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Sample records for kinase inhibitor suppresses

  1. Suppression of hepatitis C virus replication by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Tsubasa; Inada, Makoto; Tokunaga, Yuko; Wakita, Takaji; Kohara, Michinori; Nomoto, Akio

    2014-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis. Although the standard therapy for HCV-infected patients consists of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, this treatment is associated with serious side effects and high costs, and fails in some patients infected with specific HCV genotypes. To address this problem, we are developing small-molecule inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) as novel anti-HCV drug candidates. Previous data showed that HCV replication is inhibited by retinoblastoma protein, which is itself inactivated by CDK-mediated phosphorylation. Here, we report that CDK inhibitors suppress HCV replication in vitro and in vivo, and that CDK4 is required for efficient HCV replication. These findings shed light on the development of novel anti-HCV drugs that target host factors.

  2. Suppression of VEGF-induced angiogenesis by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lavendustin A.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, D E; Fan, T P

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a heparin-binding angiogenic factor which specifically acts on endothelial cells via distinct membrane-spanning tyrosine kinase receptors. Here we used the rat sponge implant model to test the hypothesis that the angiogenic activity of VEGF can be suppressed by protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors. 2. Neovascular responses in subcutaneous sponge implants were determined by measurements of relative sponge blood flow by use of a 133Xe clearance technique, and confirmed by histological studies and morphometric analysis. 3. Daily local administration of 250 ng VEGF165 accelerated the rate of 133Xe clearance from the sponges and induced an intense neovascularisation. This VEGF165-induced angiogenesis was inhibited by daily co-administration of the selective PTK inhibitor, lavendustin A (10 micrograms), but not its negative control, lavendustin B (10 micrograms). Blood flow measurements and morphometric analysis of 8-day-old sponges showed that lavendustin A reduced the 133Xe clearance of VEGF165-treated sponges from 32.9 +/- 1.5% to 20.9 +/- 1.6% and the total fibrovascular growth area from 62.4 +/- 6.1% to 21.6 +/- 6.8% (n = 12, P < 0.05). 4. Co-injection of suramin (3 mg), an inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors, also suppressed the VEGF165-elicited neovascular response. In contrast, neither lavendustin A nor suramin produced any effect on the basal sponge-induced angiogenesis. 5. When given alone, low doses of VEGF165 (25 ng) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; 10 ng) did not modify the basal sponge-induced neovascularisation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 Figure 2 PMID:7533611

  3. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) on suppression of raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Ke; Yu, Guo-Zheng; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ren, Xue-Qun

    2017-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) has been shown to be a suppressor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and is reported to be involved in human malignancy. However, the molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in regulating RKIP expression is not yet clarified. In this study, we compared RKIP expression in 107 pairs of matched liver cancer and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. Among seven HBV-encoded proteins, we found HBV X (HBX) protein could significantly inhibit the expression level of RKIP, indicating that HBV could suppress RKIP expression through regulating HBX. To further elucidate the mechanism, analyses on transcriptional regulation and promoter methylation inhibition were conducted in Huh7 cells. Our results showed that HBX can interact with AP1 protein to inhibit the RKIP transcription. Moreover, we observed that the promoter methylation level of RKIP could be enhanced by HBV. In conclusion, our study revealed that RKIP could act as a molecular marker for HBV-infected liver cancer, but had no tumor-suppressing effect. PMID:27902472

  4. Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PF-2341066, suppresses growth and invasion of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Ying; Xue, Cong; Hu, Zhihuang; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We explored the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling pathway on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells in vitro and in vivo, and investigated the ability of Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to block HGF-induced biological signaling. Experimental design Met TKI inhibitor PF-2341066 alone, or in combination with cisplatin, was investigated for its ability to block HGF-induced signaling and biological effects in vitro and in vivo. HGF/Met expression and activation of signaling in NPC cells were detected by using Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Biological evaluation, including wound healing, cell proliferation, and invasion of NPC cells, was also examined, and the correlation between HGF/Met expression of primary and metastatic tumor in NPC patients and clinical prognosis were also analyzed. Results Met TKI inhibitor, PF-2341066, inhibited growth of NPC cells in vivo with half maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.79±0.21 μmol/L, and suppressed invasion and migration of NPC cells; also, the inhibition of PF-2341066 was synergized with cisplatin treatment. Compared with the control group, Met TKI inhibited metastasis of transplanted NPC in nude mice (the number of live metastases [mean ± SD]: 5.8±2.2 versus 11.8±2.2, P=0.03; the number of lung metastases: 2.3±1.5 versus 5.3±0.9, P=0.06). HGF was widely expressed in both primary and metastatic lesions while Met expression of metastatic lesions was higher than that of primary lesions (primary lesions: 24.7%; liver metastases: 40%; lung metastases: 29%; lymph node metastases: 29%, P<0.05), and overall survival of NPC patients with higher expression of Met was shorter (P=0.13). Conclusion Our results demonstrated that HGF/Met signaling promoted NPC growth, further resulting in metastasis and poor prognosis. Met TKI, PF-2341066, showed potent antitumor activity in vivo and in vitro which was enhanced by combination with cisplatin. Our study implied that HGF/Met signaling was the

  5. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  6. Targeting tumor-associated immune suppression with selective protein kinase A type I (PKAI) inhibitors may enhance cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Muzammal; Shah, Zahir; Abbas, Nasir; Javeed, Aqeel; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood; Zhang, Jiancun

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress in last few years, the cancer immunotherapy has not yet improved disease-free because of the tumor-associated immune suppression being a major barrier. Novel trends to enhance cancer immunotherapy aims at harnessing the therapeutic manipulation of signaling pathways mediating the tumor-associated immune suppression, with the general aims of: (a) reversing the tumor immune suppression; (b) enhancing the innate and adaptive components of anti-tumor immunosurveillance, and (c) protecting immune cells from the suppressive effects of T regulatory cells (Tregs) and the tumor-derived immunoinhibitory mediators. A particular striking example in this context is the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A type I (PKAI) pathway. Oncogenic cAMP/PKAI signaling has long been implicated in the initiation and progression of several human cancers. Emerging data indicate that cAMP/PKAI signaling also contributes to tumor- and Tregs-derived suppression of innate and adaptive arms of anti-tumor immunosurveillance. Therapeutically, selective PKAI inhibitors have been developed which have shown promising anti-cancer activity in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Rp-8-Br-cAMPS is a selective PKAI antagonist that is widely used as a biochemical tool in signal transduction research. Collateral data indicate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS has shown immune-rescuing potential in terms of enhancing the innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity, as well as protecting adaptive T cells from the suppressive effects of Tregs. Therefore, this proposal specifically implicates that combining selective PKAI antagonists/inhibitors with cancer immunotherapy may have multifaceted benefits, such as rescuing the endogenous anti-tumor immunity, enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy, and direct anti-cancer effects.

  7. Novel Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib suppresses neuroblastoma growth via inhibiting Src/Abl signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bieerkehazhi, Shayahati; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Tao, Ling; Yi, Joanna S.; Muscal, Jodi A.; Pang, Jonathan C.; Guan, Shan; Zhang, Hong; Nuchtern, Jed G.; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Aberrant activation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinases Src and c-Abl contributes to the progression of NB. Thus, targeting these kinases could be a promising strategy for NB therapy. In this paper, we report that the potent dual Src/Abl inhibitor bosutinib exerts anti-tumor effects on NB. Bosutinib inhibited NB cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed colony formation ability of NB cells. Mechanistically, bosutinib effectively decreased the activity of Src/Abl and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, MAPK/ERK, and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways. In addition, bosutinib enhanced doxorubicin (Dox)- and etoposide (VP-16)-induced cytotoxicity in NB cells. Furthermore, bosutinib demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model in a similar mechanism as of that in vitro. In summary, our results reveal that Src and c-Abl are potential therapeutic targets in NB and that the novel Src/Abl inhibitor bosutinib alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents may be a valuable therapeutic option for NB patients. PMID:27903968

  8. Novel Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib suppresses neuroblastoma growth via inhibiting Src/Abl signaling.

    PubMed

    Bieerkehazhi, Shayahati; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A; Woodfield, Sarah E; Tao, Ling; Yi, Joanna S; Muscal, Jodi A; Pang, Jonathan C; Guan, Shan; Zhang, Hong; Nuchtern, Jed G; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-03

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Aberrant activation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinases Src and c-Abl contributes to the progression of NB. Thus, targeting these kinases could be a promising strategy for NB therapy. In this paper, we report that the potent dual Src/Abl inhibitor bosutinib exerts anti-tumor effects on NB. Bosutinib inhibited NB cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed colony formation ability of NB cells. Mechanistically, bosutinib effectively decreased the activity of Src/Abl and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, MAPK/ERK, and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways. In addition, bosutinib enhanced doxorubicin (Dox)- and etoposide (VP-16)-induced cytotoxicity in NB cells. Furthermore, bosutinib demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model in a similar mechanism as of that in vitro. In summary, our results reveal that Src and c-Abl are potential therapeutic targets in NB and that the novel Src/Abl inhibitor bosutinib alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents may be a valuable therapeutic option for NB patients.

  9. The novel ATP-competitive MEK/Aurora kinase inhibitor BI-847325 overcomes acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance through suppression of Mcl-1 and MEK expression

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali S.; Sini, Patrizia; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to BRAF inhibitors is a major clinical problem. Here we evaluate BI-847325, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of MEK and Aurora kinases, in treatment-naïve and drug-resistant BRAF-mutant melanoma models. BI-847325 potently inhibited growth and survival of melanoma cell lines that were both BRAF inhibitor naïve and resistant in 2D culture, 3D cell culture conditions and in colony formation assays. Western blot studies showed BI-847325 to reduce expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-histone 3 in multiple models of vemurafenib resistance. Mechanistically, BI-847325 decreased the expression of MEK and Mcl-1 while increasing the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein BIM. Strong suppression of MEK expression was observed after 48 h of treatment, with no recovery following >72 h of washout. siRNA mediated knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced the effects of BI-847325, whereas Mcl-1 overexpression reversed this in both 2D cell culture and 3D spheroid melanoma models. In vivo, once weekly BI-847325 (70 mg/kg) led to durable regression of BRAF-inhibitor naive xenografts with no regrowth seen (>65 days of treatment). In contrast, treatment with the vemurafenib analog PLX4720 was associated with tumor relapse at >30 days. BI-847325 also suppressed the long-term growth of xenografts with acquired PLX4720 resistance. Analysis of tumor samples revealed BI-847325 to induce apoptosis associated with suppression of phospho-ERK, total MEK, phospho-Histone3 and Mcl-1 expression. Our studies indicate that BI-847325 is effective in overcoming BRAF inhibitor resistance and has long-term inhibitory effects upon BRAF-mutant melanoma in vivo, through a mechanism associated with the decreased expression of both MEK and Mcl-1. PMID:25873592

  10. Trametinib, a novel MEK kinase inhibitor, suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production and endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Du, Shi-lin; Yuan, Xue; Zhan, Sun; Tang, Luo-jia; Tong, Chao-yang

    2015-03-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the most prominent pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), activates macrophages, causing release of toxic cytokines (i.e. tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α) that may provoke inflammation and endotoxin shock. Here, we tested the potential role of trametinib, a novel and highly potent MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor, against LPS-induced TNF-α response in monocytes, and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. We showed that trametinib, at nM concentrations, dramatically inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α mRNA expression and protein secretion in transformed (RAW 264.7 cells) and primary murine macrophages. In ex-vivo cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), this MEK inhibitor similarly suppressed TNF-α production by LPS. For the mechanism study, we found that trametinib blocked LPS-induced MEK-ERK activation in above monocytes, which accounted for the defective TNF-α response. Macrophages or PBMCs treated with a traditional MEK inhibitor PD98059 or infected with MEK1/2-shRNA lentivirus exhibited a similar defect as trametinib, and nullified the activity of trametinib. On the other hand, introducing a constitutively-active (CA) ERK1 restored TNF-α production by LPS in the presence of trametinib. In vivo, mice administrated with trametinib produced low levels of TNF-α after LPS stimulation, and these mice were protected from LPS-induced endotoxin shock. Together, these results show that trametinib inhibits LPS-induced TNF-α expression and endotoxin shock probably through blocking MEK-ERK signaling.

  11. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor ibrutinib suppresses stem-like traits in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zucha, Muhammad Ary; Wu, Alexander T H; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Wang, Liang-Shun; Lin, Wan-Wan; Yuan, Chiou-Chung; Yeh, Chi-Tai

    2015-05-30

    According to a Prognoscan database, upregulation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is associated with low overall survival in ovarian cancer patients. We found that spheroids-forming ovarian cancer cell, which highly expressed cancer stem-like cell (CSC) markers and Btk, were cisplatin resistant. We next treated CSCs and non-CSCs by a combination of ibrutinib and cisplatin. We found that chemoresistance was dependent on Btk and JAK2/STAT3, which maintained CSC by inducing Sox-2 and prosurvival genes. We suggest that addition of ibrutinib to cisplatin may improve treatment outcome in ovarian cancer.

  12. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  13. Dasatinib suppression of medulloblastoma survival and migration is markedly enhanced by combining treatment with the aurora kinase inhibitor AT9283.

    PubMed

    Petersen, William; Liu, Jingbo; Yuan, Liangping; Zhang, Hongying; Schneiderjan, Matthew; Cho, Yoon-Jae; MacDonald, Tobey J

    2014-11-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) expresses Src kinase, while aurora kinase A overexpression correlates with poor survival. We thus investigated novel combination treatment with dasatinib and AT9283, inhibitors of Src and aurora kinase, respectively, on MB growth in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with each drug significantly reduced cell viability and combined treatment markedly potentiated this response. AT9283 induced p53 expression, autophagy, and G2/M cell-cycle arrest, while combined treatment induced S phase arrest. Dasatinib treatment caused tumor regression in vivo. Activated Src was detected in 44% MB analyzed. We conclude that further evaluation of this combination therapy for MB is highly warranted.

  14. SKI-606 (bosutinib), a novel Src kinase inhibitor, suppresses migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vultur, Adina; Buettner, Ralf; Kowolik, Claudia; Liang, Wei; Smith, David; Boschelli, Frank; Jove, Richard

    2008-05-01

    Src family kinase activity is elevated in many human tumors, including breast cancer, and is often associated with aggressive disease. We examined the effects of SKI-606 (bosutinib), a selective Src family kinase inhibitor, on human cancer cells derived from breast cancer patients to assess its potential for breast cancer treatment. Our results show that SKI-606 caused a decrease in cell motility and invasion of breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 of approximately 250 nmol/L, which was also the IC50 for inhibition of cellular Src kinase activity in intact tumor cells. These changes were accompanied by an increase in cell-to-cell adhesion and membrane localization of beta-catenin. By contrast, cell proliferation and survival were unaffected by SKI-606 at concentrations sufficient to block cell migration and invasion. Analysis of downstream effectors of Src revealed that SKI-606 inhibits the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas), with an IC50 similar to inhibition of cellular Src kinase. Our findings indicate that SKI-606 inhibits signaling pathways involved in controlling tumor cell motility and invasion, suggesting that SKI-606 is a promising therapeutic for breast cancer.

  15. Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitors suppress Nav1.1 expression in cultured rat spiral ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiying; Zeng, Qingjiao; Yao, Chen; Cai, Zheng; Wei, Tingjia; Huang, Zhihui; Su, Jiping

    2016-03-01

    Src family kinases regulate neuronal voltage-gated Na(+) channels, which generate action potentials. The mechanisms of action, however, remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to further elucidate the effects of Src family kinases on Nav1.1 mRNA and protein expression in spiral ganglion neurons. Immunofluorescence staining techniques detected Nav1.1 expression in the spiral ganglion neurons. Additionally, quantitative PCR and western blot techniques were used to analyze Nav1.1 mRNA and protein expression, respectively, in spiral ganglion neurons following exposure to Src family kinase inhibitors PP2 (1 and 10 μM) and SU6656 (0.1 and 1 μM) for different lengths of time (6 and 24 h). In the spiral ganglion neurons, Nav1.1 protein expression was detected in the somas and axons. The Src family kinase inhibitors PP2 and SU6665 significantly decreased Nav1.1 mRNA and protein expression (p < 0.05), respectively, in the spiral ganglion neurons, and changes in expression were not dependent on time or dose (p > 0.05).

  16. SKI-606 (bosutinib), a novel Src kinase inhibitor, suppresses migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vultur, Adina; Buettner, Ralf; Kowolik, Claudia; Liang, Wei; Smith, David; Boschelli, Frank; Jove, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Src family kinase (SFK) activity is elevated in many human tumors, including breast cancer, and is often associated with aggressive disease. We examined the effects of SKI-606 (bosutinib), a selective SFK inhibitor, on human cancer cells derived from breast cancer patients in order to assess its potential for breast cancer treatment. Our results show that SKI-606 caused a decrease in cell motility and invasion of breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 of ~250 nM, which was also the IC50 for inhibition of c-Src kinase activity in intact tumor cells. These changes were accompanied by an increase in cell-to-cell adhesion and membrane localization of beta-catenin. By contrast, cell proliferation and survival were unaffected by SKI-606 at concentrations sufficient to block cell migration and invasion. Analysis of downstream effectors of Src revealed that SKI-606 inhibits the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) and Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas) with an IC50 similar to inhibition of c-Src kinase. Our findings indicate that SKI-606 inhibits signaling pathways involved in controlling tumor cell motility and invasion, suggesting that SKI-606 is a promising therapeutic for breast cancer. PMID:18483306

  17. Novel multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitor ponatinib inhibits bFGF-activated signaling in neuroblastoma cells and suppresses neuroblastoma growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiaxiong; Pan, Jessie; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Yanling; Zhang, Huiyuan; Hu, Ting; Liu, Qing; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is one of the most common pediatric malignancies in children. Abnormal activation of receptor tyrosine kinases contributes to the pathological development of NB. Therefore, targeting tyrosine kinase receptors to cure NB is a promising strategy. Here, we report that a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor ponatinib inhibited NB cell proliferation and induced NB cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ponatinib suppressed the colony formation ability of NB cells. Mechanistically, ponatinib effectively inhibited the FGFR1-activated signaling pathway. Ponatinib also enhanced the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on NB cells. Furthermore, ponatinib demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in vivo by inhibiting tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model. In summary, our results showed that ponatinib inhibited NB growth both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27564113

  18. The Broad Spectrum Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Dovitinib Suppresses Growth of BRAF Mutant Melanoma Cells in Combination with Other Signaling Pathway Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Casey G.; Held, Matthew A.; Platt, James T.; Meeth, Katrina; Iyidogan, Pinar; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Koo, Andrew B.; Klein, Michael; Liu, Zongzhi; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Stern, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BRAF inhibitors have revolutionized treatment of mutant BRAF metastatic melanomas. However, resistance develops rapidly following BRAF inhibitor treatment. We have found that BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines are more sensitive than wild-type BRAF cells to the small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib. Sensitivity is associated with inhibition of a series of known dovitinib targets. Dovitinib in combination with several agents inhibits growth more effectively than either agent alone. These combinations inhibit BRAF-mutant melanoma and colorectal carcinoma cell lines, including cell lines with intrinsic or selected BRAF inhibitor resistance. Hence, combinations of dovitinib with second agents are potentially effective therapies for BRAF-mutant melanomas, regardless of their sensitivity to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:25854919

  19. Kinase Inhibitors from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Skropeta, Danielle; Pastro, Natalie; Zivanovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases play a critical role in cell regulation and their deregulation is a contributing factor in an increasing list of diseases including cancer. Marine sponges have yielded over 70 novel compounds to date that exhibit significant inhibitory activity towards a range of protein kinases. These compounds, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, and ordered based upon the kinase that they inhibit. Relevant synthetic studies on the marine natural product kinase inhibitors have also been included. PMID:22073013

  20. Effective growth-suppressive activity of maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) inhibitor against small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kato, Taigo; Olugbile, Sope; Tamura, Kenji; Chung, Suyoun; Miyamoto, Takashi; Matsuo, Yo; Salgia, Ravi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Park, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK), that plays a critical role in maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), is predominantly expressed in various types of human cancer including small cell lung cancer (SCLC). SCLC usually acquires resistance to anti-cancer drugs and portends dismal prognosis. We have delineated roles of MELK in development/progression of SCLC and examined anti-tumor efficacy of OTS167, a highly potent MELK inhibitor, against SCLC. MELK expression was highly upregulated in both SCLC cell lines and primary tumors. siRNA-mediated MELK knockdown induced significant growth inhibition in SCLC cell lines. Concordantly, treatment with OTS167 exhibited strong cytotoxicity against eleven SCLC cell lines with IC50 of < 10 nM. As similar to siRNA knockdown, OTS167 treatment induced cytokinetic defects with intercellular bridges, and in some cell lines we observed formation of neuronal protrusions accompanied with increase of a neuronal differentiation marker (CD56), indicating that the compound induced differentiation of cancer cells to neuron-like cells. Furthermore, the MELK inhibition decreased its downstream FOXM1 activity and Akt expression in SCLC cells, and led to apoptotic cell death. OTS167 appeared to be more effective to CSCs as measured by the sphere formation assay, thus MELK inhibition might become a promising treatment modality for SCLC. PMID:26871945

  1. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors suppress the AR-V7-mediated transcription and selectively inhibit cell growth in AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Koyama, Ryokichi; Nakayama, Kazuhide; Kitazawa, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Hara, Takahito

    2017-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that androgen receptor (AR) splice variants, including AR-V7, play a pivotal role in resistance to androgen blockade in prostate cancer treatment. The development of new therapeutic agents that can suppress the transcriptional activities of AR splice variants has been anticipated as the next generation treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. High-throughput screening of AR-V7 signaling inhibitors was performed using an AR-V7 reporter system. The effects of a glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitor, LY-2090314, on endogenous AR-V7 signaling were evaluated in an AR-V7-positive cell line, JDCaP-hr, by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relationship between AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling was assessed using RNA interference. The effect of LY-2090314 on cell growth in various prostate cancer cell lines was also evaluated. We identified GSK3 inhibitors as transcriptional suppressors of AR-V7 using a high-throughput screen with an AR-V7 reporter system. LY-2090314 suppressed the reporter activity and endogenous AR-V7 activity in JDCaP-hr cells. Because silencing of β-catenin partly rescued the suppression, it was evident that the suppression was mediated, at least partially, via the activation of β-catenin signaling. AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling reciprocally regulate each other in JDCaP-hr cells, and therefore, GSK3 inhibition can repress AR-V7 transcriptional activity by accumulating intracellular β-catenin. Notably, LY-2090314 selectively inhibited the growth of AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate the potential of GSK3 inhibitors in treating advanced prostate cancer driven by AR splice variants. In vivo evaluation of AR splice variant-positive prostate cancer models will help illustrate the overall significance of GSK3 inhibitors in treating prostate cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor strongly suppressed pulmonary vascular remodeling of allergic vasculitis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yuka; Sasaki, Nobuhito; Niisato, Miyuki; Nakamura, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Kohei

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the effects of pan-class I PI3K inhibitor, ZSTK474 on vascular remodeling using a murine model of allergic vasculitis with eosinophil infiltration. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized with OVA. The positive controls were exposed to aerosolized OVA daily for 7 days. The other group of mice were administered ZSTK474 (30 mg/kg, p.o. daily) in parallel with daily exposure to aerosolized OVA for 7 days. On the 3rd and 7th day, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and the lungs were excised for pathological analysis. Cell differentials were determined and the concentrations of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and TGF-βin BAL fluid were measured. The total cell numbers and eosinophil numbers in BALF were greatly reduced in the ZSTK474-treated group on the 3rd and 7th day after exposure to OVA. The numbers of total white blood cells and eosinophils in the peripheral blood were significantly reduced in the ZSTK474-treated group on the 3rd and 7th day after exposure to OVA. The concentrations of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in BAL fluids were also reduced significantly on the 3rd day in the ZSTK474-treated group. The concentrations of TGF-β in BAL fluids were also reduced significantly on the 3rd and 7th day in the ZSTK474-treated group. The pathological scores reduced significantly in the ZSTK474-treated group compared to the control group. The PI3K inhibitor, ZSTK474 suppressed pulmonary vascular remodeling in the murine model of allergic vasculitis with eosinophil infiltration. PI3K signal transduction may have a critical role in the immunological process that induces allergic vasculitis.

  3. The pan-inhibitor of Aurora kinases danusertib induces apoptosis and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Ping; Yang, Yin-Xue; Liu, Qi-Lun; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Pan, Shu-Ting; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxin; Pan, Si-Yuan; Duan, Wei; He, Shu-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Danusertib (Danu) is a pan-inhibitor of Aurora kinases and a third-generation breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (Bcr-Abl) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human breast cancer remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Danu on the growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the molecular mechanisms in human breast cancer MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The results demonstrated that Danu remarkably inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and autophagy, and suppressed EMT in both breast cancer cell lines. Danu arrested MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in G2/M phase, accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and cyclin B1 and upregulation of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danu significantly decreased the expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra-large (Bcl-xl) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), but increased the expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and promoted the cleavage of caspases 3 and 9. Furthermore, Danu significantly increased the expression levels of the membrane-bound microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-II) and beclin 1 in breast cancer cells, two markers for autophagy. Danu induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) and inhibited the activation of protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Treatment with wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor) markedly inhibited Danu-induced activation of p38 MAPK and conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II. Pharmacological inhibition and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of p38 MAPK suppressed Akt activation, resulting in LC3-II accumulation and enhanced autophagy. Pharmacological inhibition

  4. The pan-inhibitor of Aurora kinases danusertib induces apoptosis and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Ping; Yang, Yin-Xue; Liu, Qi-Lun; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Pan, Shu-Ting; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxin; Pan, Si-Yuan; Duan, Wei; He, Shu-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Danusertib (Danu) is a pan-inhibitor of Aurora kinases and a third-generation breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (Bcr-Abl) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human breast cancer remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Danu on the growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the molecular mechanisms in human breast cancer MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The results demonstrated that Danu remarkably inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and autophagy, and suppressed EMT in both breast cancer cell lines. Danu arrested MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in G2/M phase, accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and cyclin B1 and upregulation of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danu significantly decreased the expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra-large (Bcl-xl) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), but increased the expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and promoted the cleavage of caspases 3 and 9. Furthermore, Danu significantly increased the expression levels of the membrane-bound microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-II) and beclin 1 in breast cancer cells, two markers for autophagy. Danu induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) and inhibited the activation of protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Treatment with wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor) markedly inhibited Danu-induced activation of p38 MAPK and conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II. Pharmacological inhibition and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of p38 MAPK suppressed Akt activation, resulting in LC3-II accumulation and enhanced autophagy. Pharmacological inhibition

  5. Preclinical investigation of ibrutinib, a Bruton's kinase tyrosine (Btk) inhibitor, in suppressing glioma tumorigenesis and stem cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li; Su, Yu-Kai; Lin, Chien-Min; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Huang, Shang-Pen; Huynh, Thanh-Tuan; Jan, Hsun-Jin; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Wu, Alexander T H; Hsiao, Michael

    2016-10-25

    Standard interventions for glioma include surgery, radiation and chemotherapies but the prognosis for malignant cases such as glioblastoma multiforme remain grim. Even with targeted therapeutic agent, bevacitumab, malignant glioma often develops resistance and recurrence. Thus, developing alternative interventions (therapeutic targets, biomarkers) is urgently required. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been long implicated in B cell malignancies but surprisingly it has recently been shown to also play a tumorigenic role in solid tumors such as ovarian and prostate cancer. Bioinformatics data indicates that Btk is significantly higher in clinical glioma samples as compared to normal brain cells and Btk expression level is associated with stage progression. This prompts us to investigate the potential role of Btk as a therapeutic target for glioma. Here, we demonstrate Btk expression is associated with GBM tumorigenesis. Down-regulation of Btk in GBM cell lines showed a significantly reduced abilities in colony formation, migration and GBM sphere-forming potential. Mechanistically, Btk-silenced cells showed a concomitant reduction in the expression of CD133 and Akt/mTOR signaling. In parallel, Ibrutinib (a Btk inhibitor) treatment led to a similar anti-tumorigenic response. Using xenograft mouse model, tumorigenesis was significantly reduced in Btk-silenced or ibrutinib-treated mice as compared to control counterparts. Finally, our glioma tissue microarray analysis indicated a higher Btk staining in the malignant tumors than less malignant and normal brain tissues. Collectively, Btk may represent a novel therapeutic target for glioma and ibrunitib may be used as an adjuvant treatment for malignant GBM.

  6. The novel role of tyrosine kinase inhibitor in the reversal of immune suppression and modulation of tumor microenvironment for immune-based cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ozao-Choy, Junko; Ma, Ge; Kao, Johnny; Wang, George X; Meseck, Marcia; Sung, Max; Schwartz, Myron; Divino, Celia M; Pan, Ping-Ying; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2009-03-15

    In tumor-bearing hosts, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and T regulatory cells (Treg) play important roles in immune suppression, the reversal of which is vitally important for the success of immune therapy. We have shown that ckit ligand is required for MDSC accumulation and Treg development. We hypothesized that sunitinib malate, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, could reverse MDSC-mediated immune suppression and modulate the tumor microenvironment, thereby improving the efficacy of immune-based therapies. Treatment with sunitinib decreased the number of MDSC and Treg in advanced tumor-bearing animals. Furthermore, it not only reduced the suppressive function of MDSCs but also prevented tumor-specific T-cell anergy and Treg development. Interestingly, sunitinib treatment resulted in reduced expression of interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor-beta, and Foxp3 but enhanced expression of Th1 cytokine IFN-gamma and increased CTL responses in isolated tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. A significantly higher percentage and infiltration of CD8 and CD4 cells was detected in tumors of sunitinib-treated mice when compared with control-treated mice. More importantly, the expression of negative costimulatory molecules CTLA4 and PD-1 in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, and PDL-1 expression on MDSC and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, was also significantly decreased by sunitinib treatment. Finally, sunitinib in combination with our immune therapy protocol (IL-12 and 4-1BB activation) significantly improves the long-term survival rate of large tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that sunitinib can be used to reverse immune suppression and as a potentially useful adjunct for enhancing the efficacy of immune-based cancer therapy for advanced malignancies.

  7. Benzimidazole derivatives as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole is a common kinase inhibitor scaffold and benzimidazole-based compounds interact with enzymes by multiple binding modes. In some cases, the benzimidazole acts as part of the hinge-binding motif, in others it has a scaffolding role without evidence for direct hinge binding. Several of these compounds are ATP-competitive inhibitors and show high selectivity by exploiting unique structural properties that distinguish one kinase from the majority of other kinases. However, the high specificity for a single target is not always sufficient. Thus another approach, called multi-target therapy, has been developed over the last few years. The simultaneous inhibition of various kinases may be useful because the disease is attacked at several relevant targets. Moreover, if a kinase becomes drug-resistant, a multitargeted drug can act on the other kinases. Some benzimidazole derivatives are multi-target inhibitors. In this article benzimidazole inhibitors are reported with their mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological properties.

  8. The Stilbenoid Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, G6, Suppresses Jak2-V617F-mediated Human Pathological Cell Growth in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Kirabo, Annet; Embury, Jennifer; Kiss, Róbert; Polgár, Tímea; Gali, Meghanath; Majumder, Anurima; Bisht, Kirpal S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; Keserű, György M.; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    Using structure-based virtual screening, we previously identified a novel stilbenoid inhibitor of Jak2 tyrosine kinase named G6. Here, we hypothesized that G6 suppresses Jak2-V617F-mediated human pathological cell growth in vitro and in vivo. We found that G6 inhibited proliferation of the Jak2-V617F expressing human erythroleukemia (HEL) cell line by promoting marked cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis. The G6-dependent increase in apoptosis levels was concomitant with increased caspase 3/7 activity and cleavage of PARP. G6 also selectively inhibited phosphorylation of STAT5, a downstream signaling target of Jak2. Using a mouse model of Jak2-V617F-mediated hyperplasia, we found that G6 significantly decreased the percentage of blast cells in the peripheral blood, reduced splenomegaly, and corrected a pathologically low myeloid to erythroid ratio in the bone marrow by eliminating HEL cell engraftment in this tissue. In addition, drug efficacy correlated with the presence of G6 in the plasma, marrow, and spleen. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the stilbenoid compound, G6, suppresses Jak2-V617F-mediated aberrant cell growth. As such, G6 may be a potential therapeutic lead candidate against Jak2-mediated, human disease. PMID:21127060

  9. [Kinase inhibitors against hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Arinobu

    2014-06-01

    Dysregulation of protein phosphorylation, especially on tyrosine residues, plays a crucial role in development and progression of hematological malignancies. Since remarkable success in imatinib therapy of CML and Ph+ALL, extensive efforts have made to explore candidate molecular targets and next breakthrough drugs. Now that next generation ABL kinase inhibitors are available for CML, the therapeutic algorithm has been revolutionized. As for AML and lymphoid malignancies, many kinase inhibitors targeting FLT3, BTK and aurora-A are on early and late clinical trials, and a number of promising drugs including ibrutinib are picked up for further evaluation.

  10. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor AR-A014418 suppresses pancreatic cancer cell growth via inhibition of GSK-3-mediated Notch1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) can act as either a tumour promoter or suppressor by its inactivation depending on the cell type. There are conflicting reports on the roles of GSK-3 isoforms and their interaction with Notch1 in pancreatic cancer. It was hypothesized that GSK-3α stabilized Notch1 in pancreatic cancer cells thereby promoting cellular proliferation. Methods The pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa2, PANC-1 and BxPC-3, were treated with 0–20 μM of AR-A014418 (AR), a known GSK-3 inhibitor. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay and Live-Cell Imaging. The levels of Notch pathway members (Notch1, HES-1, survivin and cyclinD1), phosphorylated GSK-3 isoforms, and apoptotic markers were determined by Western blot. Immunoprecipitation was performed to identify the binding of GSK-3 specific isoform to Notch1. Results AR-A014418 treatment had a significant dose-dependent growth reduction (P < 0.001) in pancreatic cancer cells compared with the control and the cytotoxic effect is as a result of apoptosis. Importantly, a reduction in GSK-3 phosphorylation lead to a reduction in Notch pathway members. Overexpression of active Notch1 in AR-A014418-treated cells resulted in the negation of growth suppression. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that GSK-3α binds to Notch1. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the growth suppressive effect of AR-A014418 on pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by a reduction in phosphorylation of GSK-3α with concomitant Notch1 reduction. GSK-3α appears to stabilize Notch1 by binding and may represent a target for therapeutic development. Furthermore, downregulation of GSK-3 and Notch1 may be a viable strategy for possible chemosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells to standard therapeutics. PMID:26147011

  12. Cinnamon and its Components Suppress Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Up-Regulating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeeun; Lee, Jung-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Won-Kyung; Gu, Min Jung; Lee, Kwang Jin; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia bark has been used in traditional herbal medicine to treat a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the antiproliferative effect of cinnamon extract on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the corresponding restenosis has not been explored. Hence, after examining the effect of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation, we investigated the possible involvement of signal transduction pathways associated with early signal and cell cycle analysis, including regulatory proteins. Besides, to identify the active components, we investigated the components of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation. Cinnamon extract inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and suppressed the PDGF-stimulated early signal transduction. In addition, cinnamon extract arrested the cell cycle and inhibited positive regulatory proteins. Correspondingly, the protein levels of p21 and p27 not only were increased in the presence of cinnamon extract, also the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was inhibited by cinnamon extract. Besides, among the components of cinnamon extract, cinnamic acid (CA), eugenol (EG) and cinnamyl alcohol significantly inhibited the VSMC proliferation. Overall, the present study demonstrates that cinnamon extract inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs through a G0/G1 arrest, which down-regulated the expression of cell cycle positive regulatory proteins by up-regulating p21 and p27 expression.

  13. Functional Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Arbiser, Jack L.; Govindarajan, Baskaran; Bai, Xianhe; Onda, Hiroaki; Kazlauskas, Andrius; Lim, So Dug; Amin, Mahul B.; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2002-01-01

    Tumors often exhibit activation of specific tyrosine kinases, which may allow targeting of therapy through inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling. This strategy has been used successfully in the development of STI571 (gleevec), an inhibitor of bcr-abl tyrosine kinase that has been used successfully in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. STI571 also shows activity against c-kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ) tyrosine kinase signaling, thus potentially expanding the number of tumors that may respond to it. We describe a simple and rapid method to assess functional activity of tyrosine kinase signaling that is broadly applicable to tumor types. As proof of principle, we have applied it to cells that serve as models of the autosomal-dominant tumor syndrome tuberous sclerosis (TS). We found that TS model cells derived from tuberin heterozygous mice and from a human renal angiomyolipoma are highly sensitive to PDGFR antagonists and that these cells express PDGFRβ. Given that PDGFRβ signaling is inhibited by STI571, we found that SV7tert human angiomyolipoma cells are sensitive to STI571. Thus, we describe a novel but simple method of determining the functional tyrosine kinase profile of a neoplastic cell and our results suggest that STI571 might be useful in the treatment of neoplasms commonly seen in patients with TS. PMID:12213705

  14. Suppression of caspase-11 expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Hyejung; Yoo, Lang; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2009-01-02

    It has been well documented that histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we investigated whether histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the expression of caspase-11 that is known as an inducible caspase regulating both inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we show that sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC), effectively suppressed the induction of caspase-11 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts stimulated with lipopolysaccharides. Sodium butyrate inhibited the activation of upstream signaling events for the caspase-11 induction such as activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, degradation of inhibitor of {kappa}B, and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. These results suggest that the HDAC inhibitor suppressed cytosolic signaling events for the induction of caspase-11 by inhibiting the deacetylation of non-histone proteins.

  15. Combining TRAIL with PI3 Kinase or HSP90 inhibitors enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells via suppression of survival signaling

    PubMed Central

    Saturno, Grazia; Valenti, Melanie; De Haven Brandon, Alexis; Thomas, George V.; Eccles, Suzanne; Clarke, Paul A.; Workman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL has been shown to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, but in some cases they fail to respond to this ligand. We explored the ability of representative phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 Kinase)/mTOR and HSP90 inhibitors to overcome TRAIL resistance by increasing apoptosis in colorectal cancer models. We determined the sensitivity of 27 human colorectal cancer and 2 non-transformed colon epithelial cell lines to TRAIL treatment. A subset of the cancer cell lines with a range of responses to TRAIL was selected from the panel for treatment with TRAIL combined with the PI3 Kinase/mTOR inhibitor PI-103 or the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG (tanespimycin). Two TRAIL-resistant cell lines were selected for in vivo combination studies with TRAIL and 17-AAG. We found that 13 colorectal cancer cell lines and the 2 non-transformed colon epithelial cell lines were resistant to TRAIL. We demonstrated that co-treatment of TRAIL and PI-103 or 17-AAG was synergistic or additive and significantly enhanced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. This was associated with decreased expression or activity of survival protein biomarkers such as ERBB2, AKT, IKKα and XIAP. In contrast, the effect of the combination treatments in non-transformed colon cells was minimal. We show here for the first time that co-treatment in vivo with TRAIL and 17-AAG in two TRAIL-resistant human colorectal cancer xenograft models resulted in significantly greater tumor growth inhibition compared to single treatments. We propose that combining TRAIL with PI3 Kinase/mTOR or HSP90 inhibitors has therapeutic potential in the treatment of TRAIL-resistant colorectal cancers. PMID:23852390

  16. A novel inhibitor of Chlamydophila pneumoniae protein kinase D (PknD) inhibits phosphorylation of CdsD and suppresses bacterial replication

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We have shown previously that Chlamydophila pneumoniae contains a dual-specific Ser/Thr protein kinase that phosphorylates CdsD, a structural component of the type III secretion apparatus. To further study the role of PknD in growth and development we sought to identify a PknD inhibitor to determine whether PknD activity is required for replication. Results Using an in vitro kinase assay we screened 80 known eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors for activity against PknD and identified a 3'-pyridyl oxindole compound that inhibited PknD autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of CdsD. The PknD inhibitor significantly retarded the growth rate of C. pneumoniae as evidenced by the presence of very small inclusions with a reduced number of bacteria as seen by electron microscopy. These inclusions contained the normal replicative forms including elementary bodies (EB), intermediate bodies (IB) and reticulate bodies (RB), but lacked persistent bodies (PB), indicating that induction of persistence was not the cause of reduced chlamydial growth. Blind passage of C. pneumoniae grown in the presence of this PknD inhibitor for 72 or 84 hr failed to produce inclusions, suggesting this compound blocks an essential step in the production of infectious chlamydial EB. The compound was not toxic to HeLa cells, did not block activation of the MEK/ERK pathway required for chlamydial invasion and did not block intracellular replication of either Chlamydia trachomatis serovar D or Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium suggesting that the inhibitory effect of the compound is specific for C. pneumoniae. Conclusion We have identified a 3'-pyridyl oxindole compound that inhibits the in vitro kinase activity of C. pneumoniae PknD and inhibits the growth and production of infectious C. pneumoniae progeny in HeLa cells. Together, these results suggest that PknD may play a key role in the developmental cycle of C. pneumoniae. PMID:19828035

  17. Combining trail with PI3 kinase or HSP90 inhibitors enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells via suppression of survival signaling.

    PubMed

    Saturno, Grazia; Valenti, Melanie; De Haven Brandon, Alexis; Thomas, George V; Eccles, Suzanne; Clarke, Paul A; Workman, Paul

    2013-08-01

    TRAIL has been shown to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, but in some cases they fail to respond to this ligand. We explored the ability of representative phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 Kinase)/mTOR and HSP90 inhibitors to overcome TRAIL resistance by increasing apoptosis in colorectal cancer models. We determined the sensitivity of 27 human colorectal cancer and 2 non-transformed colon epithelial cell lines to TRAIL treatment. A subset of the cancer cell lines with a range of responses to TRAIL was selected from the panel for treatment with TRAIL combined with the PI3 Kinase/mTOR inhibitor PI-103 or the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG (tanespimycin). Two TRAIL-resistant cell lines were selected for in vivo combination studies with TRAIL and 17-AAG. We found that 13 colorectal cancer cell lines and the 2 non-transformed colon epithelial cell lines were resistant to TRAIL. We demonstrated that co-treatment of TRAIL and PI-103 or 17-AAG was synergistic or additive and significantly enhanced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. This was associated with decreased expression or activity of survival protein biomarkers such as ERBB2, AKT, IKKα and XIAP. In contrast, the effect of the combination treatments in non-transformed colon cells was minimal. We show here for the first time that co-treatment in vivo with TRAIL and 17-AAG in two TRAIL-resistant human colorectal cancer xenograft models resulted in significantly greater tumor growth inhibition compared to single treatments. We propose that combining TRAIL with PI3 Kinase/mTOR or HSP90 inhibitors has therapeutic potential in the treatment of TRAIL-resistant colorectal cancers.

  18. Suppression of c-Myc and RRM2 expression in pancreatic cancer cells by the sphingosine kinase-2 inhibitor ABC294640

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Clayton S.; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Smith, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains extremely difficult to treat, with the average lifespan following diagnosis being only 3-6 months, resulting in a death to incidence ratio of 0.94. A major reason for this high mortality rate is resistance to the main chemotherapeutic agent used to treat this disease, gemcitabine. Alterations in nucleoside and gemcitabine metabolism, specifically over-expression of ribonucleotide reductase, have been implicated as a major mechanism of resistance to this drug. Here, we show that inhibition of sphingosine kinase-2 by the specific inhibitor ABC294640 is synergistically cytotoxic with gemcitabine toward three human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Treatment with ABC294640 results in decreased expression of both RRM2 and MYC in all three cell lines. Additionally, expression of c-Myc protein and phosphorylation of Rb at S780 both decrease in a dose-dependent manner in response to ABC294640, while acetylation of H3-K9 and p21 levels increase. Pretreatment with the protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor okadaic acid or the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 fails to prevent the effects of ABC294640 on Rb phosphorylation. These data indicate a role for sphingosine kinase-2 in E2F and c-Myc mediated transcription through alteration of histone acetylation and p21 expression. These effects of ABC294640 suggest that it may be an effective agent for pancreatic cancer, particularly in combination with gemcitabine. PMID:27517489

  19. From a natural product lead to the identification of potent and selective benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides as glycogen synthase kinase 3beta inhibitors that suppress proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gaisina, Irina N; Gallier, Franck; Ougolkov, Andrei V; Kim, Ki H; Kurome, Toru; Guo, Songpo; Holzle, Denise; Luchini, Doris N; Blond, Sylvie Y; Billadeau, Daniel D; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2009-04-09

    Recent studies have demonstrated that glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) is overexpressed in human colon and pancreatic carcinomas, contributing to cancer cell proliferation and survival. Here, we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides, potent GSK-3beta inhibitors. Some of these compounds show picomolar inhibitory activity toward GSK-3beta and an enhanced selectivity against cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK-2). Selected GSK-3beta inhibitors were tested in the pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa-2, BXPC-3, and HupT3. We determined that some of these compounds, namely compounds 5, 6, 11, 20, and 26, demonstrate antiproliferative activity against some or all of the pancreatic cancer cells at low micromolar to nanomolar concentrations. We found that the treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with GSK-3beta inhibitors 5 and 26 resulted in suppression of GSK-3beta activity and a distinct decrease of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) expression, leading to significant apoptosis. The present data suggest a possible role for GSK-3beta inhibitors in cancer therapy, in addition to their more prominent applications in CNS disorders.

  20. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS ‘Driver mutations’ are essential for carcinogenesis as well as tumor progression as they confer a selective growth advantage to cancer cells. Identification of driver mutations in growth related protein kinases, especially tyrosine kinases have led to clinical development of an array of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in various malignancies, including lung cancer. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinases have proven to be of meaningful clinical benefit, while inhibition of several other tyrosine kinases have been of limited clinical benefit, thus far. An improved understanding of tyrosine kinase biology has also led to faster drug development, identification of resistance mechanisms and ways to overcome resistance. In this review, we discuss the clinical data supporting the use and practical aspects of management of patients on epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22520981

  1. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  2. JAK2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG490 suppresses cell growth and invasion of gallbladder cancer cells via inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Fu, L X; Lian, Q W; Pan, J D; Xu, Z L; Zhou, T M; Ye, B

    2017-01-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling pathway (JAK/STAT pathway) have displayed a critical role in tumor development and progression in multiple malignancies. Previous studies showed that inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling blocked cell growth and metastasis in cancer cells, however, the antitumor effects of JAK inhibitor AG490 on gallbladder cancer (GBC) have not been reported. Our present study aimed to investigate the effects and associated mechanisms of JAK inhibitor AG490 on cell growth, invasive potential and apoptosis in GBC cells (GBC-SD and SGC-996) indicated by MTT, cell colony formation, Transwell and flow cytometry. As a consequence, we found that JAK2 inhibitor AG490 inhibited cell growth and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest in GBC-SD and SGC-996 cells. Furthermore, the expression levels of p-JAK2, p-STAT3, VEGFC-/-D and cyclinD1 were downregulated, while p53 expression was upregulated in AG490-treated GBC cells indicated by Western blot assay. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that JAK inhibitor AG490 inhibits growth and invasion of GBC cells via blockade of JAK2/STAT3 signaling and provides the potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of GBC patients.

  3. BGP-15, a PARP-inhibitor, prevents imatinib-induced cardiotoxicity by activating Akt and suppressing JNK and p38 MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Sarszegi, Zsolt; Bognar, Eszter; Gaszner, Balazs; Kónyi, Attila; Gallyas, Ferenc; Sumegi, Balazs; Berente, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the cardiotoxic effects of the well-known cytostatic agent imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), and presented evidence for the cardioprotective effect of BGP-15 which is a novel insulin sensitizer. The cardiotoxic effect of imatinib mesylate was assessed in Langendorff rat heart perfusion system. The cardiac high-energy phosphate levels (creatine phosphate (PCr) and ATP) were monitored in situ by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. The protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and the activation of signaling pathways were determined from the freeze-clamped hearts. Prolonged treatment of the heart with imatinib mesylate (20 mg/kg) resulted in cardiotoxicity, which were characterized by the depletion of high-energy phosphates (PCr and ATP), and significantly increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Imatinib mesylate treatment-induced activation of MAP kinases (including ERK1/2, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3beta. BGP-15 (200 μM) prevented the imatinib mesylate-induced oxidative damages, attenuated the depletion of high-energy phosphates, altered the signaling effect of imatinib mesylate by preventing p38 MAP kinase and JNK activation, and induced the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3beta. The suppressive effect of BGP-15 on p38 and JNK activation could be significant because these kinases contribute to the cell death and inflammation in the isolated perfused heart.

  4. Aurora kinase inhibitors as anticancer molecules.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed at detectable levels in all somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases leads to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Preclinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed.

  5. Aurora Kinase inhibitors as Anticancer Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed in detectable levels in somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases lead to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Pre-clinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed. PMID:20863917

  6. HM71224, a novel Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suppresses B cell and monocyte activation and ameliorates arthritis in a mouse model: a potential drug for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Kyun; Byun, Joo-Yun; Park, Ji Ah; Kim, Yu-Yon; Lee, Ye Ji; Oh, Jeong In; Jang, Sun Young; Kim, Young Hoon; Song, Yeong Wook; Son, Jeewoong; Suh, Kwee Hyun; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Eun Bong

    2016-04-18

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is critical for activation of B cells and myeloid cells. This study aimed to characterize the effects of HM71224, a novel Btk inhibitor, both in vitro and in a mouse model of experimental arthritis. The kinase inhibition profile of HM71224 was analyzed. The in vitro effects of HM71224 on B cells and monocytes were analyzed by examining phosphorylation of Btk and its downstream signaling molecules, along with cytokine production and osteoclast formation. The in vivo effects of HM71224 were investigated in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). HM71224 irreversibly bound to and inhibited Btk (IC50 = 1.95 nM). The compound also inhibited the phosphorylation of Btk and its downstream molecules such as PLCγ2, in activated Ramos B lymphoma cells and primary human B cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, HM71224 effectively inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β by human monocytes, and osteoclast formation by human monocytes. Finally, HM71224 improved experimental arthritis and prevented joint destruction in a murine model of CIA. HM71224 inhibits Btk in B cells and monocytes and ameliorates experimental arthritis in a mouse model. Thus, HM71224 is a potential novel therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis in humans.

  7. The src-family kinase inhibitor PP2 suppresses the in vitro invasive phenotype of bladder carcinoma cells via modulation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Chiang, George J; Billmeyer, Brian R; Canes, David; Stoffel, John; Moinzadeh, Alireza; Austin, Christina A; Kosakowski, Monika; Rieger-Christ, Kimberly M; Libertino, John A; Summerhayes, Ian C

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate PP2 as a modulator of the cadherin/catenin complex in late-stage bladder carcinoma cells, and to assess its potential invasion-suppressor activity in this model. A panel of five human bladder carcinoma cells, characterizing late-stage disease, was used to determine the concentration for 50% inhibition of PP2 in cell-proliferation assays. Modulation of cadherin/catenin expression by PP2 was determined in Western blot analysis, with an assessment of the activation status of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signalling pathways. Altered invasive capacity linked to these variables was determined in standard in vitro invasion assays. PP2 elicited concentration-dependent growth inhibition in all bladder cell lines within the panel, with growth suppression recorded at 10-35 micromol/L PP2. Distinct morphological changes were recorded in cell lines exposed to PP2, accompanied by up-regulation of plakoglobin expression in a subset of lines. Exposure of cells to PP2 resulted in inactivation of Akt in all cells and a concomitant reduction in in vitro invasive capacity. These results show that PP2 inhibits bladder carcinoma cell growth and can modulate plakoglobin expression in a subset of cell lines. In addition, PP2 can suppress the in vitro invasive capacity of bladder carcinoma cells by modulating the activation status of Akt.

  8. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  9. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    kinase . This grant proposal will explore the resistance to small molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors mediated by the... molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors is potentially mediated by the Pim-1 protein kinase , and that unique Pim protein kinase inhibitors that can in...application is essential for the development of this combined chemotherapeutic strategy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small Molecule AKT Inhibitors ,

  10. Exploring the scaffold universe of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-08

    The scaffold concept was applied to systematically determine, analyze, and compare core structures of kinase inhibitors. From publicly available inhibitors of the human kinome, scaffolds and cyclic skeletons were systematically extracted and organized taking activity data, structural relationships, and retrosynthetic criteria into account. Scaffold coverage varied greatly across the kinome, and many scaffolds representing compounds with different activity profiles were identified. The majority of kinase inhibitor scaffolds were involved in well-defined yet distinct structural relationships, which had different consequences on compound activity. Scaffolds exclusively representing highly potent compounds were identified as well as structurally analogous scaffolds with very different degrees of promiscuity. Scaffold relationships presented herein suggest a variety of hypotheses for inhibitor design. Our detailed organization of the kinase inhibitor scaffold universe with respect to different activity and structural criteria, all scaffolds, and the original compound data assembled for our analysis are made freely available.

  11. Prodrugs of herpes simplex thymidine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yanachkova, Milka; Xu, Wei-Chu; Dvoskin, Sofya; Dix, Edward J; Yanachkov, Ivan B; Focher, Federico; Savi, Lida; Sanchez, M Dulfary; Foster, Timothy P; Wright, George E

    2015-04-01

    Because guanine-based herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase inhibitors are not orally available, we synthesized various 6-deoxy prodrugs of these compounds and evaluated them with regard to solubility in water, oral bioavailability, and efficacy to prevent herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation from latency in a mouse model. Organic synthesis was used to prepare compounds, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to analyze hydrolytic conversion, Mass Spectrometry (MS) to measure oral bioavailability, and mouse latent infection and induced reactivation to evaluate the efficacy of a specific prodrug. Aqueous solubilities of prodrugs were improved, oxidation of prodrugs by animal cytosols occurred in vitro, and oral absorption of the optimal prodrug sacrovir™ (6-deoxy-mCF3PG) in the presence of the aqueous adjuvant Soluplus® and conversion to active compound N(2)-[3-(trifluoromethyl)pheny])guanine (mCF3PG) were accomplished in mice. Treatment of herpes simplex virus-1 latent mice with sacrovir™ in 1% Soluplus in drinking water significantly suppressed herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation and viral genomic replication. Ad libitum oral delivery of sacrovir™ was effective in suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in ocularly infected latent mice as measured by the numbers of mice shedding infectious virus at the ocular surface, numbers of trigeminal ganglia positive for infectious virus, number of corneas that had detectable infectious virus, and herpes simplex virus-1 genome copy numbers in trigeminal ganglia following reactivation. These results demonstrate the statistically significant effect of the prodrug on suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in vivo. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Outlook.

    PubMed

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Linardopoulos, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase family comprises of cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases important for mitosis. Their activity and protein expression are cell cycle regulated, peaking during mitosis to orchestrate important mitotic processes including centrosome maturation, chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. In humans, the Aurora kinase family consists of three members; Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, which each share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain but differ in their sub-cellular localization, substrate specificity, and function during mitosis. In addition, Aurora-A and Aurora-B have been found to be overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. These observations led to a number of programs among academic and pharmaceutical organizations to discovering small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. This review will summarize the known Aurora kinase inhibitors currently in the clinic, and discuss the current and future directions.

  13. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Linardopoulos, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase family comprises of cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases important for mitosis. Their activity and protein expression are cell cycle regulated, peaking during mitosis to orchestrate important mitotic processes including centrosome maturation, chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. In humans, the Aurora kinase family consists of three members; Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, which each share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain but differ in their sub-cellular localization, substrate specificity, and function during mitosis. In addition, Aurora-A and Aurora-B have been found to be overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. These observations led to a number of programs among academic and pharmaceutical organizations to discovering small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. This review will summarize the known Aurora kinase inhibitors currently in the clinic, and discuss the current and future directions. PMID:26734566

  14. Sphingosine kinase inhibitor suppresses IL-18-induced interferon-gamma production through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation in human NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Seok Bean; Jung, Minkyung; Park, Yoorim; Bang, Jung-Wook; Kim, Tae Sung; Park, Hyunjeong; Kim, Cherl-hyun; Yang, Yool-hee; Bang, Sa Ik; Cho, Daeho

    2008-09-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the innate immune response. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a well-known interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma} inducing factor, which stimulates immune response in NK and T cells. Sphingosine kinase (SPHK) catalyzes the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which acts as a second messenger to function as an anti-apoptotic factor and proliferation stimulator of immune cells. In this study, to elucidate whether SPHK is involved in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, we measured IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production after pre-treatment with SPHK inhibitor (SKI) in NK-92MI cells. We found that IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} expression was blocked by SKI pre-treatment in both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the increased IFN-{gamma} production by stimulation with IL-18 is mediated through both SPHK and p38 MAPK. To determine the upstream signals of SKI and p38 MAPK in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK was measured after SKI pre-treatment. As a result, inhibition of SPHK by SKI blocked phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, showing that SPHK activation by IL-18 is an upstream signal of p38 MAPK activation. Inhibition of SPHK by SKI also inhibited IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production in human primary NK cells. In conclusion, SPHK activation is an essential factor for IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production via p38 MAPK.

  15. Down-regulation of the PTTG1 proto-oncogene contributes to the melanoma suppressive effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor PHA-848125.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Simona; Alvino, Ester; Levati, Lauretta; Esposito, Alessia I; Ciomei, Marina; Brasca, Maria G; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Desideri, Marianna; Bonmassar, Enzo; Pfeffer, Ulrich; D'Atri, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that PHA-848125, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor presently under Phase II clinical investigation, impairs melanoma cell growth. In this study, gene expression profiling showed that PHA-848125 significantly modulated the expression of 128 genes, predominantly involved in cell cycle control, in the highly drug-sensitive GL-Mel (p53 wild-type) melanoma cells. Up-regulation of 4 selected genes (PDCD4, SESN2, DDIT4, DEPDC6), and down-regulation of 6 selected genes (PTTG1, CDC25A, AURKA, AURKB, PLK1, BIRC5) was confirmed at protein levels. The same protein analysis performed in PHA-848125-treated M10 melanoma cells - p53 mutated and less sensitive to the drug than GL-Mel cells - revealed no DEPDC6 expression and no changes of PTTG1, PDCD4 and BIRC5 levels. Upon PHA-848125 treatment, a marked PTTG1 down-modulation was also observed in A375 cells (p53 wild-type) but not in CN-Mel cells (p53 mutated). PTTG1 silencing significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and induced senescence, with effects less pronounced in p53 mutated cells. PTTG1 silencing increased PHA-848125 sensitivity of p53 mutated cells but not that of A375 or GL-Mel cells. Accordingly, in M10 but not in A375 cells a higher level of senescence was detected in PHA-848125-treated/PTTG1-silenced cells with respect to PHA-848125-treated controls. In A375 and GL-Mel cells, TP53 silencing attenuated PHA-848125-induced down-modulation of PTTG1 and decreased cell sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate that PHA-848125-induced down-regulation of PTTG1 depends, at least in part, on p53 function and contributes to the antiproliferative activity of the drug. Our study provides further molecular insight into the antitumor mechanism of PHA-848125. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management.
. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using CINAHL®, PubMed, and Cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity.
. Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems.
. Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity.

  17. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Corsino, Patrick E.; Narayan, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non–ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non–ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer. PMID:26018905

  19. ERK Signal Suppression and Sensitivity to CH5183284/Debio 1347, a Selective FGFR Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Yoshito; Mizuno, Hideaki; Sase, Hitoshi; Fujii, Toshihiko; Sakata, Kiyoaki; Akiyama, Nukinori; Aoki, Yuko; Aoki, Masahiro; Ishii, Nobuya

    2015-12-01

    Drugs that target specific gene alterations have proven beneficial in the treatment of cancer. Because cancer cells have multiple resistance mechanisms, it is important to understand the downstream pathways of the target genes and monitor the pharmacodynamic markers associated with therapeutic efficacy. We performed a transcriptome analysis to characterize the response of various cancer cell lines to a selective fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor (CH5183284/Debio 1347), a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor, or a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. FGFR and MEK inhibition produced similar expression patterns, and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) gene signature was altered in several FGFR inhibitor-sensitive cell lines. Consistent with these findings, CH5183284/Debio 1347 suppressed phospho-ERK in every tested FGFR inhibitor-sensitive cell line. Because the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway functions downstream of FGFR, we searched for a pharmacodynamic marker of FGFR inhibitor efficacy in a collection of cell lines with the ERK signature and identified dual-specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) as a candidate marker. Although a MEK inhibitor suppressed the MAPK pathway, most FGFR inhibitor-sensitive cell lines are insensitive to MEK inhibitors and we found potent feedback activation of several pathways via FGFR. We therefore suggest that FGFR inhibitors exert their effect by suppressing ERK signaling without feedback activation. In addition, DUSP6 may be a pharmacodynamic marker of FGFR inhibitor efficacy in FGFR-addicted cancers.

  20. Quercetin suppresses lung cancer growth by targeting Aurora B kinase.

    PubMed

    Xingyu, Zhu; Peijie, Ma; Dan, Peng; Youg, Wang; Daojun, Wang; Xinzheng, Chen; Xijun, Zhang; Yangrong, Song

    2016-11-01

    aurora B kinase is highly expressed in several cancer cells and promotes tumorigenesis and progression, and therefore, it is an important target for drug to treat tumors. Quercetin was identified to be an antitumor agent. Herein, we report for the first time that quercetin inhibited aurora B activities by directly binding with aurora B in vitro and in vivo. Ex vivo studies showed that quercetin inhibited aurora B activities in JB6 Cl41 cells and A549 lung cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of aurora B in A549 cells decreased their sensitivities to quercetin. In vivo study demonstrated that injection of quercetin in A549 tumor-bearing mice effectively suppressed cancer growth. The phosphorylation of histone 3 in tumor tissues was also decreased after quercetin treatment. In short, quercetin can suppress growth of lung cancer cells as an aurora B inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. KIDFamMap: a database of kinase-inhibitor-disease family maps for kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Ta; Huang, Jhang-Wei; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Tseng, Jen-Hu; You, Syuan-Ren; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play central roles in signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic targets for many diseases. Designing selective kinase inhibitors is an emergent and challenging task, because kinases share an evolutionary conserved ATP-binding site. KIDFamMap (http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/KIDFamMap/) is the first database to explore kinase-inhibitor families (KIFs) and kinase-inhibitor-disease (KID) relationships for kinase inhibitor selectivity and mechanisms. This database includes 1208 KIFs, 962 KIDs, 55 603 kinase-inhibitor interactions (KIIs), 35 788 kinase inhibitors, 399 human protein kinases, 339 diseases and 638 disease allelic variants. Here, a KIF can be defined as follows: (i) the kinases in the KIF with significant sequence similarity, (ii) the inhibitors in the KIF with significant topology similarity and (iii) the KIIs in the KIF with significant interaction similarity. The KIIs within a KIF are often conserved on some consensus KIDFamMap anchors, which represent conserved interactions between the kinase subsites and consensus moieties of their inhibitors. Our experimental results reveal that the members of a KIF often possess similar inhibition profiles. The KIDFamMap anchors can reflect kinase conformations types, kinase functions and kinase inhibitor selectivity. We believe that KIDFamMap provides biological insights into kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms. PMID:23193279

  2. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    London, Cheryl A

    2009-08-01

    Substantial progress in the field of molecular biology has permitted the identification of key abnormalities in cancer cells involving cell proteins that regulate signal transduction, cell survival, and cell proliferation. Such abnormalities often involve a class of proteins called tyrosine kinases that act to phosphorylate other proteins in the cell, tightly regulating a variety of cellular processes. A variety of small molecule inhibitors that target specific tyrosine kinases (known as tyrosine kinase inhibitors [TKIs]) have now been approved for the treatment of human cancer, and it is likely many more will become available in the near future. In some instances these inhibitors have exhibited significant clinical efficacy, and it is likely their biologic activity will be further enhanced as combination regimens with standard treatment modalities are explored. Although TKIs have been used extensively in humans, their application to cancers in dogs and cats is relatively recent. The TKIs Palladia (toceranib), Kinavet (masitinib), and Gleevec (imatinib) have been successfully used in dogs, and more recently Gleevec in cats. This article will review the biology of tyrosine kinase dysfunction in human and animal cancers, and the application of specific TKIs to veterinary cancer patients.

  3. Comprehensive kinase profile of pacritinib, a nonmyelosuppressive Janus kinase 2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jack W; Al-Fayoumi, Suliman; Ma, Haiching; Komrokji, Rami S; Mesa, Ruben; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Pacritinib, potent inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), JAK2V617F, and fms-like receptor tyrosine kinase 3, is in Phase III development in myelofibrosis. Among type 1 inhibitors, pacritinib shows a lack of myelosuppression at doses that both inhibit JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and demonstrate clinical efficacy. To elucidate these mechanisms and identify other disease targets, a kinome analysis screened 439 recombinant kinases at 100 nM pacritinib concentration. For kinases with >50% inhibition, pacritinib was titrated from 1 to 100 nM. JAK2, JAK2V617F, FLT3, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 achieved half-maximal inhibitory concentrations <50 nM. Pacritinib did not inhibit JAK1 (82% control at 100 nM). Lack of myelosuppression may stem from inhibiting JAK2 without affecting JAK1 and reducing hematopoietic inhibitory cytokines by suppressing interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 or colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor. The pacritinib kinome suggests therapeutic utility in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, solid tumors, and inflammatory conditions. PMID:27574472

  4. Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein (RKIP) Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) Induced Adhesion Molecules Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Bells by Suppressing (Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB (NF-kappaB) Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Shen-Hong; Gao, Xuan; Yu, Bo; Qiao, Hong

    2017-10-06

    BACKGROUND Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) regulates growth and differentiation and plays a role in key signal transduction cascades in mammalian cells. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism for which RKIP regulates cell-cell adhesion remains unknown. Our study investigated the function of the RKIP overexpression on adhesion molecules expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in cultured mouse vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVACs). MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were detected by ELISA kit, reverse transcription-PCR, and western blot assays. The protein expression of RKIP, p65, and inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κBα (IκBα) were detected by western blot analysis. The activity of NF-kappaB was determined using a Dual-Luciferase Reporter assay. RESULTS The results showed that MOVACs transfected with pCMV5-HA-RKIP significantly inhibited TNF-α induced mRNA and protein expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. The adhesion of THP-1 cells was also detected and inhibited by pCMV5-HA-RKIP in TNF-α-treated MOVACs. RKIP also suppressed the TNF-α-induced activation of NF-kappaB and the protein expression of phosphorylated IκB-α, and promoted the protein expression of IkB-α and nuclear translocation of p65 NF-kappaB. Furthermore, RKIP and the inhibitor of NF-kappaB (BAY11-7082) reduced the upregulation of ICAM-1 and VACM-1 induced by TNF-α. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, these results suggested that RKIP may inhibit the TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in MOVACs through inactivation of the NF-kappaB pathway.

  5. Comprehensive assay of kinase catalytic activity reveals features of kinase inhibitor selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiadis, Theonie; Deacon, Sean W.; Devarajan, Karthik; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors are central tools for elucidating cellular signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic agents. Due to evolutionary conservation of the ATP-binding site, most kinase inhibitors that target this site promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases. Interpretation of experiments utilizing these compounds is confounded by a lack of data on the comprehensive kinase selectivity of most inhibitors. Here we profiled the activity of 178 commercially available kinase inhibitors against a panel of 300 recombinant protein kinases using a functional assay. Quantitative analysis revealed complex and often unexpected kinase-inhibitor interactions, with a wide spectrum of promiscuity. Many off-target interactions occur with seemingly unrelated kinases, revealing how large-scale profiling can be used to identify multi-targeted inhibitors of specific, diverse kinases. The results have significant implications for drug development and provide a resource for selecting compounds to elucidate kinase function and for interpreting the results of experiments that use them. PMID:22037377

  6. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M L; Koty, P P

    1999-01-01

    Due to the limited efficacy of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced malignancy and its excessive toxicity precluding its use in chemoprevention, new therapeutic and preventive strategies have been sought. One of the most interesting of these new approaches is the manipulation of signal transduction pathways. Among the approaches being considered to eventuate such a strategy is the inhibition of autophosphorylation, a critical first step in the signal transduction pathways of many cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases, as well as of non-receptor tyrosine kinases. This article is intended to review those tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently in preclinical development, for which there are data to support consideration for their use in chemoprevention or cancer treatment. We will focus upon those agents that have received attention in the past several years.

  7. Mitochondrial Fission Inhibitors Suppress Endothelin-1-Induced Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang; Gao, Jin-Lai; Liu, Ming-Yu; Li, Shan-Liang; Xuan, Xiu-Chen; Zhang, Xin-Zi; Zhang, Xi-Yue; Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Zhen, Chang-Lin; Jin, Jing; Shen, Xin; Dong, De-Li

    2017-07-27

    Endothelin-1 is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, but the underlying mechanisms remained elusive. Our previous study found that inhibition of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells suppressed phenylephrine- and high K+-induced artery constriction. Here, we studied the effects of mitochondrial fission inhibitors on endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction. The tension of rat mesenteric arteries and thoracic aorta was measured by using a multi-wire myograph system. Mitochondrial morphology of aortic smooth muscle cells was observed by using transmission electron microscopy. Dynamin-related protein-1 selective inhibitor mdivi-1 relaxed endothelin-1-induced constriction, and mdivi-1 pre-treatment prevented endothelin-1-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries with intact and denuded endothelium. Mdivi-1 had a similar inhibitory effect on rat thoracic aorta. Another mitochondrial fission inhibitor dynasore showed similar effects as mdivi-1 in rat mesenteric arteries. Mdivi-1 inhibited endothelin-1-induced increase of mitochondrial fission in smooth muscle cells of rat aorta. Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 which relaxed endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction inhibited endothelin-1-induced mitochondrial fission in smooth muscle cells of rat aorta. Endothelin-1 increases mitochondrial fission in vascular smooth muscle cells, and mitochondrial fission inhibitors suppress endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors induce DNA damage through nucleoside depletion

    PubMed Central

    Juvekar, Ashish; Hu, Hai; Yadegarynia, Sina; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Ullas, Soumya; Lien, Evan C.; Bellinger, Gary; Son, Jaekyoung; Hok, Rosanna C.; Seth, Pankaj; Daly, Michele B.; Kim, Baek; Scully, Ralph; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wulf, Gerburg M.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that combining a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor with a poly-ADP Rib polymerase (PARP)-inhibitor enhanced DNA damage and cell death in breast cancers that have genetic aberrations in BRCA1 and TP53. Here, we show that enhanced DNA damage induced by PI3K inhibitors in this mutational background is a consequence of impaired production of nucleotides needed for DNA synthesis and DNA repair. Inhibition of PI3K causes a reduction in all four nucleotide triphosphates, whereas inhibition of the protein kinase AKT is less effective than inhibition of PI3K in suppressing nucleotide synthesis and inducing DNA damage. Carbon flux studies reveal that PI3K inhibition disproportionately affects the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway that delivers Rib-5-phosphate required for base ribosylation. In vivo in a mouse model of BRCA1-linked triple-negative breast cancer (K14-Cre BRCA1f/fp53f/f), the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 led to a precipitous drop in DNA synthesis within 8 h of drug treatment, whereas DNA synthesis in normal tissues was less affected. In this mouse model, combined PI3K and PARP inhibition was superior to either agent alone to induce durable remissions of established tumors. PMID:27402769

  9. Cis- and Trans-gnetin H from Paeonia suffruticosa suppress inhibitor kappa B kinase phosphorylation in LPS-stimulated human THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo S; Vick, Eric J; Gao, Ying; He, Chunnian; Almosnid, Nadin Marwan; Farone, Mary; Farone, Anthony L

    2016-08-02

    The inflammatory response is an important mechanism in host defense; however, overstimulation and chronic inflammation are involved in many important human diseases. Currently, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers such as infliximab and adalimumab along with methotrexate are used in cases of severe and chronic disease. However, there are severe side effects and limitations associated with these treatments. Cis- and trans-gnetin H are compounds isolated from the seeds of Paeonia suffruticosa, a medicinal plant used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of many conditions, including inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms of cis- and trans-gnetin H against LPS-stimulated human THP-1 cells. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were pretreated with increasing concentrations of cis- and trans-gnetin H with or without LPS. Following treatment, cytotoxicity and the TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 response were measured. We also characterized the nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunit p65 (RelA) by immunofluorescence and then investigated NF-κB activation by measuring the phosphorylation of NF-κB mediators, IKK-β, IκB α, and p65 by western blotting. We found that cis- and trans-gnetin H significantly inhibited the cytokine response in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. Cis- and trans-gnetin H effectively inhibited nuclear translocation of p65 and phosphorylation of IKK-β, IκB α, and p65. While both compounds showed promising anti-inflammatory effects, trans-gnetin H was determined to be more effective in suppressing cytokine responses. We demonstrated that cis- and trans-gnetin H suppress cytokine response in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells by preventing activation of key signaling molecules, IKK-β, IκB α, and p65, involved in the NF-κB pathway and suggest the use of cis- and trans-gnetin H in potential therapies for conditions and diseases associated with chronic inflammation

  10. The cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (R)-roscovitine mediates selective suppression of alloreactive human T cells but preserves pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific effectors

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Anoma; Liu, Bianling; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.; Li, Lequn

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD), mediated by donor T cells, remains the primary cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and novel therapeutic approaches are required. Cdk2 is a critical node of signal integration and programming of T cell responses towards immunity versus anergy but is dispensable for hematopoiesis and thymocyte development. We examined the effects of pharmacologic Cdk2 inhibition on alloreactive human T cells. Inhibition of Cdk2 blocked expansion of alloreactive T cells upon culture with HLA-mismatched dendritic cells and prevented generation of IFN-γ-producing alloantigen-specific effectors. In contrast, Cdk2 inhibition preserved effectors specific for Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) leukemia antigen and for CMV as determined by WT1-specific and CMV-specific pentamers. Cdk2 inhibition preserved Treg cells, which have the ability to prevent GvHD while maintaining GvL. Thus, Cdk inhibitors may improve allogeneic HSCT by reducing alloreactivity and GvHD without loss of pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific immunity. PMID:24631965

  11. Kinase inhibitors with redox and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, Nina; Saso, Luciano; Dimitrov, Petya

    2015-01-01

    The development of inflammatory immune response is related to an activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling. The intracellular molecules from this pathway are sensitive to the alterations in the microenvironment. The changes in cellular redox state, proliferation, gene expression pattern and genomic stability during inflammation induce the activation of non-canonical and atypical NK-κB signaling increasing the crosstalk with molecules involved in neddylation, cell cycle checkpoints regulation and DNA repair. This review article describes the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive kinases from the NF-κB pathway and presents the effects of their suppression by small kinase inhibitors. It illustrates that selective targeting of the redox sensor molecules from the inflammatory NK- κB cascades can influence cell survival and metabolism as well. We think that this issue is important when evaluating the drug efficacy in clinical studies and their side effects.

  12. Assessment of tumor response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Amanda; Han, Zhaozhong

    2015-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent developments in the use of non-invasive imaging to assess tumor response to TKI therapy. Receptor tyrosine kinases play important roles in cancer development. A new class of drugs, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) can induce rapid and dramatic tumor suppression when administered to carefully selected patient groups. Identifying these patients with responding tumors prior to or shortly after the initiation of therapy remains challenging. The gold standard of response assessment has been by invasive biopsies used in biological and biochemical procedures. Advances in non-invasive imaging at the anatomical, functional and molecular level have enabled the early detection of tumor response; sometimes within days of beginning treatment. The growing area of molecular imaging has spurred the discovery of novel targeting peptides to bind TKI responding tumors. The emergence of targeted, quick responding imaging probes advances the field of cancer management towards the goal of personalized medicine. PMID:21622159

  13. Novel protein kinase C inhibitors: alpha-terthiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Ashendel, C L; Zhou, Q; Chang, C T; Lee, E S; Chang, C J

    1998-10-06

    A series of alpha-terthiophene derivatives were prepared and their protein kinase C inhibitory activity were evaluated. The aldehyde derivatives were most potent inhibitors (IC50 < 1 microM). alpha-Terthiophene monoaldehyde was inactive in the inhibitions of protein kinase A, mitogen activated protein kinase and protein tyrosine kinase.

  14. Asymmetric Synthesis of Akt Kinase Inhibitor Ipatasertib.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Savage, Scott; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Yajima, Herbert; Remarchuk, Travis; Reents, Reinhard; Wirz, Beat; Iding, Hans; Bachmann, Stephan; Fantasia, Serena M; Scalone, Michelangelo; Hell, André; Hidber, Pirmin; Gosselin, Francis

    2017-09-15

    A highly efficient asymmetric synthesis of the Akt kinase inhibitor ipatasertib (1) is reported. The bicyclic pyrimidine 2 starting material was prepared via a nitrilase biocatalytic resolution, halogen-metal exchange/anionic cyclization, and a highly diastereoselective biocatalytic ketone reduction as key steps. The route also features a halide activated, Ru-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of a vinylogous carbamic acid to produce α-aryl-β-amino acid 3 in high yield and enantioselectivity. The API was assembled in a convergent manner through a late-stage amidation/deprotection/monohydrochloride salt formation sequence.

  15. Identification of beta-escin as a novel inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/Janus-activated kinase 2 signaling pathway that suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sandra Min-Li; Li, Feng; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Kumar, Alan Prem; Hui, Kam M; Sethi, Gautam

    2010-07-01

    The activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been linked with the proliferation, survival, invasion, and angiogenesis of a variety of human cancer cells, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Agents that can suppress STAT3 activation have potential for the prevention and treatment of HCC. In this study, we tested an agent, beta-escin, for its ability to suppress STAT3 activation. We found that beta-escin, a pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibited both constitutive and interleukin-6-inducible STAT3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HCC cells. The suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of upstream kinases c-Src, Janus-activated kinase 1, and Janus-activated kinase 2. Vanadate treatment reversed the beta-escin-induced down-regulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, we found that beta-escin induced the expression of tyrosine phosphatase Src homology phosphatase 1 that correlated with the down-regulation of constitutive STAT3 activation. beta-Escin also down-regulated the expression of STAT3-regulated gene products, such as cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, survivin, Mcl-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, beta-escin inhibited proliferation and also substantially potentiated the apoptotic effects of paclitaxel and doxorubicin in HCC cells. Overall, these results suggest that beta-escin is a novel blocker of STAT3 activation that may have potential in the suppression of proliferation and chemosensitization in HCC.

  16. ATP competitive protein kinase C inhibitors demonstrate distinct state-dependent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Hoshi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that some ATP competitive protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors with respect to substrate peptides. In this report, we demonstrate how the interactions between PKC and inhibitors change PKC activation kinetics. A substrate competitive inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, targets activated PKC and stabilizes PKC in the activated conformation. This leads to transient activation and prolonged deactivation of PKC in the presence of bisindolylmaleimide I. In contrast, an uncompetitive substrate inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide IV, targets quiescent PKC and stabilizes PKC in the quiescent conformation, which generates slower activation and suppressed translocation upon activation of PKC.

  17. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  18. Targeting cancer with small-molecular-weight kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Doriano; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Möbitz, Henrik; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Protein and lipid kinases fulfill essential roles in many signaling pathways that regulate normal cell functions. Deregulation of these kinase activities lead to a variety of pathologies ranging from cancer to inflammatory diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases, cardiovascular disorders, cell growth and survival. 518 protein kinases and about 20 lipid-modifying kinases are encoded by the human genome, and a much larger proportion of additional kinases are present in parasite, bacterial, fungal, and viral genomes that are susceptible to exploitation as drug targets. Since many human diseases result from overactivation of protein and lipid kinases due to mutations and/or overexpression, this enzyme class represents an important target for the pharmaceutical industry. Approximately one third of all protein targets under investigation in the pharmaceutical industry are protein or lipid kinases.The kinase inhibitors that have been launched, thus far, are mainly in oncology indications and are directed against a handful of protein and lipid kinases. With one exception, all of these registered kinase inhibitors are directed toward the ATP-site and display different selectivities, potencies, and pharmacokinetic properties. At present, about 150 kinase-targeted drugs are in clinical development and many more in various stages of preclinical development. Kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical trials target all stages of signal transduction from the receptor protein tyrosine kinases that initiate intracellular signaling, through second-messenger-dependent lipid and protein kinases, and protein kinases that regulate the cell cycle.This review provides an insight into protein and lipid kinase drug discovery with respect to achievements, binding modes of inhibitors, and novel avenues for the generation of second-generation kinase inhibitors to treat cancers.

  19. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barak, D; Shibata, M; Rein, R

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  20. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  1. 3-aminopyrazolopyrazine derivatives as spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiayi; Li, Xiaokai; Zhang, Zhang; Luo, Jingfeng; Long, Huoyou; Tu, Zhengchao; Zhou, Xiaoping; Ding, Ke; Lu, Xiaoyun

    2016-11-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase is a new promising target for drug discovery to treat human cancer and inflammatory disorders. A series of pyrazolopyrazine-3-amine and pyrazolopyrimidine-3-amine derivatives was designed and synthesized as new spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efforts yielded compound 6h with promising spleen tyrosine kinase inhibition in both enzymatic and B-lymphoma cell proliferation assays. Additionally, compound 6h dose dependently inhibited the activation of spleen tyrosine kinase signal in human B-cell lymphoma cells. Compound 6h might serve as a lead for further development of new spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Developing irreversible inhibitors of the protein kinase cysteinome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Sabnis, Yogesh; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Tinghu; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Jones, Lyn H.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of approximately 530 highly conserved enzymes that transfer a γ-phosphate group from ATP to a variety of amino acid residues such as tyrosine, serine and threonine which serves as a ubiquitous mechanism for cellular signal transduction. The clinical success of a number of kinase-directed drugs and the frequent observation of disease causing mutations in protein kinases suggest that a large number of kinases may represent therapeutically relevant targets. To-date the majority of clinical and preclinical kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive, non-covalent inhibitors that achieve selectivity through recognition of unique features of particular protein kinases. Recently there has been renewed interest in the development of irreversible inhibitors that form covalent bonds with cysteine or other nucleophilic residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Irreversible kinase inhibitors have a number of potential advantages including prolonged pharmacodynamics, suitability for rational design, high potency and ability to validate pharmacological specificity through mutation of the reactive cysteine residue. Here we review recent efforts to develop cysteine-targeted irreversible protein kinase inhibitors and discuss their modes of recognizing the ATP-binding pocket and their biological activity profiles. In addition, we provided an informatics assessment of the potential ‘kinase-cysteinome’ and discuss strategies for the efficient development of new covalent inhibitors. PMID:23438744

  3. Kinase inhibitor recognition by use of a multivariable QSAR model.

    PubMed

    Sprous, D G; Zhang, John; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhaolin; Tepper, M A

    2006-01-01

    We have applied a retrosynthetic program to determine the scaffold and R-group chemical space seen within a library of known kinase inhibitors and non-kinase drug-like molecules. Comparison of the differences quickly revealed that kinase inhibitors are distinct in several chemical fragment and physical properties. We then applied these descriptors in a multivariable quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model with the goal to distinguish kinase inhibitors from non-kinase drug-like molecules. This model is heuristic in that it was trained over a dataset of 258 known kinase inhibitors and 230 non-kinase drug molecules. The final model recognized 98% of the training set as being kinase inhibitors and had a false positive rate of 15%. This trait for false positives was accepted out of a desire to maintain diversity and not miss possible good kinase inhibitors for screening. The model was validated by reserving a portion of the datasets as test sets, which were not included in the QSAR model building stage. This was done repetitively for different percentiles of the total dataset population. It was seen that model recognition and false positive were only slightly damaged well down to a 70% reserve (30% dataset used for QSAR model training while 70% used for reserve test set). Beyond 70%, the QSAR models were inconsistent, signifying that the training sets were inadequately diverse to represent the greater reserve test sets. We applied this model to evaluate the commercial kinase libraries available from Asinex, BioFocus, ChemDiv and LifeChemicals to facilitate purchase decisions for compounds for HTS for lead compounds. We observed that there are significant differences in populations of recognizable kinase inhibitors across the vendors analyzed, with BioFocus showing the greatest population of kinase like molecules.

  4. Syk inhibitors interfere with erythrocyte membrane modification during P falciparum growth and suppress parasite egress.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Antonella; Kesely, Kristina R; Pau, Maria Carmina; Tsamesidis, Ioannis; Schwarzer, Evelin; Skorokhod, Oleksii A; Chien, Huynh D; Ponzi, Marta; Bertuccini, Lucia; Low, Philip S; Turrini, Francesco M

    2017-08-24

    Band 3 (also known as the anion exchanger, SLCA1, AE1) constitutes the major attachment site of the spectrin-based cytoskeleton to the erythrocyte's lipid bilayer and thereby contributes critically to the stability of the red cell membrane. During the intraerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum's lifecycle, band 3 becomes tyrosine phosphorylated in response to oxidative stress, leading to a decrease in its affinity for the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton and causing global membrane destabilization. Because this membrane weakening is hypothesized to facilitate parasite egress and the consequent dissemination of released merozoites throughout the bloodstream, we decided to explore which tyrosine kinase inhibitors might block the kinase-induced membrane destabilization. We demonstrate here that multiple Syk kinase inhibitors both prevent parasite-induced band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibit parasite-promoted membrane destabilization. We also show that the same Syk kinase inhibitors suppress merozoite egress near the end of the parasite's intraerythrocytic lifecycle. Because the entrapped merozoites die when prevented from escaping their host erythrocytes and because some Syk inhibitors have displayed long-term safety in human clinical trials, we suggest Syk kinase inhibitors constitute a promising class of antimalarial drugs that can suppress parasitemia by inhibiting a host target that cannot be mutated by the parasite to evolve drug resistance. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. In Vitro Characterization of Derrone as an Aurora Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nhung Thi My; Phuong, Thuong Thien; Nguyen, Trang Thi Nhu; Tran, Yen Thi Hai; Nguyen, Anh Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Thanh Lai; Bui, Khanh Thi Van

    2016-06-01

    Among mitotic kinases, Aurora kinases are the most widely studied, since their expression is restricted to mitosis. They play a key role in chromosome segregation and cell polyploidy. Aurora kinases are important therapeutic targets, and several research groups have directed their efforts toward the identification of kinase inhibitors. The aim of this study is to screen and characterize Aurora kinase inhibitors from natural substances extracted from plants that are used in the Vietnamese pharmacopoeia. We have characterized in vitro Derrone, extracted from Erythrina orientalis L. MURR, as a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor. This compound exhibited an ability to inhibit the phosphorylation of histone H3 at ser10 both in kinase assay and at the cellular level. The compound was more effective against Aurora kinase B, with a lower IC50 value as compared to Aurora A. Moreover, it impaired the mitotic spindle checkpoint and led to endoreduplication in cancer cells, a phenomenon caused by an Aurora B inhibitor. Interestingly, using the xCelligence system and real-time cell analysis (RTCA) software, we set up a comparison of cell proliferation profiles between cancer cells treated with Derrone and VX680-a well-known Aurora kinase inhibitor-and we found that these profiles exhibited considerable similarity in cell morphology, growth, and death. Additionally, Derrone significantly inhibited the formation and growth of MCF7 tumor spheroids.

  6. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  7. Skin problems and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kozuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is a good target for the treatment of lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor was first approved for the treatment of advanced lung cancer in 2002. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor plays an essential role in the treatment of cancer, especially for patients harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutation. Hence, skin toxicity is the most concerning issue for the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Skin toxicity is bothersome and sometimes affects the quality of life and treatment compliance. Thus, it is important for physicians to understand the background and how to manage epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated skin toxicity. Here, the author reviewed the mechanism and upfront preventive and reactive treatments for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-associated skin toxicities.

  8. Skin problems and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kozuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is a good target for the treatment of lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor was first approved for the treatment of advanced lung cancer in 2002. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor plays an essential role in the treatment of cancer, especially for patients harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutation. Hence, skin toxicity is the most concerning issue for the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Skin toxicity is bothersome and sometimes affects the quality of life and treatment compliance. Thus, it is important for physicians to understand the background and how to manage epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated skin toxicity. Here, the author reviewed the mechanism and upfront preventive and reactive treatments for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-associated skin toxicities. PMID:26826719

  9. Converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat prevents high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Munehiro; Asada, Akira; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-12-01

    We examined the involvement of the oxidative stress in high glucose-induced suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 h concentration-dependently (5.6-22.2 mol/l) inhibited human coronary endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, at 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose (22.2 mmol/l)-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat at 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-induced membrane-bound protein kinase C activity in human aortic endothelial cells. The protein kinase C inhibitors calphostin C 100 nmol/l or chelerythrine 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 h increased intracellular oxidative stress, directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by temocaprilat 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l. Bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant 100 nmol/l significantly reduced the action of temocaprilat; whereas bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-bradykinin 100 nmol/l had no effect. These findings suggest that high glucose inhibits human aortic endothelial cell proliferation and that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat inhibits high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation, possibly through suppression of protein kinase C, bradykinin B2 receptors and oxidative stress.

  10. A Novel Calcium-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor, Bumped Kinase Inhibitor 1517, Cures Cryptosporidiosis in Immunosuppressed Mice.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Sparks, Hayley; Nava, Samantha; Huang, Wenlin; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Rivas, Kasey; Hulverson, Matthew A; Barrett, Lynn K; Ojo, Kayode K; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; White, Arthur Clinton

    2016-12-15

    Cryptosporidium is recognized as one of the main causes of childhood diarrhea worldwide. However, the current treatment for cryptosporidiosis is suboptimal. Calcium flux is essential for entry in apicomplexan parasites. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are distinct from protein kinases of mammals, and the CDPK1 of the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium lack side chains that typically block a hydrophobic pocket in protein kinases. We exploited this to develop bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs) that selectively target CDPK1. We have shown that several BKIs of Cryptosporidium CDPK1 potently reduce enzymatic activity and decrease parasite numbers when tested in vitro. In the present work, we studied the anticryptosporidial activity of BKI-1517, a novel BKI. The half maximal effective concentration for Cryptosporidium parvum in HCT-8 cells was determined to be approximately 50 nM. Silencing experiments of CDPK1 suggest that BKI-1517 acts on CDPK1 as its primary target. In a mouse model of chronic infection, 5 of 6 SCID/beige mice (83.3%) were cured after treatment with a single daily dose of 120 mg/kg BKI-1517. No side effects were observed. These data support advancing BKI-1517 as a lead compound for drug development for cryptosporidiosis.

  11. Therapeutic drug monitoring and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Herviou, Pauline; Thivat, Emilie; Richard, Damien; Roche, Lucie; Dohou, Joyce; Pouget, Mélanie; Eschalier, Alain; Durando, Xavier; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic activity of drugs can be optimized by establishing an individualized dosage, based on the measurement of the drug concentration in the serum, particularly if the drugs are characterized by an inter-individual variation in pharmacokinetics that results in an under- or overexposure to treatment. In recent years, several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to block intracellular signaling pathways in tumor cells. These oral drugs are candidates for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) due to their high inter-individual variability for therapeutic and toxic effects. Following a literature search on PubMed, studies on TKIs and their pharmacokinetic characteristics, plasma quantification and inter-individual variability was studied. TDM is commonly used in various medical fields, including cardiology and psychiatry, but is not often applied in oncology. Plasma concentration monitoring has been thoroughly studied for imatinib, in order to evaluate the usefulness of TDM. The measurement of plasma concentration can be performed by various analytical techniques, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry being the reference method. This method is currently used to monitor the efficacy and tolerability of imatinib treatments. Although TDM is already being used for imatinib, additional studies are required in order to improve this practice with the inclusion of other TKIs. PMID:27446421

  12. Suppression of coronavirus replication by cyclophilin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-05-22

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication.

  13. Using Bioluminescent Kinase Profiling Strips to Identify Kinase Inhibitor Selectivity and Promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Zegzouti, Hicham; Hennek, Jacquelyn; Goueli, Said A

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of a kinase inhibitor throughout drug discovery and development is predicated upon its selectivity towards the target of interest. Thus, profiling the compound against a broad panel of kinases is important for providing a better understanding of its activity and for obviating any off-target activities that can result in undesirable consequences. To assess the selectivity and potency of an inhibitor against multiple kinases, it is desirable to use a universal assay that can monitor the activity of all classes of kinases regardless of the nature of their substrates. The luminescent ADP-Glo kinase assay is a universal platform that measures kinase activity by quantifying the amount of the common kinase reaction product ADP. Here we present a method using standardized kinase profiling systems for inhibitor profiling studies based on ADP detection by luminescence. The kinase profiling systems are sets of kinases organized by family, presented in multi-tube strips containing eight enzymes, each with corresponding substrate strips, and standardized for optimal kinase activity. We show that using the kinase profiling strips we could quickly and easily generate multiple selectivity profiles using small or large kinase panels, and identify compound promiscuity within the kinome.

  14. Bharangin, a Diterpenoid Quinonemethide, Abolishes Constitutive and Inducible Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Activation by Modifying p65 on Cysteine 38 Residue and Reducing Inhibitor of Nuclear Factor-κB α Kinase Activation, Leading to Suppression of NF-κB-Regulated Gene Expression and Sensitization of Tumor Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Kim, Jihye; Rahman, Ghazi M.; Francis, Sajin K.; Raveendran, Reshma; Nair, Mangalam S.; Das, Joydip

    2011-01-01

    Although inflammatory pathways have been linked with various chronic diseases including cancer, identification of an agent that can suppress these pathways has therapeutic potential. Herein we describe the identification of a novel compound bharangin, a diterpenoid quinonemethide that can suppress pro-inflammatory pathways specifically. We found that bharangin suppresses nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation induced by pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor promoter, cigarette smoke, and endotoxin. Inhibition of NF-κB activation was mediated through the suppression of phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB (IκBα); inhibition of IκBα kinase activation; and suppression of p65 nuclear translocation, and phosphorylation. The diterpenoid inhibited binding of p65 to DNA. A reducing agent reversed the inhibitory effect, and mutation of the Cys38 of p65 to serine abrogated the effect of bharangin on p65-DNA binding. Molecular docking revealed strong interaction of the ligand with the p65 via two hydrogen bonds one with Lys37 (2.204 Å) and another with Cys38 (2.023 Å). The inhibitory effect of bharangin on NF-κB activation was specific, inasmuch as binding of activator protein-1 and octameric transcription factor 1 to DNA was not affected. Suppression of NF-κB activation by this diterpenoid caused the down-regulation of the expression of proteins involved in tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis, leading to potentiation of apoptosis, suppression of proliferation, and invasion of tumor cells. Furthermore, the genetic deletion of p65 and mutation of p65Cys38 residue to Ser abolished the affect of bharangin. Overall, our results demonstrate that bharangin specifically inhibits the NF-κB activation pathway by modifying p65 and inhibiting IκBα kinase activation and potentiates apoptosis in tumor cells. PMID:21795584

  15. Crystal Structures of Two Aminoglycoside Kinases Bound with a Eukaryotic Protein Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jiyoung; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is recognized as a growing healthcare problem. To address this issue, one strategy is to thwart the causal mechanism using an adjuvant in partner with the antibiotic. Aminoglycosides are a class of clinically important antibiotics used for the treatment of serious infections. Their usefulness has been compromised predominantly due to drug inactivation by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, such as aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases. These kinases are structurally homologous to eukaryotic Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases and it has been shown that some can be inhibited by select protein kinase inhibitors. The aminoglycoside kinase, APH(3′)-IIIa, can be inhibited by CKI-7, an ATP-competitive inhibitor for the casein kinase 1. We have determined that CKI-7 is also a moderate inhibitor for the atypical APH(9)-Ia. Here we present the crystal structures of CKI-7-bound APH(3′)-IIIa and APH(9)-Ia, the first structures of a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor in complex with bacterial kinases. CKI-7 binds to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the enzymes and its binding alters the conformation of the nucleotide-binding loop, the segment homologous to the glycine-rich loop in eurkaryotic protein kinases. Comparison of these structures with the CKI-7-bound casein kinase 1 reveals features in the binding pockets that are distinct in the bacterial kinases and could be exploited for the design of a bacterial kinase specific inhibitor. Our results provide evidence that an inhibitor for a subset of APHs can be developed in order to curtail resistance to aminoglycosides. PMID:21573013

  16. Shaping development of autophagy inhibitors with the structure of the lipid kinase Vps34.

    PubMed

    Miller, Simon; Tavshanjian, Brandon; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Perisic, Olga; Houseman, Benjamin T; Shokat, Kevan M; Williams, Roger L

    2010-03-26

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are lipid kinases with diverse roles in health and disease. The primordial PI3K, Vps34, is present in all eukaryotes and has essential roles in autophagy, membrane trafficking, and cell signaling. We solved the crystal structure of Vps34 at 2.9 angstrom resolution, which revealed a constricted adenine-binding pocket, suggesting the reason that specific inhibitors of this class of PI3K have proven elusive. Both the phosphoinositide-binding loop and the carboxyl-terminal helix of Vps34 mediate catalysis on membranes and suppress futile adenosine triphosphatase cycles. Vps34 appears to alternate between a closed cytosolic form and an open form on the membrane. Structures of Vps34 complexes with a series of inhibitors reveal the reason that an autophagy inhibitor preferentially inhibits Vps34 and underpin the development of new potent and specific Vps34 inhibitors.

  17. Second-generation inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingjing; Liu, Christina; Tsui, Stella T; Liu, Delong

    2016-09-02

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a critical effector molecule for B cell development and plays a major role in lymphoma genesis. Ibrutinib is the first-generation BTK inhibitor. Ibrutinib has off-target effects on EGFR, ITK, and Tec family kinases, which explains the untoward effects of ibrutinib. Resistance to ibrutinib was also reported. The C481S mutation in the BTK kinase domain was reported to be a major mechanism of resistance to ibrutinib. This review summarizes the clinical development of novel BTK inhibitors, ACP-196 (acalabrutinib), ONO/GS-4059, and BGB-3111.

  18. Identification of "Preferred" Human Kinase Inhibitors for Sleeping Sickness Lead Discovery. Are Some Kinases Better than Others for Inhibitor Repurposing?

    PubMed

    Amata, Emanuele; Xi, Hualin; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Gonzalez-Diaz, Rosario; Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Berlanga, Manuela; Manzano, Pilar; Erath, Jessey; Roncal, Norma E; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Rodriguez, Ana; Sciotti, Richard J; Navarro, Miguel; Pollastri, Michael P

    2016-03-11

    A kinase-targeting cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) against Trypanosoma brucei was recently reported, and this screening set included the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS). From the PKIS was identified 53 compounds with pEC50 ≥ 6. Utilizing the published data available for the PKIS, a statistical analysis of these active antiparasitic compounds was performed, allowing identification of a set of human kinases having inhibitors that show a high likelihood for blocking T. brucei cellular proliferation in vitro. This observation was confirmed by testing other established inhibitors of these human kinases and by mining past screening campaigns at GlaxoSmithKline. Overall, although the parasite targets of action are not known, inhibitors of this set of human kinases displayed an enhanced hit rate relative to a random kinase-targeting HTS campaign, suggesting that repurposing efforts should focus primarily on inhibitors of these specific human kinases. We therefore term this statistical analysis-driven approach "preferred lead repurposing".

  19. Novel and selective spiroindoline-based inhibitors of Sky kinase.

    PubMed

    Powell, Noel A; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Filipski, Kevin J; Kaufman, Michael; Sheehan, Derek; Edmunds, Jeremy E; Delaney, Amy; Wang, Yuli; Bourbonais, Francis; Lee, Doh-Yeel; Schwende, Frank; Sun, Fang; McConnell, Pat; Catana, Cornel; Chen, Huifen; Ohren, Jeff; Perrin, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of a novel series of spiroindoline-based inhibitors of Sky kinase that bind in the ATP-binding site and exhibit high levels of kinome selectivity through filling the Ala571-subpocket. These inhibitors exhibit moderate oral bioavailability in the rat due to low absorption across the gut wall. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comprehensive characterization of the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Fedele, Vita; Szklarz, Marta; Abdul Azeez, Kamal R; Salah, Eidarus; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Romanov, Sergei; Sepetov, Nikolai; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Al Haj Zen, Ayman; Fourches, Denis; Muratov, Eugene; Tropsha, Alex; Morris, Joel; Teicher, Beverly A; Kunkel, Mark; Polley, Eric; Lackey, Karen E; Atkinson, Francis L; Overington, John P; Bamborough, Paul; Müller, Susanne; Price, Daniel J; Willson, Timothy M; Drewry, David H; Knapp, Stefan; Zuercher, William J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of protein kinase inhibitors as approved therapeutics, drug discovery has focused on a small subset of kinase targets. Here we provide a thorough characterization of the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS), a set of 367 small-molecule ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that was recently made freely available with the aim of expanding research in this field and as an experiment in open-source target validation. We screen the set in activity assays with 224 recombinant kinases and 24 G protein-coupled receptors and in cellular assays of cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis. We identify chemical starting points for designing new chemical probes of orphan kinases and illustrate the utility of these leads by developing a selective inhibitor for the previously untargeted kinases LOK and SLK. Our cellular screens reveal compounds that modulate cancer cell growth and angiogenesis in vitro. These reagents and associated data illustrate an efficient way forward to increasing understanding of the historically untargeted kinome.

  1. Canine osteosarcoma cells exhibit resistance to aurora kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cannon, C M; Pozniak, J; Scott, M C; Ito, D; Gorden, B H; Graef, A J; Modiano, J F

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of Aurora kinase inhibitors AZD1152 and VX680 on canine osteosarcoma cells. Cytotoxicity was seen in all four cell lines; however, half-maximal inhibitory concentrations were significantly higher than in human leukaemia and canine lymphoma cells. AZD1152 reduced Aurora kinase B phosphorylation, indicating resistance was not because of failure of target recognition. Efflux mediated by ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters is one known mechanism of resistance against these drugs and verapamil enhanced AZD1152-induced apoptosis; however, these transporters were only expressed by a small percentage of cells in each line and the effects of verapamil were modest, suggesting other mechanisms contribute to resistance. Our results indicate that canine osteosarcoma cells are resistant to Aurora kinase inhibitors and suggest that these compounds are unlikely to be useful as single agents for this disease. Further investigation of these resistance mechanisms and the potential utility of Aurora kinase inhibitors in multi-agent protocols is warranted.

  2. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors - small molecular weight compounds inhibiting EGFR.

    PubMed

    Hegymegi-Barakonyi, Bálint; Eros, Dániel; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Breza, Nóra; Bánhegyi, Péter; Szabó, Gábor Viktor; Várkondi, Edit; Peták, István; Orfi, László; Kéri, György

    2009-06-01

    Abnormally elevated EGFR kinase activity can lead to various pathological states, including proliferative diseases such as cancer. The development of selective protein kinase inhibitors has become an important area of drug discovery for the potential treatment of a variety of solid tumors such as breast, ovarian and colorectal cancers, NSCLC, and carcinoma of the head and neck. There are three small molecule EGFR kinase inhibitor drugs in clinical use (gefitinib, erlotinib and lapatinib), and several others are currently undergoing clinical development. This review summarizes the development of EGFR kinase inhibitors, and includes descriptions of the binding modes, the importance of a multiple-targets strategy, the effects of sensitizing and resistance mutations in the EGFR, and molecular diagnostic approaches. In addition, the use of target fishing for selectivity profiling, off-target identification and quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling for the prediction of EGFR inhibition is discussed.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors closer to market launch?

    PubMed

    Galons, Hervé; Oumata, Nassima; Gloulou, Olfa; Meijer, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Interest in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors was stimulated by the demonstration that their pharmacological activities could lead to therapies for numerous diseases. Until now, despite the clinical introduction of a dozen compounds belonging to other classes of kinase inhibitors, no CDK inhibitor has reached the marketplace. This review covers CDK inhibitor patents published between 2009 and September 2012. It presents compounds currently undergoing clinical development, along with our earlier (2010) review of the same topic, as well as descriptions of recently published compounds not disclosed in the patent literature. It provides the reader with an update of all chemical structures of current interest in the CDK inhibitor field. Though cancer remains the most obvious application for CDK inhibition, other indications, such as HIV infection, could potentially be treated with CDK inhibitors.

  4. [Mechanisms of resistance to BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Diamond, Joana; da Silva, Maria Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of imatinib mesylate for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia, impressive clinical responses were observed in the majority of patients in chronic phase. However, not all patients experience an optimal response to imatinib mesylate or even to the more potent, second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Furthermore, responses are not sustained in a number of patients, and it is yet unclear whether the inhibitors can be safely discontinued in patients who achieve long-term remission. The emergence of resistance to second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors has become a significant problem that led to extensive studies on the causal mechanisms. This review will describe our current state of knowledge on why and how chronic myeloid leukaemia cells can develop resistance to second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  5. PKC/MEK inhibitors suppress oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and potentiate the antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Tani, Tadahumi; Shimaoka, Hirotaka; Suzuyama, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Fujita, Arisa; Ogawa, Naoki; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Funakami, Yoshinori; Ichida, Seiji; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-07-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug commonly used in colorectal cancer treatment. Despite high clinical efficacy, its therapeutic application is limited by common, dose-limiting occurrence of neuropathy. As usual symptomatic neuropathy treatments fail to improve the patients' condition, there is an urgent need to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of neuropathy to propose effective therapy and ensure adequate pain management. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy was recently reported to be associated with protein kinase C (PKC) activation. It is unclear, however, whether PKC inhibition can prevent neuropathy. In our current studies, we found that a PKC inhibitor, tamoxifen, inhibited oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy via the PKC/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Fos pathway in lumbar spinal cords (lumbar segments 4-6). Additionally, tamoxifen was shown to act in synergy with oxaliplatin to inhibit growth in tumor cells-implanted mice. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, PD0325901, suppressed oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and enhanced oxaliplatin efficacy. Our results indicate that oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy is associated with PKC/ERK/c-Fos pathway in lumbar spinal cord. Additionally, we demonstrate that disruption of this pathway by PKC and MEK inhibitors suppresses oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, thereby suggesting that PKC and MEK inhibitors may be therapeutically useful in preventing oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and could aid in combination antitumor pharmacotherapy. © 2014 UICC.

  6. Development of Heat Shock Protein (Hsp90) Inhibitors To Combat Resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors through Hsp90-Kinase Interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meining; Shen, Aijun; Zhang, Chi; Song, Zilan; Ai, Jing; Liu, Hongchun; Sun, Liping; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu; Zhang, Ao

    2016-06-23

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a ubiquitous chaperone of all of the oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Many Hsp90 inhibitors, alone or in combination, have shown significant antitumor efficacy against the kinase-positive naïve and mutant models. However, clinical trials of these inhibitors are unsuccessful due to insufficient clinical benefits and nonoptimal safety profiles. Recently, much progress has been reported on the Hsp90-cochaperone-client complex, which will undoubtedly assist in the understanding of the interactions between Hsp90 and its clients. Meanwhile, Hsp90 inhibitors have shown promise against patients' resistance caused by early generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), and at least 13 Hsp90 inhibitors are being reevaluated in the clinic. In this regard, the objectives of the current perspective are to summarize the structure and function of the Hsp90-cochaperone-client complex, to analyze the structural and functional insights into the Hsp90-client interactions to address several existing unresolved problems with Hsp90 inhibitors, and to highlight the preclinical and clinical studies of Hsp90 inhibitors as an effective treatment against resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  7. Computational analysis of ABL kinase mutations allows predicting drug sensitivity against selective kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kamasani, Swapna; Akula, Sravani; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha; Duyster, Justus; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Kancha, Rama Krishna

    2017-05-01

    The ABL kinase inhibitor imatinib has been used as front-line therapy for Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia. However, a significant proportion of imatinib-treated patients relapse due to occurrence of mutations in the ABL kinase domain. Although inhibitor sensitivity for a set of mutations was reported, the role of less frequent ABL kinase mutations in drug sensitivity/resistance is not known. Moreover, recent reports indicate distinct resistance profiles for second-generation ABL inhibitors. We thus employed a computational approach to predict drug sensitivity of 234 point mutations that were reported in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Initial validation analysis of our approach using a panel of previously studied frequent mutations indicated that the computational data generated in this study correlated well with the published experimental/clinical data. In addition, we present drug sensitivity profiles for remaining point mutations by computational docking analysis using imatinib as well as next generation ABL inhibitors nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, axitinib, and ponatinib. Our results indicate distinct drug sensitivity profiles for ABL mutants toward kinase inhibitors. In addition, drug sensitivity profiles of a set of compound mutations in ABL kinase were also presented in this study. Thus, our large scale computational study provides comprehensive sensitivity/resistance profiles of ABL mutations toward specific kinase inhibitors.

  8. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  9. Discovery and Characterization of Allosteric WNK Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ken; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Xie, Xiaoling; Reinhardt, Juergen; Xie, Amy Qiongshu; LaSala, Daniel; Kohls, Darcy; Yowe, David; Burdick, Debra; Yoshisue, Hajime; Wakai, Hiromichi; Schmidt, Isabel; Gunawan, Jason; Yasoshima, Kayo; Yue, Q Kimberley; Kato, Mitsunori; Mogi, Muneto; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Kreder, Natasha; Drueckes, Peter; Pandey, Pramod; Kawanami, Toshio; Huang, Waanjeng; Yagi, Yukiko I; Deng, Zhan; Park, Hyi-Man

    2016-12-16

    Protein kinases are known for their highly conserved adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding site, rendering the discovery of selective inhibitors a major challenge. In theory, allosteric inhibitors can achieve high selectivity by targeting less conserved regions of the kinases, often with an added benefit of retaining efficacy under high physiological ATP concentration. Although often overlooked in favor of ATP-site directed approaches, performing a screen at high ATP concentration or stringent hit triaging with high ATP concentration offers conceptually simple methods of identifying inhibitors that bind outside the ATP pocket. Here, we applied the latter approach to the With-No-Lysine (K) (WNK) kinases to discover lead molecules for a next-generation antihypertensive that requires a stringent safety profile. This strategy yielded several ATP noncompetitive WNK1-4 kinase inhibitors, the optimization of which enabled cocrystallization with WNK1, revealing an allosteric binding mode consistent with the observed exquisite specificity for WNK1-4 kinases. The optimized compound inhibited rubidium uptake by sodium chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) in HT29 cells, consistent with the reported physiology of WNK kinases in renal electrolyte handling.

  10. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  11. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  12. Application Of Kinase Inhibitors For Anti-Aging Intervention.

    PubMed

    Cano, Mercedes; Ayala, Antonio; Marotta, Francesco; Argüelles, Sandro

    2017-07-14

    Protein phosphorylation, mediated by protein kinases, has important physiological and pathological implications in our lives . Targeting kinase is one of the most interesting of the emerging topics in the pharmaceutical industry, especially since there is a focus on cancer therapy. Given that kinases may be involved in the aging process the focus will be on using the kinase inhibitor for anti-aging intervention to enhance healthspan and increase longevity. In this review , we will summarize: (i) the impact of the phosphoproteomic approach to elucidate molecular mechanisms of diseases; (ii) importance of the drug discovery approach for targeting kinases; (iii) the dysregulation of Janus kinase (JAK) / signal-transducing adapter molecules (STAT) and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6Ks) pathway in aging and the age-related process; (iv) the epidemiological studies available in order to see whether a correlation between JAK/STAT and S6Ks mRNA expression levels exist in cancer and in patient outcome; (v) finally, we will show selected inhibitors of these kinases approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Sorafenib suppresses JNK-dependent apoptosis through inhibition of ZAK kinase

    PubMed Central

    Vin, Harina; Ching, Grace; Ojeda, Sandra S.; Adelmann, Charles H.; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Dwyer, David W.; Ma, Haiching; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Baccarini, Manuela; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Curry, Jonathan L.; Ciurea, Ana M.; Duvic, Madeleine; Busaidy, Naifa L.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tsai, Kenneth Y.

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib is FDA-approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma and has been combined with numerous other targeted therapies and chemotherapies in the treatment of many cancers. Unfortunately, as with other RAF inhibitors, patients treated with sorafenib have a 5–10% rate of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma/keratoacanthomas. Paradoxical activation of ERK in BRAF-wild-type cells has been implicated in RAF-inhibitor-induced cSCC. Here we report that sorafenib suppresses UV-induced apoptosis specifically by inhibiting JNK activation through the off-target inhibition of ZAK kinase. Our results implicate suppression of JNK signaling, independent of the ERK pathway, as an additional mechanism of adverse effects of sorafenib. This has broad implications for combination therapies using sorafenib with other modalities that induce apoptosis. PMID:24170769

  14. Targeting the TGF-β receptor with kinase inhibitors for scleroderma therapy.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Xia, Zhi-Kuan; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2014-09-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a connective tissue disease that affects various organ systems; the treatment of scleroderma is still difficult and remains a challenge to the clinician. Recently, kinase inhibitors have shown great potential against fibrotic diseases and, specifically, the transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGF-βR) was found as a new and promising target for scleroderma therapy. In the current study, we propose that the large pool of existing kinase inhibitors could be exploited for inhibiting the TGF-βR to suppress scleroderma. In this respect, we developed a modeling protocol to systematically profile the inhibitory activities of 169 commercially available kinase inhibitors against the TGF-βR, from which five promising candidates were selected and tested using a standard kinase assay protocol. Consequently, two molecular entities, namely the PKB inhibitor MK-2206 and the mTOR C1/C2 inhibitor AZD8055, showed high potency when bound to the TGF-βR, with IC50 values of 97 and 86 nM, respectively, which are close to those of the recently developed TGF-βR selective inhibitors SB525334 and LY2157299 (IC50 = 14.3 and 56 nM, respectively). We also performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and post-molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area analyses to dissect the structural basis and energetic properties of intermolecular interactions between the TGF-βR kinase domain and these potent compounds, highlighting intensive nonbonded networks across the tightly packed interface of non-cognate TGF-βR-inhibitor complexes.

  15. Fragment-based design of kinase inhibitors: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jon A

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design has become an important strategy for drug design and development over the last decade. It has been used with particular success in the development of kinase inhibitors, which are one of the most widely explored classes of drug targets today. The application of fragment-based methods to discovering and optimizing kinase inhibitors can be a complicated and daunting task; however, a general process has emerged that has been highly fruitful. Here a practical outline of the fragment process used in kinase inhibitor design and development is laid out with specific examples. A guide to the overall process from initial discovery through fragment screening, including the difficulties in detection, to the computational methods available for use in optimization of the discovered fragments is reported.

  16. Pyrrolo[2,3-d]Pyrimidines as Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Francesca; Sanna, Monica; Grossi, Giancarlo; Brullo, Chiara; Fallacara, Anna Lucia; Schenone, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine nucleus is a deaza-isostere of adenine, the nitrogenous base of ATP, and is present in many ATP-competitive inhibitors of different kinases. In the last few years the number of articles and patents that have appeared involving this type of inhibitors has dramatically increased and some compounds have been approved for the treatment of inflammatory or myeloproliferative diseases. Other derivatives are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. This review deals with pyrrolo[2,3- d]pyrimidine derivatives active as kinase inhibitors that have been reported in the literature from 2011 to 2016, with a particular interest on the recently patented compounds. The molecules are classified depending on the inhibited kinase, focusing on their chemical structures. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is a target for selective kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K; Larson, Eric T; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Castaneda, Lisa J; DeRocher, Amy E; Inampudi, Krishna K; Kim, Jessica E; Arakaki, Tracy L; Murphy, Ryan C; Zhang, Li; Napuli, Alberto J; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe LMJ; Buckner, Frederick S; Parsons, Marilyn; Hol, Wim GJ; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2010-01-01

    New drugs are needed to treat toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinases (TgCDPKs) are attractive targets because they are absent in mammals. We show that TgCDPK1 is inhibited by low nanomolar levels of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs), compounds designed to be inactive against mammalian kinases. Cocrystal structures of TgCDPK1 with BKIs confirm that the structural basis for selectivity is due to the unique glycine gatekeeper residue in the ATP-binding site at residue 128. We show that BKIs interfere with an early step in T. gondii infection of human cells in culture. Furthermore, we show that TgCDPK1 is the in vivo target of BKIs because T. gondii cells expressing a glycine to methionine gatekeeper mutant enzyme show significantly decreased sensitivity to this class of selective kinase inhibitors. Thus, design of selective TgCDPK1 inhibitors with low host toxicity may be achievable. PMID:20436472

  18. Combination of PIM and JAK2 inhibitors synergistically suppresses cell proliferation and overcomes drug resistance of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Rita; Li, Zhifang; Sun, Fangxian; Barberis, Claude; Tabart, Michel; Patel, Vinod; Schio, Laurent; Hurley, Raelene; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Hong; Lengauer, Christoph; Pollard, Jack; Watters, James; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Adrian, Francisco; Zhang, JingXin

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of JAK2 kinase are emerging as an important treatment modality for myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). However, similar to other kinase inhibitors, resistance to JAK2 inhibitors may eventually emerge through a variety of mechanisms. Effective drug combination is one way to enhance therapeutic efficacy and combat resistance against JAK2 inhibitors. To identify potential combination partners for JAK2 compounds in MPN cell lines, we performed pooled shRNA screen targeting 5,000 genes in the presence or absence of JAK2 blockade. One of the top hits identified was MYC, an oncogenic transcription factor that is difficult to inhibit directly, but could be targeted by modulation of upstream regulatory elements such as kinases. We demonstrate herein that PIM kinase inhibitors efficiently suppress MYC protein levels in MPN cell lines. Overexpression of MYC restores the viability of PIM inhibitor-treated cells, revealing causal relationship between MYC down-regulation and cell growth inhibition by PIM compounds. Combination of various PIM inhibitors with a JAK2 inhibitor results in significant synergistic growth inhibition of multiple MPN cancer cell lines and induction of apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed strong downregulation of phosphorylated forms of S6 and 4EBP1 by JAK2/PIM inhibitor combination treatment. Finally, such combination was effective in eradicating in vitro JAK2 inhibitor-resistant MPN clones, where MYC is consistently up-regulated. These findings demonstrate that simultaneous suppression of JAK2 and PIM kinase activity by small molecule inhibitors is more effective than either agent alone in suppressing MPN cell growth. Our data suggest that JAK2 and PIM combination might warrant further investigation for the treatment of JAK2-driven hematologic malignancies. PMID:24830942

  19. Anexelekto /MER Tyrosine Kinase inhibitor ONO-7475 growth arrests and kills FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3-Internal Tandem Duplication Mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia cells by diverse mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ruvolo, Peter P; Ma, Huaxian; Ruvolo, Vivian R; Zhang, Xiaorui; Mu, Hong; Schober, Wendy; Hernandez, Ivonne; Gallardo, Miguel; Khoury, Joseph; Cortes, Jorge; Andreeff, Michael; Post, Sean M

    2017-09-14

    Nearly one-third of patients with acute myeloid leukemia have FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 mutations and thus have poor survival prospects. Receptor tyrosine kinase Anexelekto is critical for FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 signaling and participates in FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 inhibitor resistance mechanisms. Thus, strategies targeting Anexelekto could prove useful for acute myeloid leukemia therapy. ONO-7475 is an inhibitor with high specificity for Anexelekto and MER Tyrosine Kinase. Here we report that ONO-7475 potently arrested growth and induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia with internal tandem duplication mutation of FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3. MER Tyrosine Kinase-lacking MOLM13 cells were sensitive to ONO-7475 while MER Tyrosine Kinase -expressing OCI-AML3 cells were resistant, suggesting that the drug acts via Anexelekto in acute myeloid leukemia cells. Reverse phase protein analysis of ONO-7475 treated cells revealed that cell cycle regulators like Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1, Cyclin B1, Polo-like Kinase 1, and Retinoblastoma were suppressed. ONO-7475 suppressed Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1, Cyclin B1, Polo-like Kinase 1gene expression suggesting that Anexelekto may regulate the cell cycle at least in part via transcriptional mechanisms. Importantly, ONO-7475 was effective in a human FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 with Internal Tandem Duplication mutant murine xenograft model. Mice fed a diet containing ONO-7475 exhibited significantly longer survival and, interestingly, blocked leukemia cell infiltration in the liver. In summary, ONO-7475 effectively kills acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo by mechanisms that involve disruption of diverse survival and proliferation pathways. Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  20. Seeding collaborations to advance kinase science with the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS).

    PubMed

    Drewry, David H; Willson, Timothy M; Zuercher, William J

    2014-01-01

    To catalyze research on historically untargeted protein kinases, we created the PKIS, an annotated set of 367 small molecule kinase inhibitors. The set has been widely distributed to academic collaborators as an open access tool. It has been used to identify chemical starting points for development of chemical probes for orphan kinases and to investigate kinase signaling in high content phenotypic assays. Access to the set comes with few restrictions other than the requirement that assay results be released into the public domain for the benefit of the entire research community. Examples from the efforts of several collaborators are summarized.

  1. In silico investigation of new binding pocket for mitogen activated kinase kinase (MEK): Development of new promising inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yari, Hamed; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; Sadegh, Hamidreza

    2015-12-01

    It has been previously shown that the inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) contributes to apoptosis and suppression of different cancer cells. Correspondingly, a number of MEK1/2 inhibitors have been designed and evaluated since 2001. However, they did not satisfy essential pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties thus, almost most of them were terminated in pre-clinical or clinical studies. This study aims to design new specific MEK1/2 inhibitors with improved PK/PD profiles to be used as alternative cancer medications. In first part of this study, a comprehensive screening, for the first time, was done on well-known MEK1/2 inhibitors using a number of computational programs such as AutoDock Tools 4.2 (ADT) and AutoDock Vina. Therefore a valuable training dataset as well as a reliable pharmacophore model were provided which were then used to design new inhibitors. According to the results of training dataset, Trametinib was determined as the best inhibitor provided, so far. So, Trametinib was used as the lead structure to design new inhibitors in this study. In second part of this investigation, a set of new allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitors were designed significantly improving the binding energy as well as the ADMET properties, suggesting more specific and stable ligand-receptor complexes. Consequently, the structures 14 and 15 of our inhibitors, as the most potent structures, are great substituents for Trametinib to be used and evaluated in clinical trials as alternative cancer drugs.

  2. Guanidinium-based derivatives: searching for new kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Diez-Cecilia, Elena; Kelly, Brendan; Perez, Concepcion; Zisterer, Daniela M; Nevin, Daniel K; Lloyd, David G; Rozas, Isabel

    2014-06-23

    Considering the structural similarities between the kinase inhibitor sorafenib and 4,4'-bis-guanidinium derivatives previously prepared by Rozas and co., which display interesting cytotoxicity in cancer cells, we have studied whether this activity could result from kinase inhibition. Five new families have been prepared consisting of unsubstituted and aryl-substituted 3,4'-bis-guanidiniums, 3,4'-bis-2-aminoimidazolinium and 3-acetamide-4'-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethylphenyl)guanidinium derivatives. Cytotoxicity (measuring the IC50 values) and apoptosis studies in human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells were carried out for these compounds. Additionally, their potential inhibitory effect was explored on a panel of kinases known to be involved in apoptotic pathways. The previously prepared cytotoxic 4,4'-bis-guanidiniums did not inhibit any of these kinases; however, some of the novel 3,4'-substituted derivatives showed a high percentage inhibition of RAF-1/MEK-1, for which the potential mode of binding was evaluated by docking studies. The interesting antitumour properties showed by these compounds open up new exciting lines of investigation for kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents and also highlights the relevance of the guanidinium moiety for protein kinase inhibitors chemical design.

  3. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción; Gelbert, Lawrence M; Lallena, María José; de Dios, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Sustained proliferative capacity is a hallmark of cancer. In mammalian cells proliferation is controlled by the cell cycle, where cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate critical checkpoints. CDK4 and CDK6 are considered highly validated anticancer drug targets due to their essential role regulating cell cycle progression at the G1 restriction point. This review provides an overview of recent advances on cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors in general with special emphasis on CDK4 and CDK6 inhibitors and compounds under clinical evaluation. Chemical structures, structure activity relationships, and relevant preclinical properties will be described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional Effects of AKT3 on Aurora Kinase Inhibitor-induced Aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kohji; Hongama, Keita; Hariki, Shiori; Nonomiya, Yuma; Katayama, Kazuhiro; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-03

    The suppression of mitotic Aurora kinases (AURKs) by AURK inhibitors frequently causes cytokinetic failure, leading to polyploidy or aneuploidy, indicating the critical role of AURK-mediated phosphorylation during cytokinesis. We demonstrate the deregulated expression of AKT3 in Aurora kinase inhibitor (AURKi)-resistant cells, which we established from human colorectal cancer HCT 116 cells. The AKT family, which includes AKT1, -2, and -3, plays multiple roles in antiapoptotic functions and drug resistance and is involved in cell growth and survival pathways. We found that an AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, showed synergistic effect with an AURKi, VX-680, on two AKT3-expressing AURKi-resistant cell lines, and AKT3 knockdown sensitized cells to VX-680. Consistent with these activities, AKT3 expression suppressed AURKi-induced apoptosis and conferred resistance to AURKi. Thus, AKT3 expression affects cell sensitivity to AURKi. Moreover, we found that AKT3 expression suppressed AURKi-induced aneuploidy, and inversely AKT3 knockdown enhanced it. In addition, partial co-localization of AKT3 with AURKB was observed during anaphase. Overall, this study suggests that AKT3 could repress the antiproliferative effects of AURKi, with a novel activity particularly suppressing the aneuploidy induction.

  5. Irreversible Nek2 kinase inhibitors with cellular activity

    PubMed Central

    Henise, Jeffrey C.; Taunton, Jack

    2013-01-01

    A structure-based approach was used to design irreversible, cysteine-targeted inhibitors of the human centrosomal kinase, Nek2. Potent inhibition of Nek2 kinase activity in biochemical and cell-based assays required a noncatalytic cysteine residue (Cys22), located near the glycine-rich loop in a subset of human kinases. Elaboration of an oxindole scaffold led to our most selective compound, oxindole propynamide 16 (JH295). Propynamide 16 irreversibly inhibited cellular Nek2 without affecting the mitotic kinases, Cdk1, Aurora B, or Plk1. Moreover, 16 did not perturb bipolar spindle assembly or the spindle assembly checkpoint. To our knowledge, 16 is the first small molecule shown to inactivate Nek2 kinase activity in cells. PMID:21627121

  6. Polo-like kinase inhibitors in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Talati, Chetasi; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S

    2016-02-01

    Polo-like kinases (Plk) are key regulators of the cell cycle and multiple aspects of mitosis. Two agents that inhibit the Plk signaling pathway have shown promising activity in patients with hematologic malignancies and are currently in phase III trials. Volasertib is a Plk inhibitor under evaluation combined with low-dose cytarabine in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) ineligible for intensive induction therapy. Rigosertib, a dual inhibitor of the Plk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways, is under investigation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who have failed azacitidine or decitabine treatment. The prognosis for patients with AML, who are ineligible for intensive induction therapy, and for those with MDS refractory/relapsed after a hypomethylating agent, remains poor. Novel approaches, such as Plk inhibitors, are urgently needed for these patients. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of development of Plk inhibitors for the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  7. Re-purposing clinical kinase inhibitors to enhance chemosensitivity by overriding checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Beeharry, Neil; Banina, Eugenia; Hittle, James; Skobeleva, Natalia; Khazak, Vladimir; Deacon, Sean; Andrake, Mark; Egleston, Brian L; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Astsaturov, Igor; Yen, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase, Chk1, are highly effective as chemo- and radio-sensitizers in preclinical studies but are not well-tolerated by patients. We exploited the promiscuous nature of kinase inhibitors to screen 9 clinically relevant kinase inhibitors for their ability to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to a sub-lethal concentration of gemcitabine. Bosutinib, dovitinib, and BEZ-235 were identified as sensitizers that abrogated the DNA damage checkpoint. We further characterized bosutinib, an FDA-approved Src/Abl inhibitor approved for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Unbeknownst to us, we used an isomer (Bos-I) that was unknowingly synthesized and sold to the research community as “authentic” bosutinib. In vitro and cell-based assays showed that both the authentic bosutinib and Bos-I inhibited DNA damage checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Wee1, with Bos-I showing greater potency. Imaging data showed that Bos-I forced cells to override gemcitabine-induced DNA damage checkpoint arrest and destabilized stalled replication forks. These inhibitors enhanced sensitivity to the DNA damaging agents’ gemcitabine, cisplatin, and doxorubicin in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The in vivo efficacy of Bos-I was validated using cells derived directly from a pancreatic cancer patient’s tumor. Notably, the xenograft studies showed that the combination of gemcitabine and Bos-I was significantly more effective in suppressing tumor growth than either agent alone. Finally, we show that the gatekeeper residue in Wee1 dictates its sensitivity to the 2 compounds. Our strategy to screen clinically relevant kinase inhibitors for off-target effects on cell cycle checkpoints is a promising approach to re-purpose drugs as chemosensitizers. PMID:24955955

  8. Re-purposing clinical kinase inhibitors to enhance chemosensitivity by overriding checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Beeharry, Neil; Banina, Eugenia; Hittle, James; Skobeleva, Natalia; Khazak, Vladimir; Deacon, Sean; Andrake, Mark; Egleston, Brian L; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Astsaturov, Igor; Yen, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase, Chk1, are highly effective as chemo- and radio-sensitizers in preclinical studies but are not well-tolerated by patients. We exploited the promiscuous nature of kinase inhibitors to screen 9 clinically relevant kinase inhibitors for their ability to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to a sub-lethal concentration of gemcitabine. Bosutinib, dovitinib, and BEZ-235 were identified as sensitizers that abrogated the DNA damage checkpoint. We further characterized bosutinib, an FDA-approved Src/Abl inhibitor approved for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Unbeknownst to us, we used an isomer (Bos-I) that was unknowingly synthesized and sold to the research community as "authentic" bosutinib. In vitro and cell-based assays showed that both the authentic bosutinib and Bos-I inhibited DNA damage checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Wee1, with Bos-I showing greater potency. Imaging data showed that Bos-I forced cells to override gemcitabine-induced DNA damage checkpoint arrest and destabilized stalled replication forks. These inhibitors enhanced sensitivity to the DNA damaging agents' gemcitabine, cisplatin, and doxorubicin in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The in vivo efficacy of Bos-I was validated using cells derived directly from a pancreatic cancer patient's tumor. Notably, the xenograft studies showed that the combination of gemcitabine and Bos-I was significantly more effective in suppressing tumor growth than either agent alone. Finally, we show that the gatekeeper residue in Wee1 dictates its sensitivity to the 2 compounds. Our strategy to screen clinically relevant kinase inhibitors for off-target effects on cell cycle checkpoints is a promising approach to re-purpose drugs as chemosensitizers.

  9. Screening of kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF for regulating autophagy based on kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingmei; Xue, Dongbo; Wang, Xiaochun; Lu, Ming; Gao, Bo; Qiao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify agents that regulate autophagy. A total of 544 differentially expressed genes were screened from the intersection set of GSE2435 and GSE31040, which was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database and 19 differentially expressed kinases were selected according to a 'protein kinase database'. Gene ontology‑biological process (GO-BP) enrichment analysis revealed that the 19 kinases were mainly associated with phosphorylation. The protein-protein interaction network exhibited 30 differentially expressed genes that interacted with BRAF, and GO-BP enrichment analysis showed the function of these genes were mainly involved in cell death and apoptosis. The kinase-kinase inhibitor regulatory network identified16 kinase inhibitors that specifically inhibited BRAF. Previous studies indicated that sorafenib is capable of regulating autophagy and regorafenib has also been reported; however, there have been no studies regarding the regulation of autophagy by afatinib, selumetinib, PD318088, axitinib, TAK-733, GDC-0980, GSK2126458, PLX-4720, AS703026, trametinib, GDC-0941 and PF-04217903. Thus, these kinase inhibitors are potential targets for further study on the regulation of autophagy in the future.

  10. Quinazolines as cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sielecki, Thais M.; Johnson, Tricia L.; Liu, Jie; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Grafstrom, Robert H.; Cox, Sarah; Boylan, John; Burton, Catherine R.; Chen, Haiying; Smallwood, Angela; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Boisclair, Michael; Benfield, Pamela A.; Trainor, George L.; Seitza, Steven P.

    2010-03-08

    Quinazolines have been identified as inhibitors of CDK4/D1 and CDK2/E. Aspects of the SAR were investigated using solution-phase, parallel synthesis. An X-ray crystal structure was obtained of quinazoline 51 bound in CDK2 and key interactions within the ATP binding pocket are defined.

  11. Dual Aurora A and JAK2 kinase blockade effectively suppresses malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Gevariya, Harsukh; Patel, Ronil; Luo, Yunting; Rix, Uwe; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Sebti, Said M.

    2014-01-01

    Aurora A and JAK2 kinases are involved in cell division and tumor cell survival, respectively. Here we demonstrate that ectopic expression of Aurora A and JAK2 together is more effective than each alone at inducing non-transformed cells to grow in an anchorage-independent manner and to invade. Furthermore, siRNA silencing or pharmacological inhibition of Aurora A and JAK2 with Alisertib and Ruxolitinib, respectively, is more effective than blocking each kinase alone at suppressing anchorage-dependent and –independent growth and invasion as well as at inducing apoptosis. Importantly, we have developed dual Aurora and JAK inhibitors, AJI-214 and AJI-100, which potently inhibit Aurora A, Aurora B and JAK2 in vitro. In human cancer cells, these dual inhibitors block the auto-phosphorylation of Aurora A (Thr-288) and the phosphorylation of the Aurora B substrate histone H3 (Ser-10) and the JAK2 substrate STAT3 (Tyr-705). Furthermore, AJI-214 and AJI-100 inhibit anchorage dependent and independent cell growth and invasion and induce G2/M cell cycle accumulation and apoptosis. Finally, AJI-100 caused regression of human tumor xenografts in mice. Taken together, our genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that targeting Aurora A and JAK2 together is a more effective approach than each kinase alone at inhibiting malignant transformation and warrant further advanced pre clinical investigations of dual Aurora A/JAK2 inhibitors as potential anti tumor agents. PMID:24930769

  12. Versatile templates for the development of novel kinase inhibitors: Discovery of novel CDK inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Michael P.; Paruch, Kamil; Alvarez, Carmen; Doll, Ronald J.; Keertikar, Kerry; Duca, Jose; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Hruza, Alan; Madison, Vincent; Lees, Emma; Parry, David; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Sgambellone, Nicole; Shanahan, Frances; Wiswell, Derek; Guzi, Timothy J.

    2008-06-30

    A series of four bicyclic cores were prepared and evaluated as cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) inhibitors. From the in-vitro and cell-based analysis, the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core (represented by 9) emerged as the superior core for further elaboration in the identification of novel CDK2 inhibitors.

  13. Discovery of Type II Inhibitors of TGFβ-Activated Kinase 1 (TAK1) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 2 (MAP4K2)

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Li; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Gurbani, Deepak; ...

    2014-07-17

    Here, we developed a pharmacophore model for type II inhibitors that was used to guide the construction of a library of kinase inhibitors. Kinome-wide selectivity profiling of the library resulted in the identification of a series of 4-substituted 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines that exhibited potent inhibitory activity against two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), TAK1 (MAP3K7) and MAP4K2, as well as pharmacologically well interrogated kinases such as p38α (MAPK14) and ABL. Further investigation of the structure–activity relationship (SAR) resulted in the identification of potent dual TAK1 and MAP4K2 inhibitors such as 1 (NG25) and 2 as well as MAP4K2 selective inhibitors such as 16more » and 17. Some of these inhibitors possess good pharmacokinetic properties that will enable their use in pharmacological studies in vivo. Lastly, a 2.4 Å cocrystal structure of TAK1 in complex with 1 confirms that the activation loop of TAK1 assumes the DFG-out conformation characteristic of type II inhibitors.« less

  14. Repurposing of Human Kinase Inhibitors in Neglected Protozoan Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dichiara, Maria; Marrazzo, Agostino; Prezzavento, Orazio; Collina, Simona; Rescifina, Antonio; Amata, Emanuele

    2017-08-22

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis belong to a group of infectious diseases known as neglected tropical diseases and are induced by infection with protozoan parasites named trypanosomatids. Drugs in current use have several limitations, and therefore new candidate drugs are required. The majority of current therapeutic trypanosomatid targets are enzymes or cell-surface receptors. Among these, eukaryotic protein kinases are a major group of protein targets whose modulation may be beneficial for the treatment of neglected tropical protozoan diseases. This review summarizes the finding of new hit compounds for neglected tropical protozoan diseases, by repurposing known human kinase inhibitors on trypanosomatids. Kinase inhibitors are grouped by human kinase family and discussed according to the screening (target-based or phenotypic) reported for these compounds on trypanosomatids. This collection aims to provide insight into repurposed human kinase inhibitors and their importance in the development of new chemical entities with potential beneficial effects on the diseases caused by trypanosomatids. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The specificities of protein kinase inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Jenny; McLauchlan, Hilary; Elliott, Matthew; Cohen, Philip

    2003-01-01

    We have previously examined the specificities of 28 commercially available compounds, reported to be relatively selective inhibitors of particular serine/threonine-specific protein kinases [Davies, Reddy, Caivano and Cohen (2000) Biochem. J. 351, 95-105]. In the present study, we have extended this analysis to a further 14 compounds. Of these, indirubin-3'-monoxime, SP 600125, KT 5823 and ML-9 were found to inhibit a number of protein kinases and conclusions drawn from their use in cell-based assays are likely to be erroneous. Kenpaullone, Alsterpaullone, Purvalanol, Roscovitine, pyrazolopyrimidine 1 (PP1), PP2 and ML-7 were more specific, but still inhibited two or more protein kinases with similar potency. Our results suggest that the combined use of Roscovitine and Kenpaullone may be useful for identifying substrates and physiological roles of cyclin-dependent protein kinases, whereas the combined use of Kenpaullone and LiCl may be useful for identifying substrates and physiological roles of glycogen synthase kinase 3. The combined use of SU 6656 and either PP1 or PP2 may be useful for identifying substrates of Src family members. Epigallocatechin 3-gallate, one of the main polyphenolic constituents of tea, inhibited two of the 28 protein kinases in the panel, dual-specificity, tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A; IC(50)=0.33 microM) and p38-regulated/activated kinase (PRAK; IC(50)=1.0 microM). PMID:12534346

  16. Old Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Newcomers in Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Erika; Zoratto, Federica; Strudel, Martina; Papa, Anselmo; Rossi, Luigi; Minozzi, Marina; Caruso, Davide; Zaccarelli, Eleonora; Verrico, Monica; Tomao, Silverio

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer treatment is based more on molecular biology that has provided increasing knowledge about cancer pathogenesis on which targeted therapy is being developed. Precisely, targeted therapy is defined as a "type of treatment that uses drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to identify and attack specific cancer cells". Nowadays, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved many targeted therapies for gastrointestinal cancer treatment, as many are in various phases of development as well. In a previous review we discussed the main monoclonal antibodies used and studied in gastrointestinal cancer. In addition to monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent another class of targeted therapy and following the approval of imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been approved for gastrointestinal cancers treatment such as sunitinib, regoragenib, sorafenib and erlotinib. Moving forward, the purpose of this review is to focus on the efficacy data of main tyrosine kinase inhibitors commonly used in the personalized treatment of each gastrointestinal tumour and to provide a comprehensive overview about experimental targeted therapies ongoing in this setting.

  17. Prediction of kinase-inhibitor binding affinity using energetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Usha, Singaravelu; Selvaraj, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The combination of physicochemical properties and energetic parameters derived from protein-ligand complexes play a vital role in determining the biological activity of a molecule. In the present work, protein-ligand interaction energy along with logP values was used to predict the experimental log (IC50) values of 25 different kinase-inhibitors using multiple regressions which gave a correlation coefficient of 0.93. The regression equation obtained was tested on 93 kinase-inhibitor complexes and an average deviation of 0.92 from the experimental log IC50 values was shown. The same set of descriptors was used to predict binding affinities for a test set of five individual kinase families, with correlation values > 0.9. We show that the protein-ligand interaction energies and partition coefficient values form the major deterministic factors for binding affinity of the ligand for its receptor. PMID:28149052

  18. FDA-approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas E; Clausen, Mads H

    2015-07-01

    Kinases have emerged as one of the most intensively pursued targets in current pharmacological research, especially for cancer, due to their critical roles in cellular signaling. To date, the US FDA has approved 28 small-molecule kinase inhibitors, half of which were approved in the past 3 years. While the clinical data of these approved molecules are widely presented and structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been reported for individual molecules, an updated review that analyzes all approved molecules and summarizes current achievements and trends in the field has yet to be found. Here we present all approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors with an emphasis on binding mechanism and structural features, summarize current challenges, and discuss future directions in this field.

  19. Development of Irreversible Inhibitors of MELK Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    protein . However, in the presence of either non- hydrolysable ATP analog or our pilot inhibitor, significant stabilization of the protein’s tertiary...domain as measured by DCS, ruling out the protein aggregation and other non-specific inhibiotry modalities. These leads are now being developed into...compounds and physiological targets of MELK. Body We used a variation of a ligand-assisted protein structure optimization protocol. Briefly, ATP

  20. Clinical development of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is commonly deregulated in cancer. In recent years, the results of the first phase I clinical trials with PI3K inhibitors have become available. In comparison to other targeted agents such v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) inhibitors in melanoma or crizotinib in anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) translocated tumors, the number of objective responses to PI3K inhibitors is less dramatic. In this review we propose possible strategies to optimize the clinical development of PI3K inhibitors: by exploring the potential role of PI3K isoform-specific inhibitors in improving the therapeutic index, molecular characterization as a basis for patient selection, and the relevance of performing serial tumor biopsies to understand the associated mechanisms of drug resistance. The main focus of this review will be on PI3K isoform-specific inhibitors by describing the functions of different PI3K isoforms, the preclinical activity of selective PI3K isoform-specific inhibitors and the early clinical data of these compounds. PMID:23232172

  1. The novel combination of dual mTOR inhibitor AZD2014 and pan-PIM inhibitor AZD1208 inhibits growth in acute myeloid leukemia via HSF pathway suppression.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masako; Benito, Juliana; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Kaur, Surinder; Arslan, Dirim; Ramirez, Santiago; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Platanias, Leonidas; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Kojima, Kensuke; Tabe, Yoko; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-11-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is a critical pathway in the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Proviral integration site for moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) serine/threonine kinase signaling takes part in various pathways exerting tumorigenic properties. We hypothesized that the combination of a PIM kinase inhibitor with an mTOR inhibitor might have complementary growth-inhibitory effects against AML. The simultaneous inhibition of the PIM kinase by pan-PIM inhibitor AZD1208 and of mTOR by selective mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor AZD2014 exerted anticancer properties in AML cell lines and in cells derived from primary AML samples with or without supportive stromal cell co-culture, leading to suppressed proliferation and increased apoptosis. The combination of AZD1208 and AZD2014 rapidly activated AMPKα, a negative regulator of translation machinery through mTORC1/2 signaling in AML cells; profoundly inhibited AKT and 4EBP1 activation; and suppressed polysome formation. Inhibition of both mTOR and PIM counteracted induction of heat-shock family proteins, uncovering the master negative regulation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the dominant transcription factor controlling cellular stress responses. The novel combination of the dual mTOR inhibitor and pan-PIM inhibitor synergistically inhibited AML growth by effectively reducing protein synthesis through heat shock factor pathway suppression.

  2. Luteolin Suppresses Cancer Cell Proliferation by Targeting Vaccinia-Related Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joon; Harikishore, Amaravadhi; Lim, Jong-Kwan; Jung, Youngseob; Lyu, Ha-Na; Baek, Nam-In; Choi, Kwan Yong; Yoon, Ho Sup; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled proliferation, a major feature of cancer cells, is often triggered by the malfunction of cell cycle regulators such as protein kinases. Recently, cell cycle-related protein kinases have become attractive targets for anti-cancer therapy, because they play fundamental roles in cellular proliferation. However, the protein kinase-targeted drugs that have been developed so far do not show impressive clinical results and also display severe side effects; therefore, there is undoubtedly a need to investigate new drugs targeting other protein kinases that are critical in cell cycle progression. Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) is a mitotic kinase that functions in cell cycle regulation by phosphorylating cell cycle-related substrates such as barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), histone H3, and the cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB). In our study, we identified luteolin as the inhibitor of VRK1 by screening a small-molecule natural compound library. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of luteolin as a VRK1-targeted inhibitor for developing an effective anti-cancer strategy. We confirmed that luteolin significantly reduces VRK1-mediated phosphorylation of the cell cycle-related substrates BAF and histone H3, and directly interacts with the catalytic domain of VRK1. In addition, luteolin regulates cell cycle progression by modulating VRK1 activity, leading to the suppression of cancer cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis. Therefore, our study suggests that luteolin-induced VRK1 inhibition may contribute to establish a novel cell cycle-targeted strategy for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25310002

  3. Selective Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitors as Potential Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Sara; Simithy, Johayra; Goodwin, Douglas C; Calderón, Angela I

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the persistence of tuberculosis (TB) as well as the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) forms of the disease, the development of new antitubercular drugs is crucial. Developing inhibitors of shikimate kinase (SK) in the shikimate pathway will provide a selective target for antitubercular agents. Many studies have used in silico technology to identify compounds that are anticipated to interact with and inhibit SK. To a much more limited extent, SK inhibition has been evaluated by in vitro methods with purified enzyme. Currently, there are no data on in vivo activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (MtSK) inhibitors available in the literature. In this review, we present a summary of the progress of SK inhibitor discovery and evaluation with particular attention toward development of new antitubercular agents. PMID:25861218

  4. Prolonged and tunable residence time using reversible covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J. Michael; McFarland, Jesse M.; Paavilainen, Ville O.; Bisconte, Angelina; Tam, Danny; Phan, Vernon T.; Romanov, Sergei; Finkle, David; Shu, Jin; Patel, Vaishali; Ton, Tony; Li, Xiaoyan; Loughhead, David G.; Nunn, Philip A.; Karr, Dane E.; Gerritsen, Mary E.; Funk, Jens Oliver; Owens, Timothy D.; Verner, Erik; Brameld, Ken A.; Hill, Ronald J.; Goldstein, David M.; Taunton, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Drugs with prolonged, on-target residence time often show superior efficacy, yet general strategies for optimizing drug-target residence time are lacking. Here, we demonstrate progress toward this elusive goal by targeting a noncatalytic cysteine in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with reversible covalent inhibitors. Utilizing an inverted orientation of the cysteine-reactive cyanoacrylamide electrophile, we identified potent and selective BTK inhibitors that demonstrate biochemical residence times spanning from minutes to 7 days. An inverted cyanoacrylamide with prolonged residence time in vivo remained bound to BTK more than 18 hours after clearance from the circulation. The inverted cyanoacrylamide strategy was further utilized to discover fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) kinase inhibitors with residence times of several days, demonstrating generalizability of the approach. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with inverted cyanoacrylamides may serve as a broadly applicable platform that facilitates “residence time by design”, the ability to modulate and improve the duration of target engagement in vivo. PMID:26006010

  5. Prolonged and tunable residence time using reversible covalent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, J Michael; McFarland, Jesse M; Paavilainen, Ville O; Bisconte, Angelina; Tam, Danny; Phan, Vernon T; Romanov, Sergei; Finkle, David; Shu, Jin; Patel, Vaishali; Ton, Tony; Li, Xiaoyan; Loughhead, David G; Nunn, Philip A; Karr, Dane E; Gerritsen, Mary E; Funk, Jens Oliver; Owens, Timothy D; Verner, Erik; Brameld, Ken A; Hill, Ronald J; Goldstein, David M; Taunton, Jack

    2015-07-01

    Drugs with prolonged on-target residence times often show superior efficacy, yet general strategies for optimizing drug-target residence time are lacking. Here we made progress toward this elusive goal by targeting a noncatalytic cysteine in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with reversible covalent inhibitors. Using an inverted orientation of the cysteine-reactive cyanoacrylamide electrophile, we identified potent and selective BTK inhibitors that demonstrated biochemical residence times spanning from minutes to 7 d. An inverted cyanoacrylamide with prolonged residence time in vivo remained bound to BTK for more than 18 h after clearance from the circulation. The inverted cyanoacrylamide strategy was further used to discover fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) kinase inhibitors with residence times of several days, demonstrating the generalizability of the approach. Targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with inverted cyanoacrylamides may serve as a broadly applicable platform that facilitates 'residence time by design', the ability to modulate and improve the duration of target engagement in vivo.

  6. Resistance to HER2-directed antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Joan T

    2011-01-01

    The antibody trastuzumab and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib are approved by the FDA for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. These anti-HER2 drugs are changing the natural history of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. However, therapeutic resistance to trastuzumab or lapatinib, as either single-agents or in combination with chemotherapy in the metastatic setting, typically occurs within months of starting therapy. Several mechanisms of trastuzumab-resistance have been reported that include signaling from other HER receptors, signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) outside of the HER (ErbB) family, increased phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling, and the presence of truncated forms of HER2. Mechanisms of resistance to lapatinib also point to increased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling as well as derepression/activation of compensatory survival pathways. In this review, we discuss how these models and mechanisms enhance our understanding of the clinical resistance to HER2-directed therapies. PMID:21307659

  7. Clinical experience with aurora kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Boss, David S; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2009-08-01

    The aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members, designated auroras A, B, and C. Auroras A and B are essential components of the mitotic pathway, ensuring proper chromosome assembly, formation of the mitotic spindle, and cytokinesis. The role of aurora C is less clear. Overexpression of aurora A and B has been observed in several tumor types, and has been linked with a poor prognosis of cancer patients. Several small molecules targeting aurora kinases A and B or both have been evaluated preclinically and in early phase I trials. In this review we aim to summarize the most recent advances in the development of aurora kinase inhibitors, with a focus on the clinical data.

  8. Inhibitors of glycogen synthase 3 kinase

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter; Ring, David B.; Harrison, Stephen D.; Bray, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    Compounds of formula 1: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, heteroaryl, or heteroaralkyl, substituted with 0-3 substituents selected from lower alkyl, halo, hydroxy, lower alkoxy, amino, lower alkyl-amino, and nitro; R.sub.2 is hydroxy, amino, or lower alkoxy; R.sub.3 is H, lower alkyl, lower acyl, lower alkoxy-acyl, or amnino-acyl; R.sub.4 is H or lower alkyl; and pharmaceutically acceptable salts and esters thereof; are effective inhibitors of GSK3.

  9. Inhibitors of glycogen synthase 3 kinase

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter; Ring, David B.; Harrison, Stephen D.; Bray, Andrew M.

    2006-05-30

    Compounds of formula 1: ##STR00001## wherein R.sub.1 is alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, heteroaryl, or heteroaralkyl, substituted with 0 3 substituents selected from lower alkyl, halo, hydroxy, lower alkoxy, amino, lower alkyl-amino, and nitro; R.sub.2 is hydroxy, amino, or lower alkoxy; R.sub.3 is H, lower alkyl, lower acyl, lower alkoxy-acyl, or amino-acyl; R.sub.4 is H or lower alkyl; and pharmaceutically acceptable salts and esters thereof; are effective inhibitors of GSK3.

  10. Bosutinib: a novel second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Isfort, Susanne; Keller-v Amsberg, Gunhild; Schafhausen, Philippe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Brümmendorf, Tim H

    2014-01-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is a 4-anilino-3-quinoline carbonitrile, which acts as a dual inhibitor of Src and ABL kinases. In addition, the BCR-ABL fusion gene product, a constitutively activated tyrosine kinase which is crucial for the development of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is highly sensitive to bosutinib. Interestingly, distinctly lower concentrations of bosutinib are required to ablate BCR-ABL phosphorylation when compared to the first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (IM). Bosutinib is a potent inhibitor of CML cell proliferation in vitro and has demonstrated promising activity in CML patients resistant or intolerant to IM as well as in newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase CML (CML-CP). Remarkably, bosutinib has been found to be capable of overcoming the majority of IM-resistant BCR-ABL mutations. Bosutinib has the potency to induce deep and fast responses in second- and third-/fourth-line treatment, and as a consequence, the drug has recently been licensed for patients previously treated with one or more tyrosine kinase inhibitor(s) and for whom imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. Due to its potency and differing toxicity profile, it promises to be a good therapeutic option for a defined cohort of patients. The most common side effects are gastrointestinal with most of the patients suffering from nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. For the most part, these gastrointestinal symptoms occur early after treatment initiation, are manageable, and often self-limiting. Continuous monitoring of liver enzymes upon treatment initiation is necessary during bosutinib treatment. In addition to CML treatment, bosutinib has shown some efficacy in selected patients suffering from advanced-stage solid tumors. In conclusion, bosutinib is a promising novel small molecule inhibitor approved now for targeted therapy of CML and in clinical development for other malignancies.

  11. Inhibitors of nucleotidyltransferase superfamily enzymes suppress herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tavis, John E; Wang, Hong; Tollefson, Ann E; Ying, Baoling; Korom, Maria; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Davis, Katie L; Wold, William S M; Morrison, Lynda A

    2014-12-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five compounds in two chemical families inhibited HSV replication in Vero and human foreskin fibroblast cells as well as the approved drug acyclovir did. The compounds had 50% effective concentration values as low as 0.22 μM with negligible cytotoxicity in the assays employed. The inhibitors suppressed accumulation of viral genomes and infectious particles and blocked events in the viral replication cycle before and during viral DNA replication. Acyclovir-resistant mutants of HSV-1 and HSV-2 remained highly sensitive to the NTS inhibitors. Five of six NTS inhibitors of the HSVs also blocked replication of another herpesvirus pathogen, human cytomegalovirus. Therefore, NTS enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpesvirus treatments that may have broad efficacy against members of the herpesvirus family.

  12. Type-II Kinase Inhibitor Docking, Screening, and Profiling Using Modified Structures of Active Kinase States

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Type-II kinase inhibitors represent a class of chemicals that trap their target kinases in an inactive, so-called DFG-out, state, occupying a hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the ATP binding site. These compounds are often more specific than those targeting active, DFG-in, kinase conformations. Unfortunately, the discovery of novel type-II scaffolds presents a considerable challenge, partly because the lack of compatible kinase structures makes structure-based methods inapplicable. We present a computational protocol for converting multiple available DFG-in structures of various kinases (∼70% of mammalian structural kinome) into accurate and specific models of their type-II-bound state. The models, described as Deletion-Of-Loop asp-PHe-gly-IN (DOLPHIN) kinase models, demonstrate exceptional performance in various inhibitor discovery applications, including compound pose prediction, screening, and in silico activity profiling. Given the abundance of the DFG-in structures, the presented approach opens possibilities for kinome-wide discovery of specific molecules targeting inactive kinase states. PMID:19053777

  13. Kinase inhibitor data modeling and de novo inhibitor design with fragment approaches.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Michal; Erickson, Jon; Wang, Jibo; Webster, Yue; Mader, Mary; Higgs, Richard; Watson, Ian

    2009-10-22

    A reconstructive approach based on computational fragmentation of existing inhibitors and validated kinase potency models to recombine and create "de novo" kinase inhibitor small molecule libraries is described. The screening results from model selected molecules from the corporate database and seven computationally derived small molecule libraries were used to evaluate this approach. Specifically, 1895 model selected database molecules were screened at 20 microM in six kinase assays and yielded an overall hit rate of 84%. These models were then used in the de novo design of seven chemical libraries consisting of 20-50 compounds each. Then 179 compounds from synthesized libraries were tested against these six kinases with an overall hit rate of 92%. Comparing predicted and observed selectivity profiles serves to highlight the strengths and limitations of the methodology, while analysis of functional group contributions from the libraries suggest general principles governing binding of ATP competitive compounds.

  14. Structure-guided discovery of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fischmann, Thierry O.; Hruza, Alan; Duca, Jose S.; Ramanathan, Lata; Mayhood, Todd; Windsor, William T.; Le, Hung V.; Guzi, Timothy J.; Dwyer, Michael P.; Paruch, Kamil; Doll, Ronald J.; Lees, Emma; Parry, David; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Madison, Vincent

    2008-10-02

    CDK2 inhibitors containing the related bicyclic heterocycles pyrazolopyrimidines and imidazopyrazines were discovered through high-throughput screening. Crystal structures of inhibitors with these bicyclic cores and two more related ones show that all but one have a common binding mode featuring two hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) to the backbone of the kinase hinge region. Even though ab initio computations indicated that the imidazopyrazine core would bind more tightly to the hinge, pyrazolopyrimidines gain an advantage in potency through participation of N4 in an H-bond network involving two catalytic residues and bridging water molecules. Further insight into inhibitor/CDK2 interactions was gained from analysis of additional crystal structures. Significant gains in potency were obtained by optimizing the fit of hydrophobic substituents to the gatekeeper region of the ATP binding site. The most potent inhibitors have good selectivity.

  15. BRAF inhibitors suppress apoptosis through off-target inhibition of JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vin, Harina; Ojeda, Sandra S; Ching, Grace; Leung, Marco L; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Dwyer, David W; Adelmann, Charles H; Restrepo, Monica; Richards, Kristen N; Stewart, Larissa R; Du, Lili; Ferguson, Scarlett B; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Baccarini, Manuela; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Curry, Jonathan L; Kim, Kevin B; Ciurea, Ana M; Duvic, Madeleine; Prieto, Victor G; Ullrich, Stephen E; Dalby, Kevin N; Flores, Elsa R; Tsai, Kenneth Y

    2013-01-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib selectively inhibit the v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) kinase, resulting in high response rates and increased survival in melanoma. Approximately 22% of individuals treated with vemurafenib develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) during therapy. The prevailing explanation for this is drug-induced paradoxical ERK activation, resulting in hyperproliferation. Here we show an unexpected and novel effect of vemurafenib/PLX4720 in suppressing apoptosis through the inhibition of multiple off-target kinases upstream of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), principally ZAK. JNK signaling is suppressed in multiple contexts, including in cSCC of vemurafenib-treated patients, as well as in mice. Expression of a mutant ZAK that cannot be inhibited reverses the suppression of JNK activation and apoptosis. Our results implicate suppression of JNK-dependent apoptosis as a significant, independent mechanism that cooperates with paradoxical ERK activation to induce cSCC, suggesting broad implications for understanding toxicities associated with BRAF inhibitors and for their use in combination therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00969.001 PMID:24192036

  16. LRRK2 kinase activity mediates toxic interactions between genetic mutation and oxidative stress in a Drosophila model: suppression by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dejun; Li, Tianxia; Liu, Zhaohui; Arbez, Nicolas; Yan, Jianqun; Moran, Timothy H; Ross, Christopher A; Smith, Wanli W

    2012-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. The pathogenesis of PD is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) cause genetic forms of PD, and the LRRK2 locus contributes to sporadic PD. Environmental toxins are believed to act in part by causing oxidative stress. Here we employed cell and Drosophila models to investigate the interaction between LRRK2 genetic mutations and oxidative stress. We found that H(2)O(2) increased LRRK2 kinase activity and enhanced LRRK2 cell toxicity in cultured cells and mouse primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, a sub-toxic dose of H(2)O(2) significantly shortened the survival of LRRK2 transgenic flies and augmented LRRK2-induced locomotor defects and dopamine neuron loss. Treatment with a LRRK2 kinase inhibitor (GW5074) or an anti-oxidant (curcumin) significantly suppressed these PD-like phenotypes in flies. Moreover, curcumin significantly reduced LRRK2 kinase activity and the levels of oxidized proteins, and thus acted as not only an antioxidant but also a LRRK2 kinase inhibitor. These results indicate that LRRK2 genetic alterations can interact with oxidative stress, converging on a pathogenic pathway that may be related to PD. These studies also identified curcumin as a LRRK2 kinase inhibitor that may be a useful candidate for LRRK2-linked PD intervention.

  17. Genistein suppresses smooth muscle cell-derived foam cell formation through tyrosine kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinghan; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Tingting; Sun, Lina; Yang, Meimei; Liu, Tingjiao; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Liming

    2015-08-07

    Genistein, as a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to possess anti-atherosclerotic effects. Since the smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells are key components of atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of genistein on foam cell transformation from vascular smooth muscle cells and possible mechanisms contributing to these effects. Vascular smooth muscle cells exposed to ox-LDL developed into foam cell, as demonstrated by Oil Red O staining and cholesterol content analysis. Ox-LDL induced phenotype transformation of smooth muscle cells, decreased expression of α-actin and increased expression of CD68 (a specific marker for monocytes, can also function as a subtype of scavenger receptors). The expression of scavenger receptors CD36 and LOX-1 was measured, and their role in foam cell formation in the presence of genistein, daidzein (a structurally similar analogue of genistein) and herbimycin A (a commonly tyrosine kinase inhibitor). The results showed that foam cell formation was markedly reduced by genistein and herbimycin A, as well as the expression of CD68, CD36 and LOX-1. However, daidzein had no such effect. In addition, genistein-induced down-regulation of CD68, CD36 and LOX-1 could be reversed by sodium orthovanadate (a membrane-permeable protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor). The results showed that ox-LDL induce smooth muscle cell-derived foam cell formation and transform the phenotype of smooth muscle cell. While tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein could suppress smooth muscle cell-derived foam cell formation through inhibiting the protein expressions of CD68, CD36 and LOX-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Practical synthesis of a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Achmatowicz, Michał; Thiel, Oliver R; Wheeler, Philip; Bernard, Charles; Huang, Jinkun; Larsen, Robert D; Faul, Margaret M

    2009-01-16

    p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have attracted considerable interest as potential agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Herein, we describe a concise and efficient synthesis of inhibitor 1 that is based on a phthalazine scaffold. Highlights of our approach include a practical synthesis of a 1,6-disubstituted phthalazine building block 24 as well as the one-pot formation of boronic acid 27. Significant synthetic work to understand the reactivity principles of the intermediates helped in selection of the final synthetic route. Subsequent optimization of the individual steps of the final sequence led to a practical synthesis of 1.

  19. SAR156497, an exquisitely selective inhibitor of aurora kinases.

    PubMed

    Carry, Jean-Christophe; Clerc, François; Minoux, Hervé; Schio, Laurent; Mauger, Jacques; Nair, Anil; Parmantier, Eric; Le Moigne, Ronan; Delorme, Cécile; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; Krick, Alain; Abécassis, Pierre-Yves; Crocq-Stuerga, Véronique; Pouzieux, Stéphanie; Delarbre, Laure; Maignan, Sébastien; Bertrand, Thomas; Bjergarde, Kirsten; Ma, Nina; Lachaud, Sylvette; Guizani, Houlfa; Lebel, Rémi; Doerflinger, Gilles; Monget, Sylvie; Perron, Sébastien; Gasse, Francis; Angouillant-Boniface, Odile; Filoche-Rommé, Bruno; Murer, Michel; Gontier, Sylvie; Prévost, Céline; Monteiro, Marie-Line; Combeau, Cécile

    2015-01-08

    The Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases is essential for mitosis. Their crucial role in cell cycle regulation and aberrant expression in a broad range of malignancies have been demonstrated and have prompted intensive search for small molecule Aurora inhibitors. Indeed, over 10 of them have reached the clinic as potential anticancer therapies. We report herein the discovery and optimization of a novel series of tricyclic molecules that has led to SAR156497, an exquisitely selective Aurora A, B, and C inhibitor with in vitro and in vivo efficacy. We also provide insights into its mode of binding to its target proteins, which could explain its selectivity.

  20. Activity of dual SRC-ABL inhibitors highlights the role of BCR/ABL kinase dynamics in drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammad; Nardi, Valentina; Shakespeare, William C.; Metcalf, Chester A.; Bohacek, Regine S.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Sliz, Piotr; Veach, Darren R.; Bornmann, William G.; Clarkson, Bayard; Dalgarno, David C.; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Daley, George Q.

    2006-01-01

    Mutation in the ABL kinase domain is the principal mechanism of imatinib resistance in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Many mutations favor active kinase conformations that preclude imatinib binding. Because the active forms of ABL and SRC resemble one another, we tested two dual SRC-ABL kinase inhibitors, AP23464 and PD166326, against 58 imatinib-resistant (IMR) BCR/ABL kinase variants. Both compounds potently inhibit most IMR variants, and in vitro drug selection demonstrates that active (AP23464) and open (PD166326) conformation-specific compounds are less susceptible to resistance than imatinib. Combinations of inhibitors suppressed essentially all resistance mutations, with the notable exception of T315I. Guided by mutagenesis studies and molecular modeling, we designed a series of AP23464 analogues to target T315I. The analogue AP23846 inhibited both native and T315I variants of BCR/ABL with submicromolar potency but showed nonspecific cellular toxicity. Our data illustrate how conformational dynamics of the ABL kinase accounts for the activity of dual SRC-ABL inhibitors against IMR-mutants and provides a rationale for combining conformation specific inhibitors to suppress resistance. PMID:16754879

  1. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  2. Effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora kinases on anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Enke; Tuccilli, Chiara; Prinzi, Natalie; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Antonelli, Alessandro; Gnessi, Lucio; Morrone, Stefania; Moretti, Costanzo; Bononi, Marco; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; D'Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2014-10-01

    Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that play an essential role in cell division. Their aberrant expression and/or function induce severe mitotic abnormalities, resulting in either cell death or aneuploidy. Overexpression of Aurora kinases is often found in several malignancies, among which is anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC). We have previously demonstrated the in vitro efficacy of Aurora kinase inhibitors in restraining cell growth and survival of different ATC cell lines. In this study, we sought to establish which Aurora might represent the preferential drug target for ATC. To this end, the effects of two selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) on four human ATC cell lines (CAL-62, BHT-101, 8305C, and 8505C) were analysed. Both inhibitors reduced cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC50 ranges of 44.3-134.2 nM for MLN8237 and of 9.2-461.3 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments and time-lapse videomicroscopy yielded evidence that each inhibitor induced distinct mitotic phenotypes, but both of them prevented the completion of cytokinesis. As a result, poliploidy increased in all AZD1152-treated cells, and in two out of four cell lines treated with MLN8237. Apoptosis was induced in all the cells by MLN8237, and in BHT-101, 8305C, and 8505C by AZD1152, while CAL-62 exposed to AZD1152 died through necrosis after multiple rounds of endoreplication. Both inhibitors were capable of blocking anchorage-independent cell growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated that either Aurora-A or Aurora-B might represent therapeutic targets for the ATC treatment, but inhibition of Aurora-A appears more effective for suppressing ATC cell proliferation and for inducing the apoptotic pathway.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are lipid kinases that regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation, adhesion, survival, and motility. Dysregulated PI3K pathway signaling occurs in one-third of human tumors. Aberrantly activated PI3K signaling also confers sensitivity and resistance to conventional therapies. PI3K has been recognized as an attractive molecular target for novel anti-cancer molecules. In the last few years, several classes of potent and selective small molecule PI3K inhibitors have been developed, and at least fifteen compounds have progressed into clinical trials as new anticancer drugs. Among these, idelalisib has advanced to phase III trials in patients with advanced indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma. In this review, we summarized the major molecules of PI3K signaling pathway, and discussed the preclinical models and clinical trials of potent small-molecule PI3K inhibitors. PMID:24261963

  4. Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Sheetal Mehta; Nimeiri, Halla S; Benson, Al B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options.

  5. Endocrine side effects of broad-acting kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-09-01

    Targeted therapy in oncology consists of drugs that specifically interfere with abnormal signaling pathways that are dysregulated in cancer cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) take advantage of unique oncogenes that are activated in certain types of cancer, and also target common mechanisms of growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. However, many kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy are somewhat nonselective, and most have additional mechanisms of action at the cellular level, which are not completely understood. The use of these agents has increased our knowledge of important side effects, of which the practicing clinician must be aware. Recently, proposed endocrine-related side effects of these agents include alterations in thyroid function, bone metabolism, linear growth, gonadal function, fetal development, and glucose metabolism, and adrenal function. This review summarizes the most recent data on the endocrine side effects of TKIs.

  6. Inactivation of ABL kinases suppresses non–small cell lung cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jing Jin; Rouse, Clay; Wang, Jun; Onaitis, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies to treat non–small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) have proven ineffective owing to transient, variable, and incomplete responses. Here we show that ABL kinases, ABL1 and ABL2, promote metastasis of lung cancer cells harboring EGFR or KRAS mutations. Inactivation of ABL kinases suppresses NSCLC metastasis to brain and bone, and other organs. ABL kinases are required for expression of prometastasis genes. Notably, ABL1 and ABL2 depletion impairs extravasation of lung adenocarcinoma cells into the lung parenchyma. We found that ABL-mediated activation of the TAZ and β-catenin transcriptional coactivators is required for NSCLC metastasis. ABL kinases activate TAZ and β-catenin by decreasing their interaction with the β-TrCP ubiquitin ligase, leading to increased protein stability. High-level expression of ABL1, ABL2, and a subset of ABL-dependent TAZ- and β-catenin–target genes correlates with shortened survival of lung adenocarcinoma patients. Thus, ABL-specific allosteric inhibitors might be effective to treat metastatic lung cancer with an activated ABL pathway signature. PMID:28018973

  7. Testing the promiscuity of commercial kinase inhibitors against the AGC kinase group using a split-luciferase screen.

    PubMed

    Jester, Benjamin W; Gaj, Alicia; Shomin, Carolyn D; Cox, Kurt J; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2012-02-23

    Using a newly developed competitive binding assay dependent upon the reassembly of a split reporter protein, we have tested the promiscuity of a panel of reported kinase inhibitors against the AGC group. Many non-AGC targeted kinase inhibitors target multiple members of the AGC group. In general, structurally similar inhibitors consistently exhibited activity toward the same target as well as toward closely related kinases. The inhibition data was analyzed to test the predictive value of either using identity scores derived from residues within 6 Å of the active site or identity scores derived from the entire kinase domain. The results suggest that the active site identity in certain cases may be a stronger predictor of inhibitor promiscuity. The overall results provide general guidelines for establishing inhibitor selectivity as well as for the future design of inhibitors that either target or avoid AGC kinases.

  8. FMS Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Anbar, Hanan S; Yoo, Kyung Ho; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2013-05-01

    FMS, first discovered as the oncogene responsible for Feline McDonough Sarcoma, is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase that binds to the macrophage or monocyte colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1). Signal transduction through that binding results in survival, proliferation, and differentiation of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Overexpression of CSF-1 and/or FMS has been implicated in a number of disease states such as the growth of metastasis of certain types of cancer, in promoting osteoclast proliferation in bone osteolysis, and many inflammatory disorders. Inhibition of CSF-1 and/or FMS may help treat these pathological conditions. This article reviews FMS gene, FMS kinase, CSF-1, IL-34, and their roles in bone osteolysis, cancer biology, and inflammation. Monoclonal antibodies, FMS crystal structure, and small molecule FMS kinase inhibitors of different chemical scaffolds are also reviewed.

  9. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Diabetes: A Novel Treatment Paradigm?

    PubMed

    Fountas, Athanasios; Diamantopoulos, Leonidas-Nikolaos; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2015-11-01

    Deregulation of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity is implicated in various proliferative conditions. Multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of different malignancies. Recently, several clinical cases of the reversal of both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM) during TKI administration have been reported. Experimental in vivo and in vitro studies have elucidated some of the mechanisms behind this effect. For example, inhibition of Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) results in β cell survival and enhanced insulin secretion, while platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition leads to improvement in insulin sensitivity. In addition, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) reduces the degree of islet cell inflammation (insulitis). Therefore, targeting several PTKs may provide a novel approach for correcting the pathophysiologic disturbances of diabetes.

  10. Novel Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors currently in development

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is intimately involved in multiple signal-transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation, and differentiation of B-lineage lymphoid cells. Btk is overexpressed and constitutively active in several B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Btk has emerged as a new antiapoptotic molecular target for treatment of B-lineage leukemias and lymphomas. Preclinical and early clinical results indicate that Btk inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of leukemias and lymphomas. PMID:23493945

  11. Discovery of indazoles as inhibitors of Tpl2 kinase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yonghan; Cole, Derek; Denny, Rajiah Aldrin; Anderson, David R; Ipek, Manus; Ni, Yike; Wang, Xiaolun; Thaisrivongs, Suvit; Chamberlain, Timothy; Hall, J Perry; Liu, Julie; Luong, Michael; Lin, Lih-Ling; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Gopalsamy, Ariamala

    2011-08-15

    Synthesis, modeling and structure-activity relationship of indazoles as inhibitors of Tpl2 kinase are described. From a high throughput screening effort, we identified an indazole hit compound 5 that has a single digit micromolar Tpl2 activity. Through SAR modifications at the C3 and C5 positions of the indazole, we discovered compound 31 with good potency in LANCE assay and cell-based p-Erk assay.

  12. Daurinol Enhances the Efficacy of Radiotherapy in Lung Cancer via Suppression of Aurora Kinase A/B Expression.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Shin, DongYun; Park, Seong-Hyeok; Kang, Kyungsu; Nho, Chu Won; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-07-01

    The aurora kinases constitute one family of serine/threonine kinases whose activity is essential for mitotic progression. The aurora kinases are frequently upregulated in human cancers and are associated with sensitivity to chemotherapy in certain ones. In the present study, we investigated whether aurora kinases could be a target to overcome radioresistance or enhance the radiosensitivity of lung cancer. For that purpose, we determined the therapeutic potential of daurinol, an investigational topoisomerase inhibitor, alone and in combination with radiation, by observing its effect on aurora kinases. Daurinol decreased cell viability and proliferation in human colon and lung cancer cells. Gene expression in daurinol-treated human colon cancer cells was evaluated using RNA microarray. The mRNA expression of 18 genes involved in the mitotic spindle check point, including aurora kinase A (AURKA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB), was decreased in daurinol-treated human colon cancer cells as compared with vehicle-treated cells. As expected, radiation increased expression levels of AURKA and AURKB. This increase was effectively attenuated by siRNAs against AURKA and AURKB, which suppressed cell growth and increased apoptosis under radiation. Furthermore, the expression of AURKA and AURKB was suppressed by daurinol in the presence or absence of radiation in colon and lung cancer cells. Daurinol alone or in combination with radiation decreased lung cancer growth in xenograft mouse models. Our data clearly confirm the antitumor and radiosensitizing activity of daurinol in human lung cancer cells through the inhibition of AURKA and AURKB.

  13. QSAR studies on imidazopyrazine derivatives as Aurora A kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leng, Y; Lu, T; Yuan, H L; Liu, H C; Lu, S; Zhang, W W; Jiang, Y L; Chen, Y D

    2012-10-01

    Aurora kinases have emerged as attractive targets for the development of novel anti-cancer agents. A combined study of molecular docking, pharmacophore modelling and 3D-QSAR was performed on a series of imidazo [1, 2-a] pyrazines as novel Aurora kinase inhibitors to gain insights into the structural determinants and their structure-activity relationship. An ensemble of conformations based on molecular docking was used for PHASE pharmacophore studies. The developed best-fitted pharmacophore model was validated by diverse chemotypes of Aurora A kinase inhibitors and was consistent with the structural requirements for the docked binding mechanism. Subsequently, the pharmacophore-based alignment was used to develop PHASE and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) 3D-QSAR models. The best CoMSIA model showed good statistics (q (2 )= 0.567, r (2 )= 0.992), and the predictive ability of the model was validated using an external test set of 13 compounds giving a satisfactory prediction ([Formula: see text]). The 3D contour maps provided insight into the binding mechanism and highlighted key structural features that are essential to the inhibitory activity. Based on the PHASE and CoMSIA 3D-QSAR results, a set of novel Aurora A inhibitors were designed that showed excellent potencies.

  14. Small molecule kinase inhibitor LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent activity against colorectal and pancreatic cancer through inhibition of doublecortin-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is emerging as a tumor specific stem cell marker in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of inhibiting DCLK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) as well as genetically targeting the DCLK1+ cell for deletion. However, the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity have not been studied directly. Therefore, we assessed the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity using the novel small molecule kinase inhibitor, LRRK2-IN-1, which demonstrates significant affinity for DCLK1. Results Here we report that LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity including inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Additionally we found that it regulates stemness, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and oncogenic targets on the molecular level. Moreover, we show that LRRK2-IN-1 suppresses DCLK1 kinase activity and downstream DCLK1 effector c-MYC, and demonstrate that DCLK1 kinase activity is a significant factor in resistance to LRRK2-IN-1. Conclusions Given DCLK1’s tumor stem cell marker status, a strong understanding of its biological role and interactions in gastrointestinal tumors may lead to discoveries that improve patient outcomes. The results of this study suggest that small molecule inhibitors of DCLK1 kinase should be further investigated as they may hold promise as anti-tumor stem cell drugs. PMID:24885928

  15. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jan A

    2014-03-01

    BTK is a cytoplasmic, non-receptor tyrosine kinase that transmits signals from a variety of cell-surface molecules, including the B-cell receptor (BCR) and tissue homing receptors. Genetic BTK deletion causes B-cell immunodeficiency in humans and mice, making this kinase an attractive therapeutic target for B-cell disorders. The BTK inhibitor ibrutinib (PCI-32765, brand name: Imbruvica) demonstrated high clinical activity in B-cell malignancies, especially in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM). Therefore, ibrutinib was granted a 'breakthrough therapy' designation for these indications and was recently approved for the treatment of relapsed MCL by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Other BTK inhibitors in earlier clinical development include CC-292 (AVL-292), and ONO-4059. In CLL and MCL, ibrutinib characteristically induces redistribution of malignant B cells from tissue sites into the peripheral blood, along with rapid resolution of enlarged lymph nodes and a surge in lymphocytosis. With continuous ibrutinib therapy, growth- and survival-inhibitory activities of ibrutinib result in the normalization of lymphocyte counts and remissions in a majority of patients. This review discusses the clinical advances with BTK inhibitor therapy, as well as its pathophysiological basis, and outlines perspectives for future use of BTK inhibitors.

  16. A Fluorescence-Based Thermal Shift Assay Identifies Inhibitors of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sankar N.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Mishra, Rama K.; Xu, Li; Scheidt, Karl A.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second highest cause of cancer death in United States males. If the metastatic movement of PCa cells could be inhibited, then mortality from PCa could be greatly reduced. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) has previously been shown to activate pro-invasion signaling pathways in human PCa. Recognizing that MAP2K4 represents a novel and validated therapeutic target, we sought to develop and characterize an efficient process for the identification of small molecules that target MAP2K4. Using a fluorescence-based thermal shift assay (FTS) assay, we first evaluated an 80 compound library of known kinase inhibitors, thereby identifying 8 hits that thermally stabilized MAP2K4 in a concentration dependent manner. We then developed an in vitro MAP2K4 kinase assay employing the biologically relevant downstream substrates, JNK1 and p38 MAPK, to evaluate kinase inhibitory function. In this manner, we validated the performance of our initial FTS screen. We next applied this approach to a 2000 compound chemically diverse library, identified 7 hits, and confirmed them in the in vitro kinase assay. Finally, by coupling our structure-activity relationship data to MAP2K4's crystal structure, we constructed a model for ligand binding. It predicts binding of our identified inhibitory compounds to the ATP binding pocket. Herein we report the creation of a robust inhibitor-screening platform with the ability to inform the discovery and design of new and potent MAP2K4 inhibitors. PMID:24339940

  17. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-02-21

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials.

  18. Kinetics of small molecule inhibitor binding to p38 kinase.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, R L; Wadsworth, S A; Schafer, P H; Zivin, R A; Siekierka, J J

    2001-11-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p38/p38-alpha/CSBP2/RK) has been implicated in the regulation of many proinflammatory pathways. Because of this, it has received much attention as a potential drug target for controlling diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, endotoxic shock, inflammatory bowel disease, osteoporosis, and many others. A number of small molecule inhibitors of this kinase have been described, and in this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance to directly measure and quantitate their binding to p38. Despite the relatively low molecular mass (approximately 400 Da) of these inhibitors, specific binding can be observed. For the two most potent inhibitors studied, SB 203580 and RWJ 67657, dissociation constants, K(d)'s, of 22 and 10 nm, respectively, were obtained. These values closely match the IC(5)0 values observed in a cell-based TNF alpha release assay implying that p38 plays a major role in TNF alpha release. The association and dissociation rates for the binding of these inhibitors to p38 have also been quantitated. SB 203580 and RWJ 67657 have very similar association rates of around 8 x 10(5) m(-1) x s(-1), and the differences in affinity are determined by different dissociation rates. The weaker binding compounds have dissociation rates similar to SB 203580, but the association rates vary by an order of magnitude or more. The direct measurement of compounds binding to p38 may help in understanding the difference between potency and efficacy for these inhibitors. This in turn may yield clues on how to develop better inhibitors.

  19. Characterization of irreversible kinase inhibitors by directly detecting covalent bond formation: a tool for dissecting kinase drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Klüter, Sabine; Simard, Jeffrey R; Rode, Haridas B; Grütter, Christian; Pawar, Vijaykumar; Raaijmakers, Hans C A; Barf, Tjeerd A; Rabiller, Matthias; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Rauh, Daniel

    2010-12-10

    Targeting protein kinases in cancer therapy with irreversible small-molecule inhibitors is moving to the forefront of kinase-inhibitor research and is thought to be an effective means of overcoming mutation-associated drug resistance in epidermal growth factor receptor kinase (EGFR). We generated a detection technique that allows direct measurements of covalent bond formation without relying on kinase activity, thereby allowing the straightforward investigation of the influence of steric clashes on covalent inhibitors in different resistant kinase mutants. The obtained results are discussed together with structural biology and biochemical studies of catalytic activity in both wild-type and gatekeeper mutated kinase variants to draw conclusions about the impact of steric hindrance and increased catalytic activity in drug-resistant kinase variants.

  20. Systematically Studying Kinase Inhibitor Induced Signaling Network Signatures by Integrating Both Therapeutic and Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hongwei; Peng, Tao; Ji, Zhiwei; Su, Jing; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    Substantial effort in recent years has been devoted to analyzing data based large-scale biological networks, which provide valuable insight into the topologies of complex biological networks but are rarely context specific and cannot be used to predict the responses of cell signaling proteins to specific ligands or compounds. In this work, we proposed a novel strategy to investigate kinase inhibitor induced pathway signatures by integrating multiplex data in Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS), e.g. KINOMEscan data and cell proliferation/mitosis imaging data. Using this strategy, we first established a PC9 cell line specific pathway model to investigate the pathway signatures in PC9 cell line when perturbed by a small molecule kinase inhibitor GW843682. This specific pathway revealed the role of PI3K/AKT in modulating the cell proliferation process and the absence of two anti-proliferation links, which indicated a potential mechanism of abnormal expansion in PC9 cell number. Incorporating the pathway model for side effects on primary human hepatocytes, it was used to screen 27 kinase inhibitors in LINCS database and PF02341066, known as Crizotinib, was finally suggested with an optimal concentration 4.6 uM to suppress PC9 cancer cell expansion while avoiding severe damage to primary human hepatocytes. Drug combination analysis revealed that the synergistic effect region can be predicted straightforwardly based on a threshold which is an inherent property of each kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, this integration strategy can be easily extended to other specific cell lines to be a powerful tool for drug screen before clinical trials. PMID:24339888

  1. A Cell Biologist's Field Guide to Aurora Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Christian O; Hsia, Judy E; Anzola, John V; Motamedi, Amir; Yoon, Michelle; Wong, Yao Liang; Jenkins, David; Lee, Hyun J; Martinez, Mallory B; Davis, Robert L; Gahman, Timothy C; Desai, Arshad; Shiau, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinases are essential for cell division and are frequently misregulated in human cancers. Based on their potential as cancer therapeutics, a plethora of small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors have been developed, with a subset having been adopted as tools in cell biology. Here, we fill a gap in the characterization of Aurora kinase inhibitors by using biochemical and cell-based assays to systematically profile a panel of 10 commercially available compounds with reported selectivity for Aurora A (MLN8054, MLN8237, MK-5108, MK-8745, Genentech Aurora Inhibitor 1), Aurora B (Hesperadin, ZM447439, AZD1152-HQPA, GSK1070916), or Aurora A/B (VX-680). We quantify the in vitro effect of each inhibitor on the activity of Aurora A alone, as well as Aurora A and Aurora B bound to fragments of their activators, TPX2 and INCENP, respectively. We also report kinome profiling results for a subset of these compounds to highlight potential off-target effects. In a cellular context, we demonstrate that immunofluorescence-based detection of LATS2 and histone H3 phospho-epitopes provides a facile and reliable means to assess potency and specificity of Aurora A versus Aurora B inhibition, and that G2 duration measured in a live imaging assay is a specific readout of Aurora A activity. Our analysis also highlights variation between HeLa, U2OS, and hTERT-RPE1 cells that impacts selective Aurora A inhibition. For Aurora B, all four tested compounds exhibit excellent selectivity and do not significantly inhibit Aurora A at effective doses. For Aurora A, MK-5108 and MK-8745 are significantly more selective than the commonly used inhibitors MLN8054 and MLN8237. A crystal structure of an Aurora A/MK-5108 complex that we determined suggests the chemical basis for this higher specificity. Taken together, our quantitative biochemical and cell-based analyses indicate that AZD1152-HQPA and MK-8745 are the best current tools for selectively inhibiting Aurora B and Aurora A, respectively

  2. PP2A Inhibitor PME-1 Drives Kinase Inhibitor Resistance in Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Denisova, Oxana V; Qiao, Xi; Jumppanen, Mikael; Peuhu, Emilia; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Raheem, Olayinka; Haapasalo, Hannu; Eriksson, John; Chalmers, Anthony J; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme lacks effective therapy options. Although deregulated kinase pathways are drivers of malignant progression in glioblastoma multiforme, glioma cells exhibit intrinsic resistance toward many kinase inhibitors, and the molecular basis of this resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we show that overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor protein PME-1 drives resistance of glioma cells to various multikinase inhibitors. The PME-1-elicited resistance was dependent on specific PP2A complexes and was mediated by a decrease in cytoplasmic HDAC4 activity. Importantly, both PME-1 and HDAC4 associated with human glioma progression, supporting clinical relevance of the identified mechanism. Synthetic lethality induced by both PME-1 and HDAC4 inhibition was dependent on the coexpression of proapoptotic protein BAD. Thus, PME-1-mediated PP2A inhibition is a novel mechanistic explanation for multikinase inhibitor resistance in glioma cells. Clinically, these results may inform patient stratification strategies for future clinical trials with selected kinase inhibitors in glioblastoma multiforme. Cancer Res; 76(23); 7001-11. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Selectivity and potency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Akula, Nagaraju; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan

    2006-03-24

    Members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family play key roles in various cellular processes. There are 11 members of the CDK family known till now. CDKs are activated by forming noncovalent complexes with cyclins such as A-, B-, C-, D- (D1, D2, and D3), and E-type cyclins. Each isozyme of this family is responsible for particular aspects (cell signaling, transcription, etc) of the cell cycle, and some of the CDK isozymes are specific to certain kinds of tissues. Aberrant expression and overexpression of these kinases are evidenced in many disease conditions. Inhibition of isozymes of CDKs specifically can yield beneficiary treatment modalities with minimum side effects. More than 80 3-dimensional structures of CDK2, CDK5, and CDK6 complexed with inhibitors have been published. This review provides an understanding of the structural aspects of CDK isozymes and binding modes of various known CDK inhibitors so that these kinases can be better targeted for drug discovery and design. The amino acid residues that constitute the cyclin binding region, the substrate binding region, and the area around the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site have been compared for CDK isozymes. Those amino acids at the ATP binding site that could be used to improve the potency and subtype specificity have been described.

  4. Nobiletin induces inhibitions of Ras activity and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling to suppress cell proliferation in C6 rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Koichi; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Fukunaga, Kohji; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Ras, a small G-protein, physiologically directs cell proliferation and cell cycle via regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Dysregulation of Ras/MEK/ERK signaling has been reported to cause tumorigenesis and gliomas. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, has been shown to have anti-tumor cells action. However, it remains elusive whether nobiletin could affect Ras activity. In this study, we provide the first evidence that nobiletin suppresses the proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity in C6 glioma cells, a rat glioma cell line. First, Ras pull-down assay showed that nobiletin inhibits Ras activity in a concentration-dependent manner in C6 cells. Second, farnesyltransferase inhibitor I, a Ras inhibitor, and U0126, a MEK inhibitor, induced an inhibition of the cell proliferation in C6 cells, while the cell proliferation was inhibited by nobiletin as well. Third, western blotting revealed that nobiletin showed inhibitory effects on MEK and ERK phopsphorylation levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, such an inhibitory effect on the level of ERK phosphorylation by nobiletin was appreciably prevented by Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of conventional protein kinase Cs (PKCs) showing Ca(2+)-sensitivity, while GF109203X, a general inhibitor for PKCs, and BAPTA, a cell-permeable Ca(2+) chelator, to a lesser extent, suppressed a reduction of the phosphorylation. These findings suggest that the proliferation of C6 cells is Ras- and MEK/ERK signaling-dependent, and that nobiletin suppresses the cell proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity and MEK/ERK signaling cascade probably via a Ca(2+)-sensitive PKC-dependent mechanism. Thus, the natural compound has potential to be a therapeutic agent for glioma.

  5. Repigmentation in vitiligo using the Janus kinase inhibitor tofacitinib may require concomitant light exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lucy Y; Strassner, James P; Refat, Maggi A; Harris, John E; King, Brett A

    2017-10-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which cutaneous depigmentation occurs. Existing therapies are often inadequate. Prior reports have shown benefit of the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. To evaluate the efficacy of the JAK 1/3 inhibitor tofacitinib in the treatment of vitiligo. This is a retrospective case series of 10 consecutive patients with vitiligo treated with tofacitinib. Severity of disease was assessed by body surface area of depigmentation. Ten consecutive patients were treated with tofacitinib. Five patients achieved some repigmentation at sites of either sunlight exposure or low-dose narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy. Suction blister sampling revealed that the autoimmune response was inhibited during treatment in both responding and nonresponding lesions, suggesting that light rather than immunosuppression was primarily required for melanocyte regeneration. Limitations include the small size of the study population, retrospective nature of the study, and lack of a control group. Treatment of vitiligo with JAK inhibitors appears to require light exposure. In contrast to treatment with phototherapy alone, repigmentation during treatment with JAK inhibitors may require only low-level light. Maintenance of repigmentation may be achieved with JAK inhibitor monotherapy. These results support a model wherein JAK inhibitors suppress T cell mediators of vitiligo and light exposure is necessary for stimulation of melanocyte regeneration. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Design and synthesis of carbazole carboxamides as promising inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingjie; Batt, Douglas G; Lippy, Jonathan S; Surti, Neha; Tebben, Andrew J; Muckelbauer, Jodi K; Chen, Lin; An, Yongmi; Chang, Chiehying; Pokross, Matt; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Haiqing; Burke, James R; Carter, Percy H; Tino, Joseph A

    2015-10-01

    Four series of disubstituted carbazole-1-carboxamides were designed and synthesised as inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). 4,7- and 4,6-disubstituted carbazole-1-carboxamides were potent and selective inhibitors of BTK, while 3,7- and 3,6-disubstituted carbazole-1-carboxamides were potent and selective inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. (R)-roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, enhances tonic GABA inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A; Tyzio, R; Zilberter, Y; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-10-02

    Pharmacological agents that mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance are of considerable interest for treatment of epilepsy. (R)-roscovitine is a membrane permeable cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, designed to block cell division. It is currently undergoing a phase II clinical trial as an anticancer drug. We show that (R)-roscovitine increases a tonic GABA-mediated current in rat hippocampal neurons. This enhanced tonic current appears independent of synaptic GABA release and requires functional transmembrane GABA transport. The effect of (R)-roscovitine is associated with neither modification of GABAA receptors nor protein kinase activity, but is associated with a significant increase in intracellular GABA concentration in hippocampal GABAergic neurons. (R)-roscovitine-induced tonic inhibition significantly suppresses spontaneous spiking activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, (R)-roscovitine is a potent modulator of neuronal activity in rat hippocampus and may provide a tool for preventing paroxysmal activity.

  8. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-06

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  9. A Chrysin Derivative Suppresses Skin Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N. R.; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M.; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L.; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P+ cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  10. Evaluation of a tyrosine kinase peptide microarray for tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy selection in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labots, Mariette; Gotink, Kristy J; Dekker, Henk; Azijli, Kaamar; van der Mijn, Johannes C; Huijts, Charlotte M; Piersma, Sander R; Jiménez, Connie R; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-01-01

    Personalized cancer medicine aims to accurately predict the response of individual patients to targeted therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Clinical implementation of this concept requires a robust selection tool. Here, using both cancer cell lines and tumor tissue from patients, we evaluated a high-throughput tyrosine kinase peptide substrate array to determine its readiness as a selection tool for TKI therapy. We found linearly increasing phosphorylation signal intensities of peptides representing kinase activity along the kinetic curve of the assay with 7.5–10 μg of lysate protein and up to 400 μM adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Basal kinase activity profiles were reproducible with intra- and inter-experiment coefficients of variation of <15% and <20%, respectively. Evaluation of 14 tumor cell lines and tissues showed similar consistently high phosphorylated peptides in their basal profiles. Incubation of four patient-derived tumor lysates with the TKIs dasatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib and erlotinib primarily caused inhibition of substrates that were highly phosphorylated in the basal profile analyses. Using recombinant Src and Axl kinase, relative substrate specificity was demonstrated for a subset of peptides, as their phosphorylation was reverted by co-incubation with a specific inhibitor. In conclusion, we demonstrated robust technical specifications of this high-throughput tyrosine kinase peptide microarray. These features required as little as 5–7 μg of protein per sample, facilitating clinical implementation as a TKI selection tool. However, currently available peptide substrates can benefit from an enhancement of the differential potential for complex samples such as tumor lysates. We propose that mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics may provide such an enhancement by identifying more discriminative peptides. PMID:27980342

  11. A screen for kinase inhibitors identifies antimicrobial imidazopyridine aminofurazans as specific inhibitors of the Listeria monocytogenes PASTA kinase PrkA.

    PubMed

    Schaenzer, Adam J; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Drewry, David H; Zuercher, William J; Rose, Warren E; Striker, Rob; Sauer, John-Demian

    2017-08-16

    Bacterial signaling systems such as protein kinases and quorum sensing have become increasingly attractive targets for the development of novel antimicrobial agents in a time of rising antibiotic resistance. The family of bacterial Penicillin-binding-protein And Serine/Threonine kinase-Associated (PASTA) kinases is of particular interest due to the role of these kinases in regulating resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. As such, small-molecule kinase inhibitors that target PASTA kinases may prove beneficial as treatments adjunctive to β-lactam therapy. Despite this interest, only limited progress has been made in identifying functional inhibitors of the PASTA kinases that have both activity against the intact microbe and high kinase specificity. Here, we report the results of a small-molecule screen that identified GSK690693, an imidazopyridine aminofurazan-type kinase inhibitor that increases the sensitivity of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to various β-lactams by inhibiting the PASTA kinase PrkA. GSK690693 potently inhibited PrkA kinase activity biochemically and exhibited significant selectivity for PrkA relative to the Staphylococcus aureus PASTA kinase Stk1. Furthermore, other imidazopyridine aminofurazans could effectively inhibit PrkA and potentiate β-lactam antibiotic activity to varying degrees. The presence of the 2-methyl-3-butyn-2-ol (alkynol) moiety was important for both biochemical and antimicrobial activity. Finally, mutagenesis studies demonstrated residues in the back pocket of the active site are important for GSK690693 selectivity. These data suggest that targeted screens can successfully identify PASTA kinase inhibitors with both biochemical and antimicrobial specificity. Moreover, the imidazopyridine aminofurazans represent a family of PASTA kinase inhibitors that have the potential to be optimized for selective PASTA kinase inhibition. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Photoactivatable Caged Prodrugs of VEGFR-2 Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Boris; Horbert, Rebecca; Döbber, Alexander; Kuhl, Lydia; Peifer, Christian

    2016-04-29

    In this study, we report on the design, synthesis, photokinetic properties and in vitro evaluation of photoactivatable caged prodrugs for the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR-2. Highly potent VEGFR-2 inhibitors 1 and 3 were caged by introduction of a photoremovable protecting group (PPG) to yield the caged prodrugs 4 and 5. As expected, enzymatic and cellular proliferation assays showed dramatically diminished efficacy of caged prodrugs in vitro. Upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the prodrugs original inhibitory activity was completely restored and even distinctly reinforced, as was the case for the prodrug 4. The presented results are a further evidence for caging technique being an interesting approach in the protein kinase field. It could enable spatial and temporal control for the inhibition of VEGFR-2. The described photoactivatable prodrugs might be highly useful as biological probes for studying the VEGFR-2 signal transduction.

  13. Assay for isolation of inhibitors of her2-kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Chiosis, Gabriela; Keeton, Adam B

    2009-01-01

    Her2 (ErbB2) protein is overexpressed in breast and other solid tumors, and its expression is associated with progressive disease. Current therapies directed toward Her2 either block dimerization of the receptor or inhibit tyrosine kinase activity to disrupt intracellular signaling. However, little is known about alternative mechanisms for suppressing Her2 expression, possibly by inducing degradation or blocking synthesis. Here, we describe a hybrid western-blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) designed to identify in low- to medium-throughput format noncytotoxic compounds that reduce expression of Her2 protein.

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors inspired by roscovitine: purine bioisosteres.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Radek; Paruch, Kamil; Krystof, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roscovitine is a synthetic inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases that is currently undergoing clinical trials as a candidate drug for some oncological indications. Its discovery prompted many research teams to further optimize its structure or to initiate their own related but independent studies. This article reviews known roscovitine bioisosteres that have been prepared as CDK inhibitors using different core heterocycles. The individual bioisostere types have been described and explored to a different extent, which complicates direct comparisons of their biochemical activity - only six direct analogs containing different purine bioisosteres have been prepared and evaluated side by side with roscovitine. Only four types of bioisosteres have demonstrated improved biological properties, namely pyrazolo[ 1,5-a]-1,3,5-triazines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridines and pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidines.

  15. Cyclin Dependent Kinase 9 Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Yogesh A; Taylor, Margaret A; Napoleon, John Victor; Rana, Sandeep; Contreras, Jacob I; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-10-13

    Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been the topic of intense research for nearly 2 decades due to their widely varied and critical functions within the cell. Recently CDK9 has emerged as a druggable target for the development of cancer therapeutics. CDK9 plays a crucial role in transcription regulation; specifically, CDK9 mediated transcriptional regulation of short-lived antiapoptotic proteins is critical for the survival of transformed cells. Focused chemical libraries based on a plethora of scaffolds have resulted in mixed success with regard to the development of selective CDK9 inhibitors. Here we review the regulation of CDK9, its cellular functions, and common core structures used to target CDK9, along with their selectivity profile and efficacy in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Regulate OPG through Inhibition of PDGFRβ

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Mei Lin; Lin, Jian-Ming; Bava, Usha; Callon, Karen; Cornish, Jillian; Naot, Dorit; Grey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Nilotinib and imatinib are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) used in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In vitro, imatinib and nilotinib inhibit osteoclastogenesis, and in patients they reduce levels of bone resorption. One of the mechanisms that might underlie these effects is an increase in the production of osteoprotegerin (OPG). In the current work we report that platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling regulates OPG production in vitro. In addition, we have shown that TKIs have effects on RANKL signaling through inhibition of the PDGFRβ and other target receptors. These findings have implications for our understanding of the mechanisms by which TKIs affect osteoclastogenesis, and the role of PDGFRβ signaling in regulating osteoclastogenesis. Further studies are indicated to confirm the clinical effects of PDGFRβ-inhibitors and to elaborate the intracellular pathways that underpin these effects. PMID:27737004

  17. Ret function in muscle stem cells points to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Moyle, Louise A; Blanc, Eric; Jaka, Oihane; Prueller, Johanna; Banerji, Christopher RS; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Harridge, Stephen DR; Knight, Robert D; Zammit, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) involves sporadic expression of DUX4, which inhibits myogenesis and is pro-apoptotic. To identify target genes, we over-expressed DUX4 in myoblasts and found that the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret was significantly up-regulated, suggesting a role in FSHD. RET is dynamically expressed during myogenic progression in mouse and human myoblasts. Constitutive expression of either RET9 or RET51 increased myoblast proliferation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ret induced myogenic differentiation. Suppressing RET activity using Sunitinib, a clinically-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, rescued differentiation in both DUX4-expressing murine myoblasts and in FSHD patient-derived myoblasts. Importantly, Sunitinib also increased engraftment and differentiation of FSHD myoblasts in regenerating mouse muscle. Thus, DUX4-mediated activation of Ret prevents myogenic differentiation and could contribute to FSHD pathology by preventing satellite cell-mediated repair. Rescue of DUX4-induced pathology by Sunitinib highlights the therapeutic potential of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of FSHD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11405.001 PMID:27841748

  18. Development of highly potent and selective diaminothiazole inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schonbrunn, Ernst; Betzi, Stephane; Alam, Riazul; Martin, Mathew P.; Becker, Andreas; Han, Huijong; Francis, Rawle; Chakrasali, Ramappa; Jakkaraj, Sudhakar; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Sebti, Said M.; Cubitt, Christopher L.; Gebhard, Anthony W.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Tash, Joseph S.; Georg, Gunda I.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine protein kinases that act as key regulatory elements in cell cycle progression. We describe the development of highly potent diaminothiazole inhibitors of CDK2 (IC50 = 0.0009 – 0.0015 µM) from a single hit compound with weak inhibitory activity (IC50 = 15 µM), discovered by high-throughput screening. Structure-based design was performed using 35 co-crystal structures of CDK2 liganded with distinct analogues of the parent compound. The profiling of compound 51 against a panel of 339 kinases revealed high selectivity for CDKs, with preference for CDK2 and CDK5 over CDK9, CDK1, CDK4 and CDK6. Compound 51 inhibited the proliferation of 13 out of 15 cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 0.27 and 6.9 µM, which correlated with the complete suppression of retinoblastoma phosphorylation and the onset of apoptosis. Combined, the results demonstrate the potential of this new inhibitors series for further development into CDK-specific chemical probes or therapeutics. PMID:23600925

  19. SD0006: A Potent, Selective and Orally Available Inhibitor of p38 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Burnette, Barry L.; Selness, Shaun; Devraj, Raj; Jungbluth, Gail; Kurumbail, Ravi; Stillwell, Loreen; Anderson, Gary; Mnich, Stephen; Hirsch, Jeffrey; Compton, Robert; De Ciechi, Pamela; Hope, Heidi; Hepperle, Michael; Keith, Robert H.; Naing, Win; Shieh, Huey; Portanova, Joseph; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Leimgruber, Richard M.; Monahan, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    SD0006 is a diarylpyrazole that was prepared as an inhibitor of p38 kinase-α (p38α). In vitro, SD0006 was selective for p38α kinase over 50 other kinases screened (including p38γ and p38δ with modest selectivity over p38β). Crystal structures with p38α show binding at the ATP site with additional residue interactions outside the ATP pocket unique to p38α that can confer advantages over other ATP competitive inhibitors. Direct correlation between inhibition of p38α activity and that of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated TNFα release was established in cellular models and in vivo, including a phase 1 clinical trial. Potency (IC50) for inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) release, in vitro and in vivo, was <200 nmol/l. In vivo, SD0006 was effective in the rat streptococcal-cell-wall-induced arthritis model, with dramatic protective effects on paw joint integrity and bone density as shown by radiographic analysis. In the murine collagen-induced arthritis model, equivalence was demonstrated to anti-TNFα treatment. SD0006 also demonstrated good oral anti-inflammatory efficacy with excellent cross-species correlation between the rat, cynomolgus monkey, and human. SD0006 suppressed expression of multiple proinflammatory proteins at both the transcriptional and translational levels. These properties suggest SD0006 could provide broader therapeutic efficacy than cytokine-targeted monotherapeutics. PMID:19590255

  20. Inhibition of formation of filopodia after axotomy by inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J; Wu, D Y

    1995-08-01

    The activity of motile protrusions of the growth cone--filopodia, veils, and lamellipodia--is essential for directed growth of a neuronal process. The regulation of the formation of these protrusions is not well understood. Numerous filopodia and veils or lamellipodia form within minutes of transection of an Aplysia axon in culture, as the initial components of growth cones of regenerating neurites. Axotomy, therefore, provides a robust and reliable protocol for analyzing the formation of these protrusions. We evaluated the involvement of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of protrusive activity. Of the inhibitors of protein kinases assayed, only the inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases--genistein, lavendustin A, herbimycin A, and erbstatin analogue--suppressed the formation of protrusions, as assessed by high magnification video microscopy. These drugs did not work by preventing resealing of the axon, as evident from visual inspection and by the unimpaired effectiveness of genistein or lavendustin in preventing formation of filopodia when applied after resealing. Inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases not only prevented the formation of actin-based protrusions, but also caused deterioration of the actin network underlying the protrusive area of preexisting growth cones. Consistent with an involvement of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the generation of protrusive structures, immunocytochemistry revealed that aggregates of phosphotyrosine appeared at the margins of the axon, from which protrusions emerge shortly after axotomy. These results suggest a role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the formation and maintenance of actin-based protrusive structures.

  1. Ret function in muscle stem cells points to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Louise A; Blanc, Eric; Jaka, Oihane; Prueller, Johanna; Banerji, Christopher Rs; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Harridge, Stephen Dr; Knight, Robert D; Zammit, Peter S

    2016-11-14

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) involves sporadic expression of DUX4, which inhibits myogenesis and is pro-apoptotic. To identify target genes, we over-expressed DUX4 in myoblasts and found that the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret was significantly up-regulated, suggesting a role in FSHD. RET is dynamically expressed during myogenic progression in mouse and human myoblasts. Constitutive expression of either RET9 or RET51 increased myoblast proliferation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ret induced myogenic differentiation. Suppressing RET activity using Sunitinib, a clinically-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, rescued differentiation in both DUX4-expressing murine myoblasts and in FSHD patient-derived myoblasts. Importantly, Sunitinib also increased engraftment and differentiation of FSHD myoblasts in regenerating mouse muscle. Thus, DUX4-mediated activation of Ret prevents myogenic differentiation and could contribute to FSHD pathology by preventing satellite cell-mediated repair. Rescue of DUX4-induced pathology by Sunitinib highlights the therapeutic potential of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of FSHD.

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor decreases prostaglandin F2α-stimulated interleukin-6 synthesis through p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Akira; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kato, Kenji; Natsume, Hideo; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Mizutani, Jun; Ito, Yoshiki; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2012-12-01

    We previously showed that prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) stimulates the synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, in part via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and p38 MAP kinase but not stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) among the MAP kinase superfamily in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular energy sensor, in PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. PGF(2α) time-dependently induced the phosphorylation of the AMPK α-subunit. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, dose-dependently suppressed PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 release. Compound C reduced the PGF(2α)-induced acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. In addition, PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 release in human osteoblasts was also inhibited by compound C. The IL-6 mRNA expression induced by PGF(2α) was markedly reduced by compound C. Downregulation of the AMPK α1-subunit by short interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly suppressed the PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 release. PGF(2α)-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase was inhibited by compound C, which failed to affect the p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation. These results strongly suggest that AMPK regulates PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 synthesis via p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

  3. Compound Selectivity and Target Residence Time of Kinase Inhibitors Studied with Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Willemsen-Seegers, Nicole; Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Prinsen, Martine B W; de Vetter, Judith R F; de Man, Jos; Sawa, Masaaki; Kawase, Yusuke; Buijsman, Rogier C; Zaman, Guido J R

    2017-02-17

    Target residence time (τ) has been suggested to be a better predictor of the biological activity of kinase inhibitors than inhibitory potency (IC50) in enzyme assays. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays for 46 human protein and lipid kinases were developed. The association and dissociation constants of 80 kinase inhibitor interactions were determined. τ and equilibrium affinity constants (KD) were calculated to determine kinetic selectivity. Comparison of τ and KD or IC50 values revealed a strikingly different view on the selectivity of several kinase inhibitors, including the multi-kinase inhibitor ponatinib, which was tested on 10 different kinases. In addition, known pan-Aurora inhibitors resided much longer on Aurora B than on Aurora A, despite having comparable affinity for Aurora A and B. Furthermore, the γ/δ-selective PI3K inhibitor duvelisib and the δ-selective drug idelalisib had similar 20-fold selectivity for δ- over γ-isoform but duvelisib resided much longer on both targets.

  4. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors: Rescuers of cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    King, Margaret K.; Pardo, Marta; Cheng, Yuyan; Downey, Kimberlee; Jope, Richard S.; Beurel, Eléonore

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of cognitive processes is a devastating outcome of many diseases, injuries, and drugs affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Most often, very little can be done by available therapeutic interventions to improve cognitive functions. Here we review evidence that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) ameliorates cognitive deficits in a wide variety of animal models of CNS diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, Parkinson's disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, traumatic brain injury, and others. GSK3 inhibitors also improve cognition following impairments caused by therapeutic interventions, such as cranial irradiation for brain tumors. These findings demonstrate that GSK3 inhibitors are able to ameliorate cognitive impairments caused by a diverse array of diseases, injury, and treatments. The improvements in impaired cognition instilled by administration of GSK3 inhibitors appear to involve a variety of different mechanisms, such as supporting long-term potentiation and diminishing long-term depression, promotion of neurogenesis, reduction of inflammation, and increasing a number of neuroprotective mechanisms. The potential for GSK3 inhibitors to repair cognitive deficits associated with many conditions warrants further investigation of their potential for therapeutic interventions, particularly considering the current dearth of treatments available to reduce loss of cognitive functions. PMID:23916593

  5. Development of Selective Covalent Janus Kinase 3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Akahane, Koshi; McNally, Randall; Reyskens, Kathleen M S E; Ficarro, Scott B; Liu, Suhu; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Koyama, Shohei; Pattison, Michael J; Labella, Katherine; Johannessen, Liv; Akbay, Esra A; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Frank, David A; Marto, Jarrod A; Look, Thomas A; Arthur, J Simon C; Eck, Michael J; Gray, Nathanael S

    2015-08-27

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) and their downstream effectors, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STATs), form a critical immune cell signaling circuit, which is of fundamental importance in innate immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis, and dysregulation is frequently observed in immune disease and cancer. The high degree of structural conservation of the JAK ATP binding pockets has posed a considerable challenge to medicinal chemists seeking to develop highly selective inhibitors as pharmacological probes and as clinical drugs. Here we report the discovery and optimization of 2,4-substituted pyrimidines as covalent JAK3 inhibitors that exploit a unique cysteine (Cys909) residue in JAK3. Investigation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) utilizing biochemical and transformed Ba/F3 cellular assays resulted in identification of potent and selective inhibitors such as compounds 9 and 45. A 2.9 Å cocrystal structure of JAK3 in complex with 9 confirms the covalent interaction. Compound 9 exhibited decent pharmacokinetic properties and is suitable for use in vivo. These inhibitors provide a set of useful tools to pharmacologically interrogate JAK3-dependent biology.

  6. Emerging Drug Profile: Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blachly, James S.; Byrd, John C.

    2013-01-01

    As the rational application of targeted therapies in cancer supplants traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, there is an ever-greater need for a thorough understanding of the complex machinery of the cell and an application of this knowledge to the development of novel therapeutics and combinations of agents. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of the class of targeted agents known as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, with a focus on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Flavopiridol (alvocidib) is the best studied of the CDK inhibitors, producing a dramatic cytotoxic effect in vitro and in vivo, with the principal limiting factor of acute tumor lysis. Unfortunately, flavopiridol has a narrow therapeutic window and is relatively non-selective with several off-target (i.e. non-CDK) effects, which prompted development of the second-generation CDK inhibitor dinaciclib. Dinaciclib appears to be both more potent and selective than flavopiridol, with at least an order of magnitude greater therapeutic index, and is currently in phase III clinical trials. In additional to flavopiridol and dinaciclib, we also review the current state of other members of this class, and provide commentary as to the future direction of combination therapy including CDK inhibitors. PMID:23488658

  7. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-09-03

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  8. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-05-01

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  9. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  10. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A; Gray, Nathanael S

    2014-11-11

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a "DFG-out" covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket.

  11. Andrographolide suppresses endothelial cell apoptosis via activation of phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiun-Han; Hsiao, George; Lee, An-Rong; Wu, Chin-Chen; Yen, Mao-Hsiung

    2004-04-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), an active component isolated from the Chinese official herbal Andrographis paniculata, which has been reported to prevent oxygen radical production and thus prevent inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways by which Andro protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from growth factor (GF) deprivation-induced apoptosis. Results demonstrated that HUVECs undergo apoptosis after 18 hr of GF deprivation but that this cell death was suppressed by the addition of Andro in a concentration-dependent manner (1-100 microM). Andro suppresses the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by inhibiting release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm and dissipation of mitochondrial potential (Deltapsi(m)), as a consequence, prevented caspase-3 and -9 activation. Treatment of endothelial cells with Andro-induced activation of the protein kinase Akt, an anti-apoptotic signal, and phosphorylation of BAD, a down-stream target of Akt. Suppression of Akt activity by wortmannin, by LY-294002 and by using a dominant negative Akt mutant abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of Andro. In contrast, the ERK1/2 activities were not affected by Andro. The ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059 failed to antagonize the protective effect of Andro. In conclusion, Andro exerts its anti-apoptotic potential via activation of the Akt-BAD pathway in HUVECs and thus may represent a candidate of therapeutic agent for atherosclerosis.

  12. Synthetic inhibitors of adenylate kinases in the assays for ATPases and phosphokinases.

    PubMed

    Feldhau, P; Fröhlich, T; Goody, R S; Isakov, M; Schirmer, R H

    1975-09-01

    1. Procedures are given for the syntheses of alpha,omega-dinucleoside 5'-polyphosphates as inhibitors of adenylate kinases. The following order for the ability of inhibiting pig muscle adenylate kinase was observed: Ap5A greater than 1:N6-etheno-Ap5A greater than Ap6A greater than Gp5A greater than Ap4A greater than Up5A. The synthesis of adenosine tetraphosphate, the starting material for Ap5A, is also described. 2. One molecule of pig muscle adenylate kinase binds one molecule of Ap5A. The difference spectrum of Ap5A-adenylate kinase with its maximum of 5050 M-1 - cm-1 at 271 nm, as well as the fluorescence properties of 1:N6-etheno-Ap5A can be used for kinetic and binding studies. 3. The specific binding of the negatively charged Ap5A was exploited in the preparation of human muscle adenylate kinase. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity with an overall yield of 65%, the absolute value being 70 mg per kg of muscle. 4. The effect of Ap5A on adenylate kinase in extracts of various cells and cell organelles was tested. A ratio of 1:50 (mol/mol) for Ap5A to other nucleotides was used for suppressing the adenylate kinase activity in extracts of mammalian and insect skeletal muscel, of human erythrocytes and of Staphylococcus aureus. A ratio of 1:5 was found to be necessary for the adenylate kinase from tobacco leaves and spinach chloroplasts, and a ratio of 2:1 was needed for suppressing the adenylate kinase from bovine liver mitochondria, human kidney homogenate and from Escherichia coli. Ap5A appears not to be metabolized in any of the above extracts. These results indicate that Ap5A can be used for evaluating the contribution of adenylate kinase to the production of ATP fro ADP in energy-transducing systems. 5. Contaminating adenylate kinase can be inhibited by a concentration of Ap5A which does not interfere in the study of many (phospho)kinases and ATPases. The applications of Ap5A in the assay for nucleoside diphosphokinase and in the study of mechanical and

  13. Selective Sparing of Human Tregs by Pharmacologic Inhibitors of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and MEK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zwang, N. A.; Zhang, R.; Germana, S.; Fan, M. Y.; Hastings, W. D.; Cao, A.; Turka, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK) signaling are central to the survival and proliferation of many cell types. Multiple lines of investigation in murine models have shown that control of the PI3K pathway is particularly important for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. PI3K and MEK inhibitors are being introduced into the clinic, and we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K, and possibly MEK, in mixed cultures of human mononuclear cells would preferentially affect CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes compared with Tregs. We tested this hypothesis using four readouts: proliferation, activation, functional suppression, and signaling. Results showed that Tregs were less susceptible to inhibition by both δ and α isoform–specific PI3K inhibitors and by an MEK inhibitor compared with their conventional CD4+ and CD8+ counterparts. These studies suggest less functional reliance on PI3K and MEK signaling in Tregs compared with conventional CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Therefore, the PI3K and MEK pathways are attractive pharmacologic targets for transplantation and treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:27017850

  14. Structural Determinants of CX-4945 Derivatives as Protein Kinase CK2 Inhibitors: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Xia; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jinghui; Li, Yan; Yang, Ling; Li, Guohui

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2, also known as casein kinase-2, is involved in a broad range of physiological events including cell growth, proliferation and suppression of apoptosis which are related to human cancers. A series of compounds were identified as CK2 inhibitors and their inhibitory activities varied depending on their structures. In order to explore the structure-activity correlation of CX-4945 derivatives as inhibitors of CK2, in the present study, a set of ligand- and receptor-based 3D-QSAR models were developed employing Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Index Analysis (CoMSIA). The optimum CoMFA (Rcv2 = 0.618, Rpred2 = 0.892) and CoMSIA (Rcv2 = 0.681, Rpred2 = 0.843) models exhibited reasonable statistical characteristics for CX-4945 derivatives. The results indicated that electrostatic effects contributed the most to both CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The combination of docking analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that Leu45, Lys68, Glu81, Val116, Asp175 and Trp176 of CK2 which formed several direct or water-bridged H-bonds with CX-4945 are crucial for CX-4945 derivatives recognition to CK2. These results can offer useful theoretical references for designing more potent CK2 inhibitors. PMID:22072932

  15. Structural determinants of CX-4945 derivatives as protein kinase CK2 inhibitors: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Xia; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jinghui; Li, Yan; Yang, Ling; Li, Guohui

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2, also known as casein kinase-2, is involved in a broad range of physiological events including cell growth, proliferation and suppression of apoptosis which are related to human cancers. A series of compounds were identified as CK2 inhibitors and their inhibitory activities varied depending on their structures. In order to explore the structure-activity correlation of CX-4945 derivatives as inhibitors of CK2, in the present study, a set of ligand- and receptor-based 3D-QSAR models were developed employing Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Index Analysis (CoMSIA). The optimum CoMFA (R(cv) (2) = 0.618, R(pred) (2) = 0.892) and CoMSIA (R(cv) (2) = 0.681, R(pred) (2) = 0.843) models exhibited reasonable statistical characteristics for CX-4945 derivatives. The results indicated that electrostatic effects contributed the most to both CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The combination of docking analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that Leu45, Lys68, Glu81, Val116, Asp175 and Trp176 of CK2 which formed several direct or water-bridged H-bonds with CX-4945 are crucial for CX-4945 derivatives recognition to CK2. These results can offer useful theoretical references for designing more potent CK2 inhibitors.

  16. Action of the Src family kinase inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Kim, Donghwa; Cheng, Jin Q; Zhang, Shumin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Buettner, Ralf; Mirosevich, Janni; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2005-10-15

    Src family kinases (SFK) are currently being investigated as targets for treatment strategies in various cancers. The novel SFK/Abl inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), is a promising therapeutic agent with oral bioavailability. Dasatinib has been shown to inhibit growth of Bcr-Abl-dependent chronic myeloid leukemia xenografts in nude mice. Dasatinib also has been shown to have activity against cultured human prostate and breast cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which dasatinib acts on epithelial tumor cells remains unknown. In this study, we show that dasatinib blocks the kinase activities of the SFKs, Lyn, and Src, in human prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated substrate (p130(CAS)) signaling downstream of SFKs are also inhibited at similar concentrations of dasatinib. Consistent with inhibition of these signaling pathways, dasatinib suppresses cell adhesion, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Therefore, dasatinib has potential as a therapeutic agent for metastatic prostate cancers harboring activated SFK and focal adhesion kinase signaling.

  17. Crystal structure of inhibitor of ;#954;B kinase [beta

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guozhou; Lo, Yu-Chih; Li, Qiubai; Napolitano, Gennaro; Wu, Xuefeng; Jiang, Xuliang; Dreano, Michel; Karin, Michael; Wu, Hao

    2011-07-26

    Inhibitor of {kappa}B (I{kappa}B) kinase (IKK) phosphorylates I{kappa}B proteins, leading to their degradation and the liberation of nuclear factor {kappa}B for gene transcription. Here we report the crystal structure of IKK{beta} in complex with an inhibitor, at a resolution of 3.6 {angstrom}. The structure reveals a trimodular architecture comprising the kinase domain, a ubiquitin-like domain (ULD) and an elongated, {alpha}-helical scaffold/dimerization domain (SDD). Unexpectedly, the predicted leucine zipper and helix-loop-helix motifs do not form these structures but are part of the SDD. The ULD and SDD mediate a critical interaction with I{kappa}B{alpha} that restricts substrate specificity, and the ULD is also required for catalytic activity. The SDD mediates IKK{beta} dimerization, but dimerization per se is not important for maintaining IKK{beta} activity and instead is required for IKK{beta} activation. Other IKK family members, IKK{alpha}, TBK1 and IKK-i, may have a similar trimodular architecture and function.

  18. The evolving field of kinase inhibitors in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Marotta, V; Sciammarella, C; Vitale, M; Colao, A; Faggiano, A

    2015-01-01

    Most of the genetic events implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer (TC) involve genes with kinase activity. Thus, kinase inhibitors (KIs) are very relevant in this field. KIs are considered the most suitable treatment for patients with iodine-refractory differentiated TC; these patients comprise the subgroup with the poorer prognosis. To date, only sorafenib has been approved for this indication, but promising results have been reported with several other KIs. In particular, lenvatinib has demonstrated excellent efficacy, with both progression-free survival and objective tumour response being better than with sorafenib. Despite being considered to be well tolerated, both sorafenib and lenvatinib have shown a remarkable toxicity, which has led to dose reductions in the majority of patients and to treatment discontinuation in a significant proportion of cases. The role of KIs in differentiated TC may be revolutionised by the finding that selumetinib may restore a clinical response to radioactive iodine (RAI). Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of advanced, progressive medullary TC (MTC). Nevertheless, the toxicity of both compounds suggests their selective use in those patients with strong disease progression. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus, alone or in combination with somatostatin analogues, should be studied in metastatic MTC patients with slow progression of disease, these representing the vast majority of patients. KIs did not significantly impact on the clinical features of anaplastic TC (ATC).

  19. Novel bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, William C; Metcalf, Chester A; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Keenan, Terence; Weigele, Manfred; Bohacek, Regine S; Dalgarno, David C; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2003-09-01

    Bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase (STK) inhibitors have recently been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer-related bone diseases. The concept of bone targeting derives from bisphosphonates, and from the evolution of such molecules in terms of therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bone disorders. Interestingly, some of the earliest bisphosphonates were recognized for their ability to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation (scaling) by virtue of their affinity to chelate calcium. This chelating property was subsequently exploited in the development of bisphosphonate analogs as inhibitors of the bone-resorbing cells known as osteoclasts, giving rise to breakthrough medicines, such as Fosamax (for the treatment of osteoporosis) and Zometa (for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastases). Relative to these milestone achievements, there is a tremendous opportunity to explore beyond the limited chemical space (functional group diversity) of such bisphosphonates to design novel bone-targeting moieties, which may be used to develop other classes of promising small-molecule drugs affecting different biological pathways. Here, we review studies focused on bone-targeted inhibitors of STK, a key enzyme in osteoclast-dependent bone resorption. Two strategies are described relative to bone-targeted STK inhibitor drug discovery: (i) the development of novel Src homology (SH)-2 inhibitors incorporating non-hydrolyzable phosphotyrosine mimics and exhibiting molecular recognition and bone-targeting properties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-22408; and (ii) the development of novel ATP-based Src kinase inhibitors incorporating bone-targeting moieties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-23236. In summary, AP-22408 and AP-23236, which differ mechanistically by virtue of blocking Src-dependent non-catalytic or catalytic activities in osteoclasts, exemplify ARIAD Pharmaceuticals' structure-based design of novel bone

  20. Leads for antitubercular compounds from kinase inhibitor library screens.

    PubMed

    Magnet, Sophie; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Székely, Rita; Pató, János; Triccas, James A; Schneider, Patricia; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Orfi, László; Chambon, Marc; Banfi, Damiano; Bueno, Manuel; Turcatti, Gerardo; Kéri, György; Cole, Stewart T

    2010-11-01

    Discovering new drugs to treat tuberculosis more efficiently and to overcome multidrug resistance is a world health priority. To find antimycobacterial scaffolds, we screened a kinase inhibitor library of more than 12,000 compounds using an integrated strategy involving whole cell-based assays with Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and a target-based assay with the protein kinase PknA. Seventeen "hits" came from the whole cell-based screening approach, from which three displayed minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against M. tuberculosis below 10μM and were non-mutagenic and non-cytotoxic. Two of these hits were specific for M. tuberculosis versus C. glutamicum and none of them was found to inhibit the essential serine/threonine protein kinases, PknA and PknB present in both bacteria. One of the most active hits, VI-18469, had a benzoquinoxaline pharmacophore while another, VI-9376, is structurally related to a new class of antimycobacterial agents, the benzothiazinones (BTZ). Like the BTZ, VI-9376 was shown to act on the essential enzyme decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2'-epimerase, DprE1, required for arabinan synthesis.

  1. Terreic Acid, a Quinone Epoxide Inhibitor of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Yuko; Hartman, Stephen E.; Kinoshita, Eiji; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Kitaura, Jiro; Yao, Libo; Inagaki, Naoki; Franco, Alessandra; Hata, Daisuke; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Fukamachi, Hiromi; Nagai, Hiroichi; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    1999-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays pivotal roles in mast cell activation as well as in B cell development. Btk mutations lead to severe impairments in proinflammatory cytokine production induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor on mast cells. By using an in vitro assay to measure the activity that blocks the interaction between protein kinase C and the pleckstrin homology domain of Btk, terreic acid (TA) was identified and characterized in this study. This quinone epoxide specifically inhibited the enzymatic activity of Btk in mast cells and cell-free assays. TA faithfully recapitulated the phenotypic defects of btk mutant mast cells in high-affinity IgE receptor-stimulated wild-type mast cells without affecting the enzymatic activities and expressions of many other signaling molecules, including those of protein kinase C. Therefore, this study confirmed the important roles of Btk in mast cell functions and showed the usefulness of TA in probing into the functions of Btk in mast cells and other immune cell systems. Another insight obtained from this study is that the screening method used to identify TA is a useful approach to finding more efficacious Btk inhibitors.

  2. Kinase inhibitors as potential agents in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Hanley N.

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of therapeutic options available for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) - from immunomodulating agents to proteasome inhibitors to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and, most recently, monoclonal antibodies. Used in conjunction with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, these modalities have nearly doubled the disease's five-year survival rate over the last three decades to about 50%. In spite of these advances, MM still is considered incurable as resistance and relapse are common. While small molecule protein kinase inhibitors have made inroads in the therapy of a number of cancers, to date their application to MM has been less than successful. Focusing on MM, this review examines the roles played by a number of kinases in driving the malignant state and the rationale for target development in the design of a number of kinase inhibitors that have demonstrated anti-myeloma activity in both in vitro and in vivo xenograph models, as well as those that have entered clinical trials. Among the targets and their inhibitors examined are receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases, cell cycle control kinases, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway kinases, protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, casein kinase, integrin-linked kinase, sphingosine kinase, and kinases involved in the unfolded protein response. PMID:27655636

  3. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  4. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  5. Quick evaluation of kinase inhibitors by surface plasmon resonance using single-site specifically biotinylated kinases.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daisuke; Gouda, Masaki; Kirii, Yasuyuki

    2014-03-01

    In evaluating kinase inhibitors, kinetic parameters such as association/dissociation rate constants are valuable information, as are equilibrium parameters KD and IC50 values. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique to investigate these parameters. However, results are often complicated because of impaired conformations by inappropriate conditions required for protein immobilization and/or heterogeneity of the orientation of immobilization. In addition, conventional SPR experiments are generally time-consuming. Here we introduce the use of single-site specifically biotinylated kinases combined with a multichannel SPR device to improve such problems. Kinetic parameters of four compounds-staurosporine, dasatinib, sunitinib, and lapatinib-against six kinases were determined by the ProteOn XPR36 system. The very slow off-rate of lapatinib from the epidermal growth factor receptor and dasatinib from Bruton's tyrosine kinase and colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) were confirmed. Furthermore, IC50 values were determined by an activity-based assay. Evaluating both physicochemical and biochemical properties would help to understand the detailed character of the compound.

  6. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Varma, Gaurav; Johnson, Tyler P; Advani, Ranjana H

    2016-07-01

    The development of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors and their introduction into clinical practice represent a major advance in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other B-cell lymphomas. Although ibrutinib is the only BTK inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, several others are under investigation. Ibrutinib is currently approved for use in relapsed/refractory CLL, CLL with 17p deletion (del[17p]), relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Although it is clear that ibrutinib has altered treatment paradigms and outcomes in these diseases, several questions remain regarding (1) its role in frontline vs salvage therapy; (2) its use as a single agent vs in combination with biologic agents, other small molecules, or traditional chemoimmunotherapy; (3) the optimal duration of treatment; and (4) the treatment of patients who cannot tolerate or have disease resistant to ibrutinib. Because sparse clinical data are available on other BTK inhibitors, it is unclear at present whether their clinical efficacy and toxicity will differ from those of ibrutinib.

  7. Cheminfomatic-based Drug Discovery of Human Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Terry-Elinor; Fortunak, Joseph M.; Wutoh, Anthony; Wang, Xiang Simon

    2016-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) are essential components for regulating cell-cell signaling and communication events in cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival and metabolism. Deregulation of RTKs and their associated signaling pathways can lead to a wide variety of human diseases such as immunodeficiency, diabetes, arterosclerosis, psoriasis and cancer. Thus RTKs have become one of the most important drug targets families in recent decade. Pharmaceutical companies have dedicated their research efforts towards the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of RTKs, many of which had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) or are currently in clinical trials. The great successes in the development of small-molecule inhibitors of RTKs are largely attributed to the use of modern cheminformatic approaches to identifying lead scaffolds. Those include the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling, as well as the structure-, and ligand-based pharmacophore modeling techniques in this case. Herein we inspected the literature thoroughly in an effort to conduct a comparative analysis of major findings regarding the essential structure-activity relationships (SARs)/pharmacophore features of known active RTK inhibitors, most of which were collected from cheminformatic modeling approaches. PMID:26369823

  8. Targeting Human Central Nervous System Protein Kinases: An Isoform Selective p38αMAPK Inhibitor That Attenuates Disease Progression in Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The first kinase inhibitor drug approval in 2001 initiated a remarkable decade of tyrosine kinase inhibitor drugs for oncology indications, but a void exists for serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor drugs and central nervous system indications. Stress kinases are of special interest in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders due to their involvement in synaptic dysfunction and complex disease susceptibility. Clinical and preclinical evidence implicates the stress related kinase p38αMAPK as a potential neurotherapeutic target, but isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor candidates are lacking and the mixed kinase inhibitor drugs that are promising in peripheral tissue disease indications have limitations for neurologic indications. Therefore, pursuit of the neurotherapeutic hypothesis requires kinase isoform selective inhibitors with appropriate neuropharmacology features. Synaptic dysfunction disorders offer a potential for enhanced pharmacological efficacy due to stress-induced activation of p38αMAPK in both neurons and glia, the interacting cellular components of the synaptic pathophysiological axis, to be modulated. We report a novel isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor, MW01-18-150SRM (=MW150), that is efficacious in suppression of hippocampal-dependent associative and spatial memory deficits in two distinct synaptic dysfunction mouse models. A synthetic scheme for biocompatible product and positive outcomes from pharmacological screens are presented. The high-resolution crystallographic structure of the p38αMAPK/MW150 complex documents active site binding, reveals a potential low energy conformation of the bound inhibitor, and suggests a structural explanation for MW150’s exquisite target selectivity. As far as we are aware, MW150 is without precedent as an isoform selective p38MAPK inhibitor or as a kinase inhibitor capable of modulating in vivo stress related behavior. PMID:25676389

  9. The Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib exerts immunomodulatory effects through regulation of tumor-infiltrating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ping, Lingyan; Ding, Ning; Shi, Yunfei; Feng, Lixia; Li, Jiao; Liu, Yalu; Lin, Yufu; Shi, Cunzhen; Wang, Xing; Pan, Zhengying; Song, Yuqin; Zhu, Jun

    2017-06-13

    The Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor ibrutinib has demonstrated promising efficacy in a variety of hematologic malignancies. However, the precise mechanism of action of the drug remains to be fully elucidated. Tumor-infiltrating macrophages presented in the tumor microenvironment have been shown to promote development and progression of B-cell lymphomas through crosstalk mediated by secreted cytokines and chemokines. Because Btk has been implicated in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways that regulate macrophage activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of Btk inhibitor on macrophages. Our results demonstrate that Btk inhibition efficiently suppresses production of CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, and VEGF by macrophages. Furthermore, attenuated secretion of homeostatic chemokines from Btk inhibitor-treated macrophages significantly compromise adhesion, invasion, and migration of lymphoid malignant cells and even those not driven by Btk expression. The supernatants from Btk inhibitor-treated macrophages also impair the ability of endothelial cells to undergo angiogenic tube formation. Mechanistic analysis revealed that Btk inhibitors treatment downregulates secretion of homeostatic chemokines and cytokines through inactivation of Btk signaling and the downstream transcription factors, NF-κB, STAT3, and AP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that the encouraging therapeutic efficacy of Btk inhibitor may be due to both direct cytotoxic effects on malignant B cells and immunomodulatory effects on macrophages present in the tumor microenvironment. This novel mechanism of action suggests that, in addition to B-cell lymphomas, Btk inhibitor may also have therapeutic value in lymphatic malignancies and solid tumors lacking Btk expression.

  10. The Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib exerts immunomodulatory effects through regulation of tumor-infiltrating macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yunfei; Feng, Lixia; Li, Jiao; Liu, Yalu; Lin, Yufu; Shi, Cunzhen; Wang, Xing; Pan, Zhengying; Song, Yuqin; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor ibrutinib has demonstrated promising efficacy in a variety of hematologic malignancies. However, the precise mechanism of action of the drug remains to be fully elucidated. Tumor-infiltrating macrophages presented in the tumor microenvironment have been shown to promote development and progression of B-cell lymphomas through crosstalk mediated by secreted cytokines and chemokines. Because Btk has been implicated in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways that regulate macrophage activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of Btk inhibitor on macrophages. Our results demonstrate that Btk inhibition efficiently suppresses production of CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, and VEGF by macrophages. Furthermore, attenuated secretion of homeostatic chemokines from Btk inhibitor-treated macrophages significantly compromise adhesion, invasion, and migration of lymphoid malignant cells and even those not driven by Btk expression. The supernatants from Btk inhibitor-treated macrophages also impair the ability of endothelial cells to undergo angiogenic tube formation. Mechanistic analysis revealed that Btk inhibitors treatment downregulates secretion of homeostatic chemokines and cytokines through inactivation of Btk signaling and the downstream transcription factors, NF-κB, STAT3, and AP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that the encouraging therapeutic efficacy of Btk inhibitor may be due to both direct cytotoxic effects on malignant B cells and immunomodulatory effects on macrophages present in the tumor microenvironment. This novel mechanism of action suggests that, in addition to B-cell lymphomas, Btk inhibitor may also have therapeutic value in lymphatic malignancies and solid tumors lacking Btk expression. PMID:28424405

  11. Irreversible inhibitors of c-Src kinase that target a non-conserved cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Kwarcinski, Frank E.; Fox, Christel C.; Steffey, Michael E.; Soellner, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed the first irreversible inhibitors of wild-type c-Src kinase. We demonstrate that our irreversible inhibitors display improved potency and selectivity relative to their reversible counterparts. Our strategy involves modifying a promiscuous kinase inhibitor with an electrophile to generate covalent inhibitors of c-Src. We applied this methodology to two inhibitor scaffolds that exhibit increased cellular efficacy when rendered irreversible. In addition, we have demonstrated the utility of irreversible inhibitors in studying the conformation of an important loop in kinases that can control inhibitor selectivity and cause drug resistance. Together, we have developed a general and robust framework for generating selective irreversible inhibitors from reversible, promiscuous inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:22928736

  12. Methyl (E)-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acryloyl)tryptophanate can suppress MCP-1 expression by inhibiting p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB in LPS-stimulated differentiated THP-1 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB play significant roles in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic factor-1 (MCP-1). Therefore, potent inhibitors to suppress p38 kinase and NF-kB activities have been explored as anti-inflammatory agents. In this study, a nov...

  13. Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P.; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2012-06-27

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G{sub 2}-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer.

  14. Norathyriol suppresses skin cancers induced by solar ultraviolet radiation by targeting ERK kinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G(2)-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-κB during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  15. Identification of “Preferred” Human Kinase Inhibitors for Sleeping Sickness Lead Discovery. Are Some Kinases Better than Others for Inhibitor Repurposing?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A kinase-targeting cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) against Trypanosoma brucei was recently reported, and this screening set included the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS). From the PKIS was identified 53 compounds with pEC50 ≥ 6. Utilizing the published data available for the PKIS, a statistical analysis of these active antiparasitic compounds was performed, allowing identification of a set of human kinases having inhibitors that show a high likelihood for blocking T. brucei cellular proliferation in vitro. This observation was confirmed by testing other established inhibitors of these human kinases and by mining past screening campaigns at GlaxoSmithKline. Overall, although the parasite targets of action are not known, inhibitors of this set of human kinases displayed an enhanced hit rate relative to a random kinase-targeting HTS campaign, suggesting that repurposing efforts should focus primarily on inhibitors of these specific human kinases. We therefore term this statistical analysis-driven approach “preferred lead repurposing”. PMID:26998514

  16. Mechanisms of resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihua; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is driven by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs, e.g., gefitinib and elrotinib) have been effectively used for clinical treatment. However, patients eventually develop drug resistance. Resistance to EGFR-TKIs is inevitable due to various mechanisms, such as the secondary mutation (T790M), activation of alternative pathways (c-Met, HGF, AXL), aberrance of the downstream pathways (K-RAS mutations, loss of PTEN), impairment of the EGFR-TKIs-mediated apoptosis pathway (BCL2-like 11/BIM deletion polymorphism), histologic transformation, ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter effusion, etc. Here we review and summarize the known resistant mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs and provide potential targets for development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26579470

  17. [Cytotoxicity of chimera peptides incorporating sequences of cyclin kinases inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, V P; Kulinich, V G; Lunin, V G; Filiasova, E I; Shishkin, A M; Sergeenko, O V; Riazanova, E M; Voronina, O L; Bozhenko, V K

    2007-01-01

    The study is concerned with proapoptotic properties of chimera peptides which incorporate sequences of inhibitors of cyclin kinases p161NK4a and p21CIP/WAF1 as well as internalized sequences (Antp and tat). Sequences of the p16 type appeared to be more cytotoxic than the p21 one. Cytotoxic effect proved dependent on orientation with respect to the C or N terminal point of a polypeptide chain rather than on chimera sequence extent. Although p16 endogenous synthesis did not influence chimera peptide levels, apoptosis did not take place in certain cellular lines. Due to the rather unsophisticated nature of such synthesis, it might be used in designing individually-tailored chemotherapeutic drugs.

  18. Design and Synthesis of Novel Macrocyclic Mer Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Weihe; Stashko, Michael A; Nichols, James; Miley, Michael J; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Chen, Zhilong; Machius, Mischa; DeRyckere, Deborah; Wood, Edgar; Graham, Douglas K; Earp, H Shelton; Kireev, Dmitri; Frye, Stephen V

    2016-12-08

    Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) is aberrantly elevated in various tumor cells and has a normal anti-inflammatory role in the innate immune system. Inhibition of MerTK may provide dual effects against these MerTK-expressing tumors through reducing cancer cell survival and redirecting the innate immune response. Recently, we have designed novel and potent macrocyclic pyrrolopyrimidines as MerTK inhibitors using a structure-based approach. The most active macrocycles had an EC50 below 40 nM in a cell-based MerTK phosphor-protein ELISA assay. The X-ray structure of macrocyclic analogue 3 complexed with MerTK was also resolved and demonstrated macrocycles binding in the ATP binding pocket of the MerTK protein as anticipated. In addition, the lead compound 16 (UNC3133) had a 1.6 h half-life and 16% oral bioavailability in a mouse PK study.

  19. Approved and Experimental Small-Molecule Oncology Kinase Inhibitor Drugs: A Mid-2016 Overview.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter M

    2017-03-01

    Kinase inhibitor research is a comparatively recent branch of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology and the first small-molecule kinase inhibitor, imatinib, was approved for clinical use only 15 years ago. Since then, 33 more kinase inhibitor drugs have received regulatory approval for the treatment of a variety of cancers and the volume of reports on the discovery and development of kinase inhibitors has increased to an extent where it is now difficult-even for those working in the field-easily to keep an overview of the compounds that are being developed, as currently there are 231 such compounds, targeting 38 different protein and lipid kinases (not counting isoforms), in clinical use or under clinical investigation. The purpose of this review is thus to provide an overview of the biomedical rationales for the kinases being targeted on the one hand, and the design principles, as well as chemical, pharmacological, pharmaceutical, and toxicological kinase inhibitor properties, on the other hand. Two issues that are especially important in kinase inhibitor research, target selectivity and drug resistance, as well as the underlying structural concepts, are discussed in general terms and in the context of relevant kinases and their inhibitors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Treatment of vitiligo with the topical Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Brooke; Joshipura, Deep; Saraiya, Ami; Abdat, Rana; Ashkar, Huda; Turkowski, Yana; Sheth, Vaneeta; Huang, Victor; Au, Shiu Chung; Kachuk, Courtney; Dumont, Nicole; Gottlieb, Alice B; Rosmarin, David

    2017-06-01

    Existing therapies for vitiligo are limited in efficacy and can be associated with undesirable side effects. Topical Janus kinase inhibitors may offer a new therapeutic option for vitiligo. We sought to assess the role of topical ruxolitinib 1.5% cream, a Janus kinase inhibitor, in vitiligo treatment. This 20-week, open-label, proof-of-concept trial of twice-daily topical ruxolitinib 1.5% cream was conducted in 12 patients with a minimum of 1% affected body surface area of vitiligo. The primary outcome was percent improvement in Vitiligo Area Scoring Index from baseline to week 20. Of 12 patients screened, 11 were enrolled and 9 completed the study (54.5% men; mean age, 52 years). Four patients with significant facial involvement at baseline had a 76% improvement in facial Vitiligo Area Scoring Index scores at week 20 (95% confidence interval, 53-99%; P = .001). A 23% improvement in overall Vitiligo Area Scoring Index scores was observed in all enrolled patients at week 20 (95% confidence interval, 4-43%; P = .02). Three of 8 patients responded on body surfaces and 1 of 8 patients responded on acral surfaces. Adverse events were minor, including erythema, hyperpigmentation, and transient acne. Limitations of the study include the small sample size and open-label study design. Topical ruxolitinib 1.5% cream provided significant repigmentation in facial vitiligo and may offer a valuable new treatment for vitiligo. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A matched couple: Combining kinase inhibitors with immunotherapy for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qun; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors targeting oncogenic signaling pathways have been explored as cancer therapeutic agents due to their strong anti-tumor activity and manageable toxicity. Accumulating evidence shows that many kinase inhibitors also profoundly modulate immune cell functions, suggesting they may be promising candidates for combination with immunotherapeutic agents for the improved treatment of cancer.

  2. Bosutinib induced pleural effusions: Case report and review of tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Moguillansky, Natalia I; Fakih, Hafiz Abdul Moiz; Wingard, John R

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are known to cause pulmonary complications. We report a case of bosutinib related bilateral pleural effusions in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia. Characteristics of the pleural fluid are presented. We also discuss other tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicities, including pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease.

  3. Aurora kinase inhibitor patents and agents in clinical testing: an update (2011 - 2013).

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Sarvagalla, Sailu; Lee, Jane Ying-Chieh; Huang, Yi-Chun; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj

    2014-09-01

    Aurora kinase A, B and C, members of serine/threonine kinase family, are key regulators of mitosis. As Aurora kinases are overexpressed in many of the human cancers, small-molecule inhibitors of Aurora kinase have emerged as a possible treatment option for cancer. In 2009 and 2011, the literature pertaining to Aurora kinase inhibitors and their patents was reviewed. Here, the aim is to update the information for Aurora kinase inhibitors in clinical trials and the patents filed between the years 2011 and 2013. Pubmed, Scopus®, Scifinder®, USPTO, EPO and www.clinicaltrials.gov databases were used for searching the literature and patents for Aurora kinase inhibitors. Even though both Aurora sub-type selective as well as pan-selective inhibitors show preclinical and clinical efficacy, so far no Aurora kinase inhibitor has been approved for clinical use. Particularly, dose-limiting toxicity (neutropenia) is a key issue that needs to be addressed. Preliminary evidence suggests that the use of selective Aurora A inhibitors could avoid Aurora B-mediated neutropenia in clinical settings. Also, use of adjunctive agents such as granulocyte stimulating factor to overcome neutropenia associated with Aurora B inhibition could be an answer to overcome the toxicity and bring Aurora inhibitors to market in the future.

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ciardiello, F

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-driven autocrine growth pathway has been implicated in the development and progression of the majority of the most common human epithelial cancers, making the blockade of this growth pathway a promising anticancer therapeutic strategy. Different approaches have been developed to block EGFR activation and/or function in cancer cells. In the past 15 years, various anti-EGFR blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAb), recombinant proteins containing transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) or EGF fused to toxins, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been generated and their biological and potentially therapeutic properties characterised. One of these agents, MAb IMC-C225, a chimeric human-mouse IgG1 MAb, is the first anti-EGFR agent to enter phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Several small compounds that block the ligand-induced activation of the EGFR tyrosine kinase have been developed. Among these EGFR-TKIs, various quinazoline-derived agents have been synthesised and have shown promising activity as anticancer agents in preclinical models. ZD1839 ('Iressa'), an anilinoquinazoline, is an orally active, selective EGFR-TKI which is currently under clinical evaluation in phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Preclinical data for ZD1839 strongly support the possibility of potentiating the antitumour activity of conventional chemotherapy with agents that selectively block the EGFR.

  5. Combating acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lovly, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Overview The prospective identification and therapeutic targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has revolutionized the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TKI therapy frequently induces dramatic clinical responses in molecularly defined cohorts of lung cancer patients, paving the way for the implementation of ‘precision medicine’. Unfortunately, acquired resistance, defined as tumor progression after initial response, seems to be an inevitable consequence of this treatment approach. This brief review will provide an overview of the complex and heterogeneous problem of acquired resistance to TKI therapy in NSCLC, with a focus on EGFR-mutant and ALK-rearranged NSCLC. In vitro models of TKI resistance as well as analysis of tumor biopsy samples at the time of disease progression have generated breakthroughs in our understanding of the spectrum of mechanisms by which a tumor can thwart TKI therapy and have provided important rational for development of novel approaches to delay or overcome resistance. Numerous on-going clinical trials implement strategies, including novel, more potent TKIs as well as rational combinations of targeted therapies, some of which have already proven to be effective in surmounting therapeutic resistance. PMID:25993168

  6. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 transcriptionally suppresses hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinke; Zhang, Geng; Lin, Yong; Xie, Zhanglian; Liu, Hongyan; Tang, Libo; Lu, Mengji; Yan, Ran; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Jian; Hou, Jinlin; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) replication in hepatocytes is restricted by the host innate immune system and related intracellular signaling pathways. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a key mediator of toll-like receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling pathways. Here, we report that silencing or inhibition of endogenous TAK1 in hepatoma cell lines leads to an upregulation of HBV replication, transcription, and antigen expression. In contrast, overexpression of TAK1 significantly suppresses HBV replication, while an enzymatically inactive form of TAK1 exerts no effect. By screening TAK1-associated signaling pathways with inhibitors and siRNAs, we found that the MAPK-JNK pathway was involved in TAK1-mediated HBV suppression. Moreover, TAK1 knockdown or JNK pathway inhibition induced the expression of farnesoid X receptor α, a transcription factor that upregulates HBV transcription. Finally, ectopic expression of TAK1 in a HBV hydrodynamic injection mouse model resulted in lower levels of HBV DNA and antigens in both liver and serum. In conclusion, our data suggest that TAK1 inhibits HBV primarily at viral transcription level through activation of MAPK-JNK pathway, thus TAK1 represents an intrinsic host restriction factor for HBV replication in hepatocytes. PMID:28045080

  7. Gingerenone A attenuates monocyte-endothelial adhesion via suppression of I Kappa B kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Joo; Son, Joe Eun; Kim, Jae Hwan; Lee, Charles C; Yang, Hee; Yaghmoor, Soonham Sami; Ahmed, Youssri; Yousef, Jehad Mustafa; Abualnaja, Khalid Omer; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman Labeed; Kumosani, Taha Abdullah; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Chang Yong; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2017-05-17

    During the early stages of atherosclerosis, monocytes bind and migrate into the endothelial layer, promoting inflammation within the aorta. In order to prevent the development of atherosclerosis, it is critical to inhibit such inflammation. The therapeutic effects of ginger have been investigated in several models of cardiovascular disease. However, although a number of previous studies have focused on specific compounds, the mechanisms of action responsible remain unclear. Here, we investigated five major compounds present in ginger, and observed that gingerenone A exhibited the strongest inhibitory effects against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- α and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Furthermore, gingerenone A significantly suppressed the expression of TNF- α and LPS-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), key mediators of the interaction between monocytes and endothelial cells. Transactivation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which is a key transcription factor of VCAM-1 and CCL2, was induced by TNF- and LPS, and inhibited by treatment of gingerenone A. Gingerenone A also inhibited the phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitor (Iκ B) α and Iκ B Kinase. Taken together, these results demonstrate that gingerenone A attenuates TNF- α and LPS-induced monocyte adhesion and the expression of adhesion factors in endothelial cells via the suppression of NF-κB signaling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Aurora Kinases and Potential Medical Applications of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavriilidis, Paschalis; Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinases (AKs) represent a novel group of serine/threonine kinases. They were originally described in 1995 by David Glover in the course of studies of mutant alleles characterized with unusual spindle pole configuration in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus far, three AKs A, B, and C have been discovered in human healthy and neoplastic cells. Each one locates in different subcellular locations and they are all nuclear proteins. AKs are playing an essential role in mitotic events such as monitoring of the mitotic checkpoint, creation of bipolar mitotic spindle and alignment of centrosomes on it, also regulating centrosome separation, bio-orientation of chromosomes and cytokinesis. Any inactivation of them can have catastrophic consequences on mitotic events of spindle formation, alignment of centrosomes and cytokinesis, resulting in apoptosis. Overexpression of AKs has been detected in diverse solid and hematological cancers and has been linked with a dismal prognosis. After discovery and identification of the first aurora kinase inhibitor (AKI) ZM447439 as a potential drug for targeted therapy in cancer treatment, approximately 30 AKIs have been introduced in cancer treatment. PMID:26345296

  9. Highly selective 2,4-diaminopyrimidine-5-carboxamide inhibitors of Sky kinase.

    PubMed

    Powell, Noel A; Hoffman, Jennifer K; Ciske, Fred L; Kaufman, Michael D; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Quin, John; Sheehan, Derek J; Delaney, Amy; Baxi, Sangita M; Catana, Cornel; McConnell, Patrick; Ohren, Jeff; Perrin, Lisa A; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2013-02-15

    We report the SAR around a series of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine-5-carboxamide inhibitors of Sky kinase. 2-Aminophenethyl analogs demonstrate excellent potency but moderate kinase selectivity, while 2-aminobenzyl analogs that fill the Ala571 subpocket exhibit good inhibition activity and excellent kinase selectivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovery of CX-6258. A Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious pan-Pim Kinases Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Haddach, Mustapha; Michaux, Jerome; Schwaebe, Michael K; Pierre, Fabrice; O'Brien, Sean E; Borsan, Cosmin; Tran, Joe; Raffaele, Nicholas; Ravula, Suchitra; Drygin, Denis; Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; Darjania, Levan; Stansfield, Ryan; Proffitt, Chris; Macalino, Diwata; Streiner, Nicole; Bliesath, Joshua; Omori, May; Whitten, Jeffrey P; Anderes, Kenna; Rice, William G; Ryckman, David M

    2012-02-09

    Structure-activity relationship analysis in a series of 3-(5-((2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)methyl)furan-2-yl)amides identified compound 13, a pan-Pim kinases inhibitor with excellent biochemical potency and kinase selectivity. Compound 13 exhibited in vitro synergy with chemotherapeutics and robust in vivo efficacy in two Pim kinases driven tumor models.

  11. The protein kinase 2 inhibitor tetrabromobenzotriazole protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Sun-O; Hwang, Hong Pil; Jang, Jong-Hwa; Hyuk Bang, In; Bae, Ui-Jin; Yu, Hee Chul; Cho, Baik Hwan; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase 2 (CK2) activation was reported to enhance reactive oxygen species production and activate the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Because oxidative stress and inflammation are critical events for tissue destruction during ischemia reperfusion (I/R), we sought to determine whether CK2 was important in the renal response to I/R. Mice underwent 25 min of renal ischemia and were then reperfused. We confirmed an increased expression of CK2α during the reperfusion period, while expression of CK2β remained consistent. We administered tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBBt), a selective CK2α inhibitor before inducing I/R injury. Mice subjected to I/R injury showed typical patterns of acute kidney injury; blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels, tubular necrosis and apoptosis, inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine production, and oxidative stress were markedly increased when compared to sham mice. However, pretreatment with TBBt abolished these changes and improved renal function and architecture. Similar renoprotective effects of CK2α inhibition were observed for emodin. Renoprotective effects of CK2α inhibition were associated with suppression of NF-κB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that CK2α mediates proapoptotic and proinflammatory signaling, thus the CK2α inhibitor may be used to prevent renal I/R injuries observed in clinical settings. PMID:26423352

  12. Substance P suppresses GABAA receptor function via protein kinase C in primary sensory neurones of bullfrogs.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, K; Akasu, T

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of substance P (SP) and related tachykinins on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors were examined in acutely dissociated neurones of bullfrog dorsal root ganglia (DRG) by using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. 2. Application of SP (10 nM to 1 microM) depressed inward currents produced by GABAA receptor activation (IGABA). Neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) also depressed IGABA; the rank order of agonist potency was SP > NKA > NKB. Spantide ([D-Arg1, D-Trp7,9,Leu11]SP) and L-703,606, NK1 receptor antagonists, blocked the SP-induced depression of IGABA. 3. SP irreversibly depressed IGABA, when neurones were intracellularly dialysed with GTP gamma S. Intracellular application of GDP beta S prevented the SP-induced depression of IGABA. Pertussis toxin (PTX) did not block the inhibitory effect of SP on IGABA. 4. The depression of IGABA produced by SP was inhibited by H-7 and PKC(19-36), protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, but not by H-9 and HA-1004, protein kinase A inhibitors. IGABA was suppressed by application of sn-1,2-dioctanoyl glycerol (DOG), a PKC activator. 5. It is concluded that activation of neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors downregulates the function of the GABAA receptor of primary sensory neurones through a PTX-insensitive G-protein. PKC may be involved in the transduction pathway of the tachykinin-induced inhibition of the GABAA receptor. PMID:8910228

  13. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  14. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors in Oncology Clinical Trials: Current State of the Progress.

    PubMed

    Falchook, Gerald S; Bastida, Christel C; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-12-01

    The Aurora kinase family of kinases (Aurora A, B, and C) are involved in multiple mitotic events, and aberrant expression of these kinases is associated with tumorigenesis. Aurora A and Aurora B are validated anticancer targets, and the development of Aurora kinase inhibitors has progressed from preclinical to clinical studies. A variety of Aurora A, B and pan-Aurora kinase inhibitors have entered the clinic. The main side effects include febrile neutropenia, stomatitis, gastrointestinal toxicity, hypertension, and fatigue. Responses including complete remissions have been described in diverse, advanced malignancies, most notably ovarian cancer and acute myelogenous leukemia. This review highlights the biologic rationale for Aurora kinase as a target, and clinical trials involving Aurora kinase inhibitors, with particular emphasis on published early phase studies, and the observed anti-tumor activity of these agents.

  15. Affinity purification of proteins binding to kinase inhibitors immobilized on self-assembling monolayers.

    PubMed

    Bantscheff, Marcus; Hobson, Scott; Kuster, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors represent a relatively new class of drugs that offer novel therapies targeting specific -malfunctioning kinase-mediated signaling pathways in oncology and potentially inflammation. As the ATP binding sites of the ∼500 human kinases are structurally conserved and because most current drugs target the ATP binding site, there is a need to profile all the kinases that a drug may bind and/or inhibit. We have developed a chemical proteomics method that affinity purifies kinases from cell or tissue lysates using kinase inhibitors immobilized on self-assembling monolayers. The method can be applied to assess the selectivity of a given kinase inhibitor and thus to guide its preclinical or clinical development.

  16. A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor induced compound skin toxicity with oedema in metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C L; Mortimer, P S; Larkin, J M; Basu, T N; Gore, M E; Fearfield, L

    2016-04-01

    We report three cases of skin toxicity associated with oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). All three patients developed oedema, and a single patient experienced eyelash trichomegaly. This is the first known report of eyelash trichomegaly secondary to MEK inhibitor use. We also discuss possible mechanisms for MEK inhibitor-associated oedema development. This series supports the role of the dermatologist in the screening and management of patients in the rapidly developing oncology setting, as new targeted agents can give rise to marked skin toxicity.

  17. Pharmacological cdk inhibitor R-Roscovitine suppresses JC virus proliferation.

    PubMed

    Orba, Yasuko; Sunden, Yuji; Suzuki, Tadaki; Nagashima, Kazuo; Kimura, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2008-01-05

    The human Polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) utilizes cellular proteins for viral replication and transcription in the host cell nucleus. These cellular proteins represent potential targets for antiviral drugs against the JCV. In this study, we examined the antiviral effects of the pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor R-Roscovitine, which has been shown to have antiviral activity against other viruses. We found that Roscovitine significantly inhibited the viral production and cytopathic effects of the JCV in a JCV-infected cell line. Roscovitine attenuated the transcriptional activity of JCV late genes, but not early genes, and also prevented viral replication via inhibiting phosphorylation of the viral early protein, large T antigen. These data suggest that the JCV requires cdks to transcribe late genes and to replicate its own DNA. That Roscovitine exhibited antiviral activity in JCV-infected cells suggests that Roscovitine might have therapeutic utility in the treatment of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).

  18. Pharmacological cdk inhibitor R-Roscovitine suppresses JC virus proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Orba, Yasuko; Sunden, Yuji; Suzuki, Tadaki; Nagashima, Kazuo; Kimura, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2008-01-05

    The human Polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) utilizes cellular proteins for viral replication and transcription in the host cell nucleus. These cellular proteins represent potential targets for antiviral drugs against the JCV. In this study, we examined the antiviral effects of the pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor R-Roscovitine, which has been shown to have antiviral activity against other viruses. We found that Roscovitine significantly inhibited the viral production and cytopathic effects of the JCV in a JCV-infected cell line. Roscovitine attenuated the transcriptional activity of JCV late genes, but not early genes, and also prevented viral replication via inhibiting phosphorylation of the viral early protein, large T antigen. These data suggest that the JCV requires cdks to transcribe late genes and to replicate its own DNA. That Roscovitine exhibited antiviral activity in JCV-infected cells suggests that Roscovitine might have therapeutic utility in the treatment of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)

  19. The protein kinase 2 inhibitor CX-4945 regulates osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Son, You Hwa; Moon, Seong Hee; Kim, Jiyeon

    2013-11-01

    Drug repositioning can identify new therapeutic applications for existing drugs, thus mitigating high R&D costs. The Protein kinase 2 (CK2) inhibitor CX-4945 regulates human cancer cell survival and angiogenesis. Here we found that CX-4945 significantly inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, but enhanced the BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation in a cell culture model. CX-4945 inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of TRAP and NFATc1 expression accompanied with suppression of Akt phosphorylation, but in contrast, it enhanced the BMP2-mediated ALP induction and MAPK ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CX-4945 is thus a novel drug candidate for bone-related disorders such as osteoporosis.

  20. The mTOR kinase inhibitor everolimus synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effect of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor PLS-123 on Mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Wang, Xiaogan; Xie, Yan; Ying, Zhitao; Liu, Weiping; Ping, Lingyan; Zhang, Chen; Pan, Zhengying; Ding, Ning; Song, Yuqin; Zhu, Jun

    2017-09-14

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive and incurable malignant disease. Despite of general chemotherapy, relapse and mortality are common, highlighting the need for the development of novel targeted drugs or combination of therapeutic regimens. Recently, several drugs that target the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway, especially the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib, have demonstrated notable therapeutic effects in relapsed/refractory patients, which indicate that pharmacological inhibition of BCR pathway holds promise in MCL treatment. Here, we have developed a novel irreversible BTK inhibitor, PLS-123, that has more potent and selective anti-tumor activity than ibrutinib in vitro and in vivo. Using in vitro screening, we discovered that the combination of PLS-123 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, everolimus exert synergistic activity in attenuating proliferation and motility of MCL cell lines. Simultaneous inhibition of BTK and mTOR resulted in marked induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, which were accompanied by upregulation of pro-apoptotic proteins (cleaved Caspase-3, cleaved PARP and Bax), repression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Mcl-1, Bcl-xl and XIAP), and downregulation of regulators of the G1/S phase transition (CDK2, CDK4, CDK6 and Cyclin D1). Gene expression profile analysis revealed simultaneous treatment with these agents led to inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3, AKT/mTOR signaling pathways and SGK1 expression. Finally, the anti-tumor and pro-apoptotic activities of combination strategy have also been demonstrated using xenograft mice models. Taken together, simultaneous suppression of BTK and mTOR may be indicated as a potential therapeutic modality for the treatment of MCL. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 UICC.

  1. Resveratrol dimers are novel sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitors and affect sphingosine kinase 1 expression and cancer cell growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Keng Gat; Gray, Alexander I; Pyne, Susan; Pyne, Nigel J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Sphingosine kinase 1 catalyses formation of the bioactive lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate, which protects cancer cells from apoptosis. Therefore, sphingosine kinase 1 is a novel target for intervention with anti-cancer agents. We have assessed the effect of the anti-cancer agent, resveratrol and its dimers (ampelopsin A and balanocarpol) on sphingosine kinase 1 activity and on survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ampelopsin A and balanocarpol were purified from Hopea dryobalanoides and their effect on sphingosine kinase 1 activity and expression, [3H] thymidine incorporation, ERK-1/2 phosphorylation and PARP activity assessed in MCF-7 cells. KEY RESULTS Resveratrol, ampelopsin A and balanocarpol were novel inhibitors of sphingosine kinase 1 activity. Balanocarpol was a mixed inhibitor (with sphingosine) of sphingosine kinase 1 with a Kic= 90 ± 10 µM and a Kiu of ∼500 µM. Balanocarpol and ampelopsin A also induced down-regulation of sphingosine kinase 1 expression and reduced DNA synthesis, while balanocarpol stimulated PARP cleavage in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Resveratrol was a competitive inhibitor (with sphingosine) of sphingosine kinase 1 with a Kic= 160 ± 40 µM, reduced sphingosine kinase 1 expression and induced PARP cleavage in MCF-7 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Each molecule of balanocarpol may bind at least two sphingosine kinase 1 catalytic molecules to reduce the activity of each simultaneously. These findings suggest that resveratrol, ampelopsin A and balanocarpol could perturb sphingosine kinase 1-mediated signalling and this might explain their activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Hergst and Yun, pp. 1603–1604 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.01898.x PMID:22251058

  2. Structure-based lead discovery for protein kinase C zeta inhibitor design by exploiting kinase-inhibitor complex crystal structure data and potential therapeutics for preterm labour.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Cui-Juan; Li, Jie

    2014-10-14

    The protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases with a broad range of cellular targets. Members of the PKC family participate at the diverse biological events involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and survival. The PKC isoform zeta (PKCζ) is an atypical member that has recently been found to play an essential role in promoting human uterine contractility and thus been raised as a new target for treating preterm labour and other tocolytic diseases. In this study, an integrative protocol was described to graft hundreds of inhibitor ligands from their complex crystal structures with cognate kinases into the active pocket of PKCζ and, based on the modeled structures, to evaluate the binding strength of these inhibitors to the non-cognate PKCζ receptor by using a consensus scoring strategy. A total of 32 inhibitors with top score were compiled, and eight out of them were tested for inhibitory potency against PKCζ. Consequently, five compounds, i.e. CDK6 inhibitor fisetin, PIM1 inhibitor myricetin, CDK9 inhibitor flavopiridol and PknB inhibitor mitoxantrone as well as the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed high or moderate inhibitory activity on PKCζ, with IC50 values of 58 ± 9, 1.7 ± 0.4, 108 ± 17, 280 ± 47 and 0.019 ± 0.004 μM, respectively, while other three compounds, including two marketed drugs dasatinib and sunitinib as well as the Rho inhibitor fasudil, have not been detected to possess observable activity. Next, based on the modeled structure data we modified three flavonoid kinase inhibitors, i.e. fisetin, myricetin and flavopiridol, to generate a number of more potential molecular entities, two of which were found to have a moderately improved activity as compared to their parent compounds.

  3. mTOR kinase inhibitors promote antibody class switching via mTORC2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Limon, Jose J; So, Lomon; Jellbauer, Stefan; Chiu, Honyin; Corado, Juana; Sykes, Stephen M; Raffatellu, Manuela; Fruman, David A

    2014-11-25

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase that functions in two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In peripheral B cells, complete deletion of mTOR suppresses germinal center B-cell responses, including class switching and somatic hypermutation. The allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin blocks proliferation and differentiation, but lower doses can promote protective IgM responses. To elucidate the complexity of mTOR signaling in B cells further, we used ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitors (TOR-KIs), which inhibit both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Although TOR-KIs are in clinical development for cancer, their effects on mature lymphocytes are largely unknown. We show that high concentrations of TOR-KIs suppress B-cell proliferation and differentiation, yet lower concentrations that preserve proliferation increase the fraction of B cells undergoing class switching in vitro. Transient treatment of mice with the TOR-KI compound AZD8055 increased titers of class-switched high-affinity antibodies to a hapten-protein conjugate. Mechanistic investigation identified opposing roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in B-cell differentiation and showed that TOR-KIs enhance class switching in a manner dependent on forkhead box, subgroup O (FoxO) transcription factors. These observations emphasize the distinct actions of TOR-KIs compared with rapamycin and suggest that TOR-KIs might be useful to enhance production of class-switched antibodies following vaccination.

  4. Investigational Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Norman, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The Tec family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases comprises five members. The cellular expression and function of these kinases has implicated them as potential drug targets for the treatment of both malignant and autoimmune diseases. Most attention has focused on inhibitors of BTK kinase with ibrutinib already approved for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Multiple BTK inhibitors are being developed for both oncology and autoimmune disease indications. BTK inhibitors being evaluated in rheumatoid arthritis are considered. Both inhibitors which have progressed to early clinical development, and those demonstrating activity in rodent models of arthritis are reviewed. These include both reversible and irreversible inhibitors of the kinase, most of which target the cysteine-481 residue of BTK. The selectivity of these inhibitors for Tec family kinases is considered. Developing inhibitors of any kinase to treat of rheumatoid arthritis has proved problematic with regard to both efficacy and selectivity. It is anticipated that the more selective BTK inhibitors may prove more useful in treating arthritis, with the use of reversible inhibitors possibly offering a better strategy. Chronic dosing may exacerbate the emergence of drug resistance, with resistant mutations already observed in ibrutinib-treated patients.

  5. Combination of bortezomib and mitotic inhibitors down-modulate Bcr-Abl and efficiently eliminates tyrosine-kinase inhibitor sensitive and resistant Bcr-Abl-positive leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Octavian; Stancu, Andreea Lucia; Goganau, Ioana; Petrescu, Stefana Maria; Pennarun, Bodvael; Bertomeu, Thierry; Dewar, Rajan; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of resistance to Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib, in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) demands new therapeutic strategies. We and others have previously established bortezomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, as an important potential treatment in CML. Here we show that the combined regimens of bortezomib with mitotic inhibitors, such as the microtubule-stabilizing agent Paclitaxel and the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, efficiently kill TKIs-resistant and -sensitive Bcr-Abl-positive leukemic cells. Combined treatment activates caspases 8, 9 and 3, which correlate with caspase-induced PARP cleavage. These effects are associated with a marked increase in activation of the stress-related MAP kinases p38MAPK and JNK. Interestingly, combined treatment induces a marked decrease in the total and phosphorylated Bcr-Abl protein levels, and inhibits signaling pathways downstream of Bcr-Abl: downregulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation and/or total levels and a decrease in phosphorylation of the Bcr-Abl-associated proteins CrkL and Lyn. Moreover, we found that other mitotic inhibitors (Vincristine and Docetaxel), in combination with bortezomib, also suppress the Bcr-Abl-induced pro-survival signals and result in caspase 3 activation. These results open novel possibilities for the treatment of Bcr-Abl-positive leukemias, especially in the imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib-resistant CML cases.

  6. Combination of Bortezomib and Mitotic Inhibitors Down-Modulate Bcr-Abl and Efficiently Eliminates Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitor Sensitive and Resistant Bcr-Abl-Positive Leukemic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goganau, Ioana; Petrescu, Stefana Maria; Pennarun, Bodvael; Bertomeu, Thierry; Dewar, Rajan; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of resistance to Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib, in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) demands new therapeutic strategies. We and others have previously established bortezomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, as an important potential treatment in CML. Here we show that the combined regimens of bortezomib with mitotic inhibitors, such as the microtubule-stabilizing agent Paclitaxel and the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, efficiently kill TKIs-resistant and -sensitive Bcr-Abl-positive leukemic cells. Combined treatment activates caspases 8, 9 and 3, which correlate with caspase-induced PARP cleavage. These effects are associated with a marked increase in activation of the stress-related MAP kinases p38MAPK and JNK. Interestingly, combined treatment induces a marked decrease in the total and phosphorylated Bcr-Abl protein levels, and inhibits signaling pathways downstream of Bcr-Abl: downregulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation and/or total levels and a decrease in phosphorylation of the Bcr-Abl-associated proteins CrkL and Lyn. Moreover, we found that other mitotic inhibitors (Vincristine and Docetaxel), in combination with bortezomib, also suppress the Bcr-Abl-induced pro-survival signals and result in caspase 3 activation. These results open novel possibilities for the treatment of Bcr-Abl-positive leukemias, especially in the imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib-resistant CML cases. PMID:24155950

  7. Analogs of cinnamic acid benzyl amide as nonclassical inhibitors of activated JAK2 kinase.

    PubMed

    Mielecki, Marcin; Milner-Krawczyk, Małgorzata; Grzelak, Krystyna; Mielecki, Damian; Krzysko, Krystiana A; Lesyng, Bogdan; Priebe, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Scaffold-based analogs of cinnamic acid benzyl amide (CABA) exhibit pleiotropic effects in cancer cells, and their exact molecular mechanism of action is under investigation. The present study is part of our systemic analysis of interactions of CABA analogs with their molecular targets. These compounds were shown to inhibit Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling and thus are attractive scaffolds for anticancer drug design. To identify the potential mechanisms of action of this class of compounds, direct interactions of the selected CABA analogs with JAK2 kinase were examined. Inhibition of JAK2 enzymatic activity was assessed, and molecular modeling studies of selected compounds-(E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1-phenylethyl]-3-(pyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1065), (E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1-phenylbutyl]- 3-(3-bromopyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1130), and (E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1,4-diphenylbutyl]-3-(3-bromopyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1702)-in the JAK2 kinase domain were used to support interpretation of the experimental data. Our results indicated that the tested CABA analogs are nonclassical inhibitors of activated (phosphorylated) JAK2, although markedly weaker than clinically tested ATP-competitive JAK2 inhibitors. Relatively small structural changes in the studied compounds affected interactions with JAK2, and their mode of action ranged from allosteric-noncompetitive to bisubstratecompetitive. These results demonstrated that direct inhibition of JAK2 enzymatic activity by the WP1065 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC₅₀] = 14.8 µM), WP1130 (IC₅₀ = 3.8 µM), and WP1702 (IC₅₀ = 2.9 µM) potentially contributes, albeit minimally, to suppression of the JAK2/STAT signaling pathways in cancer cells and that additional specific structural modifications may amplify JAK2-inhibitory effects.

  8. Anti-cancer synergy of dichloroacetate and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng; Tam, Kin Y

    2016-10-15

    Glycolysis has been observed as a predominant process for most cancer cells to utilize glucose, which was referred to as "Warburg Effect". Targeting critical enzymes, such as pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) that inversely regulating the process of glycolysis could be a promising approach to work alone or in combination with other treatments for cancer therapy. EGFR inhibitors for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) treatment have been applied for decades in clinical practices with great success, but also their clinical benefits were somewhat hampered by the rising acquired-resistance. Combination drug therapy is an effective strategy to cope with the challenge. In this study, we utilized Dichloroacetate (DCA), a widely regarded PDK inhibitor, together with Erlotinib and Gefitinib, two well-known EGFR inhibitors, and demonstrated that the applications of DCA in combination with either Erlotinib or Gefitinib significantly attenuated the viability of EGFR mutant NSCLC cells (NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1650) in a synergistic manner. This synergistic outcome appears to be a combination effect in promoting apoptosis, rather than co-suppression of either EGFR or PDK signaling pathways. Moreover, we have shown that the combination treatment did not exhibit synergistic effect in other NSCLC cell lines without EGFR mutations (A549 or NCI-H460). Together, these observations suggested that combined targeting of EGFR and PDK in NSCLC cells exerted synergistic effects in an EGFR mutation-dependent fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bisubstrate fluorescent probes and biosensors in binding assays for HTS of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Uri, Asko; Lust, Marje; Vaasa, Angela; Lavogina, Darja; Viht, Kaido; Enkvist, Erki

    2010-03-01

    Conjugates of adenosine mimics and d-arginine-rich peptides (ARCs) are potent inhibitors of protein kinases (PKs) from the AGC group. Labeling ARCs with fluorescent dyes or immobilizing on chip surfaces gives fluorescent probes (ARC-Photo) and biosensors that can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of protein kinases. The bisubstrate character (simultaneous association with both binding sites of the kinase) and high affinity of ARCs allow ARC-based probes and sensors to be used for characterization of inhibitors targeted to either binding site of the kinase with affinities in whole nanomolar to micromolar range. The ability to penetrate cell plasma membrane and bind to the target kinase fused with a fluorescent protein leads to the possibility to use ARC-Photo probes for high content screening (HCS) of inhibitors in cellular milieu with detection of intensity of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores.

  10. A chemoproteomic method for identifying cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are attractive drug targets for numerous human diseases including cancers, diabetes and neurodegeneration. A number of kinase inhibitors that covalently target a cysteine residue in their target kinases have recently entered use in the cancer clinic. Despite the advantages of covalent kinases inhibitors, their inherent reactivity can lead to non-specific binding to other cellular proteins and cause off- target effects in cells. It is thus essential to determine the identity of these off targets in order to fully account for the phenotype and to improve the selectivity and efficacy of covalent inhibitors. Herein we present a detailed protocol for a chemoproteomic method to enrich and identify cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors. PMID:27551330

  11. The logic and design of analog-sensitive kinases and their small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Michael S; Kliegman, Joseph I; Shokat, Kevan M

    2014-01-01

    Analog-sensitive AS Kinase technology allows for rapid, reversible, and highly specific inhibition of individual engineered kinases in cells and in mouse models of human diseases. The technique consists of two parts: a kinase containing a space-creating mutation in the ATP-binding pocket and a bulky ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitor that complements the shape of the mutant ATP pocket. This strategy enables dissection of phospho-signaling pathways, elucidation of the physiological function of individual kinases, and characterization of the pharmacology of clinical-kinase inhibitors. Here, we present an overview of AS technology and describe a stepwise approach for generating AS Kinase mutants and identifying appropriate small molecule inhibitors. We also describe commonly encountered technical obstacles and provide strategies to overcome them.

  12. A phosphoarray platform is capable of personalizing kinase inhibitor therapy in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Klinghammer, Konrad; Keller, James; George, Jonathan; Hoffmann, Jens; Chan, Edward L; Hayman, Michael J

    2017-09-14

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective treatments for cancers. Knowing the specific kinase mutants that drive the underlying cancers predict therapeutic response to these inhibitors. Thus, the current protocol for personalized cancer therapy involves genotyping tumors in search of various driver mutations and subsequently individualizing the tyrosine kinase inhibitor to the patients whose tumors express the corresponding driver mutant. While this approach works when known driver mutations are found, its limitation is the dependence on driver mutations as predictors for response. To complement the genotype approach, we hypothesize that a phosphoarray platform is equally capable of personalizing kinase inhibitor therapy. We selected head and neck squamous cell carcinoma as the cancer model to test our hypothesis. Using the receptor tyrosine kinase phosphoarray, we identified the phosphorylation profiles of 49 different tyrosine kinase receptors in five different head and neck cancer cell lines. Based on these results, we tested the cell line response to the corresponding kinase inhibitor therapy. We found that this phosphoarray accurately informed the kinase inhibitor response profile of the cell lines. Next, we determined the phosphorylation profiles of 39 head and neck cancer patient derived xenografts. We found that absent phosphorylated EGFR signal predicted primary resistance to cetuximab treatment in the xenografts without phosphorylated ErbB2. Meanwhile, absent ErbB2 signaling in the xenografts with phosphorylated EGFR is associated with a higher likelihood of response to cetuximab. In summary, the phosphoarray technology has the potential to become a new diagnostic platform for personalized cancer therapy. © 2017 UICC.

  13. Anchor-based classification and type-C inhibitors for tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Lin, Chih-Ta; Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hung, Hui-Chen; Sun, Chung-Ming; Barve, Indrajeet; Chen, Wen-Liang; Huang, Wen-Chien; Huang, Chin-Ting; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases regulate various biological processes and are drug targets for cancers. At present, the design of selective and anti-resistant inhibitors of kinases is an emergent task. Here, we inferred specific site-moiety maps containing two specific anchors to uncover a new binding pocket in the C-terminal hinge region by docking 4,680 kinase inhibitors into 51 protein kinases, and this finding provides an opportunity for the development of kinase inhibitors with high selectivity and anti-drug resistance. We present an anchor-based classification for tyrosine kinases and discover two type-C inhibitors, namely rosmarinic acid (RA) and EGCG, which occupy two and one specific anchors, respectively, by screening 118,759 natural compounds. Our profiling reveals that RA and EGCG selectively inhibit 3% (EGFR and SYK) and 14% of 64 kinases, respectively. According to the guide of our anchor model, we synthesized three RA derivatives with better potency. These type-C inhibitors are able to maintain activities for drug-resistant EGFR and decrease the invasion ability of breast cancer cells. Our results show that the type-C inhibitors occupying a new pocket are promising for cancer treatments due to their kinase selectivity and anti-drug resistance. PMID:26077136

  14. Kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutics for acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions.

    PubMed

    Cuny, G D

    2009-01-01

    Kinases, which number > 500 in humans, are a class of enzymes that participate in an array of important functions within normal cellular physiology and during various pathological conditions. Due to the key role of kinases in the regulation of all aspects of cellular signaling and the well established contribution of kinase dysregulation to the etiology of many human pathologies, the development of kinase inhibitors has emerged as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human disease, including most notably oncology. Difficulties generating selective inhibitors have hampered their use in other therapeutic areas with less tolerance for off-target effects. However, with an increasing understanding of kinase structures and with the advent of newer inhibitor design strategies more highly selective inhibitors are beginning to emerge. This has prompted interest in utilizing kinase inhibitors in therapeutic areas beyond oncology, including acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions for which disease modify therapies are lacking. This review provides a background in acute (i.e. brain ischemia and traumatic brain injury) and chronic (i.e. Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis) neurodegenerative conditions. Then, the role of several kinase (i.e. JNK3, p38 MAPK, ERK, PKC, ROCKII, GSK3, Cdk5, MLK, EphB3 kinase, RIP1 kinase, LRRK2, TTBK1, ASK1, CK, DAPK, and PKN1) that could serve as potential therapeutic targets for these maladies are reviewed.

  15. Novel mutant-selective EGFR kinase inhibitors against EGFR T790M

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wenjun; Ercan, Dalia; Chen, Liang; Yun, Cai-Hong; Li, Danan; Capelletti, Marzia; Cortot, Alexis B.; Chirieac, Lucian; Iacob, Roxana E.; Padera, Robert; Engen, John R.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Eck, Michael J.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2010-01-12

    The clinical efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is limited by the development of drug-resistance mutations, including the gatekeeper T790M mutation. Strategies targeting EGFR T790M with irreversible inhibitors have had limited success and are associated with toxicity due to concurrent inhibition of wild-type EGFR. All current EGFR inhibitors possess a structurally related quinazoline-based core scaffold and were identified as ATP-competitive inhibitors of wild-type EGFR. Here we identify a covalent pyrimidine EGFR inhibitor by screening an irreversible kinase inhibitor library specifically against EGFR T790M. These agents are 30- to 100-fold more potent against EGFR T790M, and up to 100-fold less potent against wild-type EGFR, than quinazoline-based EGFR inhibitors in vitro. They are also effective in murine models of lung cancer driven by EGFR T790M. Co-crystallization studies reveal a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of these agents. These mutant-selective irreversible EGFR kinase inhibitors may be clinically more effective and better tolerated than quinazoline-based inhibitors. Our findings demonstrate that functional pharmacological screens against clinically important mutant kinases represent a powerful strategy to identify new classes of mutant-selective kinase inhibitors.

  16. Feasibility of using molecular docking-based virtual screening for searching dual target kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shunye; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2013-04-22

    Multitarget agents have been extensively explored for solving limited efficacies, poor safety, and resistant profiles of an individual target. Theoretical approaches for searching and designing multitarget agents are critically useful. Here, the performance of molecular docking to search dual-target inhibitors for four kinase pairs (CDK2-GSK3B, EGFR-Src, Lck-Src, and Lck-VEGFR2) was assessed. First, the representative structures for each kinase target were chosen by structural clustering of available crystal structures. Next, the performance of molecular docking to distinguish inhibitors from noninhibitors for each individual kinase target was evaluated. The results show that molecular docking-based virtual screening illustrates good capability to find known inhibitors for individual targets, but the prediction accuracy is structurally dependent. Finally, the performance of molecular docking to identify the dual-target kinase inhibitors for four kinase pairs was evaluated. The analyses show that molecular docking successfully filters out most noninhibitors and achieves promising performance for identifying dual-kinase inhibitors for CDK2-GSK3B and Lck-VEGFR2. But a high false-positive rate leads to low enrichment of true dual-target inhibitors in the final list. This study suggests that molecular docking serves as a useful tool in searching inhibitors against dual or even multiple kinase targets, but integration with other virtual screening tools is necessary for achieving better predictions.

  17. Preclinical Pharmacological Evaluation of a Novel Multiple Kinase Inhibitor, ON123300, in Brain Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Hua; Zhou, Qingyu; Elkholi, Rana; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Reddy, M. V. Ramana; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Gallo, James M.

    2014-01-01

    ON123300 is a low molecular weight multi-kinase inhibitor identified through a series of screens that supported further analyses for brain tumor chemotherapy. Biochemical assays indicated ON123300 was a strong inhibitor of Ark5 and CDK4 as well as growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases such as Beta-type platelet-derived growth factor receptor [PDGFRβ]. ON123300 inhibited U87 glioma cell proliferation with an IC50 = 3.4 ± 0.1 μM and reduced phosphorylation of Akt, yet it also unexpectedly induced Erk activation; both in a dose- and time-dependent manner that subsequently was attributed to relieving Akt-mediated C-Raf S259 inactivation and activating a p70S6K initiated PI3K negative feedback loop. Co-treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib [GFN] produced synergistic cytotoxic effects. Pursuant to the in vitro studies, in vivo pharmacokinetic [PK] and pharmacodynamic [PD] studies of ON123300 were completed in mice bearing intracerebral U87 tumors following IV doses of 5 mg/kg and 25 mg/kg alone, and also at the higher dose concurrently with GFN. ON123300 showed high brain and brain tumor accumulation based on brain partition coefficient values of at least 2.5. Consistent with the in vitro studies, single agent ON123300 caused a dose-dependent suppression of phosphorylation of Akt as well as activation of Erk in brain tumors, whereas addition of GFN to the ON123300 regimen significantly enhanced p-Akt inhibition and prevented Erk activation. In summary, ON123300 demonstrated favorable PK characteristics and future development for brain tumor therapy would require use of combinations, such as GFN, that mitigated its Erk activation and enhanced its activity. PMID:24568969

  18. Kinase Pathway Dependence in Primary Human Leukemias Determined by Rapid Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Yang, Wayne F.; Bankhead, Armand; Fan, Guang; Fletcher, Luke B.; Bryant, Jade; Glover, Jason M.; Chang, Bill H.; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Fleming, William H.; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Gotlib, Jason R.; Oh, Stephen T.; Deininger, Michael W.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Den Boer, Monique L.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; O’Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.; Loriaux, Marc M.

    2012-01-01

    Kinases are dysregulated in most cancer but the frequency of specific kinase mutations is low, indicating a complex etiology in kinase dysregulation. Here we report a strategy to rapidly identify functionally important kinase targets, irrespective of the etiology of kinase pathway dysregulation, ultimately enabling a correlation of patient genetic profiles to clinically effective kinase inhibitors. Our methodology assessed the sensitivity of primary leukemia patient samples to a panel of 66 small-molecule kinase inhibitors over 3 days. Screening of 151 leukemia patient samples revealed a wide diversity of drug sensitivities, with 70% of the clinical specimens exhibiting hypersensitivity to one or more drugs. From this data set, we developed an algorithm to predict kinase pathway dependence based on analysis of inhibitor sensitivity patterns. Applying this algorithm correctly identified pathway dependence in proof-of-principle specimens with known oncogenes, including a rare FLT3 mutation outside regions covered by standard molecular diagnostic tests. Interrogation of all 151 patient specimens with this algorithm identified a diversity of gene targets and signaling pathways that could aid prioritization of deep sequencing data sets, permitting a cumulative analysis to understand kinase pathway dependence within leukemia subsets. In a proof-of-principle case, we showed that in vitro drug sensitivity could predict both a clinical response and the development of drug resistance. Taken together, our results suggested that drug target scores derived from a comprehensive kinase inhibitor panel could predict pathway dependence in cancer cells while simultaneously identifying potential therapeutic options. PMID:23087056

  19. Targeting colorectal cancer cells by a novel sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitor PF-543

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, TongFa; Gao, DaQuan; Fang, Zheng-yu

    2016-02-12

    In this study, we showed that PF-543, a novel sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) inhibitor, exerted potent anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects against a panel of established (HCT-116, HT-29 and DLD-1) and primary human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Its sensitivity was negatively associated with SphK1 expression level in the CRC cells. Surprisingly, PF-543 mainly induced programmed necrosis, but not apoptosis, in the CRC cells. CRC cell necrotic death was detected by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse and mitochondrial P53-cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D) complexation. Correspondingly, the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 largely attenuated PF-543-induced cytotoxicity against CRC cells. Meanwhile, the Cyp-D inhibitors (sanglifehrin A and cyclosporin A), or shRNA-mediated knockdown of Cyp-D, remarkably alleviated PF-543-induced CRC cell necrotic death. Reversely, over-expression of wild-type Cyp-D in HCT-116 cells significantly increased PF-543's sensitivity. In vivo, PF-543 intravenous injection significantly suppressed HCT-116 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, whiling remarkably improving the mice survival. The in vivo activity by PF-543 was largely attenuated when combined with the Cyp-D inhibitor cyclosporin A. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PF-543 exerts potent anti-CRC activity in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondrial programmed necrosis pathway is likely the key mechanism responsible for PF-543's actions in CRC cells. - Highlights: • PF-543 is anti-proliferative and cytotoxic to established and primary CRC cells. • PF-543 induces programmed necrosis, but not apoptosis, in CRC cells. • Modulation of mitochondrial protein cyclophilin-D alters PF-543's sensitivity. • PF-543 inhibits HCT-116 xenograft growth in SCID mice, improving mice survival. • Co-administration of cyclophilin-D inhibitor CsA inhibits PF-543's activity in vivo.

  20. Screening of Microbial Extracts for Anticancer Compounds Using Streptomyces Kinase Inhibitor Assay.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Prashant; Bhave, Sarita; Vartak, Ashwini; Kulkarni-Almeida, Asha; Mahajan, Girish; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic kinases are known to play an important role in signal transduction pathways by phosphorylating their respective substrates. Abnormal phosphorylations by these kinases have resulted in diseases. Hence inhibitors of kinases are of considerable pharmaceutical interest for a wide variety of disease targets, especially cancers. A number of reports have been published which indicate that eukaryotic-like kinases may complement two-component kinase systems in several bacteria. In Streptomyces sp. such kinases have been found to have a role in formation of aerial hyphae, spores, pigmentation & even in antibiotic production in some strains. Eukaryotic kinase inhibitors are seen to inhibit formation of aerial mycelia in Streptomyces without inhibiting vegetative mycelia. This property has been used to design an assay to screen for eukaryotic kinase inhibitors. The assay involves testing of compounds against Streptomyces 85E ATCC 55824 using agar well diffusion method. Inhibitors of kinases give rise to "bald" colonies where aerial mycelia and sporulation inhibition is seen. The assay has been standardized using known eukaryotic protein kinase inhibiting anticancer agents like AG-490, AG-1295, AG-1478, Flavopiridol and Imatinib as positive controls, at a concentration ranging from 10 μg/well to 100 μg/well. Anti-infective compounds which are not reported to inhibit eukaryotic protein kinases were used as negative controls. A number of microbial cultures have been screened for novel eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Further these microbial extracts were tested in various cancer cell lines like Panel, HCT116, Calul, ACHN and H460 at a concentration of 10 μg/mL/ well. The anticancer data was seen correlating well with the Streptomyces kinase assay thus validating the assay.

  1. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Protein Kinase Inhibitor Pyrrol Derivate

    PubMed Central

    Yena, Maryna S.; Kotlyar, Iryna P.; Ogloblya, Olexandr V.; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr K.

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities of protein kinases inhibitor pyrrol derivate 1-(4-Cl-benzyl)-3-Cl-4-(CF3-fenylamino)-1H-pyrrol-2,5-dione (MI-1) on rat colon cancer model. Therefore anti-inflammatory effect of MI-1 on rat acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis (UC) model was aimed to be discovered. The anti-inflammatory effects of MI-1 (2.7 mg/kg daily) compared to reference drug Prednisolone (0.7 mg/kg daily) after 14-day usage were evaluated on macro- and light microscopy levels and expressed in 21-grade scale. Redox status of bowel mucosa was also estimated. It was shown that in UC group the grade of total injury (GTI) was equal to 9.6 (GTIcontrol = 0). Increase of malonic dialdehyde (MDA) by 89% and protein carbonyl groups (PCG) by 60% and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 40% were also observed. Prednisolone decreased GTI to 3 and leveled SOD activity, but MDA and PCG remained higher than control ones by 52% and 42%, respectively. MI-1 restored colon mucosa integrity and decreased mucosa inflammation down to GTI = 0.5 and leveled PCG and SOD. Thus, MI-1 possessed anti-inflammatory properties, which were more expressed that Prednisolone ones, as well as normalized mucosa redox balance, and so has a prospect for correction of inflammatory processes. PMID:28101521

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Protein Kinase Inhibitor Pyrrol Derivate.

    PubMed

    Kuznietsova, Halyna M; Yena, Maryna S; Kotlyar, Iryna P; Ogloblya, Olexandr V; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr K

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities of protein kinases inhibitor pyrrol derivate 1-(4-Cl-benzyl)-3-Cl-4-(CF3-fenylamino)-1H-pyrrol-2,5-dione (MI-1) on rat colon cancer model. Therefore anti-inflammatory effect of MI-1 on rat acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis (UC) model was aimed to be discovered. The anti-inflammatory effects of MI-1 (2.7 mg/kg daily) compared to reference drug Prednisolone (0.7 mg/kg daily) after 14-day usage were evaluated on macro- and light microscopy levels and expressed in 21-grade scale. Redox status of bowel mucosa was also estimated. It was shown that in UC group the grade of total injury (GTI) was equal to 9.6 (GTIcontrol = 0). Increase of malonic dialdehyde (MDA) by 89% and protein carbonyl groups (PCG) by 60% and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 40% were also observed. Prednisolone decreased GTI to 3 and leveled SOD activity, but MDA and PCG remained higher than control ones by 52% and 42%, respectively. MI-1 restored colon mucosa integrity and decreased mucosa inflammation down to GTI = 0.5 and leveled PCG and SOD. Thus, MI-1 possessed anti-inflammatory properties, which were more expressed that Prednisolone ones, as well as normalized mucosa redox balance, and so has a prospect for correction of inflammatory processes.

  4. Have adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitors lost their shine?

    PubMed Central

    Sabari, Joshua K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite broad advances in molecularly targeted therapies, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the United States. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur in approximately 17% of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the US population. The remarkable efficacy of small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in this unique subset of patients has revolutionized the therapeutic approach to lung cancer. The success of these agents in the metastatic setting leads to the logical question of what role these drugs may have in the adjuvant setting for patients with earlier stage disease. RADIANT, an international randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase III study in patients with completely resected stage IB to IIIA NSLC whose tumors expressed EGFR by IHC and EGFR amplification by FISH, attempted to answer the question of whether erlotinib would improve disease free survival and overall survival in the adjuvant setting. While RADIANT does not conclude for or against adjuvant use of EGFR-TKIs, all data points towards benefit in a selected population. As clinicians, we must continue to enroll to potentially practice changing therapeutic neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy studies internationally. PMID:27568486

  5. Kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies in oncology: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gharwan, Helen; Groninger, Hunter

    2016-04-01

    Molecularly targeted cancer therapies, such as small-molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, constitute a rapidly growing and an important part of the oncology armamentarium. Unlike conventional (cytotoxic) chemotherapeutics, targeted therapies were designed to disrupt cancer cell pathogenesis at specific biological points essential for the development and progression of the tumour. These agents were developed to disrupt specific targets with the aim of minimizing treatment burden compared with conventional chemotherapy. Nevertheless the increasingly common use of targeted therapies has revealed some unanticipated, often clinically significant toxic effects, as well as compromising effective palliative and end-of-life management approaches. Although patients and clinicians welcome improvements in cancer prognosis, these changes can also impact patient quality-of-life. Therefore, as demand for oncology expertise increases, physicians need to apprise themselves of targeted therapies and their clinical implications, including drug-specific side effects, impact on quality of life, and cost issues, especially in relation to end-of-life care. This Review provides a useful summary and guide for professionals treating patients with malignant diseases.

  6. De novo ALK kinase domain mutations are uncommon in kinase inhibitor-naïve ALK rearranged lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R; Moran, Jason P; VanderLaan, Paul A; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan; Kent, Michael S; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Rangachari, Deepa; Huberman, Mark S; Kobayashi, Susumu S; Costa, Daniel B

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearranged lung adenocarcinomas are responsive to the multitargeted ALK inhibitor crizotinib. One of the common mechanisms of resistance to crizotinib is the acquisition of ALK kinase domain mutations. However, the presence of ALK mutations in crizotinib-naïve tumors has not been widely reported and it is unclear if de novo ALK mutations affect the response to crizotinib. We analyzed preclinical models of ALK rearranged lung cancers that were sensitive/resistant to ALK inhibitors, probed our institutional and other lung cancer databases for tumors with ALK kinase domain mutations, and evaluated tumor response to crizotinib. ALK rearranged cell lines with ALK kinase domain mutations were heterogeneously less inhibited by increasing concentrations of crizotinib than cells driven solely by EML4-ALK fusions. Previous ALK rearranged lung cancer cohorts did not report ALK kinase mutations in inhibitor-naïve tumors. We identified one TKI-naïve ALK rearranged tumor with an ALK kinase domain mutation: ALK-S1206F (mutations at ALK-S1206 shifted crizotinib inhibitory curves only minimally in preclinical models). The never smoker whose tumor harbored de novo EML4-ALK-E5;A20+ALK-S1206F only achieved a 4-month radiographic response to crizotinib 250mg twice daily. Combining data from our and prior cohorts, ALK kinase domain mutations were uncommon events (<3% of cases) in ALK inhibitor-naïve ALK rearranged lung adenocarcinomas but their effect on intrinsic resistance to ALK inhibitors should be better evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  8. Regulation of the activity of protein kinases by endogenous heat stable protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Szmigielski, A

    1985-01-01

    Protein kinase activities are regulated by endogenous thermostable protein inhibitors. Type I inhibitor is a protein of MW 22,000-24,000 which inhibits specifically cyclic AMP-(cAMP) dependent protein kinase (APK) as a competitive inhibitor of catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Type I inhibitor activity changes inversely according to the activation of adenylate cyclase and the changes in cAMP content in tissues. It seems that type I inhibitor serves as a factor preventing spontaneous cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in unstimulated cell. The other thermostable protein which inhibits APK activity has been found in Sertoli cell-enriched testis (testis inhibitor). Physiological role of the testis inhibitor is unknown. Type II inhibitor is a protein of MW 15,000 which blocks phosphorylation mediated by cAMP and cyclic GMP (cGMP) dependent (APK and GPK) and cyclic nucleotide independent protein kinases as a competitive inhibitor of substrate proteins. Activity of this inhibitor specifically changes in reciprocal manner to the changes in cGMP content. It seems that type II inhibitor serves as a factor preventing the phosphorylation catalyzed by GPK when cGMP content is low. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase and activation of GPK is followed by a decrease of type II inhibitor activity. This change in relationship between activities of GPK and type II inhibitor allows for effective phosphorylation catalyzed by this enzyme when cGMP content is increased.

  9. Inhibition of acquired-resistance hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth by combining sorafenib with phosphoinositide 3-kinase and rat sarcoma inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Hao; Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    To provide support for combined usage of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors together with sorafenib in treatment of sorafenib-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma. The sorafenib-resistant cell lines were established to evaluate the effects of MK-2206 2HCL, a dual PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, and PD0325901, an rat sarcoma (RAS) and/or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, on cell proliferation and apoptosis, as both single and combined treatments with sorafenib. In addition, multidrug resistance 1 gene expression, mutation status of key members in PI3K/mTOR, and RAS/ERK pathways and pathway activation were analyzed to identify predictors of drug response. Molecular studies reveal that combining MK-2206 2HCL or PD0325901 with sorafenib not only has a synergistic effect, in suppressing PI3K/protein kinase B/mTOR and RAS/MEK/ERK signaling more effectively than either treatment alone, but also prevents the cross activation of the other pathway that occurs with single treatments in both sorafenib sensitive and resistant lines. PD0325901 exhibited a stronger synergic effect with sorafenib than MK-2206 2HCL. Sorafenib-resistant cell lines were characterized by activation of both of the two pathways, as indicated by multidrug resistance 1 gene expression profiles and pathway activity analysis. Our studies have showed that both inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR and RAS/ERK signaling are potentially effective antihepatocellular carcinoma drugs especially in treating sorafenib-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A roadmap to evaluate the proteome-wide selectivity of covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dix, Melissa M.; Douhan, John; Gilbert, Adam M.; Hett, Erik C.; Johnson, Theodore O.; Joslyn, Chris; Kath, John C.; Niessen, Sherry; Roberts, Lee R.; Schnute, Mark E.; Wang, Chu; Hulce, Jonathan J.; Wei, Baoxian; Whiteley, Laurence O.; Hayward, Matthew M.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Kinases are principal components of signal transduction pathways and the focus of intense basic and drug discovery research. Irreversible inhibitors that covalently modify non-catalytic cysteines in kinase active-sites have emerged as valuable probes and approved drugs. Many protein classes, however, possess functional cysteines and therefore understanding the proteome-wide selectivity of covalent kinase inhibitors is imperative. Here, we accomplish this objective using activity-based protein profiling coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry to globally map the targets, both specific and non-specific, of covalent kinase inhibitors in human cells. Many of the specific off-targets represent non-kinase proteins that, interestingly, possess conserved, active-site cysteines. We define windows of selectivity for covalent kinase inhibitors and show that, when these windows are exceeded, rampant proteome-wide reactivity and kinase target-independent cell death conjointly occur. Our findings, taken together, provide an experimental roadmap to illuminate opportunities and surmount challenges for the development of covalent kinase inhibitors. PMID:25038787

  11. Pim kinases modulate resistance to FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Green, Alexa S.; Maciel, Thiago T.; Hospital, Marie-Anne; Yin, Chae; Mazed, Fetta; Townsend, Elizabeth C.; Pilorge, Sylvain; Lambert, Mireille; Paubelle, Etienne; Jacquel, Arnaud; Zylbersztejn, Florence; Decroocq, Justine; Poulain, Laury; Sujobert, Pierre; Jacque, Nathalie; Adam, Kevin; So, Jason C. C.; Kosmider, Olivier; Auberger, Patrick; Hermine, Olivier; Weinstock, David M.; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Vanasse, Gary J.; Leung, Anskar Y.; Moura, Ivan C.; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and is associated with a dismal long-term prognosis. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide short-term disease control, but relapse invariably occurs within months. Pim protein kinases are oncogenic FLT3-ITD targets expressed in AML cells. We show that increased Pim kinase expression is found in relapse samples from AML patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors. Ectopic Pim-2 expression induces resistance to FLT3 inhibition in both FLT3-ITD–induced myeloproliferative neoplasm and AML models in mice. Strikingly, we found that Pim kinases govern FLT3-ITD signaling and that their pharmacological or genetic inhibition restores cell sensitivity to FLT3 inhibitors. Finally, dual inhibition of FLT3 and Pim kinases eradicates FLT3-ITD+ cells including primary AML cells. Concomitant Pim and FLT3 inhibition represents a promising new avenue for AML therapy. PMID:26601252

  12. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Faidiban O; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1.

  13. A derivative of chrysin suppresses two-stage skin carcinogenesis by inhibiting mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Hwang, Joonsung; Li, Wei; Choi, Tae Woong; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Thimmegowda, N R; Lee, Ki Won; Ryoo, In-Ja; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Bode, Ann M; Zhou, Xinmin; Yang, Yifeng; Erikson, Raymond L; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) is a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase that acts downstream of both extracellular signal-regulated kinases and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in response to stress or mitogenic extracellular stimuli. Increasing evidence has shown that MSK1 is closely associated with malignant transformation and cancer development. MSK1 should be an effective target for cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. However, very few MSK1 inhibitors, especially natural compounds, have been reported. We used virtual screening of a natural products database and the active conformation of the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 (PDB id 3KN) as the receptor structure to identify chrysin and its derivative, compound 69407, as inhibitors of MSK1. Compared with chrysin, compound 69407 more strongly inhibited proliferation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ cells with lower cytotoxicity. Western blot data demonstrated that compound 69407 suppressed phosphorylation of the MSK1 downstream effector histone H3 in intact cells. Knocking down the expression of MSK1 effectively reduced the sensitivity of JB6 P+ cells to compound 69407. Moreover, topical treatment with compound 69407 before TPA application significantly reduced papilloma development in terms of number and size in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. The reduction in papilloma development was accompanied by the inhibition of histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser10 in tumors extracted from mouse skin. The results indicated that compound 69407 exerts inhibitory effects on skin tumorigenesis by directly binding with MSK1 and attenuates the MSK1/histone H3 signaling pathway, which makes it an ideal chemopreventive agent against skin cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  14. Interferon-induces expression of cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitors p21WAF1 and p27Kip1 that prevent activation of cyclin-dependent kinase by CDK-activating kinase (CAK).

    PubMed

    Mandal, M; Bandyopadhyay, D; Goepfert, T M; Kumar, R

    1998-01-15

    To understand the mechanism of interferon (IFN)-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression, we have earlier shown that IFN-alpha enhances the expression of underphosphorylated retinoblastoma protein by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK-2) activity (Kumar and Atlas, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 89, 6599-6603, 1992; Zhang and Kumar, Biochem. Biophysi. Res. Comm., 200, 522-528, 1994). In the studies presented here, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition of CDKs in IFN-treated cells by delineating the potential role(s) of CDK-inhibitors (CKIs) and CDK-activating kinase (CAK). We report that IFN-alpha inhibits the H-1 kinase activity associated with CDK-4 or CDK-2 due to induction of expression of CDK-inhibitor p21WAF1 (but not p27Kip1) as its immunodepletion from IFN-treated extracts restored the CDK-associated H-1 kinase activity. In addition, we also show that IFN-gamma induces expression of CDK-inhibitors p21WAF1 and p27Kip1 and inhibited the H-1 kinase activity associated with CDK-2 or CDK-4. The observed IFN-gamma-mediated inhibition of CDK-2 and CDK-4 kinase activity was due to enhanced interactions with p21WAF1 and p27Kip1, respectively. We also demonstrated that IFN-induced CKIs prevent CAK from activating the CDK-2 as immunodepletion of induced CKIs from the inhibitory extracts resulted in the restoration of CAK-mediated activation of CDK-2.

  15. Reduced Proteolytic Shedding of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Is a Post-Translational Mechanism of Kinase Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Miller, Miles A; Oudin, Madeleine J; Sullivan, Ryan J; Wang, Stephanie J; Meyer, Aaron S; Im, Hyungsoon; Frederick, Dennie T; Tadros, Jenny; Griffith, Linda G; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph; Flaherty, Keith T; Gertler, Frank B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2016-04-01

    Kinase inhibitor resistance often involves upregulation of poorly understood "bypass" signaling pathways. Here, we show that extracellular proteomic adaptation is one path to bypass signaling and drug resistance. Proteolytic shedding of surface receptors, which can provide negative feedback on signaling activity, is blocked by kinase inhibitor treatment and enhances bypass signaling. In particular, MEK inhibition broadly decreases shedding of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), including HER4, MET, and most prominently AXL, an ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrate, thus increasing surface RTK levels and mitogenic signaling. Progression-free survival of patients with melanoma treated with clinical BRAF/MEK inhibitors inversely correlates with RTK shedding reduction following treatment, as measured noninvasively in blood plasma. Disrupting protease inhibition by neutralizing TIMP1 improves MAPK inhibitor efficacy, and combined MAPK/AXL inhibition synergistically reduces tumor growth and metastasis in xenograft models. Altogether, extracellular proteomic rewiring through reduced RTK shedding represents a surprising mechanism for bypass signaling in cancer drug resistance. Genetic, epigenetic, and gene expression alterations often fail to explain adaptive drug resistance in cancer. This work presents a novel post-translational mechanism of such resistance: Kinase inhibitors, particularly targeting MAPK signaling, increase tumor cell surface receptor levels due to widely reduced proteolysis, allowing tumor signaling to circumvent intended drug action. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Thomas; Daugaard, Mads; Jäättelä, Marja

    2011-11-11

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a lysosomal catabolic pathway that controls cellular homeostasis and survival. It has recently emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of a variety of degenerative diseases and cancer. The targeting of autophagy has, however, been hampered by the lack of specific small molecule inhibitors. Thus, we screened two small molecule kinase inhibitor libraries for inhibitors of rapamycin-induced autophagic flux. The three most potent inhibitors identified conferred profound inhibition of autophagic flux by inhibiting the formation of autophagosomes. Notably, the autophagy inhibitory effects of all three compounds were independent of their established kinase targets, i.e. ataxia telangiectasia mutated for KU55933, protein kinase C for Gö6976, and Janus kinase 3 for Jak3 inhibitor VI. Instead, we identified phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) as a direct target of KU55933 and Gö6976. Importantly, and in contrast to the currently available inhibitors of autophagosome formation (e.g. 3-methyladenine), none of the three compounds inhibited the cell survival promoting class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signaling at the concentrations required for effective autophagy inhibition. Accordingly, they proved to be valuable tools for investigations of autophagy-associated cell death and survival. Employing KU55399, we demonstrated that autophagy protects amino acid-starved cells against both apoptosis and necroptosis. Taken together, our data introduce new possibilities for the experimental study of autophagy and can form a basis for the development of clinically relevant autophagy inhibitors.

  17. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Thomas; Daugaard, Mads; Jäättelä, Marja

    2011-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a lysosomal catabolic pathway that controls cellular homeostasis and survival. It has recently emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of a variety of degenerative diseases and cancer. The targeting of autophagy has, however, been hampered by the lack of specific small molecule inhibitors. Thus, we screened two small molecule kinase inhibitor libraries for inhibitors of rapamycin-induced autophagic flux. The three most potent inhibitors identified conferred profound inhibition of autophagic flux by inhibiting the formation of autophagosomes. Notably, the autophagy inhibitory effects of all three compounds were independent of their established kinase targets, i.e. ataxia telangiectasia mutated for KU55933, protein kinase C for Gö6976, and Janus kinase 3 for Jak3 inhibitor VI. Instead, we identified phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) as a direct target of KU55933 and Gö6976. Importantly, and in contrast to the currently available inhibitors of autophagosome formation (e.g. 3-methyladenine), none of the three compounds inhibited the cell survival promoting class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signaling at the concentrations required for effective autophagy inhibition. Accordingly, they proved to be valuable tools for investigations of autophagy-associated cell death and survival. Employing KU55399, we demonstrated that autophagy protects amino acid-starved cells against both apoptosis and necroptosis. Taken together, our data introduce new possibilities for the experimental study of autophagy and can form a basis for the development of clinically relevant autophagy inhibitors. PMID:21930714

  18. Recent development of ATP-competitive small molecule phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wan, Wen-zhu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Guan-lian; Liu, Xin-guang

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase (PI3K) is the potential anticancer target in the PI3K/Akt/ mTOR pathway. Here we reviewed the ATP-competitive small molecule PI3K inhibitors in the past few years, including the pan Class I PI3K inhibitors, the isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and/or the PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. PMID:27769061

  19. Protein kinase C theta is dispensable for suppression mediated by CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Kerstin; Thuille, Nikolaus; Wachowicz, Katarzyna; Hermann-Kleiter, Natascha; Baier, Gottfried

    2017-01-01

    The activation of conventional T cells upon T cell receptor stimulation critically depends on protein kinase C theta (PKCθ). However, its role in regulatory T (Treg) cell function has yet to be fully elucidated. Using siRNA or the potent and PKC family-selective pharmacological inhibitor AEB071, we could show that murine Treg-mediated suppression in vitro is independent of PKCθ function. Likewise, Treg cells of PKCθ-deficient mice were fully functional, showing a similar suppressive activity as wild-type CD25+CD4+ T cells in an in vitro suppression assay. Furthermore, in vitro-differentiated wild-type and PKCθ-deficient iTreg cells showed comparable Foxp3 expression as well as suppressive activity. However, we observed a reduced percentage of Foxp3+CD25+ CD4+ T cells in the lymphatic organs of PKCθ-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that while PKCθ is involved in Treg cell differentiation in vivo, it is dispensable for Treg-mediated suppression.

  20. Protein kinase C theta is dispensable for suppression mediated by CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Thuille, Nikolaus; Wachowicz, Katarzyna; Hermann-Kleiter, Natascha; Baier, Gottfried

    2017-01-01

    The activation of conventional T cells upon T cell receptor stimulation critically depends on protein kinase C theta (PKCθ). However, its role in regulatory T (Treg) cell function has yet to be fully elucidated. Using siRNA or the potent and PKC family-selective pharmacological inhibitor AEB071, we could show that murine Treg-mediated suppression in vitro is independent of PKCθ function. Likewise, Treg cells of PKCθ-deficient mice were fully functional, showing a similar suppressive activity as wild-type CD25+CD4+ T cells in an in vitro suppression assay. Furthermore, in vitro-differentiated wild-type and PKCθ-deficient iTreg cells showed comparable Foxp3 expression as well as suppressive activity. However, we observed a reduced percentage of Foxp3+CD25+ CD4+ T cells in the lymphatic organs of PKCθ-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that while PKCθ is involved in Treg cell differentiation in vivo, it is dispensable for Treg-mediated suppression. PMID:28531229

  1. A two-tiered mechanism of EGFR inhibition by RALT/MIG6 via kinase suppression and receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Frosi, Yuri; Anastasi, Sergio; Ballarò, Costanza; Varsano, Giulia; Castellani, Loriana; Maspero, Elena; Polo, Simona; Alemà, Stefano; Segatto, Oreste

    2010-05-03

    Signaling by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) must be controlled tightly because aberrant EGFR activity may cause cell transformation. Receptor-associated late transducer (RALT) is a feedback inhibitor of EGFR whose genetic ablation in the mouse causes phenotypes due to EGFR-driven excess cell proliferation. RALT inhibits EGFR catalytic activation by docking onto EGFR kinase domain. We report here an additional mechanism of EGFR suppression mediated by RALT, demonstrating that RALT-bound EGF receptors undergo endocytosis and eventual degradation into lysosomes. Moreover, RALT rescues the endocytic deficit of EGFR mutants unable to undergo either endocytosis (Dc214) or degradation (Y1045F) and mediates endocytosis via a domain distinct from that responsible for EGFR catalytic suppression. Consistent with providing a scaffolding function for endocytic proteins, RALT drives EGFR endocytosis by binding to AP-2 and Intersectins. These data suggest a model in which binding of RALT to EGFR integrates suppression of EGFR kinase with receptor endocytosis and degradation, leading to durable repression of EGFR signaling.

  2. A two-tiered mechanism of EGFR inhibition by RALT/MIG6 via kinase suppression and receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Frosi, Yuri; Anastasi, Sergio; Ballarò, Costanza; Varsano, Giulia; Castellani, Loriana; Maspero, Elena; Polo, Simona; Alemà, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Signaling by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) must be controlled tightly because aberrant EGFR activity may cause cell transformation. Receptor-associated late transducer (RALT) is a feedback inhibitor of EGFR whose genetic ablation in the mouse causes phenotypes due to EGFR-driven excess cell proliferation. RALT inhibits EGFR catalytic activation by docking onto EGFR kinase domain. We report here an additional mechanism of EGFR suppression mediated by RALT, demonstrating that RALT-bound EGF receptors undergo endocytosis and eventual degradation into lysosomes. Moreover, RALT rescues the endocytic deficit of EGFR mutants unable to undergo either endocytosis (Dc214) or degradation (Y1045F) and mediates endocytosis via a domain distinct from that responsible for EGFR catalytic suppression. Consistent with providing a scaffolding function for endocytic proteins, RALT drives EGFR endocytosis by binding to AP-2 and Intersectins. These data suggest a model in which binding of RALT to EGFR integrates suppression of EGFR kinase with receptor endocytosis and degradation, leading to durable repression of EGFR signaling. PMID:20421427

  3. Hypersensitivity to aurora kinase inhibitors in cells resistant against platinum- containing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masaki; Izumi, Hiroto; Wang, Ke-Yong; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Harada, Yoshikazu; Oya, Ryoichi; Yamaguchi, Koji; Iwai, Yoshiko; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2014-01-01

    The aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that are essential for mitosis and contribute to tumorigenesis. Therefore, aurora kinases hold promise for molecularly targeted therapy. In the present study, we demonstrated that aurora B kinase (AURKB) is overexpressed in both cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant cells. Downregulation of AURKB sensitized cells to both cisplatin and oxaliplatin, but not to paclitaxel, 5-FU or hydrogen peroxide. Interestingly, we found that both cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant cells were hypersensitive to the AURKB specific inhibitors, AZD1152 HQPA and ZM447439, suggesting that both cisplatin- and oxaliplatinresistant cells develop an addiction to AURKB. These data provide evidence that aurora kinase inhibitors can overcome both cisplatin and oxaliplatin resistance. Therefore, AURKB inhibitors could offer potential benefits if used after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.

  4. Selective interleukin-1 receptor–associated kinase 4 inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and lymphoid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Priscilla N.; Romero, Donna L.; Yang, Yibin; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Chaudhary, Divya; Robinson, Shaughnessy; Miao, Wenyan; Rui, Lixin; Westlin, William F.; Kapeller, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    Pathological activation of the Toll-like receptor signaling adaptor protein MYD88 underlies many autoimmune and inflammatory disease states. In the activated B cell–like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the oncogenic MYD88 L265P mutation occurs in 29% of cases, making it the most prevalent activating mutation in this malignancy. IRAK4 kinase accounts for almost all of the biological functions of MYD88, highlighting IRAK4 as a therapeutic target for diseases driven by aberrant MYD88 signaling. Using innovative structure-based drug design methodologies, we report the development of highly selective and bioavailable small molecule IRAK4 inhibitors, ND-2158 and ND-2110. These small molecules suppressed LPS-induced TNF production, alleviated collagen-induced arthritis, and blocked gout formation in mouse models. IRAK4 inhibition promoted killing of ABC DLBCL lines harboring MYD88 L265P, by down-modulating survival signals, including NF-κB and autocrine IL-6/IL-10 engagement of the JAK–STAT3 pathway. In ABC DLBCL xenograft models, IRAK4 inhibition suppressed tumor growth as a single agent, and in combination with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib or the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199. Our findings support pharmacological inhibition of IRAK4 as a therapeutic strategy in autoimmune disorders, in a genetically defined population of ABC DLBCL, and possibly other malignancies dependent on aberrant MYD88 signaling. PMID:26621451

  5. Structural insight into selectivity and resistance profiles of ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Davare, Monika A; Vellore, Nadeem A; Wagner, Jacob P; Eide, Christopher A; Goodman, James R; Drilon, Alexander; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J

    2015-09-29

    Oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins are molecular drivers in multiple malignancies, including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phylogenetic proximity of the ROS1 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) catalytic domains led to the clinical repurposing of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor. Despite the antitumor activity of crizotinib observed in both ROS1- and ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, resistance due to acquisition of ROS1 or ALK kinase domain mutations has been observed clinically, spurring the development of second-generation inhibitors. Here, we profile the sensitivity and selectivity of seven ROS1 and/or ALK inhibitors at various levels of clinical development. In contrast to crizotinib's dual ROS1/ALK activity, cabozantinib (XL-184) and its structural analog foretinib (XL-880) demonstrate a striking selectivity for ROS1 over ALK. Molecular dynamics simulation studies reveal structural features that distinguish the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains and contribute to differences in binding site and kinase selectivity of the inhibitors tested. Cell-based resistance profiling studies demonstrate that the ROS1-selective inhibitors retain efficacy against the recently reported CD74-ROS1(G2032R) mutant whereas the dual ROS1/ALK inhibitors are ineffective. Taken together, inhibitor profiling and stringent characterization of the structure-function differences between the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains will facilitate future rational drug design for ROS1- and ALK-driven NSCLC and other malignancies.

  6. Inhibition of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) Kinase Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Herpes keratitis (HK) remains the leading cause of cornea-derived blindness in the developed world, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Treatment toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance highlight the need for additional therapeutic approaches. This study examined ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an apical kinase in the host DNA damage response, as a potential new target for the treatment of HK. Methods. Small molecule inhibitor of ATM (KU-55933) was used to treat herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in three experimental models: (1) in vitro—cultured human corneal epithelial cells, hTCEpi, (2) ex vivo—organotypically explanted human and rabbit corneas, and (3) in vivo—corneal infection in young C57BL/6J mice. Infection productivity was assayed by plaque assay, real-time PCR, Western blot, and disease scoring. Results. Robust ATM activation was detected in HSV-1-infected human corneal epithelial cells. Inhibition of ATM greatly suppressed viral replication in cultured cells and in explanted human and rabbit corneas, and reduced the severity of stromal keratitis in mice. The antiviral effect of KU-55933 in combination with acyclovir was additive, and KU-55933 suppressed replication of a drug-resistant HSV-1 strain. KU-55933 caused minimal toxicity, as monitored by clonogenic survival assay and fluorescein staining. Conclusions. This study identifies ATM as a potential target for the treatment of HK. ATM inhibition by KU-55933 reduces epithelial infection and stromal disease severity without producing appreciable toxicity. These findings warrant further investigations into the DNA damage response as an area for therapeutic intervention in herpetic ocular diseases. PMID:24370835

  7. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase suppresses herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) keratitis.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-02-03

    Herpes keratitis (HK) remains the leading cause of cornea-derived blindness in the developed world, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Treatment toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance highlight the need for additional therapeutic approaches. This study examined ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an apical kinase in the host DNA damage response, as a potential new target for the treatment of HK. Small molecule inhibitor of ATM (KU-55933) was used to treat herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in three experimental models: (1) in vitro--cultured human corneal epithelial cells, hTCEpi, (2) ex vivo--organotypically explanted human and rabbit corneas, and (3) in vivo--corneal infection in young C57BL/6J mice. Infection productivity was assayed by plaque assay, real-time PCR, Western blot, and disease scoring. Robust ATM activation was detected in HSV-1-infected human corneal epithelial cells. Inhibition of ATM greatly suppressed viral replication in cultured cells and in explanted human and rabbit corneas, and reduced the severity of stromal keratitis in mice. The antiviral effect of KU-55933 in combination with acyclovir was additive, and KU-55933 suppressed replication of a drug-resistant HSV-1 strain. KU-55933 caused minimal toxicity, as monitored by clonogenic survival assay and fluorescein staining. This study identifies ATM as a potential target for the treatment of HK. ATM inhibition by KU-55933 reduces epithelial infection and stromal disease severity without producing appreciable toxicity. These findings warrant further investigations into the DNA damage response as an area for therapeutic intervention in herpetic ocular diseases.

  8. Dual Kinase-Bromodomain Inhibitors in Anticancer Drug Discovery: A Structural and Pharmacological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Carlino, Luca; Rastelli, Giulio

    2016-10-27

    Protein kinases play crucial roles in several cell transformation processes and are validated drug targets for many human diseases, including cancer. Nevertheless, most tumors have eluded the effects of inhibition of a single kinase by activating resistance mechanisms and/or alternative pathways and escape mechanisms. In recent years, multitarget approaches directed toward inhibition of kinases and targets of different families have received increasing attention. In particular, co-targeting kinases and bromodomain epigenetic reader proteins has rapidly emerged as a promising approach to cancer drug development. In this manuscript, we will review the recent discoveries that led to the identification and optimization of dual kinase/bromodomain inhibitors. We will analyze and compare the structural features required for dual inhibition and comment on the potential of this approach in anticancer drug discovery. Moreover, we will introduce computational approaches useful for the identification of dual kinase/bromodomain inhibitors and generate ad hoc pharmacophore and docking models.

  9. Cardiotoxicity Associated with the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tammy F.; Rupnick, Maria A.; Kerkela, Risto; Dallabrida, Susan M.; Zurakowski, David; Nguyen, Lisa; Woulfe, Kathleen; Pravda, Elke; Cassiola, Flavia; Desai, Jayesh; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Harris, David; Ismail, Nesreen S.; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Schoen, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have advanced cancer treatment. Sunitinib, a recently-approved, multi-targeted TKI, prolongs survival for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), but concerns about cardiac safety have arisen with this agent. Methods To determine the cardiovascular risk associated with sunitinib, we reviewed all cardiovascular events in patients with imatinib-resistant, metastatic GIST at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute enrolled in a Phase I/II protocol evaluating the efficacy of the drug (n=75). Sunitinib’s effects on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and blood pressure (BP) were also examined. Studies in isolated cardiomyocytes and mice investigated potential mechanisms of sunitinib-associated cardiac effects. Findings Eleven percent (8/75) of subjects suffered a cardiovascular event with congestive heart failure (CHF) occurring in 8% (6/75) of the population. Twenty-eight percent (10/36) of patients treated at the FDA-approved dose had LVEF declines of ≥ 10 EF%, and nineteen percent (7/36) experienced LVEF declines of ≥ 15 EF%. Sunitinib induced significant increases in mean systolic and diastolic BP in patients, and 47% (35/75) of individuals developed hypertension (HTN) (>150/100 mmHg). CHF and LV dysfunction generally responded to withholding drug and instituting medical management. In mice and cultured cardiomyocytes, sunitinib caused mitochondrial injury and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Interpretation Sunitinib treatment can lead to HTN, LVEF decline, and/or CHF. Experimental studies suggest that this is due, at least in part, to direct cardiomyocyte toxicity which may be exacerbated by HTN. Patients treated with sunitinib should receive close monitoring and prompt treatment for HTN and/or LVEF decline. PMID:18083403

  10. A review of a novel, Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Shien; Rattu, Mohammad A; Kim, Sara S

    2016-02-01

    Ibrutinib, a Bruton's kinase inhibitor, was granted an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in November, 2013, for the treatment of relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma and subsequently for the treatment of relapsed refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia in February, 2014. In the pivotal phase 2 study of 111 patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, the overall response rate in patients who received ibrutinib 560 mg daily was 68%. The median progression-free survival was 13.9 months, and the overall survival was 58% at 18 months. In a recently published phase 3 trial (RESONATE) that compared ibrutinib and ofatumumab for the treatment of relapsed and refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma, ibrutinib at the daily dosage of 420 mg demonstrated a significantly higher overall response rate (43% in ibrutinib vs. 4% in ofatumumab) and a significantly improved overall survival at 12 months (90% ibrutinib vs. 81% ofatumumab). Similar clinical benefits were shown regardless of del (17 p). Ibrutinib was well tolerated, and dose-limiting toxicity was not observed. Ibrutinib has shown durable remission, improved progression-free survival and overall survival, and favorable safety profile in indolent B-cell lymphoid malignancies. Ibrutinib, as a monotherapy, is an effective treatment modality as a salvage therapy for treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia / small lymphocytic lymphoma, particularly in older patients (age ≥70 years) who are not a candidate for intensive chemotherapy and/or those with del (17 p). In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and del (17 p), the current practice guideline recommends ibrutinib as an upfront treatment option. Current on-going trials will further define its role as upfront therapy and/or as a combination therapy in indolent B-cell lymphoid malignancies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  12. Pre-clinical characterization of PKC412, a multi-kinase inhibitor, against colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi-Chan; Shao, Yun; He, Xiao-Pu; Chen, Su-Rong; Wang, Dong-Dong; Qin, Li-Sen; Sun, Wei-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The potential effect of PKC412, a small molecular multi-kinase inhibitor, in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells was evaluated here. We showed that PKC412 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative against CRC cell lines (HT-29, HCT-116, HT-15 and DLD-1) and primary CRC cells. PKC412 provoked caspase-dependent apoptotic death, and induced G2-M arrest in the CRC cells. AKT activation was inhibited by PKC412 in CRC cells. Reversely, expression of constitutively-active AKT1 (CA-AKT1) decreased the PKC412's cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells. We propose that Bcl-2 could be a primary resistance factor of PKC412. ABT-737, a Bcl-2 inhibitor, or Bcl-2 siRNA knockdown, dramatically potentiated PKC412's lethality against CRC cells. Forced Bcl-2 over-expression, on the other hand, attenuated PKC412's cytotoxicity. Significantly, PKC412 oral administration suppressed AKT activation and inhibited HT-29 tumor growth in nude mice. Mice survival was also improved with PKC412 administration. These results indicate that PKC412 may have potential value for CRC treatment. PMID:27780925

  13. MAP KINASE ERK 1/2 INHIBITORS INDUCE DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROSEN, M.B. and E. S. HUNTER. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. MAP kinase Erk1/2 inhibitors induce dysmorphology in mouse whole embryo culture.

    MAP Kinase signal transduction is associated with a variety ...

  14. Discovery of orally active pyrrolopyridine- and aminopyridine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Schroeder, Gretchen M.; Cornelius, Lyndon A.M.; Kim, Kyoung; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Schmidt, Robert J.; Williams, David K.; Tokarski, John S.; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Manne, Veeraswamy; Kamath, Amrita; Zhang, Yueping; Marathe, Punit; Hunt, John T.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.

    2008-09-10

    A series of acylurea analogs derived from pyrrolopyridine and aminopyridine scaffolds were identified as potent inhibitors of Met kinase activity. The SAR at various positions of the two kinase scaffolds was investigated. These studies led to the discovery of compounds 3b and 20b, which demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties in mice and significant antitumor activity in a human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  15. Enzastaurin (LY317615), a Protein Kinase C Beta Selective Inhibitor, Enhances Antiangiogenic Effect of Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Christopher D.; Xiao Dakai; Tu Tianxiang; Kim, Kwang Woon; Moretti, Luigi; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Tawtawy, Mohammed N.; Quarles, Chad C. Ph.D.; Lu Bo

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Angiogenesis has generated interest in oncology because of its important role in cancer growth and progression, particularly when combined with cytotoxic therapies, such as radiotherapy. Among the numerous pathways influencing vascular growth and stability, inhibition of protein kinase B(Akt) or protein kinase C(PKC) can influence tumor blood vessels within tumor microvasculature. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether PKC inhibition could sensitize lung tumors to radiation. Methods and Materials: The combination of the selective PKC{beta} inhibitor Enzastaurin (ENZ, LY317615) and ionizing radiation were used in cell culture and a mouse model of lung cancer. Lung cancer cell lines and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined using immunoblotting, cytotoxic assays including cell proliferation and clonogenic assays, and Matrigel endothelial tubule formation. In vivo, H460 lung cancer xenografts were examined for tumor vasculature and proliferation using immunohistochemistry. Results: ENZ effectively radiosensitizes HUVEC within in vitro models. Furthermore, concurrent ENZ treatment of lung cancer xenografts enhanced radiation-induced destruction of tumor vasculature and proliferation by IHC. However, tumor growth delay was not enhanced with combination treatment compared with either treatment alone. Analysis of downstream effectors revealed that HUVEC and the lung cancer cell lines differed in their response to ENZ and radiation such that only HUVEC demonstrate phosphorylated S6 suppression, which is downstream of mTOR. When ENZ was combined with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in H460 lung cancer cells, radiosensitization was observed. Conclusion: PKC appears to be crucial for angiogenesis, and its inhibition by ENZ has potential to enhance radiotherapy in vivo.

  16. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the contractility of rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, C; Jensen, P E; Prieto, D; Hughes, A; Mulvany, M J; Aalkjaer, C

    1995-01-01

    1. A pharmacological characterization of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) belonging to two distinct groups (competitors at the ATP-binding site and the substrate-binding site, respectively) was performed, based on their effects on the contractility of rat mesenteric arteries. 2. Both the ATP-site competitors (genistein and its inactive analogue, daidzein) and the substrate-site competitors (tyrphostins A-23, A-47 and the inactive analogue, A-1) reversibly inhibited noradrenaline (NA, (10 microM)) and KCl (125 mM) induced contractions, concentration-dependently. Genistein was slightly but significantly more potent than daidzein; the tyrphostins were all less potent than genistein, and there were no significant differences between the individual potencies. The tyrosine kinase substrate-site inhibitor bis-tyrphostin had no inhibitory effect. 3. Genistein, daidzein, A-23 and A-47 each suppressed the contraction induced by Ca2+ (1 microM) in alpha-toxin permeabilized arteries. A-1 and bis-tyrphostin had little or no effect on contraction of the permeabilized arteries. 4. Genistein was significantly more potent than daidzein with respect to inhibition of the contraction induced by 200 nM Ca2+ in the presence of NA (100 microM) and GTP (3 microM). The effect of A-23, A-47, A-1 and bis-tyrphostin was similar in permeabilized arteries activated with Ca2+ (200 nM) + NA (100 microM) + GTP (3 microM) and permeabilized arteries activated with 1 microM Ca2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620718

  17. Drug-drug interactions with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Roelof W F; van Gelder, Teun; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Jansman, Frank G A

    2014-07-01

    In the past decade, many tyrosine-kinase inhibitors have been introduced in oncology and haemato-oncology. Because this new class of drugs is extensively used, serious drug-drug interactions are an increasing risk. In this Review, we give a comprehensive overview of known or suspected drug-drug interactions between tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and other drugs. We discuss all haemato-oncological and oncological tyrosine-kinase inhibitors that had been approved by Aug 1, 2013, by the US Food and Drug Administration or the European Medicines Agency. Various clinically relevant drug interactions with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors have been identified. Most interactions concern altered bioavailability due to altered stomach pH, metabolism by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, and prolongation of the QTc interval. To guarantee the safe use of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, a drugs review for each patient is needed. This Review provides specific recommendations to guide haemato-oncologists, oncologists, and clinical pharmacists, through the process of managing drug-drug interactions during treatment with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in daily clinical practice.

  18. Crosstalks between Raf-kinase inhibitor protein and cancer stem cell transcription factors (Oct4, KLF4, Sox2, Nanog).

    PubMed

    Lee, SoHyun; Wottrich, Stephanie; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Raf-kinase inhibitor protein has been reported to inhibit both the Raf/mitogen extracellular signal-regulated kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain of activated B cells pathways. It has also been reported in cancers that Raf-kinase inhibitor protein behaves as a metastatic suppressor as well as a chemo-immunosensitizing factor to drug/immune-mediated apoptosis. The majority of cancers exhibit low or no levels of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein. Hence, the activities of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein contrast, in part, to those mediated by several cancer stem cell transcription factors for their roles in resistance and metastasis. In this review, the existence of crosstalks in the signaling pathways between Raf-kinase inhibitor protein and several cancer stem cell transcription factors (Oct4, KLF4, Sox2 and Nanog) was assembled. Oct4 is induced by Lin28, and Raf-kinase inhibitor protein inhibits the microRNA binding protein Lin28. The expression of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein inversely correlates with the expression of Oct4. KLF4 does not interact directly with Raf-kinase inhibitor protein, but rather interacts indirectly via Raf-kinase inhibitor protein's regulation of the Oct4/Sox2/KLF4 complex through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. The mechanism by which Raf-kinase inhibitor protein inhibits Sox2 is via the inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by Raf-kinase inhibitor protein. Thus, Raf-kinase inhibitor protein's relationship with Sox2 is via its regulation of Oct4. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by Raf-kinase inhibitor protein results in the upregulation of Nanog. The inhibition of Oct4 by Raf-kinase inhibitor protein results in the failure of the heterodimer formation of Oct4 and Sox2 that is necessary to bind to the Nanog promoter for the transcription of Nanog. The findings revealed that there exists a direct correlation between the expression of Raf-kinase

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors suppress CCL2 chemokine in monocytes via epigenetic modification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Ching; Lin, Yu-Chih; Huang, Ming-Yii; Kuo, Po-Lin; Wu, Cheng-Chin; Lee, Min-Sheng; Hsieh, Chong-Chao; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Tsai, Wen-Chan; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2017-03-01

    The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors could lead to adverse effects. Therefore, the identification of downstream therapeutic targets is important. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, also called CCL2) is related to RA disease activity, and epigenetic modifications are hypothesized to regulate gene expression in RA pathogenesis. We studied the effects of two TNF-α inhibitors, etanercept and adalimumab, on CCL2 expression and the potentially associated intracellular mechanisms, including epigenetic regulation. Etanercept and adalimumab decreased CCL2 production in THP-1 cells and human primary monocytes, as detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these changes in the CCL2 levels were independent of the TNF-α levels. Etanercept and adalimumab suppressed mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phospho-p38, phospho-JNK, phospho-ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) phospho-p65, as demonstrated using western blot analyses. The investigation of epigenetic modifications using chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that etanercept and adalimumab down-regulated acetylation of histone (H)3 and H4 in the CCL2 promoter region by decreasing the recruitment of the NF-κB associated acetyltransferases p300, CBP and PCAF. Etanercept and adalimumab also down-regulated trimethylation of H3K4, H3K27, H3K36 and H3K79 in the CCL2 promoter region by decreasing the expression of the related methyltransferases WDR5 and Smyd2. We demonstrated that TNF-α inhibitors exert immunomodulatory effects on CCL2 expression in human monocytes via MAPKs, NF-κB and epigenetic modifications. These findings broaden the mechanistic knowledge related to TNF-α inhibitors and provide novel therapeutic targets for RA.

  20. Widespread potential for growth-factor-driven resistance to anticancer kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Timothy R.; Fridlyand, Jane; Yan, Yibing; Penuel, Elicia; Burton, Luciana; Chan, Emily; Peng, Jing; Lin, Eva; Wang, Yulei; Sosman, Jeff; Ribas, Antoni; Li, Jiang; Moffat, John; Sutherlin, Daniel P.; Koeppen, Hartmut; Merchant, Mark; Neve, Richard; Settleman, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Mutationally activated kinases define a clinically validated class of targets for cancer drug therapy1. However, the efficacy of kinase inhibitors in patients whose tumours harbour such alleles is invariably limited by innate or acquired drug resistance2,3. The identification of resistance mechanisms has revealed a recurrent theme—the engagement of survival signals redundant to those transduced by the targeted kinase4. Cancer cells typically express multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that mediate signals that converge on common critical downstream cell-survival effectors—most notably, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)5. Consequently, an increase in RTK-ligand levels, through autocrine tumour-cell production, paracrine contribution from tumour stroma6 or systemic production, could confer resistance to inhibitors of an oncogenic kinase with a similar signalling output. Here, using a panel of kinase-‘addicted’ human cancer cell lines, we found that most cells can be rescued from drug sensitivity by simply exposing them to one or more RTK ligands. Among the findings with clinical implications was the observation that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) confers resistance to the BRAF inhibitor PLX4032 (vemurafenib) in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells. These observations highlight the extensive redundancy of RTK-transduced signalling in cancer cells and the potentially broad role of widely expressed RTK ligands in innate and acquired resistance to drugs targeting oncogenic kinases. PMID:22763448

  1. Structural Biology Insight for the Design of Sub-type Selective Aurora Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sarvagalla, Sailu; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase A, B and C, are key regulators of mitosis and are over expressed in many of the human cancers, making them an ideal drug target for cancer chemotherapy. Currently, over a dozen of Aurora kinase inhibitors are in various phases of clinical development. The majority of the inhibitors (VX-680/MK-0457, PHA-739358, CYC116, SNS-314, AMG 900, AT-9283, SCH- 1473759, ABT-348, PF-03814735, R-763/AS-703569, KW-2449 and TAK-901) are pan-selective (isoform non-selective) and few are Aurora A (MLN8054, MLN8237, VX-689/MK5108 and ENMD 2076) and Aurora B (AZD1152 and GSK1070916) sub-type selective. Despite the intensive research efforts in the past decade, no Aurora kinase inhibitor has reached the market. Recent evidence suggests that the sub-type selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor could possess advantages over pan-selective Aurora inhibitors, by avoiding Aurora B mediated neutropenia. However, sub-type selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor design is very challenging due to the similarity in the active site among the isoforms. Structural biology and computational aspects pertaining to the design of Aurora kinase inhibitors were analyzed and found that a possible means to develop sub-type selective inhibitor is by targeting Aurora A specific residues (Leu215, Thr217 and Arg220) or Aurora B specific residues (Arg159, Glu161 and Lys164), near the solvent exposed region of the protein. Particularly, a useful strategy for the design of sub-type selective Aurora A inhibitor could be by targeting Thr217 residue as in the case of MLN8054. Further preclinical and clinical studies with the sub-type selective Aurora inhibitors could help bring them to the market for the treatment of cancer.

  2. Suppression of interferon β gene transcription by inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family members.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nazma; Vollmer, Stefan; Nanda, Sambit Kumar; Lopez-Pelaez, Marta; Prescott, Alan; Gray, Nathanael; Cohen, Philip

    2015-06-15

    PLK (Polo-like kinase) inhibitors, such as BI-2536, have been reported to suppress IFNB (encoding IFNβ, interferon β) gene transcription induced by ligands that activate TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and TLR4. In the present study, we found that BI-2536 is likely to exert this effect by preventing the interaction of the transcription factors IRF3 (interferon-regulatory factor 3) and c-Jun with the IFNB promoter, but without affecting the TBK1 {TANK [TRAF (tumour-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated factor)-associated nuclear factor κB activator]-binding kinase 1}-catalysed phosphorylation of IRF3 at Ser³⁹⁶, the dimerization and nuclear translocation of IRF3 or the phosphorylation of c-Jun and ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2). Although BI-2536 inhibits few other kinases tested, it interacts with BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal) family members and displaces them from acetylated lysine residues on histones. We found that BET inhibitors that do not inhibit PLKs phenocopied the effect of BI-2536 on IFNB gene transcription. Similarly, BET inhibitors blocked the interaction of IRF5 with the IFNB promoter and the secretion of IFNβ induced by TLR7 or TLR9 ligands in the human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line GEN2.2, but without affecting the nuclear translocation of IRF5. We found that the BET family member BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4) was associated with the IFNB promoter and that this interaction was enhanced by TLR3- or TLR4-ligation and prevented by BI-2536 and other BET inhibitors. Our results establish that BET family members are essential for TLR-stimulated IFNB gene transcription by permitting transcription factors to interact with the IFNB promoter. They also show that the interaction of the IFNB promoter with BRD4 is regulated by TLR ligation and that BI-2536 is likely to suppress IFNB gene transcription by targeting BET family members.

  3. Bivalent inhibitors of the tyrosine kinases ABL and SRC: Determinants of potency and selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Zachary B.; Perera, B. Gayani K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported a chemical genetic method for generating bivalent inhibitors of protein kinases. This method relies on the use of the DNA repair enzyme O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) to display an ATP-competitive inhibitor and a ligand that targets a secondary binding domain. With this method potent and selective inhibitors of the tyrosine kinases SRC and ABL were identified. Here, we dissect the molecular determinants of the potency and selectivity of these bivalent ligands. Systematic analysis of ATP-competitive inhibitors with varying linker lengths revealed that SRC and ABL have differential sensitivities to ligand presentation. Generation of bivalent constructs that contain ligands with differential affinities for the ATP-binding sites and SH3 domains of SRC and ABL demonstrated the modular nature of inhibitors based on the AGT scaffold. Furthermore, these studies revealed that the interaction between the SH3 domain ligand and the kinase SH3 domain is the major selectivity determinant amongst closely-related tyrosine kinases. Finally, the potency of bivalent inhibitors against distinct phospho-isoforms of SRC was determined. Overall, these results provide insight into how individual ligands can be modified to provide more potent and selective bivalent inhibitors of protein kinases. PMID:21060940

  4. Interaction of ABC multidrug transporters with anticancer protein kinase inhibitors: substrates and/or inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Csilla; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors (PKI) are becoming key agents in modern cancer chemotherapy, and combination of PKIs with classical chemotherapeutic drugs may help to overcome currently untreatable metastatic cancers. Since chemotherapy resistance is a recurrent problem, mechanisms of resistance should be clarified in order to help further drug development. Here we suggest that in addition to PKI resistance based on altered target structures, the active removal of these therapeutic agents by the MDR-ABC transporters should also be considered as a major cause of clinical resistance. We discuss the occurring systemic and cellular mechanisms, which may hamper PKI efficiency, and document the role of selected MDR-ABC transporters in these phenomena through their interactions with these anticancer agents. Moreover, we suggest that PKI interactions with ABC transporters may modulate overall drug metabolism, including the fate of diverse, chemically or target-wise unrelated drugs. These effects are based on multiple forms of MDR-ABC transporter interaction with PKIs, as these compounds may be both substrates and/or inhibitors of an ABC transporter. We propose that these interactions should be carefully considered in clinical application, and a combined MDR-ABC transporter and PKI effect may bring a major advantage in future drug development.

  5. Inhibition of mammalian S6 kinase by resveratrol suppresses autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Armour, Sean M.; Baur, Joseph A.; Hsieh, Sherry N.; Land-Bracha, Abigail; Thomas, Sheila M.; Sinclair, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that promotes health and disease resistance in rodent models, and extends lifespan in lower organisms. A major challenge is to understand the biological processes and molecular pathways by which resveratrol induces these beneficial effects. Autophagy is a critical process by which cells turn over damaged components and maintain bioenergetic requirements. Disruption of the normal balance between pro- and anti-autophagic signals is linked to cancer, liver disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that resveratrol attenuates autophagy in response to nutrient limitation or rapamycin in multiple cell lines through a pathway independent of a known target, SIRT1. In a large-scalein vitro kinase screen we identified p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) as a target of resveratrol. Blocking S6K1 activity by expression of a dominant-negative mutant or RNA interference is sufficient to disrupt autophagy to a similar extent as resveratrol. Furthermore, co-administration of resveratrol with S6K1 knockdown does not produce an additive effect. These data indicate that S6K1 is important for the full induction of autophagy in mammals and raise the possibility that some of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are due to modulation of S6K1 activity. PMID:20157535

  6. Virtual screening of selective multitarget kinase inhibitors by combinatorial support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Ma, X H; Wang, R; Tan, C Y; Jiang, Y Y; Lu, T; Rao, H B; Li, X Y; Go, M L; Low, B C; Chen, Y Z

    2010-10-04

    Multitarget agents have been increasingly explored for enhancing efficacy and reducing countertarget activities and toxicities. Efficient virtual screening (VS) tools for searching selective multitarget agents are desired. Combinatorial support vector machines (C-SVM) were tested as VS tools for searching dual-inhibitors of 11 combinations of 9 anticancer kinase targets (EGFR, VEGFR, PDGFR, Src, FGFR, Lck, CDK1, CDK2, GSK3). C-SVM trained on 233-1,316 non-dual-inhibitors correctly identified 26.8%-57.3% (majority >36%) of the 56-230 intra-kinase-group dual-inhibitors (equivalent to the 50-70% yields of two independent individual target VS tools), and 12.2% of the 41 inter-kinase-group dual-inhibitors. C-SVM were fairly selective in misidentifying as dual-inhibitors 3.7%-48.1% (majority <20%) of the 233-1,316 non-dual-inhibitors of the same kinase pairs and 0.98%-4.77% of the 3,971-5,180 inhibitors of other kinases. C-SVM produced low false-hit rates in misidentifying as dual-inhibitors 1,746-4,817 (0.013%-0.036%) of the 13.56 M PubChem compounds, 12-175 (0.007%-0.104%) of the 168 K MDDR compounds, and 0-84 (0.0%-2.9%) of the 19,495-38,483 MDDR compounds similar to the known dual-inhibitors. C-SVM was compared to other VS methods Surflex-Dock, DOCK Blaster, kNN and PNN against the same sets of kinase inhibitors and the full set or subset of the 1.02 M Zinc clean-leads data set. C-SVM produced comparable dual-inhibitor yields, slightly better false-hit rates for kinase inhibitors, and significantly lower false-hit rates for the Zinc clean-leads data set. Combinatorial SVM showed promising potential for searching selective multitarget agents against intra-kinase-group kinases without explicit knowledge of multitarget agents.

  7. Targeting inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase pathway with AZD6244 (ARRY-142886) suppresses growth and angiogenesis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jin-Hang; Wang, Chun-Hui; Tong, Huan; Wen, Shi-Lei; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2015-11-16

    AZD6244 (ARRY-142886), a highly selective MAPK-ERK kinase inhibitor, has shown excellent clinical efficacy in many tumors. However, the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenesis efficacy of AZD6244 on gastric cancer has not been well characterized. In this study, high p-ERK expression was associated with advanced TNM stage, increased lymphovascular invasion and poor survival. For absence of NRAS, KRAS and BRAF mutation, SGC7901 and BGC823 gastric cancer cells were relative resistance to AZD6244 in vitro. And such resistance was not attributed to the insufficient inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. However, tumor growth was significantly suppressed in SGC7901 xenografts by blockage of angiogenesis. This result was further supported by suppression of tube formation and migration in HUVEC cells after treatment with AZD6244. Moreover, the anti-angiogenesis effect of AZD6244 may predominantly attribute to its modulation on VEGF through p-ERK - c-Fos - HIF-1α integrated signal pathways. In conclusions, High p-ERK expression was associated with advanced TNM stage, increased lymphovascular invasion and poor survival. Targeting inhibition of p-ERK by AZD6244 suppress gastric cancer xenografts by blockage of angiogenesis without systemic toxicity. The anti-angiogenesis effect afford by AZD6244 may attribute to its modulation on p-ERK - c-Fos - HIF-1α - VEGF integrated signal pathways.

  8. Kinase Inhibitor Screening Identifies Cyclin-Dependent Kinases and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 as Potential Modulators of TDP-43 Cytosolic Accumulation during Cell Stress.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; James, Janine L; Parker, Sarah J; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Duncan, Clare; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Nonaka, Takashi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kanninen, Katja M; Grubman, Alexandra; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal processing of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been identified as a major factor in neuronal degeneration during amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It is unclear how changes to TDP-43, including nuclear to cytosolic translocation and subsequent accumulation, are controlled in these diseases. TDP-43 is a member of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) RNA binding protein family and is known to associate with cytosolic RNA stress granule proteins in ALS and FTLD. hnRNP trafficking and accumulation is controlled by the action of specific kinases including members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, little is known about how kinase pathways control TDP-43 movement and accumulation. In this study, we used an in vitro model of TDP-43-positve stress granule formation to screen for the effect of kinase inhibitors on TDP-43 accumulation. We found that while a number of kinase inhibitors, particularly of the MAPK pathways modulated both TDP-43 and the global stress granule marker, human antigen R (HuR), multiple inhibitors were more specific to TDP-43 accumulation, including inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Close correlation was observed between effects of these inhibitors on TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR, but often with different effects on HuR accumulation. This may indicate a potential interaction between TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR. CDK inhibitors were also found to reverse pre-formed TDP-43-positive stress granules and both CDK and GSK3 inhibitors abrogated the accumulation of C-terminal TDP-43 (219-414) in transfected cells. Further studies are required to confirm the specific kinases involved and whether their action is through phosphorylation of the TDP-43 binding partner hnRNP K. This knowledge provides a valuable insight into the mechanisms controlling abnormal cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulation and may herald new opportunities

  9. Tyrosine kinase, aurora kinase and leucine aminopeptidase as attractive drug targets in anticancer therapy - characterisation of their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ziemska, Joanna; Solecka, Jolanta

    Cancers are the leading cause of deaths all over the world. Available anticancer agents used in clinics exhibit low therapeutic index and usually high toxicity. Wide spreading drug resistance of cancer cells induce a demanding need to search for new drug targets. Currently, many on-going studies on novel compounds with potent anticancer activity, high selectivity as well as new modes of action are conducted. In this work, we describe in details three enzyme groups, which are at present of extensive interest to medical researchers and pharmaceutical companies. These include receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. EGFR enzymes) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src enzymes), type A, B and C Aurora kinases and aminopeptidases, especially leucine aminopeptidase. We discuss classification of these enzymes, biochemistry as well as their role in the cell cycle under normal conditions and during cancerogenesis. Further on, the work describes enzyme inhibitors that are under in vitro, preclinical, clinical studies as well as drugs available on the market. Both, chemical structures of discovered inhibitors and the role of chemical moieties in novel drug design are discussed. Described enzymes play essential role in cell cycle, especially in mitosis (Aurora kinases), cell differentiation, growth and apoptosis (tyrosine kinases) as well as G1/S transition (leucine aminopeptidase). In cancer cells, they are overexpressed and only their inhibition may stop tumor progression. This review presents the clinical outcomes of selected inhibitors and argues the safety of drug usage in human volunteers. Clinical studies of EGFR and Src kinase inhibitors in different tumors clearly show the need for molecular selection of patients (to those with mutations in genes coding EGFR and Src) to achieve positive clinical response. Current data indicates the great necessity for new anticancer treatment and actions to limit off-target activity.

  10. New HSP27 inhibitors efficiently suppress drug resistance development in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lennig, Petra; Zhang, Yixin; Schroeder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is an important open problem in cancer treatment. In recent years, the heat shock protein HSP27 (HSPB1) was identified as a key player driving resistance development. HSP27 is overexpressed in many cancer types and influences cellular processes such as apoptosis, DNA repair, recombination, and formation of metastases. As a result cancer cells are able to suppress apoptosis and develop resistance to cytostatic drugs. To identify HSP27 inhibitors we follow a novel computational drug repositioning approach. We exploit a similarity between a predicted HSP27 binding site to a viral thymidine kinase to generate lead inhibitors for HSP27. Six of these leads were verified experimentally. They bind HSP27 and down-regulate its chaperone activity. Most importantly, all six compounds inhibit development of drug resistance in cellular assays. One of the leads – chlorpromazine – is an antipsychotic, which has a positive effect on survival time in human breast cancer. In summary, we make two important contributions: First, we put forward six novel leads, which inhibit HSP27 and tackle drug resistance. Second, we demonstrate the power of computational drug repositioning. PMID:27626687

  11. Crystal Structure of the Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase in Complex with the Inhibitor STO-609*

    PubMed Central

    Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Takagi, Tetsuo; Ohsawa, Noboru; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Suzuki, Atsushi; Lee, Suni; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Kadowaki, Takashi; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) kinase (CaMKK) is a member of the CaMK cascade that mediates the response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. CaMKK phosphorylates and activates CaMKI and CaMKIV, which directly activate transcription factors. In this study, we determined the 2.4 Å crystal structure of the catalytic kinase domain of the human CaMKKβ isoform complexed with its selective inhibitor, STO-609. The structure revealed that CaMKKβ lacks the αD helix and that the equivalent region displays a hydrophobic molecular surface, which may reflect its unique substrate recognition and autoinhibition. Although CaMKKβ lacks the activation loop phosphorylation site, the activation loop is folded in an active-state conformation, which is stabilized by a number of interactions between amino acid residues conserved among the CaMKK isoforms. An in vitro analysis of the kinase activity confirmed the intrinsic activity of the CaMKKβ kinase domain. Structure and sequence analyses of the STO-609-binding site revealed amino acid replacements that may affect the inhibitor binding. Indeed, mutagenesis demonstrated that the CaMKKβ residue Pro274, which replaces the conserved acidic residue of other protein kinases, is an important determinant for the selective inhibition by STO-609. Therefore, the present structure provides a molecular basis for clarifying the known biochemical properties of CaMKKβ and for designing novel inhibitors targeting CaMKKβ and the related protein kinases. PMID:21504895

  12. Repositioning of amprenavir as a novel extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 inhibitor and apoptosis inducer in MCF-7 human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenchun; Li, Xin; Li, Tongyu; Wang, Hailian; Shi, Wei; Qi, Ping; Li, Chunyang; Chen, Jie; Bao, Jinku; Huang, Guodong; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Computational drug repositioning by virtually screening existing drugs for additional therapeutic usage could efficiently accelerate anticancer drug discovery. Herein, a library of 1447 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved small molecule drugs was screened in silico for inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2). Then, in vitro kinase assay demonstrated amprenavir, a HIV-1 protease inhibitor, as a potential kinase inhibitor of ERK2. The in vivo kinase assay indicated that amprenavir could inhibit ERK2-mediated phosphorylation of BimEL at Ser69. Amprenavir could suppress this phosphorylation in MCF-7 cells, which may further facilitate the association of BimEL with several pro-survival molecules. Additionally, inhibition of ERK2-BimEL signaling pathway by amprenavir could contribute to its anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activity in MCF-7 cells. Finally, in vivo tumor growth and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that amprenavir remarkably suppressed tumor proliferation and induce apoptosis in MCF-7 xenografts. Taken together, amprenavir can effectively inhibit the kinase activity of ERK2, and thus induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in human MCF-7 cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, making amprenavir a promising candidate for future anticancer therapeutics.

  13. A derivative of chrysin suppresses two-stage skin carcinogenesis by inhibiting mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haidan; Hwang, Joon-Sung; Li, Wei; Choi, Tae Woong; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Thimmegowda, N. R.; Lee, Ki-Won; Ryoo, In-Ja; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Bode, Ann M.; Zhou, Xinmin; Yang, Yifeng; Erikson, Raymond L.; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) is a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase that acts downstream of both ERKs and p38 MAP kinases in response to stress or mitogenic extracellular stimuli. Increasing evidence has shown that MSK1 is closely associated with malignant transformation and cancer development. MSK1 should be an effective target for cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. However, very few MSK1 inhibitors, especially natural compounds, have been reported. We used virtual screening of a natural products database and the active conformation of the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 (PDB id 3KN) as the receptor structure to identify chrysin and its derivative, compound 69407, as inhibitors of MSK1. Compared with chrysin, compound 69407 more strongly inhibited proliferation and TPA-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ cells with lower cytotoxicity. Western blot data demonstrated that compound 69407 suppressed phosphorylation of the MSK1 downstream effector histone H3 in intact cells. Knocking down the expression of MSK1 effectively reduced the sensitivity of JB6 P+ cells to compound 69407. Moreover, topical treatment with compound 69407 prior to TPA application significantly reduced papilloma development in terms of number and size in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. The reduction in papilloma development was accompanied by the inhibition of histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser10 in tumors extracted from mouse skin. The results indicated that compound 69407 exerts inhibitory effects on skin tumorigenesis by directly binding with MSK1 and attenuates the MSK1/histone H3 signaling pathway, which makes it an ideal chemopreventive agent against skin cancer. PMID:24169959

  14. SUPPRESSION OF THE NITRIC OXIDE PATHWAY IN METASTATIC RENAL CELL CARCINOMA PATIENTS RECEIVING VEGF-SIGNALING INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Emily S.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Dhawan, Mallika D.; Rogers, Miranda J.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2010-01-01

    Therapies that target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway cause hypertension but the mechanism remains unknown. This cross-sectional study tested the hypothesis that VEGF inhibition causes hypertension by suppressing VEGF-mediated vasodilatory pathways. Urine was collected from 80 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma from 2002–2009, 40 at baseline and 40 while on VEGF inhibitors. Measured urinary biomarkers include albumin, metabolites of the nitric oxide pathway and its downstream effector, cGMP, and prostaglandin pathway biomarkers prostaglandin E2, 6-keto PGF 1α, and cAMP, all normalized to urinary creatinine. The mean age in both groups was 61.8 years, 76% were male, and urinary albumin was higher in patients receiving VEGF inhibitors (median 18.4mg/g vs. 4.6 mg/g; p=0.009). cGMP/Cr was suppressed in patients on VEGF inhibitors (0.28 pmol/ug vs. 0.39 pmol/ug; p=0.01), with a trend toward suppression of nitrate/Cr (0.46 umol/mg vs. 0.62 umol/mg; p=0.09). Both comparisons were strengthened when patients on bevacizumab were excluded and only those receiving small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors were analyzed (cGMP/Cr, p=0.003; Nitrate/Cr, p=0.01). Prostaglandin E2, 6-keto PGF1α, and cAMP did not differ between groups. These results suggest that hypertension induced by VEGF inhibitors is mediated by suppression of nitric oxide production. Prospective studies are needed to explore whether these biomarkers may be useful predictors of efficacy in patients receiving VEGF-targeted therapies. PMID:20956731

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of urea derivatives as anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    af Gennäs, Gustav Boije; Mologni, Luca; Ahmed, Shaheen; Rajaratnam, Mohanathas; Marin, Oriano; Lindholm, Niko; Viltadi, Michela; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari

    2011-09-05

    In anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, chromosomal translocations involving the kinase domain of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), generally fused to the 5' part of the nucleophosmin gene, produce highly oncogenic ALK fusion proteins that deregulate cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation in these cells. Other fusion oncoproteins involving ALK, such as echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK, were recently found in patients with non-small-cell lung, breast, and colorectal cancers. Recent research has focused on the development of inhibitors for targeted therapy of these ALK-positive tumors. Because kinase inhibitors that target the inactive conformation are thought to be more specific than ATP-targeted inhibitors, we investigated the possibility of using two known inhibitors, doramapimod and sorafenib, which target inactive kinases, to design new urea derivatives as ALK inhibitors. We generated a homology model of ALK in its inactive conformation complexed with doramapimod or sorafenib in its active site. The results elucidated why doramapimod is a weak inhibitor and why sorafenib does not inhibit ALK. Virtual screening of commercially available compounds using the homology model of ALK yielded candidate inhibitors, which were tested using biochemical assays. Herein we present the design, synthesis, biological activity, and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of urea compounds as potent ALK inhibitors. Some compounds showed inhibition of purified ALK in the high nanomolar range and selective antiproliferative activity on ALK-positive cells.

  16. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  17. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site.

  18. Biochemical Mechanisms of Resistance to Small-Molecule Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurty, Ratika; Maly, Dustin J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases have emerged as one of the most frequently targeted families of proteins in drug discovery. While the development of small-molecule inhibitors that have the potency and selectivity necessary to be effective cancer drugs is still a formidable challenge, there have been several notable successes in this area over the last decade. However, in the course of the clinical use of these inhibitors, it has become apparent that drug resistance is a recurring problem. Because kinase inhibitors act by targeting a specific kinase or set of kinases, there is a strong selective pressure for the development of mutations that hinder drug binding but preserve the catalytic activity of these enzymes. To date, resistance mutations to clinically-approved kinase inhibitors have been identified in a number of kinases. This review will highlight recent work that has been performed to understand how mutations in the kinase catalytic domain confer drug resistance. In addition, recent experimental efforts to predict potential sites of clinical drug resistance will be discussed. PMID:20044834

  19. Design, synthesis and characterization of a highly effective inhibitor for analog-sensitive (as) kinases.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michael; Morillas, Montse; Vendrell, Alexandre; Brive, Lars; Gebbia, Marinella; Wallace, Iain M; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Posas, Francesc; Grøtli, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Highly selective, cell-permeable and fast-acting inhibitors of individual kinases are sought-after as tools for studying the cellular function of kinases in real time. A combination of small molecule synthesis and protein mutagenesis, identified a highly potent inhibitor (1-Isopropyl-3-(phenylethynyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine) of a rationally engineered Hog1 serine/threonine kinase (Hog1(T100G)). This inhibitor has been successfully used to study various aspects of Hog1 signaling, including a transient cell cycle arrest and gene expression changes mediated by Hog1 in response to stress. This study also underscores that the general applicability of this approach depends, in part, on the selectivity of the designed the inhibitor with respect to activity versus the engineered and wild type kinases. To explore this specificity in detail, we used a validated chemogenetic assay to assess the effect of this inhibitor on all gene products in yeast in parallel. The results from this screen emphasize the need for caution and for case-by-case assessment when using the Analog-Sensitive Kinase Allele technology to assess the physiological roles of kinases.

  20. Opening the door to the development of novel Abl kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bezerra Morais, Pedro Alves; Daltoé, Renata Dalmaschio; Paula, Heberth de

    2016-10-24

    The discovery of the importance of kinase activity and its relationship to the emergence and proliferation of cancer cells, due to changes in normal physiology, opened a remarkable pathway for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia through intense search of drug candidates. Six Abl kinase inhibitors have received the US FDA approval as chronic myelogenous leukemia treatment, and continuous efforts in obtaining new, more effective and selective molecules are being carried out. Herein we discuss the mechanisms of Abl inhibition, structural features and ligand/protein interactions that are important for the design of new Abl kinase inhibitors. This review provides a broad overview of binding mode predictions, through molecular docking, which can be an approach to discover novel Abl kinase inhibitors.

  1. Methods for Investigation of Targeted Kinase Inhibitor Therapy using Chemical Proteomics and Phosphorylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Haura, Eric B.; Smalley, Keiran S.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Koomen, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation acts as a molecular switch for many regulatory events in signaling pathways that drive cell division, proliferation, and apoptosis. Because of the critical nature of these protein post-translational modifications in cancer, drug development programs often focus on inhibitors for kinases and phosphatases, which control protein phosphorylation. Numerous kinase inhibitors have entered clinical use, but prediction of their efficacy and a molecular basis for patient response remain uncertain. Chemical proteomics, the combination of drug affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry, identifies potential target proteins that bind to the drugs. Phosphorylation profiling can complement chemical proteomics by cataloging modifications in the target kinases and their downstream substrates using phosphopeptide enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry. These experiments shed light on the mechanism of disease development and illuminate candidate biomarkers to guide personalized therapeutic strategies. In this review, commonly applied technologies and workflows are discussed to illustrate the role of proteomics in examining tumor biology and therapeutic intervention using kinase inhibitors. PMID:20361944

  2. Identification of potent Yes1 kinase inhibitors using a library screening approach.

    PubMed

    Patel, Paresma R; Sun, Hongmao; Li, Samuel Q; Shen, Min; Khan, Javed; Thomas, Craig J; Davis, Mindy I

    2013-08-01

    Yes1 kinase has been implicated as a potential therapeutic target in a number of cancers including melanomas, breast cancers, and rhabdomyosarcomas. Described here is the development of a robust and miniaturized biochemical assay for Yes1 kinase that was applied in a high throughput screen (HTS) of kinase-focused small molecule libraries. The HTS provided 144 (17% hit rate) small molecule compounds with IC₅₀ values in the sub-micromolar range. Three of the most potent Yes1 inhibitors were then examined in a cell-based assay for inhibition of cell survival in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Homology models of Yes1 were generated in active and inactive conformations, and docking of inhibitors supports binding to the active conformation (DFG-in) of Yes1. This is the first report of a large high throughput enzymatic activity screen for identification of Yes1 kinase inhibitors, thereby elucidating the polypharmacology of a variety of small molecules and clinical candidates.

  3. Antitumor activity of sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitor ABC294640 and sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Beljanski, Vladimir; Lewis, Clayton S

    2011-01-01

    The balance between the pro-apoptotic lipids ceramide and sphingosine and the pro-survival lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is termed the “sphingosine rheostat”. Two isozymes, sphingosine kinase 1 and 2 (SK1 and SK2), are responsible for phosphorylation of pro-apoptotic sphingosine to form pro-survival S1P. We have previously reported the antitumor properties of an SK2 selective inhibitor, ABC294640, alone or in combination with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib in mouse models of kidney carcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Here, we evaluated the combined antitumor effects of the aforementioned drug combination in two mouse models of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although combining the SK2 inhibitor, ABC294640 and sorafenib in vitro only afforded additive drug-drug effects, their combined antitumor properties in the mouse model bearing HepG2 cells mirrored effects previously observed in animals bearing kidney carcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Combining ABC294640 and sorafenib led to a decrease in the levels of phosphorylated ERK in SK-HEP -1 cells, indicating that the antitumor effect of this drug combination is likely mediated through a suppression of the MAPK pathway in hepatocellular models. We also measured levels of S1P in the plasma of mice treated with two different doses of ABC294640 and sorafenib. We found decreases in the levels of S1P in plasma of mice treated daily with 100 mg/kg of ABC294640 for 5 weeks, and this decrease was not affected by coadministration of sorafenib. Taken together, these data support combining ABC294640 and sorafenib in clinical trials in HCC patients. Furthermore, monitoring levels of S1P may provide a pharmacodynamic marker of ABC294640 activity. PMID:21258214

  4. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  5. Computational Insights for the Discovery of Non-ATP Competitive Inhibitors of MAP Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schnieders, Michael J.; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Yan, Chunli; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ren, Pengyu

    2014-01-01

    Due to their role in cellular signaling mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases represent targets of pharmaceutical interest. However, the majority of known MAP kinase inhibitors compete with cellular ATP and target an ATP binding pocket that is highly conserved in the 500 plus representatives of the human protein kinase family. Here we review progress toward the development of non-ATP competitive MAP kinase inhibitors for the extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), the c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3) and the p38 MAPKs (α, β, γ, and δ). Special emphasis is placed on the role of computational methods in the drug discovery process for MAP kinases. Topics include recent advances in X-ray crystallography theory that improve the MAP kinase structures essential to structure-based drug discovery, the use of molecular dynamics to understand the conformational heterogeneity of the activation loop and inhibitors discovered by virtual screening. The impact of an advanced polarizable force field such as AMOEBA used in conjunction with sophisticated kinetic and thermodynamic simulation methods is also discussed. PMID:22316156

  6. Global target profile of the kinase inhibitor bosutinib in primary chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Remsing Rix, L L; Rix, U; Colinge, J; Hantschel, O; Bennett, K L; Stranzl, T; Müller, A; Baumgartner, C; Valent, P; Augustin, M; Till, J H; Superti-Furga, G

    2009-03-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism of action of second-generation BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including perturbed targets and pathways, should contribute to rationalized therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or in other affected diseases. Here, we characterized the target profile of the dual SRC/ABL inhibitor bosutinib employing a two-tiered approach using chemical proteomics to identify natural binders in whole cell lysates of primary CML and K562 cells in parallel to in vitro kinase assays against a large recombinant kinase panel. The combined strategy resulted in a global survey of bosutinib targets comprised of over 45 novel tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. We have found clear differences in the target patterns of bosutinib in primary CML cells versus the K562 cell line. A comparison of bosutinib with dasatinib across the whole kinase panel revealed overlapping, but distinct, inhibition profiles. Common among those were the SRC, ABL and TEC family kinases. Bosutinib did not inhibit KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, but prominently targeted the apoptosis-linked STE20 kinases. Although in vivo bosutinib is inactive against ABL T315I, we found this clinically important mutant to be enzymatically inhibited in the mid-nanomolar range. Finally, bosutinib is the first kinase inhibitor shown to target CAMK2G, recently implicated in myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

  7. MLS-2384, a new 6-bromoindirubin derivative with dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitory activity, suppresses growth of diverse cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lucy; Gaboriaud, Nicolas; Vougogianopoulou, Konstantina; Tian, Yan; Wu, Jun; Wen, Wei; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Jove, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) and Src kinase are the two major tyrosine kinase families upstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT). Among the seven STAT family proteins, STAT3 is constitutively activated in many diverse cancers. Upon activation, JAK and Src kinases phosphorylate STAT3, and thereby promote cell growth and survival. MLS-2384 is a novel 6-bromoindirubin derivative with a bromo-group at the 6-position on one indole ring and a hydrophilic group at the 3′-position on the other indole ring. In this study, we investigated the kinase inhibitory activity and anticancer activity of MLS-2384. Our data from in vitro kinase assays, cell viability analyses, western blotting analyses, and animal model studies, demonstrate that MLS-2384 is a dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitor, and suppresses growth of various human cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, skin, ovarian, lung, and liver. Consistent with the inactivation of JAK and Src kinases, phosphorylation of STAT3 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the cancer cells treated with MLS-2384. STAT3 downstream proteins involved in cell proliferation and survival, such as c-Myc and Mcl-1, are downregulated by MLS-2384 in prostate cancer cells, whereas survivin is downregulated in A2058 cells. In these two cancer cell lines, PARP is cleaved, indicating that MLS-2384 induces apoptosis in human melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MLS-2384 suppresses tumor growth with low toxicity in a mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. Taken together, MLS-2384 demonstrates dual JAK/Src inhibitory activity and suppresses tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings support further development of MLS-2384 as a potential small-molecule therapeutic agent that targets JAK, Src, and STAT3 signaling in multiple human cancer cells. PMID:24100507

  8. MLS-2384, a new 6-bromoindirubin derivative with dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitory activity, suppresses growth of diverse cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lucy; Gaboriaud, Nicolas; Vougogianopoulou, Konstantina; Tian, Yan; Wu, Jun; Wen, Wei; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Jove, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) and Src kinase are the two major tyrosine kinase families upstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT). Among the seven STAT family proteins, STAT3 is constitutively activated in many diverse cancers. Upon activation, JAK and Src kinases phosphorylate STAT3, and thereby promote cell growth and survival. MLS-2384 is a novel 6-bromoindirubin derivative with a bromo-group at the 6-position on one indole ring and a hydrophilic group at the 3'-position on the other indole ring. In this study, we investigated the kinase inhibitory activity and anticancer activity of MLS-2384. Our data from in vitro kinase assays, cell viability analyses, western blotting analyses, and animal model studies, demonstrate that MLS-2384 is a dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitor, and suppresses growth of various human cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, skin, ovarian, lung, and liver. Consistent with the inactivation of JAK and Src kinases, phosphorylation of STAT3 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the cancer cells treated with MLS-2384. STAT3 downstream proteins involved in cell proliferation and survival, such as c-Myc and Mcl-1, are downregulated by MLS-2384 in prostate cancer cells, whereas survivin is downregulated in A2058 cells. In these two cancer cell lines, PARP is cleaved, indicating that MLS-2384 induces apoptosis in human melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MLS-2384 suppresses tumor growth with low toxicity in a mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. Taken together, MLS-2384 demonstrates dual JAK/Src inhibitory activity and suppresses tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings support further development of MLS-2384 as a potential small-molecule therapeutic agent that targets JAK, Src, and STAT3 signaling in multiple human cancer cells.

  9. The noni anthraquinone damnacanthal is a multi-kinase inhibitor with potent anti-angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    García-Vilas, Javier A; Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Martínez-Poveda, Beatriz; Quesada, Ana R; Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-28

    The natural bioactive compound damnacanthal inhibits several tyrosine kinases. Herein, we show that -in fact- damancanthal is a multi kinase inhibitor. A docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach allows getting further insight on the inhibitory effect of damnacanthal on three different kinases: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, c-Met and focal adhesion kinase. Several of the kinases targeted and inhibited by damnacanthal are involved in angiogenesis. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments clearly demonstrate that, indeed, damnacanthal is a very potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. A number of in vitro assays contribute to determine the specific effects of damnacanthal on each of the steps of the angiogenic process, including inhibition of tubulogenesis, endothelial cell proliferation, survival, migration and production of extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme. Taken altogether, these results suggest that damancanthal could have potential interest for the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-dependent diseases.

  10. Identification of novel polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors by a hybrid virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuai; Sun, Shan-Liang; Liu, Hai-Chun; Chen, Ya-Dong; Yuan, Hao-Liang; Gao, Yi-Ping; Yang, Pei; Lu, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 is an important and attractive oncological target that plays a key role in mitosis and cytokinesis. A combined pharmacophore- and docking-based virtual screening was performed to identify novel polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors. A total of 34 hit compounds were selected and tested in vitro, and some compounds showed inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and human tumor cell growth. The most potent compound (66) inhibited polo-like kinase 1 with an IC(50) value of 6.99 μm. The docked binding models of two hit compounds were discussed in detail. These compounds contained novel chemical scaffolds and may be used as foundations for the development of novel classes of polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors.

  11. Effect of kinase inhibitors on the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Mathé, Doriane; Evesque, Anne; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies of malignancies currently consist of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors. The combination of these novel agents raises the issue of potential antagonisms. We evaluated the potential effect of 4 kinase inhibitors, including the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, and 3 PI3K inhibitors idelalisib, NVP-BEZ235 and LY294002, on the effects of the 3 monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and obinutuzumab (directed against CD20) and trastuzumab (directed against HER2). We found that ibrutinib potently inhibits antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity exerted by all antibodies, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.2 microM for trastuzumab, 0.5 microM for rituximab and 2 microM for obinutuzumab, suggesting a lesser effect in combination with obinutuzumab than with rituximab. The 4 kinase inhibitors were found to inhibit phagocytosis by fresh human neutrophils, as well as antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis induced by the 3 antibodies. Conversely co-administration of ibrutinib with rituximab, obinutuzumab or trastuzumab did not demonstrate any inhibitory effect of ibrutinib in vivo in murine xenograft models. In conclusion, some kinase inhibitors, in particular, ibrutinib, are likely to exert inhibitory effects on innate immune cells. However, these effects do not compromise the antitumor activity of monoclonal antibodies in vivo in the models that were evaluated. PMID:25523586

  12. Effect of kinase inhibitors on the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Mathé, Doriane; Evesque, Anne; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies of malignancies currently consist of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors. The combination of these novel agents raises the issue of potential antagonisms. We evaluated the potential effect of 4 kinase inhibitors, including the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, and 3 PI3K inhibitors idelalisib, NVP-BEZ235 and LY294002, on the effects of the 3 monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and obinutuzumab (directed against CD20) and trastuzumab (directed against HER2). We found that ibrutinib potently inhibits antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity exerted by all antibodies, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.2 microM for trastuzumab, 0.5 microM for rituximab and 2 microM for obinutuzumab, suggesting a lesser effect in combination with obinutuzumab than with rituximab. The 4 kinase inhibitors were found to inhibit phagocytosis by fresh human neutrophils, as well as antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis induced by the 3 antibodies. Conversely co-administration of ibrutinib with rituximab, obinutuzumab or trastuzumab did not demonstrate any inhibitory effect of ibrutinib in vivo in murine xenograft models. In conclusion, some kinase inhibitors, in particular, ibrutinib, are likely to exert inhibitory effects on innate immune cells. However, these effects do not compromise the antitumor activity of monoclonal antibodies in vivo in the models that were evaluated.

  13. Structure-based design of isoquinoline-5-sulfonamide inhibitors of protein kinase B.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ian; Caldwell, John; Fonseca, Tatiana; Donald, Alastair; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Hunter, Lisa-Jane K; Garrett, Michelle D; Rowlands, Martin G; Aherne, G Wynne; Davies, Thomas G; Berdini, Valerio; Woodhead, Steven J; Davis, Deborah; Seavers, Lisa C A; Wyatt, Paul G; Workman, Paul; McDonald, Edward

    2006-02-15

    Structure-based drug design of novel isoquinoline-5-sulfonamide inhibitors of PKB as potential antitumour agents was investigated. Constrained pyrrolidine analogues that mimicked the bound conformation of linear prototypes were identified and investigated by co-crystal structure determinations with the related protein PKA. Detailed variation in the binding modes between inhibitors with similar overall conformations was observed. Potent PKB inhibitors from this series inhibited GSK3beta phosphorylation in cellular assays, consistent with inhibition of PKB kinase activity in cells.

  14. Assessing and managing toxicities induced by kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Raffaella E; Pennella, Giulia; Saturno, Grazia S; Grossi, Pietro; Brughera, Marco; Venturi, Miro

    2007-01-01

    Currently, several protein kinase-modulating compounds have received market approval across a range of diverse therapeutic indications. Furthermore, a large number of chemical and biological protein kinase-modulating compounds are undergoing testing at the preclinical and clinical level. Protein kinases are both major pharmacological targets and diagnostically useful. Progression of kinase modulators toward clinically viable therapies is aided by a reversible mechanism of action, short treatment durations and patient-compliant administration routes. However, the physiological role and essential functional activity of protein kinases in many organs and tissues complicates, to different extents, the development of useful, highly potent protein kinase modulators. In this review, we will highlight common problems in the development of these compounds and lessons learned from the extensive preclinical and clinical characterization of some key protein kinase modulators, some of which have either entered and successfully completed clinical trials or have been abandoned as a consequence of unacceptable toxicity issues. We will ultimately explore how molecular profiling tools combined with histopathological endpoints can be adopted to address and further understand these toxicities in humans and understand their relevance and characterization when identified during early animal experiments.

  15. Aurora kinase inhibitors: which role in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients resistant to imatinib?

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Soverini, Simona; Cilloni, Daniela; Baccarani, Michele

    2009-01-01

    At present, there are no compounds in clinical development in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that have been documented to harbor significant activity against the imatinib-resistant T315I mutation. Recent reports on the pre-clinical activity of some emerging tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as ON012380, VX-680 and PHA-739358 promise possible clinical efficacy against this specific Bcr-Abl mutant form. Here, we focus on the role of aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680 and PHA-739358 in blocking the leukemogenic pathways driven by wild-type and T315I-Bcr-Abl in CML or Ph+ ALL by reviewing recent research evidence. We also discuss the possibility of employing aurora kinase inhibitors as a promising new therapeutic approach in the treatment of CML and Ph+ ALL patients resistant to first and second generation TK inhibitors.

  16. Inhibition of sphingosine kinase prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth and suppresses proinflammatory responses in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vibhuti; Ashby, Charles R; Olgun, Nicole S; Sundaram, Sruthi; Salami, Oluwabukola; Munnangi, Swapna; Pekson, Ryan; Mahajan, Prathamesh; Reznik, Sandra E

    2015-03-01

    Premature delivery occurs in 12% of all births, and accounts for nearly half of long-term neurological morbidity, and 60% to 80% of perinatal mortality. Despite advances in obstetrics and neonatology, the rate of premature delivery has increased approximately 12% since 1990. The single most common cause of spontaneous preterm birth is infection. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the role of endothelin-1 as both a constrictor of uterine myometrial smooth muscle and a proinflammatory mediator. Endothelin-1 activates the phospholipase C pathway, leading to activation of protein kinase C and, in turn, sphingosine kinase (SphK). The inhibition of SphK has been recently shown to control the proinflammatory response associated with sepsis. We show herein, for the first time, that SphK inhibition prevents inflammation-associated preterm birth in a murine model. Rescue of pups from premature abortion with an SphK inhibitor occurs by suppression of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, Il-1β, and Il-6 and attenuation of polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells into the placental labyrinth. Moreover, we postulate that inhibition of SphK leads to suppression of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression, indicating the presence of an endothelin-converting enzyme 1/endothelin 1-SphK positive feedback loop. This work introduces a novel approach for the control of infection-triggered preterm labor, a condition for which there is no effective treatment.

  17. Janus kinase inhibition suppresses PKC-induced cytokine release without affecting HIV-1 latency reversal ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Adam M; Larragoite, Erin T; Coletti, McKenna L; Macedo, Amanda B; Martins, Laura J; Bosque, Alberto; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-12-20

    Despite the durable viral suppression afforded by antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 eradication will require strategies to target latently infected cells that persist in infected individuals. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation is a promising strategy to reactivate latent proviruses and allow for subsequent recognition and clearance of infected cells by the immune system. Ingenol derivatives are PKC agonists that induce latency reversal but also lead to T cell activation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which would be undesirable in vivo. In this work, we sought to identify compounds that would suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the context of PKC activation. We performed an in vitro screen to identify compounds that could dampen pro-inflammatory cytokine release associated with T cell activation, using IL-6 as a model cytokine. We then tested the ability of the most promising screening hit, the FDA-approved Janus Kinase (JAK) inhibitor ruxolitinib, to diminish release of multiple cytokines and its effect on latency reversal using cells from HIV-1-positive, aviremic participants. We demonstrate that co-administration of ruxolitinib with ingenol-3,20-dibenzoate significantly reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine release without impairing latency reversal ex vivo. The combination of ingenol compounds and JAK inhibition represents a novel strategy for HIV-1 eradication.

  18. Suppression of BRCA1 sensitizes cells to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Bouwman, P; Greco, D; Saarela, J; Yadav, B; Jonkers, J; Kuznetsov, S G

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a multifunctional protein best known for its role in DNA repair and association with breast and ovarian cancers. To uncover novel biologically significant molecular functions of BRCA1, we tested a panel of 198 approved and experimental drugs to inhibit growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted for BRCA1 by siRNA. 26S proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib emerged as a new class of selective BRCA1-targeting agents. The effect was confirmed in HeLa and U2OS cancer cell lines using two independent siRNAs, and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with inducible deletion of Brca1. Bortezomib treatment did not cause any increase in nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX, and knockdown of BRCA2 did not entail sensitivity to bortezomib, suggesting that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 may not be directly involved. We found that a toxic effect of bortezomib on BRCA1-depleted cells is mostly due to deregulated cell cycle checkpoints mediated by RB1-E2F pathway and 53BP1. Similar to BRCA1, depletion of RB1 also conferred sensitivity to bortezomib, whereas suppression of E2F1 or 53BP1 together with BRCA1 reduced induction of apoptosis after bortezomib treatment. A gene expression microarray study identified additional genes activated by bortezomib treatment only in the context of inactivation of BRCA1 including a critical involvement of the ERN1-mediated unfolded protein response. Our data indicate that BRCA1 has a novel molecular function affecting cell cycle checkpoints in a manner dependent on the 26S proteasome activity. PMID:25522274

  19. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B. Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage.

  20. Crystal structure of a human cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexwith a flavonol inhibitor, Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Heshu; Chang, Debbie J.; Baratte, Blandine; Meijer, Laurent; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula

    2005-01-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in cell cycle control, apoptosis, transcription and neuronal functions. They are important targets for the design of drugs with anti-mitotic and/or anti-neurodegenerative effects. CDK4 and CDK6 form a subfamily among the CDKs in mammalian cells, as defined by sequence similarities. Compared to CDK2 and CDK5, structural information on CDK4 and CDK6 is sparse. We describe here the crystal structure of human CDK6 in complex with a viral cyclin and a flavonol inhibitor, fisetin. Fisetin binds to the active form of CDK6, forming hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues in the binding pocket that undergo large conformational changes during CDK activation by cyclin binding. The 4-keto group and the 3-hydroxyl group of fisetin are hydrogen bonded with the backbone in the hinge region between the N-terminal and C-terminal kinase domain, as has been observed for many CDK inhibitors. However, CDK2 and HCK kinase in complex with other flavone inhibitors such as quercetin and flavopiridol showed a different binding mode with the inhibitor rotated by about 180. The structural information of the CDK6-fisetin complex is correlated with the binding affinities of different flavone inhibitors for CDK6. This complex structure is the first description of an inhibitor complex with a kinase from the CDK4/6 subfamily and can provide a basis for selecting and designing inhibitor compounds with higher affinity and specificity.

  1. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Suppression by WEE1 Kinase Protects the Genome through Control of Replication Initiation and Nucleotide Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Patzke, Sebastian; Holmberg, Christian; Mejlvang, Jakob; Groth, Anja; Nielsen, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes or inhibition of WEE1 kinase deregulates cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and leads to replication stress; however, the underlying mechanism is not understood. We now show that elevation of CDK activity by inhibition of WEE1 kinase rapidly increases initiation of replication. This leads to nucleotide shortage and reduces replication fork speed, which is followed by SLX4/MUS81-mediated DNA double-strand breakage. Fork speed is normalized and DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation is suppressed when CDT1, a key factor for replication initiation, is depleted. Furthermore, addition of nucleosides counteracts the effects of unscheduled CDK activity on fork speed and DNA DSB formation. Finally, we show that WEE1 regulates the ionizing radiation (IR)-induced S-phase checkpoint, consistent with its role in control of replication initiation. In conclusion, these results suggest that deregulated CDK activity, such as that occurring following inhibition of WEE1 kinase or activation of oncogenes, induces replication stress and loss of genomic integrity through increased firing of replication origins and subsequent nucleotide shortage. PMID:22907750

  2. Reduced Proteolytic Shedding of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases is a Post-Translational Mechanism of Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Oudin, Madeleine J.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Wang, Stephanie J.; Meyer, Aaron S.; Im, Hyungsoon; Frederick, Dennie T.; Tadros, Jenny; Griffith, Linda G.; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph; Flaherty, Keith T.; Gertler, Frank B.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Kinase inhibitor resistance often involves upregulation of poorly understood “bypass” signaling pathways. Here, we show that extracellular proteomic adaptation is one path to bypass signaling and drug resistance. Proteolytic shedding of surface receptors, which can provide negative feedback on signaling activity, is blocked by kinase inhibitor treatment and enhances bypass signaling. In particular, MEK inhibition broadly decreases shedding of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including HER4, MET, and most prominently AXL, an ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrate, thus increasing surface RTK levels and mitogenic signaling. Progression-free survival of melanoma patients treated with clinical BRAF/MEK inhibitors inversely correlates with RTK shedding reduction following treatment, as measured non-invasively in blood plasma. Disrupting protease inhibition by neutralizing TIMP1 improves MAPK inhibitor efficacy, and combined MAPK/AXL inhibition synergistically reduces tumor growth and metastasis in xenograft models. Altogether, extracellular proteomic rewiring through reduced RTK shedding represents a surprising mechanism for bypass signaling in cancer drug resistance. PMID:26984351

  3. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  4. Temporal quantitation of mutant Kit tyrosine kinase signaling attenuated by a novel thiophene kinase inhibitor OSI-930.

    PubMed

    Petti, Filippo; Thelemann, April; Kahler, Jen; McCormack, Siobhan; Castaldo, Linda; Hunt, Tony; Nuwaysir, Lydia; Zeiske, Lynn; Haack, Herbert; Sullivan, Laura; Garton, Andrew; Haley, John D

    2005-08-01

    OSI-930, a potent thiophene inhibitor of the Kit, KDR, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, was used to selectively inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of juxtamembrane mutant Kit in the mast cell leukemia line HMC-1. Inhibition of Kit kinase activity resulted in a rapid dephosphorylation of Kit and inhibition of the downstream signaling pathways. Attenuation of Ras-Raf-Erk (phospho-Erk, phospho-p38), phosphatidyl inositol-3' kinase (phospho-p85, phospho-Akt, phospho-S6), and signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling pathways (phospho-STAT3/5/6) were measured by affinity liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, by immunoblot, and by tissue microarrays of fixed cell pellets. To more globally define additional components of Kit signaling temporally altered by kinase inhibition, a novel multiplex quantitative isobaric peptide labeling approach was used. This approach allowed clustering of proteins by temporal expression patterns. Kit kinase, which dephosphorylates rapidly upon kinase inhibition, was shown to regulate both Shp-1 and BDP-1 tyrosine phosphatases and the phosphatase-interacting protein PSTPIP2. Interactions with SH2 domain adapters [growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2), Cbl, Slp-76] and SH3 domain adapters (HS1, cortactin, CD2BP3) were attenuated by inhibition of Kit kinase activity. Functional crosstalk between Kit and the non-receptor tyrosine kinases Fes/Fps, Fer, Btk, and Syk was observed. Inhibition of Kit modulated phosphorylation-dependent interactions with pathways controlling focal adhesion (paxillin, leupaxin, p130CAS, FAK1, the Src family kinase Lyn, Wasp, Fhl-3, G25K, Ack-1, Nap1, SH3P12/ponsin) and septin-actin complexes (NEDD5, cdc11, actin). The combined use of isobaric protein quantitation and expression clustering, immunoblot, and tissue microarray strategies allowed temporal measurement signaling pathways modulated by mutant Kit inhibition in a model of mast cell

  5. The casein kinase 2 inhibitor, CX-4945, as an anti-cancer drug in treatment of human hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hae J; Bae, Kyoung J; Lee, Yura; Kim, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    The casein kinase 2 (CK2) protein kinase is a pro-survival kinase and therapeutic target in treatment of various human cancers. CK2 overexpression has been demonstrated in hematological malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma. CX-4945, also known as Silmitasertib, is an orally administered, highly specific, ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2. CX-4945 induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of many cancer types. In the past 2 years, the focus on the therapeutic potential of CX-4945 has shifted from solid tumors to hematological malignancies. CX-4945 exerts anti-proliferative effects in hematological tumors by downregulating CK2 expression and suppressing activation of CK2-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, combination of CX-4945 with other inhibitors yielded synergistic effects in cell death induction. These new findings demonstrate that CK2 overexpression contributes to blood cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Combinatorial use of CX-4945 is a promising therapeutic tool for treatment of hematological malignancies.

  6. Novel anti-inflammatory function of NSC95397 by the suppression of multiple kinases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanyan; Yang, Woo Seok; Yu, Tao; Yi, Young-Su; Park, Jae Gwang; Jeong, Deok; Kim, Ji Hye; Oh, Jeong Su; Yoon, Keejung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-03-15

    NSC95397 (2,3-bis-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a CDC25 inhibitor with anti-cancer properties. Since the anti-inflammatory activity of this compound has not yet been explored, the aim of this study was to examine whether this compound is able to modulate the inflammatory process. Toll like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a TLR4 ligand, and pam3CSK, a TLR2 ligand, in peritoneal macrophages and RAW264.7. The molecular mechanism of NSC95397's anti-inflammatory activity was studied using immunoblotting analysis, nuclear fractionation, immunoprecipitation, overexpression strategies, luciferase reporter gene assays, and kinase assays. NSC95397 dose-dependently suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and prostaglandin (PG)E2, and diminished the mRNA expression of inflammatory genes such as inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interferon (IFN)-β, and TNF-α in peritoneal macrophages and RAW264.7 cells that were stimulated by LPS and pam3CSK. This compound also clearly blocked the activation of NF-κB (p65), AP-1 (c-Fos/c-Jun), and IRF-3 in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells and TRIF- and MyD88-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In addition, biochemical and molecular approaches revealed that this compound targeted AKT, IKKα/β, MKK7, and TBK1. Therefore, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory function of NSC95397 can be attributed to its inhibition of multiple targets such as AKT, IKKα/β, MKK7, and TBK1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  8. Benefits of targeting both pericytes and endothelial cells in the tumor vasculature with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bergers, Gabriele; Song, Steven; Meyer-Morse, Nicole; Bergsland, Emily; Hanahan, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Functions of receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in angiogenesis were pharmacologically impaired in a mouse model of pancreatic islet cancer. An inhibitor targeting VEGFRs in endothelial cells (SU5416) is effective against early-stage angiogenic lesions, but not large, well-vascularized tumors. In contrast, a kinase inhibitor incorporating selectivity for PDGFRs (SU6668) is shown to block further growth of end-stage tumors, eliciting detachment of pericytes and disruption of tumor vascularity. Importantly, PDGFRs were expressed only in perivascular cells of this tumor type, suggesting that PDGFR+ pericytes in tumors present a complimentary target to endothelial cells for efficacious antiangiogenic therapy. Therapeutic regimes combining the two kinase inhibitors (SU5416 and SU6668) were more efficacious against all stages of islet carcinogenesis than either single agent. Combination of the VEGFR inhibitor with another distinctive kinase inhibitor targeting PDGFR activity (Gleevec) was also able to regress late-stage tumors. Thus, combinatorial targeting of receptor tyrosine kinases shows promise for treating multiple stages in tumorigenesis, most notably the often-intractable late-stage solid tumor. PMID:12727920

  9. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  10. Structure-guided inhibitor design expands the scope of analog-sensitive kinase technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Lopez, Michael S; Dar, Arvin C; Ladow, Eva; Finkbeiner, Steven; Yun, Cai-Hong; Eck, Michael J; Shokat, Kevan M

    2013-09-20

    Engineered analog-sensitive (AS) protein kinases have emerged as powerful tools for dissecting phospho-signaling pathways, for elucidating the cellular function of individual kinases, and for deciphering unanticipated effects of clinical therapeutics. A crucial and necessary feature of this technology is a bioorthogonal small molecule that is innocuous toward native cellular systems but potently inhibits the engineered kinase. In order to generalize this method, we sought a molecule capable of targeting divergent AS-kinases. Here we employ X-ray crystallography and medicinal chemistry to unravel the mechanism of current inhibitors and use these insights to design the most potent, selective, and general AS-kinase inhibitors reported to date. We use large-scale kinase inhibitor profiling to characterize the selectivity of these molecules as well as examine the consequences of potential off-target effects in chemical genetic experiments. The molecules reported here will serve as powerful tools in efforts to extend AS-kinase technology to the entire kinome and the principles discovered may help in the design of other engineered enzyme/ligand pairs.

  11. Inflammation and bone erosion are suppressed in models of rheumatoid arthritis following treatment with a novel Syk inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Pine, Polly R; Chang, Betty; Schoettler, Nathan; Banquerigo, Mona L; Wang, Su; Lau, Angela; Zhao, Feifei; Grossbard, Elliott B; Payan, Donald G; Brahn, Ernest

    2007-09-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a key mediator of immunoreceptor signaling in inflammatory cells, is essential for immune complex-mediated signal transduction initiated by activated receptors for immunoglobulin G. In collagen-induced arthritis, R788/R406, a novel and potent small molecule Syk inhibitor suppressed clinical arthritis, bone erosions, pannus formation, and synovitis. Serum anti-collagen type II antibody levels were unaltered, while the half-life of exogenous antibody was extended when co-administered with R406. Expression of the targeted kinase (Syk) in synovial tissue correlated with the joint level of inflammatory cell infiltrates and was virtually undetectable in treated rats. Syk inhibition suppressed synovial cytokines and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in serum, suggesting a sensitive and reliable biomarker for R406 activity. These results highlight the role of activating Fcgamma receptors in inflammatory synovitis and suggest that interruption of the signaling cascade with a novel Syk inhibitor may be a useful addition to immunosuppressive disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs currently used in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Nemo-like kinase (NLK) expression in osteoblastic cells and suppression of osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nifuji, Akira; Ideno, Hisashi; Ohyama, Yoshio; Takanabe, Rieko; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi; Noda, Masaki; Shibuya, Hiroshi

    2010-04-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate proliferation and differentiation in osteoblasts. The vertebral homologue of nemo, nemo-like kinase (NLK), is an atypical MAPK that targets several signaling components, including the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/Lef1) transcription factor. Recent studies have shown that NLK forms a complex with the histone H3-K9 methyltransferase SETDB1 and suppresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma:: action in the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Here we investigated whether NLK regulates osteoblastic differentiation. We showed that NLK mRNA is expressed in vivo in osteoblasts at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) mouse calvariae. By using retrovirus vectors, we performed forced expression of NLK in primary calvarial osteoblasts (pOB cells) and the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Wild-type NLK (NLK-WT) suppressed alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of bone marker genes such as alkaline phosphatase, type I procollagen, runx2, osterix, steopontin and osteocalcin in these cells. NLK-WT also decreased type I collagen protein expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was reduced in pOB cells overexpressing NLK-WT. In contrast, kinase-negative form of NLK (NLK-KN) did not suppress or partially suppress ALP activity and bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. NLK-KN did not suppress nodule formation in pOB cells. In addition to forced expression, suppression of endogenous NLK expression by siRNA increased bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Finally, transcriptional activity analysis of gene promoters revealed that NLK-WT suppressed Wnt1 activation of TOP flash promoter and Runx2 activation of the osteocalcin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that NLK negatively regulates osteoblastic differentiation.

  13. Nemo-like kinase (NLK) expression in osteoblastic cells and suppression of osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nifuji, Akira; Ideno, Hisashi; Ohyama, Yoshio; Takanabe, Rieko; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi; Noda, Masaki; Shibuya, Hiroshi

    2010-04-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate proliferation and differentiation in osteoblasts. The vertebral homologue of nemo, nemo-like kinase (NLK), is an atypical MAPK that targets several signaling components, including the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/Lef1) transcription factor. Recent studies have shown that NLK forms a complex with the histone H3-K9 methyltransferase SETDB1 and suppresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma:: action in the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Here we investigated whether NLK regulates osteoblastic differentiation. We showed that NLK mRNA is expressed in vivo in osteoblasts at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) mouse calvariae. By using retrovirus vectors, we performed forced expression of NLK in primary calvarial osteoblasts (pOB cells) and the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Wild-type NLK (NLK-WT) suppressed alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of bone marker genes such as alkaline phosphatase, type I procollagen, runx2, osterix, steopontin and osteocalcin in these cells. NLK-WT also decreased type I collagen protein expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was reduced in pOB cells overexpressing NLK-WT. In contrast, kinase-negative form of NLK (NLK-KN) did not suppress or partially suppress ALP activity and bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. NLK-KN did not suppress nodule formation in pOB cells. In addition to forced expression, suppression of endogenous NLK expression by siRNA increased bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Finally, transcriptional activity analysis of gene promoters revealed that NLK-WT suppressed Wnt1 activation of TOP flash promoter and Runx2 activation of the osteocalcin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that NLK negatively regulates osteoblastic differentiation.

  14. BRAF kinase inhibitor exerts anti-tumor activity against breast cancer cells via inhibition of FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong Xin; Jin, Wen Jun; Yang, Sheng; Ji, Cun Li

    2016-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials targetvascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified BRAF kinase inhibitor, vemurafenibas an agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-breast cancer activities. Vemurafenib demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, vemurafenib suppressed bFGF-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis in vivo. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of vemurafenib on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that vemurafenib suppressed bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (AKT). Moreover, vemurafenib directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231, vemurafenib showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that vemurafenib targets the FGFR2-mediated AKT signaling pathway in endothelial cells, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:27293997

  15. Glycogen synthase kinasesuppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  16. Oncogenic roles of TOPK and MELK, and effective growth suppression by small molecular inhibitors in kidney cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taigo; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Imoto, Seiya; Tamada, Yoshinori; Miyamoto, Takashi; Matsuo, Yo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Park, Jae-Hyun

    2016-04-05

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) and maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) have been reported to play critical roles in cancer cell proliferation and maintenance of stemness. In this study, we investigated possible roles of TOPK and MELK in kidney cancer cells and found their growth promotive effect as well as some feedback mechanism between these two molecules. Interestingly, the blockade of either of these two kinases effectively caused downregulation of forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) activity which is known as an oncogenic transcriptional factor in various types of cancer cells. Small molecular compound inhibitors against TOPK (OTS514) and MELK (OTS167) effectively suppressed the kidney cancer cell growth, and the combination of these two compounds additively worked and showed the very strong growth suppressive effect on kidney cancer cells. Collectively, our results suggest that both TOPK and MELK are promising molecular targets for kidney cancer treatment and that dual blockade of OTS514 and OTS167 may bring additive anti-tumor effects with low risk of side effects.

  17. Kinase inhibitors of the IGF-1R as a potential therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Shinji; Fujishiro, Maki; Yoshida, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Hirai, Takuya; Miyashita, Tomoko; Ikeda, Keigo; Yamaji, Ken; Takamori, Kenji; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Sekigawa, Iwao; Tamura, Naoto

    2017-08-01

    We have previously shown that the inhibition of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a potential therapeutic strategy against rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CTGF consists of four distinct modules, including the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP). In serum, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) bind IGFBPs, interact with the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1 R), and regulate anabolic effects and bone metabolism. We investigated the correlation between IGF-1 and the pathogenesis of RA, and the inhibitory effect on osteoclastogenesis and angiogenesis of the small molecular weight kinase inhibitor of the IGF-1 R, NVP-AEW541, against pathogenesis of RA in vitro. Cell proliferation was evaluated by cell count and immunoblotting. The expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1 R was evaluated by RT-PCR. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, a bone resorption assay, and osteoclast-specific enzyme production. Angiogenesis was evaluated by a tube formation assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The proliferation of MH7A cells was found to be inhibited in the presence of NVP-AEW541, and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt was downregulated in MH7A cells. IGF-1 and IGF-1 R mRNA expression levels were upregulated during formation of M-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast formation. Moreover, osteoclastogenesis was suppressed in the presence of NVP-AEW541. The formation of the tubular network was enhanced by IGF-1, and this effect was neutralized by NVP-ARE541. Our findings suggest that NVP-AEW541 may be utilized as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of RA.

  18. Unprecedently Large-Scale Kinase Inhibitor Set Enabling the Accurate Prediction of Compound–Kinase Activities: A Way toward Selective Promiscuity by Design?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery programs frequently target members of the human kinome and try to identify small molecule protein kinase inhibitors, primarily for cancer treatment, additional indications being increasingly investigated. One of the challenges is controlling the inhibitors degree of selectivity, assessed by in vitro profiling against panels of protein kinases. We manually extracted, compiled, and standardized such profiles published in the literature: we collected 356 908 data points corresponding to 482 protein kinases, 2106 inhibitors, and 661 patents. We then analyzed this data set in terms of kinome coverage, results reproducibility, popularity, and degree of selectivity of both kinases and inhibitors. We used the data set to create robust proteochemometric models capable of predicting kinase activity (the ligand–target space was modeled with an externally validated RMSE of 0.41 ± 0.02 log units and R02 0.74 ± 0.03), in order to account for missing or unreliable measurements. The influence on the prediction quality of parameters such as number of measurements, Murcko scaffold frequency or inhibitor type was assessed. Interpretation of the models enabled to highlight inhibitors and kinases properties correlated with higher affinities, and an analysis in the context of kinases crystal structures was performed. Overall, the models quality allows the accurate prediction of kinase-inhibitor activities and their structural interpretation, thus paving the way for the rational design of compounds with a targeted selectivity profile. PMID:27482722

  19. Aurora kinase inhibitors--rising stars in cancer therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Dar, Altaf A; Goff, Laura W; Majid, Shahana; Berlin, Jordan; El-Rifai, Wael

    2010-02-01

    Standard therapeutic approaches of cytotoxics and radiation in cancer are not only highly toxic, but also of limited efficacy in treatment of a significant number of cancer patients. The molecular analysis of the cancer genomes have shown a remarkable complexity and pointed to key genomic and epigenomic alterations in cancer. These discoveries are paving the way for targeted therapy approaches. However, although there are a large number of potential targets, only a few can regulate key cellular functions and intersect multiple signaling networks. The Aurora kinase family members (A, B, and C) are a collection of highly related and conserved serine-threonine kinases that fulfill these criteria, being key regulators of mitosis and multiple signaling pathways. Alterations in Aurora kinase signaling are associated with mitotic errors and have been closely linked to chromosomal aneuploidy in cancer cells. Several studies have shown amplification and/or overexpression of Aurora kinase A and B in hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Over the past several years, Aurora kinases have become attractive targets. Several ongoing clinical trials and bench-based research are assessing the unique therapeutic potential of Aurora-based targeted therapy.

  20. Structure and inhibitor specificity of the PCTAIRE-family kinase CDK16.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E; Shehata, Saifeldin N; Krojer, Tobias; Sharpe, Timothy D; von Delft, Frank; Sakamoto, Kei; Bullock, Alex N

    2017-02-20

    CDK16 (also known as PCTAIRE1 or PCTK1) is an atypical member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family that has emerged as a key regulator of neurite outgrowth, vesicle trafficking and cancer cell proliferation. CDK16 is activated through binding to cyclin Y via a phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3 interaction and has a unique consensus substrate phosphorylation motif compared with conventional CDKs. To elucidate the structure and inhibitor-binding properties of this atypical CDK, we screened the CDK16 kinase domain against different inhibitor libraries and determined the co-structures of identified hits. We discovered that the ATP-binding pocket of CDK16 can accommodate both type I and type II kinase inhibitors. The most potent CDK16 inhibitors revealed by cell-free and cell-based assays were the multitargeted cancer drugs dabrafenib and rebastinib. An inactive DFG-out binding conformation was confirmed by the first crystal structures of CDK16 in separate complexes with the inhibitors indirubin E804 and rebastinib, respectively. The structures revealed considerable conformational plasticity, suggesting that the isolated CDK16 kinase domain was relatively unstable in the absence of a cyclin partner. The unusual structural features and chemical scaffolds identified here hold promise for the development of more selective CDK16 inhibitors and provide opportunity to better characterise the role of CDK16 and its related CDK family members in various physiological and pathological contexts.

  1. Activation of Pim Kinases Is Sufficient to Promote Resistance to MET Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    An, Ningfei; Xiong, Ying; LaRue, Amanda C.; Kraft, Andrew S.; Cen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    MET blockade offers a new targeted therapy particularly in those cancers with MET amplification. However, the efficacy and the duration of the response to MET inhibitors are limited by the emergence of drug resistance. Here we report that resistance to small molecule inhibitors of MET can arise from increased expression of the pro-survival Pim protein kinases. This resistance mechanism was documented in non-small cell lung cancer and gastric cancer cells with MET amplification. Inhibition of Pim kinases enhanced cell death triggered by short-term treatment with MET inhibitors. Pim kinases control the translation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 at an internal ribosome entry site and this mechanism was identified as the basis for Pim-mediated resistance to MET inhibitors. Protein synthesis was increased in drug-resistant cells, secondary to a Pim-mediated increase in cap-independent translation. In cells rendered drug resistant by chronic treatment with MET inhibitors, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Pim kinases was sufficient to restore sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results rationalize Pim inhibition as a strategy to augment responses and blunt acquired resistance to MET inhibitors in cancer. PMID:26670562

  2. Structure and inhibitor specificity of the PCTAIRE-family kinase CDK16

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E.; Shehata, Saifeldin N.; Krojer, Tobias; Sharpe, Timothy D.; vonDelft, Frank; Sakamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    CDK16 (also known as PCTAIRE1 or PCTK1) is an atypical member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family that has emerged as a key regulator of neurite outgrowth, vesicle trafficking and cancer cell proliferation. CDK16 is activated through binding to cyclin Y via a phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3 interaction and has a unique consensus substrate phosphorylation motif compared with conventional CDKs. To elucidate the structure and inhibitor-binding properties of this atypical CDK, we screened the CDK16 kinase domain against different inhibitor libraries and determined the co-structures of identified hits. We discovered that the ATP-binding pocket of CDK16 can accommodate both type I and type II kinase inhibitors. The most potent CDK16 inhibitors revealed by cell-free and cell-based assays were the multitargeted cancer drugs dabrafenib and rebastinib. An inactive DFG-out binding conformation was confirmed by the first crystal structures of CDK16 in separate complexes with the inhibitors indirubin E804 and rebastinib, respectively. The structures revealed considerable conformational plasticity, suggesting that the isolated CDK16 kinase domain was relatively unstable in the absence of a cyclin partner. The unusual structural features and chemical scaffolds identified here hold promise for the development of more selective CDK16 inhibitors and provide opportunity to better characterise the role of CDK16 and its related CDK family members in various physiological and pathological contexts. PMID:28057719

  3. Active site inhibitors protect protein kinase C from dephosphorylation and stabilize its mature form.

    PubMed

    Gould, Christine M; Antal, Corina E; Reyes, Gloria; Kunkel, Maya T; Adams, Ryan A; Ziyar, Ahdad; Riveros, Tania; Newton, Alexandra C

    2011-08-19

    Conformational changes acutely control protein kinase C (PKC). We have previously shown that the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate must be removed from the active site in order for 1) PKC to be phosphorylated by its upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1), 2) the mature enzyme to bind and phosphorylate substrates, and 3) the mature enzyme to be dephosphorylated by phosphatases. Here we show an additional level of conformational control; binding of active site inhibitors locks PKC in a conformation in which the priming phosphorylation sites are resistant to dephosphorylation. Using homogeneously pure PKC, we show that the active site inhibitor Gö 6983 prevents the dephosphorylation by pure protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) or the hydrophobic motif phosphatase, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP). Consistent with results using pure proteins, treatment of cells with the competitive inhibitors Gö 6983 or bisindolylmaleimide I, but not the uncompetitive inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide IV, prevents the dephosphorylation and down-regulation of PKC induced by phorbol esters. Pulse-chase analyses reveal that active site inhibitors do not affect the net rate of priming phosphorylations of PKC; rather, they inhibit the dephosphorylation triggered by phorbol esters. These data provide a molecular explanation for the recent studies showing that active site inhibitors stabilize the phosphorylation state of protein kinases B/Akt and C.

  4. BIM expression in treatment naïve cancers predicts responsiveness to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Anthony; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Ebi, Hiromichi; Sequist, Lecia V.; Waltman, Belinda A.; Chung, Euiheon; Incio, Joao; Digumarthy, Subba R.; Pollack, Sarah F.; Song, Youngchul; Muzikansky, Alona; Lifshits, Eugene; Roberge, Sylvie; Coffman, Erik J.; Benes, Cyril; Gómez, Henry; Baselga, Jose; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Rivera, Miguel N.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Jain, Rakesh K.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Cancers with specific genetic mutations are susceptible to selective kinase inhibitors. However, there is wide spectrum of benefit among cancers harboring the same sensitizing genetic mutations. Herein, we measured apoptotic rates among cell lines sharing the same driver oncogene following treatment with the corresponding kinase inhibitor. There was a wide range of kinase inhibitor-induced apoptosis despite comparable inhibition of the target and associated downstream signaling pathways. Surprisingly, pre-treatment RNA levels of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic BIM strongly predicted the capacity of EGFR, HER2, and PI3K inhibitors to induce apoptosis in EGFR mutant, HER2 amplified, and PIK3CA mutant cancers, respectively, but BIM levels did not predict responsiveness to standard chemotherapies. Furthermore, BIM RNA levels in EGFR mutant lung cancer specimens predicted response and duration of clinical benefit from EGFR inhibitors. These findings suggest assessment of BIM levels in treatment naïve tumor biopsies may indicate the degree of benefit from single-agent kinase inhibitors in multiple oncogene-addiction paradigms. PMID:22145099

  5. A novel transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase complexes with protein phosphatase-1 and inhibitor-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2002-12-20

    Protein kinases and protein phosphatases exert coordinated control over many essential cellular processes. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a novel human transmembrane protein KPI-2 (Kinase/Phosphatase/Inhibitor-2) that was identified by yeast two-hybrid using protein phosphatase inhibitor-2 (Inh2) as bait. KPI-2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle. KPI-2 is a 1503-residue protein with two predicted transmembrane helices at the N terminus, a kinase domain, followed by a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane helices were sufficient for targeting proteins to the membrane. KPI-2 kinase domain has about 60% identity with its closest relative, a tyrosine kinase. However, it only exhibited serine/threonine kinase activity in autophosphorylation reactions or with added substrates. KPI-2 kinase domain phosphorylated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1C) at Thr(320), which attenuated PP1C activity. KPI-2 C-terminal domain directly associated with PP1C, and this required a VTF motif. Inh2 associated with KPI-2 C-terminal domain with and without PP1C. Thus, KPI-2 is a kinase with sites to associate with PP1C and Inh2 to form a regulatory complex that is localized to membranes.

  6. Structural insight into selectivity and resistance profiles of ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davare, Monika A.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Wagner, Jacob P.; Eide, Christopher A.; Goodman, James R.; Drilon, Alexander; Deininger, Michael W.; O’Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins are molecular drivers in multiple malignancies, including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phylogenetic proximity of the ROS1 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) catalytic domains led to the clinical repurposing of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor. Despite the antitumor activity of crizotinib observed in both ROS1- and ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, resistance due to acquisition of ROS1 or ALK kinase domain mutations has been observed clinically, spurring the development of second-generation inhibitors. Here, we profile the sensitivity and selectivity of seven ROS1 and/or ALK inhibitors at various levels of clinical development. In contrast to crizotinib’s dual ROS1/ALK activity, cabozantinib (XL-184) and its structural analog foretinib (XL-880) demonstrate a striking selectivity for ROS1 over ALK. Molecular dynamics simulation studies reveal structural features that distinguish the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains and contribute to differences in binding site and kinase selectivity of the inhibitors tested. Cell-based resistance profiling studies demonstrate that the ROS1-selective inhibitors retain efficacy against the recently reported CD74-ROS1G2032R mutant whereas the dual ROS1/ALK inhibitors are ineffective. Taken together, inhibitor profiling and stringent characterization of the structure–function differences between the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains will facilitate future rational drug design for ROS1- and ALK-driven NSCLC and other malignancies. PMID:26372962

  7. 3-Methyladenine suppresses cell migration and invasion of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells through inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinases independently of autophagy inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shingo; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Mochizuki, Shigenobu; Takenaga, Keizo

    2007-08-01

    3-Methyladenine (3-MA) inhibits class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and is widely used as an inhibitor of autophagy. 3-MA has also been shown to stimulate cell death of tumor cells under nutrient-starved conditions by inhibiting autophagy. To explore the possibility of this type of autophagy inhibitors as anticancer drugs, we examined the effects of 3-MA on the phenotypes of highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. We report here that although 3-MA did not markedly affect cell survival of the cells under either normal or amino acid-starved conditions, it strongly inhibited the invasiveness of the cells. 3-MA rapidly suppressed actin rich membrane ruffle and/or lamellipodia formation under normal conditions, leading to inhibition of cell migration and invasion of the cells without substantial inhibitions of small GTPase Rac activity and the production of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. 3-MA abolished class I and class II PI3Ks in in vitro lipid kinase assays, and suppressed cell motility of the cells more strongly than the other PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. Downregulation of Beclin 1, a protein required for autophagic body formation, by transfection of Beclin 1 siRNA did not inhibit membrane ruffle formation and cell migration. These results suggest that 3-MA suppresses the invasion of HT1080 cells, independently of autophagy inhibition, through inhibition of type I and II PI3Ks and possibly other molecules.

  8. Recent developments in the chromatographic bioanalysis of approved kinase inhibitor drugs in oncology.

    PubMed

    Rood, Johannes J M; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Sparidans, Rolf W

    2016-10-25

    In recent years (2010-present) there has been an increase in the number of publications reporting the development, validation and use of bioanalytical methods in the rapidly expanding drug class of small molecule protein kinase inhibitors. Most reports describe the technological set-up of the methods that have allowed for drug concentration measurements from various sample types. This includes plasma, dried blood-spot, and tissue-analysis. Also method development, exploration of various techniques, as well as measurement and identification of metabolites were addressed. For the bioanalysis, a variety of sample-pretreatment methods like protein-precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction, and solid-phase extraction have been employed, all varying in complexity, cleanliness and time-consumption. Chromatographic separation, nowadays, is more focused on separating components from ion-suppressive effects, since for MS/MS detection, various components do not have to be baseline separated. For detection multiple types of detectors were used, ranging from state-of-the-art high resolution, and tandem mass spectrometry with low picogram per milliliter detection limits to the classical UV-detector with several nanograms per milliliter limits. As new bioanalytical methods have arisen that do rely on chromatographic separation, for example for high-throughput analysis, these are addressed in this review as well.

  9. 3-Cyano-6-(5-methyl-3-pyrazoloamino) pyridines (Part 2): A dual inhibitor of Aurora kinase and tubulin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Masahiko

    2016-12-15

    A new class of a dual inhibitor of Aurora kinase and tubulin polymerization was created by introducing various substituted phenoxyethylamino or pyridyloxyethylamino groups to the 2-position of 3-cyano-4-methyl-6-(5-methyl-3-pyrazoloamino)-pyridine. Compound 3g exhibited Aurora kinase inhibition, excellent protein kinase selectivity to Aurora kinase in comparison with 66 other kinases, inhibition of phosphorylation of Ser10 of histone H3 as an Aurora kinase inhibitor, inhibition of tubulin polymerization in vitro, good cell membrane permeability, and a good PK profile. Therefore compound 3g was effective in some antitumor mouse models at a dose of 30mg/kgpoqd.

  10. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M.; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential. PMID:26622997

  11. Discovery of Small Molecule Mer Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic Mer expression promotes pro-survival signaling and contributes to leukemogenesis and chemoresistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Consequently, Mer kinase inhibitors may promote leukemic cell death and further act as chemosensitizers increasing efficacy and reducing toxicities of current ALL regimens. We have applied a structure-based design approach to discover novel small molecule Mer kinase inhibitors. Several pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives effectively inhibit Mer kinase activity at subnanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, the lead compound shows a promising selectivity profile against a panel of 72 kinases and has excellent pharmacokinetic properties. We also describe the crystal structure of the complex between the lead compound and Mer, opening new opportunities for further optimization and new template design. PMID:22662287

  12. Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Mer Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yang, Chao; Simpson, Catherine; Deryckere, Deborah; Van Deusen, Amy; Miley, Michael J; Kireev, Dmitri; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Sather, Susan; Hunter, Debra; Korboukh, Victoria K; Patel, Hari S; Janzen, William P; Machius, Mischa; Johnson, Gary L; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K; Frye, Stephen V; Wang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-09

    Ectopic Mer expression promotes pro-survival signaling and contributes to leukemogenesis and chemoresistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Consequently, Mer kinase inhibitors may promote leukemic cell death and further act as chemosensitizers increasing efficacy and reducing toxicities of current ALL regimens. We have applied a structure-based design approach to discover novel small molecule Mer kinase inhibitors. Several pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives effectively inhibit Mer kinase activity at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, the lead compound shows a promising selectivity profile against a panel of 72 kinases and has excellent pharmacokinetic properties. We also describe the crystal structure of the complex between the lead compound and Mer, opening new opportunities for further optimization and new template design.

  13. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential.

  14. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, Harry A.; Gadbois, Donna M.; Tobey, Robert A.; Bradbury, E. Morton

    1993-01-01

    A G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G.sub.1 cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G.sub.1 phase, suggesting that such G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  15. Lichen planopilaris-like eruption during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib*

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Juliana Ribeiro; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai; Kakizaki, Priscila; Veronez, Isis Suga; Pires, Mario Cezar

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective as a target therapy for malignant neoplasms. Imatinib was the first tyrosine kinase inhibitor used. After its introduction, several other drugs have appeared with a similar mechanism of action, but less prone to causing resistance. Even though these drugs are selective, their toxicity does not exclusively target cancer cells, and skin toxicity is the most common non-hematologic adverse effect. We report an eruption similar to lichen planopilaris that developed during therapy with nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia resistant to imatinib. In a literature review, we found only one report of non-scarring alopecia due to the use of nilotinib.

  16. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1993-02-09

    A G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G[sub 1] cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G[sub 1] phase, suggesting that such G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  17. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1991-12-31

    A G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G{sub 1} cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G{sub 1} phase, suggesting that such G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors as potential anticancer, antineurodegenerative, antiviral and antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Laurent

    2000-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in the cell division cycle, in neuronal functions, in transcription and in apoptosis. Intensive screening with these kinases as targets has lead to the identification of highly selective and potent small - molecule inhibitors. Co-crystallization with CDK2 shows that these flat heterocyclic hydrophobic compounds bind through two or three hydrogen bonds with the side chains of two amino acids located in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase. These inhibitors are anti-proliferative; they arrest cells in G1 and in G2/M phase. Furthermore they facilitate or even trigger apoptosis in proliferating cells while they protect neuronal cells and thymocytes from apoptosis. The potential use of these inhibitors is being extensively evaluated for cancer chemotherapy and also in other therapeutic areas: neurology (Alzheimer's disease), cardiovascular (restenosis, angiogenesis), nephrology (glomerulonephritis), parasitology (Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma, etc.) and virology (cytomegalovirus, HIV, herpes virus). Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  19. A first generation inhibitor of human Greatwall kinase, enabled by structural and functional characterisation of a minimal kinase domain construct

    PubMed Central

    Ocasio, Cory A.; Rajasekaran, Mohan B.; Walker, Sarah; Le Grand, Darren; Spencer, John; Pearl, Frances M.G.; Ward, Simon E.; Savic, Velibor; Pearl, Laurence H.; Hochegger, Helfrid; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    MASTL (microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like), more commonly known as Greatwall (GWL), has been proposed as a novel cancer therapy target. GWL plays a crucial role in mitotic progression, via its known substrates ENSA/ARPP19, which when phosphorylated inactivate PP2A/B55 phosphatase. When over-expressed in breast cancer, GWL induces oncogenic properties such as transformation and invasiveness. Conversely, down-regulation of GWL selectively sensitises tumour cells to chemotherapy. Here we describe the first structure of the GWL minimal kinase domain and development of a small-molecule inhibitor GKI-1 (Greatwall Kinase Inhibitor-1). In vitro, GKI-1 inhibits full-length human GWL, and shows cellular efficacy. Treatment of HeLa cells with GKI-1 reduces ENSA/ARPP19 phosphorylation levels, such that they are comparable to those obtained by siRNA depletion of GWL; resulting in a decrease in mitotic events, mitotic arrest/cell death and cytokinesis failure. Furthermore, GKI-1 will be a useful starting point for the development of more potent and selective GWL inhibitors. PMID:27563826

  20. Autophagy Induced by CX-4945, a Casein Kinase 2 Inhibitor, Enhances Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dae Wook; So, Kwang Sup; Kim, Song Cheol; Park, Kwang-Min; Lee, Young-Joo; Kim, Sun-Whe; Choi, Chang-Min; Rho, Jin Kyung; Choi, Yun Jung; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal malignancy with only a few effective chemotherapeutic drugs. Because the inhibition of casein kinase 2 (CK2) has been reported as a novel therapeutic strategy for many cancers, we investigated the effects of CK2 inhibitors in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The BxPC3, 8902, MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines, and CX-4945, a novel CK2 inhibitor, were used. Autophagy was analyzed by acridine orange staining, fluorescence microscope detection of punctuate patterns of GFP-tagged LC3 and immunoblotting for LC3. Cell survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis analysis was performed. CX-4945 induced significant inhibition of proliferation and triggered autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells. This suppression of proliferation was caused by the direct inhibition of CK2α, which was required for autophagy and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. CX-4945 suppressed cell cycle progression in G2/M and induced apoptosis. The inhibition of CX-4945-induced autophagy was rescued by 3-methyladenine or small interfering RNA against Atg7, which attenuated apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. CX-4945, a potent and selective inhibitor of CK2, effectively induces autophagy and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells, indicating that the induction of autophagy by CX-4945 may have an important role in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, Vatalanib, Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Human Pterygial Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Kyu; Choi, Ji-Young; Park, Sang Min; Rho, Chang Rae; Cho, Kyong Jin; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2017-09-01

    Vatalanib is a small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We investigated the effects of vatalanib on the proliferation and migration of cultured human pterygial fibroblasts (HPFs). Pterygium tissues were obtained after pterygium excision surgery and subjected to primary culture. HPFs were treated with vatalanib at various concentrations. Mitomycin C (MMC) was used as a positive control. Cell proliferation and migration assays were used to investigate the effects of vatalanib. Cell death was measured using flow cytometry analysis. Western blot analysis was performed to identify signaling molecules associated with the response to vatalanib. Vatalanib inhibited both proliferation and migration of HPFs in a dose-dependent manner. Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed by vatalanib (10 and 100 μM) and MMC (0.004% and 0.04%) treatments. Migration assays revealed significant HPF delay when treated with vatalanib (1, 10, and 100 μM) and MMC (0.004% and 0.04%) compared with that in a negative control. Cell death analysis showed that high concentrations of vatalanib (100 μM) and MMC (0.004% and 0.04%) decreased cell numbers. Western blot analysis of vatalanib-treated cells showed vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-β significantly reduced, but there was no alteration in p53 protein levels in HPFs. These results indicate that vatalanib significantly suppressed the proliferation and migration of HPFs by decreasing vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-β. Vatalanib showed less toxicity than that of MMC. Based on these results, vatalanib may potentially serve as a new adjuvant treatment after pterygium excision surgery.

  2. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in tumor cells by small molecule Src family kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bartscht, Tobias; Rosien, Benjamin; Rades, Dirk; Kaufmann, Roland; Biersack, Harald; Lehnerta, Hendrik; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2017-01-02

    In a series of studies carried out over the last couple of years in various cell types, it was observed that the experimentally used Src family kinase inhibitors PP1 and PP2 and the clinically used Src/Abl inhibitors AZM475271 and dasatinib are potent inhibitors of TGF-β mediated cellular responses such as Smad and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, Smad-dependent transcriptional activation, growth inhibition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and cell motility. While for PP1/PP2 it was demonstrated shown that these agents directly inhibit the kinase activity of the TGF-β type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 5, the mechanism of the anti-TGF-β effect of AZM475271 and dasatinib is less clear. In contrast, the anti-TGF-β effect of yet another Src/Abl inhibitor, bosutinib, is more variable with respect to the type of the TGF-β response and the cell type affected, and lacks a clear dose-dependency. In the light of their strong anti-activin receptor-like kinase 5 kinase effect, PP1 and PP2 should not be used when studying the role of c-Src as downstream mediators in TGF-β/activin receptor-like kinase 5 signaling. On the other hand, based upon in vitro findings, it is conceivable that part of the therapeutic effects of AZM475271 and dasatinib seen in preclinical and clinical studies with solid tumors was caused by inhibition of prometastatic TGF-β rather than Src signaling. If AZM475271 and dasatinib can indeed act as dual Src / TGF-β inhibitors in vivo, this may be beneficial for prevention of metastatic disease in more advanced tumor stages.

  3. Are Accurins the cure for Aurora kinase inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Bearss, David J

    2016-02-10

    A nanoparticle formulation of an Aurora B inhibitor increases antitumor efficacy and reduces toxicity, which may be a precedent for the use of this technology with other small molecules (Ashton et al., this issue).

  4. First Bispecific Inhibitors of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase and the NF-κB Activity As Novel Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mostafa M; Darwish, Sarah S; Herrmann, Jennifer; Abadi, Ashraf H; Engel, Matthias

    2017-04-13

    The activation of the NF-κB transcription factor is a major adaptive response induced upon treatment with EGFR kinase inhibitors, leading to the emergence of resistance in nonsmall cell lung cancer and other tumor types. To suppress this survival mechanism, we developed new thiourea quinazoline derivatives that are dual inhibitors of both EGFR kinase and the NF-κB activity. Optimization of the hit compound, identified in a NF-κB reporter gene assay, led to compound 9b, exhibiting a cellular IC50 for NF-κB inhibition of 0.3 μM while retaining a potent EGFR kinase inhibition (IC50 = 60 nM). The dual inhibitors showed a higher potency than gefitinib to inhibit cell growth of EGFR-overexpressing tumor cell lines in vitro and in a xenograft model in vivo, while no signs of toxicity were observed. An investigation of the molecular mechanism of NF-κB suppression revealed that the dual inhibitors depleted the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein from the NF-κB complex in the nucleus.

  5. "Addition" and "Subtraction": Selectivity Design for Type II Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Giraldes, John; Sprague, Elizabeth R; Shakya, Subarna; Chen, Zhuoliang; Wang, Yaping; Joud, Carol; Mathieu, Simon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Straub, Christopher; Duca, Jose; Hurov, Kristen; Yuan, Yanqiu; Shao, Wenlin; Touré, B Barry

    2017-03-09

    While adding the structural features that are more favored by on-target activity is the more common strategy in selectivity optimization, the opposite strategy of subtracting the structural features that contribute more to off-target activity can also be very effective. Reported here is our successful effort of improving the kinase selectivity of type II maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitors by applying these two complementary approaches together, which clearly demonstrates the powerful synergy between them.

  6. A Comparison of Protein Kinases Inhibitor Screening Methods Using Both Enzymatic Activity and Binding Affinity Determination

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Amalie Frederikke; Skovgaard, Tine; Knapp, Stefan; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Berthelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Binding assays are increasingly used as a screening method for protein kinase inhibitors; however, as yet only a weak correlation with enzymatic activity-based assays has been demonstrated. We show that the correlation between the two types of assays can be improved using more precise screening conditions. Furthermore a marked improvement in the correlation was found by using kinase constructs containing the catalytic domain in presence of additional domains or subunits. PMID:24915177

  7. Suppression of microRNAs by dual-targeting and clustered Tough Decoy inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Bak, Rasmus O.; Haslund, Didde; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that contribute to almost any cellular process. Methods for managing of miRNA activity are attracting increasing attention in relation to diverse experimental and therapeutic applications. DNA-encoded miRNA inhibitors expressed from plasmid or virus-based vectors provide persistent miRNA suppression and options of tissue-directed micromanaging. In this report, we explore the potential of exploiting short, hairpin-shaped RNAs for simultaneous suppression of two or more miRNAs. Based on the “Tough Decoy” (TuD) design, we create dual-targeting hairpins carrying two miRNA recognition sites and demonstrate potent co-suppression of different pairs of unrelated miRNAs by a single DNA-encoded inhibitor RNA. In addition, enhanced miRNA suppression is achieved by expression of RNA polymerase II-transcribed inhibitors carrying clustered TuD hairpins with up to a total of eight miRNA recognition sites. Notably, by expressing clustered TuD inhibitors harboring a single recognition site for each of a total of six miRNAs, we document robust parallel suppression of multiple miRNAs by inhibitor RNA molecules encoded by a single expression cassette. These findings unveil a new potential of TuD-based miRNA inhibitors and pave the way for standardizing synchronized suppression of families or clusters of miRNAs. PMID:23324610

  8. Chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Nam Lee, Mi; Jeong, Byung-Chul; Oh, Sin-Hye; Kook, Min-Suk; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2017-03-16

    The c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase and its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), have been recently introduced to negatively regulate bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced osteogenesis. However, the effect of chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor on osteoblast differentiation process has not been examined, especially the applicability of c-Met chemical inhibitors on in vivo bone regeneration. In this study, we demonstrated that chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase, SYN1143 and SGX523, could potentiate the differentiation of precursor cells to osteoblasts and stimulate regeneration in calvarial bone defects of mice. Treatment with SYN1143 or SGX523 inhibited HGF-induced c-Met phosphorylation in MC3T3-E1 and C3H10T1/2 cells. Cell proliferation of MC3T3-E1 or C3H10T1/2 was not significantly affected by the concentrations of these inhibitors. Co-treatment with chemical inhibitor of c-Met and osteogenic inducing media enhanced osteoblast-specific genes expression and calcium nodule formation accompanied by increased Runx2 expression via c-Met receptor-dependent but Erk-Smad signaling independent pathway. Notably, the administration of these c-Met inhibitors significantly repaired critical-sized calvarial bone defects. Collectively, our results suggest that chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase might be used as novel therapeutics to induce bone regeneration.

  9. FHL-2 suppresses VEGF-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt activation via interaction with sphingosine kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakagami, Hironori; Takami, Yoichi; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki; Tamai, Katsuto; Sun, Jianxin; Nagao, Kaori; Morishita, Ryuichi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2009-06-01

    In the functional screening of a human heart cDNA library to identify a novel antiangiogenic factor, the prime candidate gene was "four-and-a-half LIM only protein-2" (FHL-2). The goal of this study is to clear the mechanism of antiangiogenic signaling of FHL-2 in endothelial cells (ECs). Overexpressed FHL-2 strongly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced EC migration. In the angiogenic signaling, we focused on sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1), which produces sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive sphingolipid, as a potent angiogenic mediator in ECs. Immunoprecipitation and immunostaining analysis showed that FHL-2 might bind to SK1. Importantly, overexpression of FHL-2 in ECs inhibited VEGF-induced SK1 activity, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. In contrast, overexpression of FHL-2 had no effect on S1P-induced Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, VEGF stimulation decreased the binding of FHL-2 and SK1. Depletion of FHL-2 by siRNA increased EC migration accompanied with SK1 and Akt activation, and increased the expression of VEGF receptor-2 which further enhanced VEGF signaling. Furthermore, injection of FHL-2 mRNA into Xenopus embryos resulted in inhibition of vascular network development, assessed by in situ hybridization with endothelial markers. FHL-2 may regulate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt via direct suppression of the SK1-S1P pathway in ECs.

  10. Recent Progress on Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1): Expression, Regulation, Downstream Signaling and Cancer Suppressive Function

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1), known as a serine/threonine kinase, has been identified as a critical cancer suppressor in many cancer cells. It is a master upstream kinase of 13 AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related protein kinases, and possesses versatile biological functions. LKB1 gene is mutated in many cancers, and its protein can form different protein complexes with different cellular localizations in various cell types. The expression of LKB1 can be regulated through epigenetic modification, transcriptional regulation and post-translational modification. LKB1 dowcnstream pathways mainly include AMPK, microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK), salt-inducible kinase (SIK), sucrose non-fermenting protein-related kinase (SNRK) and brain selective kinase (BRSK) signalings, etc. This review, therefore, mainly discusses recent studies about the expression, regulation, downstream signaling and cancer suppressive function of LKB1, which can be helpful for better understanding of this molecular and its significance in cancers. PMID:25244018

  11. Computational methods for analysis and inference of kinase/inhibitor relationships

    PubMed Central

    Ferrè, Fabrizio; Palmeri, Antonio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    The central role of kinases in virtually all signal transduction networks is the driving motivation for the development of compounds modulating their activity. ATP-mimetic inhibitors are essential tools for elucidating signaling pathways and are emerging as promising therapeutic agents. However, off-target ligand binding and complex and sometimes unexpected kinase/inhibitor relationships can occur for seemingly unrelated kinases, stressing that computational approaches are needed for learning the interaction determinants and for the inference of the effect of small compounds on a given kinase. Recently published high-throughput profiling studies assessed the effects of thousands of small compound inhibitors, covering a substantial portion of the kinome. This wealth of data paved the road for computational resources and methods that can offer a major contribution in understanding the reasons of the inhibition, helping in the rational design of more specific molecules, in the in silico prediction of inhibition for those neglected kinases for which no systematic analysis has been carried yet, in the selection of novel inhibitors with desired selectivity, and offering novel avenues of personalized therapies. PMID:25071826

  12. Mechanisms of Paradoxical Activation of AMPK by the Kinase Inhibitors SU6656 and Sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Ross, Fiona A; Hawley, Simon A; Auciello, F Romana; Gowans, Graeme J; Atrih, Abdelmadjid; Lamont, Douglas J; Hardie, D Grahame

    2017-07-20

    SU6656, a Src kinase inhibitor, was reported to increase fat oxidation and reduce body weight in mice, with proposed mechanisms involving AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation via inhibition of phosphorylation of either LKB1 or AMPK by the Src kinase, Fyn. However, we report that AMPK activation by SU6656 is independent of Src kinases or tyrosine phosphorylation of LKB1 or AMPK and is not due to decreased cellular energy status or binding at the ADaM site on AMPK. SU6656 is a potent AMPK inhibitor, yet binding at the catalytic site paradoxically promotes phosphorylation of Thr172 by LKB1. This would enhance phosphorylation of downstream targets provided the lifetime of Thr172 phosphorylation was sufficient to allow dissociation of the inhibitor and subsequent catalysis prior to its dephosphorylation. By contrast, sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor in clinical use, activates AMPK indirectly by inhibiting mitochondrial metabolism and increasing cellular AMP:ADP and/or ADP:ATP ratios. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal structures of the S6K1 kinase domain in complexes with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Hideaki; Mikuni, Junko; Sasaki, Shunta; Tomabechi, Yuri; Honda, Keiko; Ikeda, Mariko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays an important role in the PIK3/mTOR signaling pathway, and is implicated in diseases including diabetes, obesity, and cancer. The crystal structures of the S6K1 kinase domain in complexes with staurosporine and the S6K1-specific inhibitor PF-4708671 have been reported. In the present study, five compounds (F108, F109, F176, F177, and F179) were newly identified by in silico screening of a chemical library and kinase assay. The crystal structures of the five inhibitors in complexes with the S6K1 kinase domain were determined at resolutions between 1.85 and 2.10 Å. All of the inhibitors bound to the ATP binding site, lying along the P-loop, while the activation loop stayed in the inactive form. Compound F179, with a carbonyl group in the middle of the molecule, altered the αC helix conformation by interacting with the invariant Lys123. Compounds F176 and F177 bound slightly distant from the hinge region, and their sulfoamide groups formed polar interactions with the protein. The structural features required for the specific binding of inhibitors are discussed.

  14. Identification of anti-proliferative kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents to treat canine osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mauchle, Ulrike; Selvarajah, Gayathri T; Mol, Jan A; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Verheije, Monique H

    2015-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in dogs but various forms of therapy have not significantly improved clinical outcomes. As dysregulation of kinase activity is often present in tumours, kinases represent attractive molecular targets for cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify novel compounds targeting kinases with the potential to induce cell death in a panel of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. The ability of 80 well-characterized kinase inhibitor compounds to inhibit the proliferation of four canine osteosarcoma cell lines was investigated in vitro. For those compounds with activity, the mechanism of action and capability to potentiate the activity of doxorubicin was further evaluated. The screening showed 22 different kinase inhibitors that induced significant anti-proliferative effects across the four canine osteosarcoma cell lines investigated. Four of these compounds (RO 31-8220, 5-iodotubercidin, BAY 11-7082 and an erbstatin analog) showed significant cell growth inhibitory effects across all cell lines in association with variable induction of apoptosis. RO 31-8220 and 5-iodotubercidin showed the highest ability to potentiate the effects of doxorubicin on cell viability. In conclusion, the present study identified several potent kinase inhibitors targeting the PKC, CK1, PKA, ErbB2, mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which may warrant further investigations for the treatment of osteosarcoma in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  16. Novel N9-arenethenyl purines as potent dual Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihan; Shakespeare, William C; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Lentini, Scott; Das, Sasmita; Liu, Shuangying; Banda, Geeta; Wen, David; Zhu, Xiaotian; Xu, Qihong; Keats, Jeffrey; Wang, Frank; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Snodgrass, Joseph T; Broudy, Mark I; Russian, Karin; Dalgarno, David; Clackson, Tim; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2008-09-01

    Novel N(9)-arenethenyl purines, optimized potent dual Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors, are described. The key structural feature is a trans vinyl linkage at N(9) on the purine core which projects hydrophobic substituents into the selectivity pocket at the rear of the ATP site. Their synthesis was achieved through a Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction of N(9)-phosphorylmethylpurines and substituted benzaldehydes or Heck reactions between 9-vinyl purines and aryl halides. Most compounds are potent inhibitors of both Src and Abl kinase, and several possess good oral bioavailability.

  17. Bosutinib: a SRC-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Fuad El; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2013-08-05

    Bosutinib is one of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors commercially available in the United States for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. This review of bosutinib summarizes the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety data, as well as the patient-focused perspective through quality-of-life data. Bosutinib has shown considerable and sustained efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia, especially in the chronic phase, with resistance or intolerance to prior tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib has distinct but manageable adverse events. In the absence of T315I and V299L mutations, there are no absolute contraindications for the use of bosutinib in this patient population.

  18. Targeting kinases with anilinopyrimidines: discovery of N-phenyl-N’-[4-(pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl]urea derivatives as selective inhibitors of class III receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Gandin, Valentina; Ferrarese, Alessandro; Dalla Via, Martina; Marzano, Cristina; Chilin, Adriana; Marzaro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors are attractive drugs/drug candidates for the treatment of cancer. The most recent literature has highlighted the importance of multi target kinase inhibitors, although a correct balance between specificity and non-specificity is required. In this view, the discovery of multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors with subfamily selectivity is a challenging goal. Herein we present the synthesis and the preliminary kinase profiling of a set of novel 4-anilinopyrimidines. Among the synthesized compounds, the N-phenyl-N’-[4-(pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl]urea derivatives selectively targeted some members of class III receptor tyrosine kinase family. Starting from the structure of hit compound 19 we synthesized a further compound with an improved affinity toward the class III receptor tyrosine kinase members and endowed with a promising antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine solid tumor model. Molecular modeling simulations were used in order to rationalize the behavior of the title compounds. PMID:26568452

  19. Preclinical testing of selective Aurora kinase inhibitors on a medullary thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Tuccilli, Chiara; Baldini, Enke; Prinzi, Natalie; Morrone, Stefania; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Filippini, Angelo; Catania, Antonio; Alessandrini, Stefania; Rendina, Roberta; Coccaro, Carmela; D'Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    Deregulated expression of the Aurora kinases (Aurora-A, B, and C) is thought to be involved in cell malignant transformation and genomic instability in several cancer types. Over the last decade, a number of small-molecule inhibitors of Aurora kinases have been developed, which have proved to efficiently restrain malignant cell growth and tumorigenicity. Regarding medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we previously showed the efficacy of a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor (MK-0457) in impairing growth and survival of the MTC-derived cell line TT. In the present study, we sought to establish if one of the Aurora kinases might represent a preferential target for MTC therapy. The effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) were analyzed on TT cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and ploidy. The two inhibitors reduced TT cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC50 of 19.0 ± 2.4 nM for MLN8237 and 401.6 ± 44.1 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments confirmed that AZD1152 inhibited phosphorylation of histone H3 (Ser10) by Aurora-B, while it did not affect Aurora-A autophosphorylation. MLN8237 inhibited Aurora-A autophosphorylation as expected, but at concentrations required to achieve the maximum antiproliferative effects it also abolished H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation. Cytofluorimetry experiments showed that both inhibitors induced accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and increased the subG0/G1 fraction and polyploidy. Finally, both inhibitors triggered apoptosis. We demonstrated that inhibition of either Aurora-A or Aurora-B has antiproliferative effects on TT cells, and thus it would be worthwhile to further investigate the therapeutical potential of Aurora kinase inhibitors in MTC treatment.

  20. Serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) B1 suppresses cell migration and invasion in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Huasong, Gao; Zongmei, Ding; Jianfeng, Huang; Xiaojun, Qiu; Jun, Guo; Sun, Guan; Donglin, Wang; Jianhong, Zhu

    2015-03-10

    The serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) B1 is expressed in numerous human tumors, but little is known regarding its role in the pathophysiology of glioma. In this paper, we report that SERPINB1 expression was down-regulated in high-grade human glioma tissue samples and glioblastoma cell lines. To investigate the role of SERPINB1 in glioma migration and invasion, we generated human glioma cell lines in which SERPINB1 was either overexpressed or depleted. Overexpression of SERPINB1 suppressed, while elimination of SERPINB1 promoted, the migration and invasion of glioma cells. SERPINB1 inhibited glioma migration and invasion probably by dampening the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Molecular data showed that the effect of SERPINB1 in glioma cells might be mediated via sustained inactivation of the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) involved in the downregulation of the expressions of MMP-2. In a multivariate analysis, high SERPINB1 expression was showed to be associated with good prognosis in glioma. In conclusion, our data suggest that SERPINB1 negatively regulates glioma cell migration and invasion probably by abrogating the expression of MMP-2 and the activation of FAK. We suggest that SERPINB1 may offer the application in clinical medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of an orally-administrative MELK-targeting inhibitor that suppresses the growth of various types of human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Suyoun; Suzuki, Hanae; Miyamoto, Takashi; Takamatsu, Naofumi; Tatsuguchi, Ayako; Ueda, Koji; Kijima, Kyoko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuo, Yo

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase) as a novel therapeutic target for breast cancer. MELK was also reported to be highly upregulated in multiple types of human cancer. It was implied to play indispensable roles in cancer cell survival and indicated its involvement in the maintenance of tumor-initiating cells. We conducted a high-throughput screening of a compound library followed by structure-activity relationship studies, and successfully obtained a highly potent MELK inhibitor OTSSP167 with IC50 of 0.41 nM. OTSSP167 inhibited the phosphorylation of PSMA1 (proteasome subunit alpha type 1) and DBNL (drebrin-like), which we identified as novel MELK substrates and are important for stem-cell characteristics and invasiveness. The compound suppressed mammosphere formation of breast cancer cells and exhibited significant tumor growth suppression in xenograft studies using breast, lung, prostate, and pancreas cancer cell lines in mice by both intravenous and oral administration. This MELK inhibitor should be a promising compound possibly to suppress the growth of tumor-initiating cells and be applied for treatment of a wide range of human cancer. PMID:23283305

  2. A novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting residues that bind the substrate peptide.

    PubMed

    Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Hisami; Parker, Lorien; Yuki, Hitomi; Taruya, Shigenao; Nakagawa, Yukari; Kamei, Daisuke; Mori, Masumi; Ogawa, Naoko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Honma, Teruki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-03-30

    A new screening method using fluorescent correlation spectroscopy was developed to select kinase inhibitors that competitively inhibit the binding of a fluorescently labeled substrate peptide. Using the method, among approximately 700 candidate compounds selected by virtual screening, we identified a novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting its peptide binding residues. X-ray crystal analysis of the complex structure of Pim-1 with the inhibitor indicated that the inhibitor actually binds to the ATP-binding site and also forms direct interactions with residues (Asp128 and Glu171) that bind the substrate peptide. These interactions, which cause small side-chain movements, seem to affect the binding ability of the fluorescently labeled substrate. The compound inhibited Pim-1 kinase in vitro, with an IC(50) value of 150 nM. Treatment of cultured leukemia cells with the compound reduced the amount of p21 and increased the amount of p27, due to Pim-1 inhibition, and then triggered apoptosis after cell-cycle arrest at the G(1)/S phase. This screening method may be widely applicable for the identification of various new Pim-1 kinase inhibitors targeting the residues that bind the substrate peptide.

  3. Deguelin Potentiates Apoptotic Activity of an EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (AG1478) in PIK3CA-Mutated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Yuh; Maeda, Toyonobu; Suzuki, Atsuko; Takada, Satoshi; Fujii, Masato; Kato, Yasumasa

    2017-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is known to be intrinsically resistant to inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Until now, clinical outcomes for HNSCC using EGFR inhibitors as single agents have yielded disappointing results. Here, we aimed to study whether combinatorial treatment using AG1478 (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and deguelin, which is a rotenoid isolated from the African plant Mundulea sericea, could enhance the anti-tumor effects of AG1478 in HNSCC. For Ca9-22 cells with EGFR, KRAS, and PIK3CA wild types, AG1478 alone suppressed both phosphorylated levels of ERK and AKT and induced apoptosis. On the contrary, for HSC-4 cells with EGFR and KRAS wild types, and a PIK3CA mutant, AG1478 alone did not suppress the phosphorylated level of AKT nor induce apoptosis, while it suppressed ERK phosphorylation. Forced expression of constitutively active PIK3CA (G1633A mutation) significantly reduced the apoptotic effect of AG1478 on the PIK3CA wild-type Ca9-22 cells. When HSC-4 cells with the PIK3CA G1633A mutation were treated with a combination of AG1478 and deguelin, combination effects on apoptosis induction were observed through the inhibition of the AKT pathway. These results suggest that the combination of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor with deguelin is a potential therapeutic approach to treat PIK3CA-mutated HNSCC. PMID:28134774

  4. Inhibitors of cellular kinases with broad-spectrum antiviral activity for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; McMullan, Laura K; Lo, Michael K; Spengler, Jessica R; Bergeron, Éric; Albariño, César G; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Flint, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Host cell kinases are important for the replication of a number of hemorrhagic fever viruses. We tested a panel of kinase inhibitors for their ability to block the replication of multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses. OSU-03012 inhibited the replication of Lassa, Ebola, Marburg and Nipah viruses, whereas BIBX 1382 dihydrochloride inhibited Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses. BIBX 1382 blocked both Lassa and Ebola virus glycoprotein-dependent cell entry. These compounds may be used as tools to understand conserved virus-host interactions, and implicate host cell kinases that may be targets for broad spectrum therapeutic intervention.

  5. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  6. Development of Certain Protein Kinase Inhibitors with the Components from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minghua; Zhao, Ge; Cao, Shousong; Zhang, Yangyang; Li, Xiaofang; Lin, Xiukun

    2017-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have been used in China for more than two thousand years, and some of them have been confirmed to be effective in cancer treatment. Protein kinases play critical roles in control of cell growth, proliferation, migration, survival, and angiogenesis and mediate their biological effects through their catalytic activity. In recent years, numerous protein kinase inhibitors have been developed and are being used clinically. Anticancer TCMs represent a large class of bioactive substances, and some of them display anticancer activity via inhibiting protein kinases to affect the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, serine/threonine-specific protein kinases, pechanistic target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR), P38, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) pathways. In the present article, we comprehensively reviewed several components isolated from anticancer TCMs that exhibited significantly inhibitory activity toward a range of protein kinases. These components, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, based upon the kinases that they inhibit. The prospects and problems in development of the anticancer TCMs are also discussed. PMID:28119606

  7. Methods Of Using Chemical Libraries To Search For New Kinase Inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S. , Schultz, Peter , Wodicka, Lisa , Meijer, Laurent , Lockhart, David J.

    2003-06-03

    The generation of selective inhibitors for specific protein kinases would provide new tools for analyzing signal transduction pathways and possibly new therapeutic agents. We have invented an approach to the development of selective protein kinase inhibitors based on the unexpected binding mode of 2,6,9-trisubstituted purines to the ATP binding site of human CDK2. The most potent inhibitor, purvalanol B (IC.sub.50 =6 nM), binds with a 30-fold greater affinity than the known CDK2 inhibitor, flavopiridol. The cellular effects of this class of compounds were examined and compared to those of flavopiridol by monitoring changes in mRNA expression levels for all genes in treated cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays.

  8. Selective inhibitors of Cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK) as anti-HCV agents

    PubMed Central

    Kovackova, Sona; Chang, Lei; Bekerman, Elena; Neveu, Gregory; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Chaikuad, Apirat; Heroven, Christina; Šála, Michal; De Jonghe, Steven; Knapp, Stefan; Einav, Shirit; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK) emerged as a promising drug target for the treatment of viral infections. However, no potent and selective GAK inhibitors have been reported in the literature to date. This paper describes the discovery of isothiazolo[5,4-b]pyridines as selective GAK inhibitors, with the most potent congeners displaying low nanomolar binding affinity for GAK. Co-crystallization experiments revealed that these compounds behaved as classic type I ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. In addition, we have demonstrated that these compounds exhibit a potent activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) by inhibiting two temporally distinct steps in the HCV lifecycle (i.e. viral entry and assembly). Hence, these GAK inhibitors represent chemical probes to study GAK function in different disease areas where GAK has been implicated (including viral infection, cancer and Parkinson's disease). PMID:25822739

  9. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Vascular Toxicity: Impetus for a Classification System?

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of molecularly targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has revolutionized cancer therapy and has contributed to a steady decline in cancer-related mortality since the late 1990s. However, not only cardiac but also vascular toxicity has been reported for these agents, some as expected on-target effects (e.g., VEGF receptor inhibitors) and others as unanticipated events (e.g., BCR-Abl inhibitors). A sound understanding of these cardiovascular toxic effects is critical to advance mechanistic insight into vascular disease and clinical care. From a conceptual standpoint, there might be value in defining type I (permanent) and type II (transient) vascular toxicity. This review will focus on the tyrosine kinase inhibitors in current clinical use and their associated vascular side effects.

  10. Urotensin II inhibitor eases neuropathic pain by suppressing the JNK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Pan-Pan; Hao, Ting; Wang, Dan; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yang-Zi; Wu, Yu-Qing; Zhou, Cheng-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic peptide originally isolated from the caudal neurosecretory system of fishes, can produce proinflammatory effects through its specific G protein-coupled receptor, GPR14. Neuropathic pain, a devastating disease, is related to excessive inflammation in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the relationship between U-II and neuropathic pain has not been reported. This study was designed to investigate the effect of U-II antagonist on neuropathic pain and to understand the associated mechanisms. We reported that U-II and its receptor GPR14 were persistently upregulated and activated in the dorsal horn of L4-6 spinal cord segments after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Intrathecal injection of SB657510, a specific antagonist against U-II, reversed CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, we found that SB657510 reduced the expression of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 as well as subsequent secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). It was also showed that both the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC significantly attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. Our present research showed that U-II receptor antagonist alleviated neuropathic pain possibly through the suppression of the JNK/NF-κB pathway in CCI rats, which will contribute to the better understanding of function of U-II and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  11. Raf kinase inhibitory protein suppresses a metastasis signalling cascade involving LIN28 and let-7

    PubMed Central

    Dangi-Garimella, Surabhi; Yun, Jieun; Eves, Eva M; Newman, Martin; Erkeland, Stefan J; Hammond, Scott M; Minn, Andy J; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) negatively regulates the MAP kinase (MAPK), G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2, and NF-κB signalling cascades. RKIP has been implicated as a metastasis suppressor for prostate cancer, but the mechanism is not known. Here, we show that RKIP inhibits invasion by metastatic breast cancer cells and represses breast tumour cell intravasation and bone metastasis in an orthotopic murine model. The mechanism involves inhibition of MAPK, leading to decreased transcription of LIN28 by Myc. Suppression of LIN28 enables enhanced let-7 processing in breast cancer cells. Elevated let-7 expression inhibits HMGA2, a chromatin remodelling protein that activates pro-invasive and pro-metastatic genes, including Snail. LIN28 depletion and let-7 expression suppress bone metastasis, and LIN28 restores bone metastasis in mice bearing RKIP-expressing breast tumour cells. These results indicate that RKIP suppresses invasion and metastasis in part through a signalling cascade involving MAPK, Myc, LIN28, let-7, and downstream let-7 targets. RKIP regulation of two pluripotent stem cell genes, Myc and LIN28, highlights the importance of RKIP as a key metastasis suppressor and potential therapeutic agent. PMID:19153603

  12. The novel kinase inhibitor PRT062070 (Cerdulatinib) demonstrates efficacy in models of autoimmunity and B-cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Greg; Betz, Andreas; DeGuzman, Francis; Pak, Yvonne; Inagaki, Mayuko; Baker, Dale C; Hollenbach, Stanley J; Pandey, Anjali; Sinha, Uma

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity and severity of certain autoimmune diseases and B-cell malignancies warrant simultaneous targeting of multiple disease-relevant signaling pathways. Dual inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and Janus kinase (JAK) represents such a strategy and may elicit several benefits relative to selective kinase inhibition, such as gaining control over a broader array of disease etiologies, reducing probability of selection for bypass disease mechanisms, and the potential that an overall lower level suppression of individual targets may be sufficient to modulate disease activity. To this end, we provide data on the discovery and preclinical development of PRT062070 [4-(cyclopropylamino)-2-({4-[4-(ethylsulfonyl)piperazin-1-yl]phenyl}amino)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide hydrochloride], an orally active kinase inhibitor that demonstrates activity against SYK and JAK. Cellular assays demonstrated specific inhibitory activity against signaling pathways that use SYK and JAK1/3. Limited inhibition of JAK2 was observed, and PRT062070 did not inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-mediated signaling or activation in B and T cells nor T-cell antigen receptor-mediated signaling in T cells, providing evidence for selectivity of action. Potent antitumor activity was observed in a subset of B-cell lymphoma cell lines. After oral dosing, PRT062070 suppressed inflammation and autoantibody generation in a rat collagen-induced arthritis model and blocked B-cell activation and splenomegaly in a mouse model of chronic B-cell antigen receptor stimulation. PRT062070 is currently under evaluation in a phase I dose escalation study in patients with B-cell leukemia and lymphoma (NCT01994382), with proof-of-concept studies in humans planned to assess therapeutic potential in autoimmune and malignant diseases. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Threshold levels of ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors retained in chronic myeloid leukemia cells define commitment to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    O’Hare, Thomas; Eide, Christopher A.; Agarwal, Anupriya; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zabriskie, Matthew S.; MacKenzie, Ryan J.; LaTocha, Dorian H.; Johnson, Kara J.; You, Huihong; Luo, Jenny; Riddle, Steven M.; Marks, Bryan D.; Vogel, Kurt W.; Koop, Dennis R.; Apgar, John; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Deininger, Michael W.; Druker, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    The imatinib paradigm in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) established continuous BCR-ABL inhibition as a design principle for ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, clinical responses seen in patients treated with the ABL TKI dasatinib despite its much shorter plasma half-life and the apparent rapid restoration of BCR-ABL signaling activity following once-daily dosing suggested acute, potent inhibition of kinase activity may be sufficient to irrevocably commit CML cells to apoptosis. To determine the specific requirements for ABL TKI-induced CML cell death for a panel of clinically important ABL TKIs (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, and DCC-2036), we interrogated response of CML cell lines and primary CML cells following acute drug exposure using intracellular FACS and immunoblot analyses of BCR-ABL signaling, apoptosis measurements, liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry of intracellular drug levels, and biochemical TKI dissociation studies. Importantly, significant intracellular TKI stores were detected following drug washout, levels of which tracked with onset of apoptosis and incomplete return of BCR-ABL signaling, particularly pSTAT5, to baseline. Among TKIs tested, ponatinib demonstrated the most robust capacity for apoptotic commitment showing sustained suppression of BCR-ABL signaling even at low intracellular levels following extensive washout, consistent with high-affinity binding and slow dissociation from ABL kinase. Together, our findings suggest commitment of CML cells to apoptosis requires protracted incomplete restoration of BCR-ABL signaling mediated by intracellular retention of TKIs above a quantifiable threshold. These studies refine our understanding of apoptotic commitment in CML cells and highlight parameters important to design of therapeutic kinase inhibitors for CML and other malignancies. PMID:23576564

  14. Clinical development of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2010-01-01

    The PI3K pathway is the most commonly altered in human cancer. Several recent phase I studies with therapeutic inhibitors of this pathway have shown that pharmacological inhibition of PI3K in humans is feasible and overall well tolerated. Furthermore, there has already been clinical evidence of anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced cancer. The intensity and duration of PI3K inhibition required for an antitumor effect and the optimal pharmacodynamic biomarker(s) of pathway inactivation remain to be established. Preclinical and early clinical data support focusing on trials with PI3K inhibitors that are at a minimum enriched with patients with alterations in this signaling pathway. These inhibitors are likely to be more effective in combination with established and other novel molecular therapies.

  15. Novel inhibitors of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Mardia Telep; Zoraghi, Roya; Reiner, Neil; Suzen, Sibel; Ohlsen, Knut; Lalk, Michael; Altanlar, Nurten; Hilgeroth, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Novel bisindolyl-cycloalkane indoles resulted from the reaction of aliphatic dialdehydes and indole. As bisindolyl-natural alkaloid compounds have recently been reported as inhibitors of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-pyruvate kinase (PK), we tested our novel compounds as MRSA PK inhibitors and now report first inhibiting activities. We discuss structure-activity relationships of structurally varied compounds. Activity influencing substituents have been characterized and relations to antibacterial activities of the most active compounds have been proved.

  16. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced NSCLC: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alves, Ana Ferreira; Liebermann, Marco

    2008-10-01

    Erlotinib is a molecule that selectively inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activity. The authors present a case that exemplifies the use of erlotinib as second line therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This case is about a 76 years old woman, non-smoker, with advanced lung adenocarcinoma (stage IIIB) previously treated with two cycles of standard chemotherapy, which were interrupted by serious adverse reactions. Rev Port Pneumol 2008; XIV (Supl 3): S23-S28.

  17. The novel IκB kinase β inhibitor IMD-0560 prevents bone invasion by oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Yukiyo; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sugiyama, Goro; Nakatomi, Chihiro; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Osawa, Kenji; Sugamori, Yasutaka; Ohya, Keiichi; Okamoto, Masato; Fujikawa, Tomoyuki; Itai, Akiko; Matsuo, Kou; Watanabe, Seiji; Jimi, Eijiro

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells display significantly augmented nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, and inhibiting this activity suppresses malignant tumor characteristics. Thus, we evaluated the effect of IMD-0560, a novel inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) β that is under assessment in a clinical trial of rheumatoid arthritis, on bone invasion by the mouse OSCC cell line SCCVII. We examined the inhibitory effects of IMD-0560 on NF-κB activity and tumor invasion using human OSCC cell lines and SCCVII cells in vitro. Using a mouse model of jaw bone invasion by SCCVII cells, we assessed the inhibitory effect of IMD-0560 on jaw bone invasion, tumor growth, and matrix degradation in vivo. IMD-0560 suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the degradation of IκBα in OSCC cells. IMD-0560 also inhibited invasion by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) production in OSCC cells. IMD-0560 protected against zygoma and mandible destruction by SCCVII cells, reduced the number of osteoclasts by inhibiting receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblastic cells and SCCVII cells, increased SCCVII cell death and suppressed cell proliferation and MMP-9 production in SCCVII cells. Based on these results, IMD-0560 may represent a new therapeutic agent for bone invasion by OSCC cells. PMID:25373602

  18. Structural Mechanism of the Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor Ponatinib (AP24534): Lessons for Overcoming Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Yihan; Thomas, Mathew; Keats, Jeff; Xu, Qihong; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Clackson, Tim; Dalgarno, David C.; Zhu, Xiaotian

    2012-01-20

    The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, drug resistance caused by kinase domain mutations has necessitated the development of new mutation-resistant inhibitors, most recently against the T315I gatekeeper residue mutation. Ponatinib (AP24534) inhibits both native and mutant BCR-ABL, including T315I, acting as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor. Here, we undertook a combined crystallographic and structure-activity relationship analysis on ponatinib to understand this unique profile. While the ethynyl linker is a key inhibitor functionality that interacts with the gatekeeper, virtually all other components of ponatinib play an essential role in its T315I inhibitory activity. The extensive network of optimized molecular contacts found in the DFG-out binding mode leads to high potency and renders binding less susceptible to disruption by single point mutations. The inhibitory mechanism exemplified by ponatinib may have broad relevance to designing inhibitors against other kinases with mutated gatekeeper residues.

  19. A Pentacyclic Aurora Kinase Inhibitor (AKI-001) With High in Vivo Potency And Oral Bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Rawson, T.E.; Ruth, M.; Blackwood, E.; Burdick, D.; Corson, L.; Dotson, J.; Drummond, J.; Fields, C.; Georges, G.J.; Goller, B.; Halladay, J.; Hunsaker, T.; Kleinheinz, T.; Krell, H.-W.; Li, J.; Liang, J.; Limberg, A.; McNutt, A.; Moffat, J.; Phillips, G.; Ran, Y.

    2009-05-21

    Aurora kinase inhibitors have attracted a great deal of interest as a new class of antimitotic agents. We report a novel class of Aurora inhibitors based on a pentacyclic scaffold. A prototype pentacyclic inhibitor 32 (AKI-001) derived from two early lead structures improves upon the best properties of each parent and compares favorably to a previously reported Aurora inhibitor, 39 (VX-680). The inhibitor exhibits low nanomolar potency against both Aurora A and Aurora B enzymes, excellent cellular potency (IC{sub 50} < 100 nM), and good oral bioavailability. Phenotypic cellular assays show that both Aurora A and Aurora B are inhibited at inhibitor concentrations sufficient to block proliferation. Importantly, the cellular activity translates to potent inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. An oral dose of 5 mg/kg QD is well tolerated and results in near stasis (92% TGI) in an HCT116 mouse xenograft model.

  20. SAR and inhibitor complex structure determination of a novel class of potent and specific Aurora kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heron, Nicola M; Anderson, Malcolm; Blowers, David P; Breed, Jason; Eden, Jonathan M; Green, Stephen; Hill, George B; Johnson, Trevor; Jung, Frederic H; McMiken, Helen H J; Mortlock, Andrew A; Pannifer, Andrew D; Pauptit, Richard A; Pink, Jennifer; Roberts, Nicola J; Rowsell, Siân

    2006-03-01

    A novel series of 5-aminopyrimidinyl quinazolines has been developed from anilino-quinazoline 1, which was identified in a high throughput screen for Aurora A. Introduction of the pyrimidine ring and optimisation of the substituents both on this ring and at the C7 position of the quinazoline led to the discovery of compounds that are highly specific Aurora kinase inhibitors. Co-crystallisation of one of these inhibitors with a fragment of Aurora A shows the importance of the benzamido group in achieving selectivity.

  1. Kinase crystal identification and ATP-competitive inhibitor screening using the fluorescent ligand SKF86002.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lorien J; Taruya, Shigenao; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Ogawa, Naoko; Mikuni, Junko; Honda, Keiko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko

    2014-02-01

    The small kinase inhibitor SKF86002 lacks intrinsic fluorescence but becomes fluorescent upon binding to the ATP-binding sites of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38α). It was found that co-crystals of this compound with various kinases were distinguishable by their strong fluorescence. The co-crystals of SKF86002 with p38α, Pim1, ASK1, HCK and AMPK were fluorescent. Addition of SKF86002, which binds to the ATP site, to the co-crystallization solution of HCK promoted protein stability and thus facilitated the production of crystals that otherwise would not grow in the apo form. It was further demonstrated that the fluorescence of SKF86002 co-crystals can be applied to screen for candidate kinase inhibitors. When a compound binds competitively to the ATP-binding site of a kinase crystallized with SKF86002, it displaces the fluorescent SKF86002 and the crystal loses its fluorescence. Lower fluorescent signals were reported after soaking SKF86002-Pim1 and SKF86002-HCK co-crystals with the inhibitors quercetin, a quinazoline derivative and A-419259. Determination of the SKF86002-Pim1 and SKF86002-HCK co-crystal structures confirmed that SKF86002 interacts with the ATP-binding sites of Pim1 and HCK. The structures of Pim1-SKF86002 crystals soaked with the inhibitors quercetin and a quinazoline derivative and of HCK-SKF86002 crystals soaked with A-419259 were determined. These structures were virtually identical to the deposited crystal structures of the same complexes. A KINOMEscan assay revealed that SKF86002 binds a wide variety of kinases. Thus, for a broad range of kinases, SKF86002 is useful as a crystal marker, a crystal stabilizer and a marker to identify ligand co-crystals for structural analysis.

  2. Targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase RET in combination with aromatase inhibitors in ER positive breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fearns, Antony; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Chiarugi, Paola; Isacke, Clare M.; Morandi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The majority of breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive (ER+). Blockade of estrogen biosynthesis by aromatase inhibitors (AIs) is the first-line endocrine therapy for post-menopausal women with ER+ breast cancers. However, AI resistance remains a major challenge. We have demonstrated previously that increased GDNF/RET signaling in ER+ breast cancers promotes AI resistance. Here we investigated the efficacy of different small molecule RET kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, cabozantinib, NVP-BBT594 and NVP-AST487, and the potential of combining a RET inhibitor with the AI letrozole in ER+ breast cancers. The most effective inhibitor identified, NVP-AST487, suppressed GDNF-stimulated RET downstream signaling and 3D tumor spheroid growth. Ovariectomized mice were inoculated with ER+ aromatase-overexpressing MCF7-AROM1 cells and treated with letrozole, NVP-AST487 or the two drugs in combination. Surprisingly, the three treatment regimens showed similar efficacy in impairing MCF7-AROM1 tumor growth in vivo. However in vitro, NVP-AST487 was superior to letrozole in inhibiting the GDNF-induced motility and tumor spheroid growth of MCF7-AROM1 cells and required in combination with letrozole to inhibit GDNF-induced motility in BT474-AROM3 aromatase expressing cells. These data indicate that inhibiting RET is as effective as the current therapeutic regimen of AI therapy but that a combination treatment may delay cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. PMID:27602955

  3. Rational design of potent and selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Liu, X P; Zheng, Y; Uckun, F M

    2001-08-01

    Increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) subfamily of tyrosine kinases, and of their role in the initiation and progression of various cancers has led to the search for inhibitors of signaling molecules that may prove to be important in cancer therapy. The complex nature of EGFR biology allows for potential opportunities for EGFR inhibitors in a number of areas of cancer therapy, including proliferative, angiogenic, invasive, and metastatic aspects. Different approaches have been used to target either the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the EGFR or the intracellular tyrosine kinase region that results in interference with its signaling pathways that modulate cancer-promoting responses. Examples of these include a number of monoclonal antibodies, immunotoxins and ligand-binding cytotoxic agents that target the extracellular ligand binding region of EGFR, and small molecule inhibitors that target the intracellular kinase domain and act by interfering with ATP binding to the receptor. During the past 3 years, significant progress has been made towards the identification of new structural classes of small molecule inhibitors that show high potency and specificity towards EGFR. The search for new small molecules that inhibit kinases has included traditional approaches like the testing of natural products, random screening of chemical libraries, the use of classical structure-activity-relationship studies, and the incorporation of structure-based drug design and combinatorial chemistry techniques. There has been a significant improvement in the development of selective EGFR inhibitors with the use of a structure-based design approach employing a homology model of the EGFR kinase domain. Molecular modeling procedures have been used to generate novel molecules that are complementary in shape and electrostatics to the EGFR kinase domain topography. This review focuses on some examples of the successful use of

  4. Selective elimination of neuroblastoma cells by synergistic effect of Akt kinase inhibitor and tetrathiomolybdate.

    PubMed

    Navrátilová, Jarmila; Karasová, Martina; Kohutková Lánová, Martina; Jiráková, Ludmila; Budková, Zuzana; Pacherník, Jiří; Šmarda, Jan; Beneš, Petr

    2017-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumour of infancy. Pathological activation of glucose consumption, glycolysis and glycolysis-activating Akt kinase occur frequently in neuroblastoma cells, and these changes correlate with poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, several inhibitors of glucose utilization and the Akt kinase activity are in preclinical trials as potential anti-cancer drugs. However, metabolic plasticity of cancer cells might undermine efficacy of this approach. In this work, we identified oxidative phosphorylation as compensatory mechanism preserving viability of neuroblastoma cells with inhibited glucose uptake/Akt kinase. It was oxidative phosphorylation that maintained intracellular level of ATP and proliferative capacity of these cells. The oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors (rotenone, tetrathiomolybdate) synergized with inhibitor of the Akt kinase/glucose uptake in down-regulation of both viability of neuroblastoma cells and clonogenic potential of cells forming neuroblastoma spheroids. Interestingly, tetrathiomolybdate acted as highly specific inhibitor of oxygen consumption and activator of lactate production in neuroblastoma cells, but not in normal fibroblasts and neuronal cells. Moreover, the reducing effect of tetrathiomolybdate on cell viability and the level of ATP in the cells with inhibited Akt kinase/glucose uptake was also selective for neuroblastoma cells. Therefore, efficient elimination of neuroblastoma cells requires inhibition of both glucose uptake/Akt kinase and oxidative phosphorylation activities. The use of tetrathiomolybdate as a mitochondrial inhibitor contributes to selectivity of this combined treatment, preferentially targeting neuroblastoma cells. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. LIM kinase inhibitors disrupt mitotic microtubule organization and impair tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mardilovich, Katerina; Baugh, Mark; Crighton, Diane; Kowalczyk, Dominika; Gabrielsen, Mads; Munro, June; Croft, Daniel R.; Lourenco, Filipe; James, Daniel; Kalna, Gabriella; McGarry, Lynn; Rath, Oliver; Shanks, Emma; Garnett, Mathew J.; McDermott, Ultan; Brookfield, Joanna; Charles, Mark; Hammonds, Tim; Olson, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons are critically important for cancer cell proliferation, and drugs that target microtubules are widely-used cancer therapies. However, their utility is compromised by toxicities due to dose and exposure. To overcome these issues, we characterized how inhibition of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton regulatory LIM kinases could be used in drug combinations to increase efficacy. A previously-described LIMK inhibitor (LIMKi) induced dose-dependent microtubule alterations that resulted in significant mitotic defects, and increased the cytotoxic potency of microtubule polymerization inhibitors. By combining LIMKi with 366 compounds from the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set, effective combinations were identified with kinase inhibitors including EGFR, p38 and Raf. These findings encouraged a drug discovery effort that led to development of CRT0105446 and CRT0105950, which potently block LIMK1 and LIMK2 activity in vitro, and inhibit cofilin phosphorylation and increase αTubulin acetylation in cells. CRT0105446 and CRT0105950 were screened against 656 cancer cell lines, and rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma and kidney cancer cells were identified as significantly sensitive to both LIMK inhibitors. These large-scale screens have identified effective LIMK inhibitor drug combinations and sensitive cancer types. In addition, the LIMK inhibitory compounds CRT0105446 and CRT0105950 will enable further development of LIMK-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:26540348

  6. Pharmacophore modeling study based on known spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors together with virtual screening for identifying novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huan-Zhang; Li, Lin-Li; Ren, Ji-Xia; Zou, Jun; Yang, Li; Wei, Yu-Quan; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2009-04-01

    In this investigation, chemical features based 3D pharmacophore models were developed based on the known inhibitors of Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) with the aid of hiphop and hyporefine modules within catalyst. The best quantitative pharmacophore model, Hypo1, was used as a 3D structural query for retrieving potential inhibitors from chemical databases including Specs, NCI, MayBridge, and Chinese Nature Product Database (CNPD). The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by Lipinski's rule of five and docking studies to refine the retrieved hits. Finally 30 compounds were selected from the top ranked hit compounds and conducted an in vitro kinase inhibitory assay. Six compounds showed a good inhibitory potency against Syk, which have been selected for further investigation.

  7. Protein-Protein Interaction for the De Novo Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arumugasamy, Karthiga; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The homology of the inhibitor binding site regions on the surface of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) makes actual CDK inhibitors unable to bind specifically to their molecular targets. Most of them are ATP competitive inhibitors with low specificity that also affect the phosphorylation mechanisms of other nontarget kinases giving rise to harmful side effects. So, the search of specific and potent inhibitors able to bind to the desired CDK target is still a pending issue. Structure based drug design minimized the erroneous binding and increased the affinity of the inhibitor interaction. In the case of CDKs their activation and regulation mechanisms mainly depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The design of drugs targeting these PPIs makes feasible and promising towards the discovery of new and specific CDK inhibitors. Development of peptide inhibitors for a target protein is an emerging approach in computer aided drug designing. This chapter describes in detail methodology for use of the VitAL-Viterbi algorithm for de novo peptide design of CDK2 inhibitors.

  8. Visible-Light-Triggered Activation of a Protein Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Danielle; Li, Jason W; Branda, Neil R

    2017-02-20

    A photoresponsive small molecule undergoes a ring-opening reaction when exposed to visible light and becomes an active inhibitor of the enzyme protein kinase C. This "turning on" of enzyme inhibition with light puts control into the hands of the user, creating the opportunity to regulate when and where enzyme catalysis takes place.

  9. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of LIM Domain Kinase for Inhibiting HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Fei; Guo, Jia; Dabbagh, Deemah; Spear, Mark; He, Sijia; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Fontenot, Jacque; Yin, Yan; Bibian, Mathieu; Park, Chul Min; Zheng, Ke; Park, Ha Jeung; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima; Retterer, Cary; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Pitt, Margaret L.; Naughton, John; Jiang, Yongjun; Shang, Hong; Hakami, Ramin M.; Ling, Binhua; Young, John A. T.; Bavari, Sina; Xu, Xuehua

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A dynamic actin cytoskeleton is necessary for viral entry, intracellular migration, and virion release. For HIV-1 infection, during entry, the virus triggers early actin activity by hijacking chemokine coreceptor signaling, which activates a host dependency factor, cofilin, and its kinase, the LIM domain kinase (LIMK). Although knockdown of human LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibits HIV infection, no specific small-molecule inhibitor of LIMK has been available. Here, we describe the design and discovery of novel classes of small-molecule inhibitors of LIMK for inhibiting HIV infection. We identified R10015 as a lead compound that blocks LIMK activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket. R10015 specifically blocks viral DNA synthesis, nuclear migration, and virion release. In addition, R10015 inhibits multiple viruses, including Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggesting that LIMK inhibitors could be developed as a new class of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE The actin cytoskeleton is a structure that gives the cell shape and the ability to migrate. Viruses frequently rely on actin dynamics for entry and intracellular migration. In cells, actin dynamics are regulated by kinases, such as the LIM domain kinase (LIMK), which regulates actin activity through phosphorylation of cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Recent studies have found that LIMK/cofilin are targeted by viruses such as HIV-1 for propelling viral intracellular migration. Although inhibiting LIMK1 expression blocks HIV-1 infection, no highly specific LIMK inhibitor is available. This study describes the design, medicinal synthesis, and discovery of small-molecule LIMK inhibitors for blocking HIV-1 and several other viruses and emphasizes the feasibility of developing LIMK inhibitors as broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. PMID:28381571

  10. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of LIM Domain Kinase for Inhibiting HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fei; Guo, Jia; Dabbagh, Deemah; Spear, Mark; He, Sijia; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Fontenot, Jacque; Yin, Yan; Bibian, Mathieu; Park, Chul Min; Zheng, Ke; Park, Ha Jeung; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima; Retterer, Cary; Zamani,