAP3Ks). In addition, for all MKKs, Mn-induced activation was persistent at least for 4 h, indicating a long-term effect. PMID:20589745

  10. Prevention of neuronal apoptosis by phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C: blockade of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Behrens, M M; Strasser, U; Koh, J Y; Gwag, B J; Choi, D W

    1999-01-01

    Consistent with previous studies on cell lines and non-neuronal cells, specific inhibitors of protein kinase C induced mouse primary cultured neocortical neurons to undergo apoptosis. To examine the complementary hypothesis that activating protein kinase C would attenuate neuronal apoptosis, the cultures were exposed for 1 h to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, which activated protein kinase C as evidenced by downstream enhancement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Exposure to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, or another active phorbol ester, phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, but not to the inactive ester, 4alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, markedly attenuated neuronal apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate also attenuated neuronal apoptosis induced by exposure to beta-amyloid peptide 1-42, or oxygen-glucose deprivation in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists. The neuroprotective effects of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate were blocked by brief (non-toxic) concurrent exposure to the specific protein kinase C inhibitors, but not by a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 inhibitor. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate blocked the induction of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and specific inhibition of this kinase by SB 203580 attenuated serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 activity was high at rest and not modified by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate treatment. These data strengthen the idea that protein kinase C is a key modulator of several forms of central neuronal apoptosis, in part acting through inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase regulated pathways.

  11. Effects of AMP-activated protein kinase in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine threonine kinase that is highly conserved through evolution. AMPK is found in most mammalian tissues including the brain. As a key metabolic and stress sensor/effector, AMPK is activated under conditions of nutrient deprivation, vigorous exercise, or heat shock. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that changes in AMPK activation not only signal unmet metabolic needs, but also are involved in sensing and responding to 'cell stress', including ischemia. The downstream effect of AMPK activation is dependent on many factors, including the severity of the stressor as well as the tissue examined. This review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed in the brain/neuronal cells and vasculature that have contributed to our understanding of AMPK in stroke. Recent data on the potential role of AMPK in angiogenesis and neurogenesis and the interaction of AMPK with 3-hydroxy-3-methy-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) agents are highlighted. The interaction between AMPK and nitric oxide signaling is also discussed.

  12. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  13. Effects of AMP-activated protein kinase in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine threonine kinase that is highly conserved through evolution. AMPK is found in most mammalian tissues including the brain. As a key metabolic and stress sensor/effector, AMPK is activated under conditions of nutrient deprivation, vigorous exercise, or heat shock. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that changes in AMPK activation not only signal unmet metabolic needs, but also are involved in sensing and responding to ‘cell stress', including ischemia. The downstream effect of AMPK activation is dependent on many factors, including the severity of the stressor as well as the tissue examined. This review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed in the brain/neuronal cells and vasculature that have contributed to our understanding of AMPK in stroke. Recent data on the potential role of AMPK in angiogenesis and neurogenesis and the interaction of AMPK with 3-hydroxy-3-methy-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) agents are highlighted. The interaction between AMPK and nitric oxide signaling is also discussed. PMID:20010958

  14. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID.

    PubMed

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês C R; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-06-19

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the--in many cells--asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant.

  15. Alpha 2-macroglobulin used to isolate intracellular endopeptidases from mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Slot, L A; Hendil, K B

    1988-01-01

    Extracts of cell cultures labelled with [3H]leucine were incubated with human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M), a plasma proteinase inhibitor. The proteinase-alpha 2M complexes were then precipitated with immobilized monoclonal antibodies to alpha 2M and analysed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Parallel experiments were done with methylamine-inactivated alpha 2M to check for unspecific binding of cell proteins to alpha 2M. Several 3H-labelled cell proteins bound to active, but not to inactivated, alpha 2M. Such proteins are likely to be proteinases. Putative endopeptidases of subunit Mr 112000, 78,000, 53,000, and in some experiments 88,000 and 16,000, were trapped by alpha 2M in supernatant fractions from IMR90 human fibroblasts, EBTr bovine fibroblasts and HeLa human carcinoma cells. No additional proteins were trapped in the presence of ATP. The Mr-78,000 endopeptidase was identified as calpain II by immunoblotting. At pH 5.3 putative endopeptidases of subunit Mr 80,000, 53,000 and 28,000-32,000 were trapped from IMR90-fibroblast extracts. Immunoblotting showed that both cathepsin B and cathepsin D were present in the Mr-28,000-32,000 electrophoretic bands. The use of alpha 2M and immobilized antibody to alpha 2M thus allows a rapid enrichment of endopeptidases from cell extracts. Some potentials and limitations of the method are discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2462415

  16. Functional modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by cereblon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Jo, Sooyeon; Kim, Hyunyoung; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in cereblon (CRBN), a substrate binding component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cause a form of mental retardation in humans. However, the cellular proteins that interact with CRBN remain largely unknown. Here, we report that CRBN directly interacts with the α1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK α1) and inhibits the activation of AMPK activation. The ectopic expression of CRBN reduces phosphorylation of AMPK α1 and, thus, inhibits the enzyme in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, AMPK α1 can be potently activated by suppressing endogenous CRBN using CRBN-specific small hairpin RNAs. Thus, CRBN may act as a negative modulator of the AMPK signaling pathway in vivo.

  17. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  18. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 interacts with p21-activated kinase 6 to control neurite complexity in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Beilina, Alexandra; Rodella, Umberto; Russo, Isabella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Reyniers, Lauran; Hondhamuni, Geshanthi; Lewis, Patrick A; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Bubacco, Luigi; Piccoli, Giovanni; Cookson, Mark R; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a causative gene for Parkinson's disease, but the physiological function and the mechanism(s) by which the cellular activity of LRRK2 is regulated are poorly understood. Here, we identified p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of the GTPase/ROC domain of LRRK2. p21-activated kinases are serine-threonine kinases that serve as targets for the small GTP binding proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 and have been implicated in different morphogenetic processes through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton such as synapse formation and neuritogenesis. Using an in vivo neuromorphology assay, we show that PAK6 is a positive regulator of neurite outgrowth and that LRRK2 is required for this function. Analyses of post-mortem brain tissue from idiopathic and LRRK2 G2019S carriers reveal an increase in PAK6 activation state, whereas knock-out LRRK2 mice display reduced PAK6 activation and phosphorylation of PAK6 substrates. Taken together, these results support a critical role of LRRK2 GTPase domain in cytoskeletal dynamics in vivo through the novel interactor PAK6, and provide a valuable platform to unravel the mechanism underlying LRRK2-mediated pathophysiology. We propose p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a kinase involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). In health, PAK6 regulates neurite complexity in the brain and LRRK2 is required for its function, (a) whereas PAK6 is aberrantly activated in LRRK2-linked PD brain (b) suggesting that LRRK2 toxicity is mediated by PAK6.

  19. Autophosphorylation in the Activation Loop Is Required for Full Kinase Activity In Vivo of Human and Yeast Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α Kinases PKR and GCN2

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patrick R.; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Qizhi; Taylor, Deborah R.; Zhang, Fan; Herring, Christopher; Mathews, Michael B.; Qin, Jun; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    1998-01-01

    The human double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is an important component of the interferon response to virus infection. The activation of PKR is accompanied by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including one in the N-terminal regulatory region (Thr-258) that is required for full kinase activity. Several protein kinases are activated by phosphorylation in the region between kinase subdomains VII and VIII, referred to as the activation loop. We show that Thr-446 and Thr-451 in the PKR activation loop are required in vivo and in vitro for high-level kinase activity. Mutation of either residue to Ala impaired translational control by PKR in yeast cells and COS1 cells and led to tumor formation in mice. These mutations also impaired autophosphorylation and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit α (eIF2α) phosphorylation by PKR in vitro. Whereas the Ala-446 substitution substantially reduced PKR function, the mutant kinase containing Ala-451 was completely inactive. PKR specifically phosphorylated Thr-446 and Thr-451 in synthetic peptides in vitro, and mass spectrometry analysis of PKR phosphopeptides confirmed that Thr-446 is an autophosphorylation site in vivo. Substitution of Glu-490 in subdomain X of PKR partially restored kinase activity when combined with the Ala-451 mutation. This finding suggests that the interaction between subdomain X and the activation loop, described previously for MAP kinase, is a regulatory feature conserved in PKR. We found that the yeast eIF2α kinase GCN2 autophosphorylates at Thr-882 and Thr-887, located in the activation loop at exactly the same positions as Thr-446 and Thr-451 in PKR. Thr-887 was more critically required than was Thr-882 for GCN2 kinase activity, paralleling the relative importance of Thr-446 and Thr-451 in PKR. These results indicate striking similarities between GCN2 and PKR in the importance of autophosphorylation and the conserved Thr residues in the activation loop. PMID:9528799

  20. Receptor for bombesin with associated tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, D M; Gaudino, G; Naldini, L; Comoglio, P M

    1986-01-01

    The neuropeptide bombesin is known for its potent mitogenic activity on murine 3T3 fibroblasts and other cells. Recently it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of small cell lung carcinoma, in which it acts through an autocrine loop of growth stimulation. Phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) antibodies have been successfully used to recognize the autophosphorylated receptors for known growth factors. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, phosphotyrosine antibodies identified a 115,000-Mr cell surface protein (p115) that became phosphorylated on tyrosine as a specific response to bombesin stimulation of quiescent cells. The extent of phosphorylation was dose dependent and correlated with the mitogenic effect induced by bombesin, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p115 was detectable minutes after the addition of bombesin, and its time course paralleled that described for the binding of bombesin to its receptor. Immunocomplexes of phosphorylated p115 and phosphotyrosine antibodies bound 125I-labeled [Tyr4]bombesin in a specific and saturable manner and displayed an associated tyrosine kinase activity enhanced by bombesin. Furthermore, the 125I-labeled bombesin analog gastrin-releasing peptide, bound to intact live cells, was coprecipitated with p115. These data strongly suggest that p115 participates in the structure and function of the surface receptor for bombesin, a new member of the family of growth factor receptors with associated tyrosine kinase activity. Images PMID:2432404

  1. Sphingosine Kinase Mediates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Activation of Ras and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaodong; Wu, Weicheng; Mosteller, Raymond D.; Broek, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is critical to the processes of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Here, evidence is presented for VEGF stimulation of sphingosine kinase (SPK) that affects not only endothelial cell signaling but also tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors. VEGF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment of the T24 bladder tumor cell line resulted in a time- and dose-dependent stimulation of SPK activity. In T24 cells, VEGF treatment reduced cellular sphingosine levels while raising that of sphingosine-1-phosphate. VEGF stimulation of T24 cells caused a slow and sustained accumulation of Ras-GTP and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (phospho-ERK) compared with that after EGF treatment. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets SPK1, but not SPK2, blocks VEGF-induced accumulation of Ras-GTP and phospho-ERK in T24 cells. In contrast to EGF stimulation, VEGF stimulation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation was unaffected by dominant-negative Ras-N17. Raf kinase inhibition blocked both VEGF- and EGF-stimulated accumulation of phospho-ERK1/2. Inhibition of SPK by pharmacological inhibitors, a dominant-negative SPK mutant, or siRNA that targets SPK blocked VEGF, but not EGF, induction of phospho-ERK1/2. We conclude that VEGF induces DNA synthesis in a pathway which sequentially involves protein kinase C (PKC), SPK, Ras, Raf, and ERK1/2. These data highlight a novel mechanism by which SPK mediates signaling from PKC to Ras in a manner independent of Ras-guanine nucleotide exchange factor. PMID:12391145

  2. Role of diacylglycerol-regulated protein kinase C isotypes in growth factor activation of the Raf-1 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H; Smola, U; Wixler, V; Eisenmann-Tappe, I; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J; Rapp, U; Cooper, G M

    1997-01-01

    The Raf protein kinases function downstream of Ras guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to transduce intracellular signals from growth factor receptors. Interaction with Ras recruits Raf to the plasma membrane, but the subsequent mechanism of Raf activation has not been established. Previous studies implicated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in Raf activation; therefore, we investigated the role of the epsilon isotype of protein kinase C (PKC), which is stimulated by PC-derived diacylglycerol, as a Raf activator. A dominant negative mutant of PKC epsilon inhibited both proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells and activation of Raf in COS cells. Conversely, overexpression of active PKC epsilon stimulated Raf kinase activity in COS cells and overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative Ras in NIH 3T3 cells. PKC epsilon also stimulated Raf kinase in baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells and was able to directly activate Raf in vitro. Consistent with its previously reported activity as a Raf activator in vitro, PKC alpha functioned similarly to PKC epsilon in both NIH 3T3 and COS cell assays. In addition, constitutively active mutants of both PKC alpha and PKC epsilon overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative mutants of the other PKC isotype, indicating that these diacylglycerol-regulated PKCs function as redundant activators of Raf-1 in vivo. PMID:9001227

  3. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    DOE PAGES

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; ...

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1more » acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.« less

  4. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-01-01

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Here, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1 acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. PMID:25489024

  5. Arabidopsis receptor of activated C kinase1 phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE.

    PubMed

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-02-01

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Here, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1 acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1A(S122A/T162A), but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1A(S122D/T162E), rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1A(S122D/T162E) accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1(S122A/T162A). However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1A(S122A/T162A) protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1A(S122D/T162E) protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.

  6. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1 acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.

  7. Identification and characterization of a mitogen-activated S6 kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jenö, P; Ballou, L M; Novak-Hofer, I; Thomas, G

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells with epidermal growth factor, orthovanadate, or serum results in the activation of a kinase that phosphorylates protein S6 of the 40S ribosomal subunit in vitro. This kinase is eluted as a single peak of activity from either a Mono Q anion-exchange column at 0.34 M NaCl or a Mono S cation-exchange column at 0.20 M NaCl. Treatment of the peak fraction from the Mono S column with phosphatase 2A completely abolishes the activity of the enzyme. The kinase appears to be distinct from protein kinase C, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and two protease-activated kinases, PAK II and H4P. The kinase has been purified to apparent homogeneity and migrates as a single band at Mr 70,000 in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. The kinase exhibits the ability to autophosphorylate, and this activity directly parallels S6 phosphorylation activity on the final step of purification. In vitro, the kinase incorporates up to 5 mol of phosphate into S6, and the tryptic phosphopeptide maps obtained are equivalent to those from S6 phosphorylated in vivo. Most important, treatment of the purified kinase with phosphatase 2A results in complete inactivation of the enzyme, arguing that the activity of the kinase is directly controlled by phosphorylation. Images PMID:3257566

  8. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  9. Alpha-2-Macroglobulin Is Acutely Sensitive to Freezing and Lyophilization: Implications for Structural and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Amy R.; Kumita, Janet R.; Farrawell, Natalie E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wilson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin is an abundant secreted protein that is of particular interest because of its diverse ligand binding profile and multifunctional nature, which includes roles as a protease inhibitor and as a molecular chaperone. The activities of alpha-2-macroglobulin are typically dependent on whether its conformation is native or transformed (i.e. adopts a more compact conformation after interactions with proteases or small nucleophiles), and are also influenced by dissociation of the native alpha-2-macroglobulin tetramer into stable dimers. Alpha-2-macroglobulin is predominately present as the native tetramer in vivo; once purified from human blood plasma, however, alpha-2-macroglobulin can undergo a number of conformational changes during storage, including transformation, aggregation or dissociation. We demonstrate that, particularly in the presence of sodium chloride or amine containing compounds, freezing and/or lyophilization of alpha-2-macroglobulin induces conformational changes with functional consequences. These conformational changes in alpha-2-macroglobulin are not always detected by standard native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but can be measured using bisANS fluorescence assays. Increased surface hydrophobicity of alpha-2-macroglobulin, as assessed by bisANS fluorescence measurements, is accompanied by (i) reduced trypsin binding activity, (ii) increased chaperone activity, and (iii) increased binding to the surfaces of SH-SY5Y neurons, in part, via lipoprotein receptors. We show that sucrose (but not glycine) effectively protects native alpha-2-macroglobulin from denaturation during freezing and/or lyophilization, thereby providing a reproducible method for the handling and long-term storage of this protein. PMID:26103636

  10. Interleukin-1 activates a novel protein kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of Hsp27.

    PubMed

    Freshney, N W; Rawlinson, L; Guesdon, F; Jones, E; Cowley, S; Hsuan, J; Saklatvala, J

    1994-09-23

    An IL-1-stimulated protein kinase cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein hsp27 has been identified in KB cells. It is distinct from the p42 MAP kinase cascade. An upstream activator kinase phosphorylated a 40 kDa kinase (p40) upon threonine and tyrosine residues, which in turn phosphorylated a 50 kDa kinase (p50) upon threonine (and some serine) residues. p50 phosphorylated hsp27 upon serine. p40 and p50 were purified to near homogeneity. All three components were inactivated by protein phosphatase 2A, and p40 was inactivated by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. The substrate specificity of p40 differed from that of p42 and p54 MAP kinases. The upstream activator was not a MAP kinase kinase. p50 resembled MAPKAPK-2 and may be identical.

  11. Acute hypertension activates mitogen-activated protein kinases in arterial wall.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Liu, Y; Gorospe, M; Udelsman, R; Holbrook, N J

    1996-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are rapidly activated in cells stimulated with various extracellular signals by dual phosphorylation of tyrosine and threonine residues. They are thought to play a pivotal role in transmitting transmembrane signals required for cell growth and differentiation. Herein we provide evidence that two distinct classes of MAP kinases, the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK), are transiently activated in rat arteries (aorta, carotid and femoral arteries) in response to an acute elevation in blood pressure induced by either restraint or administration of hypertensive agents (i.e., phenylephrine and angiotensin II). Kinase activation is followed by an increase in c-fos and c-jun gene expression and enhanced activating protein 1 (AP-1) DNA-binding activity. Activation of ERK and JNK could contribute to smooth muscle cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia during arterial remodeling due to frequent and/or persistent elevations in blood pressure. PMID:8567974

  12. Homology modeling and ligand docking of Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 5 (MK5)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 5 (MK5) is involved in one of the major signaling pathways in cells, the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. MK5 was discovered in 1998 by the groups of Houng Ni and Ligou New, and was found to be highly conserved throughout the vertebrates. Studies, both in vivo and in vitro, have shown that it is implicated in tumor suppression as well as tumor promotion, embryogenesis, anxiety, locomotion, cell motility and cell cycle regulation. Methods In order to obtain a molecular model of MK5 that can be used as a working tool for development of chemical probes, three MK5 models were constructed and refined based on three different known crystal structures of the closely related MKs; MK2 [PDB: 2OZA and PDB: 3M2W] and MK3 [PDB: 3FHR]. The main purpose of the present MK5 molecular modeling study was to identify the best suited template for making a MK5 model. The ability of the generated models to effectively discriminate between known inhibitors and decoys was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results According to the ROC curve analyzes, the refined model based on 3FHR was most effective in discrimination between known inhibitors and decoys. Conclusions The 3FHR-based MK5 model may serve as a working tool for development of chemical probes using computer aided drug design. The biological function of MK5 still remains elusive, but its role as a possible drug target may be elucidated in the near future. PMID:24034446

  13. Identification of the regulatory autophosphorylation site of autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase (auto-kinase). Evidence that auto-kinase belongs to a member of the p21-activated kinase family.

    PubMed

    Yu, J S; Chen, W J; Ni, M H; Chan, W H; Yang, S D

    1998-08-15

    Autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase (auto-kinase) was identified from pig brain and liver on the basis of its unique autophosphorylation/activation property [Yang, Fong, Yu and Liu (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 7034-7040; Yang, Chang and Soderling (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 9421-9427]. Its substrate consensus sequence motif was determined as being -R-X-(X)-S*/T*-X3-S/T-. To characterize auto-kinase further, we partly sequenced the kinase purified from pig liver. The N-terminal sequence (VDGGAKTSDKQKKKAXMTDE) and two internal peptide sequences (EKLRTIV and LQNPEK/ILTP/FI) of auto-kinase were obtained. These sequences identify auto-kinase as a C-terminal catalytic fragment of p21-activated protein kinase 2 (PAK2 or gamma-PAK) lacking its N-terminal regulatory region. Auto-kinase can be recognized by an antibody raised against the C-terminal peptide of human PAK2 by immunoblotting. Furthermore the autophosphorylation site sequence of auto-kinase was successfully predicted on the basis of its substrate consensus sequence motif and the known PAK2 sequence, and was further demonstrated to be RST(P)MVGTPYWMAPEVVTR by phosphoamino acid analysis, manual Edman degradation and phosphopeptide mapping via the help of phosphorylation site analysis of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence of PAK2 from residues 396 to 418. During the activation process, auto-kinase autophosphorylates mainly on a single threonine residue Thr402 (according to the sequence numbering of human PAK2). In addition, a phospho-specific antibody against a synthetic phosphopeptide containing this identified sequence was generated and shown to be able to differentially recognize the activated auto-kinase autophosphorylated at Thr402 but not the non-phosphorylated/inactive auto-kinase. Immunoblot analysis with this phospho-specific antibody further revealed that the change in phosphorylation level of Thr402 of auto-kinase was well correlated with the activity change of the kinase during both

  14. Suppression of integrin activation by activated Ras or Raf does not correlate with bulk activation of ERK MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Paul E; Oertli, Beat; Hansen, Malene; Chou, Fan-Li; Willumsen, Berthe M; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2002-07-01

    The rapid modulation of ligand-binding affinity ("activation") is a central property of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors. The Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins and their downstream effectors are key players in regulating integrin activation. H-Ras can suppress integrin activation in fibroblasts via its downstream effector kinase, Raf-1. In contrast, to H-Ras, a closely related small GTP-binding protein R-Ras has the opposite activity, and promotes integrin activation. To gain insight into the regulation of integrin activation by Ras GTPases, we created a series of H-Ras/R-Ras chimeras. We found that a 35-amino acid stretch of H-Ras was required for full suppressive activity. Furthermore, the suppressive chimeras were weak activators of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway, suggesting that the suppression of integrin activation may be independent of the activation of the bulk of ERK MAP kinase. Additional data demonstrating that the ability of H-Ras or Raf-1 to suppress integrin activation was unaffected by inhibition of bulk ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation supported this hypothesis. Thus, the suppression of integrin activation is a Raf kinase induced regulatory event that can be mediated independently of bulk activation of the ERK MAP-kinase pathway.

  15. Src kinases and ERK activate distinct responses to Stitcher receptor tyrosine kinase signaling during wound healing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tsarouhas, Vasilios; Yao, Liqun; Samakovlis, Christos

    2014-04-15

    Metazoans have evolved efficient mechanisms for epidermal repair and survival following injury. Several cellular responses and key signaling molecules that are involved in wound healing have been identified in Drosophila, but the coordination of cytoskeletal rearrangements and the activation of gene expression during barrier repair are poorly understood. The Ret-like receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Stitcher (Stit, also known as Cad96Ca) regulates both re-epithelialization and transcriptional activation by Grainy head (Grh) to induce restoration of the extracellular barrier. Here, we describe the immediate downstream effectors of Stit signaling in vivo. Drk (Downstream of receptor kinase) and Src family tyrosine kinases bind to the same docking site in the Stit intracellular domain. Drk is required for the full activation of transcriptional responses but is dispensable for re-epithelialization. By contrast, Src family kinases (SFKs) control both the assembly of a contractile actin ring at the wound periphery and Grh-dependent activation of barrier-repair genes. Our analysis identifies distinct pathways mediating injury responses and reveals an RTK-dependent activation mode for Src kinases and their central functions during epidermal wound healing in vivo.

  16. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  17. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  18. The Y’s that bind: negative regulators of Src family kinase activity in platelets

    PubMed Central

    NEWMAN, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases play important roles in platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge regarding how Src family kinase activity is regulated in general, to describe what is known about mechanisms underlying SFK activation in platelets, and to discuss platelet proteins that contribute to SFK inactivation, particularly those that use phosphotyrosine-containing sequences to recruit phosphatases and kinases to sites of SFK activity. PMID:19630799

  19. Contraction inhibits insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate-1/2-associated phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity, but not protein kinase B activation or glucose uptake, in rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, J P; Soos, M A; Aslesen, R; O'rahilly, S; Jensen, J

    2000-01-01

    The initial stages of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake are thought to involve tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRSs), which recruit and activate phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), leading to the activation of protein kinase B (PKB) and other downstream effectors. In contrast, contraction stimulates glucose uptake via a PI 3-kinase-independent mechanism. The combined effects of insulin and contraction on glucose uptake are additive. However, it has been reported that contraction causes a decrease in insulin-stimulated IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity. To investigate this paradox, we have examined the effects of contraction on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and proximal insulin-signalling events in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle. Stimulation by insulin or contraction produced a 3-fold increase in glucose uptake, with the effects of simultaneous treatment by insulin and contraction being additive. Wortmannin completely blocked the additive effect of insulin in contracting skeletal muscle, indicating that this is a PI 3-kinase-dependent effect. Insulin-stimulated recruitment of PI 3-kinase to IRS-1 was unaffected by contraction; however, insulin produced no discernible increase in PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1 or IRS-2 immunocomplexes in contracting skeletal muscle. Consistent with this, contraction inhibited insulin-stimulated p70(S6K) activation. In contrast, insulin-stimulated activation of PKB was unaffected by contraction. Thus, in contracting skeletal muscle, insulin stimulates glucose uptake and activates PKB, but not p70(S6K), by a PI 3-kinase-dependent mechanism that is independent of changes in IRS-1- and IRS-2-associated PI 3-kinase activity. PMID:10903138

  20. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  1. Src family kinases: at the forefront of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Mazharian, Alexandra; Mori, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in mediating the rapid response of platelets to vascular injury. They transmit activation signals from a diverse repertoire of platelet surface receptors, including the integrin αIIbβ3, the immunoreceptor tyrosine–based activation motif–containing collagen receptor complex GPVI-FcR γ-chain, and the von Willebrand factor receptor complex GPIb-IX-V, which are essential for thrombus growth and stability. Ligand-mediated clustering of these receptors triggers an increase in SFK activity and downstream tyrosine phosphorylation of enzymes, adaptors, and cytoskeletal proteins that collectively propagate the signal and coordinate platelet activation. A growing body of evidence has established that SFKs also contribute to Gq- and Gi-coupled receptor signaling that synergizes with primary activation signals to maximally activate platelets and render them prothrombotic. Interestingly, SFKs concomitantly activate inhibitory pathways that limit platelet activation and thrombus size. In this review, we discuss past discoveries that laid the foundation for this fundamental area of platelet signal transduction, recent progress in our understanding of the distinct and overlapping functions of SFKs in platelets, and new avenues of research into mechanisms of SFK regulation. We also highlight the thrombotic and hemostatic consequences of targeting platelet SFKs. PMID:25115887

  2. Positive feedback of protein kinase C proteolytic activation during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leverrier, Sabrina; Vallentin, Alice; Joubert, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and PKCepsilon, which are better known for promoting cell survival, PKCdelta is known for its pro-apoptotic function, which is exerted mainly through a caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation pathway. In the present study, we used the rat GH3B6 pituitary adenoma cell line to show that PKCalpha and PKCepsilon are activated and relocalized together with PKCdelta when apoptosis is induced by a genotoxic stress. Proteolytic activation is a crucial step used by the three isoforms since: (1) the catalytic domains of the PKCalpha, PKCepsilon or PKCdelta isoforms (CDalpha, CDepsilon and CDdelta respectively) accumulated, and this accumulation was dependent on the activity of both calpain and caspase; and (2) transient expression of CDalpha, CDepsilon or CDdelta sufficed to induce apoptosis. However, following this initial step of proteolytic activation, the pathways diverge; cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation are induced by CDepsilon and CDdelta, but not by CDalpha. Another interesting finding of the present study is the proteolysis of PKCdelta induced by CDepsilon expression that revealed the existence of a cross-talk between PKC isoforms during apoptosis. Hence the PKC family may participate in the apoptotic process of pituitary adenoma cells at two levels: downstream of caspase and calpain, and via retro-activation of caspase-3, resulting in the amplification of its own proteolytic activation. PMID:12238950

  3. Role of alpha-2-macroglobulin and bacterial elastase in guinea-pig pseudomonal septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. M.; Shibuya, Y.; Kambara, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    An essential role of alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) was revealed in the prevention of septic shock induced in guinea-pigs by an elastase producing strain (IFO-3455) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When bacterial peritonitis was induced by inoculating fibrin-thrombin clot containing viable bacteria at a dose of 10(9) c.f.u./kg body weight, the guinea-pigs (n = 6) died within 7-8 hours due to septic shock. Prior to the shock, consumption of two-thirds of the circulating alpha 2M was observed. When circulating alpha 2M was depleted 4 hours after the bacterial inoculation, the guinea-pigs immediately developed shock and died within one hour. This shock was prevented either with a specific elastase inhibitor, HONHCOCH(CH2C6H5)CO-Ala-Gly-NH2, zincov (6 microM), or with human alpha 2M. Simultaneous depletion of circulating Hageman factor also prevented shock in the alpha 2M-depleted animals. These results indicate that septic shock was induced through activation of the Hageman factor dependent system by the bacteria-produced elastase which survived alpha 2M in the circulation. PMID:7537522

  4. Alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation triggers Achilles tenocyte hypercellularity: Comparison between two model systems

    PubMed Central

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Fong, G; Alfredson, H; Scott, A; Danielson, P

    2013-01-01

    The histopathology of tendons with painful tendinopathy is often tendinosis, a fibrosis-like condition of unclear pathogenesis characterized by tissue changes including hypercellularity. The primary tendon cells (tenocytes) have been shown to express adrenoreceptors (mainly alpha-2A) as well as markers of catecholamine production, particularly in tendinosis. It is known that adrenergic stimulation can induce proliferation in other cells. The present study investigated the effects of an exogenously administered alpha-2 adrenergic agonist in an established in vivo Achilles tendinosis model (rabbit) and also in an in vitro human tendon cell culture model. The catecholamine producing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase and the alpha-2A-adrenoreceptor (α2A AR) were expressed by tenocytes, and alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation had a proliferative effect on these cells, in both models. The proliferation was inhibited by administration of an α2A AR antagonist, and the in vitro model further showed that the proliferative alpha-2A effect was mediated via a mitogenic cell signaling pathway involving phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2. The results indicate that catecholamines produced by tenocytes in tendinosis might contribute to the proliferative nature of the pathology through stimulation of the α2A AR, pointing to a novel target for future therapies. The study furthermore shows that animal models are not necessarily required for all aspects of this research. PMID:22292987

  5. The protein activator of protein kinase R, PACT/RAX, negatively regulates protein kinase R during mouse anterior pituitary development.

    PubMed

    Dickerman, Benjamin K; White, Christine L; Kessler, Patricia M; Sadler, Anthony J; Williams, Bryan R G; Sen, Ganes C

    2015-12-01

    The murine double-stranded RNA-binding protein termed protein kinase R (PKR)-associated protein X (RAX) and the human homolog, protein activator of PKR (PACT), were originally characterized as activators of PKR. Mice deficient in RAX show reproductive and developmental defects, including reduced body size, craniofacial defects and anterior pituitary hypoplasia. As these defects are not observed in PKR-deficient mice, the phenotype has been attributed to PKR-independent activities of RAX. Here we further investigated the involvement of PKR in the physiological function of RAX, by generating rax(-/-) mice deficient in PKR, or carrying a kinase-inactive mutant of PKR (K271R) or an unphosphorylatable mutant of the PKR substrate eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 α subunit (eIF2α) (S51A). Ablating PKR expression rescued the developmental and reproductive deficiencies in rax(-/-) mice. Generating rax(-/-) mice with a kinase-inactive mutant of PKR resulted in similar rescue, confirming that the rax(-/-) defects are PKR dependent; specifically that the kinase activity of PKR was required for these defects. Moreover, generating rax(-/-) mice that were heterozygous for an unphosphorylatable mutant eIF2α provides partial rescue of the rax(-/-) defect, consistent with mutation of one copy of the Eif2s1 gene. These observations were further investigated in vitro by reducing RAX expression in anterior pituitary cells, resulting in increased PKR activity and induction of the PKR-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1). These results demonstrate that PKR kinase activity is required for onset of the rax(-/-) phenotype, implying an unexpected function for RAX as a negative regulator of PKR in the context of postnatal anterior pituitary tissue, and identify a critical role for the regulation of PKR activity for normal development.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in male reproductive function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Michelle W.M.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that male reproductive function is modulated via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The MAPK cascade is involved in numerous male reproductive processes, including spermatogenesis, sperm maturation and activation, capacitation and acrosome reaction, before fertilization of the oocyte. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in this rapidly developing field regarding the role of MAPK in male reproduction in animal models and in human spermatozoa in vitro. This research will facilitate the design of future studies in humans, although much work is needed before this information can be used to manage male infertility and environmental toxicant-induced testicular injury in men, such as blood–testis-barrier disruption. PMID:19303360

  7. [Quantitation and heterogeneity of serum alpha 2-macroglobulin].

    PubMed

    Mashiko, T; Ichikawa, K; Jimbo, S; Tanaka, T; Kanoh, Y; Ohtani, H

    1999-05-01

    alpha 2-Macroglobulin (alpha 2M) is a major protease inhibitor in human plasma. In this study, serum alpha 2M was determined by means of immunoelectrophoresis (IEP), rocket immunoelectrophoresis (R-IEP), laser nephelometry (LN) and single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) in 133 subjects. The values obtained by these methods coincided well in most specimens, but some specimens showed disagreement. The sera of alpha 2M deficiency found by IEP were analyzed by the other methods. We found that R-IEP gave the results of alpha 2M deficiency most frequently while the other methods gave the results of normal alpha 2M level for some specimens. We studied on the presumption that the phenomenon is due to heterogeneity in molecular weight of alpha 2M. After alpha 2M was purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography, we further employed gel-filtration on a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to isolate alpha 2M with different molecular size. Two peaks of immunoreactive alpha 2M were found by the gel-filtration HPLC. When we performed IEP for both portions, the first portion with higher molecular size showed larger rate of migration than the second portion. Serum alpha 2M quantitation with SRID is not appropriate because molecular weight influences on the determination by SRID. We conclude that R-IEP is best suitable for the detection of decrease of serum alpha 2M, although this method requires expertness of manipulation.

  8. [Interferon alpha-2b modified with polyethylene glycol].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingxin; Zhai, Yanqin; Lei, Jiandu; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2008-09-01

    In order to obtain a more stable PEGylated interferon alpha-2b, and prolong its half life, interferon alpha-2b (IFN alpha-2b) was modified with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol propionaldehyde (mPEG-ALD) 20000. It was found that the optimized reaction condition for the maximum bioactivity and highest PEGylation degree of the mono PEGylated interferon alpha-2b was as follows: in 20 mmol/L, pH 6.5, citric acid and sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, the concentration of IFN alpha-2b was 4 mg/mL, and the molar ratio of PEG/IFN alpha-2b was 8:1, and the reaction time was 20 h at 4 degrees C. Under the optimized reaction condition, the mono PEGylation degree reached to 55%. Ion exchange chromatography was used to separate and purify mono PEGylated interferon alpha-2b from the reaction mixture. The purity of mono PEGylated interferon alpha-2b was higher than 97% characterized by HPLC. The bioactivity of the mono PEGylated interferon alpha-2b was 13.4% of the native IFN alpha-2b, while its half life in SD rat is much longer than the native IFN alpha-2b. The mono PEGylated interferon alpha-2b is also stable in aqueous.

  9. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  10. Activation of BTK by a Phosphorylation Mechanism Initiated by SRC Family Kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, David J.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Park, Hyunsun; Wahl, Matthew I.; Lin, Siqi; Kato, Roberta M.; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Witte, Owen N.; Kinet, Jean-Pierre

    1996-02-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is pivotal in B cell activation and development through its participation in the signaling pathways of multiple hematopoietic receptors. The mechanisms controlling BTK activation were studied here by examination of the biochemical consequences of an interaction between BTK and SRC family kinases. This interaction of BTK with SRC kinases transphosphorylated BTK on tyrosine at residue 551, which led to BTK activation. BTK then autophosphorylated at a second site. The same two sites were phosphorylated upon B cell antigen receptor cross-linking. The activated BTK was pre-dominantly membrane-associated, which suggests that BTK integrates distinct receptor signals resulting in SRC kinase activation and BTK membrane targeting.

  11. 3pK, a new mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase located in the small cell lung cancer tumor suppressor gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Latif, F; Duh, F M; Bernal, R; Smola, U; Li, H; Kuzmin, I; Wixler, V; Geil, L; Shrestha, S

    1996-01-01

    NotI linking clones, localized to the human chromosome 3p21.3 region and homozygously deleted in small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H740 and NCI-H1450, were used to search for a putative tumor suppressor gene(s). One of these clones, NL1G210, detected a 2.5-kb mRNA in all examined human tissues, expression being especially high in the heart and skeletal muscle. Two overlapping cDNA clones containing the entire open reading frame were isolated from a human heart cDNA library and fully characterized. Computer analysis and a search of the GenBank database to reveal high sequence identity of the product of this gene to serine-threonine kinases, especially to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a recently described substrate of mitogen-activated kinases. Sequence identitiy was 72% at the nucleotide level and 75% at the amino acid level, strongly suggesting that this protein is a serine-threonine kinase. Here we demonstrate that the new gene, referred to as 3pK (for chromosome 3p kinase), in fact encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated protein serine-threonine kinase with a novel substrate specificity. PMID:8622688

  12. Treponema denticola activates mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathways through Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Ruby, John; Rehani, Kunal; Martin, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Treponema denticola, a spirochete indigenous to the oral cavity, is associated with host inflammatory responses to anaerobic polymicrobial infections of the root canal, periodontium, and alveolar bone. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition of T. denticola by the innate immune system and the underlying cell signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory response to T. denticola are currently unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that T. denticola induces innate immune responses via the utilization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4. Assessment of TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers revealed that T. denticola predominantly utilizes TLR2/6 for the induction of cellular responses. Analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in T. denticola-stimulated monocytes identified a prolonged up-regulation of the MAPK extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38, while no discernible increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) levels was observed. With the aid of pharmacological inhibitors selectively targeting ERK1/2 via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 kinase and p38, we further demonstrate that ERK1/2 and p38 play a major role in T. denticola-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production.

  13. The protein activator of protein kinase R, PACT/RAX, negatively regulates protein kinase R during mouse anterior pituitary development

    PubMed Central

    Dickerman, Benjamin K.; White, Christine L.; Kessler, Patricia M.; Sadler, Anthony J.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Sen, Ganes C.

    2015-01-01

    The murine double-stranded RNA-binding protein RAX and the human homolog PACT were originally characterized as activators of protein kinase R (PKR). Mice deficient in RAX show reproductive and developmental defects, including reduced body size, craniofacial defects and anterior pituitary hypoplasia. As these defects are not observed in PKR-deficient mice, the phenotype has been attributed to PKR-independent activities of RAX. Here we further investigated the involvement of PKR in the physiological function of RAX, by generating rax−/− mice deficient in PKR, or carrying a kinase-inactive mutant of PKR (K271R) or an unphosphorylatable mutant of the PKR substrate eIF2α (S51A). Ablating PKR expression rescued the developmental and reproductive deficiencies in rax−/− mice. Generating rax−/− mice with a kinase-inactive mutant of PKR resulted in similar rescue, confirming that the rax−/− defects are PKR dependent; specifically that the kinase activity of PKR was required for these defects. Moreover, generating rax−/− mice that were heterozygous for an unphosphorylatable mutant eIF2α provides partial rescue of the rax−/− defect, consistent with mutation of one copy of the Eif2s1 gene. These observations were further investigated in vitro by reducing RAX expression in anterior pituitary cells, resulting in increased PKR activity and induction of the PKR-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1. These results demonstrate that PKR kinase activity is required for onset of the rax−/− phenotype, implying an unexpected function for RAX as a negative regulator of PKR in the context of postnatal anterior pituitary tissue, and identify a critical role for the regulation of PKR activity for normal development. PMID:26414443

  14. Changes of the excitability of rat trigeminal root ganglion neurons evoked by alpha(2)-adrenoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Ikeda, M; Tanimoto, T; Lipski, J; Matsumoto, S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor agonists on the excitability of trigeminal root ganglion (TRG) neurons using the perforated patch-clamp technique, and to determine whether these neurons express mRNA for alpha(2)-adrenoreceptors. In current-clamp mode, the resting membrane potential was -57.4+/-1.2 mV (n=26). Most neurons (71%) were hyperpolarized by clonidine (5-50 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner. The response was associated with an increase of cell input resistance. In addition, clonidine reduced the repetitive firing evoked by depolarizing current pulses. An alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist, UK14,304, (10-20 microM) also hyperpolarized TRG neurons. The clonidine- and UK14,304-induced hyperpolarization was blocked by idazoxan (alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor antagonist). In voltage-clamp, clonidine (1-50 microM) reversibly reduced the hyperpolarization- and time-dependent cationic current. The effect was mimicked by UK14,304 (10-20 microM), and antagonized by idazoxan. Hyperpolarization-activated cationic current was blocked by extracellular Cs(+) (2 mM) or a specific blocker, ZD7288 (20 microM). Analysis of tail currents revealed that a reversal potential of the clonidine-sensitive component of hyperpolarization-activated cationic current was -46 mV. Single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated the expression of mRNA for alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoreceptors. These results demonstrate that activation of alpha(2)-adrenoreceptors can hyperpolarize TRG neurons, and that the inhibitory effect is associated with inhibition of hyperpolarization-activated cationic current. Our results suggest that activation of alpha(2)-adrenoreceptors in the absence of nerve injury may have an inhibitory effect on nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal system at the level of both TRG neuronal cell bodies and primary afferent terminals.

  15. Low salt concentrations activate AMP-activated protein kinase in mouse macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Natasha; Fraser, Scott A; Katerelos, Marina; Katsis, Frosa; Gleich, Kurt; Mount, Peter F; Steinberg, Gregory R; Levidiotis, Vicki; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2009-04-01

    The energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is associated with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2 in the kidney and phosphorylates it on a regulatory site in vitro. To identify a potential role for AMPK in salt sensing at the macula densa, we have used the murine macula densa cell line MMDD1. In this cell line, AMPK was rapidly activated by isosmolar low-salt conditions. In contrast to the known salt-sensing pathway in the macula densa, AMPK activation occurred in the presence of either low sodium or low chloride and was unaffected by inhibition of NKCC2 with bumetanide. Assays using recombinant AMPK demonstrated activation of an upstream kinase by isosmolar low salt. The specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase inhibitor STO-609 failed to suppress AMPK activation, suggesting that it was not part of the signal pathway. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of the specific substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79), as well as increased NKCC2 phosphorylation at Ser(126). AMPK activation due to low salt concentrations was inhibited by an adenovirus construct encoding a kinase dead mutant of AMPK, leading to reduced ACC Ser(79) and NKCC2 Ser(126) phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that AMPK activation in macula densa-like cells occurs via isosmolar changes in sodium or chloride concentration, leading to phosphorylation of ACC and NKCC2. Phosphorylation of these substrates in vivo is predicted to increase intracellular chloride and so reduce the effect of salt restriction on tubuloglomerular feedback and renin secretion.

  16. Spatial distribution of protein kinase A activity during cell migration is mediated by A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP Lbc.

    PubMed

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A; Vergara, Leoncio A; Bellot, Larry J; Canton, David; Scott, John D; O'Connor, Kathleen L

    2009-02-27

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility.

  17. Spatial Distribution of Protein Kinase A Activity during Cell Migration Is Mediated by A-kinase Anchoring Protein AKAP Lbc*

    PubMed Central

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.; Vergara, Leoncio A.; Bellot, Larry J.; Canton, David; Scott, John D.; O'Connor, Kathleen L.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility. PMID:19106088

  18. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide induces oxidation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W; Banerjee, Sami; Bae, Hongbeom; Friggeri, Arnaud; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Abraham, Edward

    2010-10-22

    Although metabolic conditions associated with an increased AMP/ATP ratio are primary factors in the activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a number of recent studies have shown that increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species can stimulate AMPK activity, even without a decrease in cellular levels of ATP. We found that exposure of recombinant AMPKαβγ complex or HEK 293 cells to H(2)O(2) was associated with increased kinase activity and also resulted in oxidative modification of AMPK, including S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα and AMPKβ subunits. In experiments using C-terminal truncation mutants of AMPKα (amino acids 1-312), we found that mutation of cysteine 299 to alanine diminished the ability of H(2)O(2) to induce kinase activation, and mutation of cysteine 304 to alanine totally abrogated the enhancing effect of H(2)O(2) on kinase activity. Similar to the results obtained with H(2)O(2)-treated HEK 293 cells, activation and S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα subunit were present in the lungs of acatalasemic mice or mice treated with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole, conditions in which intracellular steady state levels of H(2)O(2) are increased. These results demonstrate that physiologically relevant concentrations of H(2)O(2) can activate AMPK through oxidative modification of the AMPKα subunit. The present findings also imply that AMPK activation, in addition to being a response to alterations in intracellular metabolic pathways, is directly influenced by cellular redox status.

  19. Tyrosine kinase activity of a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II catalytic fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Yasunori; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu

    2008-12-12

    A 30-kDa fragment of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (30K-CaMKII) is a constitutively active protein Ser/Thr kinase devoid of autophosphorylation activity. We have produced a chimeric enzyme of 30K-CaMKII (designated CX{sub 40}-30K-CaMKII), in which the N-terminal 40 amino acids of Xenopus Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CX{sub 40}) were fused to the N-terminal end of 30K-CaMKII. Although CX{sub 40}-30K-CaMKII exhibited essentially the same substrate specificity as 30K-CaMKII, it underwent significant autophosphorylation. Surprisingly, its autophosphorylation site was found to be Tyr-18 within the N-terminal CX{sub 40} region of the fusion protein, although it did not show any Tyr kinase activity toward exogenous substrates. Several lines of evidence suggested that the autophosphorylation occurred via an intramolecular mechanism. These data suggest that even typical Ser/Thr kinases such as 30K-CaMKII can phosphorylate Tyr residues under certain conditions. The possible mechanism of the Tyr residue autophosphorylation is discussed.

  20. Measuring Activity of Phosphoinositide Lipid Kinases Using a Bioluminescent ADP-Detecting Assay.

    PubMed

    Tai, Andrew W; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) and its phosphorylated derivatives, collectively called phosphoinositides, are important second messengers involved in a variety of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, and migration. These derivatives are generated by a family of kinases called phosphoinositide lipid kinases (PIKs). Due to the central role of these kinases in signaling pathways, assays for measuring their activity are often used for drug development. Lipid kinase substrates are present in unique membrane environments in vivo and are insoluble in aqueous solutions. Therefore the most important consideration in developing successful lipid kinase assays is the physical state of lipid kinase substrates. Here we describe the preparation of lipid substrates for two major classes of lipid kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) and phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks). Using PI4Ks as an example, we also provide a detailed protocol for small-scale kinase expression and affinity purification from transiently transfected mammalian cells. For measuring lipid kinase activity we apply a universal bioluminescent ADP detection approach. The approach is compatible with diverse lipid substrates and can be used as a single integrated platform for measuring all classes of lipid and protein kinases.

  1. Expression and activity of the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in selected tissues during chicken embryonic development.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase and a key part of a kinase signaling cascade that senses cellular energy status (AMP/ATP ratio) and acts to maintain energy homeostasis by coordinately regulating energy-consuming and energy-generating m...

  2. Hypothalamic AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Glucose Production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Clair S.; Lam, Carol K.L.; Chari, Madhu; Cheung, Grace W.C.; Kokorovic, Andrea; Gao, Sun; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A.; Lam, Tony K.T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fuel sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hypothalamus regulates energy homeostasis by sensing nutritional and hormonal signals. However, the role of hypothalamic AMPK in glucose production regulation remains to be elucidated. We hypothesize that bidirectional changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity alter glucose production. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To introduce bidirectional changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity in vivo, we first knocked down hypothalamic AMPK activity in male Sprague-Dawley rats by either injecting an adenovirus expressing the dominant-negative form of AMPK (Ad-DN AMPKα2 [D157A]) or infusing AMPK inhibitor compound C directly into the mediobasal hypothalamus. Next, we independently activated hypothalamic AMPK by delivering either an adenovirus expressing the constitutive active form of AMPK (Ad-CA AMPKα1312 [T172D]) or the AMPK activator AICAR. The pancreatic (basal insulin)-euglycemic clamp technique in combination with the tracer-dilution methodology was used to assess the impact of alternations in hypothalamic AMPK activity on changes in glucose kinetics in vivo. RESULTS Injection of Ad-DN AMPK into the hypothalamus knocked down hypothalamic AMPK activity and led to a significant suppression of glucose production with no changes in peripheral glucose uptake during the clamps. In parallel, hypothalamic infusion of AMPK inhibitor compound C lowered glucose production as well. Conversely, molecular and pharmacological activation of hypothalamic AMPK negated the ability of hypothalamic nutrients to lower glucose production. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity are sufficient and necessary for hypothalamic nutrient-sensing mechanisms to alter glucose production in vivo. PMID:20682691

  3. Activation of the Smk1 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by Developmentally Regulated Autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Whinston, Elizabeth; Omerza, Gregory; Singh, Amrita; Tio, Chong Wai

    2013-01-01

    Smk1 is a meiosis-specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls spore morphogenesis. Similar to other MAPKs, it is controlled by dual phosphorylation of its T-X-Y activation motif. However, Smk1 is not phosphorylated by a prototypical MAPK kinase. Here, we show that the T residue in Smk1's activation motif is phosphorylated by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-activating kinase, Cak1. The Y residue is autophosphorylated in an independent intramolecular reaction that requires the meiosis-specific protein Ssp2. Although both SMK1 and SSP2 are expressed as middle-meiosis-specific genes, Smk1 protein starts to accumulate before Ssp2. Thus, Smk1 exists in a low-activity (pT) form early in sporulation and a high-activity (pT/pY) form later in the program. Ssp2 must be present when Smk1 is being produced to activate the autophosphorylation reaction, suggesting that Ssp2 acts through a transitional intermediate form of Smk1. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for how Smk1 activity thresholds are generated. They demonstrate that intramolecular autophosphorylation of MAPKs can be regulated and suggest new mechanisms for coupling MAPK outputs to developmental programs. PMID:23207907

  4. Wounding systemically activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase in forage and turf grasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Forage and turf grasses are continually cut and grazed by livestock, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to wounding. Mechanical wounding rapidly activated a 46 kDa and a 44 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in six different grass species. In the m...

  5. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Is Activated as a Consequence of Lipolysis in the Adipocyte

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated in adipocytes during exercise and other states in which lipolysis is stimulated. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect and its physiological relevance are unclear. To examine these questions, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with agents...

  6. Visual Snapshots of Intracellular Kinase Activity At The Onset of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhaohua; Dulyaninova, Natalya G.; Kumar, Sanjai; Bresnick, Anne R.; Lawrence, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Visual snapshots of intracellular kinase activity can be acquired with exquisite temporal control using a light-activatable (caged) sensor, thereby providing a means to interrogate enzymatic activity at any point during the cell division cycle. Robust protein kinase activity transpires just prior to, but not immediately following, nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB). Furthermore, kinase activity is required for progression from prophase into metaphase. Finally, the application of selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, in combination with the caged sensor, correlates the action of the PKC β isoform with subsequent NEB. PMID:18022564

  7. Adiponectin inhibits neutrophil apoptosis via activation of AMP kinase, PKB and ERK 1/2 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandra; Lord, Janet M

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in the immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die by apoptosis following activation and uptake of microbes and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter a pathogen. Adiponectin exerts anti-inflammatory effects on neutrophil antimicrobial functions, but whether this abundant adipokine influences neutrophil apoptosis is unknown. Here we report that adiponectin in the physiological range (1-10 μg/ml) reduced apoptosis in resting neutrophils, decreasing caspase-3 cleavage and maintaining Mcl-1 expression by stabilizing this anti-apoptotic protein. We show that adiponectin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), protein kinase B (PKB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK, PKB and ERK 1/2 ablated the pro-survival effects of adiponectin and treatment of neutrophils with an AMPK specific activator (AICAR) and AMPK inhibitor (compound C) respectively decreased and increased apoptosis. Finally, activation of AMPK by AICAR or adiponectin also decreased ceramide accumulation in the neutrophil cell membrane, a process involved in the early stages of spontaneous apoptosis, giving another possible mechanism downstream of AMPK activation for the inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis.

  8. Structural basis of constitutive activity and a unique nucleotide binding mode of human Pim-1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kevin C; Wang, Lian; Hickey, Eugene R; Studts, Joey; Barringer, Kevin; Peng, Charline; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Li, Jun; White, Andre; Mische, Sheenah; Farmer, Bennett

    2005-02-18

    Pim-1 kinase is a member of a distinct class of serine/threonine kinases consisting of Pim-1, Pim-2, and Pim-3. Pim kinases are highly homologous to one another and share a unique consensus hinge region sequence, ER-PXPX, with its two proline residues separated by a non-conserved residue, but they (Pim kinases) have <30% sequence identity with other kinases. Pim-1 has been implicated in both cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. We have determined the crystal structures of apo Pim-1 kinase and its AMP-PNP (5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate) complex to 2.1-angstroms resolutions. The structures reveal the following. 1) The kinase adopts a constitutively active conformation, and extensive hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between the activation loop and the catalytic loop might be the structural basis for maintaining such a conformation. 2) The hinge region has a novel architecture and hydrogen-bonding pattern, which not only expand the ATP pocket but also serve to establish unambiguously the alignment of the Pim-1 hinge region with that of other kinases. 3) The binding mode of AMP-PNP to Pim-1 kinase is unique and does not involve a critical hinge region hydrogen bond interaction. Analysis of the reported Pim-1 kinase-domain structures leads to a hypothesis as to how Pim kinase activity might be regulated in vivo.

  9. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  10. Impaired activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases after hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Khadaroo, Rachel G; Lu, Ziyue; Powers, Kinga A; Papia, Giuseppe; Kapus, Andras; Rotstein, Ori D

    2002-08-01

    Patients sustaining major trauma are at risk of developing organ dysfunction. We have previously shown that resuscitated hemorrhagic shock primes for increased lung injury in response to lippolysaccharide (LPS), in part by preventing upregulation of the counterinflammatory cytokine IL-10. Because the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family is known to participate in LPS signaling, we hypothesized that altered upstream signaling through these kinases might contribute to impaired LPS-simulated IL-10 release after shock and resuscitation. Rats were bled to a mean arterial pressure of 40 mm Hg and maintained for 1 hour, then resuscitated. Alveolar macrophages were retrieved at the end of resuscitation and exposed to LPS (0.5 microg/mL). Western blotting for p38, extracellular-regulated protein kinase, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase was performed on whole cell lysates. In some studies, the alveolar macrophages were preincubated with the p38 inhibitor or the extracellular-regulated protein kinase inhibitor before LPS stimulation. IL-10 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LPS caused an early activation in all members of the MAPK family, whereas antecedent shock both delayed and attenuated the LPS induction. To discern whether this reduction in LPS-stimulated MAPK activation after shock might contribute to reduced IL-10, specific inhibitors were used. Inhibition of p38 MAPK completely inhibited LPS-induced IL-10 production, whereas blockade of extracellular-regulated protein kinase pathway had no effect. Shock resuscitation impairs LPS-induced activation of the members of the MAPK family. For the critical counterinflammatory cytokine IL-10, inhibition of p38 activation appears to contribute to the reduced levels of this cytokine in response to LPS. This study provides in vitro evidence for altered signaling through p38 MAPK, as a mechanism leading to failed upregulation of a counterinflammatory cytokine, and thus the propagation of an

  11. Mayaro virus infection cycle relies on casein kinase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Madalena M S; Lima, Carla S; Silva-Neto, Mário A C; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2002-09-06

    Replication of Mayaro virus in Vero cells induces dramatic cytopathic effects and cell death. In this study, we have evaluated the role of casein kinase 2 (CK2) during Mayaro virus infection cycle. We found that CK2 was activated during the initial stages of infection ( approximately 36% after 4h). This activation was further confirmed when the enzyme was partially purified from the cellular lysate either by Mono Q 5/5Hr column or heparin-agarose column. Using this later column, we found that the elution profile of CK2 activity from infected cells was different from that obtained for control cell enzyme, suggesting a structural modification of CK2 after infection. Treatment of infected cells with a cell-permeable inhibitor of CK2, dichloro-1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)benzimidazole (DRB), abolished the cytopathic effect in a dose-dependent manner. Together this set of data demonstrates for the first time that CK2 activity in host cells is required in Mayaro virus infection cycle.

  12. Stimulation of Leishmania tropica protein kinase CK2 activities by platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    PubMed

    Dutra, Patricia M L; Vieira, Danielle P; Meyer-Fernandes, Jose R; Silva-Neto, Mario A C; Lopes, Angela H

    2009-09-01

    Leishmania tropica is one of the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid mediator in diverse biological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that PAF promoted a three-fold increase on ecto-protein kinase and a three-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity of L. tropica live promastigotes. When casein was added to the reaction medium, along with PAF, there was a four-fold increase on the ecto-kinase activity. When live L. tropica promastigotes were pre-incubated for 30 min in the presence of PAF-plus casein, a six-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity was observed. Also, a protein released from L. tropica promastigotes reacted with polyclonal antibodies for the mammalian CK2 alpha catalytic subunit. Furthermore, in vitro mouse macrophage infection by L. tropica was doubled when promastigotes were pre-treated for 2 h with PAF. Similar results were obtained when the interaction was performed in the presence of purified CK2 or casein. TBB and DRB, CK2 inhibitors, reversed PAF enhancement of macrophage infection by L. tropica. WEB 2086, a competitive PAF antagonist, reversed all PAF effects here described. This study shows for the first time that PAF promotes the activation of two isoforms of CK2, secreted and membrane-bound, correlating these activities to infection of mouse macrophages.

  13. PD98059 and U0126 activate AMP-activated protein kinase by increasing the cellular AMP:ATP ratio and not via inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Dokladda, Kanchana; Green, Kevin A; Pan, David A; Hardie, D Grahame

    2005-01-03

    The MAP kinase pathway inhibitor U0126 caused phosphorylation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased phosphorylation of its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase, in HEK293 cells. This effect only occurred in cells expressing the upstream kinase, LKB1. Of two other widely used MAP kinase pathway inhibitors not closely related in structure to U0126, PD98059 also activated AMPK but PD184352 did not. U0126 and PD98059, but not PD184352, also increased the cellular ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios, accounting for their ability to activate AMPK. These results suggest the need for caution in interpreting experiments conducted using U0126 and PD98059.

  14. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP). An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with a companion diagnostic

  15. A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor induced compound skin toxicity with oedema in metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C L; Mortimer, P S; Larkin, J M; Basu, T N; Gore, M E; Fearfield, L

    2016-04-01

    We report three cases of skin toxicity associated with oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). All three patients developed oedema, and a single patient experienced eyelash trichomegaly. This is the first known report of eyelash trichomegaly secondary to MEK inhibitor use. We also discuss possible mechanisms for MEK inhibitor-associated oedema development. This series supports the role of the dermatologist in the screening and management of patients in the rapidly developing oncology setting, as new targeted agents can give rise to marked skin toxicity.

  16. JAK tyrosine kinases promote hierarchical activation of Rho and Rap modules of integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Alessio; Bolomini-Vittori, Matteo; Toffali, Lara; Rossi, Barbara; Constantin, Gabriela; Laudanna, Carlo

    2013-12-23

    Lymphocyte recruitment is regulated by signaling modules based on the activity of Rho and Rap small guanosine triphosphatases that control integrin activation by chemokines. We show that Janus kinase (JAK) protein tyrosine kinases control chemokine-induced LFA-1- and VLA-4-mediated adhesion as well as human T lymphocyte homing to secondary lymphoid organs. JAK2 and JAK3 isoforms, but not JAK1, mediate CXCL12-induced LFA-1 triggering to a high affinity state. Signal transduction analysis showed that chemokine-induced activation of the Rho module of LFA-1 affinity triggering is dependent on JAK activity, with VAV1 mediating Rho activation by JAKs in a Gαi-independent manner. Furthermore, activation of Rap1A by chemokines is also dependent on JAK2 and JAK3 activity. Importantly, activation of Rap1A by JAKs is mediated by RhoA and PLD1, thus establishing Rap1A as a downstream effector of the Rho module. Thus, JAK tyrosine kinases control integrin activation and dependent lymphocyte trafficking by bridging chemokine receptors to the concurrent and hierarchical activation of the Rho and Rap modules of integrin activation.

  17. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals activate MAP kinase in human neutrophils: inhibition of MAP kinase, oxidase activation and degranulation responses of neutrophils by taxol.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J K; Tudan, C; Sahl, B; Pelech, S L; Burt, H M

    1997-01-01

    The activation of MAP kinase in human neutrophils stimulated by both uncoated and plasma-opsonized crystals of triclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) was investigated. The effect of taxol on MAP kinase activation and on the responses of neutrophils stimulated by plasma-opsonized crystals was determined. MAP kinase activation was identified and quantified in Mono Q chromatography separated fractions of neutrophils that had been incubated with CPPD crystals by measuring [gamma-32P]adenosine triphosphate (ATP) phosphorylation of myelin basic protein and using immunoblotting techniques. Human neutrophils were incubated with taxol (0-50 microM), added to plasma-opsonized CPPD (50 mg/ml) and MAP kinase activation, chemiluminescence, superoxide anion generation, lysozyme and myeloperoxidase release were monitored. Both uncoated and plasma coated CPPD crystals induced a large increase in MAP kinase activity in neutrophils over control levels within 1 min of incubation. Pretreatment of neutrophils with taxol was able to suppress this activation of MAP kinase. Taxol produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of opsonized CPPD-induced neutrophil chemiluminescence, superoxide anion production and myeloperoxide release. Taxol at 28 microM also significantly inhibited chemiluminescence, superoxide anion production and myeloperoxidase release from neutrophils stimulated by opsonized zymosan. This is the first report of crystal-induced activation of MAP kinase in neutrophils. Microtubule-associated processes, such as signal transduction, secretion and phagocytosis are involved in particulate-induced neutrophil responses. We have suggested that the inhibitory effect of taxol observed in this work is due to its stabilizing effect on microtubules and disruption of MAP kinase activation associated with microtubules. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9176102

  18. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  19. Effect of Flos carthami on stress-activated protein kinase activity in the isolated reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Siow, Y L; Choy, P C; Leung, W M; O, K

    2000-04-01

    The apoptotic death of cardiomyocytes due to ischemia/reperfusion is one of the major complications of heart disease. Ischemia/reperfusion has been shown to lead to the activation of the stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases and the p38/reactivating kinase (p38/RK). In this study, the direct effect of an aqueous Flos carthami (FC) extract on SAP kinases was investigated. When isolated rat hearts were perfused by Langendorff mode with media containing FC extract prior to the induction of global ischemia and the subsequent reperfusion, SAP kinase activity was inhibited 95%. Untreated ischemic/reperfused hearts showed a 57% elevation in the activity of SAP kinase. The in vitro effect of these FC extracts on SAP kinase was also tested. At a concentration of 10 microg/ml, the aqueous FC extract resulted in 50% inhibition of SAP kinase activity in ischemic heart tissue. Our results showed that FC affected both the interaction of SAP kinase with c-jun as well as the phosphotransferase reaction. These results clearly demonstrate that extracts from Flos carthami exerted inhibitory effects on SAP kinase. The administration of the FC extract may lead to a modulation of the apoptotic effect of SAP kinase activation induced during ischemia/reperfusion.

  20. AOP-1 interacts with cardiac-specific protein kinase TNNI3K and down-regulates its kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Dong-Qing; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao; Cao, Hui-Qing; Wang, Lai-Yuan; Shi, Na; Meng, Xian-Min

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, a yeast two-hybrid screening system was used to identify the interaction partners of cardiac troponin I-interacting kinase (TNNI3K) that might serve as regulators or targets, and thus in turn to gain some insights on the roles of TNNI3K. After screening the adult heart cDNA library with a bait construct encoding the ANK motif of TNNI3K, antioxidant protein 1 (AOP-1) was isolated. The interaction between TNNI3K and AOP-1 was confirmed by the in vitro binding assay and coexpression experiments in vivo. The colocalization of TNNI3K and AOP-1 was clarified by confocal immunofluorescence. Moreover, coexpression of AOP-1 inhibited TNNI3K kinase activity in the in vitro kinase assay.

  1. Signaling via mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) is required for Golgi fragmentation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U; Mallabiabarrena, A; Acharya, J K; Malhotra, V

    1998-01-23

    We have developed an assay using permeabilized cells to monitor fragmentation of the Golgi complex that occurs during mitosis. Golgi stacks, in permeabilized interphase normal rat kidney (NRK) cells, upon incubation with mitotic extracts undergo extensive fragmentation, and the fragmented Golgi membranes are dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. We find that the continued presence of p34cdc2, the mitosis initiation kinase, is not necessary for Golgi fragmentation. Instead, fragmentation depends on cytosolic mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1 or MAPKK1). However, the known cytoplasmic substrates for MEK1, ERK1, and ERK2 are not required for this process. Interestingly, we find a Golgi-associated ERK, which we propose as the likely target for MEK1 in Golgi fragmentation.

  2. Activation of human mitochondrial pantothenate kinase 2 by palmitoylcarnitine.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Roberta; Rock, Charles O; Jackowski, Suzanne; Zhang, Yong-Mei

    2007-01-30

    The human isoform 2 of pantothenate kinase (PanK2) is localized to the mitochondria, and mutations in this protein are associated with a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. PanK2 inhibition by acetyl-CoA is so stringent (IC50 < 1 microM) that it is unclear how the enzyme functions in the presence of intracellular CoA concentrations. Palmitoylcarnitine was discovered to be a potent activator of PanK2 that functions to competitively antagonize acetyl-CoA inhibition. Acetyl-CoA was a competitive inhibitor of purified PanK2 with respect to ATP. The interaction between PanK2 and acetyl-CoA was stable enough that a significant proportion of the purified protein was isolated as the PanK2.acetyl-CoA complex. The long-chain acylcarnitine activation of PanK2 explains how PanK2 functions in vivo, by providing a positive regulatory mechanism to counteract the negative regulation of PanK2 activity by acetyl-CoA. Our results suggest that PanK2 is located in the mitochondria to sense the levels of palmitoylcarnitine and up-regulate CoA biosynthesis in response to an increased mitochondrial demand for the cofactor to support beta-oxidation.

  3. Evolution of alpha 2-macroglobulin. The demonstration in a variety of vertebrate species of a protein resembling human alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, P M; Barrett, A J

    1982-01-01

    Plasma or serum samples from a large number of vertebrate species were screened for the presence of a papain-binding protein resembling human alph a 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). The screening method depended on the unique property of alpha 2M of binding proteinases in such a way that the enzyme retains partial activity against low-molecular-weight substrates. A papain-binding protein was detected in serum from members of all the major vertebrate taxa. In mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians the protein had an Mr similar to that of human alpha 2M (725 000), but in fish, including dipnoans, actinopterygians, elasmobranchs and cyclostomes, the papain-binding protein was of Mr about 360 000. Of the invertebrate species tested, all of which were arthropods, two were negative, but the horseshoe crab, an arachnid, did possess a papain-binding protein, although this was heterogeneous in electrophoresis and differed from alpha 2M in resisting inactivation by methylamine. From the results, and a detailed study of the properties of the fish papain-binding protein described in an accompanying paper [Starkey, Fletcher & Barrett (1982) Biochem. J. 205, 97-104], it seems that alpha 2M first appeared in an ancestor of all modern vertebrates as a protein of Mr 360 000 and that the larger macroglobulin (Mr 725 000) first appeared in an ancestor of the tetrapods. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6181778

  4. Purification and characterization of the three Snf1-activating kinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Elbing, Karin; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2006-02-01

    Members of the Snf1/AMPK family of protein kinases are activated by distinct upstream kinases that phosphorylate a conserved threonine residue in the Snf1/AMPK activation loop. Recently, the identities of the Snf1- and AMPK-activating kinases have been determined. Here we describe the purification and characterization of the three Snf1-activating kinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The identities of proteins associated with the Snf1-activating kinases were determined by peptide mass fingerprinting. These kinases, Sak1, Tos3 and Elm2 do not appear to require the presence of additional subunits for activity. Sak1 and Snf1 co-purify and co-elute in size exclusion chromatography, demonstrating that these two proteins form a stable complex. The Snf1-activating kinases phosphorylate the activation loop threonine of Snf1 in vitro with great specificity and are able to do so in the absence of beta and gamma subunits of the Snf1 heterotrimer. Finally, we showed that the Snf1 kinase domain isolated from bacteria as a GST fusion protein can be activated in vitro and shows substrate specificity in the absence of its beta and gamma subunits.

  5. Purification and characterization of the three Snf1-activating kinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Members of the Snf1/AMPK family of protein kinases are activated by distinct upstream kinases that phosphorylate a conserved threonine residue in the Snf1/AMPK activation loop. Recently, the identities of the Snf1- and AMPK-activating kinases have been determined. Here we describe the purification and characterization of the three Snf1-activating kinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The identities of proteins associated with the Snf1-activating kinases were determined by peptide mass fingerprinting. These kinases, Sak1, Tos3 and Elm2 do not appear to require the presence of additional subunits for activity. Sak1 and Snf1 co-purify and co-elute in size exclusion chromatography, demonstrating that these two proteins form a stable complex. The Snf1-activating kinases phosphorylate the activation loop threonine of Snf1 in vitro with great specificity and are able to do so in the absence of β and γ subunits of the Snf1 heterotrimer. Finally, we showed that the Snf1 kinase domain isolated from bacteria as a GST fusion protein can be activated in vitro and shows substrate specificity in the absence of its β and γ subunits. PMID:16201971

  6. Macro creatine kinase: determination and differentiation of two types by their activation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, W.; Bohner, J.; Steinhart, R.; Eggstein, M.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase in patients with acute myocardial infarction may be disturbed by the presence of macro creatine kinase. The relative molecular mass of this form of creatine kinase in human serum is at least threefold that of the ordinary enzyme, and it is more thermostable. Here we describe our method for determination of macro creatine kinases and an easy-to-perform test for differentiating two forms of macro creatine kinase, based on their distinct activation energies. The activation energies of serum enzymes are mostly in the range of 40-65 kJ/mol of substrate. Unlike normal cytoplasmatic creatine kinases and IgG-linked CK-BB (macro creatine kinase type 1) a second form of macro creatine kinase (macro creatine kinase type 2) shows activation energies greater than 80 kJ/mol of substrate. The exact composition of macro creatine kinase type 2 is still unknown, but there is good reason to believe that it is of mitochondrial origin.

  7. Purification and properties of pyruvate kinase from Streptococcus sanguis and activator specificity of pyruvate kinase from oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Abbe, K; Takahashi, S; Yamada, T

    1983-03-01

    It was found that pyruvate kinases with two different regulatory characteristics were distributed among oral streptococci. The pyruvate kinases of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus bovis were activated by glucose 6-phosphate, whereas the enzymes of both Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mitis were activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) from S. sanguis NCTC 10904 was purified, giving a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 250,000 to 260,000 and consisted of four identical subunits. Whereas the pyruvate kinase from S. mutans was completely dependent on glucose 6-phosphate (K. Abbe and T. Yamada, J. Bacteriol. 149:299-305, 1982), the enzyme from S. sanguis was activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. In the presence of 0.5 mM fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, the saturation curves for the substrates, phosphoenolpyruvate and ADP, were hyperbolic, and the Km values were 0.13 and 0.30 mM, respectively. Without fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, however, saturation curves for both substrates were sigmoidal. GDP, IDP, and UDP could replace ADP. Like the enzyme from S. mutans, the enzyme from S. sanguis required a divalent cation, Mg2+ or Mn2+, and a monovalent cation, K+ or NH4+, for activity, and it was strongly inhibited by Pi. When the concentration of Pi was increased, the half-saturating concentration and Hill coefficient for fructose 1,6-bisphosphate increased. The remarkable fluctuation of intracellular levels of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate observed in the cells growing under glucose limitation and nitrogen limitation implies that the intracellular concentration of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, in cooperation with that of Pi, may regulate pyruvate kinase activity in S. sanguis in vivo.

  8. Role of receptor desensitization, phosphatase induction and intracellular cyclic AMP in the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in UTP-stimulated EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Malarkey, K; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms that bring about the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activation in response to UTP in EAhy 926 endothelial cells. UTP-stimulated MAP kinase activity was transient, returning to basal values by 60 min. At this time MAP kinase activation was desensitized; re-application of UTP did not further activate MAP kinase, full re-activation of MAP kinase being only apparent after a 1-2 h wash period. However, activation of MAP kinase by UTP could be sustained beyond 60 min by preincubation of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. UTP also stimulated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 and this was abolished after pretreatment with cycloheximide. Pretreatment of cells with forskolin abolished the initial activation of MAP kinase kinase or c-Raf-1 by UTP, but only affected MAP kinase activity during prolonged stimulation. The effect of forskolin on prolonged MAP kinase activation was also prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the termination of MAP kinase activity in response to UTP involves a number of interacting mechanisms including receptor desensitization and the induction of a phosphatase. However, several pieces of evidence do not support a major role for MAP kinase phosphatase-1 in termination of the MAP kinase signal. Raising intracellular cyclic AMP may also be involved but only after an initial protein-synthesis step and by a mechanism that does not involve the inactivation of c-Raf-1 or MAP kinase kinase. PMID:8615830

  9. The elusive activity of the Yersinia protein kinase A kinase domain is revealed.

    PubMed

    Laskowski-Arce, Michelle A; Orth, Kim

    2007-10-01

    Yersinia spp. pathogens use their type III secretion system to translocate effectors that manipulate host signaling pathways during infection. Although molecular targets for five of the six known Yersinia effectors are known, the target for the serine/threonine kinase domain of Yersinia protein kinase A (YpkA) has remained elusive. Recently, Navarro et al. (2007) demonstrated that YpkA phosphorylates Galphaq, and inhibits Galphaq-mediated signaling. Inhibition by YpkA could contribute to one of the most documented symptoms of Yersinia pestis infection, extensive bleeding.

  10. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activating kinase 1/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-mediated inhibition of SKOV3ip.1 ovarian cancer metastasis involves growth arrest and p21 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Tamara; Hickson, Jonathan; Souris, Jeffrey; Huo, Dezheng; Taylor, Jennifer; Li, Terry; Otto, Kristen; Yamada, Seiko Diane; Macleod, Kay; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W

    2008-04-01

    In many patients without clinical metastases, cancer cells have already escaped from the primary tumor and entered a distant organ. A long-standing question in metastasis research is why some disseminated cancer cells fail to complete steps of metastatic colonization for extended periods of time. Our laboratory identified c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activating kinase 1/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (JNKK1/MKK4) as a metastasis suppressor protein in a mouse xenograft model of experimental i.p. ovarian cancer metastasis. In this model, expression of JNKK1/MKK4 via activation of p38 delays formation of >or=1-mm implants and prolongs animal survival. Here, we elucidate the time course of this delay as well as the biological mechanisms underpinning it. Using the Gompertz function to model the net accumulation of experimental omental metastases, we show that MKK4-expressing implants arise, on average, 30 days later than controls. Quantitative real-time PCR shows that MKK4 expression does not have a substantial effect on the number of cancer cells initially adhering to the omentum, and terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling analysis shows that there is no increase in apoptosis in these cells. Instead, immunohistochemical quantitation of cell cycle proteins reveals that MKK4-expressing cells fail to proliferate once they reach the omentum and up-regulate p21, a cell cycle inhibitor. Consistent with the time course data, in vitro kinase assays and in vivo passaging of cell lines derived from macroscopic metastases show that the eventual outgrowth of MKK4-expressing cells is not due to a discrete selection event. Rather, the population of MKK4-expressing cells eventually uniformly adapts to the consequences of up-regulated MKK4 signaling.

  11. Peroxide Sensors for the Fission Yeast Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Vicky; Quinn, Janet; Pino, Teresa Soto; Martin, Humberto; Saldanha, Jose; Makino, Kozo; Morgan, Brian A.; Millar, Jonathan B.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe stress-activated Sty1p/Spc1p mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates gene expression through the Atf1p and Pap1p transcription factors, homologs of human ATF2 and c-Jun, respectively. Mcs4p, a response regulator protein, acts upstream of Sty1p by binding the Wak1p/Wis4p MAP kinase kinase kinase. We show that phosphorylation of Mcs4p on a conserved aspartic acid residue is required for activation of Sty1p only in response to peroxide stress. Mcs4p acts in a conserved phospho-relay system initiated by two PAS/PAC domain-containing histidine kinases, Mak2p and Mak3p. In the absence of Mak2p or Mak3p, Sty1p fails to phosphorylate the Atf1p transcription factor or induce Atf1p-dependent gene expression. As a consequence, cells lacking Mak2p and Mak3p are sensitive to peroxide attack in the absence of Prr1p, a distinct response regulator protein that functions in association with Pap1p. The Mak1p histidine kinase, which also contains PAS/PAC repeats, does not regulate Sty1p or Atf1p but is partially required for Pap1p- and Prr1p-dependent transcription. We conclude that the transcriptional response to free radical attack is initiated by at least two distinct phospho-relay pathways in fission yeast. PMID:11179424

  12. Isozymic forms of rat brain CA/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.; Huang, F.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three forms of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) were purified from the cytosolic fraction of rat brain. These enzymes, designated as type I, II, and III protein kinase C, all have the similar molecular weight of 80 Kd, bind (/sup 3/H)-phorbol dibutyrate in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, and undergo autophosphorylation in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, phosphatidylserine, and diolein. Autophosphorylation of these kinases resulted in an incorporation of 1- 1.5 mol /sup 32/P/mol of enzyme. Analysis of the /sup 32/P-labeled tryptic peptides derived from the autophosphorylated protein kinase C by two-dimensional peptide mapping revealed that these kinases had different sites of autophosphorylation. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the type I and type III protein kinase C mainly phosphorylated at Ser residue while the type II kinase phosphorylated at both Ser and Thr residues. In addition, polyclonal antibodies previously prepared against a mixed enzyme fraction preferentially inhibited the type I and type II enzymes but less effectively toward the type III enzyme. Monoclonal antibody specifically against the type II protein kinase C did not inhibit the type I or type III enzymes. These kinases also had different susceptibility to limited proteolysis by trypsin and upon proteolytic degradation they generate distinct fragments. These results demonstrate the presence of isozymic forms of protein kinase C in rat brain.

  13. CaM kinase kinase beta-mediated activation of the growth regulatory kinase AMPK is required for androgen-dependent migration of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frigo, Daniel E; Howe, Matthew K; Wittmann, Bryan M; Brunner, Abigail M; Cushman, Ian; Wang, Qianben; Brown, Myles; Means, Anthony R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2011-01-15

    While patients with advanced prostate cancer initially respond favorably to androgen ablation therapy, most experience a relapse of the disease within 1-2 years. Although hormone-refractory disease is unresponsive to androgen-deprivation, androgen receptor (AR)-regulated signaling pathways remain active and are necessary for cancer progression. Thus, both AR itself and the processes downstream of the receptor remain viable targets for therapeutic intervention. Microarray analysis of multiple clinical cohorts showed that the serine/threonine kinase Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is both highly expressed in the prostate and further elevated in prostate cancers. Using cellular models of prostate cancer, we have determined that androgens (a) directly increase the expression of a CaMKKβ splice variant and (b) increase functional CaMKKβ protein levels as determined by the phosphorylation of both CaMKI and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), two of CaMKKβ's primary substrates. Importantly, inhibition of the CaMKKβ-AMPK, but not CaMKI, signaling axis in prostate cancer cells by pharmacological inhibitors or siRNA-mediated knockdown blocks androgen-mediated migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of CaMKKβ alone leads to both increased AMPK phosphorylation and cell migration. Given the key roles of CaMKKβ and AMPK in the biology of prostate cancer cells, we propose that these enzymes are potential therapeutic targets in prostate cancer. © 2010 AACR.

  14. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jerome M; Sparks, Samuel; Cowburn, David

    2017-02-01

    The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase's activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function.

  15. The CDC2-related kinase PITALRE is the catalytic subunit of active multimeric protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Garriga, J; Mayol, X; Graña, X

    1996-01-01

    PITALRE is a human protein kinase identified by means of its partial sequence identity to the cell division cycle regulatory kinase CDC2. Immunopurified PITALRE protein complexes exhibit an in vitro kinase activity that phosphorylates the retinoblastoma protein, suggesting that PITALRE catalyses this phosphorylation reaction. However, the presence of other kinases in the immunopurified complex could not be ruled out. In the present work, an inactive mutant of the PITALRE kinase has been used to demonstrate that PITALRE is the catalytic subunit responsible for the PITALRE-complex-associated kinase activity, Ectopic overexpression of PITALRE did not increase the total PITALRE kinase activity in the cell, suggesting that PITALRE is regulated by limiting cellular factor(s). Characterization of the PITALRE-containing protein complexes indicated that most of the cellular PITALRE protein exists as a subunit in at least two different active multimeric complexes. Although monomeric PITALRE is also active in vitro, PITALRE present in multimeric complexes exhibits several-fold higher activity than monomeric PITALRE. In addition, overexpression of PITALRE demonstrated the existence of two new associated proteins of approx. 48 and 98 kDa. Altogether these results suggest that, in contrast to the situation with cyclin-dependent kinases, monomeric PITALRE is active, and that association with other proteins modulates its activity and/or its ability to recognize substrates in vivo. PMID:8870681

  16. Discovery of orally active pyrrolopyridine- and aminopyridine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Schroeder, Gretchen M.; Cornelius, Lyndon A.M.; Kim, Kyoung; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Schmidt, Robert J.; Williams, David K.; Tokarski, John S.; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Manne, Veeraswamy; Kamath, Amrita; Zhang, Yueping; Marathe, Punit; Hunt, John T.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.

    2008-09-10

    A series of acylurea analogs derived from pyrrolopyridine and aminopyridine scaffolds were identified as potent inhibitors of Met kinase activity. The SAR at various positions of the two kinase scaffolds was investigated. These studies led to the discovery of compounds 3b and 20b, which demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties in mice and significant antitumor activity in a human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  17. Crystal Structures of Human Choline Kinase Isoforms in Complex with Hemicholinium-3 Single Amino Acid near the Active Site Influences Inhibitor Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Bum Soo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Tempel, Wolfram; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dimov, Svetoslav; Vedadi, Masoud; Park, Hee-Won

    2010-07-06

    Human choline kinase (ChoK) catalyzes the first reaction in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and exists as ChoK{alpha} ({alpha}1 and {alpha}2) and ChoK{beta} isoforms. Recent studies suggest that ChoK is implicated in tumorigenesis and emerging as an attractive target for anticancer chemotherapy. To extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ChoK inhibition, we have determined the high resolution x-ray structures of the ChoK{alpha}1 and ChoK{beta} isoforms in complex with hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a known inhibitor of ChoK. In both structures, HC-3 bound at the conserved hydrophobic groove on the C-terminal lobe. One of the HC-3 oxazinium rings complexed with ChoK{alpha}1 occupied the choline-binding pocket, providing a structural explanation for its inhibitory action. Interestingly, the HC-3 molecule co-crystallized with ChoK{beta} was phosphorylated in the choline binding site. This phosphorylation, albeit occurring at a very slow rate, was confirmed experimentally by mass spectroscopy and radioactive assays. Detailed kinetic studies revealed that HC-3 is a much more potent inhibitor for ChoK{alpha} isoforms ({alpha}1 and {alpha}2) compared with ChoK{beta}. Mutational studies based on the structures of both inhibitor-bound ChoK complexes demonstrated that Leu-401 of ChoK{alpha}2 (equivalent to Leu-419 of ChoK{alpha}1), or the corresponding residue Phe-352 of ChoK{beta}, which is one of the hydrophobic residues neighboring the active site, influences the plasticity of the HC-3-binding groove, thereby playing a key role in HC-3 sensitivity and phosphorylation.

  18. Redox Regulation of the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yingying; Wang, Qilong; Song, Ping; Zhu, Yi; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death. Objectives The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC). Methods Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation. Results In BAEC, Berberine caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser79, a well characterized downstream target of AMPK. Concomitantly, Berberine increased peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant formed by simultaneous generation of superoxide and nitric oxide. Pre-incubation of BAEC with anti-oxidants markedly attenuated Berberine-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK and ACC. Consistently, adenoviral expression of superoxide dismutase and pretreatment of L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a non-selective NOS inhibitor) blunted Berberine-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Furthermore, mitochondria-targeted tempol (mito-tempol) pretreatment or expression of uncoupling protein attenuated AMPK activation caused by Berberine. Depletion of mitochondria abolished the effects of Berberine on AMPK in EC. Finally, Berberine significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser307 and gene silencing of LKB1 attenuated Berberine-enhanced AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation in BAEC. Conclusion Our results suggest that mitochondria-derived superoxide anions and peroxynitrite are required for Berberine-induced AMPK activation in endothelial cells. PMID:21079763

  19. [Expression and secretion of alpha-2-macroglobulin by dust-stimulated alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Ossege, L M; Voss, B; Müller, K M

    1994-04-01

    In dust-induced, fibrosing lung processes macrophages are increased activated by foreign body reactions. The release of monokines and proteolytic enzymes, which depends on phagocytosis, may lead to destruction of the extracellular matrix with the consequence of degradation and restitution. Also the transcellular signaling or cell-matrix-interaction may finally result in development of fibrosis. However the proteolytic effect of elastase and collagenase can be inhibited by alpha-2-macroglobulin. Alpha-2-macroglobulin is a protease-inhibitor, which is synthesized by macrophages and has a wide spectrum of inhibitory abilities. Our interest was focused on observation of the production of alpha-2-macroglobulin by alveolar macrophages after stimulation with inorganic dusts of different chemical and physical properties. Rat alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage and exposed to crocidolite, quarz or welder steam dust in vitro. The expression and secretion of alpha-2-macroglobulin was examined by non radioactive in situ hybridization, indirect immunofluorescence and radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. The stimulated rat alveolar macrophages showed an increased expression of alpha-2-macroglobulin-mRNA and also an enhanced synthesis of alpha-2-macroglobulin-protein. Besides only small differences between the substances used for stimulation were demonstrated.

  20. Peginterferon alpha-2b: a new approach to improving response in hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Patel, K; McHutchison, J

    2001-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection affects approximately four million Americans. Over the last decade, Type 1 interferons (IFNs) have been the mainstay of therapy for suitable patients. Recently, the combination of IFN plus ribavirin, with enhanced response rates, has replaced IFN monotherapy for treatment of these patients. The addition of a polyethylene glycol (peg) moiety to IFN alpha-2b has provided a drug with reduced clearance whilst retaining biological and antiviral activity. This formulation allows once-weekly dosing and enhances sustained response rates, without significantly changing the safety and tolerability of IFN. Clinical trials indicate a doubling of sustained virological response rates for regimens utilising pegIFN alpha-2b, compared with standard IFN-alpha 2b. The combination of pegIFN alpha-2b and ribavirin further increases the sustained virological response rates to > 50% for suitable patients. Future pegIFN alpha-2b studies will need to examine drug profiles in patients with co-morbid conditions (e.g., renal impairment, liver transplantation), as well as safety and efficacy issues in different ethnic groups. Further clinical trials are also required to determine the benefits of pegIFN alpha-2b in previous non-responders or relapse patients and as maintenance therapy to prevent disease progression. Finally, careful cost effectiveness analyses will need to be performed.

  1. Activity and regulation by growth factors of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (elongation factor 2-kinase) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, T G; Ward, M D; Yurkow, E J; Vyas, V H; Kearney, T J; Hait, W N

    1999-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (CaM kinase III, elongation factor-2 kinase) is a unique member of the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase family. Activation of CaM kinase III leads to the selective phosphorylation of elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) and transient inhibition of protein synthesis. Recent cloning and sequencing of CaM kinase III revealed that this enzyme represents a new superfamily of protein kinases. The activity of CaM kinase III is selectively activated in proliferating cells; inhibition of the kinase blocked cells in G0/G1-S and decreased viability. To determine the significance of CaM kinase III in breast cancer, we measured the activity of the kinase in human breast cancer cell lines as well as in fresh surgical specimens. The specific activity of CaM kinase III in human breast cancer cell lines was equal to or greater than that seen in a variety of cell lines with similar rates of proliferation. The specific activity of CaM kinase III was markedly increased in human breast tumour specimens compared with that of normal adjacent breast tissue. The activity of this enzyme was regulated by breast cancer mitogens. In serum-deprived MDA-MB-231 cells, the combination of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated cell proliferation and activated CaM kinase III to activities observed in the presence of 10% serum. Inhibition of enzyme activity blocked cell proliferation induced by growth factors. In MCF-7 cells separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, CaM kinase III was increased in S-phase over that of other phases of the cell cycle. In summary, the activity of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase III is controlled by breast cancer mitogens and appears to be constitutively activated in human breast cancer. These results suggest that CaM kinase III may contribute an important link between growth factor/receptor interactions, protein synthesis and the induction of cellular prolifer