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Sample records for kinase tmk assays

  1. [Isolation, prokaryotic expression and activity analysis of thymidylate kinase (tmk) gene from Phytoplasma of wheat blue dwarf].

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Ji, Lingling; Wu, Yunfeng; Hao, Xing'an

    2008-06-01

    Wheat blue dwarf (WBD) is an important disease in winter wheat district, which causes serious losses in wheat production. Thymidylate kinase (TMK) catalyses the phosphorylation of dTMP to dTDP in the de novo and salvage pathways of dTTP synthesis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In order effectively control this phytoplasma, we isolated the thymidylate kinase gene of WBD phytoplasma, and analyzed the catalytic activity of TMK protein. tmk gene was amplified from the phytoplasma of WBD, the amplicons were digested with EcoR I and Hind III and then inserted into expression vector pET-30a(+). The polyHis-tagged TMK was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and fusion protein was obtained and purified by Ni-NTA column. The TMK activities were measured by the method of en-zyme-coupled assay involving Mg2+, dTMP and ATP. Two genes, tmk-1 and tmk-2 were obtained, with the molecular weight of 630 bp and 624 bp. Both of them encoded an amino acid sequence with three conserved functional motifs which related with binding NTP/NMP. The fusion protein, TMK-2 had a higher catalytic activity (112.41 U/mg) than TMK-1 (16.4 U/mg), and its optimum catalytic conditions were 32 degrees C, pH7.3, 1.5 mmol/L Mg2+ and 1 mmol/L ATP. TMK-1 and TMK-2 had conserved functional motifs in their primary sequence, and suggested that they may function as TMK enzymes. But, the TMK-1-polyHis fusion protein had very low catalytic activity, the possible reason was that two highly conserved regions were absent in TMK-1, and it might function as another type of kinase in WBD phytoplasma. This experiment lay a foundation for further study of the TMK function in infection and reproduction of WBD phytoplasma.

  2. A Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Tmk3 Participates in High Osmolarity Resistance, Cell Wall Integrity Maintenance and Cellulase Production Regulation in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyu; Zhao, Qiushuang; Yang, Jinghua; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Fangzhong; Liu, Kuimei; Fang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are important signal transduction pathways conserved in essentially all eukaryotes, but haven't been subjected to functional studies in the most important cellulase-producing filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. Previous reports suggested the presence of three MAPKs in T. reesei: Tmk1, Tmk2, and Tmk3. By exploring the phenotypic features of T. reesei Δtmk3, we first showed elevated NaCl sensitivity and repressed transcription of genes involved in glycerol/trehalose biosynthesis under higher osmolarity, suggesting Tmk3 participates in high osmolarity resistance via derepression of genes involved in osmotic stabilizer biosynthesis. We also showed significant downregulation of genes encoding chitin synthases and a β-1,3-glucan synthase, decreased chitin content, ‘budded’ hyphal appearance typical to cell wall defective strains, and increased sensitivity to calcofluor white/Congo red in the tmk3 deficient strain, suggesting Tmk3 is involved in cell wall integrity maintenance in T. reesei. We further observed the decrease of cellulase transcription and production in T. reesei Δtmk3 during submerged cultivation, as well as the presence of MAPK phosphorylation sites on known transcription factors involved in cellulase regulation, suggesting Tmk3 is also involved in the regulation of cellulase production. Finally, the expression of cell wall integrity related genes, the expression of cellulase coding genes, cellulase production and biomass accumulation were compared between T. reesei Δtmk3 grown in solid state media and submerged media, showing a strong restoration effect in solid state media from defects resulted from tmk3 deletion. These results showed novel physiological processes that fungal Hog1-type MAPKs are involved in, and present the first experimental investigation of MAPK signaling pathways in T. reesei. Our observations on the restoration effect during solid state cultivation suggest that T. reesei

  3. A high-throughput radiometric kinase assay

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  4. Real-time protein kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongye; Low, Karen E; Woo, Sam; Noble, Richard L; Graham, Ronald J; Connaughton, Sonia S; Gee, Melissa A; Lee, Linda G

    2005-04-01

    We report a novel, real-time fluorogenic kinase assay. The peptide substrates are synthesized with a fluorescent dye and a hydrocarbon tail. The substrate self-assembles into micelles, increasing the local concentration of the dye and quenching its fluorescence. Upon phosphorylation, the fluorescence intensity increases 4-6-fold due to micelle reorganization. Both dynamic light scattering data and cryoelectron microscope images show that the size and the shape of the phosphopeptide micelles are significantly different from micelles of substrate peptide. The system provides a robust fluorescence increase in a real-time protein kinase assay. Unlike other fluorogenic systems, the fluorophore may be distant from the serine, threonine, or tyrosine that is phosphorylated. Assays for several kinases, including PKA, PKC, p38, MAPKAP K2, akt, Erk1, and src-family kinases, have been developed. IC(50) values of inhibitors for PKC betaII determined with this technology are consistent with published values. The utility of this assay to high-throughput screening was demonstrated with Sigma's LOPAC library, a collection of 640 compounds with known biological activities, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  5. Structure Guided Development of Novel Thymidine Mimetics targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa Thymidylate Kinase: from Hit to Lead Generation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Plummer, Mark S.; Starr, Jeremy; Desbonnet, Charlene R.; Soutter, Holly; Chang, Jeanne; Miller, J. Richard; Dillman, Keith; Miller, Alita A.; Roush, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Thymidylate kinase (TMK) is a potential chemotherapeutic target because it is directly involved in the synthesis of an essential component, thymidine triphosphate, in DNA replication. All reported TMK inhibitors are thymidine analogs, which might retard their development as potent therapeutics due to cell permeability and off-target activity against human TMK. A small molecule hit (1, IC50 = 58 μM), which has reasonable inhibition potency against Pseudomonas aeruginosa TMK (PaTMK), was identified by the analysis of the binding mode of thymidine or TP5A in a PaTMK homology model. This hit (1) was co-crystallized with PaTMK, and several potent PaTMK inhibitors (leads, 46, 47, 48, and 56, IC50 = 100–200 nM) were synthesized using computer aided design approaches including virtual synthesis/screening, which was used to guide the design of inhibitors. The binding mode of the optimized leads in PaTMK overlaps with that of other bacterial TMKs, but not with human TMK which shares few common features with the bacterial enzymes. Therefore, the optimized TMK inhibitors described here should be useful for the development of antibacterial agents targeting TMK without undesired off-target effects. In addition, an inhibition mechanism associated with the LID loop, which mimics the process of phosphate transfer from ATP to dTMP, was proposed based on X-ray co-crystal structures, homology models, and SAR results. PMID:22243413

  6. Comprehensive assay of kinase catalytic activity reveals features of kinase inhibitor selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiadis, Theonie; Deacon, Sean W.; Devarajan, Karthik; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors are central tools for elucidating cellular signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic agents. Due to evolutionary conservation of the ATP-binding site, most kinase inhibitors that target this site promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases. Interpretation of experiments utilizing these compounds is confounded by a lack of data on the comprehensive kinase selectivity of most inhibitors. Here we profiled the activity of 178 commercially available kinase inhibitors against a panel of 300 recombinant protein kinases using a functional assay. Quantitative analysis revealed complex and often unexpected kinase-inhibitor interactions, with a wide spectrum of promiscuity. Many off-target interactions occur with seemingly unrelated kinases, revealing how large-scale profiling can be used to identify multi-targeted inhibitors of specific, diverse kinases. The results have significant implications for drug development and provide a resource for selecting compounds to elucidate kinase function and for interpreting the results of experiments that use them. PMID:22037377

  7. Robust versatile tyrosine kinase assay for HTS in drug discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Sudhir S.; Mineyev, I.; Owicki, John C.

    1999-04-01

    A fluorescence polarization assay was developed as an alternative to the radiolabeled SPA assays currently used to monitor the activity of tyrosine kinases in drug discovery. The assay can be used with enzymes having substrate specificity similar to that of the insulin receptor, the EGF receptor and the Src kinase receptor enzymes. The assay is easy to configure in 96, 384 and 1536-well microplates in assay volumes ranging from (mu) L with minimal efforts. The reconstituted reagents are stable for up to 24 hr at ambient temperatures, thereby minimizing the need for replenishing the stock solutions during the course of a high-throughput screen. Because of the stability and equilibrium kinetics, the assay allows the user the luxury of scheduling the reading of plates any time up to 24 hr after the completion of the assay without substantial deterioration in the assay signal. The antibody and the tracer solutions can also be premixed and added as a preformed complex in a single step. The performance of the assay with the insulin receptor kinase is described. In addition, given the diversity of the substrates used in measuring the activity of different tyrosine kinases, LJL's on-going efforts to provide different antibodies of wide ranging specificity and sensitivity are described.

  8. [Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay for in vitro determination of PKA activity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Yan-lin; Liu, Qian; Chen, Chen; Qin, Yuan-yuan; Wu, Gui-yan; Gao, Hua

    2012-07-01

    To establish a simple, convenient and harmless non-radioactive method of determining protein kinase A (PKA) activity in vitro. Human PKAα cDNA was amplified from total RNA of HEK293 cells using RT-PCR method and then cloned into pGEX-6p-1 vector. In vitro purified GST-PKAα protein was identified by Western blot analysis. Finally, a non-radioactive method, Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay, was employed to determine the kinase activity of purified GST-PKAα. After the optimization of the induction conditions, we purified GST-PKAα protein successfully. We then determined GST-PKAα activity using Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay. We also further confirmed the kinase activity of GST-PKAα using H-89, a specific PKA inhibitor, and determined its IC(50); value (35.2±3.97) nmol/L which is consistent with reported value. The non-radioactive Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay is a simple, convenient and harmless method of determining the kinase activity of PKA. This method is effective for pre-clinical high-throughput screening of PKA inhibitor, discovering novel target proteins of PKA and investigating PKA phosphorylation sites in target proteins.

  9. A fluorescent plate reader assay for ceramide kinase.

    PubMed

    Don, Anthony S; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-04-15

    Ceramide kinase and its product ceramide 1-phosphate have been implicated in cellular proliferation and survival, activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), mast cell degranulation, and phagocytosis. Current assays for ceramide kinase activity employ [(32)P]ATP, with separation of labeled product from excess ATP by organic extraction and thin-layer chromatography. We have developed a fluorescent plate reader assay for ceramide kinase that uses commercially available C6-NBD ceramide (N-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]hexanoyl}-D-erythro-sphingosine). Our assay is based on the differential partitioning of substrate and product following a single chloroform/methanol extraction. The product, which partitions into the aqueous phase at physiological pH, is quantitated directly in a plate reader. The substrate may be delivered using either fatty acid-free albumin or detergent/lipid mixed micelles, and we have found that the use of albumin rather than detergent micelles allows one to detect lipid interactions with the enzyme that might otherwise go unnoticed. Our method is useful for assaying ceramide kinase activity both in vitro and in cultured cells, and it offers several advantages over the conventional assay, including greater speed, the ability to run a larger number of assay replicates at one time, and the elimination of environmental and safety issues associated with the use of radioactive materials.

  10. Comparison of the luminescent ADP-Glo assay to a standard radiometric assay for measurement of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Li, Rick; Yan, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Many assay technologies have been developed and utilized to efficiently assay and screen against protein kinase targets. The radiometric assay format for assaying the protein kinase targets has been considered the "Gold Standard" format since it allows the direct readout of kinase functional activity and is a universal assay that is highly sensitive. However, the hazardous nature of the radiometric assay together with the regulatory hurdles has led to the development of alternative assay formats for assessing protein kinase activity measurements. The luminescent ADP-Glo assay has been developed as an alternative to radiometric format for assaying protein kinase targets. This assay allows the measurement of the ADP product formed during the kinase reaction. Therefore, the luminescent ADP-Glo assay is similar to the radiometric format in that it measures the direct product of the protein kinase reaction. Furthermore, since the ADP product is generated by all protein kinase reactions, this is a universal format that can be used for assaying any given protein kinase target. Analysis of data generated with multiple protein kinase targets and the luminescent ADP-Glo technology shows comparable results to the radiometric assay format. Therefore, the luminescent ADP-Glo assay is a robust new technology for evaluating catalytic function of protein kinases as well as other ATPases.

  11. The assay of pyruvate kinase activity in gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Orwell, R L; Thornton, H C; Piper, D W

    1975-05-01

    Pyruvate kinase activity in gastric mucosal supernatant preparations shows large responses to exogenous effectors. At pH 7.5, fructose 1,6-diphosphate can cause large stimulations in activity. Alanine inhibits the reaction but this effect is partially reversed by fructose 1,6-diphosphate. In the absence of these compounds, 4.0-5.0 mM phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is required to generate maximal activity in the assay system used. Electrophoresis reveals an isoenzyme pattern containing only one form of pyruvate kinase, an M isoenzyme, in both fundic and antral mucosa. The pyruvate kinase of gastric mucosa thus resembles the M-type enzymes of leucocytes and liver. Measurements of activity at both 1.0 mM PEP and 4.0--5.0 mM PEP, with and without additions of fructose 1,6-diphosphate, are recommended for the reliable estimation of pyruvate kinase activity in this tissue.

  12. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  13. Designing, synthesis of selective and high-affinity chalcone-benzothiazole hybrids as Brugia malayi thymidylate kinase inhibitors: In vitro validation and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sashidhara, Koneni V; Avula, Srinivasa Rao; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Singh, L Ravithej; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Gupta, Jyoti; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja; Rathaur, Sushma; Saxena, Anil K; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2015-10-20

    In our continuing search for safe and efficacious antifilarials, a series of novel chalcone-benzothiazole hybrids have been synthesized and evaluated for their Brugia malayi thymidylate kinase (BmTMK) enzyme inhibition activity. Their selectivity towards BmTMK was studied and compared to the human TMK (HsTMK) by an in silico method. Out of seventeen derivatives, compounds 34 and 42 showed higher interactions with the BmTMK active site. MolDock docking model revealed the interactions of these two derivatives and the results corroborated well with their in vitro antifilarial activities. Our studies suggest that these hybrids are selective towards the BmTMK enzyme and may serve as potential therapeutic agents against filariasis.

  14. A Fluorescence-Based Thermal Shift Assay Identifies Inhibitors of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sankar N.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Mishra, Rama K.; Xu, Li; Scheidt, Karl A.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second highest cause of cancer death in United States males. If the metastatic movement of PCa cells could be inhibited, then mortality from PCa could be greatly reduced. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) has previously been shown to activate pro-invasion signaling pathways in human PCa. Recognizing that MAP2K4 represents a novel and validated therapeutic target, we sought to develop and characterize an efficient process for the identification of small molecules that target MAP2K4. Using a fluorescence-based thermal shift assay (FTS) assay, we first evaluated an 80 compound library of known kinase inhibitors, thereby identifying 8 hits that thermally stabilized MAP2K4 in a concentration dependent manner. We then developed an in vitro MAP2K4 kinase assay employing the biologically relevant downstream substrates, JNK1 and p38 MAPK, to evaluate kinase inhibitory function. In this manner, we validated the performance of our initial FTS screen. We next applied this approach to a 2000 compound chemically diverse library, identified 7 hits, and confirmed them in the in vitro kinase assay. Finally, by coupling our structure-activity relationship data to MAP2K4's crystal structure, we constructed a model for ligand binding. It predicts binding of our identified inhibitory compounds to the ATP binding pocket. Herein we report the creation of a robust inhibitor-screening platform with the ability to inform the discovery and design of new and potent MAP2K4 inhibitors. PMID:24339940

  15. Evaluation of the enzyme activity of protozoan protein kinases by using an in vitro kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    The life cycles of parasites are more complicated than those of other biological species. Protein kinases (PKs) encoded by parasites are the main triggers of life stage conversions. Phosphorylation by cellular PKs regulates important cellular processes, and the protozoan genome contains many PKs. Some PK inhibitors inhibit specific parasite life cycle event. In this report, I present a practical approach to expressing and purifying protozoan PKs by using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and I assess the phosphorylation activities of protozoan PKs by using an in vitro kinase assay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assay for isolation of inhibitors of her2-kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Chiosis, Gabriela; Keeton, Adam B

    2009-01-01

    Her2 (ErbB2) protein is overexpressed in breast and other solid tumors, and its expression is associated with progressive disease. Current therapies directed toward Her2 either block dimerization of the receptor or inhibit tyrosine kinase activity to disrupt intracellular signaling. However, little is known about alternative mechanisms for suppressing Her2 expression, possibly by inducing degradation or blocking synthesis. Here, we describe a hybrid western-blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) designed to identify in low- to medium-throughput format noncytotoxic compounds that reduce expression of Her2 protein.

  17. Comparison of luminescence ADP production assay and radiometric scintillation proximity assay for Cdc7 kinase.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshimitsu; Shum, David; Parisi, Monika; Santos, Ruth E; Radu, Constantin; Calder, Paul; Rizvi, Zahra; Frattini, Mark G; Djaballah, Hakim

    2011-09-01

    Several assay technologies have been successfully adapted and used in HTS to screen for protein kinase inhibitors; however, emerging comparative analysis studies report very low hit overlap between the different technologies, which challenges the working assumption that hit identification is not dependent on the assay method of choice. To help address this issue, we performed two screens on the cancer target, Cdc7-Dbf4 heterodimeric protein kinase, using a direct assay detection method measuring [(33)P]-phosphate incorporation into the substrate and an indirect method measuring residual ADP production using luminescence. We conducted the two screens under similar conditions, where in one, we measured [(33)P]-phosphate incorporation using scintillation proximity assay (SPA), and in the other, we detected luminescence signal of the ATP-dependent luciferase after regenerating ATP from residual ADP (LUM). Surprisingly, little or no correlation were observed between the positives identified by the two methods; at a threshold of 30% inhibition, 25 positives were identified in the LUM screen whereas the SPA screen only identified two positives, Tannic acid and Gentian violet, with Tannic acid being common to both. We tested 20 out of the 25 positive compounds in secondary confirmatory study and confirmed 12 compounds including Tannic acid as Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase inhibitors. Gentian violet, which was only positive in the SPA screen, inhibited luminescence detection and categorized as a false positive. This report demonstrates the strong impact in detection format on the success of a screening campaign and the importance of carefully designed confirmatory assays to eliminate those compounds that target the detection part of the assay.

  18. Novel detection method for chemiluminescence derived from the Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay platform: Advantages over traditional microplate luminometers

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ryan A.V.; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of cellular signal transduction is of paramount importance for the proper functioning of a cell and an organism as a whole. Protein kinases are responsible for much of this transmission and thus have been the focal point of extensive research. While there are numerous commercially available protein kinase assays, the Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay (Promega) provides an easy-to-use and high throughput platform for determining protein kinase activity. This assay is said to require the use of a microplate spectrophotometer capable of detecting a luminescent signal. This study shows that:•The ChemiGenius Bioimaging system (Syngene), typically used for visualizing chemiluminescence from Western blots, provides an alternative detection system for Kinase-Glo luminescence.•The novel detection system confers an advantage over traditional luminometers, in that it allows visualization of the luminescent wells, which allows for the real-time analysis and correction of experimental errors (i.e. bubble formation).•Determining kinase kinetics using this detection system produced comparable results to previous studies on the same enzyme (i.e. glycogen synthase kinase 3). PMID:26150941

  19. Novel detection method for chemiluminescence derived from the Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay platform: Advantages over traditional microplate luminometers.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of cellular signal transduction is of paramount importance for the proper functioning of a cell and an organism as a whole. Protein kinases are responsible for much of this transmission and thus have been the focal point of extensive research. While there are numerous commercially available protein kinase assays, the Kinase-Glo luminescent kinase assay (Promega) provides an easy-to-use and high throughput platform for determining protein kinase activity. This assay is said to require the use of a microplate spectrophotometer capable of detecting a luminescent signal. This study shows that:•The ChemiGenius Bioimaging system (Syngene), typically used for visualizing chemiluminescence from Western blots, provides an alternative detection system for Kinase-Glo luminescence.•The novel detection system confers an advantage over traditional luminometers, in that it allows visualization of the luminescent wells, which allows for the real-time analysis and correction of experimental errors (i.e. bubble formation).•Determining kinase kinetics using this detection system produced comparable results to previous studies on the same enzyme (i.e. glycogen synthase kinase 3).

  20. Novel ABP1-TMK auxin sensing system controls ROP GTPase-mediated interdigitated cell expansion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jisheng; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2014-06-30

    ROP GTPases (Rho-like GTPase from plants), plant counterparts of animal and fungal Rho-family GTPases, have recently been shown to be key components of a novel signaling pathway activated by the plant hormone auxin. Auxin (indole acetic acid) is a key regulator of virtually every aspect of plant growth and development, yet the molecular mechanisms of auxin responses remain largely unknown. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is an ancient protein that binds auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses, but its precise mechanism remains unresolved. A paradox for ABP1's action is that it is predominantly found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen, while it has been implicated as a cell surface auxin receptor, functionally distinct from the nuclear TIR1/AFB auxin receptor family that regulates transcriptional responses. Since our group reported that ABP1 is required for activating two antagonizing ROP signaling pathways involved in cytoskeletal reorganization and cell shape formation in Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells, we recently further showed that the plasma membrane-localized TMK receptor-like kinases functionally interact in a complex with ABP1 and are required for ABP1-dependent activation of ROP GTPases by auxin. The formation of this cell surface complex is induced by auxin and requires functional ABP1. These exciting findings provide convincing evidence for this novel auxin sensing system on the cell surface and suggest intriguing mechanisms for TMKs being functional partners of ABP1 to transmit extracellular auxin signal to intracellular ROP signaling module during polar cell expansion.

  1. Multiplexing terbium- and europium-based TR-FRET readouts to increase kinase assay capacity.

    PubMed

    Horton, Robert A; Vogel, Kurt W

    2010-09-01

    Identification and characterization of kinase inhibitor potency and selectivity is often an iterative process in which a library of compounds is first screened against a single kinase, and hits from that screen are then profiled against other kinases to determine specificity. By developing kinase assays that employ either a terbium- or a europium-based time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) readout, one can take advantage of the distinct emission properties of these labels to develop assays for 2 kinases that can be performed simultaneously in the same well. This not only increases the information content provided per assay well but can immediately provide information on compound specificity. The authors have applied this strategy to the development of multiplexed assays for 2 examples systems: EGFR and IKKbeta, as well as lipid kinase family members mTOR and PIK3C3. They demonstrate the ability of these multiplexed assays to characterize selective kinase inhibitors in a dose-response mode, with no difference in results obtained from traditional single kinase assays performed separately.

  2. Screening of Microbial Extracts for Anticancer Compounds Using Streptomyces Kinase Inhibitor Assay.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Prashant; Bhave, Sarita; Vartak, Ashwini; Kulkarni-Almeida, Asha; Mahajan, Girish; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic kinases are known to play an important role in signal transduction pathways by phosphorylating their respective substrates. Abnormal phosphorylations by these kinases have resulted in diseases. Hence inhibitors of kinases are of considerable pharmaceutical interest for a wide variety of disease targets, especially cancers. A number of reports have been published which indicate that eukaryotic-like kinases may complement two-component kinase systems in several bacteria. In Streptomyces sp. such kinases have been found to have a role in formation of aerial hyphae, spores, pigmentation & even in antibiotic production in some strains. Eukaryotic kinase inhibitors are seen to inhibit formation of aerial mycelia in Streptomyces without inhibiting vegetative mycelia. This property has been used to design an assay to screen for eukaryotic kinase inhibitors. The assay involves testing of compounds against Streptomyces 85E ATCC 55824 using agar well diffusion method. Inhibitors of kinases give rise to "bald" colonies where aerial mycelia and sporulation inhibition is seen. The assay has been standardized using known eukaryotic protein kinase inhibiting anticancer agents like AG-490, AG-1295, AG-1478, Flavopiridol and Imatinib as positive controls, at a concentration ranging from 10 μg/well to 100 μg/well. Anti-infective compounds which are not reported to inhibit eukaryotic protein kinases were used as negative controls. A number of microbial cultures have been screened for novel eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Further these microbial extracts were tested in various cancer cell lines like Panel, HCT116, Calul, ACHN and H460 at a concentration of 10 μg/mL/ well. The anticancer data was seen correlating well with the Streptomyces kinase assay thus validating the assay.

  3. Measuring Activity of Phosphoinositide Lipid Kinases Using a Bioluminescent ADP-Detecting Assay.

    PubMed

    Tai, Andrew W; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) and its phosphorylated derivatives, collectively called phosphoinositides, are important second messengers involved in a variety of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, and migration. These derivatives are generated by a family of kinases called phosphoinositide lipid kinases (PIKs). Due to the central role of these kinases in signaling pathways, assays for measuring their activity are often used for drug development. Lipid kinase substrates are present in unique membrane environments in vivo and are insoluble in aqueous solutions. Therefore the most important consideration in developing successful lipid kinase assays is the physical state of lipid kinase substrates. Here we describe the preparation of lipid substrates for two major classes of lipid kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) and phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks). Using PI4Ks as an example, we also provide a detailed protocol for small-scale kinase expression and affinity purification from transiently transfected mammalian cells. For measuring lipid kinase activity we apply a universal bioluminescent ADP detection approach. The approach is compatible with diverse lipid substrates and can be used as a single integrated platform for measuring all classes of lipid and protein kinases.

  4. Simultaneous inhibition assay for human and microbial kinases via MALDI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anne Marie E; Brennan, John D

    2014-03-03

    Selective inhibition of one kinase over another is a critical issue in drug development. For antimicrobial development, it is particularly important to selectively inhibit bacterial kinases, which can phosphorylate antimicrobial compounds such as aminoglycosides, without affecting human kinases. Previous work from our group showed the development of a MALDI-MS/MS assay for the detection of small molecule modulators of the bacterial aminoglycoside kinase APH3'IIIa. Herein, we demonstrate the development of an enhanced kinase MALDI-MS/MS assay involving simultaneous assaying of two kinase reactions, one for APH3'IIIa, and the other for human protein kinase A (PKA), which leads to an output that provides direct information on selectivity and mechanism of action. Specificity of the respective enzyme substrates were verified, and the assay was validated through generation of Z'-factors of 0.55 for APH3'IIIa with kanamycin and 0.60 for PKA with kemptide. The assay was used to simultaneously screen a kinase-directed library of mixtures of ten compounds each against both enzymes, leading to the identification of selective inhibitors for each enzyme as well as one non-selective inhibitor following mixture deconvolution.

  5. ADP-Glo: A Bioluminescent and homogeneous ADP monitoring assay for kinases.

    PubMed

    Zegzouti, Hicham; Zdanovskaia, Marina; Hsiao, Kevin; Goueli, Said A

    2009-12-01

    ADP-Glo is a novel bioluminescent, homogeneous assay for monitoring ADP producing biochemical reactions and thus it is an ideal assay for detecting enzyme activity using a wide variety of substrates. It is a universal assay that can be used with protein kinases, lipid kinases, sugar kinases, and many more kinases as well as ATPases. Because of its high sensitivity, it is suitable for monitoring enzyme activities at very early substrate conversions requiring very low amount of enzymes. Furthermore, as the assay is applicable to a broad range of ATP and substrate concentrations, it is optimal for enzymes that require high ATP and substrate concentrations. This is critical since inhibitor potency has to be demonstrated at the cellular level where ATP is present at millimolar concentrations. ADP-Glo is performed in 2 steps upon completion of kinase reaction: a combined termination of kinase reaction and depletion of remaining ATP in the first step, and conversion of generated ADP to ATP and the newly produced ATP to light output using luciferase/luciferin reaction in the second step. The luminescent signal generated is proportional to the ADP concentration produced and is correlated with the kinase activity. Due to its high signal to background and luminescent readout, this assay is less susceptible to generation of false hits and thus it is applicable to not only primary and secondary screening but also kinase profiling.

  6. A high-throughput, multiplexed kinase assay using a benchtop orbitrap mass spectrometer to investigate the effect of kinase inhibitors on kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Ryan C; McAllister, Fiona E; Rush, John; Gygi, Steven P

    2012-07-17

    Protein phosphorylation is an important and ubiquitous post-translational modification in eukaryotic biological systems. The KAYAK (Kinase ActivitY Assay for Kinome profiling) assay measures the phosphorylation rates of dozens of peptide substrates simultaneously, directly from cell lysates. Here, we simplified the assay by removing the phosphopeptide enrichment step, increasing throughput while maintaining similar data quality. We term this new method, direct-KAYAK, because kinase activities were measured directly from reaction mixtures after desalting. In addition, new peptides were included to profile additional kinase pathways and redundant substrate peptides were removed. Finally, the method is now performed in 96-well plate format using a benchtop orbitrap mass spectrometer and the Pinpoint software package for improved data analysis. We applied the new high-throughput method to measure IC(50) values for kinases involved in monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation, a process important for inflammation and the immune response.

  7. Quantifying Kinase-Specific Phosphorylation Stoichiometry Using Stable Isotope Labeling In a Reverse In-Gel Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Cox, Jonathan T; Huang, Weiliang; Kane, Maureen; Tang, Keqi; Bieberich, Charles J

    2016-12-06

    Despite recent advancements in large-scale phosphoproteomics, methods to quantify kinase-specific phosphorylation stoichiometry of protein substrates are lacking. We developed a method to quantify kinase-specific phosphorylation stoichiometry by combining the reverse in-gel kinase assay (RIKA) with high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Beginning with predetermined ratios of phosphorylated to nonphosphorylated protein kinase CK2 (CK2) substrate molecules, we employed (18)O-labeled adenosine triphosphate ((18)O-ATP) as the phosphate donor in a RIKA, then quantified the ratio of (18)O- versus (16)O-labeled tryptic phosphopeptide using high mass accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). We demonstrate that the phosphorylation stoichiometry determined by this method across a broad percent phosphorylation range correlated extremely well with the predicted value (correlation coefficient = 0.99). This approach provides a quantitative alternative to antibody-based methods of determining the extent of phosphorylation of a substrate pool.

  8. Development of a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for ATM kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kexiao; Shelat, Anang A; Guy, R Kiplin; Kastan, Michael B

    2014-04-01

    The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein kinase is a major regulator of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA lesions that can be caused by ionizing irradiation (IR), oxidative damage, or exposure to certain chemical agents. In response to DSBs, the ATM kinase is activated and subsequently phosphorylates numerous downstream substrates, including p53, Chk2, BRCA1, and KAP1, which affect processes such as cell cycle progression and DNA repair. Numerous studies have demonstrated that loss of ATM function results in enhanced sensitivity to ionizing irradiation in clinically relevant dose ranges, suggesting that ATM kinase is an attractive therapeutic target for enhancing tumor cell kill with radiotherapy. Previously identified small-molecule ATM kinase inhibitors, such as CP466722 and Ku55933, were identified using in vitro kinase assays carried out with recombinant ATM kinase isolated from mammalian cells. Since it has not been feasible to express full-length recombinant ATM in bacterial or baculovirus systems, a robust in vitro screening tool has been lacking. We have developed a cell-based assay that is robust, straightforward, and sensitive. Using this high-throughput assay, we screened more than 7000 compounds and discovered additional small molecules that inhibit the ATM kinase and further validated these hits by secondary assays.

  9. Phosphatase-coupled universal kinase assay and kinetics for first-order-rate coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L

    2011-01-01

    Kinases use adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as the donor substrate and generate adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) as a product. An ADP-based phosphatase-coupled kinase assay is described here. In this assay, CD39L2, a nucleotidase, is added into a kinase reaction to hydrolyze ADP to AMP and phosphate. The phosphate is subsequently detected using malachite green phosphate-detection reagents. As ADP hydrolysis by CD39L2 displays a first-order rate constant, relatively simple equations are derived to calculate the coupling rate and the lagging time of the coupling reaction, allowing one to obtain kinase kinetic parameters without the completion of the coupling reaction. ATP inhibition of CD39L2-catalyzed ADP hydrolysis is also determined for correction of the kinetic data. As examples, human glucokinase, P. chrysogenum APS kinase and human ERK1, kinases specific for sugar, nucleotide and protein respectively, are assayed. To assess the compatibility of the method for high-throughput assays, Z' factors >0.5 are also obtained for the three kinases.

  10. KINATEST-ID: a pipeline to develop phosphorylation-dependent terbium sensitizing kinase assays.

    PubMed

    Lipchik, Andrew M; Perez, Minervo; Bolton, Scott; Dumrongprechachan, Vasin; Ouellette, Steven B; Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L

    2015-02-25

    Nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases (NRTKs) are essential for cellular homeostasis and thus are a major focus of current drug discovery efforts. Peptide substrates that can enhance lanthanide ion luminescence upon tyrosine phosphorylation enable rapid, sensitive screening of kinase activity, however design of suitable substrates that can distinguish between tyrosine kinase families is a huge challenge. Despite their different substrate preferences, many NRTKs are structurally similar even between families. Furthermore, the development of lanthanide-based kinase assays is hampered by incomplete understanding of how to integrate sequence selectivity with metal ion binding, necessitating laborious iterative substrate optimization. We used curated proteomic data from endogenous kinase substrates and known Tb(3+)-binding sequences to build a generalizable in silico pipeline with tools to generate, screen, align, and select potential phosphorylation-dependent Tb(3+)-sensitizing substrates that are most likely to be kinase specific. We demonstrated the approach by developing several substrates that are selective within kinase families and amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) applications. Overall, this strategy represents a pipeline for developing efficient and specific assays for virtually any tyrosine kinase that use HTS-compatible lanthanide-based detection. The tools provided in the pipeline also have the potential to be adapted to identify peptides for other purposes, including other enzyme assays or protein-binding ligands.

  11. KINATEST-ID™: A PIPELINE TO DEVELOP PHOSPHORYLATION-DEPENDENT TERBIUM SENSITIZING KINASE ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    Lipchik, Andrew M.; Perez, Minervo; Bolton, Scott; Dumrongprechachan, Vasin; Ouellette, Steven B.; Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L.

    2015-01-01

    Non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases (NRTKs) are essential for cellular homeostasis, and thus are a major focus of current drug discovery efforts. Peptide substrates that can enhance lanthanide ion luminescence upon tyrosine phosphorylation enable rapid, sensitive screening of kinase activity, however design of suitable substrates that can distinguish between tyrosine kinase families is a huge challenge. Despite their different substrate preferences, many NRTKs are structurally similar even between families. Furthermore, the development of lanthanide-based kinase assays is hampered by incomplete understanding of how to integrate sequence selectivity with metal ion binding, necessitating laborious iterative substrate optimization. We used curated proteomic data from endogenous kinase substrates and known Tb3+-binding sequences to build a generalizable in silico pipeline with tools to generate, screen, align and select potential phosphorylation-dependent Tb3+-sensitizing substrates that are most likely to be kinase specific. We demonstrated the approach by developing several substrates that are selective within kinase families and amenable to HTS applications. Overall, this strategy represents a pipeline for developing efficient and specific assays for virtually any tyrosine kinase that use high throughput screening-compatible lanthanide-based detection. The tools provided in the pipeline also have the potential to be adapted to identify peptides for other purposes, including other enzyme assays or protein binding ligands. PMID:25689372

  12. Comparative Analysis of a FRET-based PLK1 Kinase Assay to Identify PLK1 inhibitors for Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sol-Bi; Woo, Sang-Uk; Lee, Young-Joo; Yim, Hyungshin

    2017-03-01

    Advanced techniques for detecting kinase inhibitors are in demand due to limitations of traditional approaches. Here, we used a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinase assay, a sensitive fluorescence turn-on biosensing platform, to identify a Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitor. The assay was developed with the Z'-Lyte™ FRET-peptide and PLK1 kinase purified from a baculovirus expression system. Using PLK1 inhibitors, sensitivity and efficiency of this FRET-based PLK1 kinase assay were compared to those of radioisotope-based and immunoblot-based assays. Although the inhibitory activity of BI 2536 against PLK1 kinase in each assay was almost the same, the FRET-based PLK1 kinase assay was much easier, faster, safer, and more convenient than a radioisotope-based assay or an immunoblot-based traditional kinase assay. From our findings, we suggest that a FRET-based PLK1 kinase assay is an advanced tool which overcomes the limitations of previous traditional kinase assays to detect kinase inhibitors for the development of anticancer drugs. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Steven B.; Noel, Brett M.; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  14. A novel quantitative kinase assay using bacterial surface display and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Thorstholm, Louise; Huang, Yen-Hua; Getz, Jennifer A; Daugherty, Patrick S; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    The inhibition of tyrosine kinases is a successful approach for the treatment of cancers and the discovery of kinase inhibitor drugs is the focus of numerous academic and pharmaceutical laboratories. With this goal in mind, several strategies have been developed to measure kinase activity and to screen novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nevertheless, a general non-radioactive and inexpensive approach, easy to implement and adapt to a range of applications, is still missing. Herein, using Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, an oncogenic target and a model protein for cancer studies, we describe a novel cost-effective high-throughput screening kinase assay. In this approach, named the BacKin assay, substrates displayed on a Bacterial cell surface are incubated with Kinase and their phosphorylation is examined and quantified by flow cytometry. This approach has several advantages over existing approaches, as using bacteria (i.e. Escherichia coli) to display peptide substrates provides a self renewing solid support that does not require laborious chemical strategies. Here we show that the BacKin approach can be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies, as well as a platform to characterize and identify small-molecule or peptide-based kinase inhibitors with potential applications in drug development.

  15. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowers gastric adenocarcinoma TMK1 cell proliferation via bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Yu Le; Cho, C.H.

    2008-06-27

    Proteasome inhibitor is a novel class of cancer therapeutics, of which the mechanism of action is not fully understood. It is reported that proteasome inhibitor enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in osteoblasts to stimulate bone formation. BMP signaling is also an important tumor-suppressing pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine the anti-mitogenic effect of proteasome inhibition in relation to BMP signaling in gastric cancer cells. Results showed that proteasome inhibitor MG-132 significantly suppressed the proliferation and the colony-forming ability of gastric cancer TMK1 cells. In this connection, MG-132 activated BMP signaling, manifested as an increase in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and up-regulation of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of BMP receptor II by RNA interference abolished Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction, and the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by MG-132. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 up-regulated the expression of BMP1 and BMP4 and suppressed the expression of Smad6. Knockdown of Smad6 also mimicked the effect of MG-132 on BMP signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of proteasome suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation via activation of BMP signaling. This discovery may open up a novel therapeutic avenue to proteasome inhibitors for the management of gastric cancer.

  16. EphB4 cellular kinase activity assayed using an enzymatic protein interaction system.

    PubMed

    Wehrman, Tom; Nguyen, Mimi; Feng, Wei; Bader, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are important players in various cellular processes, including proliferation, migration, metabolism, and neuronal development. EphB4 RTK is essential for the development of a functional arterial-venous network in embryonic and adult neoangiogenesis. To develop novel inhibitors of EphB4 that might have applications in severe diseases like cancer and retinopathies, assays need to be in place that resemble, in a most physiological fashion, the activation and downstream function of the kinase. In addition, such assays need to be amenable to high-throughput screening to serve efficiently the modern drug discovery processes in the pharmaceutical industry. The authors have developed an enzyme fragment complementation assay that measures the interaction of a downstream docking protein to the activated and phosphorylated full-length EphB4 kinase in cells. The assay is specific, robust, and amenable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. It covers most steps in the activation process of EphB4, including ligand binding, autophosphorylation, and docking of a downstream interactor. This assay format can be transferred to other RTKs and adds an important cell-based kinase assay option to researchers in the field.

  17. Development and Application of a High-Throughput Fluorescence Polarization Assay to Target Pim Kinases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongho; Hong, Victor Sukbong

    2016-01-01

    Pim proteins consisting of three isoforms (Pim-1, Pim-2, and Pim-3) are a family of serine/threonine kinases that regulate fundamental cellular responses such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Overexpression of the Pim kinases has been linked to a wide variety of hematological and solid tumors. Thus, all three Pim kinases have been studied as promising targets for anticancer therapy. Here, we report on the development and optimization of an immobilized metal ion affinity partitioning (IMAP) fluorescence polarization (FP) method for Pim kinases. In this homogeneous 384-well assay method, fluorescein-labeled phosphopeptides are captured on cationic nanoparticles through interactions with immobilized trivalent metals, resulting in high polarization values. The apparent Km values for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were determined to be 45 ± 7, 6.4 ± 2, and 29 ± 5 μM for Pim-1, Pim-2, and Pim-3, respectively. The assay yielded robustness with Z'-factors of >0.75 and low day-to-day variability (CV <5%) for all three Pim kinases. The IMAP FP assay was further validated by determining IC50 values for staurosporine and a known Pim inhibitor. We have also used an IMAP FP assay to examine whether compound 1, an ATP mimetic inhibitor designed through structure-based drug design, is indeed an ATP-competitive inhibitor of Pim kinases. Kinetic analysis based on Lineweaver-Burk plots showed that the inhibition mechanism of compound 1 is ATP competitive against all three Pim isoforms. The optimized IMAP assay for Pim kinases not only allows for high-throughput screening but also facilitates the characterization of novel Pim inhibitors for drug development.

  18. Application of a coupled enzyme assay to characterize nicotinamide riboside kinases.

    PubMed

    Dölle, Christian; Ziegler, Mathias

    2009-02-15

    The recently identified nicotinamide riboside kinases (Nrks) constitute a distinct pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Here we present the combination of an established optical adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) test, the pyruvate kinase/lactate dehydrogenase system, with the Nrk-catalyzed reaction to determine kinetic properties of these enzymes, in particular affinities for ATP. The assay allows variation of both nucleoside and phosphate donor substrates, thereby providing major advantages for the characterization of these enzymes. We confirm previously established kinetic parameters and identify differences in substrate selectivity between the two human Nrk isoforms. The proposed assay is inexpensive and may be applied for high-throughput screening.

  19. A Magnetic Bead-Based Protein Kinase Assay with Dual Detection Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangchang; Sylvester, Juliesta E.; Wu, Ding; Veach, Darren R.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel magnetic bead-based protein kinase assay was developed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and immuno-chemifluorescence as two independent detection techniques. Abltide substrate was immobilized onto magnetic beads via non-covalent biotin-streptavidin interactions. This non-covalent immobilization strategy facilitated peptide release and allowed MALDI-TOF MS analysis of substrate phosphorylation. The use of magnetic beads provided rapid sample handling and allowed secondary analysis by immuno-chemifluorescence to determine the degree of substrate phosphorylation. This dual detection technique was used to evaluate the inhibition of c-Abl kinase by imatinib and dasatinib. For each inhibitor, IC50 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) values determined by these two different detection methods were consistent and close to values reported in the literature. The high-throughput potential of this new approach to kinase assays was preliminarily demonstrated by screening a chemical library consisting of 31 compounds against c-Abl kinase using a 96-well plate. In this proof-of-principle experiment, both MALDI-TOF MS and immuno-chemifluorescence were able to compare inhibitor potencies with consistent values. Dual detection may significantly enhance the reliability of chemical library screening and identify false positives and negatives. Formatted for 96-well plates and with high-throughput potential, this dual detection kinase assay may provide a rapid, reliable and inexpensive route to the discovery of small molecule drug leads. PMID:20807497

  20. Detecting kinase activities from single cell lysate using concentration-enhanced mobility shift assay.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Lih Feng; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Kolitz, Sarah; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-08-05

    Electrokinetic preconcentration coupled with mobility shift assays can give rise to very high detection sensitivities. We describe a microfluidic device that utilizes this principle to detect cellular kinase activities by simultaneously concentrating and separating substrate peptides with different phosphorylation states. This platform is capable of reliably measuring kinase activities of single adherent cells cultured in nanoliter volume microwells. We also describe a novel method utilizing spacer peptides that significantly increase separation resolution while maintaining high concentration factors in this device. Thus, multiplexed kinase measurements can be implemented with single cell sensitivity. Multiple kinase activity profiling from single cell lysate could potentially allow us to study heterogeneous activation of signaling pathways that can lead to multiple cell fates.

  1. A high-throughput, nonisotopic, competitive binding assay for kinases using nonselective inhibitor probes (ED-NSIP).

    PubMed

    Vainshtein, Inna; Silveria, Scott; Kaul, Poonam; Rouhani, Riaz; Eglen, Richard M; Wang, John

    2002-12-01

    A novel competitive binding assay for protein kinase inhibitors has been developed for high-throughput screening (HTS). Unlike functional kinase assays, which are based on detection of substrate phosphorylation by the enzyme, this novel method directly measures the binding potency of compounds to the kinase ATP binding site through competition with a conjugated binding probe. The binding interaction is coupled to a signal amplification system based on complementation of beta-galactosidase enzyme fragments, a homogeneous, nonisotopic assay technology platform developed by DiscoveRx Corp. In the present study, staurosporine, a potent, nonselective kinase inhibitor, was chemically conjugated to a small fragment of beta-galactosidase (termed ED-SS). This was used as the binding probe to the kinase ATP binding pocket. The binding potencies of several inhibitors with diverse structures were assessed by displacement of ED-SS from the kinase. The assay format was specifically evaluated with GSK3alpha, an enzyme previously screened in a radioactive kinase assay (i.e., measurement of [(33)P]-gamma-ATP incorporation into the kinase peptide substrate). Under optimized assay conditions, nonconjugated staurosporine inhibited ED-SS binding in a concentration-dependent manner with an apparent potency (IC(50)) of 11 nM, which was similar to the IC(50) value determined in a radioactive assay. Furthermore, 9 kinase inhibitors with diverse structures, previously identified from chemical compound library screening, were screened using the competitive binding assay. The potencies in the binding assay were in very good agreement with those obtained previously in the isotopic functional activity assay. The binding assay was adapted for automated HTS using selected compound libraries in a 384-well microtiter plate format. The HTS assay was observed to be highly robust and reproducible (Z' factors > 0.7) with high interassay precision (R(2) > 0.96). Interference of compounds with the beta

  2. TR-FRET binding assay targeting unactivated form of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Asami, Tokiko; Kawahata, Wataru; Sawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) is one of the crucial kinases for the B cell maturation and mast cell activation, and specific inhibitors of BTK are considered to be attractive targets in drug discovery research. In this Letter, we have designed and synthesized a new fluorescent probe for TR-FRET-based high-throughput screening, to identify compounds that preferentially bind to an inactive conformation of BTK which has a unique structural feature. A set of kinase-focused compound library was screened using this assay method, and compound 31 was successfully identified as a potent inhibitor which preferentially bind to the inactive conformation of BTK. These results suggest that this screening method has a great potential for the discovery of novel selective BTK inhibitors.

  3. Western blot analysis of Src kinase assays using peptide substrates ligated to a carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-06-01

    We have applied intein-mediated peptide ligation (IPL) to the use of peptide substrates for kinase assays and subsequent Western blot analysis. IPL allows for the efficient ligation of a synthetic peptide with an N-terminal cysteine residue to an intein-generated carrier protein containing a cysteine reactive C-terminal thioester through a native peptide bond. A distinct advantage of this procedure is that each carrier protein molecule ligates only one peptide, ensuring that the ligation product forms a sharp band on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by mutational analysis of peptide substrates derived from human cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2, which contains a phosphorylation site of human c-Src protein tyrosine kinase.

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer as a versatile tool in the development of homogeneous cellular kinase assays.

    PubMed

    Saville, Lisa; Spais, Chrysanthe; Mason, Jennifer L; Albom, Mark S; Murthy, Seetha; Meyer, Sheryl L; Ator, Mark A; Angeles, Thelma S; Husten, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Homogeneous cellular assays can streamline product detection in the drug discovery process. One commercially available assay employing time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) that detects phosphorylated products was used to evaluate inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL in a cell line expressing an AXL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein. This TR-FRET assay was modified to evaluate the phosphorylation state of the AXL family member MER in a cell line expressing MER with a V5 tag by adding a fluorescein-labeled anti-V5 antibody. This homogeneous cellular assay was further modified to evaluate the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in cell lines that expressed an untagged kinase by the inclusion of a commercially available anti-FAK antibody conjugated with an acceptor dye. The methods described here can be further adapted for TR-FRET detection of other cellular kinase activities.

  5. Modular, Antibody-free Time-Resolved LRET Kinase Assay Enabled by Quantum Dots and Tb3+-sensitizing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent drug screening assays are essential for tyrosine kinase inhibitor discovery. Here we demonstrate a flexible, antibody-free TR-LRET kinase assay strategy that is enabled by the combination of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (QD) acceptors and biotinylated, Tb3+ sensitizing peptide donors. By exploiting the spectral features of Tb3+ and QD, and the high binding affinity of the streptavidin-biotin interaction, we achieved multiplexed detection of kinase activity in a modular fashion without requiring additional covalent labeling of each peptide substrate. This strategy is compatible with high-throughput screening, and should be adaptable to the rapidly changing workflows and targets involved in kinase inhibitor discovery.

  6. Identification of Polo-like kinase 1 interaction inhibitors using a novel cell-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Normandin, Karine; Lavallée, Jean-François; Futter, Marie; Beautrait, Alexandre; Duchaine, Jean; Guiral, Sébastien; Marinier, Anne; Archambault, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) plays several roles in cell division and it is a recognized cancer drug target. Plk1 levels are elevated in cancer and several types of cancer cells are hypersensitive to Plk1 inhibition. Small molecule inhibitors of the kinase domain (KD) of Plk1 have been developed. Their selectivity is limited, which likely contributes to their toxicity. Polo-like kinases are characterized by a Polo-Box Domain (PBD), which mediates interactions with phosphorylation substrates or regulators. Inhibition of the PBD could allow better selectivity or result in different effects than inhibition of the KD. In vitro screens have been used to identify PBD inhibitors with mixed results. We developed the first cell-based assay to screen for PBD inhibitors, using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET). We screened through 112 983 compounds and characterized hits in secondary biochemical and biological assays. Subsequent Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) analysis on our most promising hit revealed that it requires an alkylating function for its activity. In addition, we show that the previously reported PBD inhibitors thymoquinone and Poloxin are also alkylating agents. Our cell-based assay is a promising tool for the identification of new PBD inhibitors with more drug-like profiles using larger and more diverse chemical libraries. PMID:27874094

  7. Synthetic inhibitors of adenylate kinases in the assays for ATPases and phosphokinases.

    PubMed

    Feldhau, P; Fröhlich, T; Goody, R S; Isakov, M; Schirmer, R H

    1975-09-01

    1. Procedures are given for the syntheses of alpha,omega-dinucleoside 5'-polyphosphates as inhibitors of adenylate kinases. The following order for the ability of inhibiting pig muscle adenylate kinase was observed: Ap5A greater than 1:N6-etheno-Ap5A greater than Ap6A greater than Gp5A greater than Ap4A greater than Up5A. The synthesis of adenosine tetraphosphate, the starting material for Ap5A, is also described. 2. One molecule of pig muscle adenylate kinase binds one molecule of Ap5A. The difference spectrum of Ap5A-adenylate kinase with its maximum of 5050 M-1 - cm-1 at 271 nm, as well as the fluorescence properties of 1:N6-etheno-Ap5A can be used for kinetic and binding studies. 3. The specific binding of the negatively charged Ap5A was exploited in the preparation of human muscle adenylate kinase. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity with an overall yield of 65%, the absolute value being 70 mg per kg of muscle. 4. The effect of Ap5A on adenylate kinase in extracts of various cells and cell organelles was tested. A ratio of 1:50 (mol/mol) for Ap5A to other nucleotides was used for suppressing the adenylate kinase activity in extracts of mammalian and insect skeletal muscel, of human erythrocytes and of Staphylococcus aureus. A ratio of 1:5 was found to be necessary for the adenylate kinase from tobacco leaves and spinach chloroplasts, and a ratio of 2:1 was needed for suppressing the adenylate kinase from bovine liver mitochondria, human kidney homogenate and from Escherichia coli. Ap5A appears not to be metabolized in any of the above extracts. These results indicate that Ap5A can be used for evaluating the contribution of adenylate kinase to the production of ATP fro ADP in energy-transducing systems. 5. Contaminating adenylate kinase can be inhibited by a concentration of Ap5A which does not interfere in the study of many (phospho)kinases and ATPases. The applications of Ap5A in the assay for nucleoside diphosphokinase and in the study of mechanical and

  8. Single cell kinase signaling assay using pinched flow coupled droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wang, Ming; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S; Tan Shao Weng, Daniel; Thakor, Nitish V; Teck Lim, Chwee; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2014-05-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has shown potential in high throughput single cell assays by encapsulating individual cells in water-in-oil emulsions. Ordering cells in a micro-channel is necessary to encapsulate individual cells into droplets further enhancing the assay efficiency. This is typically limited due to the difficulty of preparing high-density cell solutions and maintaining them without cell aggregation in long channels (>5 cm). In this study, we developed a short pinched flow channel (5 mm) to separate cell aggregates and to form a uniform cell distribution in a droplet-generating platform that encapsulated single cells with >55% encapsulation efficiency beating Poisson encapsulation statistics. Using this platform and commercially available Sox substrates (8-hydroxy-5-(N,N-dimethylsulfonamido)-2-methylquinoline), we have demonstrated a high throughput dynamic single cell signaling assay to measure the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in lung cancer cells triggered by cell surface ligand binding. The phosphorylation of the substrates resulted in fluorescent emission, showing a sigmoidal increase over a 12 h period. The result exhibited a heterogeneous signaling rate in individual cells and showed various levels of drug resistance when treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, gefitinib.

  9. Bioluminescence Methods for Assaying Kinases in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Format Applied to Yes1 Tyrosine Kinase, Glucokinase, and PI5P4Kα Lipid Kinase.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Auld, Douglas S; Inglese, James

    2016-01-01

    Assays in which the detection of a biological phenomenon is coupled to the production of bioluminescence by luciferase have gained widespread use. As firefly luciferases (FLuc) and kinases share a common substrate (ATP), coupling of a kinase to FLuc allows for the amount of ATP remaining following a kinase reaction to be assessed by quantitating the amount of luminescence produced. Alternatively, the amount of ADP produced by the kinase reaction can be coupled to FLuc through a two-step process. This chapter describes the bioluminescent assays that were developed for three classes of kinases (lipid, protein, and metabolic kinases) and miniaturized to 1536-well format, enabling their use for quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) of small-molecule libraries.

  10. Development of a High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Inhibitors of the Lipid Kinase PIP5K1C.

    PubMed

    Wright, Brittany D; Simpson, Catherine; Stashko, Michael; Kireev, Dmitri; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Zylka, Mark J; Janzen, William P

    2015-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks) regulate a variety of cellular processes, including signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), endocytosis, exocytosis, and cell migration. These lipid kinases synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Because small-molecule inhibitors of these lipid kinases did not exist, molecular and genetic approaches were predominantly used to study PIP5K1 regulation of these cellular processes. Moreover, standard radioisotope-based lipid kinase assays cannot be easily adapted for high-throughput screening. Here, we report a novel, high-throughput, microfluidic mobility shift assay to identify inhibitors of PIP5K1C. This assay uses fluorescently labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate as the substrate and recombinant human PIP5K1C. Our assay exhibited high reproducibility, had a calculated adenosine triphosphate Michaelis constant (Km) of 15 µM, performed with z' values >0.7, and was used to screen a kinase-focused library of ~4700 compounds. From this screen, we identified several potent inhibitors of PIP5K1C, including UNC3230, a compound that we recently found can reduce nociceptive sensitization in animal models of chronic pain. This novel assay will allow continued drug discovery efforts for PIP5K1C and can be adapted easily to screen additional lipid kinases.

  11. Development of a high-throughput screening assay to identify inhibitors of the lipid kinase PIP5K1C

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Brittany D.; Simpson, Catherine; Stashko, Michael; Kireev, Dmitri; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Zylka, Mark J.; Janzen, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks) regulate a variety of cellular processes including signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), endocytosis, exocytosis, and cell migration. These lipid kinases synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Since small molecule inhibitors of these lipid kinases did not exist, molecular and genetic approaches were predominantly used to study PIP5K1 regulation of these cellular processes. Moreover, standard radioisotope-based lipid kinase assays cannot be easily adapted for high-throughput screening. Here, we report a novel high-throughput microfluidic mobility shift assay to identify inhibitors of PIP5K1C. This assay utilizes fluorescently labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate as the substrate and recombinant human PIP5K1C. Our assay exhibited high reproducibility, had a calculated ATP Km of 15 µM, performed with z’ values >0.7, and was used to screen a kinase-focused library of ~4,700 compounds. From this screen, we identified several potent inhibitors of PIP5K1C, including UNC3230, a compound that we recently found can reduce nociceptive sensitization in animal models of chronic pain. This novel assay will allow continued drug discovery efforts for PIP5K1C and can be easily adapted to screen additional lipid kinases. PMID:25534829

  12. Validation of a Targeted RNA Sequencing Assay for Kinase Fusion Detection in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Reeser, Julie W; Martin, Dorrelyn; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko A; Lyon, Ezra; Zhu, Eliot; Wing, Michele R; Smith, Amy; Reeder, Matthew; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Parks, Hannah; Naik, Karan R; Gozgit, Joseph; Nowacki, Nicholas; Davies, Kurtis D; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Yu, Lianbo; Freud, Aharon G; Coleman, Joshua; Aisner, Dara L; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2017-09-01

    Kinase gene fusions are important drivers of oncogenic transformation and can be inhibited with targeted therapies. Clinical grade diagnostics using RNA sequencing to detect gene rearrangements in solid tumors are limited, and the few that are available require prior knowledge of fusion break points. To address this, we have analytically validated a targeted RNA sequencing assay (OSU-SpARKFuse) for fusion detection that interrogates complete transcripts from 93 kinase and transcription factor genes. From a total of 74 positive and 36 negative control samples, OSU-SpARKFuse had 93.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity for fusion detection. Assessment of repeatability and reproducibility revealed 96.3% and 94.4% concordance between intrarun and interrun technical replicates, respectively. Application of this assay on prospective patient samples uncovered OLFM4 as a novel RET fusion partner in a small-bowel cancer and led to the discovery of a KLK2-FGFR2 fusion in a patient with prostate cancer who subsequently underwent treatment with a pan-fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor. Beyond fusion detection, OSU-SpARKFuse has built-in capabilities for discovery research, including gene expression analysis, detection of single-nucleotide variants, and identification of alternative splicing events. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A high throughput assay to identify substrate-selective inhibitors of the ERK protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Turk, Benjamin E

    2017-10-15

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylate a variety of substrates important for survival and proliferation, and their activity is frequently deregulated in tumors. ERK pathway inhibitors have shown clinical efficacy as anti-cancer drugs, but most patients eventually relapse due to reactivation of the pathway. One factor limiting the efficacy of current therapeutics is the difficulty in reaching clinically effective inhibition of the ERK pathway in the absence of on-target toxicities. Here, we describe an assay suitable for high throughput screening to discover substrate selective ERK1/2 inhibitors, which may have a larger therapeutic window than conventional inhibitors. Specifically, we aim to target a substrate-binding pocket within the ERK1/2 catalytic domain outside of the catalytic cleft. The assay uses an AlphaScreen format to detect phosphorylation of a high-efficiency substrate harboring an essential docking site motif. Pilot screening established that the assay is suitably robust for high-throughput screening. Importantly, the assay can be conducted at high ATP concentrations, which we show reduces the discovery of conventional ATP-competitive inhibitors. These studies provide the basis for high-throughput screens to discover new classes of non-conventional ERK1/2 inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Label-free and real-time cell-based kinase assay for screening selective and potent receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors using microelectronic sensor array.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Josephine M; Yu, Naichen; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Abassi, Yama

    2006-09-01

    Kinases are the 2nd largest group of therapeutic targets in the human genome. In this article, a label-free and real-time cell-based receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) assay that addresses limitation of existing kinase assays and can be used for high-throughput screening and lead optimization studies was validated and characterized. Using impedance, growth factor-induced morphological changes were quantitatively assessed in real time and used as a measure of RTK activity. COS7 cells treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin results in a rapid increase in cell impedance. Assessment of these growth factor-induced morphological changes and levels of receptor autophosphorylation using fluorescent microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, demonstrates that these changes correlate with changes in impedance. This assay was used to screen, identify, and characterize a potent EGF receptor inhibitor from a compound library. This report describes an assay that is simple in that it does not require intensive optimization or special reagents such as peptides, antibodies, or probes. More important, because the assay is cell based, the studies are done in a physiologically relevant environment, allowing for concurrent assessment of a compound's solubility, stability, membrane permeability, cytotoxicity, and off-target interaction effects.

  15. Modular, Antibody-free Time-Resolved LRET Kinase Assay Enabled by Quantum Dots and Tb3+-sensitizing Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent drug screening assays are essential for tyrosine kinase inhibitor discovery. Here we demonstrate a flexible, antibody-free TR-LRET kinase assay strategy that is enabled by the combination of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (QD) acceptors and biotinylated, Tb3+ sensitizing peptide donors. By exploiting the spectral features of Tb3+ and QD, and the high binding affinity of the streptavidin-biotin interaction, we achieved multiplexed detection of kinase activity in a modular fashion without requiring additional covalent labeling of each peptide substrate. This strategy is compatible with high-throughput screening, and should be adaptable to the rapidly changing workflows and targets involved in kinase inhibitor discovery. PMID:27426233

  16. IKK Kinase Assay for Assessment of Canonical NF-κB Activation in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mihalas, Anca B.; Meffert, Mollie K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a potent transcription factor highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) where it has been shown to be required for multiple behavioral paradigms of learning and memory in both mammalian and invertebrate systems. NF-κB dimers are found in neuronal cell bodies, are also present at synapses, and can participate in the activity-dependent regulation of gene expression in response to excitatory neurotransmission. Multiple serine-directed phosphorylation events are critical in the canonical NF-κB activation pathway, including activation of the IκB kinase complex (IKK) and phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB). In this chapter, we describe methods for immunoprecipitation (IP) of the IKK complex from dissociated cultured murine hippocampal neurons, followed by in vitro kinase assay to evaluate excitatory neurotransmission-induced IKK activation by monitoring phosphorylation of a GST-IκBα substrate. These methods can also be successfully implemented in subcellular-reduced brain preparations, such as biochemically isolated synapses. PMID:25736744

  17. A novel microfluidic assay reveals a key role for protein kinase C δ in regulating human neutrophil-endothelium interaction.

    PubMed

    Soroush, Fariborz; Zhang, Ting; King, Devon J; Tang, Yuan; Deosarkar, Sudhir; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Kilpatrick, Laurie E; Kiani, Mohammad F

    2016-11-01

    A key step in neutrophil-mediated tissue damage is the migration of activated neutrophils across the vascular endothelium. Previously, we identified protein kinase C δ as a critical regulator of neutrophil migration in sepsis but did not identify specific steps in migration. In this study, we used our novel biomimetic microfluidic assay to delineate systematically the mechanism by which protein kinase C δ regulates individual steps in human neutrophil-endothelial interaction during inflammation. The biomimetic microfluidic assay includes a network of vascular channels, produced from in vivo images connected to a tissue compartment through a porous barrier. HUVECs cultured in vascular channels formed a complete lumen under physiologic shear flow. HUVECs were pretreated with TNF-α ± a protein kinase C δ inhibitor, and the tissue compartment was filled with a chemoattractant (fMLP or IL-8). Under physiologic shear flow, the role of protein kinase C δ on spatial and temporal neutrophil adherence/migration was quantified. Protein kinase C δ inhibition significantly reduced neutrophil adhesion in response to fMLP and IL-8 only under low shear rate and near bifurcations. Protein kinase C δ inhibition also decreased adherence to nonactivated HUVECs in response to fMLP or IL-8. Protein kinase C δ inhibition reduced neutrophil migration into the tissue compartment in response to fMLP and to a lesser degree, to IL-8. Antibody-coated microparticles demonstrated that protein kinase C δ inhibition down-regulated E-selectin and ICAM-1 but not VCAM-1 expression. With the use of a physiologically relevant in vitro model system, we demonstrate that protein kinase C δ plays an important role in the regulation of neutrophil adherence/migration during inflammation and identifies key steps regulated by protein kinase C δ in neutrophil-endothelial interactions.

  18. Fluorescence polarization binding assay to develop inhibitors of inactive p38alpha mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Lenka; Selig, Roland; Yeung, Yiu To; Peifer, Christian; Hauser, Dominik; Laufer, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Development of inhibitors that target inactive kinase conformations is becoming a more attractive approach to kinase inhibitor research. The major advantage of this methodology is that targeting the inactive conformation reduces competition with high intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations. p38alpha Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling has been identified as the principal mediator of inflammation associated with a spectrum of disorders (e.g., arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, various malignancies). To allow identification and development of p38alpha MAPK inhibitors that preferentially bind to the inactive conformation, a novel fluorescence polarization-based binding assay is presented. The assay is homogeneous, requires low amounts of the kinase and fluoroprobe, and does not rely on radioactivity. It may, therefore, offer an inexpensive alternative to current p38alpha MAPK inhibitor screening methods. The validation of the system with known p38alpha MAPK inhibitors confirmed that the binding assay, rather than the conventional enzyme activity assay, correlates with cellular efficacy. Finally, we show that pyridinyl imidazoles that potently bind to the inactive p38alpha MAPK prevent activation of p38 MAPK in living cells, suggesting that pyridinyl imidazoles other than SB203580 are able to induce the DFG-out conformation that is incompatible with activation (where DFG is a single-letter amino acid code for the aspartate-phenylalanine-glycine sequence at the start of the activation loop). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A system for assaying homologous recombination at the endogenous human thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.B.; Little, J.B. ); Potter, H. ); Yandell, D.W. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-08-01

    A system for assaying human interchromosomal recombination in vitro was developed, using a cell line containing two different mutant thymidine kinase genes (TK) on chromosomes 17. Heteroalleles were generated in the TK{sup +/+} parent B-lymphoblast cell line WIL-2 by repeated exposure to the alkylating nitrogen mustard ICR-191, which preferentially causes +1 or {minus}1 frameshifts. Resulting TK{sup {minus}/{minus}} mutants were selected in medium containing the toxic thymidine analog trifluorothymidine. In two lines, heterozygous frameshifts were located in exons 4 and 7 of the TK gene separated by {approx}8 kilobases. These lines undergo spontaneous reversion to TK{sup +} at a frequency of < 10{sup {minus}7}, and revertants can be selected in cytidine/hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium. The nature and location of these heteroallelic mutations make large deletions, rearrangements, nondisjunction, and reduplication unlikely mechanisms for reversion to TK{sup +}. The mode of reversion to TK{sup +} was specifically assessed by DNA sequencing, use of single-strand conformation polymorphisms, and analysis of various restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the TK gene on chromosome 17. The data suggest that a proportion of revertants has undergone recombination and gene conversion at the TK locus, with concomitant loss of frameshifts and allele loss at linked RFLPs. Models are presented for the origin of two recombinants.

  20. A spectrophotometric assay for the determination of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Cristobal; Mendez, Eva; Terencio, José; Boronat, Albert; Imperial, Santiago

    2005-05-15

    We report an assay for the determination of the activity of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase, the enzyme which catalyzes the fourth reaction step of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoids, which is based on the spectrophotometrical determination of adenosine 5'-diphosphate using pyruvate kinase and L-lactate dehydrogenase as auxiliary enzymes. This method can be adapted to microtiter plates, can be automated, and because of its simplicity and speed can be useful for the functional characterization of the enzyme and for the screening of inhibitors with potential antibiotic or antimalarial action.

  1. A site-specific, multiplexed kinase activity assay using stable-isotope dilution and high-resolution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yonghao; Anjum, Rana; Kubota, Kazuishi; Rush, John; Villen, Judit; Gygi, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    Most kinases are capable of recognizing and phosphorylating peptides containing short, linear sequence motifs. To measure the activation state of many kinases from the same cell lysate, we created a multiplexed, mass-spectrometry-based in vitro kinase assay. Ninety chemically synthesized peptides derived from well-characterized peptide substrates and in vivo phosphorylation sites with either known or previously unidentified upstream kinases were reacted individually in a plate format with crude cell lysates and ATP. Phosphorylation rates were directly measured based on the addition of 90 same-sequence, site-specific phosphopeptides enriched in stable isotopes to act as ideal quantitative internal standards for analysis by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. This approach concurrently measured up to 90 site-specific peptide phosphorylation rates, reporting a diagnostic fingerprint for activated kinase pathways. We applied this unique kinome-activity profiling strategy in a variety of cellular settings, including mitogen stimulation, cell cycle, pharmacological inhibition of pathways, and to a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Finally, we identified the source of activity for a peptide (derived from a PI3K regulatory subunit) from our library. This peptide substrate demonstrated mitotic and tyrosine-specific phosphorylation, which was confirmed to be a novel Src family kinase site in vivo. PMID:19564600

  2. In situ fabrication of cleavable peptide arrays on polydimethylsiloxane and applications for kinase activity assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huang-Han; Hsiao, Yu-Chieh; Li, Jie-Ren; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2015-03-20

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is widely used for microfabrication and bioanalysis; however, its surface functionalization is limited due to the lack of active functional groups and incompatibility with many solvents. We presented a novel approach for in situ fabrication of cleavable peptide arrays on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) viatert-butyloxycarbonyl (t-Boc)/trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) chemistry using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the anchor and a disulfide/amine terminated hetero-polyethylene glycol as the cleavable linker. The method was fine tuned to use reagents compatible with the PDMS. Using 5-mer pentapeptide, Trp5, as a model, step-by-step covalent coupling during the reaction cycles was monitored by Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), or atomic force microscopy (AFM), and further confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS) detection of the cleaved peptides. Using such a method, heptapeptides of the PKA substrate, LRRASLG (Kemptide), and its point mutated analogs were fabricated in an array format for comparative studies of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. Based on on-chip detection, Kemptide sequence exhibited the highest phosphorylation activity, which was detected to a 1.5-time lesser extent for the point mutated sequence (LRRGSLG) containing the recognition motif (RRXS), and was nearly undetectable for another point mutated sequence (LRLASLG) that lacked the recognition motif. These results indicate that the reported fabrication method is able to yield highly specific peptide sequences on PDMS, leading to a highly motif-sensitive enzyme activity assay.

  3. An SH2 domain-based tyrosine kinase assay using biotin ligase modified with a terbium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Shinji; Shinboku, Yuki; Kusaba, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are modules of approximately 100 amino acids and are known to bind phosphotyrosine-containing sequences with high affinity and specificity. In the present work, we developed an SH2 domain-based assay for Src tyrosine kinase using a unique biotinylation reaction from archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. S. tokodaii biotinylation has a unique property that biotin protein ligase (BPL) forms a stable complex with its biotinylated substrate protein (BCCP). Here, an SH2 domain from lymphocyte-specific tyrosine kinase was genetically fused to a truncated BCCP, and the resulting fusion protein was labeled through biotinylation with BPL carrying multiple copies of a luminescent Tb(3+) complex. The labeled SH2 fusion proteins were employed to detect a phosphorylated peptide immobilized on the surface of the microtiter plate, where the phosphorylated peptide was produced by phosphorylation to the substrate peptide by Src tyrosine kinase. Our assay allows for a reliable determination of the activity of Src kinase lower than 10 pg/μL by a simple procedure.

  4. Quantitative Profiling of Protein Tyrosine Kinases in Human Cancer Cell Lines by Multiplexed Parallel Reaction Monitoring Assays*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Lin, De; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play key roles in cellular signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, cell division, and cell differentiation. Dysregulation of PTK-activated pathways, often by receptor overexpression, gene amplification, or genetic mutation, is a causal factor underlying numerous cancers. In this study, we have developed a parallel reaction monitoring-based assay for quantitative profiling of 83 PTKs. The assay detects 308 proteotypic peptides from 54 receptor tyrosine kinases and 29 nonreceptor tyrosine kinases in a single run. Quantitative comparisons were based on the labeled reference peptide method. We implemented the assay in four cell models: 1) a comparison of proliferating versus epidermal growth factor-stimulated A431 cells, 2) a comparison of SW480Null (mutant APC) and SW480APC (APC restored) colon tumor cell lines, and 3) a comparison of 10 colorectal cancer cell lines with different genomic abnormalities, and 4) lung cancer cell lines with either susceptibility (11–18) or acquired resistance (11–18R) to the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We observed distinct PTK expression changes that were induced by stimuli, genomic features or drug resistance, which were consistent with previous reports. However, most of the measured expression differences were novel observations. For example, acquired resistance to erlotinib in the 11–18 cell model was associated not only with previously reported up-regulation of MET, but also with up-regulation of FLK2 and down-regulation of LYN and PTK7. Immunoblot analyses and shotgun proteomics data were highly consistent with parallel reaction monitoring data. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring assays provide a targeted, systems-level profiling approach to evaluate cancer-related proteotypes and adaptations. Data are available through Proteome eXchange Accession PXD002706. PMID:26631510

  5. Structure-based modelling, scoring, screening, and in vitro kinase assay of anesthetic pkc inhibitors against a natural medicine library.

    PubMed

    Shi, B X; Chen, F R; Sun, X

    2017-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is an intracellular effector of the inositol phosphate-mediated signal transduction pathway. Evidence is emerging that certain general anaesthetics can influence the activity of PKC by interacting with the regulatory domain of the enzyme, and targeting PKC kinase domain is considered as a strategy to modulate the anaesthetic effects. Here, an integrated method was used to perform virtual screening against a large library of natural compounds for the discovery of new and potent PKC modulators. A number of hits were identified and their inhibitory activity against PKC kinase domain was measured by using a standard kinase assay protocol. Three and five compounds were determined to have high and moderate activities with IC50 values at nanomolar and micromolar levels, respectively. These compounds can be considered as promising lead molecular entities to develop efficacious anaesthetic modulators. Structural examination revealed a variety of nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bonds, cation-π contacts, and hydrophobic forces across the complex interface of PKC with the identified compounds. This study helps to establish an integrative approach to rational kinase inhibitor discovery by efficiently exploiting various existing natural products.

  6. Bisubstrate fluorescent probes and biosensors in binding assays for HTS of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Uri, Asko; Lust, Marje; Vaasa, Angela; Lavogina, Darja; Viht, Kaido; Enkvist, Erki

    2010-03-01

    Conjugates of adenosine mimics and d-arginine-rich peptides (ARCs) are potent inhibitors of protein kinases (PKs) from the AGC group. Labeling ARCs with fluorescent dyes or immobilizing on chip surfaces gives fluorescent probes (ARC-Photo) and biosensors that can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of protein kinases. The bisubstrate character (simultaneous association with both binding sites of the kinase) and high affinity of ARCs allow ARC-based probes and sensors to be used for characterization of inhibitors targeted to either binding site of the kinase with affinities in whole nanomolar to micromolar range. The ability to penetrate cell plasma membrane and bind to the target kinase fused with a fluorescent protein leads to the possibility to use ARC-Photo probes for high content screening (HCS) of inhibitors in cellular milieu with detection of intensity of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores.

  7. Investigation of the bindings of a class of inhibitors with GSK3β kinase using thermodynamic integration MD simulation and kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Jen; Hsu, Wen-Chi; Lee, Der-Jay; Liu, An-Lun; Chang, Chia-Ming; Shih, Huei-Jhen; Huang, Wun-Han; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Sun, Ying-Chieh

    2017-08-01

    GSK3β kinase is a noteworthy target for discovery of the drugs that will be used to treat several diseases. In the effort to identify a new inhibitor lead compound, we utilized thermodynamic integration (TI)-molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and kinase assay to investigate the bindings between GSK3β kinase and five compounds that were analogous to a known inhibitor with an available crystal structure. TI-MD simulations of the first two compounds (analogs 1 and 2) were used for calibration. The computed binding affinities of analogs 1 and 2 agreed well with the experimental results. The rest three compounds (analogs 3-5) were newly obtained from a database search, and their affinity data were newly measured in our labs. TI-MD simulations predicted the binding modes and the computed ΔΔG values have a reasonably good correlation with the experimental affinity data. These newly identified inhibitors appear to be new leads according to our survey of GSK3β inhibitors listed in recent review articles. The predicted binding modes of these compounds should aid in designing new derivatives of these compounds in the future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. A Three-Dimensional Lymphatic Endothelial Cell Tube Formation Assay to Identify Novel Kinases Involved in Lymphatic Vessel Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gambino, T Jessica; Williams, Steven P; Caesar, Carol; Resnick, Daniel; Nowell, Cameron J; Farnsworth, Rae H; Achen, Marc G; Stacker, Steven A; Karnezis, Tara

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system is a series of vessels that transport cells and excess fluid from tissues to the blood vascular system. Normally quiescent, the lymphatics can grow or remodel in response to developmental, immunological, or cells pathological stimuli. Lymphatic vessels comprise lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) that can respond to external growth factors by undergoing proliferation, migration, adhesion, and tube and lumen formation into new vessel structures, a process known as lymphangiogenesis. To understand the key gene and signaling pathways necessary for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic vessel remodeling, we have developed a three-dimensional LEC tube formation assay to explore the role of kinase signaling in these processes. The collagen-overlay-based assay was used with primary human adult dermal LECs to investigate a library of 60 tyrosine kinase (TK) and TK-like genes by siRNA knockdown. Nine candidate genes were identified and characterized for their ability to modify key parameters of lymphatic tube formation, including tube length, area, thickness, branching, and number of blind-ended sacs. Four genes-ZAP70, IRAK4, RIPK1, and RIPK2-were identified as high-confidence hits after tertiary deconvolution screens and demonstrate the utility of the assay to define LEC genes critical for the formation of tube structures. This assay facilitates the identification of potential molecular targets for novel drugs designed to modulate the remodeling of lymphatics that is important for the metastatic spread of cancer and other pathologies.

  9. Binding assay for characterization of protein kinase inhibitors possessing sub-picomolar to sub-millimolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Sinijarv, Hedi; Wu, Shanshan; Ivan, Taavi; Laasfeld, Tonis; Viht, Kaido; Uri, Asko

    2017-08-15

    High demand for inhibitors regulating the activity of protein kinases has stimulated the quest for high throughput and reliable compound screening assays. Here we introduce a method applying a non-metal photoluminescent probe ARC-Lum(Fluo) for determination of dissociation constants of competitive inhibitors of protein kinases. Employing a single probe instead of a combination of antibody and fluorescent tracer makes the assay simpler, cheaper, and more accurate than several other inhibitor-screening technologies. High affinity (20 pM) and low background signal of the free probe supports the determination of dissociation constants of tight-binding as well as low affinity inhibitors. The calculated lowest Kd value that can be accurately determined with the method is 60 fM. We also introduce graphical presentation of the linearized Cheng-Prusoff equation and demonstrate multiple possibilities for its application (deciding upon the assay formats, calculation of the limits of Kd determination, etc.). The open toolbox (http://www.ut.ee/medchem/toolbox-fluorescence-probes) is available for creating the map of resolvable affinities if applying the competitive probes at defined assay conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phos-tag analysis of Rab10 phosphorylation by LRRK2: a powerful assay for assessing kinase function and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Genta; Katsemonova, Kristina; Tonelli, Francesca; Lis, Pawel; Baptista, Marco A.S.; Shpiro, Natalia; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Steve; Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Ho, Shu-Leong; Reith, Alastair D.; Alessi, Dario R.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations that activate the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) cause inherited Parkinson's disease. Recent work has revealed that LRRK2 directly phosphorylates a conserved threonine/serine residue in the effector-binding switch-II motif of a number of Rab GTPase proteins, including Rab10. Here we describe a facile and robust method to assess phosphorylation of endogenous Rab10 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), lung and spleen-derived B-cells, based on the ability of the Phos-tag reagent to retard the electrophoretic mobility of LRRK2-phosphorylated Rab10. We exploit this assay to show that phosphorylation of Rab10 is ablated in kinase-inactive LRRK2[D2017A] knockin MEFs and mouse lung, demonstrating that LRRK2 is the major Rab10 kinase in these cells/tissue. We also establish that the Phos-tag assay can be deployed to monitor the impact that activating LRRK2 pathogenic (G2019S and R1441G) knockin mutations have on stimulating Rab10 phosphorylation. We show that upon addition of LRRK2 inhibitors, Rab10 is dephosphorylated within 1–2 min, markedly more rapidly than the Ser935 and Ser1292 biomarker sites that require 40–80 min. Furthermore, we find that phosphorylation of Rab10 is suppressed in LRRK2[S910A+S935A] knockin MEFs indicating that phosphorylation of Ser910 and Ser935 and potentially 14-3-3 binding play a role in facilitating the phosphorylation of Rab10 by LRRK2 in vivo. The Rab Phos-tag assay has the potential to significantly aid with evaluating the effect that inhibitors, mutations and other factors have on the LRRK2 signalling pathway. PMID:27474410

  11. Palliative systemic therapy and overall survival of 1,395 patients with advanced breast cancer - Results from the prospective German TMK cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fietz, Thomas; Tesch, Hans; Rauh, Jacqueline; Boller, Emil; Kruggel, Lisa; Jänicke, Martina; Marschner, Norbert

    2017-08-01

    Data on treatment and outcome of advanced breast cancer in routine practice are rare, especially concerning recurrent disease, but important to complement the results from clinical trials and to improve the standard of care. We present data on choice of systemic first-line treatment, number of treatment lines, and survival of patients treated by medical oncologists in Germany. 1395 patients recruited by 124 sites at start of first-line therapy into the ongoing, prospective German clinical cohort study TMK (Tumour Registry Breast Cancer) between February 2007 and October 2015 were analysed. The median OS was 33.8 months (95% CI 30.2-40.2) for HR-positive/HER2-negative, 38.2 months (95% CI 31.3-43.0) for HER2-positive and 16.8 months (95% CI 11.5-22.0) for triple negative breast cancer. Patients with triple negative tumours more often died before start of a third-line therapy than patients with HR-positive or HER2-positive tumours (44% vs. 25%). Use of taxane-based chemotherapies has increased since 2007, with 65% of all first-line chemotherapy-treatments containing taxanes in 2013-15 (60% HR-positive/HER2-negative, 75% HER2-positive, 56% triple negative). 52% of the patients with HR-positive/HER2-negative tumours received first-line endocrine therapy in 2013-15; when restricted to patients with only non-visceral metastases this percentage increased to 63%. To our knowledge, this is the first cohort study showing systemic first-line therapy for all subtypes of advanced breast cancer. Overall survival in the TMK is comparable to that reported by clinical trials despite the inclusion of older and comorbid patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptation of the plasma inhibitory activity assay to detect Aurora, ABL and FLT3 kinase inhibition by AT9283 in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Jennifer E; Sugar, Richard; Squires, Matt; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Pearson, Andrew D J; Moore, Andrew S

    2011-09-01

    Non-invasive assessment of biomarker modulation is important for evaluating targeted therapeutics, particularly in pediatrics. The plasma inhibitory activity (PIA) assay is used clinically to assess FLT3 inhibition ex vivo and guide dosing. AT9283 is a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor with secondary activity against FLT3 and ABL. We adapted the PIA assay to simultaneously detect inhibition of Aurora and FLT3 in AML, and Aurora and ABL in CML by AT9283. Furthermore, we optimized the assay for children, where limited blood volumes are available for pharmacodynamic studies. Simultaneously detecting multiple kinase inhibition may identify important mechanisms of action for novel anti-leukemic drugs.

  13. Diagnosis of preeclampsia with soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1/placental growth factor ratio: an inter-assay comparison.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise Bjørkholt; Frederiksen-Møller, Britta; Work Havelund, Kathrine; Dechend, Ralf; Jørgensen, Jan Stener; Jensen, Boye L; Nielsen, Jan; Lykkedegn, Sine; Barington, Torben; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2015-02-01

    The angiogenic factor ratio soluble Fms-kinase 1 (sFlt-1)/placental growth factor (PlGF) is a novel diagnostic tool for preeclampsia. We compared the efficacy of the KRYPTOR (BRAHMS) automated assays for sFlt-1 and PlGF with the Elecsys (Roche) assays in a routine clinical setting. Preeclamptic women (n = 39) were included shortly after the time of diagnosis. Normotensive control pregnancies were matched by gestational age (n = 76). The KRYPTOR assays performed comparably or superior to Elecsys (sFlt-1/PlGF area under the curve 0.746 versus 0.735; P = .09; for non-obese 0.820 versus 0.805, P = .047). For early-onset preeclampsia, KRYPTOR area under the curve increased to 0.929 with a 100% specificity for preeclampsia at cut-off 85 and an 88.9% sensitivity for preeclampsia at cut-off 33. For women with preeclampsia and preterm delivery or Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count (HELLP) syndrome, the KRYPTOR sFlt-1/PlGF ratio was manifold increased (P < .01). The sFlt-1/PlGF ratio proved especially useful in early-onset preeclampsia, preeclampsia with preterm delivery or HELLP, and among non-obese women. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. LC-MS/MS assay for the quantitation of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor neratinib in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Kiesel, Brian F; Parise, Robert A; Wong, Alvin; Keyvanjah, Kiana; Jacobs, Samuel; Beumer, Jan H

    2017-02-05

    Neratinib is an orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and EGFR (ERBB). It is being clinically evaluated for the treatment of breast and other solid tumors types as a single agent or in combination with other chemotherapies. In support of several phase I/II clinical trials investigating neratinib combinations, we developed and validated a novel LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of neratinib in 100μL of human plasma with a stable isotopic internal standard. Analytes were extracted from plasma using protein precipitation and evaporation of the resulting supernatant followed by resuspension. Chromatographic separation was achieved using an Acquity UPLC BEH Shield RP18 column and a gradient methanol-water mobile phase containing 10% ammonium acetate. An ABI 4000 mass spectrometer and electrospray positive mode ionization were used for detection. The assay was linear from 2 to 1,000ng/mL and proved to be accurate (98.9-106.5%) and precise (<6.2%CV), and met the FDA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. This LC-MS/MS assay will be an essential tool to further define the pharmacokinetics of neratinib.

  15. Dephospho-CoA Kinase Provides a Rapid and Sensitive Radiochemical Assay for Coenzyme A and Its Thioesters

    PubMed Central

    Wadler, Caryn; Cronan, John E.

    2007-01-01

    A new approach to determine in vivo pools of coenzyme A and short chain acyl-CoA thioesters is reported. The metabolites released by extraction with trichloroacetic acid are recovered and quantitatively dephosphorylated by treatment with shrimp alkaline phosphatase. Following phosphatase removal, the dephosphorylated CoA metabolites are quantitatively rephosphorylated by treatment with γ-labeled 33P-ATP plus a dephospho-CoA kinase. The resulting radioactive CoA metabolites are then separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and quantitated by scintillation counting. Due to the enzymatic radio-phosphorylation, the assay is specific for CoA and its short chain thioesters and sensitive to subpicomole levels of these compounds. PMID:17603993

  16. Rapid immunoblot and kinase assay tests for a syndromal form of X linked mental retardation: Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merienne, K; Jacquot, S; Trivier, E; Pannetier, S; Rossi, A; Scott, C; Schinzel, A; Castellan, C; Kress, W; Hanauer, A

    1998-11-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a syndromal form of X linked mental retardation, in which some associated facial, hand, and skeletal abnormalities are diagnostic features. Accurate diagnosis, critical for genetic counselling, is often difficult, especially in early childhood. We have recently shown that Coffin-Lowry syndrome is caused by mutations in the gene encoding RSK2, a growth factor regulated protein kinase. RSK2 mutations are very heterogeneous and most of them lead to premature termination of translation or to loss of phosphotransferase activity or both. In the present study, we have evaluated immunoblot and RSK2 kinase assays as a rapid and simple diagnostic test for CLS, using cultured lymphoblastoid or fibroblast cell lines. Western blot analysis failed to detect RSK2 in six patients, suggesting the presence of truncated proteins in these patients. This conclusion was confirmed in four patients, in whom the causative mutations, all leading to premature termination of translation, were identified. Of four patients showing a normal amount of RSK2 protein on western blot and tested for RSK2 phosphotransferase activity, one had a dramatically impaired activity. Analysis of the RSK2 cDNA sequence in this patient showed a mutation of a putative phosphorylation site that would be critical for RSK2 activity. Preliminary results show that, at least, the western blot protocol can be successfully applied to lymphocyte protein extracts prepared directly from blood samples. These assays promise to become important diagnostic tools for CLS, particularly with regard to very young patients with no family history of the condition.

  17. Universal quantitative kinase assay based on diagonal SCX chromatography and stable isotope dimethyl labeling provides high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and human Mps1.

    PubMed

    Hennrich, Marco L; Marino, Fabio; Groenewold, Vincent; Kops, Geert J P L; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-05-03

    In order to understand cellular signaling, a clear understanding of kinase-substrate relationships is essential. Some of these relationships are defined by consensus recognition motifs present in substrates making them amendable for phosphorylation by designated kinases. Here, we explore a method that is based on two sequential steps of strong cation exchange chromatography combined with differential stable isotope labeling, to define kinase consensus motifs with high accuracy. We demonstrate the value of our method by evaluating the motifs of two very distinct kinases: cAMP regulated protein kinase A (PKA) and human monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) kinase, also known as TTK. PKA is a well-studied basophilic kinase with a relatively well-defined motif and numerous known substrates in vitro and in vivo. Mps1, a kinase involved in chromosome segregation, has been less well characterized. Its substrate specificity is unclear and here we show that Mps1 is an acidophilic kinase with a striking tendency for phosphorylation of threonines. The final outcomes of our work are high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and Mps1. Our generic method, which makes use of proteolytic cell lysates as a source for peptide-substrate libraries, can be implemented for any kinase present in the kinome.

  18. A Fluorescence Immunochromatographic Assay Using Europium (III) Chelate Microparticles for Rapid, Quantitative and Sensitive Detection of Creatine Kinase MB.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-Hong; Liang, Rong-Liang; Liu, Tian-Cai; Dong, Zhi-Ning; Wu, Ying-Song; Li, Lin-Hai

    2016-05-01

    The isoenzyme creatine kinase MB is very important for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Some CK-MB immunoassays are sensitive, accurate and available for clinical application, but they are expensive and time-consuming procedures. Furthermore, conventional fluorescence immunochromatographic assays (FL-ICAs) have suffered from background fluorescence interference and low analytical sensitivity. A rapid and simple FL-ICA with Eu (III) chelate polystyrene microparticles was developed to determine CK-MB in 50uL serum samples using a portable test strip reader by measuring the fluorescence peak heights of the test line (HT) and the control line (HC) in 12 min. The assay was reliable with a good correlation coefficient between HT/HC ratio and CK-MB concentration in samples. A linear range was 0.85-100.29 ng/mL for CK-MB, and the LOD was 0.029 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were both <10 % and the average recoveries were from 90.17 % -112.63 % for CK-MB. The system performed well in interference experiments. Furthermore, a highly significant correlation (r = 0.9794, P < 0.001) between this method and the commercially available bioMérieux mini VIDAS system were attained for measuring 120 CK-MB samples. These results indicated that the Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based FL-ICA is simple, fast, highly sensitive, reliable, and reproducible for point-of-care testing of CK-MB concentrations in serum. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Identification of 3,5,6-substituted indolin-2-one's inhibitors of Aurora B by development of a luminescent kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; Yang, Tianming; Xie, Xilei; Liu, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Aurora B kinase plays an important role in the cell normal mitosis and overexpresses in a variety of tumors. Inhibition of Aurora B kinase resulted in an apoptosis of cancer cells, which prevented tumor growth in xenograft models. In this Letter, we developed a luminescent kinase assay to perform high-throughput screening for identification of small molecule Aurora B inhibitors. Two 3,5,6-substituted indolin-2-one derivatives were identified within an in-house compound library. Their new derivatives were then designed and synthesized that resulting two new inhibitors of Aurora B kinase with improved potency. Docking simulation further demonstrated the proposed binding modes between indolin-2-one inhibitor and Aurora B.

  20. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity assay based on FRET between cationic conjugated polymer and chromophore-labeled peptide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiyun; Hu, Yufang; Shen, Qinpeng; Fang, Heting; Li, Wang; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-09-21

    A sensitive fluorescence turn-on biosensing platform for protein kinase activity assay has been developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a fluorophore labeled peptide and a water soluble cationic conjugated polymer (CCP). The CCP-based assay is based on the electrostatic interaction between the peptide and the CCP. The FRET efficiency will change with the changing charges around the peptide after phosphorylation. The feasibility of this method has been demonstrated by sensitive measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) with a low detection limit (0.3 mU μL(-1)). Based on its simple mechanism, this assay is also sensitive and robust enough to be applied to the evaluation of PKA inhibitor H-89. The IC50 value, the half maximal inhibitory concentration, was 40 nM. Furthermore, our method has excellent selectivity. CCP-based assay is sensitive, versatile, cost-effective and easy to operate, so, this method is a promising candidate for kinase activity assay and inhibitor screening.

  1. Expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinant thymidine kinase and its application to a rapid antiviral sensitivity assay.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Lixin, Wang; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Iizuka, Itoe; Ogata, Momoko; Tsuji, Masanori; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Morikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-08-01

    Antiviral-resistant herpesvirus infection has become a great concern for immunocompromised patients. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections are treated with viral thymidine kinase (vTK)-associated drugs such as acyclovir (ACV), and most ACV-resistance (ACV(r)) is due to mutations in the vTK. The standard drug sensitivity test is usually carried out by the plaque reduction assay-based method, which requires over 10 days. To shorten the time required, a novel system was developed by the concept, in which 293T cells transiently expressing recombinant vTK derived from the test sample by transfection of the cells with an expression vector were infected with vTK-deficient and ACV(r) HSV-1 (TAR), and then cultured in a maintenance medium with or without designated concentrations of ACV, ganciclovir (GCV) and brivudine (BVdU). The replication of TAR was strongly inhibited by ACV, GCV and BVdU in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the ACV-sensitive HSV-1, whereas replication was not or slightly inhibited in cells expressing the recombinant vTK of highly resistant or intermediately resistant HSV-1, respectively. An inverse correlation was demonstrated in the 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) and inhibitory effects of these compounds on the replication of TAR among ACV(s) and ACV(r) HSV-1 clones. These results indicate that the EC(50)s of the vTK-associated drugs including ACV can be assumed by measuring the inhibitory effect of drugs in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the target virus. The newly developed antiviral sensitivity assay system for HSV-1 makes it possible to estimate EC(50) for vTK-associated drugs, when whole vTK gene is available for use by gene amplification directly from lesion's samples or from virus isolates.

  2. Wild Roman chamomile extracts and phenolic compounds: enzymatic assays and molecular modelling studies with VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Calhelha, Ricardo C; Froufe, Hugo J C; Abreu, Rui M V; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Queiroz, Maria João R P; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a process by which new blood vessels are formed from the pre-existing vasculature, and it is a key process that leads to tumour development. Some studies have recognized phenolic compounds as chemopreventive agents; flavonoids, in particular, seem to suppress the growth of tumor cells modifying the cell cycle. Herein, the antiangiogenic activity of Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L.) extracts (methanolic extract and infusion) and the main phenolic compounds present (apigenin, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, luteolin, and luteolin-7-O-glucoside) was evaluated through enzymatic assays using the tyrosine kinase intracellular domain of the Vascular Endothelium Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), which is a transmembrane receptor expressed fundamentally in endothelial cells involved in angiogenesis, and molecular modelling studies. The methanolic extract showed a lower IC50 value (concentration that provided 50% of VEGFR-2 inhibition) than the infusion, 269 and 301 μg mL(-1), respectively. Regarding phenolic compounds, luteolin and apigenin showed the highest capacity to inhibit the phosphorylation of VEGFR-2, leading us to believe that these compounds are involved in the activity revealed by the methanolic extract.

  3. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Mitotic Kinase Haspin by High Throughput Screening using a Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Debasis; Xian, Jun; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Stein, Ross L.; Higgins, Jonathan M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Haspin/Gsg2 is a kinase that phosphorylates Histone H3 at Thr-3 (H3T3ph) during mitosis. Its depletion by RNA interference results in failure of chromosome alignment and a block in mitosis. Haspin therefore is a novel target for development of anti-mitotic agents. We report the development of a high throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) kinase assay for Haspin. Histone H3 peptide was used as a substrate, and a Europium-labeled H3T3ph phosphospecific monoclonal antibody was used to detect phosphorylation. A library of 137632 small molecules was screened at Km concentrations of ATP and peptide to allow identification of diverse inhibitor types. Reconfirmation of hits and IC50 determinations were carried out with the TR-FRET assay and by a radiometric assay using recombinant Histone H3 as the substrate. A preliminary assessment of specificity was made by testing inhibition of two unrelated kinases. EC50 values in cells were determined using a cell-based ELISA assay of H3T3ph. Five compounds were selected as leads based on potency and chemical structure considerations. These leads form the basis for the development of specific inhibitors of Haspin that will have clear utility in basic research and possible use as starting points for development of anti-mitotic anticancer therapeutics. PMID:18978305

  4. Effects of insulin on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and untreated rats: /sup 13/C NMR assay of pyruvate kinase flux

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-27

    The effects of insulin in vitro on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and their untreated littermates during gluconeogenesis from either (3-/sup 13/C)alanine + ethanol or (2-/sup 13/C)pyruvate + NH/sub 4/Cl + ethanol were studied by /sup 13/C NMR. A /sup 13/C NMR determination of the rate of pyruvate kinase flux under steady-state conditions of active gluconeogenesis was developed; this assay includes a check on the reuse of recycled pyruvate. The preparations studied provided gradations of pyruvate kinase flux within the confines of the assay's requirement of active gluconeogenesis. By this determination, the rate of pyruvate kinase flux was 0.74 +/- 0.04 of the gluconeogenic rate in liver from 24-h-fasted controls; in liver from 12-h fasted controls, relative pyruvate kinase flux increased to 1.0 +/- 0.2. In diabetic liver, this flux was undetectable by the authors NMR method. Insulin's hepatic influence in vitro was greatest in the streptozotocin model of type 1 diabetes: upon treatment of diabetic liver with 7 nM insulin in vitro, a partial reversal of many of the differences noted between diabetic and control liver was demonstrated by /sup 13/C NMR. A major effect of insulin in vitro upon diabetic liver was the induction of a large increase in the rate of pyruvate kinase flux, bringing relative and absolute fluxes up to the levels measured in 24-h-fasted controls. By way of comparison, the effects of ischemia on diabetic liver were studied by /sup 13/C NMR to test whether changes in allosteric effectors under these conditions could also increase pyruvate kinase flux. A large increase in this activity was demonstrated in ischemic diabetic liver.

  5. Combination of immunoprecipitation (IP)-ATP_Glo kinase assay and melanogenesis for the assessment of potent and safe PAK1-blockers in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Be Tu, Pham Thi; Tawata, Shinkichi; Maruta, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Cucurbitacin I (CBI) is a triterpene from a bitter melon called Goya grown in Okinawa, Japan, and directly inhibits both the Tyr-kinase JAK2 and the G protein RAC, leading to the inactivation of PAK1 (RAC/CDC42-activated kinase 1). Bio 30, a propolis produced in New Zealand, contains CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester) as the major anti-cancer ingredient which directly down-regulates RAC, leading to the inactivation of PAK1. Since PAK1 is essential for the growth of RAS cancer cells such as A549 cell line which carry an oncogenic K-RAS mutant, and the melanogenesis in skin cells, here using these PAK1-blockers as model compounds, we introduce a new approach to the quick assessment of PAK1-blockers in cell culture. First, combining the immuno-precipitation (IP) of PAK1 from cell lysate and the in vitro ATP_Glo kinase assay kit (called "Macaroni-Western" assay), we confirmed that both CBI and Bio 30 inactivate PAK1 in A549 lung cancer cells in 24 h, and inhibit their PAK1-dependent growth in 72 h. Furthermore, we verified that CBI inhibits the PAK1/PAK4-dependent melanogenesis in melanoma cells by far more than 50%, while Bio 30 inhibits the melanogenesis only by 50%, with only a merginal effect on their growth per se. Since the "Macaroni-Western" kinase assay and melanogenesis are both rather simple and quick, the combination of these two cell culture assays would be highly useful for selecting both "potent" (highly cell-permeable) and "safe" (non-toxic) natural or synthetic PAK1-blockers.

  6. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  7. Enzymatic Characterization of ER Stress-Dependent Kinase, PERK, and Development of a High-Throughput Assay for Identification of PERK Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Dariusz; Seyb, Kathleen; Liu, Min; Ray, Soumya S; Concannon, John; Huang, Mickey; Cuny, Gregory D; Diehl, J Alan; Glicksman, Marcie A

    2014-08-01

    PERK is serine/threonine kinase localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. PERK is activated and contributes to cell survival in response to a variety of physiological stresses that affect protein quality control in the ER, such as hypoxia, glucose depravation, increased lipid biosynthesis, and increased protein translation. Pro-survival functions of PERK are triggered by such stresses, suggesting that development of small-molecule inhibitors of PERK may be efficacious in a variety of disease scenarios. Hence, we have conducted a detailed enzymatic characterization of the PERK kinase to develop a high-throughput-screening assay (HTS) that will permit the identification of small-molecule PERK inhibitors. In addition to establishing the K(m) of PERK for both its primary substrate, eIF2α, and for adenosine triphosphate, further mechanistic studies revealed that PERK targets its substrate via either a random/steady-state ordered mechanism. For HTS, we developed a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay that yielded a robust Z' factor and percent coefficient of variation value, enabling the successful screening of 79,552 compounds. This approach yielded one compound that exhibited good in vitro and cellular activity. These results demonstrate the validity of this screen and represent starting points for drug discovery efforts.

  8. Oxygen-sensing histidine-protein kinases: assays of ligand binding and turnover of response-regulator substrates.

    PubMed

    Gilles-Gonzalez, Marie-Alda; Gonzalez, Gonzalo; Sousa, Eduardo Henrique Silva; Tuckerman, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Heme-based sensors are a recently discovered functional class of heme proteins that serve to detect physiological fluctuations in oxygen (O(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), or nitric oxide (NO). Many of these modular sensors detect heme ligands by coupling a histidine-protein kinase to a heme-binding domain. They typically bind O2, CO, and NO but respond only to one of these ligands. Usually, they are active in the ferrous unliganded state but are switched off by saturation with O2. The heme-binding domains of these kinases are quite varied. They may feature a PAS fold, as in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Sinorhizobium melitoti FixL proteins, or a GAF fold, as in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DevS and DosT proteins. Alternative folds, such as HNOB (also H-NOX), have also been noted for such signal-transducing kinases, although these classes are less well studied. Histidine-protein kinases function in partnership with cognate response-regulator substrate(s): usually transcription factors that they activate by phosphorylation. For example, FixL proteins specifically phosphorylate their FixJ partners, and DevS and DosT proteins phosphorylate DevR in response to hypoxia. We present methods for purifying these sensors and their protein substrates, verifying the quality of the preparations, determining the K(d) values for binding of ligand and preparing sensors of known saturation, and measuring the rates of turnover (k(cat)) of the protein substrate by sensors of known heme status.

  9. Analytical evaluation of the novel soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and placental growth factor assays for the diagnosis of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Josef; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Performance evaluation of the novel BRAHMS KRYPTOR soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) and placental growth factor (PlGF) assays. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision, functional sensitivity, linearity in dilution, method comparison, and diagnostic capacity were evaluated. Intra-assay coefficient of variations (CVs) were between 1.1% and 5.3% and inter-assay CVs between 3.9% and 11.1%. Functional sensitivity was 6.7ng/L for PlGF and 34ng/L for sFlt-1, respectively. The linearity in dilution was excellent (r>0.995) in the assay-specific relevant range of concentration. The KRYPTOR assay correlated well with the Elecsys sFlt-1 (r=0.996), Elecsys PlGF (r=0.990) and the Elecsys sFlt-1/PlGF ratio (r=0.947) with partially high mean bias values. The optimal cut points for diagnosis of preeclampsia were calculated for KRYPTOR assays at: 60.5ng/L (PlGF), 4725ng/L (sFlt-1), and 99.2 (sFlt-1/PlGF ratio) which were different with the corresponding Elecsys cut points. Nevertheless, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and areas under the curves (AUCs) were completely comparable in both assay platforms, even when applying the standard cut-off of 85 for sFlt-1/PlGF ratio or gestational age specific "rule in-rule-out" cut-offs for early and late onset preeclampsia. The new BRAHMS KRYPTOR sFlt-1 and PlGF immunoassay show excellent precision and reliability. The assay results and the diagnostic capacity were highly comparable to established fully automated immunoassays (Elecsys). Hence, sFlt-1/PlGF ratio generated on KRYPTOR immunoassay platform should be suitable for diagnosing preeclampsia in clinical routine laboratory. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development and Evaluation of a New Creatine Kinase MB Mass Determination Assay Using a Latex Agglutination Turbidimetric Immunoassay with an Automated Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tadashi; Hanai, Kazuma; Tanimoto, Kazuhito; Nakayama, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of myocardial infraction (MI) in patients presenting to the emergency department represents a clinical challenge. It is known that creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) is present in soluble cell fractions of cardiac muscle, and injury to those cells results in an increase of CK-MB in the blood. Therefore, CK-MB is a suitable clinical biomarker of myocardial infraction. To measure CK-MB mass rapidly and easily, we developed the new reagent 'L-type Wako CK-MB mass' (L-CK-MB mass) for the latex agglutination turbidimetric immunoassay method. Using a Hitachi LABOSPECT 008, we evaluated the performance of this assay as a method for quantifying CK-MB mass, and we compared the measurement of the serum CK-MB mass concentration with this assay to that obtained using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). A dilution test showed linearity from 5 μg/L to 190 μg/L, and the limit of quantification of the L-CK-MB mass assay was 3.0 μg/L. The within-run CV and between-day CV were 1.0 - 4.5% and 1.8 - 4.4%, respectively. Serum CK-MB mass concentration determined using the L-CK-MB mass assay was reliably and strongly correlated with that determined using ECLIA (n = 163, r = 0.999, y = 0.977x + 0.307). The L-CK-MB mass assay is able to specifically determine CK-MB mass and is a very useful method for the accurate measurement of CK-MB mass for routine clinical analyses.

  11. A Novel Assay Principle for Modulators of Protein-Protein Interactions and its Application to non-ATP-Competitive Ligands Targeting Protein Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, S. Adrian; Kaler, Gregory; Cottam, Howard B.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Targeting sites that modulate protein-protein interactions represents an ongoing challenge for drug discovery. We have devised an assay principle, named Ligand-Regulated Competition (LiReC), in an effort to find non-ATP competitive small molecule regulators for type Iα cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA-Iα), a protein complex that is implicated in disease. Our assay based on the LiReC principle utilizes a competitive fluorescent peptide probe to assess the integrity of the PKA-Iα complex upon introduction of an allosteric ligand. The developed fluorescence polarization method screens for small molecules that specifically protect (antagonists) or conversely activate (agonists) this protein complex. In high throughput format, various cyclic nucleotide-derived agonists and antagonists are successfully detected with high precision. Furthermore, assay performance (Z’-factors above 0.7) far exceeds the minimum requirement for small molecule screening. To identify compounds that operate through novel modes of action, our method shields the ATP binding site and purposely excludes ATP-competitive ligands. These proof-of-principle experiments highlight the potential of the LiReC technique and suggest its application to other protein complexes, thereby providing a novel approach to identify and characterize modulators (small molecules, proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids) of protein-protein systems. PMID:17165815

  12. A validated assay for the simultaneous quantification of six tyrosine kinase inhibitors and two active metabolites in human serum using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Nielka P; de Wit, Djoeke; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Gelderblom, Hans; Hessing, Trees J; Hartigh, Jan den

    2013-10-15

    A sensitive, sophisticated and practical bioanalytical assay for the simultaneous determination of six tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, sunitinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, pazopanib, regorafenib) and two active metabolites (N-desmethyl imatinib and N-desethyl sunitinib) was developed and validated. For the quantitative assay, a mixture of three stable isotopes as internal standards was added to human serum, standards and controls. Thereafter, samples were pre-treated using protein precipitation with methanol. The supernatant was diluted with water and injected into an ultra pressure liquid chromatographic system with an Acquity TQ tandem mass spectrometry detector. The compounds were separated on an Acquity BEH C18 analytical column (100mm×2.1mm ID, 1.7μm particle size) and eluted with a linear gradient system. The ions were detected in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The lower limit of quantification and the linearity of all compounds generously met with the concentrations that are to be expected in clinical practice. The developed bioanalytical assay can be used for guiding TKI therapy in daily clinical practice as well as for investigator-initiated research.

  13. Optimized thymidylate kinase assay, based on enzymatically synthesized 5-(/sup 125/I)iododeoxyuridine monophosphate and its application to an immunological study of herpes simplex virus thymidine-thymidylate kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstroem, A.R.G.; Gronowitz, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    The biological synthesis and purification of 5-(/sup 125/I)iododeoxyuridine monophosphate (IdUMP) are described. The specificity of IdUMP as substrate in the thymidylate monophosphate kinase (TMPK) assay is demonstrated, and a 100-fold gain in sensitivity as compared to the conventional TMPK assay is shown. TMPK measurements of isozymes derived from herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells, uninfected cells, and tumor biopsies were performed. The results showed a significant difference in dependence of phosphate donor concentration present for TMPK activity from HSV-infected cells compared to the corresponding activity from uninfected cells, while only a minor difference in pH optima was observed for these enzyme activities. The increased sensitivity made it possible to detect and quantify HSV TMPK-blocking antibodies (ab) present in human sera. Sera from HSV ab-positive individuals were found to block the two HSV TMPKs to varying degrees and with different specificities. The immunological relationship between the TMPK and thymidine kinase (TK) induced by HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively, was studied by comparing the capacities of different sera to block the two enzymatic activities. The results showed that the capacity to block HSV-1 TK and TMPK was proportional for all of the sera studied, while sera that preferentially blocked only the HSV-2 TMPK or HSV-2 TK were found. It was concluded that the HSV-2 TMPK and TK activities are less related than the corresponding activities for HSV-1 and that the HSV-2 enzyme activities are mediated by different catalytic sites.

  14. Zirconium-metalloporphyrin frameworks as a three-in-one platform possessing oxygen nanocage, electron media, and bonding site for electrochemiluminescence protein kinase activity assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-Yao; Cai, Chang; Cosnier, Serge; Zeng, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Ji; Shan, Dan

    2016-06-01

    A Zr-based metal-organic framework with zinc tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin (ZnTCPP) groups (MOF-525-Zn) was utilized to develop a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for highly sensitive protein kinase activity assay. In this work, in terms of ECL measurements and cyclic voltammetry, the cathodic ECL behaviors of MOF-525-Zn in aqueous media were thoroughly investigated for the first time. The photoelectric active groups ZnTCPP on the MOF-525-Zn frameworks could promote the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2) via a series of electrochemical and chemical reactions, resulting in a strong and stable red irradiation at 634 nm. Additionally, the surfactant tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOAB) further facilitated dissolved oxygen to interact with the active sites ZnTCPP of MOF-525-Zn. Furthermore, the inorganic Zr-O clusters of MOF-525-Zn were simultaneously served as the recognition sites of phosphate groups. And then, an ultrasensitive ECL sensor was proposed for protein kinase A (PKA) activity detection with a linear range from 0.01 to 20 U mL-1 and a sensitive detection limit of 0.005 U mL-1. This biosensor can also be applied for quantitative kinase inhibitor screening. Finally, it exhibits good performance with high stability and acceptable fabrication reproducibility, which provide a valuable strategy for clinic diagnostics and therapeutics.A Zr-based metal-organic framework with zinc tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin (ZnTCPP) groups (MOF-525-Zn) was utilized to develop a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for highly sensitive protein kinase activity assay. In this work, in terms of ECL measurements and cyclic voltammetry, the cathodic ECL behaviors of MOF-525-Zn in aqueous media were thoroughly investigated for the first time. The photoelectric active groups ZnTCPP on the MOF-525-Zn frameworks could promote the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2) via a series of electrochemical and chemical reactions, resulting in a strong and stable red

  15. Detection of somatic coliphages through a bioluminescence assay measuring phage mediated release of adenylate kinase and adenosine 5'-triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Luna, Carolina; Costán-Longares, Ana; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Joan

    2009-10-01

    The feasibility of detecting somatic coliphages by phage infection of Escherichia coli WG5 and measurement of phage propagation by the lysis mediated release of the bacterial host adenylate kinase (AK) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) detected by a bioluminescent signal was evaluated. After 2h of incubation, all cultures infected with reference bacteriophage phiX174 showed a significant increase in the bioluminescent signal, even with number of phages as low as less of 10 plaque forming units (PFU). Naturally occurring somatic coliphages ensured a significant bioluminescent signal after 3h of infection when >10 PFU were inoculated. These results indicate that an easy and reliable method to detect low numbers of coliphages in less than 3h is feasible.

  16. Src homology 2 domain-based high throughput assays for profiling downstream molecules in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Takuro; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-05-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are evolutionary conserved small protein modules that bind specifically to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. More than 100 SH2 domains have been identified in proteins encoded by the human genome. The binding specificity of these domains plays a critical role in signaling within the cell, mediating the relocalization and interaction of proteins in response to changes in tyrosine phosphorylation states. Here we developed an SH2 domain profiling method based on a multiplexed fluorescent microsphere assay in which various SH2 domains are used to probe the global state of tyrosine phosphorylation within a cell and to screen synthetic peptides that specifically bind to each SH2 domain. The multiplexed, fluorescent microsphere-based assay is a recently developed technology that can potentially detect a wide variety of interactions between biological molecules. We constructed 25-plex SH2 domain-GST fusion protein-conjugated fluorescent microsphere sets to investigate phosphorylation-mediated cell signaling through the specific binding of SH2 domains to activated target proteins. The response of HeLa, COS-1, A431, and 293 cells and four breast cancer cell lines to epidermal growth factor and insulin were quantitatively profiled using this novel microsphere-based, multiplexed, high throughput assay system.

  17. Clinical utility of a two-site immunoradiometric assay for creatine kinase-MB in the detection of perioperative myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    DePuey, E.G.; Aessopos, A.; Monroe, L.R.; Hall, R.J.; Thompson, W.L.; Sonnemaker, R.E.; Burdine, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    In 144 patients, creatine kinase MB was measured serially at 0, 8, 16, 24, 48 and 72 h using a two-site immunoradionmetric assay (IRMA). Cardiac enzymes were also measured, including SGOT, LDH, total CPK, and CK-MB by electrophoresis. The presence of perioperative myocardial infarction (poMI) was established in 24 patients by the appearance of new electrocardiographic Q waves and/or new wall motion abnormalities detected by radionuclide ventriculography. In patients without poMI, CK-MB (IRMA) was elevated at 0 to 8 h but decreased by 16 h. In patients with poMI, peak values occurred at 16 to 24 h. Using a threshold value of 8.5 EU/I, patients with poMI could be distinguished from those without with 97% accuracy (sensitivity = 88%, specificity = 99%). We conclude that the CK-MB (IRMA) can serve as a valuable postoperative screening tet for poMI.

  18. Response of phage T4 polynucleotide kinase toward dinucleotides containing apurinic sites: Design of a sup 32 P-postlabeling assay for apurinic sites in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Weinfeld, M.; Liuzzi, M.; Paterson, M.C. )

    1990-02-20

    The authors have examined the capacity of bacteriophage T4 polynucleotide kinase to phosphorylate the partially depurinated products of d-ApA, namely d-SpA and d-ApS (where S represents an apurinic deoxyribose group). It was observed that the enzyme acted only on the latter isomer. Since molecules of this type (d-NpS) are the sole apurinic site containing products resulting from the combined digestion of lightly depurinated DNA by snake venom phosphodiesterase and calf alkaline phosphatase they were able to devise a postlabeling assay for these biologically important DNA lesions. The method offers several advantages, including (a) elimination of the need for prelabeled DNA, (b) high (femtomole range) sensitivity, and (c) nearest-neighbor analysis of bases 5{prime} to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. Using this assay, they obtained a value for the rate of depurination of form I pRSV neo plasmid DNA. The rate of depurination of poly(dA), treated in a similar fashion, was found to be {approximately}1 base per 10{sup 3} nucleotides per hour.

  19. Electrochemical biosensor for protein kinase A activity assay based on gold nanoparticles-carbon nanospheres, phos-tag-biotin and β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunlei; Yin, Huanshun; Li, Xue; Li, Zhi; Ai, Shiyun; Lin, Hai

    2016-12-15

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor was fabricated for protein kinase A (PKA) activity assay. Multiple signal amplification techniques were employed including the nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres (Au@C), the biocomposite of SiO2 and streptavidin (SiO2-SA), the composite of AuNPs and biotinylated β-galactosidase (AuNPs-B-Gal) and in situ enzymatic generation of electrochemical activity molecule of p-aminophenol. After peptides were assembled on Au@C modified electrode surface, they were phosphorylated by PKA in the presence of ATP. Then, biotinylated Phos-tag was modified on electrode surface through the specific interaction between Phos-tag and phosphate group. Finally, SiO2-SA and AuNPs-B-Gal were captured through the specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Because the electrochemical response of p-aminophenol was directly related to PKA concentration, an innovative electrochemical assay could be realized for PKA detection. The detection limit was 0.014unit/mL. The developed method showed high detection sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, the fabricated biosensor can be also applied to detect PKA in human normal gastricepithelial cell line and human gastric carcinoma cell line with satisfactory results.

  20. Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Human Erythrocytes Involves PATMK, a Member of the Transmembrane Kinase Family

    PubMed Central

    Boettner, Douglas R; Huston, Christopher D; Linford, Alicia S; Buss, Sarah N; Houpt, Eric; Sherman, Nicholas E; Petri, William A

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK), was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i) incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii) PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii) expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMKΔ932). Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMKΔ932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection. PMID:18208324

  1. Diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement in cytological samples through a fluorescence in situ hybridization-based assay: Cytological smears versus cell blocks.

    PubMed

    Zito Marino, Federica; Rossi, Giulio; Brunelli, Matteo; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Liguori, Giuseppina; Bogina, Giuseppe; Morabito, Alessandro; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2017-02-14

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) status analysis of lung cytological specimens should be successfully encouraged in routine practice because biopsy specimens are not always available. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as diagnostic tests for identifying ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with crizotinib. Although ALK IHC is an optimal diagnostic tool, FISH becomes mandatory in equivocal cases. ALK FISH of paraffin-embedded tissue material is still the gold standard, whereas the cytological specimen assay has not yet been completely standardized. Many controversial data have been reported on the adequacy of cytology cell blocks (CBs) versus conventional smears for FISH testing. This review discusses some critical issues related to ALK FISH of cytological samples, including the triaging of collected specimens to optimize the material, the use of CBs versus conventional smears, and alternative methods for an ALK rearrangement diagnosis. Conventional smears have the advantages of an immediate evaluation, no probe tissue-related artifactual loss, no fixation-related alterations, and usually sufficient material for an analytic preparation. On the other hand, CBs have several advantages, including the appropriate conservation of the tissue architecture, an absence of problems related to cell overlapping, and the ability to evaluate neoplastic cells in a dark field. Cancer Cytopathol 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Rapid and sensitive allele-specific (AS)-RT-PCR assay for detection of T315I mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Manrique Arechavaleta, Gonzalo; Scholl, Vanesa; Pérez, Verónica; Bittencourt, Roberta; Moellmann, Arthur; Hassan, Rocio; Seuánez, Héctor N; Dobbin, Jane; Martinez, Lem; Renault, Ilana Zalcberg; Uriarte, Rosario

    2011-03-01

    Point mutations in the kinase domain of BCR-ABL were described in 40-90% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) resistant to Imatinib. We herein describe the development of a rapid allele-specific (AS)-RT-PCR assay to identify the T315I mutation, which confers full resistance to all available tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI). The mutation status of 65 patients with resistant CML was evaluated, and the T315I was detected in 3/65 (4.6%). Comparisons between sequencing and AS-RT-PCR results, as well as serial dilutions experiments proved that the method is specific and reproducible, with maximum sensitivity of 1 × 10(-3). The developed assay is a convenient and easy tool to be used in research of CML resistance for rapid mutation screening and, together with sequencing, may be included in efficient strategies for early detection of TKI resistance in patients with CML.

  3. The selectivity and promiscuity of brain-neuroregenerative inhibitors between ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms: An integration of SB-QSSR modelling, QM/MM analysis and in vitro kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L; Yang, Y; Lu, X

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) have long been recognized as an attractive therapeutic target for various neurological diseases; selective inhibition of ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms would result in distinct biological effects on neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and neuroregeneration after brain surgery and traumatic brain injury. However, the discovery and design of isoform-selective inhibitors remain a great challenge due to the high conservation and similarity between the kinase domains of ROCK1 and ROCK2. Here, a structure-based quantitative structure-selectivity relationship (SB-QSSR) approach was used to correlate experimentally measured selectivity with the difference in inhibitor binding to the two kinase isoforms. The resulting regression models were examined rigorously through both internal cross-validation and external blind validation; a nonlinear predictor was found to have high fitting stability and strong generalization ability, which was then employed to perform virtual screening against a structurally diverse, drug-like compound library. Consequently, five and seven hits were identified as promising candidates of 1-o-2 and 2-o-1 selective inhibitors, respectively, from which seven purchasable compounds were tested in vitro using a standard kinase assay protocol to determine their inhibitory activity against and selectivity between ROCK1 and ROCK2. The structural basis, energetic property and biological implication underlying inhibitor selectivity and promiscuity were also investigated systematically using a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) scheme.

  4. A novel Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR based assay for genotyping SNP rs12303764(G/T) of human Unc-51 like kinase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Rohit; Duseja, Ajay; Changotra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    Various case-control studies have shown association of single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) in ULK1 with crohn's disease. The techniques used in these studies were time consuming, complicated and require sophisticated/expensive instruments. Therefore, in order to overcome these problems, we have developed a new, rapid and cost effective Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR assay to genotype single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) of ULK1 gene. We manually designed allele specific primers. DNA fragment amplified using outer primers was sequenced to obtain samples with known genotypes (GG, GT and TT) for further use in the development of T-ARMS-PCR assay. Amplification conditions were optimized for parameters; annealing temperature, Taq DNA polymerase and primers. The developed T-ARMS-PCR assay was applied to genotype one hundred samples from healthy individuals. Genotyping results of 10 DNA samples from healthy individuals for rs12303764(G/T) by T-ARMS-PCR assay and sequencing were concordant. The newly developed assay was further applied to genotype samples from 100 healthy individuals of North Indian origin. Genotype frequencies were 9, 34 and 57 % for GG, GT and TT, respectively. Allele frequencies were 0.26 and 0.74 for G and T, respectively. The allele frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium (p = 0.2443). T-ARMS-PCR assay developed in our laboratory for genotyping rs12303764 (G/T) of ULK1 gene is time saving and cost-effective as compared to the available methods. Furthermore, this is the first study reporting allelic and genotype frequencies of ULK1 rs12303764 (G/T) variants in North Indian population.

  5. The split Renilla luciferase complementation assay is useful for identifying the interaction of Epstein-Barr virus protein kinase BGLF4 and a heat shock protein Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Guo, W; Long, C; Zhou, H; Wang, H; Sun, X

    2016-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions can regulate different cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, and oncogenic transformation. The split Renilla luciferase complementation assay (SRLCA) is one of the techniques that detect protein-protein interactions. The SRLCA is based on the complementation of the LN and LC non-functional halves of Renilla luciferase fused to possibly interacting proteins which after interaction form a functional enzyme and emit luminescence. The BGLF4 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a viral protein kinase that is expressed during the early and late stages of lytic cycles, which can regulate multiple cellular and viral substrates to optimize the DNA replication environment. The heat shock protein Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that maintains the integrity of structure and function of various interacting proteins, which can form a complex with BGLF4 and stabilize its expression in cells. The interaction between BGLF4 and Hsp90 could be specifically detected through the SRLCA. The region of aa 250-295 of BGLF4 is essential for the BGLF4/Hsp90 interaction and the mutation of Phe-254, Leu-266, and Leu-267 can disrupt this interaction. These results suggest that the SRLCA can specifically detect the BGLF4/Hsp90 interaction and provide a reference to develop inhibitors that disrupt the BGLF4/Hsp90 interaction.

  6. Serological thymidine kinase 1 is a biomarker for early detection of tumours--a health screening study on 35,365 people, using a sensitive chemiluminescent dot blot assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi Heng; Huang, Shou Qing; Wang, Yande; Yang, Ai Zhen; Wen, Jian; Xu, Xiao Hong; Chen, Yan; Chen, Qu Bo; Wang, Ying Hong; He, Ellen; Zhou, Ji; Skog, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Serological thymidine kinase 1 (STK1) is a reliable proliferation marker for prognosis, monitoring tumour therapy, and relapse. Here we investigated the use of STK1 in health screening for early detection of pre-malignant and malignant diseases. The investigation was based on 35,365 participants in four independent health screening studies in China between 2005-2011. All participants were clinically examined. The concentration of STK1 was determined by a sensitive chemiluminescent dot blot ECL assay. The ROCvalue of the STK1 assay was 0.96. At a cut-off STK1 value of 2.0 pM, the likelihood (+) value was 236.5, and the sensitivity and the specificity were 0.78 and 0.99, respectively. The relative number of city-dwelling people with elevated STK1 values (≥2.0 pM) was 0.8% (198/26,484), while the corresponding value for the group of oil-field workers was 5.8% (514/8,355). The latter group expressed significantly higher frequency of refractory anaemia, fatty liver, and obesity, compared to the city dwellers, but no cases of breast hyperplasia or prostate hyperplasia. Furthermore, people working in oil drilling/oil transportation showed higher STK1 values and higher frequency of pre-malignancies and benign diseases than people working in the oil-field administration. In the STK1 elevated group of the city-dwelling people, a statistically significantly higher number of people were found to have malignancies, pre-malignancies of all types, moderate/severe type of hyperplasia of breast or prostate, or refractory anaemia, or to be at high risk for hepatitis B, compared to people with normal STK1 values (<2.0 pM). No malignancies were found in the normal STK1 group. In the elevated STK1 group 85.4% showed diseases linked to a higher risk for pre-/early cancerous progression, compared to 52.4% of those with normal STK1 values. Among participants with elevated STK1 values, 8.8% developed new malignancies or progress in their pre-malignancies within 5 to 72 months, compared

  7. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    DOEpatents

    Skopek, Thomas R.; Liber, Howard L.; Penman, Bruce W.; Thilly, William G.; Hoppe, IV, Henry

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  8. Using Bioluminescent Kinase Profiling Strips to Identify Kinase Inhibitor Selectivity and Promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Zegzouti, Hicham; Hennek, Jacquelyn; Goueli, Said A

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of a kinase inhibitor throughout drug discovery and development is predicated upon its selectivity towards the target of interest. Thus, profiling the compound against a broad panel of kinases is important for providing a better understanding of its activity and for obviating any off-target activities that can result in undesirable consequences. To assess the selectivity and potency of an inhibitor against multiple kinases, it is desirable to use a universal assay that can monitor the activity of all classes of kinases regardless of the nature of their substrates. The luminescent ADP-Glo kinase assay is a universal platform that measures kinase activity by quantifying the amount of the common kinase reaction product ADP. Here we present a method using standardized kinase profiling systems for inhibitor profiling studies based on ADP detection by luminescence. The kinase profiling systems are sets of kinases organized by family, presented in multi-tube strips containing eight enzymes, each with corresponding substrate strips, and standardized for optimal kinase activity. We show that using the kinase profiling strips we could quickly and easily generate multiple selectivity profiles using small or large kinase panels, and identify compound promiscuity within the kinome.

  9. Seeding collaborations to advance kinase science with the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS).

    PubMed

    Drewry, David H; Willson, Timothy M; Zuercher, William J

    2014-01-01

    To catalyze research on historically untargeted protein kinases, we created the PKIS, an annotated set of 367 small molecule kinase inhibitors. The set has been widely distributed to academic collaborators as an open access tool. It has been used to identify chemical starting points for development of chemical probes for orphan kinases and to investigate kinase signaling in high content phenotypic assays. Access to the set comes with few restrictions other than the requirement that assay results be released into the public domain for the benefit of the entire research community. Examples from the efforts of several collaborators are summarized.

  10. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  11. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  12. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  13. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  14. Enzyme assays.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  15. Protein Kinases in Zucchini (Characterization of Calcium-Requiring Plasma Membrane Kinases).

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, S. D.; Gaiser, J. C.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    Using an in situ phosphorylation assay with zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L. cv Dark Green) seedling tissue, we have identified numerous polypeptides that are capable of acting as protein kinases. Total protein preparations from different organs contain different kinase profiles, but all are within the range of 55 to 70 kD. At least four kinases are associated with highly purified plasma membranes from etiolated zucchini hypocotyls. The major phosphorylated polypeptides from plasma membranes range in apparent molecular mass from 58 to 68 kD. The plasma membrane kinases are activated by micromolar concentrations of calcium and phosphorylate serine, and, to a lesser extent, threonine residues. These characteristics are similar to those of a soluble calcium-dependent protein kinase that has been purified to homogeneity from soybean suspension cultures. Three of the zucchini plasma membrane kinases share antigenic epitopes with the soluble soybean kinase. The presence of kinase activity at different apparent molecular masses may be indicative of separate kinases with similar characteristics. The zucchini hypocotyl protein kinases are not removed from plasma membrane vesicles by 0.5 M NaCl/5 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate or by detergent concentrations below the critical micelle concentration of two types of detergent. This indicates that the plasma membrane protein kinases are tightly associated with the membrane in zucchini seedlings. PMID:12231949

  16. 3-aminopyrazolopyrazine derivatives as spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiayi; Li, Xiaokai; Zhang, Zhang; Luo, Jingfeng; Long, Huoyou; Tu, Zhengchao; Zhou, Xiaoping; Ding, Ke; Lu, Xiaoyun

    2016-11-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase is a new promising target for drug discovery to treat human cancer and inflammatory disorders. A series of pyrazolopyrazine-3-amine and pyrazolopyrimidine-3-amine derivatives was designed and synthesized as new spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efforts yielded compound 6h with promising spleen tyrosine kinase inhibition in both enzymatic and B-lymphoma cell proliferation assays. Additionally, compound 6h dose dependently inhibited the activation of spleen tyrosine kinase signal in human B-cell lymphoma cells. Compound 6h might serve as a lead for further development of new spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Protein kinase biochemistry and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Phillip A; Murray, Brion W

    2011-12-01

    Protein kinases are fascinating biological catalysts with a rapidly expanding knowledge base, a growing appreciation in cell regulatory control, and an ascendant role in successful therapeutic intervention. To better understand protein kinases, the molecular underpinnings of phosphoryl group transfer, protein phosphorylation, and inhibitor interactions are examined. This analysis begins with a survey of phosphate group and phosphoprotein properties which provide context to the evolutionary selection of phosphorylation as a central mechanism for biological regulation of most cellular processes. Next, the kinetic and catalytic mechanisms of protein kinases are examined with respect to model aqueous systems to define the elements of catalysis. A brief structural biology overview further delves into the molecular basis of catalysis and regulation of catalytic activity. Concomitant with a prominent role in normal physiology, protein kinases have important roles in the disease state. To facilitate effective kinase drug discovery, classic and emerging approaches for characterizing kinase inhibitors are evaluated including biochemical assay design, inhibitor mechanism of action analysis, and proper kinetic treatment of irreversible inhibitors. As the resulting protein kinase inhibitors can modulate intended and unintended targets, profiling methods are discussed which can illuminate a more complete range of an inhibitor's biological activities to enable more meaningful cellular studies and more effective clinical studies. Taken as a whole, a wealth of protein kinase biochemistry knowledge is available, yet it is clear that a substantial extent of our understanding in this field remains to be discovered which should yield many new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Interaction of phospholipase D1 with a casein-kinase-2-like serine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, I G; Walker, S J; Manifava, M; Li, D; Brown, H A; Ktistakis, N T

    2001-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD)1 was phosphorylated in vivo and by an associated kinase in vitro following immunoprecipitation. Both phosphorylation events were greatly reduced in a catalytically inactive point mutant in which the serine residue at position 911 was converted into alanine (S911A). The kinase could be enriched from detergent-extracted brain membranes and bind and phosphorylate PLD1 that was immunoprecipitated from COS-7 cells. Using in-gel kinase assays we determined that the size of the kinase is approximately 40 kDa and that PLD1 is more effective than S911A in binding the kinase. Preliminary analysis of the phosphorylation sites on PLD1 suggested that the kinase belongs to the casein kinase 2 (CK2) family. Consistent with this, we found that the kinase could utilize GTP, and could be inhibited by heparin and 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). Membrane fractions from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines that inducibly express PLD1 contained an endogenous kinase activity that phosphorylated PLD1 using GTP and was inhibited by DRB. Direct evidence that the kinase is CK2 came from observations that immunoprecipitates using PLD1 antibodies contained immunoreactive CK2alpha, and immunoprecipitates using CK2alpha antibodies contained immunoreactive PLD1. Co-expression of PLD1 in COS-7 cells with the two recombinant CK2 subunits, alpha or beta, suggests that the association of PLD1 with the kinase is through the beta subunit. Supporting this, phosphorylation of PLD1 by purified recombinant CK2alpha was enhanced by purified recombinant CK2beta. Assays measuring PLD1 catalytic activity following phosphorylation by CK2 suggest that this phosphorylation event does not influence PLD1-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine in vitro. PMID:11171116

  19. The spectral karyotype of L5178Y TK⁺/⁻ mouse lymphoma cells clone 3.7.2C and factors affecting mutant frequency at the thymidine kinase (tk) locus in the microtitre mouse lymphoma assay.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Mick D; McDermott, Angela; Clare, Katie R; Doherty, Ann; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-01-01

    There has been much discussion on acceptable spontaneous mutant frequencies in the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA). This culminated in the International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT) recommended control limits for the microtitre version of 50-170 mutants/10(6) viable cells, which has now been included in the draft Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development guideline for assays investigating mammalian cell gene mutation at the tk locus. Some of the factors affecting mutant frequency have been investigated. It was shown that when culturing methotrexate cleansed TK⁺/⁻ cells, a spontaneous mutant frequency of ∼100 mutants/10⁶ viable cells was achieved after only 26 doublings. However, after further culturing for ∼6 months the spontaneous mutant frequency only gradually increased. Culturing for this time did not affect the karyotype of the cell in so much as the modal chromosome number remained stable. The spontaneous mutant frequency could effectively be manipulated by cleansing with various concentrations of methotrexate. The necessity for using appropriately heat-inactivated horse serum was confirmed. Finally, following treatment with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, cells did not preferentially survive when plated at high cell densities (1.6 cells plus 2,000 feeder cells/well) versus cells at low density (1.6 cells/well). It was considered that these findings confirm that the dynamics of spontaneous mutant formation in the MLA are complex. However, the karyotype of L5178Y cells is remarkably stable and assuming investigators are using cells with appropriate provenance and good culturing technique, it is clear that the IWGT recommendations are achievable.

  20. Angiogenesis Assays.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis.

  1. Teaching resources. Protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Avrom

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein kinases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the genomics and evolutionary relationships among kinases and then proceeds to describe the structure-function relationships of specific kinases, the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate specificity, and selected issues in regulation of kinase activity.

  2. Two Kinase Family Dramas

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Hurley, James H.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Lietha and colleagues (2007) report the structure of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and reveal how FAK maintains an autoinhibited state. Together with the structure of another tyrosine kinase, ZAP-70 (Deindl et al., 2007), this work highlights the diversity of mechanisms that nature has evolved within the kinase superfamily to regulate their activity through autoinhibition. PMID:17574014

  3. Cadmium activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene and MBP kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Hsiao, Lin-June; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are modules involved in the transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular targets in all eukaryotes. In plants, it has been evidenced that MAPKs play a role in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stresses, plant hormones, and cell cycle cues. However, the effect of heavy metals on plant MAPKs has not been well examined. The Northern blot analysis of OsMAPK mRNA levels has shown that only OsMAPK2, but not OsMAPK3 and OsMAPK4, expressed in suspension-cultured cells in response to 100-400 microM Cd treatments. The OsMAPK2 transcripts increased within 12 h upon 400 microM Cd treatment. In addition, we found that 42- and 50-kDa MBP kinases were significantly activated by Cd treatment in rice suspension-cultured cells. And 40-, 42-, 50- and 64-kDa MBP kinases were activated in rice roots. Furthermore, GSH inhibits Cd-induced 40-kDa MBP kinase activation. By immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by in-gel kinase assay, we confirmed that Cd-activated 42-kDa MBP kinase is a MAP kinase. Our results suggest that a MAP kinase cascade may function in the Cd-signalling pathway in rice.

  4. Activation of fat cell adenylate cyclase by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, S.; Noguchi, M.; Huang, K.P.; Londos, C.

    1986-05-01

    Purified protein kinase C (C-kinase) from guinea pig pancreas and rat brain stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in purified rat adipocyte membranes. Cyclase stimulation occurred over 100 to 1000 mU/ml of C-kinase activity, required greater than 10 ..mu..M calcium, proceeded without a lag, was not readily reversible, and required no exogenous phospholipid. Moreover, C-kinase inhibitors, such as chlorpromazine and palmitoyl carnitine, inhibited selectively adenylate cyclase which was activated by C-kinase and calcium. Depending on assay conditions, 10 nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either enhanced or was required for kinase action on cyclase. Also, TPA plus calcium promoted the quantitative association of C-kinase with membranes. Adenylate cyclase activation by C-kinase was seen both in the presence and absence of exogenous GTP, indicating that the kinase effect does not result from an action on the GTP-binding, inhibitory regulatory component (N/sub i/) of the cyclase system. Moreover, the kinase effect was seen in the presence of non-phosphorylating ATP analogs, such as AppNHp and AppCH/sub 2/p, suggesting that the effects of C-kinase described herein may result from association with, rather than phosphorylation of, adenylate cyclase.

  5. Nucleotide selectivity of antibiotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-05-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3')-IIIa, APH(2'')-Ib, and MPH(2')-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3')-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2')-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2'')-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance.

  6. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-09-03

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  7. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-05-01

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  8. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C.; Muskal, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  9. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  10. A Comparison of Protein Kinases Inhibitor Screening Methods Using Both Enzymatic Activity and Binding Affinity Determination

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Amalie Frederikke; Skovgaard, Tine; Knapp, Stefan; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Berthelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Binding assays are increasingly used as a screening method for protein kinase inhibitors; however, as yet only a weak correlation with enzymatic activity-based assays has been demonstrated. We show that the correlation between the two types of assays can be improved using more precise screening conditions. Furthermore a marked improvement in the correlation was found by using kinase constructs containing the catalytic domain in presence of additional domains or subunits. PMID:24915177

  11. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  12. Simple fluorescence-based detection of protein kinase A activity using a molecular beacon probe.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbei; Lv, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Kemin; Jin, Shunxin; Liu, Haisheng; Wu, Kefeng; Zeng, Weimin

    2017-06-08

    Protein kinase A was detected by quantifying the amount of ATP used after a protein kinase reaction. The ATP assay was performed using the T4 DNA ligase and a molecular beacon (MB). In the presence of ATP, DNA ligase catalyzed the ligation of short DNA. The ligation product then hybridized to MB, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement of the MB. This assay was capable of determining protein kinase A in the range of 12.5∼150 nM, with a detection limit of 1.25 nM. Furthermore, this assay could also be used to investigate the effect of genistein on protein kinase A. It was a universal, non-radioisotopic, and homogeneous method for assaying protein kinase A.

  13. [Evaluation of the Creatine Kinase MB Activity Assay Kit].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Manabu; Kimura, Shigeki; Matsui, Masahiko; Suehisa, Etsuji; Hidaka, Yoh

    2014-11-01

    CK-MB activity, which is measured by the immunoinhibition method, is an important marker for use in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes. In the present study, we evaluated the basal performance of a recently improved CK-MB activity kit, "L-system CK-MB," in which the activity of mitochondrial CK subunits is inhibited. Within-run and between-day precision were in the range of 1.9-2.3% and 3.2-6.0%, respectively. Diluted linearity and limit of detection were determined to be 600 U/L and 0.8 U/L, respectively. The use of L-system CK-MB allowed the inhibition of the activity of 98.1% of sarcomeric mitochondrial CK, 97.7% of ubiquitous mitochondrial CK, and 99.9% of CK-MM. The correlation coefficient (r) between CK-MB activity and CK-MB protein was 0.968. However, we found 4 cases showing CK-MB activity significantly higher than the protein concentration. Increased CK-BB activity was detected by electrophoresis in these cases. In some patients with malignant tumors, the presence of CK-immunoglobulin complex also lead to elevated CK-MB concentrations. Thus, the discrepancy in the CK-MB activity and the protein concentration may be caused by the presence of CK-BB and/or CK-immunoglobulin complex. More attention needs to be focused on samples with high CK-MB protein concentrations, especially when the CK-MB/CK ratio is high.

  14. [PTH assay: whole PTH assay (new IRMA assay)].

    PubMed

    Tanno, Yudo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2003-03-01

    The common intact-PTH assay detects not only PTH (1-84) but also PTH (7-84) fragment. Recently, it is reported that PTH (7-84) fragment is the antagonist to PTH (1-84) biological action. Thus, conventional intact-PTH assay might mislead the overestimation of parathyroid function in uremic patients. Whole PTH assay, which detect only PTH (1-84) fragments may be useful for more precise evaluation of PTH activity in uremic patient.

  15. A Highly Scalable Peptide-Based Assay System for Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Igor A.; Thomsen, Elliot R.; Munchel, Sarah E.; Villegas, Patricia; Capek, Petr; Gower, Austin J.; K. Pond, Stephanie J.; Chudin, Eugene; Chee, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a scalable and cost-effective technology for generating and screening high-complexity customizable peptide sets. The peptides are made as peptide-cDNA fusions by in vitro transcription/translation from pools of DNA templates generated by microarray-based synthesis. This approach enables large custom sets of peptides to be designed in silico, manufactured cost-effectively in parallel, and assayed efficiently in a multiplexed fashion. The utility of our peptide-cDNA fusion pools was demonstrated in two activity-based assays designed to discover protease and kinase substrates. In the protease assay, cleaved peptide substrates were separated from uncleaved and identified by digital sequencing of their cognate cDNAs. We screened the 3,011 amino acid HCV proteome for susceptibility to cleavage by the HCV NS3/4A protease and identified all 3 known trans cleavage sites with high specificity. In the kinase assay, peptide substrates phosphorylated by tyrosine kinases were captured and identified by sequencing of their cDNAs. We screened a pool of 3,243 peptides against Abl kinase and showed that phosphorylation events detected were specific and consistent with the known substrate preferences of Abl kinase. Our approach is scalable and adaptable to other protein-based assays. PMID:22701568

  16. A-kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Recruits Protein Kinase C to Phosphorylate Roundabout Receptors.

    PubMed

    Samelson, Bret K; Gore, Bryan B; Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Purkey, Alicia M; Colledge, Marcie; Langeberg, Lorene K; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Zweifel, Larry S; Scott, John D

    2015-05-29

    Anchoring proteins direct protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases toward selected substrates to control the efficacy, context, and duration of neuronal phosphorylation events. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 interacts with protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) to modulate second messenger signaling events. In a mass spectrometry-based screen for additional AKAP79/150 binding partners, we have identified the Roundabout axonal guidance receptor Robo2 and its ligands Slit2 and Slit3. Biochemical and cellular approaches confirm that a linear sequence located in the cytoplasmic tail of Robo2 (residues 991-1070) interfaces directly with sites on the anchoring protein. Parallel studies show that AKAP79/150 interacts with the Robo3 receptor in a similar manner. Immunofluorescent staining detects overlapping expression patterns for murine AKAP150, Robo2, and Robo3 in a variety of brain regions, including hippocampal region CA1 and the islands of Calleja. In vitro kinase assays, peptide spot array mapping, and proximity ligation assay staining approaches establish that human AKAP79-anchored PKC selectively phosphorylates the Robo3.1 receptor subtype on serine 1330. These findings imply that anchored PKC locally modulates the phosphorylation status of Robo3.1 in brain regions governing learning and memory and reward. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. In Vitro Characterization of Derrone as an Aurora Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nhung Thi My; Phuong, Thuong Thien; Nguyen, Trang Thi Nhu; Tran, Yen Thi Hai; Nguyen, Anh Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Thanh Lai; Bui, Khanh Thi Van

    2016-06-01

    Among mitotic kinases, Aurora kinases are the most widely studied, since their expression is restricted to mitosis. They play a key role in chromosome segregation and cell polyploidy. Aurora kinases are important therapeutic targets, and several research groups have directed their efforts toward the identification of kinase inhibitors. The aim of this study is to screen and characterize Aurora kinase inhibitors from natural substances extracted from plants that are used in the Vietnamese pharmacopoeia. We have characterized in vitro Derrone, extracted from Erythrina orientalis L. MURR, as a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor. This compound exhibited an ability to inhibit the phosphorylation of histone H3 at ser10 both in kinase assay and at the cellular level. The compound was more effective against Aurora kinase B, with a lower IC50 value as compared to Aurora A. Moreover, it impaired the mitotic spindle checkpoint and led to endoreduplication in cancer cells, a phenomenon caused by an Aurora B inhibitor. Interestingly, using the xCelligence system and real-time cell analysis (RTCA) software, we set up a comparison of cell proliferation profiles between cancer cells treated with Derrone and VX680-a well-known Aurora kinase inhibitor-and we found that these profiles exhibited considerable similarity in cell morphology, growth, and death. Additionally, Derrone significantly inhibited the formation and growth of MCF7 tumor spheroids.

  18. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  19. Irreversible Nek2 kinase inhibitors with cellular activity

    PubMed Central

    Henise, Jeffrey C.; Taunton, Jack

    2013-01-01

    A structure-based approach was used to design irreversible, cysteine-targeted inhibitors of the human centrosomal kinase, Nek2. Potent inhibition of Nek2 kinase activity in biochemical and cell-based assays required a noncatalytic cysteine residue (Cys22), located near the glycine-rich loop in a subset of human kinases. Elaboration of an oxindole scaffold led to our most selective compound, oxindole propynamide 16 (JH295). Propynamide 16 irreversibly inhibited cellular Nek2 without affecting the mitotic kinases, Cdk1, Aurora B, or Plk1. Moreover, 16 did not perturb bipolar spindle assembly or the spindle assembly checkpoint. To our knowledge, 16 is the first small molecule shown to inactivate Nek2 kinase activity in cells. PMID:21627121

  20. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Eathiraj, Sudharshan; Palma, Rocio; Hirschi, Marscha; Volckova, Erika; Nakuci, Enkeleda; Castro, Jennifer; Chen, Chang-Rung; Chan, Thomas C. K.; France, Dennis S.; Ashwell, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases. PMID:21454610

  1. Comprehensive characterization of the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Fedele, Vita; Szklarz, Marta; Abdul Azeez, Kamal R; Salah, Eidarus; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Romanov, Sergei; Sepetov, Nikolai; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Al Haj Zen, Ayman; Fourches, Denis; Muratov, Eugene; Tropsha, Alex; Morris, Joel; Teicher, Beverly A; Kunkel, Mark; Polley, Eric; Lackey, Karen E; Atkinson, Francis L; Overington, John P; Bamborough, Paul; Müller, Susanne; Price, Daniel J; Willson, Timothy M; Drewry, David H; Knapp, Stefan; Zuercher, William J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of protein kinase inhibitors as approved therapeutics, drug discovery has focused on a small subset of kinase targets. Here we provide a thorough characterization of the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS), a set of 367 small-molecule ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that was recently made freely available with the aim of expanding research in this field and as an experiment in open-source target validation. We screen the set in activity assays with 224 recombinant kinases and 24 G protein-coupled receptors and in cellular assays of cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis. We identify chemical starting points for designing new chemical probes of orphan kinases and illustrate the utility of these leads by developing a selective inhibitor for the previously untargeted kinases LOK and SLK. Our cellular screens reveal compounds that modulate cancer cell growth and angiogenesis in vitro. These reagents and associated data illustrate an efficient way forward to increasing understanding of the historically untargeted kinome.

  2. Testing the promiscuity of commercial kinase inhibitors against the AGC kinase group using a split-luciferase screen.

    PubMed

    Jester, Benjamin W; Gaj, Alicia; Shomin, Carolyn D; Cox, Kurt J; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2012-02-23

    Using a newly developed competitive binding assay dependent upon the reassembly of a split reporter protein, we have tested the promiscuity of a panel of reported kinase inhibitors against the AGC group. Many non-AGC targeted kinase inhibitors target multiple members of the AGC group. In general, structurally similar inhibitors consistently exhibited activity toward the same target as well as toward closely related kinases. The inhibition data was analyzed to test the predictive value of either using identity scores derived from residues within 6 Å of the active site or identity scores derived from the entire kinase domain. The results suggest that the active site identity in certain cases may be a stronger predictor of inhibitor promiscuity. The overall results provide general guidelines for establishing inhibitor selectivity as well as for the future design of inhibitors that either target or avoid AGC kinases.

  3. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  4. Effect of Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF Beta) and Vitamin D3 Metabolites on Protein Kinase C Mediated Signal Transduction in Rat Costochondral Chondrocyte Cultures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-05-01

    The Macro BCA Protein Assay Reagent combines the biuret reaction (Protein reacting with Cu2 +) with BCA. A purple product is formed by the interaction...with vitamin D3 metabolites for up to 24 hours, lysed, and the cell extracts assayed for protein kinase C (PKC) specific activity using a specific...C. Experimental Protocols 13 D. Protein Kinase C Assays 14 E. Translocation Experiment Protocols 16 F. Tyrosine Kinase and Phospholipase C 16 viii G

  5. MAPK Assays in Arabidopsis MAMP-PRR Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hoo Sun; Sheen, Jen

    2017-01-01

    Activation of MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) cascades after MAMP (Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern) perception through PRR (Pattern Recognition Receptor) is one of the first conserved responses when plants encounter microbial organisms. Phosphorylation of various cellular factors in the MAMP-PRR pathway by MAPK cascades is critical for broad-spectrum plant innate immunity. Measurement of MAPK activation and identification of MAPK phosphorylation targets in the MAMP-PRR signal transduction pathway are essential to understand how plants reprogram their cellular processes to cope with unfavorable microbial attack. Here, we describe detailed protocols of three assays measuring MAPK activity after MAMP perception: (1) immune-blotting analysis with anti-phospho ERK1/2 antibody; (2) in-gel kinase assay using a general substrate myelin basic protein (MBP); (3) an in vitro kinase assay to evaluate phosphorylation of MAPK substrate candidates during MAMP-PRR signaling based on a protoplast expression system.

  6. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  7. Compound Selectivity and Target Residence Time of Kinase Inhibitors Studied with Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Willemsen-Seegers, Nicole; Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Prinsen, Martine B W; de Vetter, Judith R F; de Man, Jos; Sawa, Masaaki; Kawase, Yusuke; Buijsman, Rogier C; Zaman, Guido J R

    2017-02-17

    Target residence time (τ) has been suggested to be a better predictor of the biological activity of kinase inhibitors than inhibitory potency (IC50) in enzyme assays. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays for 46 human protein and lipid kinases were developed. The association and dissociation constants of 80 kinase inhibitor interactions were determined. τ and equilibrium affinity constants (KD) were calculated to determine kinetic selectivity. Comparison of τ and KD or IC50 values revealed a strikingly different view on the selectivity of several kinase inhibitors, including the multi-kinase inhibitor ponatinib, which was tested on 10 different kinases. In addition, known pan-Aurora inhibitors resided much longer on Aurora B than on Aurora A, despite having comparable affinity for Aurora A and B. Furthermore, the γ/δ-selective PI3K inhibitor duvelisib and the δ-selective drug idelalisib had similar 20-fold selectivity for δ- over γ-isoform but duvelisib resided much longer on both targets.

  8. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  9. The specificities of protein kinase inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Jenny; McLauchlan, Hilary; Elliott, Matthew; Cohen, Philip

    2003-01-01

    We have previously examined the specificities of 28 commercially available compounds, reported to be relatively selective inhibitors of particular serine/threonine-specific protein kinases [Davies, Reddy, Caivano and Cohen (2000) Biochem. J. 351, 95-105]. In the present study, we have extended this analysis to a further 14 compounds. Of these, indirubin-3'-monoxime, SP 600125, KT 5823 and ML-9 were found to inhibit a number of protein kinases and conclusions drawn from their use in cell-based assays are likely to be erroneous. Kenpaullone, Alsterpaullone, Purvalanol, Roscovitine, pyrazolopyrimidine 1 (PP1), PP2 and ML-7 were more specific, but still inhibited two or more protein kinases with similar potency. Our results suggest that the combined use of Roscovitine and Kenpaullone may be useful for identifying substrates and physiological roles of cyclin-dependent protein kinases, whereas the combined use of Kenpaullone and LiCl may be useful for identifying substrates and physiological roles of glycogen synthase kinase 3. The combined use of SU 6656 and either PP1 or PP2 may be useful for identifying substrates of Src family members. Epigallocatechin 3-gallate, one of the main polyphenolic constituents of tea, inhibited two of the 28 protein kinases in the panel, dual-specificity, tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A; IC(50)=0.33 microM) and p38-regulated/activated kinase (PRAK; IC(50)=1.0 microM). PMID:12534346

  10. A Flexible Workflow for Automated Bioluminescent Kinase Selectivity Profiling.

    PubMed

    Worzella, Tracy; Butzler, Matt; Hennek, Jacquelyn; Hanson, Seth; Simdon, Laura; Goueli, Said; Cowan, Cris; Zegzouti, Hicham

    2017-04-01

    Kinase profiling during drug discovery is a necessary process to confirm inhibitor selectivity and assess off-target activities. However, cost and logistical limitations prevent profiling activities from being performed in-house. We describe the development of an automated and flexible kinase profiling workflow that combines ready-to-use kinase enzymes and substrates in convenient eight-tube strips, a bench-top liquid handling device, ADP-Glo Kinase Assay (Promega, Madison, WI) technology to quantify enzyme activity, and a multimode detection instrument. Automated methods were developed for kinase reactions and quantification reactions to be assembled on a Gilson (Middleton, WI) PIPETMAX, following standardized plate layouts for single- and multidose compound profiling. Pipetting protocols were customized at runtime based on user-provided information, including compound number, increment for compound titrations, and number of kinase families to use. After the automated liquid handling procedures, a GloMax Discover (Promega) microplate reader preloaded with SMART protocols was used for luminescence detection and automatic data analysis. The functionality of the automated workflow was evaluated with several compound-kinase combinations in single-dose or dose-response profiling formats. Known target-specific inhibitions were confirmed. Novel small molecule-kinase interactions, including off-target inhibitions, were identified and confirmed in secondary studies. By adopting this streamlined profiling process, researchers can quickly and efficiently profile compounds of interest on site.

  11. A Flexible Workflow for Automated Bioluminescent Kinase Selectivity Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Worzella, Tracy; Butzler, Matt; Hennek, Jacquelyn; Hanson, Seth; Simdon, Laura; Goueli, Said; Cowan, Cris; Zegzouti, Hicham

    2016-01-01

    Kinase profiling during drug discovery is a necessary process to confirm inhibitor selectivity and assess off-target activities. However, cost and logistical limitations prevent profiling activities from being performed in-house. We describe the development of an automated and flexible kinase profiling workflow that combines ready-to-use kinase enzymes and substrates in convenient eight-tube strips, a bench-top liquid handling device, ADP-Glo Kinase Assay (Promega, Madison, WI) technology to quantify enzyme activity, and a multimode detection instrument. Automated methods were developed for kinase reactions and quantification reactions to be assembled on a Gilson (Middleton, WI) PIPETMAX, following standardized plate layouts for single- and multidose compound profiling. Pipetting protocols were customized at runtime based on user-provided information, including compound number, increment for compound titrations, and number of kinase families to use. After the automated liquid handling procedures, a GloMax Discover (Promega) microplate reader preloaded with SMART protocols was used for luminescence detection and automatic data analysis. The functionality of the automated workflow was evaluated with several compound-kinase combinations in single-dose or dose-response profiling formats. Known target-specific inhibitions were confirmed. Novel small molecule-kinase interactions, including off-target inhibitions, were identified and confirmed in secondary studies. By adopting this streamlined profiling process, researchers can quickly and efficiently profile compounds of interest on site. PMID:28095176

  12. Discovery of indazoles as inhibitors of Tpl2 kinase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yonghan; Cole, Derek; Denny, Rajiah Aldrin; Anderson, David R; Ipek, Manus; Ni, Yike; Wang, Xiaolun; Thaisrivongs, Suvit; Chamberlain, Timothy; Hall, J Perry; Liu, Julie; Luong, Michael; Lin, Lih-Ling; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Gopalsamy, Ariamala

    2011-08-15

    Synthesis, modeling and structure-activity relationship of indazoles as inhibitors of Tpl2 kinase are described. From a high throughput screening effort, we identified an indazole hit compound 5 that has a single digit micromolar Tpl2 activity. Through SAR modifications at the C3 and C5 positions of the indazole, we discovered compound 31 with good potency in LANCE assay and cell-based p-Erk assay.

  13. Fluorescent sensors of protein kinases: from basics to biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Nhu Ngoc Van, Thi; Morris, May C

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases constitute a major class of enzymes underlying essentially all biological processes. These enzymes present similar structural folds, yet their mechanism of action and of regulation vary largely, as well as their substrate specificity and their subcellular localization. Classical approaches to study the function/activity of protein kinases rely on radioactive endpoint assays, which do not allow for characterization of their dynamic activity in their native environment. The development of fluorescent biosensors has provided a whole new avenue for studying protein kinase behavior and regulation in living cells in real time with high spatial and temporal resolution. Two major classes of biosensors have been developed: genetically encoded single-chain fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensors and peptide/protein biosensors coupled to small synthetic fluorophores which are sensitive to changes in their environment. In this review, we discuss the developments in fluorescent biosensor technology related to protein kinase sensing and the different strategies employed to monitor protein kinase activity, conformation, or relative abundance, as well as kinase regulation and subcellular dynamics in living cells. Moreover, we discuss their application in biomedical settings, for diagnostics and therapeutics, to image disease progression and monitor response to therapeutics, in drug discovery programs, for high-throughput screening assays, for postscreen characterization of drug candidates, and for clinical evaluation of novel drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative and Dynamic Imaging of ATM Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nyati, Shyam; Young, Grant; Ross, Brian Dale; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events facilitating DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. Traditionally, protein kinases have been analyzed in vitro using biochemical methods (kinase assays using purified proteins or immunological assays) requiring a large number of cells and cell lysis. Genetically encoded biosensors based on optical molecular imaging such as fluorescence or bioluminescence have been developed to enable interrogation of kinase activities in live cells with a high signal to background. We have genetically engineered a hybrid protein whose bioluminescent activity is dependent on the ATM-mediated phosphorylation of a substrate. The engineered protein consists of the split luciferase-based protein complementation pair with a CHK2 (a substrate for ATM kinase activity) target sequence and a phospho-serine/threonine-binding domain, FHA2, derived from yeast Rad53. Phosphorylation of the serine residue within the target sequence by ATM would lead to its interaction with the phospho-serine-binding domain, thereby preventing complementation of the split luciferase pair and loss of reporter activity. Bioluminescence imaging of reporter expressing cells in cultured plates or as mouse xenografts provides a quantitative surrogate for ATM kinase activity and therefore the cellular DNA damage response in a noninvasive, dynamic fashion.

  15. RAS - Screens & Assays

    Cancer.gov

    A primary goal of the RAS Initiative is to develop assays for RAS activity, localization, and signaling and adapt those assays so they can be used for finding new drug candidates. Explore the work leading to highly validated screening protocols.

  16. Assays of Serum Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Herati, Amin S; Cengiz, Cenk; Lamb, Dolores J

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of male hypogonadism depends on an assessment of the clinical signs and symptoms of hypogonadism and serum testosterone level. Current clinical laboratory testosterone assay platforms include immunoassays and mass spectrometry. Despite significant advances to improve the accuracy and precision of the currently available assays, limited comparability exists between assays at the lower and upper extremes of the testosterone range. Because of this lack of comparability, there is no current gold standard assay for the assessment of total testosterone levels.

  17. Orphan kinases turn eccentric

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Rainer, Johannes; Geley, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK) are a highly conserved, but poorly characterized, subgroup of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). They are characterized by a conserved catalytic domain flanked by N- and C-terminal extensions that are involved in cyclin binding. Vertebrate genomes contain three highly similar PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK1,2,3, a.k.a., CDK16,17,18), which are most abundant in post-mitotic cells in brain and testis. Consistent with this restricted expression pattern, PCTK1 (CDK16) has recently been shown to be essential for spermatogenesis. PCTAIREs are activated by cyclin Y (CCNY), a highly conserved single cyclin fold protein. By binding to N-myristoylated CCNY, CDK16 is targeted to the plasma membrane. Unlike conventional cyclin-CDK interactions, binding of CCNY to CDK16 not only requires the catalytic domain, but also domains within the N-terminal extension. Interestingly, phosphorylation within this domain blocks CCNY binding, providing a novel means of cyclin-CDK regulation. By using these functional characteristics, we analyzed “PCTAIRE” sequence containing protein kinase genes in genomes of various organisms and found that CCNY and CCNY-dependent kinases are restricted to eumetazoa and possibly evolved along with development of a central nervous system. Here, we focus on the structure and regulation of PCTAIREs and discuss their established functions. PMID:22895054

  18. Conserved herpesvirus protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Conserved herpesviral protein kinases (CHPKs) are a group of enzymes conserved throughout all subfamilies of Herpesviridae. Members of this group are serine/threonine protein kinases that are likely to play a conserved role in viral infection by interacting with common host cellular and viral factors; however along with a conserved role, individual kinases may have unique functions in the context of viral infection in such a way that they are only partially replaceable even by close homologues. Recent studies demonstrated that CHPKs are crucial for viral infection and suggested their involvement in regulation of numerous processes at various infection steps (primary infection, nuclear egress, tegumentation), although the mechanisms of this regulation remain unknown. Notwithstanding, recent advances in discovery of new CHPK targets, and studies of CHPK knockout phenotypes have raised their attractiveness as targets for antiviral therapy. A number of compounds have been shown to inhibit the activity of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded UL97 protein kinase and exhibit a pronounced antiviral effect, although the same compounds are inactive against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase BGLF4, illustrating the fact that low homology between the members of this group complicates development of compounds targeting the whole group, and suggesting that individualized, structure-based inhibitor design will be more effective. Determination of CHPK structures will greatly facilitate this task. PMID:17881303

  19. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  20. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  1. PAK family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo-shen; Manser, Ed

    2012-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases that are represented by six genes in humans (PAK 1–6), and are found in all eukaryotes sequenced to date. Genetic and knockdown experiments in frogs, fish and mice indicate group I PAKs are widely expressed, required for multiple tissue development, and particularly important for immune and nervous system function in the adult. The group II PAKs (human PAKs 4–6) are more enigmatic, but their restriction to metazoans and presence at cell-cell junctions suggests these kinases emerged to regulate junctional signaling. Studies of protozoa and fungal PAKs show that they regulate cell shape and polarity through phosphorylation of multiple cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule binding proteins, myosins and septins. This chapter discusses what we know about the regulation of PAKs and their physiological role in different model organisms, based primarily on gene knockout studies. PMID:23162738

  2. Dual activators of Protein Kinase R (PKR) and Protein Kinase R Like Kinase (PERK) Identify Common and Divergent Catalytic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Jie; Sun, Hong; Cao, Peng; Fusco, Dahlene N.; Chung, Raymond T.; Chorev, Michael; Jin, Qi; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical genetics has evolved into a powerful tool for studying gene function in normal- and patho-biology. PKR and PERK, two eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) kinases, play critical roles in maintenance of cellular hemostasis, metabolic stability, and anti-viral defenses. Both kinases interact with and phosphorylate additional substrates including tumor suppressor p53 and nuclear protein 90. Loss of function of both kinases has been studied by reverse genetics and recently identified inhibitors. In contrast, activating probes for studying the role of catalytic activity of these kinases are not available. We identified a 3-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxin-6-yl)-5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one (DHBDC) as specific dual activator of PKR and PERK by screening a chemical library of 20,000 small molecules in a dual luciferase surrogate eIF2α phosphorylation assay. We present here extensive biological characterization and preliminary structure-activity relationship of DHBDC, which phosphorylate eIF2α by activating PKR and PERK but no other eIF2α kinases. These agents also activate downstream effectors of eIF2α phosphorylation; inducing CHOP and suppressing cyclin D1 expression and inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, all in a manner dependent on PKR and PERK. Consistent with the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in viral infection, DHBDC inhibits proliferation of human hepatitis C virus. Finally, DHBDC induces phosphorylation of Ikβα, and activates NF-κB pathway. Surprisingly, activation of NF-κB pathway is dependent on PERK but independent of PKR activity. These data indicate that DHBDC is an invaluable probe for elucidating the role of PKR and PERK in normal- and patho-biology. PMID:23784735

  3. AOP-1 interacts with cardiac-specific protein kinase TNNI3K and down-regulates its kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Dong-Qing; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao; Cao, Hui-Qing; Wang, Lai-Yuan; Shi, Na; Meng, Xian-Min

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, a yeast two-hybrid screening system was used to identify the interaction partners of cardiac troponin I-interacting kinase (TNNI3K) that might serve as regulators or targets, and thus in turn to gain some insights on the roles of TNNI3K. After screening the adult heart cDNA library with a bait construct encoding the ANK motif of TNNI3K, antioxidant protein 1 (AOP-1) was isolated. The interaction between TNNI3K and AOP-1 was confirmed by the in vitro binding assay and coexpression experiments in vivo. The colocalization of TNNI3K and AOP-1 was clarified by confocal immunofluorescence. Moreover, coexpression of AOP-1 inhibited TNNI3K kinase activity in the in vitro kinase assay.

  4. Thrombin activates MAPKAP2 kinase in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Brophy, C M; Woodrum, D; Dickinson, M; Beall, A

    1998-05-01

    Thrombin mediates hemostasis by promoting thrombus development and vasospasm, which reduces the size of the arterial injury. Thrombin stimulation of vascular smooth muscle is associated with activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the subsequent cellular signaling events in thrombin-stimulated vascular smooth muscle contraction. Contractile responses of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle were determined in a muscle bath and compared with phosphorylation events with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The activity of a novel kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein-2 kinase (MAPKAP2 kinase), was determined by immunoprecipitation and a phosphotransferase assay. A small heat shock protein, HSP27, was identified with immunoblotting. Thrombin induces contraction of vascular smooth muscle and is associated with increased activity of MAPKAP2 kinase and increased phosphorylation of HSP27. Multiple isoforms of HSP27 are the predominant phosphoproteins in vascular smooth muscle, and peptide mapping suggests that the isoforms of HSP27 are structurally related and phosphorylated within similar peptide sequences. Activation of the MAPKAP2 kinase pathway and phosphorylation of HSP27 are associated with thrombin-induced contraction of vascular smooth muscle.

  5. Arginine kinase in Phytomonas, a trypanosomatid parasite of plants.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Gaspar E; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Sayé, Melisa; Pereira, Claudio A

    2011-09-01

    Phytomonas are trypanosomatid plant parasites closely related to parasites that cause several human diseases. Little is known about the biology of these organisms including aspects of their metabolism. Arginine kinase (E.C. 2.7.3.3) is a phosphotransferase which catalyzes the interconversion between the phosphagen phosphoarginine and ATP. This enzyme is present in some invertebrates and is a homolog of another widely distributed phosphosphagen kinase, creatine kinase. In this work, a single canonical arginine kinase isoform was detected in Phytomonas Jma by enzymatic activity assays, PCR, and Western Blot. This arginine kinase is very similar to the canonical isoforms found in T. cruzi and T. brucei, presenting about 70% of amino acid sequence identity and a very similar molecular weight (40kDa). The Phytomonas phosphagen system seems to be very similar to T. cruzi, which has only one isoform, or T. brucei (three isoforms); establishing a difference with other trypanosomatids, such as Leishmania, which completely lacks phosphagen kinases, probably by the presence of the arginine-consuming enzyme, arginase. Finally, phylogenetic analysis suggests that Kinetoplastids' arginine kinase was acquired, during evolution, from the arthropod vectors by horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of an antibody-free ADP detection assay: ADP-Glo.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Totoritis, Rachel D; Lor, Leng A; Schwartz, Benjamin; Caprioli, Peter; Jurewicz, Anthony J; Zhang, Guofeng

    2009-12-01

    Identification of kinase, especially protein kinase, modulators through high-throughput screening (HTS) has become a common strategy for drug discovery programs in both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. There are a number of platform technologies that can be used for measuring kinase activities. However, there is none that fits all criteria in terms of sensitivity, ATP tolerance, robustness, throughput, and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, development of a homogeneous and robust HTS assay for some kinase targets is still challenging. We recently evaluated the ADP-Glo assay from Promega. This is a homogeneous, signal increase assay that measures ADP production from a kinase reaction by coupled enzymes that first convert ADP to ATP and subsequently quantifies ATP using luciferase in the presence of luciferin. Since the unused ATP in the reaction is depleted prior to ADP to ATP conversion, this assay shows excellent sensitivity over a wide range of ATP concentrations. We demonstrate that ADP-Glo assay can be used for 2 kinase targets that belong to different classes, and compare the results of compound profiling with SPA and FP assay technologies.

  7. The phosphatase activity of mammalian polynucleotide kinase takes precedence over its kinase activity in repair of single strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Caroline J; Allinson, Sarah L

    2006-01-01

    The dual function mammalian DNA repair enzyme, polynucleotide kinase (PNK), facilitates strand break repair through catalysis of 5'-hydroxyl phosphorylation and 3'-phosphate dephosphorylation. We have examined the relative activities of the kinase and phosphatase functions of PNK using a novel assay, which allows the simultaneous characterization of both activities in processing nicks and gaps containing both 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl. Under multiple turnover conditions the phosphatase activity of the purified enzyme is significantly more active than its kinase activity. Consistent with this result, phosphorylation of the 5'-hydroxyl is rate limiting in cell extract mediated-repair of a nicked substrate. On characterizing the effects of individually mutating the two active sites of PNK we find that while site-directed mutagenesis of the kinase domain of PNK does not affect its phosphatase activity, disruption of the phosphatase domain also abrogates kinase function. This loss of kinase function requires the presence of a 3'-phosphate, but it need not be present in the same strand break as the 5'-hydroxyl. PNK preferentially binds 3'-phosphorylated substrates and DNA binding to the phosphatase domain blocks further DNA binding by the kinase domain.

  8. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  9. Pantothenate - kinase associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Alpana; Khare, Shruti; Srivastav, Vipul

    2012-04-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation is a group of disorders, the commonest of which is PKAN (Pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration). We present here, a case of 18 year old boy with progressive dementia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal involvement, dysarthria, seizures and myoclonus. The patient was diagnosed as PKAN (formerly Hallervorden Spatz disease) after "eye of tiger" appearance on neuro-imaging.

  10. Colorimetric protein assay techniques.

    PubMed

    Sapan, C V; Lundblad, R L; Price, N C

    1999-04-01

    There has been an increase in the number of colorimetric assay techniques for the determination of protein concentration over the past 20 years. This has resulted in a perceived increase in sensitivity and accuracy with the advent of new techniques. The present review considers these advances with emphasis on the potential use of such technologies in the assay of biopharmaceuticals. The techniques reviewed include Coomassie Blue G-250 dye binding (the Bradford assay), the Lowry assay, the bicinchoninic acid assay and the biuret assay. It is shown that each assay has advantages and disadvantages relative to sensitivity, ease of performance, acceptance in the literature, accuracy and reproducibility/coefficient of variation/laboratory-to-laboratory variation. A comparison of the use of several assays with the same sample population is presented. It is suggested that the most critical issue in the use of a chromogenic protein assay for the characterization of a biopharmaceutical is the selection of a standard for the calibration of the assay; it is crucial that the standard be representative of the sample. If it is not possible to match the standard with the sample from the perspective of protein composition, then it is preferable to use an assay that is not sensitive to the composition of the protein such as a micro-Kjeldahl technique, quantitative amino acid analysis or the biuret assay. In a complex mixture it might be inappropriate to focus on a general method of protein determination and much more informative to use specific methods relating to the protein(s) of particular interest, using either specific assays or antibody-based methods. The key point is that whatever method is adopted as the 'gold standard' for a given protein, this method needs to be used routinely for calibration.

  11. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two directions, cis (intrasubunit) or trans (intersubunit) within the dimeric histidine kinase. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete catalytic machinery of a chimeric histidine kinase. The structure shows an asymmetric histidine kinase dimer where one subunit is caught performing the autophosphorylation reaction. A structure-guided functional analysis on HK853 and EnvZ, two prototypical cis- and trans-phosphorylating histidine kinases, has allowed us to decipher the catalytic mechanism of histidine kinase autophosphorylation, which seems to be common independently of the reaction directionality.

  12. Kinase Inhibitors from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Skropeta, Danielle; Pastro, Natalie; Zivanovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases play a critical role in cell regulation and their deregulation is a contributing factor in an increasing list of diseases including cancer. Marine sponges have yielded over 70 novel compounds to date that exhibit significant inhibitory activity towards a range of protein kinases. These compounds, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, and ordered based upon the kinase that they inhibit. Relevant synthetic studies on the marine natural product kinase inhibitors have also been included. PMID:22073013

  13. Partial characterization of a highly conserved aspartyl kinase (AK) in normal human liver.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Díaz, G; Marshall, S H

    1990-01-01

    Subcellular fractions from human liver were assayed for aspartyl kinase (AK) activity measured by standard spectrophotometric methods. Along the purification procedure three different fractions displayed the expected enzyme activity. Interestingly, two of these fractions were specifically recognized by antibodies raised against E. coli aspartate kinases, suggesting a high degree of evolutionary conservation for these ubiquitous enzymes for prokaryotes. Since their known function in bacteria is not strictly required in eukaryotes, these observation imply that the presence and activity of aspartyl kinase(s) in mammals might represent putative regulatory roles for these enzymes in eukaryotic cell metabolism.

  14. Novel screening cascade identifies MKK4 as key kinase regulating Tau phosphorylation at Ser422.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Fiona; Bohrmann, Bernd; Christensen, Klaus; Graf, Martin; Roth, Doris; Czech, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Phosphorylation of Tau at serine 422 promotes Tau aggregation. The kinase that is responsible for this key phosphorylation event has so far not been identified but could be a potential drug target for Alzheimer's disease. We describe here an assay strategy to identify this kinase. Using a combination of screening a library of 65'000 kinase inhibitors and in vitro inhibitor target profiling of the screening hits using the Ambit kinase platform, MKK4 was identified as playing a key role in Tau-S422 phosphorylation in human neuroblastoma cells.

  15. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. Evaluation of a tyrosine kinase peptide microarray for tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy selection in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labots, Mariette; Gotink, Kristy J; Dekker, Henk; Azijli, Kaamar; van der Mijn, Johannes C; Huijts, Charlotte M; Piersma, Sander R; Jiménez, Connie R; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-01-01

    Personalized cancer medicine aims to accurately predict the response of individual patients to targeted therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Clinical implementation of this concept requires a robust selection tool. Here, using both cancer cell lines and tumor tissue from patients, we evaluated a high-throughput tyrosine kinase peptide substrate array to determine its readiness as a selection tool for TKI therapy. We found linearly increasing phosphorylation signal intensities of peptides representing kinase activity along the kinetic curve of the assay with 7.5–10 μg of lysate protein and up to 400 μM adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Basal kinase activity profiles were reproducible with intra- and inter-experiment coefficients of variation of <15% and <20%, respectively. Evaluation of 14 tumor cell lines and tissues showed similar consistently high phosphorylated peptides in their basal profiles. Incubation of four patient-derived tumor lysates with the TKIs dasatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib and erlotinib primarily caused inhibition of substrates that were highly phosphorylated in the basal profile analyses. Using recombinant Src and Axl kinase, relative substrate specificity was demonstrated for a subset of peptides, as their phosphorylation was reverted by co-incubation with a specific inhibitor. In conclusion, we demonstrated robust technical specifications of this high-throughput tyrosine kinase peptide microarray. These features required as little as 5–7 μg of protein per sample, facilitating clinical implementation as a TKI selection tool. However, currently available peptide substrates can benefit from an enhancement of the differential potential for complex samples such as tumor lysates. We propose that mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics may provide such an enhancement by identifying more discriminative peptides. PMID:27980342

  18. The anaplastic lymphoma kinase testing conundrum.

    PubMed

    Conde, Esther; Taniere, Philippe; Lopez-Rios, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Given the excellent results of the clinical trials with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors, the importance of accurately identifying ALK-positive lung carcinoma patients has never been greater. It brings with it a pressing need for harmonized development of companion diagnostics, for economic, scientific and medical reasons. Therefore, it is crucial that ALK testing assays become more standardized both in performance (analytical phase) and interpretation (post-analytical phase). We find that both methods currently recommended by College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology guidelines (FISH and Immunohistochemistry) are reasonable approaches for primary routine ALK testing, if at least 50 tumor cells are scored and protocols are strictly followed. Moreover, due to the high demand to study multiple predictive biomarkers on different assay platforms, quick and reliable approaches to achieve this are essential to guide treatment decisions.

  19. Identification of an autoinhibitory region in the activation loop of the Mos protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, S C; Donoghue, D J

    1996-01-01

    The Mos protein is a serine/threonine protein kinase which acts to regulate progression through meiosis in vertebrate oocytes. Although Mos function is dependent on its ability to act as a protein kinase, little is known about the factors which regulate Mos kinase activity. To understand the mechanism by which Mos kinase activity is regulated, we have used molecular modeling to construct a three-dimensional model of Mos based on the crystallographic coordinates of cyclic AMP-dependent kinase (PKA). This model identified a loop in Mos which is positioned near the active site and appears capable of blocking substrate access to the active site. Mutagenesis was used to construct altered forms of the Mos protein with deletions of parts or all of the loop. In vitro kinase assays showed that Mos proteins with the loop removed had up to a fourfold increase in kinase activity compared with the wild-type protein, indicating that the loop acts in an autoinhibitory manner for Mos kinase activity. Point mutations were also made on individual residues of the loop which were determined from the molecular model to be capable of reaching the active site. Determination of the kinase activities of these mutants showed that individual mutations in the loop region are capable of either increasing or decreasing kinase activity with regard to the wild-type protein. These data suggest that the loop identified in Mos acts as an autoinhibitor of kinase activity. PMID:8668163

  20. Secondary kinase reactions catalyzed by yeast pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Leblond, D J; Robinson, J L

    1976-06-07

    1. Yeast pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) catalyzes, in addition to the primary, physiologically important reaction, three secondary kinase reactions, the ATP-dependent phosphorylations of fluoride (fluorokinase), hydroxylamine (hydroxylamine kinase) and glycolate (glycolate kinase). 2. These reactions are accelerated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, the allosteric activator of the primary reaction. Wth Mg2+ as the required divalent cation, none of these reactions are observed in the absence of fructose-biphosphate. With Mn2+, fructose-bisphosphate is required for the glycolate kinase reaction, but merely stimulates the other reactions. 3. The effect of other divalent cations and pH on three secondary kinase reactions was also examined. 4. Results are compared with those obtained from muscle pyruvate kinase and the implications of the results for the mechanism of the yeast enzyme are discussed.

  1. High-throughput, cell-free, liposome-based approach for assessing in vitro activity of lipid kinases.

    PubMed

    Demian, Douglas J; Clugston, Susan L; Foster, Meta M; Rameh, Lucia; Sarkes, Deborah; Townson, Sharon A; Yang, Lily; Zhang, Melvin; Charlton, Maura E

    2009-08-01

    Lipid kinases are central players in lipid signaling pathways involved in inflammation, tumorigenesis, and metabolic syndrome. A number of these kinase targets have proven difficult to investigate in higher throughput cell-free assay systems. This challenge is partially due to specific substrate interaction requirements for several of the lipid kinase family members and the resulting incompatibility of these substrates with most established, homogeneous assay formats. Traditional, cell-free in vitro investigational methods for members of the lipid kinase family typically involve substrate incorporation of [gamma-32P] and resolution of signal by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and autoradiograph densitometry. This approach, although highly sensitive, does not lend itself to high-throughput testing of large numbers of small molecules (100 s to 1 MM+). The authors present the development and implementation of a fully synthetic, liposome-based assay for assessing in vitro activity of phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate-4-kinase isoforms (PIP4KIIbeta and alpha) in 2 commonly used homogeneous technologies. They have validated these assays through compound testing in both traditional TLC and radioactive filterplate approaches as well as binding validation using isothermic calorimetry. A directed library representing known kinase pharmacophores was screened against type IIbeta phosphatidylinositol-phosphate kinase (PIPK) to identify small-molecule inhibitors. This assay system can be applied to other types and isoforms of PIPKs as well as a variety of other lipid kinase targets.

  2. Sti1 and Cdc37 can stabilize Hsp90 in chaperone complexes with a protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul; Shabbir, Arsalan; Cardozo, Christopher; Caplan, Avrom J

    2004-04-01

    Hsp90 functions in association with several cochaperones for folding of protein kinases and transcription factors, although the relative contribution of each to the overall reaction is unknown. We assayed the role of nine different cochaperones in the activation of Ste11, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase. Studies on signaling via this protein kinase pathway was measured by alpha-factor-stimulated induction of FIG1 or lacZ, and repression of HHF1. Several cochaperone mutants tested had reduced FIG1 induction or HHF1 repression, although to differing extents. The greatest defects were in cpr7Delta, sse1Delta, and ydj1Delta mutants. Assays of Ste11 kinase activity revealed a pattern of defects in the cochaperone mutant strains that were similar to the gene expression studies. Overexpression of CDC37, a chaperone required for protein kinase folding, suppressed defects the sti1Delta mutant back to wild-type levels. CDC37 overexpression also restored stable Hsp90 binding to the Ste11 protein kinase domain in the sti1Delta mutant strain. These data suggest that Cdc37 and Sti1 have functional overlap in stabilizing Hsp90:client complexes. Finally, we show that Cns1 functions in MAP kinase signaling in association with Cpr7.

  3. Quick evaluation of kinase inhibitors by surface plasmon resonance using single-site specifically biotinylated kinases.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daisuke; Gouda, Masaki; Kirii, Yasuyuki

    2014-03-01

    In evaluating kinase inhibitors, kinetic parameters such as association/dissociation rate constants are valuable information, as are equilibrium parameters KD and IC50 values. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique to investigate these parameters. However, results are often complicated because of impaired conformations by inappropriate conditions required for protein immobilization and/or heterogeneity of the orientation of immobilization. In addition, conventional SPR experiments are generally time-consuming. Here we introduce the use of single-site specifically biotinylated kinases combined with a multichannel SPR device to improve such problems. Kinetic parameters of four compounds-staurosporine, dasatinib, sunitinib, and lapatinib-against six kinases were determined by the ProteOn XPR36 system. The very slow off-rate of lapatinib from the epidermal growth factor receptor and dasatinib from Bruton's tyrosine kinase and colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) were confirmed. Furthermore, IC50 values were determined by an activity-based assay. Evaluating both physicochemical and biochemical properties would help to understand the detailed character of the compound.

  4. LIM-kinase1.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, C A; Bernard, O

    1999-01-01

    LIM-kinase1 (LIMK1) is a serine-only protein kinase that contains LIM and PDZ protein-protein interaction domains which is highly expressed in neurons. Overexpression of LIMK1 in cultured cells results in accumulation of filamentous (F-) actin. LIMK1 phosphorylates cofilin, an actin depolymerisation factor, which is then unable to bind and depolymerise F-actin. Rac-GTP enhances phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin, which leads to accumulation of F-actin, while Rac-GDP and PMA reduce these effects. LIMK1 is therefore a key component of a signal transduction network that connects extracellular stimuli to changes in cytoskeletal structure. Control of cell morphology and mobility via LIMK1 activity may provide novel approaches to cancer therapy.

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  6. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  7. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  8. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  10. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  11. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  12. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  13. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  14. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  16. Development of a Novel Phosphorylated AMPK Protection Assay for High-Throughput Screening Using TR-FRET Assay.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yazhou; Wang, Yunjie; Xu, Yuan; Li, Jia; Liao, Hong; Zhang, Luyong; Pang, Tao

    2015-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a conserved heterotrimeric kinase, serves as an energy sensor maintaining energy balance at both cellular and whole-body levels and plays multiple beneficial roles in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, which makes AMPK an attractive target for diabetes and other metabolic disorders. To date, establishment of the physiologically relevant biochemical assay for AMPK has not been reported. Here we developed a phosphorylated AMPK protection assay based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay, using the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) to dephosphorylate AMPK. The partially dephosphorylated AMPK by PP2A had lower activity than phosphorylated AMPK. This specific TR-FRET assay for AMPK was optimized in the 384-well format and produced similar EC(50) values for AMPK activators AMP and A769662 and a similar IC(50) value for AMPK inhibitor compound C, as previously reported. Under the optimized conditions, the assay Z' factor calculated over 160 data points has an optimal value greater than 0.5, which is suitable for high-throughput screening. In conclusion, this phosphorylated AMPK protection assay we developed is very robust, sensitive, and simple to perform and may be useful as a high-throughput assay for identifying AMPK activators with the ability of preventing activated AMPK against dephosphorylation by phosphatase in the physiological conditions.

  17. The response of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to cetuximab treatment depends on Aurora kinase A polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Alexander; Huhn, Maximilian; Wirth, Markus; Reiter, Rudolf; Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Brockhoff, Gero

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of cetuximab-based anti-EGFR treatment and Aurora kinase A / B knockdown as a function of Aurora kinase polymorphism in HNSCC cell lines. Materials and methods First, protein expression of Aurora kinase A / B and EGFR and Aurora kinase A polymorphism were studied in tumour samples. The survival and proliferation of Aurora kinase A homo- (Cal27) and heterozygous (HN) HNSCC cell lines was evaluated using a colony formation assay and a flow cytometric assay. Also, aneuploidy was determined. EGFR signalling pathway were visualised by western blotting. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed the overexpression of Aurora kinase A / B in HNSCC. The knockdown of each kinase caused a significant decrease in clonogenic survival, independent of Aurora kinase A polymorphism. In contrast, cetuximab treatment impaired clonogenic survival only in the Aurora kinase A-homozygous cell line (Cal27). Conclusion This study provides in vitro evidence for the predictive value of Aurora kinase A polymorphism in the efficiency of cetuximab treatment. Resistance to cetuximab treatment can be overcome by simultaneous Aurora kinase A/B knockdown. PMID:24980817

  18. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Danai, Laura V.; DiStefano, Marina T.; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B.; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C.; Czech, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo. After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  20. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  1. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  2. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing. PMID:27631493

  3. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  4. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  5. Effect of Narrow Spectrum Versus Selective Kinase Inhibitors on the Intestinal Proinflammatory Immune Response in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Biancheri, Paolo; Foster, Martyn R.; Fyfe, Matthew C. T.; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Sirohi, Sameer; Solanke, Yemisi; Wood, Eleanor; Rowley, Adele; Webber, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kinases are key mediators of inflammation, highlighting the potential of kinase inhibitors as treatments for inflammatory disorders. Selective kinase inhibitors, however, have proved disappointing, particularly in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Consequently, to improve efficacy, attention has turned to multikinase inhibition. Methods: The activity of a narrow spectrum kinase inhibitor, TOP1210, has been compared with selective kinase inhibitors (BIRB-796, dasatinib and BAY-61-3606) in a range of kinase assays, inflammatory cell assays, and in inflamed biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Effects on recombinant P38α, Src, and Syk kinase activities were assessed using Z-lyte assays (Invitrogen, Paisley, United Kingdom). Anti-inflammatory effects were assessed by measurement of proinflammatory cytokine release from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, primary macrophages, HT29 cells, inflamed colonic UC biopsies, and myofibroblasts isolated from inflamed colonic UC mucosa. Results: TOP1210 potently inhibits P38α, Src, and Syk kinase activities. Similarly, TOP1210 demonstrates potent inhibitory activity against proinflammatory cytokine release in each of the cellular assays and the inflamed colonic UC biopsies and myofibroblasts isolated from inflamed colonic UC mucosa. Generally, the selective kinase inhibitors showed limited and weaker activity in the cellular assays compared with the broad inhibitory profile of TOP1210. However, combination of the selective inhibitors led to improved efficacy and potency in both cellular and UC biopsy assays. Conclusions: Targeted, multikinase inhibition with TOP1210 leads to a broad efficacy profile in both the innate and adaptive immune responses, with significant advantages over existing selective kinase approaches, and potentially offers a much improved therapeutic benefit in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27104822

  6. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling.

  7. Selective Pharmacologic Inhibition of a PASTA Kinase Increases Listeria monocytogenes Susceptibility to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Pensinger, Daniel A.; Aliota, Matthew T.; Schaenzer, Adam J.; Boldon, Kyle M.; Ansari, Israr-ul H.; Vincent, William J. B.; Knight, Benjamin; Reniere, Michelle L.; Striker, Rob

    2014-01-01

    While β-lactam antibiotics are a critical part of the antimicrobial arsenal, they are frequently compromised by various resistance mechanisms, including changes in penicillin binding proteins of the bacterial cell wall. Genetic deletion of the penicillin binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated protein (PASTA) kinase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been shown to restore β-lactam susceptibility. However, the mechanism remains unclear, and whether pharmacologic inhibition would have the same effect is unknown. In this study, we found that deletion or pharmacologic inhibition of the PASTA kinase in Listeria monocytogenes by the nonselective kinase inhibitor staurosporine results in enhanced susceptibility to both aminopenicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics. Resistance to vancomycin, another class of cell wall synthesis inhibitors, or antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis was unaffected by staurosporine treatment. Phosphorylation assays with purified kinases revealed that staurosporine selectively inhibited the PASTA kinase of L. monocytogenes (PrkA). Importantly, staurosporine did not inhibit a L. monocytogenes kinase without a PASTA domain (Lmo0618) or the PASTA kinase from MRSA (Stk1). Finally, inhibition of PrkA with a more selective kinase inhibitor, AZD5438, similarly led to sensitization of L. monocytogenes to β-lactam antibiotics. Overall, these results suggest that pharmacologic targeting of PASTA kinases can increase the efficacy of β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:24867981

  8. Miniaturization of ultra-high-throughput screening assays into 1536-well format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, James R.; McCoy, Paul M.; Walker, Tiffany; Dunn, David A.

    2002-06-01

    Assay miniaturization and the implementation of high-density 1536 micro-well screening increases the speed and efficiency of screening and lead discovery. To serve this need, a platform of miniaturizable assay technologies has been assembled for specific biological targets. This platform will enable initiation and completion of uHTS screens in a straightforward and expeditious manner. For kinases, we have examined assays using several technologies including DELFIA, HTR-FRET, FP, EFC, and FMAT. This presentation compares these technologies for the measurement of typical tyrosine kinase activity in 1536-well format. Quality parameters such as assay reproducibility, signal: background ratio, Z factor, and assay sensitivity were calculated and compared. Additionally, the relative merits of each of these technologies were assessed in terms of assay miniaturization, ease of development, ultimate screening capability, efficiency, and cost.

  9. A Broad Specificity Nucleoside Kinase from Thermoplasma acidophilum

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, Sarah R.; Kumar, Abhinav; Price, Carol W.; Columbus, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of Ta0880, determined at 1.91 A resolution, from Thermoplasma acidophilum revealed a dimer with each monomer composed of an α/β /α sandwich domain and a smaller lid domain. The overall fold belongs to the PfkB family of carbohydrate kinases (a family member of the Ribokinase clan) which include ribokinases, 1-phosphofructokinases, 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase, inosine/guanosine kinases, frutokinases, adenosine kinases, and many more. Based on its general fold, Ta0880 had been annotated as a ribokinase-like protein. Using a coupled pyruvate kinase/lactate dehydrogenase assay, the activity of Ta0880 was assessed against a variety of ribokinase/pfkB-like family substrates; activity was not observed for ribose, fructose-1-phosphate, or fructose-6-phosphate. Based on structural similarity with nucleoside kinases (NK) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjNK, PDB 2C49 and 2C4E) and Burkholderia thailandensis (BtNK, PDB 3B1O), nucleoside kinase activity was investigated. Ta0880 (TaNK) was confirmed to have nucleoside kinase activity with an apparent KM for guanosine of 0.21 μM and catalytic efficiency of 345,000 M−1 s−1. These three NKs have significantly different substrate, phosphate donor, and cation specificities and comparisons of specificity and structure identified residues likely responsible for the nucleoside substrate selectivity. Phylogenetic analysis identified three clusters within the PfkB family and indicates that TaNK represents a new sub-family with broad nucleoside specificities. PMID:23161756

  10. A broad specificity nucleoside kinase from Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Sarah R; Kumar, Abhinav; Price, Carol W; Columbus, Linda

    2013-04-01

    The crystal structure of Ta0880, determined at 1.91 Å resolution, from Thermoplasma acidophilum revealed a dimer with each monomer composed of an α/β/α sandwich domain and a smaller lid domain. The overall fold belongs to the PfkB family of carbohydrate kinases (a family member of the Ribokinase clan) which include ribokinases, 1-phosphofructokinases, 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase, inosine/guanosine kinases, fructokinases, adenosine kinases, and many more. Based on its general fold, Ta0880 had been annotated as a ribokinase-like protein. Using a coupled pyruvate kinase/lactate dehydrogenase assay, the activity of Ta0880 was assessed against a variety of ribokinase/pfkB-like family substrates; activity was not observed for ribose, fructose-1-phosphate, or fructose-6-phosphate. Based on structural similarity with nucleoside kinases (NK) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjNK, PDB 2C49, and 2C4E) and Burkholderia thailandensis (BtNK, PDB 3B1O), nucleoside kinase activity was investigated. Ta0880 (TaNK) was confirmed to have nucleoside kinase activity with an apparent KM for guanosine of 0.21 μM and catalytic efficiency of 345,000 M(-1) s(-1) . These three NKs have significantly different substrate, phosphate donor, and cation specificities and comparisons of specificity and structure identified residues likely responsible for the nucleoside substrate selectivity. Phylogenetic analysis identified three clusters within the PfkB family and indicates that TaNK is a member of a new sub-family with broad nucleoside specificities. Proteins 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  12. Factor IX assay

    MedlinePlus

    Christmas factor assay; Serum factor IX; Hemophilic factor B; Plasma thromboplastin component; PTC ... chap 137. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Factor IX (Christmas factor, hemophilic factor B, plasma thromboplastin component, PTC) - ...

  13. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  14. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  15. Lateral flow assays

    PubMed Central

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  16. DNA-PK assay

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  17. Aurora Kinases Throughout Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Annika K; Demidov, Dmitri; Lermontova, Inna; Beeckman, Tom; Van Damme, Daniël

    2016-01-01

    Aurora kinases are evolutionarily conserved key mitotic determinants in all eukaryotes. Yeasts contain a single Aurora kinase, whereas multicellular eukaryotes have at least two functionally diverged members. The involvement of Aurora kinases in human cancers has provided an in-depth mechanistic understanding of their roles throughout cell division in animal and yeast models. By contrast, understanding Aurora kinase function in plants is only starting to emerge. Nevertheless, genetic, cell biological, and biochemical approaches have revealed functional diversification between the plant Aurora kinases and suggest a role in formative (asymmetric) divisions, chromatin modification, and genome stability. This review provides an overview of the accumulated knowledge on the function of plant Aurora kinases as well as some major challenges for the future.

  18. Multiple log potash assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. G.

    1993-10-01

    A five-mineral multiple-log potash assay technique has been successfully applied to evaluate potash-rich intervals in evaporite sequences. The technique is able to distinguish economic potash minerals from non-economic potash minerals and from other non-potash radioactive minerals. It can be applied on location, using a programmable calculator or microcomputer, providing near real-time logs of potash mineral concentrations. Log assay values show good agreement with core wet chemistry analyses.

  19. Doped colorimetric assay liposomes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides compositions comprising colorimetric assay liposomes. The present invention also provides methods for producing colorimetric liposomes and calorimetric liposome assay systems. In preferred embodiments, these calorimetric liposome systems provide high levels of sensitivity through the use of dopant molecules. As these dopants allow the controlled destabilization of the liposome structure, upon exposure of the doped liposomes to analyte(s) of interest, the indicator color change is facilitated and more easily recognized.

  20. MAP kinase and pain

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Gereau, Robert W.; Malcangio, Marzia; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2008-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important for intracellular signal transduction and play critical roles in regulating neural plasticity and inflammatory responses. The MAPK family consists of three major members: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which represent three separate signaling pathways. Accumulating evidence shows that all three MAPK pathways contribute to pain sensitization after tissue and nerve injury via distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms. Activation (phosphorylation) of MAPKs under different persistent pain conditions results in the induction and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity via non-transcriptional and transcriptional regulation. In particular, ERK activation in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons by nociceptive activity, via multiple neurotransmitter receptors, and using different second messenger pathways plays a critical role in central sensitization by regulating the activity of glutamate receptors and potassium channels and inducing gene transcription. ERK activation in amygdala neurons is also required for inflammatory pain sensitization. After nerve injury, ERK, p38, and JNK are differentially activated in spinal glial cells (microglia vs astrocytes), leading to the synthesis of proinflammatory/pronociceptive mediators, thereby enhancing and prolonging pain. Inhibition of all three MAPK pathways has been shown to attenuate inflammatory and neuropathic pain in different animal models. Development of specific inhibitors for MAPK pathways to target neurons and glial cells may lead to new therapies for pain management. Although it is well documented that MAPK pathways can increase pain sensitivity via peripheral mechanisms, this review will focus on central mechanisms of MAPKs, especially ERK. PMID:19150373

  1. Serum selenium assay following serum ferritin assay

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.; Morris, J.S.; Hann, H.L.; Pulsipher, B.; Stahlhut, M.W.

    1986-08-01

    Stored serum samples can be an important research resource into the etiology of cancer. These sera cannot be replaced and should therefore be used to best advantage. In previous epidemiologic studies, only single serum constituents have been assayed in individual serum samples. For example, serum ferritin has been examined in samples stored for as long as 10 years at -20C for a possible relation with general mortality (1) and cancer death (2). Ferritin is the tissue iron-storage protein and is therefore subject to denaturation. Serum selenium has also been examined in relation to cancer risk in a prospective manner by using stored frozen serum samples (3, 4). The interactions of a variety of serum factors in relation to cancer risk would be a desirable research goal, except that the amounts of serum typically available in frozen serum banks are less than 1 ml. It was the purpose of this investigation to determine if a radioimmunoassay for ferritin affected a subsequent neutron activation assay for selenium on the same 0.1 ml serum sample.

  2. SNAP Assay Technology.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    The most widely used immunoassay configuration is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) because the procedure produces highly sensitive and specific results and generally is easy to use. By definition, ELISAs are immunoassays used to detect a substance (typically an antigen or antibody) in which an enzyme is attached (conjugated) to one of the reactants and an enzymatic reaction is used to amplify the signal if the substance is present. Optimized ELISAs include several steps that are performed in sequence using a defined protocol that typically includes application of sample and an enzyme-conjugated antibody or antigen to an immobilized reagent, followed by wash and enzyme reaction steps. The SNAP assay is an in-clinic device that performs each of the ELISA steps in a timed sequential fashion with little consumer interface. The components and mechanical mechanism of the assay device are described. Detailed descriptions of features of the assay, which minimize nonspecific binding and enhance the ability to read results from weak-positive samples, are given. Basic principles used in assays with fundamentally different reaction mechanisms, namely, antigen-detection, antibody-detection, and competitive assays are given. Applications of ELISA technology, which led to the development of several multianalyte SNAP tests capable of testing for up to 6 analytes using a single-sample and a single-SNAP device are described.

  3. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kung, Charles; Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-09-14

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A.; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. PMID:28760888

  5. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  6. Regulation of casein kinase 2 by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Agostinis, P; Goris, J; Pinna, L A; Merlevede, W

    1987-01-01

    The effects of various polycation-stimulated (PCS) phosphatases and of the active catalytic subunit of the ATPMg-dependent (AMDc) protein phosphatase on the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) were investigated by using the synthetic peptide substrate Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu, whose phosphorylated derivative is entirely insensitive to these protein phosphatases. Previous dephosphorylation of native CK-2 enhances its specific activity 2-3-fold. Such an effect, accounted for by an increase in Vmax, is more readily promoted by the PCS phosphatases than by the AMDc phosphatase. The phosphate incorporated by autophosphorylation could not be removed by the protein phosphatases, suggesting the involvement of phosphorylation site(s) other than the one(s) affected by intramolecular autophosphorylation. The activation of CK-2 by the phosphatase pretreatment is neutralized during the kinase assay; the mechanism of this phenomenon, which is highly dependent on the kinase concentration, is discussed. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2829841

  7. Regulation of casein kinase 2 by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Agostinis, P; Goris, J; Pinna, L A; Merlevede, W

    1987-12-15

    The effects of various polycation-stimulated (PCS) phosphatases and of the active catalytic subunit of the ATPMg-dependent (AMDc) protein phosphatase on the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) were investigated by using the synthetic peptide substrate Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu, whose phosphorylated derivative is entirely insensitive to these protein phosphatases. Previous dephosphorylation of native CK-2 enhances its specific activity 2-3-fold. Such an effect, accounted for by an increase in Vmax, is more readily promoted by the PCS phosphatases than by the AMDc phosphatase. The phosphate incorporated by autophosphorylation could not be removed by the protein phosphatases, suggesting the involvement of phosphorylation site(s) other than the one(s) affected by intramolecular autophosphorylation. The activation of CK-2 by the phosphatase pretreatment is neutralized during the kinase assay; the mechanism of this phenomenon, which is highly dependent on the kinase concentration, is discussed.

  8. Overcoming compound fluorescence in the FLiK screening assay with red-shifted fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ralf; Gohla, Anne; Simard, Jeffrey R; Yadav, Dharmendra B; Fang, Zhizhou; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Rauh, Daniel

    2013-06-05

    In the attempt to discover novel chemical scaffolds that can modulate the activity of disease-associated enzymes, such as kinases, biochemical assays are usually deployed in high-throughput screenings. First-line assays, such as activity-based assays, often rely on fluorescent molecules by measuring a change in the total emission intensity, polarization state, or energy transfer to another fluorescent molecule. However, under certain conditions, intrinsic compound fluorescence can lead to difficult data analysis and to false-positive, as well as false-negative, hits. We have reported previously on a powerful direct binding assay called fluorescent labels in kinases ('FLiK'), which enables a sensitive measurement of conformational changes in kinases upon ligand binding. In this assay system, changes in the emission spectrum of the fluorophore acrylodan, induced by the binding of a ligand, are translated into a robust assay readout. However, under the excitation conditions of acrylodan, intrinsic compound fluorescence derived from highly conjugated compounds complicates data analysis. We therefore optimized this method by identifying novel fluorophores that excite in the far red, thereby avoiding compound fluorescence. With this advancement, even rigid compounds with multiple π-conjugated ring systems can now be measured reliably. This study was performed on three different kinase constructs with three different labeling sites, each undergoing distinct conformational changes upon ligand binding. It may therefore serve as a guideline for the establishment of novel fluorescence-based detection assays.

  9. Acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase.

    PubMed

    Ferry, James G

    2011-01-01

    Most of the methane produced in nature derives from the methyl group of acetate, the major end product of anaerobes decomposing complex plant material. The acetate is derived from the metabolic intermediate acetyl-CoA via the combined activities of phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase. In Methanosarcina species, the enzymes function in the reverse direction to activate acetate to acetyl-CoA prior to cleavage into a methyl and carbonyl group of which the latter is oxidized providing electrons for reduction of the former to methane. Thus, phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase have a central role in the conversion of complex organic matter to methane by anaerobic microbial food chains. Both enzymes have been purified from Methanosarcina thermophila and characterized. Both enzymes from M. thermophila have also been produced in Escherichia coli permitting crystal structures and amino acid variants, the kinetic and biochemical studies of which have lead to proposals for catalytic mechanisms. The high identity of both enzymes to paralogs in the domain Bacteria suggests ancient origins and common mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Signaling via mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) is required for Golgi fragmentation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U; Mallabiabarrena, A; Acharya, J K; Malhotra, V

    1998-01-23

    We have developed an assay using permeabilized cells to monitor fragmentation of the Golgi complex that occurs during mitosis. Golgi stacks, in permeabilized interphase normal rat kidney (NRK) cells, upon incubation with mitotic extracts undergo extensive fragmentation, and the fragmented Golgi membranes are dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. We find that the continued presence of p34cdc2, the mitosis initiation kinase, is not necessary for Golgi fragmentation. Instead, fragmentation depends on cytosolic mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1 or MAPKK1). However, the known cytoplasmic substrates for MEK1, ERK1, and ERK2 are not required for this process. Interestingly, we find a Golgi-associated ERK, which we propose as the likely target for MEK1 in Golgi fragmentation.

  11. Homogeneous, bioluminescent proteasome assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha A; Moravec, Richard A; Riss, Terry L; Bulleit, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is mediated predominantly through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The importance of the proteasome in regulating degradation of proteins involved in cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis led to the recognition of the proteasome as a therapeutic target for cancer. The proteasome is also essential for degrading misfolded and aberrant proteins, and impaired proteasome function has been implicated in neurodegerative and cardiovascular diseases. Robust, sensitive assays are essential for monitoring proteasome activity and for developing inhibitors of the proteasome. Peptide-conjugated fluorophores are widely used as substrates for monitoring proteasome activity, but fluorogenic substrates can exhibit significant background and can be problematic for screening because of cellular autofluorescence or interference from fluorescent library compounds. Furthermore, fluorescent proteasome assays require column-purified 20S or 26S proteasome (typically obtained from erythrocytes), or proteasome extracts from whole cells, as their samples. To provide assays more amenable to high-throughput screening, we developed a homogeneous, bioluminescent method that combines peptide-conjugated aminoluciferin substrates and a stabilized luciferase. Using substrates for the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activities in combination with a selective membrane permeabilization step, we developed single-step, cell-based assays to measure each of the proteasome catalytic activities. The homogeneous method eliminates the need to prepare individual cell extracts as samples and has adequate sensitivity for 96- and 384-well plates. The simple "add and read" format enables sensitive and rapid proteasome assays ideal for inhibitor screening.

  12. SIGMA RECEPTOR BINDING ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    CHU, UYEN B.; RUOHO, ARNOLD E.

    2016-01-01

    Sigma receptors belong to a class of small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated receptors, of which there are two subtypes: the Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) and the Sigma-2 receptor (S2R). Both S1R and S2R bind to a number of drugs including antipsychotic, haloperidol, and the opioid analgesic, (+)-pentazocine. Sigma receptors are implicated in multiple disease pathologies associated with the nervous system including diseases affecting motor control such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzeimher's disease. This unit describes methods for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R using radioligand-binding assays. In the first section, radioligand saturation binding assay to determine receptor densities and competitive inhibition assays to characterize affinities of novel compounds are presented for S1R using the selective S1R ligand, [3H]-(+)-pentazocine. The second section describes radioligand saturation binding assay and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R using a non-selective S1R and S2R ligand, [3H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([3H]-DTG). PMID:26646191

  13. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  14. Identification of potent Yes1 kinase inhibitors using a library screening approach.

    PubMed

    Patel, Paresma R; Sun, Hongmao; Li, Samuel Q; Shen, Min; Khan, Javed; Thomas, Craig J; Davis, Mindy I

    2013-08-01

    Yes1 kinase has been implicated as a potential therapeutic target in a number of cancers including melanomas, breast cancers, and rhabdomyosarcomas. Described here is the development of a robust and miniaturized biochemical assay for Yes1 kinase that was applied in a high throughput screen (HTS) of kinase-focused small molecule libraries. The HTS provided 144 (17% hit rate) small molecule compounds with IC₅₀ values in the sub-micromolar range. Three of the most potent Yes1 inhibitors were then examined in a cell-based assay for inhibition of cell survival in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Homology models of Yes1 were generated in active and inactive conformations, and docking of inhibitors supports binding to the active conformation (DFG-in) of Yes1. This is the first report of a large high throughput enzymatic activity screen for identification of Yes1 kinase inhibitors, thereby elucidating the polypharmacology of a variety of small molecules and clinical candidates.

  15. Phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase associates with an insulin receptor substrate-1 serine kinase distinct from its intrinsic serine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, K A; Kason, R E; Freund, G G

    1998-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) has been proposed as a counter-regulatory mechanism in insulin and cytokine signalling. Here we report that IRS-1 is phosphorylated by a wortmannin insensitive phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-associated serine kinase (PAS kinase) distinct from PI 3-kinase serine kinase. We found that PI 3-kinase immune complexes contain 5-fold more wortmannin-insensitive serine kinase activity than SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and IRS-1 immune complexes. Affinity chromatography of cell lysates with a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein for the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase showed that PAS kinase associated with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. This interaction required unoccupied SH2 domain(s) but did not require the PI 3-kinase p110 subunit binding domain. In terms of function, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 and, after insulin stimulation, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 in PI 3-kinase-IRS-1 complexes. Phosphopeptide mapping showed that insulin-dependent in vivo sites of IRS-1 serine phosphorylation were comparable to those of PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1. More importantly, PAS kinase-dependent phosphorylation of IRS-1 reduced by 4-fold the ability of IRS-1 to act as an insulin receptor substrate. Taken together, these findings indicate that: (a) PAS kinase is distinct from the intrinsic serine kinase activity of PI 3-kinase, (b) PAS kinase associates with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase through SH2 domain interactions, and (c) PAS kinase is an IRS-1 serine kinase that can reduce the ability of IRS-1 to serve as an insulin receptor substrate. PMID:9761740

  16. Rover waste assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Understanding the Polo Kinase machine.

    PubMed

    Archambault, V; Lépine, G; Kachaner, D

    2015-09-10

    The Polo Kinase is a central regulator of cell division required for several events of mitosis and cytokinesis. In addition to a kinase domain (KD), Polo-like kinases (Plks) comprise a Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions with targets and regulators of Plks. In all organisms that contain Plks, one Plk family member fulfills several essential functions in the regulation of cell division, and here we refer to this conserved protein as Polo Kinase (Plk1 in humans). The PBD and the KD are capable of both cooperation and mutual inhibition in their functions. Crystal structures of the PBD, the KD and, recently, a PBD-KD complex have helped understanding the inner workings of the Polo Kinase. In parallel, an impressive array of molecular mechanisms has been found to mediate the regulation of the protein. Moreover, the targeting of Polo Kinase in the development of anti-cancer drugs has yielded several molecules with which to chemically modulate Polo Kinase to study its biological functions. Here we review our current understanding of the protein function and regulation of Polo Kinase as a fascinating molecular device in control of cell division.

  18. Clonogenic Assay: Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T.; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 19561. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture1. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811)2. Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  19. Multiplex Flow Assays

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow or dipstick assays (e.g., home pregnancy tests), where an analyte solution is drawn through a porous membrane and is detected by localization onto a capture probe residing at a specific site on the flow strip, are the most commonly and extensively used type of diagnostic assay. However, after over 30 years of use, these assays are constrained to measuring one or a few analytes at a time. Here, we describe a completely general method, in which any single-plex lateral flow assay is transformed into a multiplex assay capable of measuring an arbitrarily large number of analytes simultaneously. Instead of identifying the analyte by its localization onto a specific geometric location in the flow medium, the analyte-specific capture probe is identified by its association with a specific optically encoded region within the flow medium. The capture probes for nucleic acids, antigens, or antibodies are attached to highly porous agarose beads, which have been encoded using multiple lanthanide emitters to create a unique optical signature for each capture probe. The optically encoded capture probe-derivatized beads are placed in contact with the analyte-containing porous flow medium and the analytes are captured onto the encoded regions as the solution flows through the porous medium. To perform a multiplex diagnostic assay, a solution comprising multiple analytes is passed through the flow medium containing the capture probe-derivatized beads, and the captured analyte is treated with a suitable fluorescent reporter. We demonstrate this multiplex analysis technique by simultaneously measuring DNA samples, antigen–antibody pairs, and mixtures of multiple nucleic acids and antibodies. PMID:27819063

  20. Substrate thiophosphorylation by Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Leissing, Franz; Nomoto, Mika; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Tada, Yasuomi; Conrath, Uwe; Beckers, Gerold J M

    2016-02-24

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are important to cellular signaling in eukaryotes. They regulate growth, development and the response to environmental challenges. MPK cascades function via reversible phosphorylation of cascade components, MEKK, MEK, and MPK, but also by MPK substrate phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we previously identified many in vivo MPK3 and MPK6 substrates in Arabidopsis thaliana, and we disclosed their phosphorylation sites. We verified phosphorylation of several of our previously identified MPK3/6 substrates using a nonradioactive in vitro labeling assay. We engineered MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6 to accept bio-orthogonal ATPγS analogs for thiophosphorylating their appropriate substrate proteins. Subsequent alkylation of the thiophosphorylated amino acid residue(s) allows immunodetection using thiophosphate ester-specific antibodies. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids confirmed the protein substrates' site-specific phosphorylation by MPK3 and MPK6. A combined assay with MPK3, MPK6, and MPK4 revealed substrate specificity of the individual kinases. Our work demonstrates that the in vitro-labeling assay represents an effective, specific and highly sensitive test for determining kinase-substrate relationships.

  1. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is /sup 125/I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed.

  2. CTL ELISPOT assay.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Elena; Popescu, Iulia; Gigante, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot (Elispot) is a quantitative method for measuring relevant parameters of T cell activation. The sensitivity of Elispot allows the detection of low-frequency antigen-specific T cells that secrete cytokines and effector molecules, such as granzyme B and perforin. Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) studies have taken advantage with this high-throughput technology by providing insights into quantity and immune kinetics. Accuracy, sensitivity, reproducibility, and robustness of Elispot resulted in a wide range of applications in research as well as in diagnostic field. Actually, CTL monitoring by Elispot is a gold standard for the evaluation of antigen-specific T cell immunity in clinical trials and vaccine candidates where the ability to detect rare antigen-specific T cells is of relevance for immune diagnostic. The most utilized Elispot assay is the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) test, a marker for CD8(+) CTL activation, but Elispot can also be used to distinguish different subsets of activated T cells by using other cytokines such as T-helper (Th) 1-type cells (characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-21, and TNF-α), Th2 (producing cytokines like IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13), and Th17 (IL-17) cells. The reliability of Elispot-generated data, by the evaluation of T cell frequency recognizing individual antigen/peptide, is the core of this method currently applied widely to investigate specific immune responses in cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. The Elispot assay is competing with other methods measuring single-cell cytokine production, e.g., intracellular cytokine by FACS or Miltenyi cytokine secretion assay. Other types of lymphocyte frequency and function assays include limiting dilution assay (LDA), cytotoxic T cell assay (CTL), and tetramer staining. Compared with respect to sensitivity the Elispot assay is outranking other methods to define frequency of antigen-specific lymphocytes. The method

  3. Fluorometric assay for aflatoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, A.G.

    1984-11-01

    The method that is now widely adopted by the government laboratories for the assay of individual aflatoxin components (B/sub 1/, B/sub 2/, G/sub 1/, and G/sub 2/) utilizes a TLC technique. The extraction and clean-up steps of this technique were further researched but the method is still time consuming. It is, therefore, very important to develop a rapid and accurate assay technique for aflatoxins. The current research proposes a technique which utilizes a Turner Fluorometer.

  4. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R [Danville, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Pearson, Francesca S [Livermore, CA; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  5. Activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yali; Lascola, Judith; Dulin, Nickolai O; Ye, Richard D; Browning, Darren D

    2003-05-09

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG) are emerging as important components of mainstream signal transduction pathways. Nitric oxide-induced cGMP formation by stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase is generally accepted as being the most widespread mechanism underlying PKG activation. In the present study, PKG was found to be a target for phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-responsive protein kinase C (PKC). PKG1alpha became phosphorylated in HEK-293 cells stimulated with PMA and also in vitro using purified components. PKC-dependent phosphorylation was found to activate PKG as measured by phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, and by in vitro kinase assays. Although there are 11 potential PKC substrate recognition sites in PKG1alpha, threonine 58 was examined due to its proximity to the pseudosubstrate domain. Antibodies generated against the phosphorylated form of this region were used to demonstrate phosphorylation in response to PMA treatment of the cells with kinetics similar to vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation. A phospho-mimetic mutation at this site (T58E) generated a partially activated PKG that was more sensitive to cGMP levels. A phospho-null mutation (T58A) revealed that this residue is important but not sufficient for PKG activation by PKC. Taken together, these findings outline a novel signal transduction pathway that links PKC stimulation with cyclic nucleotide-independent activation of PKG.

  6. Parkinson's disease-associated mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 augment kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew B.; Moore, Darren J.; Biskup, Saskia; Bugayenko, Artem; Smith, Wanli W.; Ross, Christopher A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) cause late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Initial studies suggest that LRRK2 mutations are the most common yet identified determinant of PD susceptibility, transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Herein, we characterize the LRRK2 gene and transcript in human brain and subclone the predominant ORF. Exogenously expressed LRRK2 protein migrates at ≈280 kDa and is present largely in the cytoplasm but also associates with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Familial-linked mutations G2019S or R1441C do not have an obvious effect on protein steady-state levels, turnover, or localization. However, in vitro kinase assays using full-length recombinant LRRK2 reveal an increase in activity caused by familial-linked mutations in both autophosphorylation and the phosphorylation of a generic substrate. These results suggest a gain-of-function mechanism for LRRK2-linked disease with a central role for kinase activity in the development of PD. PMID:16269541

  7. Coupling phosphoryl transfer and substrate interactions in protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Lieser, Scot A; Aubol, Brandon E; Wong, Lilly; Jennings, Patricia A; Adams, Joseph A

    2005-12-30

    Protein kinases control cell signaling events through the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine residues in protein targets. The recognition of these protein substrates by the kinases relies on two principal factors: proper subcellular co-localization and molecular interactions between the kinase and substrate. In this review, we will focus on the kinetic role of the latter in conveying favorable substrate recognition. Using rapid mixing technologies, we demonstrate that the intrinsic thermodynamic affinities of two protein substrates for their respective kinases (Csk with Src and Sky1p with Npl3) are weak compared to their apparent affinities measured in traditional steady-state kinetic assays (i.e.--Km < Kd). The source of the high apparent affinities rests in a very fast and highly favorable phosphoryl transfer step that serves as a clamp for substrate recognition. In this mechanism, both Csk and Sky1p utilize this step to draw the substrate toward product, thereby, converting a high Kd into a low Km. We propose that this one form of substrate recognition employed by protein kinases is advantageous since it simultaneously facilitates high apparent substrate affinity and fast protein turnover.

  8. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Stephen R; Li, Rui; Dhahbi, Joseph M; Yamakawa, Amy; Sauer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI) receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and protein kinase C (PKC). If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  9. P21 activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Chetan K; Minden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The p21 activated kinases (Paks) are well known effector proteins for the Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac. The Paks contain 6 members, which fall into 2 families of proteins. The first family consists of Paks 1, 2, and 3, and the second consists of Paks 4, 5, and 6. While some of the Paks are ubiquitously expressed, others have more restrictive tissue specificity. All of them are found in the nervous system. Studies using cell culture, transgenic mice, and knockout mice, have revealed important roles for the Paks in cytoskeletal organization and in many aspects of cell growth and development. This review discusses the basic structures of the Paks, and their roles in cell growth, development, and in cancer. PMID:24658305

  10. Cardiovascular effects of a novel selective Rho kinase inhibitor, 2-(1H-indazole-5-yl)amino-4-methoxy-6-piperazino triazine (DW1865).

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Oh, Byung Koo; Park, Cheon Ho; Seo, Ho Won; Kang, Nam Sook; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jin Soo; Ho Lee, Byung

    2013-02-28

    The arising critical implications of Rho kinase signaling in cardiovascular diseases have been attracting attention in the pharmacological potential of Rho kinase inhibitors. We identified a novel inhibitor of Rho kinase (2-(1H-indazole-5-yl)amino-4-methoxy-6-piperazino triazine; DW 1865) and characterized its effects in biochemical, cellular, tissue and animal based assays. DW 1865 potently inhibited the kinase activity of both Rho kinase 1 and Rho kinase 2 in vitro, and behaved as an ATP-competitive inhibitor. Interestingly, DW1865 was 10 times more potent in inhibiting Rho kinase activities than fasudil as a selective Rho kinase inhibitor. The activity of DW1865 was shown to be highly selective for Rho kinase in the panel assay of 13 other kinases. In the isolated vascular tissue study, DW1865 exerted vasorelaxation in phenylephrine- or 5-hydroxytriptamine-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner manner. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, administration of DW1865 caused a significant and dose-related reduction in blood pressure. Furthermore, DW1865 blocked angiotensin II-induced stress fiber formation and cellular hypertrophy in rat heart-derived H9c2 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that DW1865 is a highly selective and potent Rho kinase inhibitor that will alleviate the pathophysiological actions of Rho kinase such as stress fiber formation, cellular hypertrophy, and hypertension.

  11. Engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates for novel assay capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Keith V.

    2004-06-01

    In the development of HTS as a central paradigm of drug discovery, fluorescent reporter molecules have generally been adopted as the favored signal transducer. Nevertheless, luminescence has maintained a prominent position among certain methodologies, most notably genetic reporters. Recently, there has been growing partiality for luminescent assays across a broader range of applications due to their sensitivity, extensive linearity, and robustness to library compounds and complex biological samples. This trend has been fostered by development several new assay designs for diverse targets such as kinases, cytochrome p450's, proteases, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. This review addresses recent progress made in the use of bioluminescent assays for drug discovery, highlighting new detection capabilities brought about by engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates. In reporter gene applications, modified luciferases have provided greatly improved expression efficiency in mammalian cells, improved responsiveness to changes of transcriptional rate, and increased the magnitude of the reporter response. Highly stabilized luciferase mutants have enabled new assays strategies for high-throughput screening based on detection of ATP and luciferin. Assays based on ATP support rapid analysis of cell metabolism and enzymatic processes coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Although luciferin is found natively only in luminous beetles, coupled assays have been designed using modified forms of luciferin requiring the action of second enzyme to yield luminescence. Due to the very low inherent background and protection of the photon-emitter afforded by the enzyme, bioluminescent assays often outperform the analogous fluorescent assays for analyses performed in multiwell plates.

  12. The noni anthraquinone damnacanthal is a multi-kinase inhibitor with potent anti-angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    García-Vilas, Javier A; Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Martínez-Poveda, Beatriz; Quesada, Ana R; Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-28

    The natural bioactive compound damnacanthal inhibits several tyrosine kinases. Herein, we show that -in fact- damancanthal is a multi kinase inhibitor. A docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach allows getting further insight on the inhibitory effect of damnacanthal on three different kinases: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, c-Met and focal adhesion kinase. Several of the kinases targeted and inhibited by damnacanthal are involved in angiogenesis. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments clearly demonstrate that, indeed, damnacanthal is a very potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. A number of in vitro assays contribute to determine the specific effects of damnacanthal on each of the steps of the angiogenic process, including inhibition of tubulogenesis, endothelial cell proliferation, survival, migration and production of extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme. Taken altogether, these results suggest that damancanthal could have potential interest for the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-dependent diseases.

  13. Recognition of a PP2C interaction motif in several plant protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ohta, Masaru; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2007-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2Cs (PP2Cs) constitute a major class of phosphatases in plants. PP2Cs play important roles in many signaling pathways by countering the action of specific protein kinases. In addition to their role in several environmental stress-related signal transduction pathways, they are also involved in plant metabolism. Protein phosphatases often physically associate with their protein kinase counterparts. One approach to understanding PP2C function is to identify their interacting protein kinases. We describe a yeast two-hybrid assay system used in our lab to determine the interaction between members of the PP2C family and protein kinases in the SOS2 family. This chapter and the cited articles describing related work might be of help in discovering interactions between other protein phosphatases and kinases.

  14. STRUBBELIG defines a receptor kinase-mediated signaling pathway regulating organ development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, David; Batoux, Martine; Fulton, Lynette; Pfister, Karen; Yadav, Ram Kishor; Schellenberg, Maja; Schneitz, Kay

    2005-01-01

    An open question remains as to what coordinates cell behavior during organogenesis, permitting organs to reach their appropriate size and shape. The Arabidopsis gene STRUBBELIG (SUB) defines a receptor-mediated signaling pathway in plants. SUB encodes a putative leucine-rich repeat transmembrane receptor-like kinase. The mutant sub phenotype suggests that SUB affects the formation and shape of several organs by influencing cell morphogenesis, the orientation of the division plane, and cell proliferation. Mutational analysis suggests that the kinase domain is important for SUB function. Biochemical assays using bacterially expressed fusion proteins indicate that the SUB kinase domain lacks enzymatic phosphotransfer activity. Furthermore, transgenes encoding WT and different mutant variants of SUB were tested for their ability to rescue the mutant sub phenotype. These genetic data also indicate that SUB carries a catalytically inactive kinase domain. The SUB receptor-like kinase may therefore signal in an atypical fashion. PMID:15951420

  15. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  16. Sigma Receptor Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2015-12-08

    Sigma receptors, both Sigma-1(S1R) and Sigma-2 (S2R), are small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated sites. A number of drugs bind to sigma receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol and (+)-pentazocine, an opioid analgesic. Sigma receptors are implicated in many central nervous system disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease and conditions associated with motor control, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Described in this unit are radioligand binding assays used for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R. Methods detailed include a radioligand saturation binding assay for defining receptor densities and a competitive inhibition binding assay employing [³H]-(+)-pentazocine for identifying and characterizing novel ligands that interact with S1R. Procedures using [³H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([³H]-DTG), a nonselective sigma receptor ligand, are described for conducting a saturation binding and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R site. These protocols are of value in drug discovery in identifying new sigma ligands and in the characterization of these receptors.

  17. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  18. New oligosaccharyltransferase assay method.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2007-11-01

    We developed a new in vitro assay for oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), which catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. The asparagine residues reside in the sequon, Asn-X-Thr/Ser, where X can be any amino acid residue except Pro. We demonstrate the potency of our assay using the OST from yeast. In our method, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to separate the glycopeptide products from the peptide substrates. The substrate peptide is fluorescently labeled and the formation of glycopeptides is analyzed by fluorescence gel imaging. Two in vitro OST assay methods are now widely used, but both the methods depend on previous knowledge of the oligosaccharide moiety: One method uses lectin binding as the separation mechanism and the other method uses biosynthetically or chemoenzymatically synthesized lipid-linked oligosaccharides as donors. N-linked protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life, but little is known about the N-glycosylation in Archaea. Thus, our new assay, which does not require a priori knowledge of the oligosaccharides, will be useful in such cases. Indeed, we have detected the OST activity in the membrane fraction from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus.

  19. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  20. Multi-Kinase Inhibitor C1 Triggers Mitotic Catastrophe of Glioma Stem Cells Mainly through MELK Kinase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kaushal; Nakano-Okuno, Mariko; Hong, Christopher; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Kornblum, Harley I.; Molla, Annie; Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly lethal brain tumor. Due to resistance to current therapies, patient prognosis remains poor and development of novel and effective GBM therapy is crucial. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have gained attention as a therapeutic target in GBM due to their relative resistance to current therapies and potent tumor-initiating ability. Previously, we identified that the mitotic kinase maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) is highly expressed in GBM tissues, specifically in GSCs, and its expression is inversely correlated with the post-surgical survival period of GBM patients. In addition, patient-derived GSCs depend on MELK for their survival and growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate evidence that the role of MELK in the GSC survival is specifically dependent on its kinase activity. With in silico structure-based analysis for protein-compound interaction, we identified the small molecule Compound 1 (C1) is predicted to bind to the kinase-active site of MELK protein. Elimination of MELK kinase activity was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay in nano-molar concentrations. When patient-derived GSCs were treated with C1, they underwent mitotic arrest and subsequent cellular apoptosis in vitro, a phenotype identical to that observed with shRNA-mediated MELK knockdown. In addition, C1 treatment strongly induced tumor cell apoptosis in slice cultures of GBM surgical specimens and attenuated growth of mouse intracranial tumors derived from GSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Lastly, C1 treatment sensitizes GSCs to radiation treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that targeting MELK kinase activity is a promising approach to attenuate GBM growth by eliminating GSCs in tumors. PMID:24739874

  1. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  2. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 interacts with p21-activated kinase 6 to control neurite complexity in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Beilina, Alexandra; Rodella, Umberto; Russo, Isabella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Reyniers, Lauran; Hondhamuni, Geshanthi; Lewis, Patrick A; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Bubacco, Luigi; Piccoli, Giovanni; Cookson, Mark R; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a causative gene for Parkinson's disease, but the physiological function and the mechanism(s) by which the cellular activity of LRRK2 is regulated are poorly understood. Here, we identified p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of the GTPase/ROC domain of LRRK2. p21-activated kinases are serine-threonine kinases that serve as targets for the small GTP binding proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 and have been implicated in different morphogenetic processes through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton such as synapse formation and neuritogenesis. Using an in vivo neuromorphology assay, we show that PAK6 is a positive regulator of neurite outgrowth and that LRRK2 is required for this function. Analyses of post-mortem brain tissue from idiopathic and LRRK2 G2019S carriers reveal an increase in PAK6 activation state, whereas knock-out LRRK2 mice display reduced PAK6 activation and phosphorylation of PAK6 substrates. Taken together, these results support a critical role of LRRK2 GTPase domain in cytoskeletal dynamics in vivo through the novel interactor PAK6, and provide a valuable platform to unravel the mechanism underlying LRRK2-mediated pathophysiology. We propose p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a kinase involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). In health, PAK6 regulates neurite complexity in the brain and LRRK2 is required for its function, (a) whereas PAK6 is aberrantly activated in LRRK2-linked PD brain (b) suggesting that LRRK2 toxicity is mediated by PAK6.

  3. Bimodal lipid substrate dependence of phosphatidylinositol kinase.

    PubMed

    Ganong, B R

    1990-07-24

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase activity was solubilized from rat liver microsomes and partially purified by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and Reactive Green 19-Superose. Examination of the ATP dependence using a mixed micellar assay gave a Km of 120 microM. The dependence of reaction rate on PI was more complicated. PI kinase bound a large amount of Triton X-100, and as expected for a micelle-associated enzyme utilizing a micelle-associated lipid substrate, the reaction rate was dependent on the micellar mole fraction, PI/(PI + Triton X-100), with a Km of 0.02 (unitless). Activity showed an additional dependence on bulk PI concentration at high micelle dilution. These results demonstrated two kinetically distinguishable steps leading to formation of a productive PI/enzyme(/ATP) complex. The rate of the first step, which probably represents exchange of PI from the bulk micellar pool into enzyme-containing micelles, depends on bulk PI concentration. The rate of the second step, association of PI with enzyme within a single micelle, depends on the micellar mole fraction of PI. Depression of the apparent Vmax at low ionic strength suggested that electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged PI/Triton X-100 mixed micelles inhibits PI exchange, consistent with a model in which intermicellar PI exchange depends on micellar collisions.

  4. Role of the carboxyl terminus on the catalytic activity of protein kinase CK2alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Julio; Jacob, Germaine; Allende, Catherine C; Allende, Jorge E

    2002-11-06

    Protein kinase CK2 (also known as casein kinase 2) has catalytic (alpha, alpha') and regulatory (beta) subunits. The role of carboxyl amino acids in positions from 324 to 328 was studied for Xenopus laevis CK2alpha. Deletions and mutations of these residues were produced in recombinant CK2alpha, which was assayed for kinase activity. Activity dropped 7000-fold upon deletion of amino acids 324-328. The key residues are isoleucine 327 and phenylalanine 324. A three dimensional model of CK2alpha indicates that these hydrophobic residues of helix alphaN may interact with hydrophobic residues in helix alphaE which is linked to the catalytic center.

  5. Aurora kinase A is a possible target of OSU‑03012 to destabilize MYC family proteins.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andres; Wang, Jennie; Lomahan, Sarah; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Grenlin, Laura; Suganami, Akiko; Tamura, Yutaka; Ikegaki, Naohiko

    2014-09-01

    OSU-03012, a 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) inhibitor, destabilizes MYCN and MYC proteins in neuroblastoma cells. However, AKT phosphorylation is barely detectable in neuroblastoma cells under normal culture conditions whether treated with OSU-03012 or not. This observation suggests that PDK1 is not the main target of OSU-03012 to destabilize MYC and MYCN in neuroblastoma cells. In the present study, we explored one of the possible mechanisms by which OSU-03012 destabilizes MYC and MYCN. Since Aurora kinase A is reported to phosphorylate GSK3β, leading to its inactivation, we hypothesized that one of the targets of OSU-03012 is Aurora kinase A. Comparative analysis of OSU-03012 and VX-680, a potent and specific inhibitor of Aurora kinases, showed that both inhibitors destabilized MYC and MYCN and were significantly growth suppressive to neuroblastoma cell lines. In silico molecular docking analysis further showed that the calculated interaction energy between Aurora kinase A and OSU-03012 was -109.901 kcal/mol, which was lower than that (-89.273 kcal/mol) between Aurora kinase A and FXG, an Aurora kinase-specific inhibitor. Finally, an in vitro Aurora kinase A inhibition assay using a recombinant Aurora kinase A showed that OSU-03012 significantly inhibited Aurora kinase A, although it was weaker in potency than that of VX-680. Thus, OSU-03012 has a likelihood of binding to and inhibiting Aurora kinase A in vivo. These results suggest that OSU-03012 affects multiple cellular targets, including Aurora kinase A, to exhibit its growth suppressive and MYC and MYCN-destabilizing effects on neuroblastoma and other cancer cells.

  6. Spk1, a new kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphorylates proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Stern, D F; Zheng, P; Beidler, D R; Zerillo, C

    1991-02-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae lambda gt11 library was screened with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies in an attempt to identify a gene encoding a tyrosine kinase. A subclone derived from one positive phage was sequenced and found to contain an 821-amino-acid open reading frame that encodes a protein with homology to protein kinases. We tested the activity of the putative kinase by constructing a vector encoding a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein containing most of the predicted polypeptide. The fusion protein phosphorylated endogenous substrates and enolase primarily on serine and threonine. The gene was designated SPK1 for serine-protein kinase. Expression of the Spk1 fusion protein in bacteria stimulated serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation of bacterial proteins. These results, combined with the antiphosphotyrosine immunoreactivity induced by the kinase, indicate that Spk1 is capable of phosphorylating tyrosine as well as phosphorylating serine and threonine. In in vitro assays, the fusion protein kinase phosphorylated the synthetic substrate poly(Glu/Tyr) on tyrosine, but the activity was weak compared with serine and threonine phosphorylation of other substrates. To determine if other serine/threonine kinases would phosphorylate poly(Glu/Tyr), we tested calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The two kinases had similar tyrosine-phosphorylating activities. These results establish that the functional difference between serine/threonine- and tyrosine-protein kinases is not absolute and suggest that there may be physiological circumstances in which tyrosine phosphorylation is mediated by serine/threonine kinases.

  7. Development of a STAT5 phosphorylation assay as a rapid bioassay to assess interleukin-7 potency.

    PubMed

    Zumpe, C; Engel, K; Wiedemann, N; Metzger, A U; Pischetsrieder, M; Bachmann, C L

    2011-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-7 is a cytokine inducing the Janus Kinase (JAK)/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) pathway. As a consequence of IL-7 activating this pathway, STAT5 is phosphorylated. In pharmaceutical quality control, the potency of biopharmaceuticals is commonly assessed by proliferation assays. This is also possible for IL-7 conjugates. However, the disadvantage of these classical "endpoint-assays" is that they require very long incubation times, up to several days, since they measure the downstream events of a cellular response. As an alternative to this, we developed a rapid intracellular phosphorylation assay, measuring IL-7 induced STAT5 phosphorylation in Kit 225 cells. The Kit 225 human T cell line expresses the IL-7 receptor and is responsive to IL-7, therefore making it a good candidate cell line for assay development. Like the Kinase receptor activation (KIRA) assay, developed by Sadick et al. [1], the STAT5 phosphorylation assay was performed using two separate microtiter plates: the first one for cell stimulation and lysis, the second one for enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The assay showed a high accuracy and precision with a mean recovery of 102% and a mean coefficient of variation of 9%. In comparison to the classical proliferation assay, the phosphorylation assay is much faster. Thus, the assay procedure time can at least be reduced from six to three days by using STAT5 phosphorylation instead of proliferation as an endpoint due to the shorter incubation time with IL-7. Moreover, the phosphorylation assay shows a wider dynamic range and higher signal to noise ratios and is thus more robust than the proliferation assay.mAs a consequence, this assay could serve as reliable, accurate, precise and fast alternative to the classical proliferation assay for IL-7. This study also serves as an example for the typical steps during development and qualification / validation of a potency assay for quality control testing.

  8. Arginine kinase shows nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity toward deoxythymidine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Hernandez-Flores, Jose M; Lugo-Sanchez, Maria E; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) (ATP: L-arginine phosphotransferase, E.C. 2.7.3.3) catalyzes the reversible transfer of ATP γ-phosphate group to L-arginine to synthetize phospho-arginine as a high-energy storage. Previous studies suggest additional roles for AK in cellular processes. Since AK is found only in invertebrates and it is homologous to creatine kinase from vertebrates, the objective of this work was to demonstrate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for shrimp AK. For this, AK from marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvAK) was purified and its activity was assayed for phosphorylation of TDP using ATP as phosphate donor. Moreover, by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) the phosphate transfer reaction was followed. Also, LvAK tryptophan fluorescence emission changes were detected by dTDP titration, suggesting that the hydrophobic environment of Trp 221, which is located in the top of the active site, is perturbed upon dTDP binding. The kinetic constants for both substrates Arg and dTDP were calculated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Besides, docking calculations suggested that dTDP could bind LvAK in the same cavity where ATP bind, and LvAK basic residues (Arg124, 126 and 309) stabilize the dTDP phosphate groups and the pyrimidine base interact with His284 and Ser122. These results suggest that LvAK bind and phosphorylate dTDP being ATP the phosphate donor, thus describing a novel alternate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for this enzyme.

  9. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  10. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  11. A simple in vitro method to measure autophosphorylation of protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) are a large and important group of plant proteins involved in numerous aspects of development and stress response. Within this family, homo-oligermization of receptors followed by autophosphorylation of the intracellular protein kinase domain appears to be a widespread mechanism to regulate protein kinase activity. In vitro studies of several RLKs have identified autophosphorylation sites involved in regulation of catalytic activity and signaling in vivo. Recent work has established that multiple RLKs are biochemically active when expressed in E. coli and readily autophosphorylate prior to purification or subsequent manipulation. This observation has led us to develop a simplified method for assaying RLK phosphorylation status as an indirect measure of intrinsic autophosphorylation activity. The method involves expressing a recombinant RLK protein kinase domain in E. coli, followed by SDS-PAGE of boiled cell lysate, and sequential staining with the phosphoprotein stain Pro-Q Diamond and a colloidal Coomassie total protein stain. We show this method can be used to measure and quantify in vitro autophosphorylation levels of recombinant wildtype and mutant versions of the Arabidopsis RLK HAESA, as well as to detect transphosphorylation activity of recombinant HAESA against a protein kinase inactive version of itself. Our method has several advantages over traditional protein kinase assays. It does not require protein purification, transfer, blotting, or radioactive reagents. It allows for rapid and quantitative assessment of autophosphorylation levels and should have general utility in the study of any autophosphorylating protein kinase expressed in E. coli. PMID:23803530

  12. Identification and characterization of two wheat Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/ SHAGGY-like kinases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/ SHAGGY-like kinases (GSKs) have been implicated in numerous biological processes ranging from embryonic, flower, stomata development to stress and wound responses. They are key regulators of brassinosteroid signaling and are also involved in the cross-talk between auxin and brassinosteroid pathways. In contrast to the human genome that contains two genes, plant GSKs are encoded by a multigene family. Little is known about Liliopsida resp. Poaceae in comparison to Brassicaceae GSKs. Here, we report the identification and structural characterization of two GSK homologs named TaSK1 and TaSK2 in the hexaploid wheat genome as well as a widespread phylogenetic analysis of land plant GSKs. Results Genomic and cDNA sequence alignments as well as chromosome localization using nullisomic-tetrasomic lines provided strong evidence for three expressed gene copies located on homoeolog chromosomes for TaSK1 as well as for TaSK2. Predicted proteins displayed a clear GSK signature. In vitro kinase assays showed that TaSK1 and TaSK2 possessed kinase activity. A phylogenetic analysis of land plant GSKs indicated that TaSK1 and TaSK2 belong to clade II of plant GSKs, the Arabidopsis members of which are all involved in Brassinosteroid signaling. Based on a single ancestral gene in the last common ancestor of all land plants, paralogs were acquired and retained through paleopolyploidization events, resulting in six to eight genes in angiosperms. More recent duplication events have increased the number up to ten in some lineages. Conclusions To account for plant diversity in terms of functionality, morphology and development, attention has to be devoted to Liliopsida resp Poaceae GSKs in addition to Arabidopsis GSKs. In this study, molecular characterization, chromosome localization, kinase activity test and phylogenetic analysis (1) clarified the homologous/paralogous versus homoeologous status of TaSK sequences, (2) pointed out their

  13. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Slowly on, Slowly off: Bisubstrate-Analogue Conjugates of 5-Iodotubercidin and Histone H3 Peptide Targeting Protein Kinase Haspin.

    PubMed

    Kestav, Katrin; Viht, Kaido; Konovalov, Anton; Enkvist, Erki; Uri, Asko; Lavogina, Darja

    2017-02-09

    The atypical protein kinase Haspin serves as one of a key players in mitosis by catalysing phosphorylation of Thr3 in histone H3, and thus sustaining the normal functioning of the chromosomal passenger complex. Here, we report the development of bisubstrate-analogue inhibitors targeting Haspin. The compounds were constructed by linking 5-iodotubercidin moiety to the N-terminal sequence of histone H3. The new conjugates possessed high affinity (KD in the subnanomolar range) towards Haspin as well as slow kinetics of association and dissociation (residence time on the scale of several hours), which reflected their unique binding mode and translated into improved selectivity. The latter was confirmed in a biochemical binding/displacement assay with a panel of 10 protein kinases, in thermal shift assay with off-targets of 5-iodotubercidin represented by adenosine kinase and the Cdc2-like kinase family, as well as in assay with spiked lysates of HeLa cells.

  15. The in vitro DNA binding properties of NDP kinase are related to its oligomeric state.

    PubMed

    Mesnildrey, S; Agou, F; Véron, M

    1997-11-24

    Genetic and biochemical evidences suggest that the enzymatic activity of NDP kinase is necessary but not sufficient for its biological function. While the human NDPK-B binds specifically single-strand polypyrimidines sequences, the hexameric enzyme from Dictyostelium does not. We demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and filter binding assay that a dimeric mutant from Dictyostelium binds to an oligodesoxynucleotide while the wild-type does not. These data suggest that the differences in the DNA binding properties of several eucaryotic NDP kinases might be correlated to the differences in the stability of their hexameric structure.

  16. Biochemical Screening of Five Protein Kinases from Plasmodium falciparum against 14,000 Cell-Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Gregory J.; Hillesland, Heidi K.; Keyloun, Katelyn R.; Reid, Molly C.; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Leonard, Stephen E.; He, Panqing; Jones, Jackson C.; Krahn, Mallory M.; Mo, Jack S.; Dasari, Kartheek S.; Fox, Anna M. W.; Boesche, Markus; El Bakkouri, Majida; Rivas, Kasey L.; Leroy, Didier; Hui, Raymond; Drewes, Gerard; Maly, Dustin J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Ojo, Kayode K.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010 the identities of thousands of anti-Plasmodium compounds were released publicly to facilitate malaria drug development. Understanding these compounds’ mechanisms of action—i.e., the specific molecular targets by which they kill the parasite—would further facilitate the drug development process. Given that kinases are promising anti-malaria targets, we screened ~14,000 cell-active compounds for activity against five different protein kinases. Collections of cell-active compounds from GlaxoSmithKline (the ~13,000-compound Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set, or TCAMS), St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (260 compounds), and the Medicines for Malaria Venture (the 400-compound Malaria Box) were screened in biochemical assays of Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinases 1 and 4 (CDPK1 and CDPK4), mitogen-associated protein kinase 2 (MAPK2/MAP2), protein kinase 6 (PK6), and protein kinase 7 (PK7). Novel potent inhibitors (IC50 < 1 μM) were discovered for three of the kinases: CDPK1, CDPK4, and PK6. The PK6 inhibitors are the most potent yet discovered for this enzyme and deserve further scrutiny. Additionally, kinome-wide competition assays revealed a compound that inhibits CDPK4 with few effects on ~150 human kinases, and several related compounds that inhibit CDPK1 and CDPK4 yet have limited cytotoxicity to human (HepG2) cells. Our data suggest that inhibiting multiple Plasmodium kinase targets without harming human cells is challenging but feasible. PMID:26934697

  17. An Arabidopsis kinase cascade influences auxin-responsive cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Enders, Tara A; Frick, Elizabeth M; Strader, Lucia C

    2017-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are conserved mechanisms of signal transduction across eukaryotes. Despite the importance of MPK proteins in signaling events, specific roles for many Arabidopsis MPK proteins remain unknown. Multiple studies have suggested roles for MPK signaling in a variety of auxin-related processes. To identify MPK proteins with roles in auxin response, we screened mpk insertional alleles and identified mpk1-1 as a mutant that displays hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays. Further, mutants defective in the upstream MAP kinase kinase MKK3 also display hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays, suggesting that this MPK cascade affects auxin-influenced cell expansion. We found that MPK1 interacts with and phosphorylates ROP BINDING PROTEIN KINASE 1 (RBK1), a protein kinase that interacts with members of the Rho-like GTPases from Plants (ROP) small GTPase family. Similar to mpk1-1 and mkk3-1 mutants, rbk1 insertional mutants display auxin hypersensitivity, consistent with a possible role for RBK1 downstream of MPK1 in influencing auxin-responsive cell expansion. We found that RBK1 directly phosphorylates ROP4 and ROP6, supporting the possibility that RBK1 effects on auxin-responsive cell expansion are mediated through phosphorylation-dependent modulation of ROP activity. Our data suggest a MKK3 • MPK1 • RBK1 phosphorylation cascade that may provide a dynamic module for altering cell expansion. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evidence for two NAD kinases in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, W.; Roth, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The electron-carrying cofactor NADP is formed by phosphorylation of NAD. A strategy for the isolation of NAD kinase mutants revealed two classes of temperature-sensitive mutations, nadF and nadG, mapping at min 13 and 72 of the Salmonella chromosome. Both mutant types grew on nutrient broth at both 30 and 42 degrees C but on minimal medium showed a temperature-sensitive growth defect which was not corrected by any of the single nutritional supplements tested. A nadF deletion mutant grew on nutrient broth but not on minimal medium. A double mutant with the nadF deletion and a nadG(Ts) mutation showed temperature-sensitive growth on all media. We propose that Salmonella typhimurium has two NAD kinases, one encoded by the nadF and one by the nadG gene. This is supported by the fact that temperature-sensitive mutants of both genes produce kinase activity with altered heat stability. Results suggest that either one of two NAD kinases is sufficient for growth on rich medium, but that both are needed for growth on minimal media. Enzyme assays show that the nadF gene is responsible for about 70% of total NAD kinase activity, and that the nadG gene dictates the remaining 30%. While testing nutritional phenotypes of nadF and nadG mutants, we found that the biosynthetic intermediate, quinolinic acid (QA) inhibited growth of nadF mutants on nutrient broth. This suggested that the NadG enzyme might be inhibited by QA. Enzyme assays demonstrated that QA inhibits the NadG but not the NadF enzyme. This suggests the existence of a regulatory mechanism which controls NADP levels. PMID:8021211

  19. Arabidopsis assay for mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Gichner, T; Badayev, S A; Demchenko, S I; Relichová, J; Sandhu, S S; Usmanov, P D; Usmanova, O; Velemínský, J

    1994-10-16

    Four laboratories, two in the Czech Republic (Brno and Prague) and two in the CIS (Moscow and Duschanbe), participated in the International Programme on Chemical Safety's (IPCS) collaborative study to evaluate the utility of the most commonly used plant test systems, including the Arabidopsis thaliana assay, for assessing the mutagenic potential of environmental agents. Out of the five compounds evaluated in the Arabidopsis assay, three compounds, i.e., ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and azidoglycerol, were reported to be mutagenic by all four participating laboratories. Sodium azide (NaN3) demonstrated a negative response in all four laboratories, whereas maleic hydrazide was reported to be weakly mutagenic by one laboratory and nonmutagenic by the other three laboratories.

  20. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  1. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  2. Multiplexed Elispot Assay

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, William D.; Collarini, Ellen J.; Cromer, Remy G.; Dutta, April; Strandh, Magnus; Zhang, Fen; Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    2009-01-01

    Micron scale latex beads are well established as highly biocompatible reagents. Imbibing two fluorescent dyes into the interior of the beads enables the creation of a family of combinatorially colored labels. Previous use of such beads, in flow cytometry for example, has focused on beads of ~5μm diameter. We show here that 280 nm combinatorially labeled particles can be used to create ELISA-style assays in 200 μm scale virtual wells, using digital microscopy as the readout. The utility of this technique is illustrated by profiling the secreted cytokine footprints of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a multiparametric version of the popular Elispot assay. Doing so reveals noncanonical classes of T lymphocytes. We further show that the secreting cell type can be concurrently identified by surface staining with a cell type specific antibody conjugated to the same multiplexed beads. PMID:19084532

  3. The corneal pocket assay.

    PubMed

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cornea in most species is physiologically avascular, and thus this assay allows the measurement of newly formed vessels. The continuous monitoring of neovascular growth in the same animal allows the evaluation of drugs acting as suppressors or stimulators of angiogenesis. Under anesthesia a micropocket is produced in the cornea thickness and the angiogenesis stimulus (tumor tissue, cell suspension, growth factor) is placed into the pocket in order to induce vascular outgrowth from the limbal capillaries. Neovascular development and progression can be modified by the presence of locally released or applied inhibitory factors or by systemic treatments. In this chapter the experimental details of the avascular cornea assay, the technical challenges, and advantages and disadvantages in different species are discussed. Protocols for local drug treatment and tissue sampling for histology and pharmacokinetic profile are reported.

  4. NAK is an IkappaB kinase-activating kinase.

    PubMed

    Tojima, Y; Fujimoto, A; Delhase, M; Chen, Y; Hatakeyama, S; Nakayama, K; Kaneko, Y; Nimura, Y; Motoyama, N; Ikeda, K; Karin, M; Nakanishi, M

    2000-04-13

    Phosphorylation of IkappaB by the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex is a critical step leading to IkappaB degradation and activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB. The IKK complex contains two catalytic subunits, IKKalpha and IKKbeta, the latter being indispensable for NF-kappaB activation by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Although IKK is activated by phosphorylation of the IKKbeta activation loop, the physiological IKK kinases that mediate responses to extracellular stimuli remain obscure. Here we describe an IKK-related kinase, named NAK (NF-kappaB-activating kinase), that can activate IKK through direct phosphorylation. NAK induces IkappaB degradation and NF-kappaB activity through IKKbeta. Endogenous NAK is activated by phorbol ester tumour promoters and growth factors, whereas catalytically inactive NAK specifically inhibits activation of NF-kappaB by protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCepsilon). Thus, NAK is an IKK kinase that may mediate IKK and NF-kappaB activation in response to growth factors that stimulate PKCepsilon activity.

  5. Cytotoxicity assay automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinthal, E. C.; Payne, R. O.

    1971-01-01

    The design and construction of a system to automatically test HLP antigens are described. Major efforts were made to test and evaluate the performance of such a system, and compare its performance with nonautomatic tissue typing techniques. The system is based on the fluorochromatic cytotoxicity assay. Results show the system will work but is subject to malfunctions after a few samplings, and poses problems in showing correctly the necessary readings.

  6. B cell helper assays.

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  7. Enzyme assay design for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin P; Scott, John E

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes continue to be a major drug target class for the pharmaceutical industry with high-throughput screening the approach of choice for identifying initial active chemical compounds. The development of fluorescent- or absorbance-based readouts typically remains the formats of choice for enzyme screens and a wealth of experience from both industry and academia has led to a comprehensive set of standardized assay development and validation guidelines for enzyme assays. In this chapter, we generalize approaches to developing, validating, and troubleshooting assays that should be applicable in both industrial and academic settings. Real-life examples of various enzyme classes including kinases, proteases, transferases, and phosphatases are used to illustrate assay development approaches and solutions. Practical examples are given for how to deal with low-purity enzyme targets, compound interference, and identification of activators. Assay acceptance criteria and a number of assay notes on pitfalls to avoid should provide pointers on how to develop a suitable enzymatic assay applicable for HTS.

  8. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  9. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  10. Use of 5'-γ-ferrocenyl adenosine triphosphate (Fc-ATP) bioconjugates having poly(ethylene glycol) spacers in kinase-catalyzed phosphorylations.

    PubMed

    Martić, Sanela; Rains, Meghan K; Freeman, Daniel; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2011-08-17

    The 5'-γ-ferrocenyl adenosine triphosphate (Fc-ATP) bioconjugates (3 and 4), containing the poly(ethylene glycol) spacers, were synthesized and compared to a hydrophobic analogue as co-substrates for the following protein kinases: sarcoma related kinase (Src), cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), casein kinase II (CK2α), and protein kinase A (PKA). Electrochemical kinase assays indicate that the hydrophobic Fc-ATP analogue was an optimal co-substrate for which K(M) values were determined to be in the 30-200 μM range, depending on the particular protein kinase. The luminescence kinase assay demonstrated the kinase utility for all Fc-ATP conjugates, which is in line with the electrochemical data. Moreover, Fc-ATP bioconjugates exhibit competitive behavior with respect to ATP. Relatively poor performance of the polar Fc-ATP bioconjugates as co-substrates for protein kinases was presumably due to the additional H-bonding and electrostatic interactions of the poly(ethylene glycol) linkers of Fc-ATP with the kinase catalytic site and the target peptides. Phosphorylation of the full-length protein, His-tagged pro-caspase-3, was demonstrated through Fc-phosphoamide transfer to the Ser residues of the surface-bound protein by electrochemical means. These results suggest that electrochemical detection of the peptide and protein Fc-phosphorylation via tailored Fc-ATP co-substrates may be useful for probing protein-protein interactions.

  11. Regulation of CDPKs, including identification of PAL kinase, in biotically stressed cells of French bean.

    PubMed

    Allwood, Ellen G; Davies, Dewi R; Gerrish, Chris; Bolwell, G Paul

    2002-07-01

    Changes in protein kinase activity have been investigated during the early response of suspension cultured cells of French bean to fungal elicitor. One of the kinases activated has a known target, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), which has an important role in plant defence responses, and was purified. Kinase acivity during purification was monitored for both the PAL-derived peptide and syntide-2, which it also phosphorylated. The kinase had an Mr of 55,000 on the basis of gel migration, 45Ca2+ binding, autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of various substrates using in-gel assays. The kinase has been characterised with respect to kinetics and other properties in vitro and appears to be a CDPK. In-gel assays were also used to show that this kinase and a number of other CDPKs of similar Mr showed complex changes in elicitor-treated suspension-cultured cells of French bean. An activation was observed within 10 min and was maintained for up to 4 h. The time course of activation was different from MAP kinase and casein kinase assayed in the same extracts. However, at 5 min after addition of elicitor there is a transient inactivation of the CDPKs before activation. This inactivation can be mimicked by adding forskolin to the cells 30 min before elicitation, which brings about changes in the cellular pH. Forskolin potentiates the oxidative burst when elicitor is subsequently added while the CDPK cannot be activated by elicitor upon forskolin treatment. In contrast, intracellular acidification brought about by forskolin brings about slight activation of MAPkinase.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Env7 Is a Novel Serine/Threonine Kinase 16-Related Protein Kinase and Negatively Regulates Organelle Fusion at the Lysosomal Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Manandhar, Surya P.; Ricarte, Florante; Cocca, Stephanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion depends on conserved components and is responsible for organelle biogenesis and vesicular trafficking. Yeast vacuoles are dynamic structures analogous to mammalian lysosomes. We report here that yeast Env7 is a novel palmitoylated protein kinase ortholog that negatively regulates vacuolar membrane fusion. Microscopic and biochemical studies confirmed the localization of tagged Env7 at the vacuolar membrane and implicated membrane association via the palmitoylation of its N-terminal Cys13 to -15. In vitro kinase assays established Env7 as a protein kinase. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Env7 alanine-proline-glutamic acid (APE) motif Glu269 to alanine results in an unstable kinase-dead allele that is stabilized and redistributed to the detergent-resistant fraction by interruption of the proteasome system in vivo. Palmitoylation-deficient Env7C13-15S is also kinase dead and mislocalizes to the cytoplasm. Microscopy studies established that env7Δ is defective in maintaining fragmented vacuoles during hyperosmotic response and in buds. ENV7 function is not redundant with a similar role of vacuolar membrane kinase Yck3, as the two do not share a substrate, and ENV7 is not a suppressor of yck3Δ. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses strongly support ENV7 as an ortholog of the gene encoding human STK16, a Golgi apparatus protein kinase with undefined function. We propose that Env7 function in fusion/fission dynamics may be conserved within the endomembrane system. PMID:23166297

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Env7 is a novel serine/threonine kinase 16-related protein kinase and negatively regulates organelle fusion at the lysosomal vacuole.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Surya P; Ricarte, Florante; Cocca, Stephanie M; Gharakhanian, Editte

    2013-02-01

    Membrane fusion depends on conserved components and is responsible for organelle biogenesis and vesicular trafficking. Yeast vacuoles are dynamic structures analogous to mammalian lysosomes. We report here that yeast Env7 is a novel palmitoylated protein kinase ortholog that negatively regulates vacuolar membrane fusion. Microscopic and biochemical studies confirmed the localization of tagged Env7 at the vacuolar membrane and implicated membrane association via the palmitoylation of its N-terminal Cys13 to -15. In vitro kinase assays established Env7 as a protein kinase. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Env7 alanine-proline-glutamic acid (APE) motif Glu269 to alanine results in an unstable kinase-dead allele that is stabilized and redistributed to the detergent-resistant fraction by interruption of the proteasome system in vivo. Palmitoylation-deficient Env7C13-15S is also kinase dead and mislocalizes to the cytoplasm. Microscopy studies established that env7Δ is defective in maintaining fragmented vacuoles during hyperosmotic response and in buds. ENV7 function is not redundant with a similar role of vacuolar membrane kinase Yck3, as the two do not share a substrate, and ENV7 is not a suppressor of yck3Δ. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses strongly support ENV7 as an ortholog of the gene encoding human STK16, a Golgi apparatus protein kinase with undefined function. We propose that Env7 function in fusion/fission dynamics may be conserved within the endomembrane system.

  14. Using the semi-synthetic epitope system to identify direct substrates of the meiosis-specific budding yeast kinase, Mek1

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the meiosis-specific kinase, Mek1, plays a key role in promoting recombination between homologous chromosomes during meiosis in budding yeast by suppressing recombination between sister chromatids, as well as playing a role in the meiotic recombination checkpoint. Understanding how Mek1 regulates recombination requires the identification of direct substrates of the kinase. We have applied the semi-synthetic epitope method developed by Shokat and colleagues to Mek1. This method uses an analog-sensitive version of Mek1, Gst-mek1-as, in conjunction with an ATPγS analog, for kinase assays that detect only those proteins that are directly phosphorylated by Mek1. This method may be applicable to any kinase for which an analog-sensitive version is available. In addition, it provides a non-radioactive alternative for kinase assays with wild-type kinases. PMID:21660693

  15. CUL3 and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Thibaud; Kleiss, Charlotte; Sumara, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational mechanisms drive fidelity of cellular processes. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of substrates represent very common, covalent, posttranslational modifications and are often co-regulated. Phosphorylation may play a critical role both by directly regulating E3-ubiquitin ligases and/or by ensuring specificity of the ubiquitination substrate. Importantly, many kinases are not only critical regulatory components of these pathways but also represent themselves the direct ubiquitination substrates. Recent data suggest the role of CUL3-based ligases in both proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of protein kinases. Our own recent study identified the mitotic kinase PLK1 as a direct target of the CUL3 E3-ligase complex containing BTB-KELCH adaptor protein KLHL22.1 In this study, we aim at gaining mechanistic insights into CUL3-mediated regulation of the substrates, in particular protein kinases, by analyzing mechanisms of interaction between KLHL22 and PLK1. We find that kinase activity of PLK1 is redundant for its targeting for CUL3-ubiquitination. Moreover, CUL3/KLHL22 may contact 2 distinct motifs within PLK1 protein, consistent with the bivalent mode of substrate targeting found in other CUL3-based complexes. We discuss these findings in the context of the existing knowledge on other protein kinases and substrates targeted by CUL3-based E3-ligases. PMID:24067371

  16. Benzimidazole derivatives as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole is a common kinase inhibitor scaffold and benzimidazole-based compounds interact with enzymes by multiple binding modes. In some cases, the benzimidazole acts as part of the hinge-binding motif, in others it has a scaffolding role without evidence for direct hinge binding. Several of these compounds are ATP-competitive inhibitors and show high selectivity by exploiting unique structural properties that distinguish one kinase from the majority of other kinases. However, the high specificity for a single target is not always sufficient. Thus another approach, called multi-target therapy, has been developed over the last few years. The simultaneous inhibition of various kinases may be useful because the disease is attacked at several relevant targets. Moreover, if a kinase becomes drug-resistant, a multitargeted drug can act on the other kinases. Some benzimidazole derivatives are multi-target inhibitors. In this article benzimidazole inhibitors are reported with their mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological properties.

  17. Functional Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Arbiser, Jack L.; Govindarajan, Baskaran; Bai, Xianhe; Onda, Hiroaki; Kazlauskas, Andrius; Lim, So Dug; Amin, Mahul B.; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2002-01-01

    Tumors often exhibit activation of specific tyrosine kinases, which may allow targeting of therapy through inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling. This strategy has been used successfully in the development of STI571 (gleevec), an inhibitor of bcr-abl tyrosine kinase that has been used successfully in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. STI571 also shows activity against c-kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ) tyrosine kinase signaling, thus potentially expanding the number of tumors that may respond to it. We describe a simple and rapid method to assess functional activity of tyrosine kinase signaling that is broadly applicable to tumor types. As proof of principle, we have applied it to cells that serve as models of the autosomal-dominant tumor syndrome tuberous sclerosis (TS). We found that TS model cells derived from tuberin heterozygous mice and from a human renal angiomyolipoma are highly sensitive to PDGFR antagonists and that these cells express PDGFRβ. Given that PDGFRβ signaling is inhibited by STI571, we found that SV7tert human angiomyolipoma cells are sensitive to STI571. Thus, we describe a novel but simple method of determining the functional tyrosine kinase profile of a neoplastic cell and our results suggest that STI571 might be useful in the treatment of neoplasms commonly seen in patients with TS. PMID:12213705

  18. The protein kinase C family.

    PubMed

    Azzi, A; Boscoboinik, D; Hensey, C

    1992-09-15

    Protein kinase C represents a structurally homologous group of proteins similar in size, structure and mechanism of activation. They can modulate the biological function of proteins in a rapid and reversible manner. Protein kinase C participates in one of the major signal transduction systems triggered by the external stimulation of cells by various ligands including hormones, neurotransmitters and growth factors. Hydrolysis of membrane inositol phospholipids by phospholipase C or of phosphatidylcholine, generates sn-1,2-diacylglycerol, considered the physiological activator of this kinase. Other agents, such as arachidonic acid, participate in the activation of some of these proteins. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters and related compounds is not physiological and may be responsible, at least in part, for their tumor-promoting activity. The cellular localization of the different calcium-activated protein kinases, their substrate and activator specificity are dissimilar and thus their role in signal transduction is unlike. A better understanding of the exact cellular function of the different protein kinase C isoenzymes requires the identification and characterization of their physiological substrates.

  19. Structural basis of autoregulatory scaffolding by apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Weijman, Johannes F.; Kumar, Abhishek; Jamieson, Sam A.; King, Chontelle M.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Ledgerwood, Elizabeth C.; Murphy, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinases (ASK1–3) are apical kinases of the p38 and JNK MAP kinase pathways. They are activated by diverse stress stimuli, including reactive oxygen species, cytokines, and osmotic stress; however, a molecular understanding of how ASK proteins are controlled remains obscure. Here, we report a biochemical analysis of the ASK1 kinase domain in conjunction with its N-terminal thioredoxin-binding domain, along with a central regulatory region that links the two. We show that in solution the central regulatory region mediates a compact arrangement of the kinase and thioredoxin-binding domains and the central regulatory region actively primes MKK6, a key ASK1 substrate, for phosphorylation. The crystal structure of the central regulatory region reveals an unusually compact tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) region capped by a cryptic pleckstrin homology domain. Biochemical assays show that both a conserved surface on the pleckstrin homology domain and an intact TPR region are required for ASK1 activity. We propose a model in which the central regulatory region promotes ASK1 activity via its pleckstrin homology domain but also facilitates ASK1 autoinhibition by bringing the thioredoxin-binding and kinase domains into close proximity. Such an architecture provides a mechanism for control of ASK-type kinases by diverse activators and inhibitors and demonstrates an unexpected level of autoregulatory scaffolding in mammalian stress-activated MAP kinase signaling. PMID:28242696

  20. Global target profile of the kinase inhibitor bosutinib in primary chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Remsing Rix, L L; Rix, U; Colinge, J; Hantschel, O; Bennett, K L; Stranzl, T; Müller, A; Baumgartner, C; Valent, P; Augustin, M; Till, J H; Superti-Furga, G

    2009-03-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism of action of second-generation BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including perturbed targets and pathways, should contribute to rationalized therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or in other affected diseases. Here, we characterized the target profile of the dual SRC/ABL inhibitor bosutinib employing a two-tiered approach using chemical proteomics to identify natural binders in whole cell lysates of primary CML and K562 cells in parallel to in vitro kinase assays against a large recombinant kinase panel. The combined strategy resulted in a global survey of bosutinib targets comprised of over 45 novel tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. We have found clear differences in the target patterns of bosutinib in primary CML cells versus the K562 cell line. A comparison of bosutinib with dasatinib across the whole kinase panel revealed overlapping, but distinct, inhibition profiles. Common among those were the SRC, ABL and TEC family kinases. Bosutinib did not inhibit KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, but prominently targeted the apoptosis-linked STE20 kinases. Although in vivo bosutinib is inactive against ABL T315I, we found this clinically important mutant to be enzymatically inhibited in the mid-nanomolar range. Finally, bosutinib is the first kinase inhibitor shown to target CAMK2G, recently implicated in myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

  1. Functional Analysis of Kinases and Transcription Factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using an Integrated Overexpression Library

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ji-Young; Friesen, Helena; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Liang, Wendy; Messier, Vincent; Cox, Mike J.; Moses, Alan M.; Andrews, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Kinases and transcription factors (TFs) are key modulators of important signaling pathways and their activities underlie the proper function of many basic cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, and development. Changes in kinase and TF dosage are often associated with disease, yet a systematic assessment of the cellular phenotypes caused by the combined perturbation of kinases and TFs has not been undertaken. We used a reverse-genetics approach to study the phenotypic consequences of kinase and TF overexpression (OE) in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We constructed a collection of strains expressing stably integrated inducible alleles of kinases and TFs and used a variety of assays to characterize the phenotypes caused by TF and kinase OE. We used the Synthetic Genetic Array (SGA) method to examine dosage-dependent genetic interactions (GIs) between 239 gain-of-function (OE) alleles of TFs and six loss-of-function (LOF) and seven OE kinase alleles, the former identifying Synthetic Dosage Lethal (SDL) interactions and the latter testing a GI we call Double Dosage Lethality (DDL). We identified and confirmed 94 GIs between 65 OE alleles of TFs and 9 kinase alleles. Follow-up experiments validated regulatory relationships between genetically interacting pairs (Cdc28–Stb1 and Pho85–Pdr1), suggesting that GI studies involving OE alleles of regulatory proteins will be a rich source of new functional information. PMID:28122947

  2. Functional Analysis of Kinases and Transcription Factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using an Integrated Overexpression Library.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ji-Young; Friesen, Helena; Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Liang, Wendy; Messier, Vincent; Cox, Mike J; Moses, Alan M; Andrews, Brenda

    2017-03-10

    Kinases and transcription factors (TFs) are key modulators of important signaling pathways and their activities underlie the proper function of many basic cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, and development. Changes in kinase and TF dosage are often associated with disease, yet a systematic assessment of the cellular phenotypes caused by the combined perturbation of kinases and TFs has not been undertaken. We used a reverse-genetics approach to study the phenotypic consequences of kinase and TF overexpression (OE) in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae We constructed a collection of strains expressing stably integrated inducible alleles of kinases and TFs and used a variety of assays to characterize the phenotypes caused by TF and kinase OE. We used the Synthetic Genetic Array (SGA) method to examine dosage-dependent genetic interactions (GIs) between 239 gain-of-function (OE) alleles of TFs and six loss-of-function (LOF) and seven OE kinase alleles, the former identifying Synthetic Dosage Lethal (SDL) interactions and the latter testing a GI we call Double Dosage Lethality (DDL). We identified and confirmed 94 GIs between 65 OE alleles of TFs and 9 kinase alleles. Follow-up experiments validated regulatory relationships between genetically interacting pairs (Cdc28-Stb1 and Pho85-Pdr1), suggesting that GI studies involving OE alleles of regulatory proteins will be a rich source of new functional information.

  3. Salinomycin causes migration and invasion of human fibrosarcoma cells by inducing MMP-2 expression via PI3-kinase, ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-06-01

    Salinomycin (SAL) is a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to regulate a variety of cellular responses in various human cancer cells. However, the effects of SAL on metastatic capacity of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells have not been elucidated. We investigated the effect of SAL on migration and invasion, with emphasis on the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Treatment of SAL promoted the expression and activation of MMP-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as detected by western blot analysis, gelatin zymography, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. SAL also increased metastatic capacities, as determined by an increase in the migration and invasion of cells using the wound healing assay and the invasion assay, respectively. To confirm the detailed molecular mechanisms of these effects, we measured the activation of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3-kinase) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)s (ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase), as detected by the phosphorylated proteins through western blot analysis. SAL treatment increased the phosphorylation of Akt and MAPKs. Inhibition of PI3-kinase, ERK-1/2, and p38 kinase with LY294002, PD98059, and SB203580, respectively, in the presence of SAL suppressed the metastatic capacity by reducing MMP-2 expression, as determined by gelatin zymography. Our results indicate that the PI3-kinase and MAPK signaling pathways are involved in migration and invasion of HT1080 through induction of MMP-2 expression and activation. In conclusion, SAL significantly increases the metastatic capacity of HT1080 cells by inducing MMP-2 expression via PI3-kinase and MAPK pathways. Our results suggest that SAL may be a potential agent for the study of cancer metastatic capacities.

  4. TNF and MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Davis, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) to cell surface receptors engages multiple signal transduction pathways, including three groups of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases: extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); the cJun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs); and the p38 MAP kinases. These MAP kinase signalling pathways induce a secondary response by increasing the expression of several inflammatory cytokines (including TNFα) that contribute to the biological activity of TNFα. MAP kinases therefore function both upstream and down-stream of signalling by TNFα receptors. Here we review mechanisms that mediate these actions of MAP kinases during the response to TNFα. PMID:24647229

  5. Proteolytic susceptibility of creatine kinase isozymes and arginine kinase.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Altan; Grossman, Steven H

    2003-07-11

    The time course and dose-response to proteolysis of three dimeric isozymes of creatine kinase, CK-MM (muscle), CK-BB (brain), and CK-MB (heart) and the homologous monomer, arginine kinase were compared. Chymotrypsin and trypsin cause a rapid and significant loss of intact CK-BB, but limited hydrolysis of CK-MM. After 1h of hydrolysis by chymotrypsin, 80% of CK-MM is intact as judged by quantification of monomers after electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. While 50% of the intact monomers of CK-MB remain under these conditions, no CK-BB monomers are detected. These results indicate that treatment with chymotrypsin leads to a CK-MB devoid of the B-subunit. When treated with trypsin for 1h, CK-MM is totally resistant to hydrolysis and all CK-BB is highly degraded. However, CK-MB exhibits approximately 90% intact monomers, indicating survival of intact B-subunit in CK-MB. This suggests that heterodimerization of a B-subunit with an M-subunit may have a protective effect against hydrolysis by trypsin. In view of the considerably larger number of potentially tryptic sensitive sites on the muscle isozyme, the resistance of CK-MM and susceptibility of CK-BB dimers to trypsin implies that differences in subunit tertiary structure are a factor in proteolysis of the homodimeric isozymes. Arginine kinase is rapidly degraded by trypsin, but is minimally affected by chymotrypsin. The finding that both a monomeric (arginine kinase) and dimeric (CK-BB) phosphagen kinase are highly susceptible to proteolysis by trypsin indicates that quaternary structure is not, in and of itself, an advantage in resistance to proteolysis. Since both arginine kinase and muscle creatine kinase are resistant to chymotryptic hydrolysis, it seems unlikely that in general, the increased packing density, which may result from dimerization can account for the stability of CK-MM towards trypsin.

  6. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    kinase . This grant proposal will explore the resistance to small molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors mediated by the... molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors is potentially mediated by the Pim-1 protein kinase , and that unique Pim protein kinase inhibitors that can in...application is essential for the development of this combined chemotherapeutic strategy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small Molecule AKT Inhibitors ,

  7. Radon assay for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  8. Radon assay for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-01

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  9. Leads for antitubercular compounds from kinase inhibitor library screens.

    PubMed

    Magnet, Sophie; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Székely, Rita; Pató, János; Triccas, James A; Schneider, Patricia; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Orfi, László; Chambon, Marc; Banfi, Damiano; Bueno, Manuel; Turcatti, Gerardo; Kéri, György; Cole, Stewart T

    2010-11-01

    Discovering new drugs to treat tuberculosis more efficiently and to overcome multidrug resistance is a world health priority. To find antimycobacterial scaffolds, we screened a kinase inhibitor library of more than 12,000 compounds using an integrated strategy involving whole cell-based assays with Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and a target-based assay with the protein kinase PknA. Seventeen "hits" came from the whole cell-based screening approach, from which three displayed minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against M. tuberculosis below 10μM and were non-mutagenic and non-cytotoxic. Two of these hits were specific for M. tuberculosis versus C. glutamicum and none of them was found to inhibit the essential serine/threonine protein kinases, PknA and PknB present in both bacteria. One of the most active hits, VI-18469, had a benzoquinoxaline pharmacophore while another, VI-9376, is structurally related to a new class of antimycobacterial agents, the benzothiazinones (BTZ). Like the BTZ, VI-9376 was shown to act on the essential enzyme decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2'-epimerase, DprE1, required for arabinan synthesis.

  10. Terreic Acid, a Quinone Epoxide Inhibitor of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Yuko; Hartman, Stephen E.; Kinoshita, Eiji; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Kitaura, Jiro; Yao, Libo; Inagaki, Naoki; Franco, Alessandra; Hata, Daisuke; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Fukamachi, Hiromi; Nagai, Hiroichi; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    1999-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays pivotal roles in mast cell activation as well as in B cell development. Btk mutations lead to severe impairments in proinflammatory cytokine production induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor on mast cells. By using an in vitro assay to measure the activity that blocks the interaction between protein kinase C and the pleckstrin homology domain of Btk, terreic acid (TA) was identified and characterized in this study. This quinone epoxide specifically inhibited the enzymatic activity of Btk in mast cells and cell-free assays. TA faithfully recapitulated the phenotypic defects of btk mutant mast cells in high-affinity IgE receptor-stimulated wild-type mast cells without affecting the enzymatic activities and expressions of many other signaling molecules, including those of protein kinase C. Therefore, this study confirmed the important roles of Btk in mast cell functions and showed the usefulness of TA in probing into the functions of Btk in mast cells and other immune cell systems. Another insight obtained from this study is that the screening method used to identify TA is a useful approach to finding more efficacious Btk inhibitors.

  11. In vivo inhibition of RIPK2 kinase alleviates inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Tigno-Aranjuez, Justine T; Benderitter, Pascal; Rombouts, Frederik; Deroose, Frederik; Bai, XiaoDong; Mattioli, Benedetta; Cominelli, Fabio; Pizarro, Theresa T; Hoflack, Jan; Abbott, Derek W

    2014-10-24

    The RIPK2 kinase transduces signaling downstream of the intracellular peptidoglycan sensors NOD1 and NOD2 to promote a productive inflammatory response. However, excessive NOD2 signaling has been associated with numerous diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sarcoidosis and inflammatory arthritis, making pharmacologic inhibition of RIPK2 an appealing strategy. In this work, we report the generation, identification, and evaluation of novel RIPK2 specific inhibitors. These compounds potently inhibit the RIPK2 tyrosine kinase activity in in vitro biochemical assays and cellular assays, as well as effectively reduce RIPK2-mediated effects in an in vivo peritonitis model. In conjunction with the development of these inhibitors, we have also defined a panel of genes whose expression is regulated by RIPK2 kinase activity. Such RIPK2 activation markers may serve as a useful tool for predicting settings likely to benefit from RIPK2 inhibition. Using these markers and the FDA-approved RIPK2 inhibitor Gefitinib, we show that pharmacologic RIPK2 inhibition drastically improves disease in a spontaneous model of Crohn Disease-like ileitis. Furthermore, using novel RIPK2-specific inhibitors, we show that cellular recruitment is inhibited in an in vivo peritonitis model. Altogether, the data presented in this work provides a strong rationale for further development and optimization of RIPK2-targeted pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Scaffold oriented synthesis. Part 3: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-substituted indazoles as potent and selective kinase inhibitors employing [2+3] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Akritopoulou-Zanze, Irini; Wakefield, Brian D; Gasiecki, Alan; Kalvin, Douglas; Johnson, Eric F; Kovar, Peter; Djuric, Stevan W

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 5-substituted indazoles and amino indazoles as kinase inhibitors. The compounds were synthesized in a parallel synthesis fashion from readily available starting materials employing [2+3] cycloaddition reactions and were evaluated against a panel of kinase assays. Potent inhibitors were identified for numerous kinases such as Rock2, Gsk3β, Aurora2 and Jak2.

  13. c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: XXX aminopyrazoles, a new class of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitors, have been synthesized and the biochemical IC50 has been...have also been generated as backups. XXX compounds from the pyridopyrimidinone class have been synthesized and tested in biochemical and cell based...assays, and XXX compounds from the amino acid transporter analog class have been made and tested in biochemical assays. The goal of this work is to

  14. Rho-kinase in sea urchin eggs and embryos.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Armenta, Beatriz; López-Godínez, Juana; Martínez-Cadena, Guadalupe; García-Soto, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    The activation of sea urchin eggs at fertilization provides an ideal system for studying the molecular events involved in cellular activation. Rho GTPases, which are key signaling enzymes in eukaryotes, are involved in sustaining the activation of sea urchin eggs; however, their downstream effectors have not yet been characterized. In somatic cells, RhoA regulates a serine/threonine kinase known as Rho-kinase (ROCK). The activity of ROCK in early sea urchin development has been inferred, but not tested directly. A ROCK gene was identified in the sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome and the sequence of its cDNA determined. The sea urchin ROCK (SpROCK) sequence predicts a protein of 158 kDa with >72% and 45% identities with different protein orthologues of the kinase catalytic domain and the complete protein sequence, respectively. SpROCK mRNA levels are high in unfertilized eggs and decrease to 35% after 15 min postfertilization and remain low up to the 4 cell stage. Antibodies to the human ROCK-I kinase domain revealed SpROCK to be concentrated in the cortex of eggs and early embryos. Co-immunoprecipitation assays indicate that RhoA and SpROCK are physically associated. This association is destroyed by treatment with the C3 exoenzyme and with the ROCK antagonist H-1152. H-1152 also inhibited DNA synthesis in embryos. We conclude that the Rho-dependent signaling pathway, via SpROCK, is essential for early embryonic development.

  15. Protein kinase D activity controls endothelial nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Zaragoza, Carlos; Iglesias, Teresa; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates key functions of the endothelium, such as angiogenesis or vessel repair in processes involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. One of the effector kinases that become activated in endothelial cells upon VEGF treatment is protein kinase D (PKD). Here, we show that PKD phosphorylates eNOS, leading to its activation and a concomitant increase in NO synthesis. Using mass spectrometry, we show that the purified active kinase specifically phosphorylates recombinant eNOS on Ser1179. Treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activates PKD and increases eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKD and gene silencing of both PKD1 and PKD2 abrogate VEGF signaling, resulting in a clear diminished migration of endothelial cells in a wound healing assay. Finally, inhibition of PKD in mice results in an almost complete disappearance of the VEGF-induced vasodilatation, as monitored through determination of the diameter of the carotid artery. Hence, our data indicate that PKD is a new regulatory kinase of eNOS in endothelial cells whose activity orchestrates mammalian vascular tone. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Zebrafish Assays of Ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Norann A.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    In light of the growing list of human disorders associated with their dysfunction, primary cilia have recently come to attention as being important regulators of developmental signaling pathways and downstream processes. These organelles, present on nearly every vertebrate cell type, are highly conserved structures allowing for study across a range of species. Zebrafish, in particular, have emerged as useful organisms in which to explore the consequences of ciliary dysfunction and to model human ciliopathies. Here, we present a range of useful techniques that allow for investigation of various aspects of ciliary function. The described assays capitalize on the hallmark gastrulation defects associated with ciliary defects as well as relative ease of visualization of cilia in whole-mount embryos. Further, we describe our recently developed assay for querying functionality of human gene variants in live developing embryos. Finally, a current catalog of known zebrafish ciliary mutant lines is included. The techniques presented here provide a basic toolkit for in vivo investigation of both the biological and genetic mechanisms underlying a growing class of human diseases. PMID:21951534

  17. Scaffold oriented synthesis. Part 4: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-substituted indazoles as potent and selective kinase inhibitors employing heterocycle forming and multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Akritopoulou-Zanze, Irini; Wakefield, Brian D; Gasiecki, Alan; Kalvin, Douglas; Johnson, Eric F; Kovar, Peter; Djuric, Stevan W

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 5-substituted indazoles as kinase inhibitors. The compounds were synthesized in a parallel synthesis fashion from readily available starting materials employing heterocycle forming and multicomponent reactions and were evaluated against a panel of kinase assays. Potent inhibitors were identified for Gsk3β, Rock2, and Egfr.

  18. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  19. Biosensors: Viruses for ultrasensitive assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional assay based on genetically engineered viral nanoparticles and nickel nanohairs can detect much lower levels of protein markers associated with heart attacks than conventional assays.

  20. JAK2 and AMP-kinase inhibition in vitro by food extracts, fractions and purified phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Martin, Harry; Burgess, Elaine J; Smith, Wendy A; McGhie, Tony K; Cooney, Janine M; Lunken, Rona C M; de Guzman, Erika; Trower, Tania; Perry, Nigel B

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a range of food phytochemicals that inhibit Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK). A mutated and dysregulated form of JAK2, a tyrosine kinase, is associated with several diseases including Crohn's disease. Using an in vitro, time-resolved fluorescence (TR-FRET) assay, we tested 49 different types of food extracts, plus 10 concentrated fractions of increasing hydrophobicity from each extract, to find foods containing JAK2 inhibitors. The food extracts tested included grains, meat, fish, shellfish, dairy products, herbs, mushrooms, hops, fruits and vegetables. Several fruits were potent inhibitors of JAK2: blackberry, boysenberry, feijoa, pomegranate, rosehip and strawberry, which all contain ellagitannins, known inhibitors of kinases. These fruits are in the Rosales and Myrtales plant orders. No other foods gave >1% of the maximal JAK2 inhibitory activities of these fruits. AMPK, a sensor and regulator of energy metabolism in cells, is a serine-threonine kinase which is reported to be activated by various flavonoid phytochemicals. Using a TR-FRET assay, we tested various fruit extracts for AMPK activation and inhibition. Ellagitannin containing foods scored highly as AMPK inhibitors. Despite several reports of AMPK activation in whole cells by phytochemicals, no extracts or pure compounds activated AMPK in our assay.

  1. Quantitative and Dynamic Imaging of ATM Kinase Activity by Bioluminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nyati, Shyam; Young, Grant; Ross, Brian Dale; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA damage response, including DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events facilitating DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. Traditionally, protein kinases have been analyzed in vitro using biochemical methods (kinase assays using purified proteins or immunological assays) requiring a large number of cells and cell lysis. Genetically encoded biosensors based on optical molecular imaging such as fluorescence or bioluminescence have been developed to enable interrogation of kinase activities in live cells with a high signal to background. We have genetically engineered a hybrid protein whose bioluminescent activity is dependent on the ATM-mediated phosphorylation of a substrate. The engineered protein consists of the split luciferase-based protein complementation pair with a CHK2 (a substrate for ATM kinase activity) target sequence and a phospho-serine/threonine-binding domain, FHA2, derived from yeast Rad53. Phosphorylation of the serine residue within the target sequence by ATM would lead to its interaction with the phospho-serine-binding domain, thereby preventing complementation of the split luciferase pair and loss of reporter activity. Bioluminescence imaging of reporter-expressing cells in cultured plates or as mouse xenografts provides a quantitative surrogate for ATM kinase activity and therefore the cellular DNA damage response in a noninvasive, dynamic fashion.

  2. Transmembrane neuregulins interact with LIM kinase 1, a cytoplasmic protein kinase implicated in development of visuospatial cognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Frenzel, K E; Wen, D; Falls, D L

    1998-08-07

    The neuregulins are receptor tyrosine kinase ligands that play a critical role in the development of the heart, nervous system, and breast. Unlike many extracellular signaling molecules, such as the neurotrophins, most neuregulins are synthesized as transmembrane proteins. To determine the functions of the highly conserved neuregulin cytoplasmic tail, a yeast two-hybrid screen was performed to identify proteins that interact with the 157-amino acid sequence common to the cytoplasmic tails of all transmembrane neuregulin isoforms. This screen revealed that the neuregulin cytoplasmic tail interacts with the LIM domain region of the nonreceptor protein kinase LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1). Interaction between the neuregulin cytoplasmic tail and full-length LIMK1 was demonstrated by in vitro binding and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Transmembrane neuregulins with each of the three known neuregulin cytoplasmic tail isoforms interacted with LIMK1. In contrast, the cytoplasmic tail of TGF-alpha did not interact with LIMK1. In vivo, neuregulin and LIMK1 are co-localized at the neuromuscular synapse, suggesting that LIMK1, like neuregulin, may play a role in synapse formation and maintenance. To our knowledge, LIMK1 is the first identified protein shown to interact with the cytoplasmic tail of a receptor tyrosine kinase ligand.

  3. Role of diacylglycerol-regulated protein kinase C isotypes in growth factor activation of the Raf-1 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H; Smola, U; Wixler, V; Eisenmann-Tappe, I; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J; Rapp, U; Cooper, G M

    1997-01-01

    The Raf protein kinases function downstream of Ras guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to transduce intracellular signals from growth factor receptors. Interaction with Ras recruits Raf to the plasma membrane, but the subsequent mechanism of Raf activation has not been established. Previous studies implicated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in Raf activation; therefore, we investigated the role of the epsilon isotype of protein kinase C (PKC), which is stimulated by PC-derived diacylglycerol, as a Raf activator. A dominant negative mutant of PKC epsilon inhibited both proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells and activation of Raf in COS cells. Conversely, overexpression of active PKC epsilon stimulated Raf kinase activity in COS cells and overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative Ras in NIH 3T3 cells. PKC epsilon also stimulated Raf kinase in baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells and was able to directly activate Raf in vitro. Consistent with its previously reported activity as a Raf activator in vitro, PKC alpha functioned similarly to PKC epsilon in both NIH 3T3 and COS cell assays. In addition, constitutively active mutants of both PKC alpha and PKC epsilon overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative mutants of the other PKC isotype, indicating that these diacylglycerol-regulated PKCs function as redundant activators of Raf-1 in vivo. PMID:9001227

  4. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced ...

  5. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  6. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-30

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson's group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src-transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src-associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month.

  7. WNK kinases and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chou-Long; Kuo, Elizabeth; Toto, Robert D

    2008-03-01

    The present review summarizes recent literature and discusses the potential roles of WNKs in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. WNKs (with-no-lysine [K]) are a recently discovered family of serine-threonine protein kinases with unusual protein kinase domains. The role of WNK kinases in the control of blood pressure was first revealed by the findings that mutations of two members, WNK1 and WNK4, cause Gordon's syndrome. Laboratory studies have revealed that WNK kinases play important roles in the regulation of sodium and potassium transport. Animal models have been created to unravel the pathophysiology of sodium transport disorders caused by mutations of the WNK4 gene. Potassium deficiency causes sodium retention and increases hypertension prevalence. The expression of WNK1 is upregulated by potassium deficiency, raising the possibility that WNK1 may contribute to salt-sensitive essential hypertension associated with potassium deficiency. Associations of polymorphisms of WNK genes with essential hypertension in the general population have been reported. Mutations of WNK1 and WNK4 cause hypertension at least partly by increasing renal sodium retention. The role of WNK kinases in salt-sensitive hypertension within general hypertension is suggested, but future work is required to firmly establish the connection.

  8. Endothelial Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 Is Critical for Lymphatic Vascular Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-An; Danai, Laura V.; Yawe, Joseph C.; Gujja, Sharvari; Edwards, Yvonne J. K.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying lymphatic vascular development and function are not well understood. Recent studies have suggested a role for endothelial cell (EC) mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) in developmental angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. Here, we show that constitutive loss of EC Map4k4 in mice causes postnatal lethality due to chylothorax, suggesting that Map4k4 is required for normal lymphatic vascular function. Mice constitutively lacking EC Map4k4 displayed dilated lymphatic capillaries, insufficient lymphatic valves, and impaired lymphatic flow; furthermore, primary ECs derived from these animals displayed enhanced proliferation compared with controls. Yeast 2-hybrid analyses identified the Ras GTPase-activating protein Rasa1, a known regulator of lymphatic development and lymphatic endothelial cell fate, as a direct interacting partner for Map4k4. Map4k4 silencing in ECs enhanced basal Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activities, and primary ECs lacking Map4k4 displayed enhanced lymphatic EC marker expression. Taken together, these results reveal that EC Map4k4 is critical for lymphatic vascular development by regulating EC quiescence and lymphatic EC fate. PMID:27044870

  9. A femtomole-sensitivity mass assay for inositol hexakisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Letcher, Andrew J; Schell, Michael J; Irvine, Robin F

    2010-01-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) is an important component of cells, and its mass levels are usually assayed by either (a) equilibrium labelling of cell cultures with radiolabelled inositol or (b) by a variety of mass assays of differing sensitivities and ambiguities. Here, we describe a mass assay for InsP(6) that is based on phosphorylating InsP(6) with [(32)P]-ATP to 5-(PP)InsP(5) using a recombinant Giardia InsP(6) kinase and quantification of the radiolabelled 5-[(32)P](PP)InsP(5) product by anion exchange HPLC with an internal [(3)H]-(PP)InsP(5) standard. Interference with the enzyme reaction by other factors in the tissue extract is corrected for by assay of identical aliquots of tissue spiked with known amounts of InsP(6). This assay only measures InsP(6) (and not other inositol phosphates), and although it is simple in principle and requires no dedicated or specialised equipment, it is quite time-consuming. But the assay is unambiguous and is capable of quantifying accurately as little as 10 fmol of InsP(6) in a cell extract.

  10. Baculovirus protein PK2 subverts eIF2α kinase function by mimicry of its kinase domain C-lobe

    PubMed Central

    Li, John J.; Cao, Chune; Fixsen, Sarah M.; Young, Janet M.; Bando, Hisanori; Elde, Nels C.; Katsuma, Susumu; Dever, Thomas E.; Sicheri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) by eIF2α family kinases is a conserved mechanism to limit protein synthesis under specific stress conditions. The baculovirus-encoded protein PK2 inhibits eIF2α family kinases in vivo, thereby increasing viral fitness. However, the precise mechanism by which PK2 inhibits eIF2α kinase function remains an enigma. Here, we probed the mechanism by which PK2 inhibits the model eIF2α kinase human RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) as well as native insect eIF2α kinases. Although PK2 structurally mimics the C-lobe of a protein kinase domain and possesses the required docking infrastructure to bind eIF2α, we show that PK2 directly binds the kinase domain of PKR (PKRKD) but not eIF2α. The PKRKD–PK2 interaction requires a 22-residue N-terminal extension preceding the globular PK2 body that we term the “eIF2α kinase C-lobe mimic” (EKCM) domain. The functional insufficiency of the N-terminal extension of PK2 implicates a role for the adjacent EKCM domain in binding and inhibiting PKR. Using a genetic screen in yeast, we isolated PK2-activating mutations that cluster to a surface of the EKCM domain that in bona fide protein kinases forms the catalytic cleft through sandwiching interactions with a kinase N-lobe. Interaction assays revealed that PK2 associates with the N- but not the C-lobe of PKRKD. We propose an inhibitory model whereby PK2 engages the N-lobe of an eIF2α kinase domain to create a nonfunctional pseudokinase domain complex, possibly through a lobe-swapping mechanism. Finally, we show that PK2 enhances baculovirus fitness in insect hosts by targeting the endogenous insect heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI)–like eIF2α kinase. PMID:26216977

  11. Novel interaction partners of the TPR/MET tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Christian P; Benzing, Jörg; Schmitt, Thomas; Erz, Dorothee H R; Tewes, Magdalena; Bartram, Claus R; Janssen, Johannes W G

    2005-02-01

    A large variety of biological processes is mediated by stimulation of the receptor tyrosine kinase MET. Screening a mouse embryo cDNA library, we were able to identify several novel, putative intracellular TPR/MET-substrates: SNAPIN, DCOHM, VAV-1, Sorting nexin 2, Death associated protein kinase 3, SMC-1, Centromeric protein C, and hTID-1. Interactions as identified by yeast two-hybrid analysis were validated in vitro and in vivo by mammalian two-hybrid studies, a far-western assay and coimmunoprecipitation. Participation in apoptosis-regulating mechanisms through interaction with DAPK-3 and cell cycle control via binding to nuclear proteins such as CENPC and SMC-1 are possible new aspects of intracellular MET signaling.

  12. Photoactivatable Caged Prodrugs of VEGFR-2 Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Boris; Horbert, Rebecca; Döbber, Alexander; Kuhl, Lydia; Peifer, Christian

    2016-04-29

    In this study, we report on the design, synthesis, photokinetic properties and in vitro evaluation of photoactivatable caged prodrugs for the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR-2. Highly potent VEGFR-2 inhibitors 1 and 3 were caged by introduction of a photoremovable protecting group (PPG) to yield the caged prodrugs 4 and 5. As expected, enzymatic and cellular proliferation assays showed dramatically diminished efficacy of caged prodrugs in vitro. Upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the prodrugs original inhibitory activity was completely restored and even distinctly reinforced, as was the case for the prodrug 4. The presented results are a further evidence for caging technique being an interesting approach in the protein kinase field. It could enable spatial and temporal control for the inhibition of VEGFR-2. The described photoactivatable prodrugs might be highly useful as biological probes for studying the VEGFR-2 signal transduction.

  13. Drugging MYCN through an allosteric transition in Aurora Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, William Clay; Meyerowitz, Justin Gabriel; Nekritz, Erin A.; Chen, Justin; Benes, Cyril; Charron, Elise; Simonds, Erin Fitzgerald; Seeger, Robert; Matthay, Katherine; Hertz, Nicholas T.; Eilers, Martin; Shokat, Kevan M.; Weiss, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary MYC proteins are major drivers of cancer, yet are considered undruggable, as their DNA binding domains are composed of two extended alpha helices with no apparent surfaces for small molecule binding. Proteolytic degradation of MYCN protein is regulated in part by a kinase-independent function of Aurora A. We describe a class of inhibitors that disrupts the native conformation of Aurora A, and drives degradation of MYCN protein across MYCN-driven cancers. Comparison of co-crystal structures with structure-activity relationships across multiple inhibitors and chemotypes, coupled with mechanistic studies and biochemical assays, delineates an Aurora A conformation-specific effect on proteolytic degradation of MYCN, rather than simple nanomolar-level inhibition of Aurora A kinase activity. PMID:25175806

  14. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS ‘Driver mutations’ are essential for carcinogenesis as well as tumor progression as they confer a selective growth advantage to cancer cells. Identification of driver mutations in growth related protein kinases, especially tyrosine kinases have led to clinical development of an array of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in various malignancies, including lung cancer. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinases have proven to be of meaningful clinical benefit, while inhibition of several other tyrosine kinases have been of limited clinical benefit, thus far. An improved understanding of tyrosine kinase biology has also led to faster drug development, identification of resistance mechanisms and ways to overcome resistance. In this review, we discuss the clinical data supporting the use and practical aspects of management of patients on epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22520981

  15. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis.

  16. Arylphthalazines: identification of a new phthalazine chemotype as inhibitors of VEGFR kinase.

    PubMed

    Piatnitski, Evgueni L; Duncton, Matthew A J; Kiselyov, Alexander S; Katoch-Rouse, Reeti; Sherman, Dan; Milligan, Daniel L; Balagtas, Chris; Wong, Wai C; Kawakami, Joel; Doody, Jacqueline F

    2005-11-01

    A novel class of 4-arylamino-phthalazin-1-yl-benzamides is described as inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor II (VEGFR-2). Several compounds display potent VEGFR-2 inhibitory activity with an IC50 as low as 0.078 microM in an HTRF enzymatic assay. These compounds are relatively selective against a small kinase panel.

  17. A Discovery Strategy for Selective Inhibitors of c-Src in Complex with the Focal Adhesion Kinase SH3/SH2-binding Region

    PubMed Central

    Moroco, Jamie A.; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Rust, Heather L.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Hur, Wooyoung; Gray, Nathanael S.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Src tyrosine kinase co-operates with the focal adhesion kinase to regulate cell adhesion and motility. Focal adhesion kinase engages the regulatory SH3 and SH2 domains of c-Src, resulting in localized kinase activation that contributes to tumor cell metastasis. Using assay conditions where c-Src kinase activity required binding to a tyrosine phosphopeptide based on the focal adhesion kinase SH3-SH2 docking sequence, we screened a kinase-biased library for selective inhibitors of the Src/focal adhesion kinase peptide complex versus c-Src alone. This approach identified an aminopyrimidinyl carbamate compound, WH-4-124-2, with nanomolar inhibitory potency and fivefold selectivity for c-Src when bound to the phospho-focal adhesion kinase peptide. Molecular docking studies indicate that WH-4-124-2 may preferentially inhibit the ‘DFG-out’ conformation of the kinase active site. These findings suggest that interaction of c-Src with focal adhesion kinase induces a unique kinase domain conformation amenable to selective inhibition. PMID:25376742

  18. Differential regulation of rice mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MKK) by abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kundan; Rao, Kudupudi Prabhakara; Sharma, Pallavi; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2008-10-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinase cascade plays a crucial role in various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormones, cell division and developmental processes. MAP kinase kinase being integral part of this cascade performs an important function of integrating upstream signals to mitogen activated protein kinase for further appropriate cellular responses. We here report cloning of five MAP kinase kinase members from Oryza sativa indica cultivar var. Pusa Basmati 1, namely MAP kinase kinases 1, 3, 4, 6 and 10-2. All these members, except MKK10-2 possess fully canonical motif structures of MAP kinase kinase. The deduced amino acid sequence showed changes at certain position within japonica and indica variety of rice. Analysis of transcript regulation by quantitative real time PCR revealed that these five members are differentially regulated by cold, heat, salinity and drought stresses. MAP kinase kinases 4 and 6 are strongly regulated by cold and salt stresses while MAP kinase kinase 1 is regulated by salt and drought stresses. MAP kinase kinase 10-2 is regulated only by cold stress. The study provides the indication of involvement of specific MAP kinase kinase in different abiotic stress signaling and also possible cross talks that exist during the signaling processes.

  19. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Eun H.; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V.

    2017-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans. PMID:28241407

  20. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase increases okadaic acid mediated AP-1 expression and DNA binding but has no effect on TRE dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, S F; Gupta, A; Bowden, G T

    1999-06-17

    By performing in vitro kinase assays we found in papilloma producing 308 mouse keratinocytes that okadaic acid elevated activities of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). This okadaic acid mediated activation of MAP kinases correlated with increased AP-1 binding to a consensus TPA responsive element (TRE) and elevated TRE dependent transcription. To determine the role of p38 MAP kinases in these processes we employed the specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB 203580. Using orthophosphate labeling we showed a decrease in phosphorylation of MAPK activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAP-K2) indicating reduced activity of p38 MAPKs utilizing this kinase as substrate. In contrast, we found that SB 203580 raised activities of ERK-1/2 and JNKs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed an increase in TRE binding activity in response to SB 203580 most likely resulting from increased expression of the major TRE binding components JunD and FosB as indicated by Western blot analyses. Increased TRE DNA binding failed to lead to increased transactivation correlating with the inability of SB 203580 to increase phosphorylation of these AP-1 proteins. These data indicate that SB 203580 sensitive p38 MAP kinases are not involved in okadaic acid mediated increases in TRE DNA binding and transactivation.

  1. Hydrophobic Core Variations Provide a Structural Framework for Tyrosine Kinase Evolution and Functional Specialization

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Annie; Byrne, Dominic P.; Ferries, Samantha; Ruan, Zheng; Hanold, Laura E.; Katiyar, Samiksha; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Eyers, Patrick A.; Kannan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are a group of closely related enzymes that have evolutionarily diverged from serine/threonine kinases (STKs) to regulate pathways associated with multi-cellularity. Evolutionary divergence of PTKs from STKs has occurred through accumulation of mutations in the active site as well as in the commonly conserved hydrophobic core. While the functional significance of active site variations is well understood, relatively little is known about how hydrophobic core variations contribute to PTK evolutionary divergence. Here, using a combination of statistical sequence comparisons, molecular dynamics simulations, mutational analysis and in vitro thermostability and kinase assays, we investigate the structural and functional significance of key PTK-specific variations in the kinase core. We find that the nature of residues and interactions in the hydrophobic core of PTKs is strikingly different from other protein kinases, and PTK-specific variations in the core contribute to functional divergence by altering the stability and dynamics of the kinase domain. In particular, a functionally critical STK-conserved histidine that stabilizes the regulatory spine in STKs is selectively mutated to an alanine, serine or glutamate in PTKs, and this loss-of-function mutation is accommodated, in part, through compensatory PTK-specific interactions in the core. In particular, a PTK-conserved phenylalanine in the I-helix appears to structurally and functionally compensate for the loss of STK-histidine by interacting with the regulatory spine, which has far-reaching effects on enzyme activity, inhibitor sensing, and stability. We propose that hydrophobic core variations provide a selective advantage during PTK evolution by increasing the conformational flexibility, and therefore the allosteric potential of the kinase domain. Our studies also suggest that Tyrosine Kinase Like kinases such as RAF are intermediates in PTK evolutionary divergence inasmuch as they

  2. Subunits of the Snf1 kinase heterotrimer show interdependence for association and activity.

    PubMed

    Elbing, Karin; Rubenstein, Eric M; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2006-09-08

    The Snf1 kinase and its mammalian orthologue, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), function as heterotrimers composed of a catalytic alpha-subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma. The beta-subunit is thought to hold the complex together and control subcellular localization whereas the gamma-subunit plays a regulatory role by binding to and blocking the function of an auto-inhibitory domain (AID) present in the alpha-subunit. In addition, catalytic activity requires phosphorylation by a distinct upstream kinase. In yeast, any one of three Snf1-activating kinases, Sak1, Tos3, or Elm1, can fulfill this role. We have previously shown that Sak1 is the only Snf1-activating kinase that forms a stable complex with Snf1. Here we show that the formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex requires the beta- and gamma-subunits in vivo. However, formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex is not necessary for glucose-regulated phosphorylation of the Snf1 activation loop. Snf1 kinase purified from cells lacking the beta-subunits do not contain any gamma-subunit, indicating that the Snf1 kinase does not form a stable alphagamma dimer in vivo. In vitro kinase assays using purified full-length and truncated Snf1 proteins demonstrate that the kinase domain, which lacks the AID, is significantly more active than the full-length Snf1 protein. Addition of purified beta- and gamma-subunits could stimulate the kinase activity of the full-length alpha-subunit but only when all three subunits were present, suggesting an interdependence of all three subunits for assembly of a functional complex.

  3. One reporter for in-cell activity profiling of majority of protein kinase oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Gudernova, Iva; Foldynova-Trantirkova, Silvie; Ghannamova, Barbora El; Fafilek, Bohumil; Varecha, Miroslav; Balek, Lukas; Hruba, Eva; Jonatova, Lucie; Jelinkova, Iva; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Trantirek, Lukas; Mayer, Jiri; Krejci, Pavel

    2017-02-15

    In-cell profiling enables the evaluation of receptor tyrosine activity in a complex environment of regulatory networks that affect signal initiation, propagation and feedback. We used FGF-receptor signaling to identify EGR1 as a locus that strongly responds to the activation of a majority of the recognized protein kinase oncogenes, including 30 receptor tyrosine kinases and 154 of their disease-associated mutants. The EGR1 promoter was engineered to enhance trans-activation capacity and optimized for simple screening assays with luciferase or fluorescent reporters. The efficacy of the developed, fully synthetic reporters was demonstrated by the identification of novel targets for two clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nilotinib and osimertinib. A universal reporter system for in-cell protein kinase profiling will facilitate repurposing of existing anti-cancer drugs and identification of novel inhibitors in high-throughput screening studies.

  4. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the thymidine kinase gene from herpesvirus of turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S L; Aparisio, D I; Bandyopadhyay, P K

    1989-01-01

    The thymidine kinase gene encoded by herpesvirus of turkeys has been identified and characterized. A viral mutant (ATR0) resistant to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylthymine was isolated. This mutant was also resistant to 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuronosyl)-5-methyluracil and was unable to incorporate [125I]deoxycytidine into DNA. The mutant phenotype was rescued by a cloned region of the turkey herpesvirus genome whose DNA sequence was found to contain an open reading frame similar to that for known thymidine kinases from other viruses. When expressed in Escherichia coli, this open reading frame complemented a thymidine kinase-deficient strain and resulted in thymidine kinase activity in extracts assayed in vitro. Images PMID:2724415

  5. One reporter for in-cell activity profiling of majority of protein kinase oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gudernova, Iva; Foldynova-Trantirkova, Silvie; Ghannamova, Barbora El; Fafilek, Bohumil; Varecha, Miroslav; Balek, Lukas; Hruba, Eva; Jonatova, Lucie; Jelinkova, Iva; Bosakova, Michaela Kunova; Trantirek, Lukas; Mayer, Jiri; Krejci, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    In-cell profiling enables the evaluation of receptor tyrosine activity in a complex environment of regulatory networks that affect signal initiation, propagation and feedback. We used FGF-receptor signaling to identify EGR1 as a locus that strongly responds to the activation of a majority of the recognized protein kinase oncogenes, including 30 receptor tyrosine kinases and 154 of their disease-associated mutants. The EGR1 promoter was engineered to enhance trans-activation capacity and optimized for simple screening assays with luciferase or fluorescent reporters. The efficacy of the developed, fully synthetic reporters was demonstrated by the identification of novel targets for two clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nilotinib and osimertinib. A universal reporter system for in-cell protein kinase profiling will facilitate repurposing of existing anti-cancer drugs and identification of novel inhibitors in high-throughput screening studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21536.001 PMID:28199182

  6. Luciferin and derivatives as a DYRK selective scaffold for the design of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Ulli; Eriksson, Jonas; Stensen, Wenche; Leeson, Frederick; Engh, Richard A; Svendsen, John S

    2015-04-13

    D-Luciferin is widely used as a substrate in luciferase catalysed bioluminescence assays for in vitro studies. However, little is known about cross reactivity and potential interference of D-luciferin with other enzymes. We serendipitously found that firefly luciferin inhibited the CDK2/Cyclin A protein kinase. Inhibition profiling of D-luciferin over a 103-protein kinase panel showed significant inhibition of a small set of protein kinases, in particular the DYRK-family, but also other members of the CMGC-group, including ERK8 and CK2. Inhibition profiling on a 16-member focused library derived from D-luciferin confirms that D-luciferin represents a DYRK-selective chemotype of fragment-like molecular weight. Thus, observation of its inhibitory activity and the initial SAR information reported here promise to be useful for further design of protein kinase inhibitors with related scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the thymidine kinase gene from herpesvirus of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Martin, S L; Aparisio, D I; Bandyopadhyay, P K

    1989-06-01

    The thymidine kinase gene encoded by herpesvirus of turkeys has been identified and characterized. A viral mutant (ATR0) resistant to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylthymine was isolated. This mutant was also resistant to 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuronosyl)-5-methyluracil and was unable to incorporate [125I]deoxycytidine into DNA. The mutant phenotype was rescued by a cloned region of the turkey herpesvirus genome whose DNA sequence was found to contain an open reading frame similar to that for known thymidine kinases from other viruses. When expressed in Escherichia coli, this open reading frame complemented a thymidine kinase-deficient strain and resulted in thymidine kinase activity in extracts assayed in vitro.

  8. Targeting Plasmodium falciparum protein kinases with adenosine analogue-oligoarginine conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lavogina, Darja; Budu, Alexandre; Enkvist, Erki; Hopp, Christine S; Baker, David A; Langsley, Gordon; Garcia, Celia R S; Uri, Asko

    2014-03-01

    During the last decade, a vast number of inhibitors, ligands and fluorescent probes have evolved for mammalian protein kinases; however, the suitability of these compounds for studies of evolutionarily divergent eukaryotes has mostly been left beyond the scope of research. Here, we examined whether adenosine analogue-oligoarginine conjugates that had been extensively characterized as efficient inhibitors of the human protein kinases are applicable for targeting Plasmodium protein kinases. We demonstrated that ARCs were not only able to bind to and inhibit a representative member of Plasmodium falciparum kinome (cGMP-dependent protein kinase) in biochemical assay, but also affected the general phosphorylation levels in parasites released from the infected red blood cells upon saponin treatment. These findings urge advantaging of already existing biochemical tools, whose initially generic, but intrinsically "tunable" selectivity profiles could be used for dissection of signaling pathways outside the initially defined group of biological targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinase inhibitor data modeling and de novo inhibitor design with fragment approaches.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Michal; Erickson, Jon; Wang, Jibo; Webster, Yue; Mader, Mary; Higgs, Richard; Watson, Ian

    2009-10-22

    A reconstructive approach based on computational fragmentation of existing inhibitors and validated kinase potency models to recombine and create "de novo" kinase inhibitor small molecule libraries is described. The screening results from model selected molecules from the corporate database and seven computationally derived small molecule libraries were used to evaluate this approach. Specifically, 1895 model selected database molecules were screened at 20 microM in six kinase assays and yielded an overall hit rate of 84%. These models were then used in the de novo design of seven chemical libraries consisting of 20-50 compounds each. Then 179 compounds from synthesized libraries were tested against these six kinases with an overall hit rate of 92%. Comparing predicted and observed selectivity profiles serves to highlight the strengths and limitations of the methodology, while analysis of functional group contributions from the libraries suggest general principles governing binding of ATP competitive compounds.

  10. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  11. Quantifying Kinase-Specific Phosphorylation Stoichiometry Using Stable Isotope Labeling In a Reverse In-Gel Kinase Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang; Cox, Jonathan T.; Huang, Weiliang; Kane, Maureen; Tang, Keqi; Bieberich, Charles J.

    2016-12-06

    Reversible protein phosphorylation regulates essentially all cellular activities. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is an etiological factor in a wide array of diseases, including cancer1, diabetes2, and Alzheimer’s3. Given the broad impact of protein phosphorylation on cellular biology and organismal health, understanding how protein phosphorylation is regulated and the consequences of gain and loss of phosphoryl moieties from proteins is of primary importance. Advances in instrumentation, particularly in mass spectrometry, coupled with high throughput approaches have recently yielded large datasets cataloging tens of thousands of protein phosphorylation sites in multiple organisms4-6. While these studies are seminal in term of data collection, our understanding of protein phosphorylation regulation remains largely one-dimensional.

  12. Coagulation assays and anticoagulant monitoring.

    PubMed

    Funk, Dorothy M Adcock

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy, including conventional agents and a variety of new oral, fast-acting drugs, is prescribed for millions of patients annually. Each anticoagulant varies in its effect on routine and specialty coagulation assays and each drug may require distinct laboratory assay(s) to measure drug concentration or activity. This review provides an overview of the assorted assays that can measure anticoagulant drug concentration or activity and includes key assay interferences. The effect of these conventional and new anticoagulant agents on specialty coagulation assays used to evaluate for bleeding or clotting disorders, and whether this impact is physiological or factitious, is included. Also provided is a short review of superwarfarin poisoning and features distinguishing this from warfarin overdose. Knowledge of clinically significant pearls and pitfalls pertinent to coagulation assays in relation to anticoagulant therapy are important to optimize patient care.

  13. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min−1, respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2′/3′-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μm, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg2+ ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3–6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  14. [Kinase inhibitors against hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Arinobu

    2014-06-01

    Dysregulation of protein phosphorylation, especially on tyrosine residues, plays a crucial role in development and progression of hematological malignancies. Since remarkable success in imatinib therapy of CML and Ph+ALL, extensive efforts have made to explore candidate molecular targets and next breakthrough drugs. Now that next generation ABL kinase inhibitors are available for CML, the therapeutic algorithm has been revolutionized. As for AML and lymphoid malignancies, many kinase inhibitors targeting FLT3, BTK and aurora-A are on early and late clinical trials, and a number of promising drugs including ibrutinib are picked up for further evaluation.

  15. Cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Li, H; Lohmann, S M; Boss, G R; Pilz, R B

    1998-12-01

    Agents which increase the intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) concentration and cGMP analogs inhibit cell growth in several different cell types, but it is not known which of the intracellular target proteins of cGMP is (are) responsible for the growth-suppressive effects of cGMP. Using baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which are deficient in cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase), we show that 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate and 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate inhibit cell growth in cells stably transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector but not in untransfected cells or in cells transfected with a catalytically inactive G-kinase. We found that the cGMP analogs inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and nuclear translocation of MAP kinase in G-kinase-expressing cells but not in G-kinase-deficient cells. Ras activation by EGF was not impaired in G-kinase-expressing cells treated with cGMP analogs. We show that activation of G-kinase inhibited c-Raf kinase activation and that G-kinase phosphorylated c-Raf kinase on Ser43, both in vitro and in vivo; phosphorylation of c-Raf kinase on Ser43 uncouples the Ras-Raf kinase interaction. A mutant c-Raf kinase with an Ala substitution for Ser43 was insensitive to inhibition by cGMP and G-kinase, and expression of this mutant kinase protected cells from inhibition of EGF-induced MAP kinase activity by cGMP and G-kinase, suggesting that Ser43 in c-Raf is the major target for regulation by G-kinase. Similarly, B-Raf kinase was not inhibited by G-kinase; the Ser43 phosphorylation site of c-Raf is not conserved in B-Raf. Activation of G-kinase induced MAP kinase phosphatase 1 expression, but this occurred later than the inhibition of MAP kinase activation. Thus, in BHK cells, inhibition of cell growth by cGMP analogs is strictly dependent on G-kinase and G-kinase activation inhibits the Ras/MAP kinase pathway (i) by

  16. Evolutionary Ancestry of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases and Choline Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shenshen; Safaei, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by protein kinases in eukaryotes supports an important role for eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) in the emergence of nucleated cells in the third superkingdom of life. Choline kinases (ChKs) could also be critical in the early evolution of eukaryotes, because of their function in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is unique to eukaryotic membranes. However, the genomic origins of ePKs and ChKs are unclear. The high degeneracy of protein sequences and broad expansion of ePK families have made this fundamental question difficult to answer. In this study, we identified two class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with high similarities to consensus amino acid sequences of human protein-serine/threonine kinases. Comparisons of primary and tertiary structures supported that ePKs and ChKs evolved from a common ancestor related to glutaminyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which may have been one of the key factors in the successful of emergence of ancient eukaryotic cells from bacterial colonies. PMID:26742849

  17. Characterization of PDZ-binding kinase, a mitotic kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Suzanne; Branton, Daniel; Lue, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    hDlg, the human homologue of the Drosophila Discs-large (Dlg) tumor suppressor protein, is known to interact with the tumor suppressor protein APC and the human papillomavirus E6 transforming protein. In a two-hybrid screen, we identified a 322-aa serine/threonine kinase that binds to the PDZ2 domain of hDlg. The mRNA for this PDZ-binding kinase, or PBK, is most abundant in placenta and absent from adult brain tissue. The protein sequence of PBK has all the characteristic protein kinase subdomains and a C-terminal PDZ-binding T/SXV motif. In vitro, PBK binds specifically to PDZ2 of hDlg through its C-terminal T/SXV motif. PBK and hDlg are phosphorylated at mitosis in HeLa cells, and the mitotic phosphorylation of PBK is required for its kinase activity. In vitro, cdc2/cyclin B phosphorylates PBK. This evidence shows how PBK could link hDlg or other PDZ-containing proteins to signal transduction pathways regulating the cell cycle or cellular proliferation. PMID:10779557

  18. Structure of the pseudokinase-kinase domains from protein kinase TYK2 reveals a mechanism for Janus kinase (JAK) autoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Lupardus, Patrick J; Ultsch, Mark; Wallweber, Heidi; Bir Kohli, Pawan; Johnson, Adam R; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2014-06-03

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are receptor-associated multidomain tyrosine kinases that act downstream of many cytokines and interferons. JAK kinase activity is regulated by the adjacent pseudokinase domain via an unknown mechanism. Here, we report the 2.8-Å structure of the two-domain pseudokinase-kinase module from the JAK family member TYK2 in its autoinhibited form. We find that the pseudokinase and kinase interact near the kinase active site and that most reported mutations in cancer-associated JAK alleles cluster in or near this interface. Mutation of residues near the TYK2 interface that are analogous to those in cancer-associated JAK alleles, including the V617F and "exon 12" JAK2 mutations, results in increased kinase activity in vitro. These data indicate that JAK pseudokinases are autoinhibitory domains that hold the kinase domain inactive until receptor dimerization stimulates transition to an active state.

  19. Selective inhibition of the kinase DYRK1A by targeting its folding process

    PubMed Central

    Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Goto, Toshiyasu; Sonamoto, Rie; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Kato-Sumida, Tomoe; Koike, Yuka; Abe, Minako; Nonaka, Yosuke; Ikura, Teikichi; Ito, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Autophosphorylation of amino-acid residues is part of the folding process of various protein kinases. Conventional chemical screening of mature kinases has missed inhibitors that selectively interfere with the folding process. Here we report a cell-based assay that evaluates inhibition of a kinase at a transitional state during the folding process and identify a folding intermediate-selective inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), which we refer to as FINDY. FINDY suppresses intramolecular autophosphorylation of Ser97 in DYRK1A in cultured cells, leading to its degradation, but does not inhibit substrate phosphorylation catalysed by the mature kinase. FINDY also suppresses Ser97 autophosphorylation of recombinant DYRK1A, suggesting direct inhibition, and shows high selectivity for DYRK1A over other DYRK family members. In addition, FINDY rescues DYRK1A-induced developmental malformations in Xenopus laevis embryos. Our study demonstrates that transitional folding intermediates of protein kinases can be targeted by small molecules, and paves the way for developing novel types of kinase inhibitors. PMID:27102360

  20. Restricted distribution of the butyrate kinase pathway among butyrate-producing bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Duncan, Sylvia H; McCrae, Sheila I; Millar, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle S; Flint, Harry J

    2004-04-01

    The final steps in butyrate synthesis by anaerobic bacteria can occur via butyrate kinase and phosphotransbutyrylase or via butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase. Degenerate PCR and enzymatic assays were used to assess the presence of butyrate kinase among 38 anaerobic butyrate-producing bacterial isolates from human feces that represent three different clostridial clusters (IV, XIVa, and XVI). Only four strains were found to possess detectable butyrate kinase activity. These were also the only strains to give PCR products (verifiable by sequencing) with degenerate primer pairs designed within the butyrate kinase gene or between the linked butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes. Further analysis of the butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes of one isolate, L2-50, revealed similar organization to that described previously from different groups of clostridia, along with differences in flanking sequences and phylogenetic relationships. Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase activity was detected in all 38 strains examined, suggesting that it, rather than butyrate kinase, provides the dominant route for butyrate formation in the human colonic ecosystem that contains a constantly high concentration of acetate.

  1. Crystal Structures of Putative Sugar Kinases from Synechococcus Elongatus PCC 7942 and Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 encodes a putative sugar kinase (SePSK), which shares 44.9% sequence identity with the xylulose kinase-1 (AtXK-1) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence alignment suggests that both kinases belong to the ribulokinase-like carbohydrate kinases, a sub-family of FGGY family carbohydrate kinases. However, their exact physiological function and real substrates remain unknown. Here we solved the structures of SePSK and AtXK-1 in both their apo forms and in complex with nucleotide substrates. The two kinases exhibit nearly identical overall architecture, with both kinases possessing ATP hydrolysis activity in the absence of substrates. In addition, our enzymatic assays suggested that SePSK has the capability to phosphorylate D-ribulose. In order to understand the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, we solved the structure of SePSK in complex with D-ribulose and found two potential substrate binding pockets in SePSK. Using mutation and activity analysis, we further verified the key residues important for its catalytic activity. Moreover, our structural comparison with other family members suggests that there are major conformational changes in SePSK upon substrate binding, facilitating the catalytic process. Together, these results provide important information for a more detailed understanding of the cofactor and substrate binding mode as well as the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, and possible similarities with its plant homologue AtXK-1. PMID:27223615

  2. Specificity and mechanism of protein kinase C activation by sn-1,2-diacylglycerols.

    PubMed Central

    Ganong, B R; Loomis, C R; Hannun, Y A; Bell, R M

    1986-01-01

    The specificity of protein kinase C activation by sn-1,2-diacylglycerols and analogues was investigated by using a Triton X-100 mixed micellar assay [Hannun, Y. A., Loomis, C. R. & Bell, R. M. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 10039-10043]. Analogues containing acyl or alkyl chains eight carbons in length were synthesized because sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol is an effective cell-permeant activator of protein kinase C. These analogues were tested as activators and antagonists of rat brain protein kinase C to determine the exact structural features important for activity. The analogues established that activation of protein kinase C by diacylglycerols is highly specific. Several analogues established that both carbonyl moieties of the oxygen esters are required for maximal activity and that the 3-hydroxyl moiety is also required. None of the analogues were antagonists. These data, combined with previous investigations, permitted formulation of a model of protein kinase C activation. A three-point attachment of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol to the surface-bound protein kinase C-phosphatidylserine-Ca2+ complex is envisioned to cause activation. Direct ligation of diacylglycerol to Ca2+ is proposed to be an essential step in the mechanism of activation of protein kinase C. Images PMID:3456578

  3. Selective inhibition of the kinase DYRK1A by targeting its folding process.

    PubMed

    Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Goto, Toshiyasu; Sonamoto, Rie; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Kato-Sumida, Tomoe; Koike, Yuka; Abe, Minako; Nonaka, Yosuke; Ikura, Teikichi; Ito, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2016-04-22

    Autophosphorylation of amino-acid residues is part of the folding process of various protein kinases. Conventional chemical screening of mature kinases has missed inhibitors that selectively interfere with the folding process. Here we report a cell-based assay that evaluates inhibition of a kinase at a transitional state during the folding process and identify a folding intermediate-selective inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), which we refer to as FINDY. FINDY suppresses intramolecular autophosphorylation of Ser97 in DYRK1A in cultured cells, leading to its degradation, but does not inhibit substrate phosphorylation catalysed by the mature kinase. FINDY also suppresses Ser97 autophosphorylation of recombinant DYRK1A, suggesting direct inhibition, and shows high selectivity for DYRK1A over other DYRK family members. In addition, FINDY rescues DYRK1A-induced developmental malformations in Xenopus laevis embryos. Our study demonstrates that transitional folding intermediates of protein kinases can be targeted by small molecules, and paves the way for developing novel types of kinase inhibitors.

  4. Identification of kinases phosphorylating 13 sites in the nuclear, DNA-binding protein NUCKS.

    PubMed

    Grundt, Kirsten; Thiede, Bernd; Østvold, Anne Carine

    2017-03-01

    NUCKS is a vertebrate specific, nuclear and DNA-binding phospho protein. The protein is highly expressed in rapidly dividing cells, and is overexpressed in a number of cancer tissues. The phosphorylation of NUCKS is cell cycle and DNA-damage regulated, but little is known about the responsible kinases. By utilizing in vitro and in vivo phosphorylation assays using isolated NUCKS as well as synthetic NUCKS-derived peptides in combination with mass spectrometry, phosphopeptide mapping, phosphphoamino acid analyses, phosphospecific antibodies and the use of specific kinase inhibitors, we found that NUCKS is phosphorylated on 11 sites by CK2. At least 7 of the CK2 sites are phosphorylated in vivo. We also found that NUCKS is phosphorylated on two sites by ATM kinase and DNA-PK in vitro, and is phosphorylated in vivo by ATM kinase in γ-irradiated cells. All together, we identified three kinases phosphorylating 13 out of 39 in vivo phosphorylated sites in mammalian NUCKS. The identification of CK2 and PIKK kinases as kinases phosphorylating NUCKS in vivo provide further evidence for the involvement of NUCKS in cell cycle control and DNA repair.

  5. Crystal Structures of Putative Sugar Kinases from Synechococcus Elongatus PCC 7942 and Arabidopsis Thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuan; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 encodes a putative sugar kinase (SePSK), which shares 44.9% sequence identity with the xylulose kinase-1 (AtXK-1) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence alignment suggests that both kinases belong to the ribulokinase-like carbohydrate kinases, a sub-family of FGGY family carbohydrate kinases. However, their exact physiological function and real substrates remain unknown. Here we solved the structures of SePSK and AtXK-1 in both their apo forms and in complex with nucleotide substrates. The two kinases exhibit nearly identical overall architecture, with both kinases possessing ATP hydrolysis activity in the absence of substrates. In addition, our enzymatic assays suggested that SePSK has the capability to phosphorylate D-ribulose. In order to understand the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, we solved the structure of SePSK in complex with D-ribulose and found two potential substrate binding pockets in SePSK. Using mutation and activity analysis, we further verified the key residues important for its catalytic activity. Moreover, our structural comparison with other family members suggests that there are major conformational changes in SePSK upon substrate binding, facilitating the catalytic process. Together, these results provide important information for a more detailed understanding of the cofactor and substrate binding mode as well as the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, and possible similarities with its plant homologue AtXK-1.

  6. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activating kinase 1/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-mediated inhibition of SKOV3ip.1 ovarian cancer metastasis involves growth arrest and p21 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Tamara; Hickson, Jonathan; Souris, Jeffrey; Huo, Dezheng; Taylor, Jennifer; Li, Terry; Otto, Kristen; Yamada, Seiko Diane; Macleod, Kay; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W

    2008-04-01

    In many patients without clinical metastases, cancer cells have already escaped from the primary tumor and entered a distant organ. A long-standing question in metastasis research is why some disseminated cancer cells fail to complete steps of metastatic colonization for extended periods of time. Our laboratory identified c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activating kinase 1/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (JNKK1/MKK4) as a metastasis suppressor protein in a mouse xenograft model of experimental i.p. ovarian cancer metastasis. In this model, expression of JNKK1/MKK4 via activation of p38 delays formation of >or=1-mm implants and prolongs animal survival. Here, we elucidate the time course of this delay as well as the biological mechanisms underpinning it. Using the Gompertz function to model the net accumulation of experimental omental metastases, we show that MKK4-expressing implants arise, on average, 30 days later than controls. Quantitative real-time PCR shows that MKK4 expression does not have a substantial effect on the number of cancer cells initially adhering to the omentum, and terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling analysis shows that there is no increase in apoptosis in these cells. Instead, immunohistochemical quantitation of cell cycle proteins reveals that MKK4-expressing cells fail to proliferate once they reach the omentum and up-regulate p21, a cell cycle inhibitor. Consistent with the time course data, in vitro kinase assays and in vivo passaging of cell lines derived from macroscopic metastases show that the eventual outgrowth of MKK4-expressing cells is not due to a discrete selection event. Rather, the population of MKK4-expressing cells eventually uniformly adapts to the consequences of up-regulated MKK4 signaling.

  7. Two distinct functions for PI3-kinases in macropinocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoeller, Oliver; Bolourani, Parvin; Clark, Jonathan; Stephens, Len R.; Hawkins, Phillip T.; Weiner, Orion D.; Weeks, Gerald; Kay, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Class-1 PI3-kinases are major regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, whose precise contributions to chemotaxis, phagocytosis and macropinocytosis remain unresolved. We used systematic genetic ablation to examine this question in growing Dictyostelium cells. Mass spectroscopy shows that a quintuple mutant lacking the entire genomic complement of class-1 PI3-kinases retains only 10% of wild-type PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels. Chemotaxis to folate and phagocytosis of bacteria proceed normally in the quintuple mutant but macropinocytosis is abolished. In this context PI3-kinases show specialized functions, only one of which is directly linked to gross PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels: macropinosomes originate in patches of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, with associated F-actin-rich ruffles, both of which depend on PI3-kinase 1/2 (PI3K1/2) but not PI3K4, whereas conversion of ruffles into vesicles requires PI3K4. A biosensor derived from the Ras-binding domain of PI3K1 suggests that Ras is activated throughout vesicle formation. Binding assays show that RasG and RasS interact most strongly with PI3K1/2 and PI3K4, and single mutants of either Ras have severe macropinocytosis defects. Thus, the fundamental function of PI3-kinases in growing Dictyostelium cells is in macropinocytosis where they have two distinct functions, supported by at least two separate Ras proteins. PMID:23843627

  8. Profile-QSAR: a novel meta-QSAR method that combines activities across the kinase family to accurately predict affinity, selectivity, and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Eric; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Sullivan, David; Jansen, Johanna

    2011-08-22

    Profile-QSAR is a novel 2D predictive model building method for kinases. This "meta-QSAR" method models the activity of each compound against a new kinase target as a linear combination of its predicted activities against a large panel of 92 previously studied kinases comprised from 115 assays. Profile-QSAR starts with a sparse incomplete kinase by compound (KxC) activity matrix, used to generate Bayesian QSAR models for the 92 "basis-set" kinases. These Bayesian QSARs generate a complete "synthetic" KxC activity matrix of predictions. These synthetic activities are used as "chemical descriptors" to train partial-least squares (PLS) models, from modest amounts of medium-throughput screening data, for predicting activity against new kinases. The Profile-QSAR predictions for the 92 kinases (115 assays) gave a median external R²(ext) = 0.59 on 25% held-out test sets. The method has proven accurate enough to predict pairwise kinase selectivities with a median correlation of R²(ext) = 0.61 for 958 kinase pairs with at least 600 common compounds. It has been further expanded by adding a "C(k)XC" cellular activity matrix to the KxC matrix to predict cellular activity for 42 kinase driven cellular assays with median R²(ext) = 0.58 for 24 target modulation assays and R²(ext) = 0.41 for 18 cell proliferation assays. The 2D Profile-QSAR, along with the 3D Surrogate AutoShim, are the foundations of an internally developed iterative medium-throughput screening (IMTS) methodology for virtual screening (VS) of compound archives as an alternative to experimental high-throughput screening (HTS). The method has been applied to 20 actual prospective kinase projects. Biological results have so far been obtained in eight of them. Q² values ranged from 0.3 to 0.7. Hit-rates at 10 uM for experimentally tested compounds varied from 25% to 80%, except in K5, which was a special case aimed specifically at finding "type II" binders, where none of the compounds were predicted to be

  9. Biomolecular Interaction Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Brown, L; Holman, David A.; Olson, Lydia; Grate, Jay W.

    2000-12-29

    Understanding the binding interactions of complexes of multiple proteins is an important area of medical research since many biological signaling pathways involve multiple protein complexes. A number of sensor technologies have been adapted to monitoring biomolecular interactions. Acoustic wave devices such as flexural plate wave devices, surface transverse waves, and quartz crystal microbalances detect the mass increase observed upon binding of a solution biomolecule to a surface bound biomolecule. However, these devices will also respond to changes in viscosity, temperature, liquid density, and viscoelastic effects, which may confound the interpretation of observed signals. Nonspecific binding is indistinguishable from specific binding. Several techniques for refractive index sensing, such as planar wave guides and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), can also be used to observe biomolecular interactions localized at a surface. Again, nonspecific binding is indistinguishable from specific binding. In addition, the derivatized surface must be very thin and uniform to obtain adequate sensitivity and reproducibility, and the technique is not suited for monitoring large multiple protein complexes since the measurement sensitivity decreases rapidly with distance from the sensor surface. All of these techniques use planar surfaces that are difficult to prepare and characterize, and must be prepared fresh for each assay.

  10. Assay for calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  11. The Substrate-Activity-Screening methodology applied to receptor tyrosine kinases: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Chapelat, Julien; Berst, Frédéric; Marzinzik, Andreas L; Moebitz, Henrik; Drueckes, Peter; Trappe, Joerg; Fabbro, Doriano; Seebach, Dieter

    2012-11-01

    Protein kinases are widely recognized as important therapeutic targets due to their involvement in signal transduction pathways. These pathways are tightly controlled and regulated, notably by the ability of kinases to selectively phosphorylate a defined set of substrates. A wide variety of disorders can arise as a consequence of abnormal kinase-mediated phosphorylation and numerous kinase inhibitors have earned their place as key components of the modern pharmacopeia. Although "traditional" kinase inhibitors typically act by preventing the interaction between the kinase and ATP, thus stopping substrate phosphorylation, an alternative approach consists in disrupting the protein-protein interaction between the kinase and its downstream partners. In order to facilitate the identification of potential chemical starting points for substrate-site inhibition approaches, we desired to investigate the application of Substrate Activity Screening to kinases. We herein report a proof-of-concept study demonstrating, on a model tyrosine kinase, that the key requirements of this methodology can be met. Namely, using peptides as model substrates, we show that a simple ADP-accumulation assay can be used to monitor substrate efficiency and that efficiency can be optimized in a modular manner. More importantly, we demonstrate that structure-efficiency relationships translate into structure-activity relationships upon conversion of the substrates into inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Aurora A kinase is required for activation of the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Min Jeong; Hwang, Soo Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sunshin; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have linked the DNA damage response to mitotic progression machinery. Mitotic kinases, such as Aurora A kinase and Polo-like kinase, are involved in the phosphorylation of cell cycle regulators in response to DNA damage. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of Aurora A kinase in the activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway, which participates in cellular response to DNA interstrand cross-link lesions (ICL). Initially, we detected interactions between Aurora A kinase and FANCA protein, one of the components of the FA nuclear core complex. Silencing of Aurora A kinase led to inhibition of monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and formation of nuclear foci, the final consequences of FA/BRCA pathway activation upon ICL induction. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that Aurora A kinase phosphorylates S165 of FANCA. Moreover, this phosphorylation event was induced by the treatment with mitomycin C (MMC), an ICL-inducing agent. In cells overexpressing S165A mutant FANCA, monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and nuclear foci formation was impaired and cellular sensitivity to MMC was enhanced. These results suggest that S165 phosphorylation by Aurora A kinase is required for proper activation of the FA/BRCA pathway in response to DNA damage.

  13. Kinase signalling in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Kathryn R; Jones, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in numerous signal transduction pathways and aberrant activity of specific kinases have been identified in multiple cell and mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD), as well as in human HD brain. The balance and integration of a network of kinase signalling pathways is paramount for the regulation of a wide range of cellular and physiological processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, neuronal plasticity and apoptosis. Unbalanced activity within these pathways provides a potential mechanism for many of the pathological phenotypes associated with HD, such as transcriptional dysregulation, inflammation and ultimately neurodegeneration. The characterisation of aberrant kinase signalling regulation in HD has been inconsistent and may be a result of failure to consider integration between multiple signalling pathways, as well as alterations that may occur over time with both age and disease progression. Collating the information about the effect of mHTT on signalling pathways demonstrates that it has wide ranging effects on multiple pro- and anti-apoptotic kinases, resulting in the dysregulation of numerous complex interactions within a dynamic network.

  14. Case report: pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J M

    1995-09-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency is a rare cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. Despite a paucity of reports, splenectomy resulted in successful outcomes for two siblings with this disorder. The sisters were diagnosed at birth with profound jaundice and congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... shape, leading to a reduction of mevalonate kinase enzyme activity. Despite this shortage (deficiency) of mevalonate kinase activity, ... who have less than 1 percent of normal enzyme activity usually develop MVA. Learn more about the gene ...

  16. Identifying a Kinase Network Regulating FGF14:Nav1.6 Complex Assembly Using Split-Luciferase Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Nenov, Miroslav N.; Shavkunov, Alexander; Panova, Neli; Zhan, Ming; Laezza, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Kinases play fundamental roles in the brain. Through complex signaling pathways, kinases regulate the strength of protein:protein interactions (PPI) influencing cell cycle, signal transduction, and electrical activity of neurons. Changes induced by kinases on neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and brain connectivity are linked to complex brain disorders, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these cellular events remain for the most part elusive. To further our understanding of brain disease, new methods for rapidly surveying kinase pathways in the cellular context are needed. The bioluminescence-based luciferase complementation assay (LCA) is a powerful, versatile toolkit for the exploration of PPI. LCA relies on the complementation of two firefly luciferase protein fragments that are functionally reconstituted into the full luciferase enzyme by two interacting binding partners. Here, we applied LCA in live cells to assay 12 kinase pathways as regulators of the PPI complex formed by the voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.6, a transmembrane ion channel that elicits the action potential in neurons and mediates synaptic transmission, and its multivalent accessory protein, the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14). Through extensive dose-dependent validations of structurally-diverse kinase inhibitors and hierarchical clustering, we identified the PI3K/Akt pathway, the cell-cycle regulator Wee1 kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC) as prospective regulatory nodes of neuronal excitability through modulation of the FGF14:Nav1.6 complex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis shows convergence of these pathways on glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and functional assays demonstrate that inhibition of GSK3 impairs excitability of hippocampal neurons. This combined approach provides a versatile toolkit for rapidly surveying PPI signaling, allowing the discovery of new modular pathways centered on GSK3 that might be the basis for functional alterations between the normal and

  17. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Activated Protein Kinase 2 Regulates Actin Polymerization and Vascular Leak in Ventilator Associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Damarla, Mahendra; Hasan, Emile; Boueiz, Adel; Le, Anne; Pae, Hyun Hae; Montouchet, Calypso; Kolb, Todd; Simms, Tiffany; Myers, Allen; Kayyali, Usamah S.; Gaestel, Matthias; Peng, Xinqi; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Damico, Rachel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation, a fundamental therapy for acute lung injury, worsens pulmonary vascular permeability by exacting mechanical stress on various components of the respiratory system causing ventilator associated lung injury. We postulated that MK2 activation via p38 MAP kinase induced HSP25 phosphorylation, in response to mechanical stress, leading to actin stress fiber formation and endothelial barrier dysfunction. We sought to determine the role of p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 on HSP25 phosphorylation and actin stress fiber formation in ventilator associated lung injury. Wild type and MK2−/− mice received mechanical ventilation with high (20 ml/kg) or low (7 ml/kg) tidal volumes up to 4 hrs, after which lungs were harvested for immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and lung permeability assays. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation resulted in significant phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, MK2, HSP25, actin polymerization, and an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability in wild type mice as compared to spontaneous breathing or low tidal volume mechanical ventilation. However, pretreatment of wild type mice with specific p38 MAP kinase or MK2 inhibitors abrogated HSP25 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, and protected against increased lung permeability. Finally, MK2−/− mice were unable to phosphorylate HSP25 or increase actin polymerization from baseline, and were resistant to increases in lung permeability in response to HVT MV. Our results suggest that p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 mediate lung permeability in ventilator associated lung injury by regulating HSP25 phosphorylation and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:19240800

  18. Fragment-Based Screening Maps Inhibitor Interactions in the ATP-Binding Site of Checkpoint Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Santisteban, M. Cris; Westwood, Isaac M.; Boxall, Kathy; Brown, Nathan; Peacock, Sam; McAndrew, Craig; Barrie, Elaine; Richards, Meirion; Mirza, Amin; Oliver, Antony W.; Burke, Rosemary; Hoelder, Swen; Jones, Keith; Aherne, G. Wynne; Blagg, Julian; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.; van Montfort, Rob L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) is an important serine/threonine kinase in the cellular response to DNA damage. A fragment-based screening campaign using a combination of a high-concentration AlphaScreen™ kinase assay and a biophysical thermal shift assay, followed by X-ray crystallography, identified a number of chemically different ligand-efficient CHK2 hinge-binding scaffolds that have not been exploited in known CHK2 inhibitors. In addition, it showed that the use of these orthogonal techniques allowed efficient discrimination between genuine hit matter and false positives from each individual assay technology. Furthermore, the CHK2 crystal structures with a quinoxaline-based fragment and its follow-up compound highlight a hydrophobic area above the hinge region not previously explored in rational CHK2 inhibitor design, but which might be exploited to enhance both potency and selectivity of CHK2 inhibitors. PMID:23776527

  19. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases. PMID:19489726

  20. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  1. High-throughput assays for sirtuin enzymes: a microfluidic mobility shift assay and a bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yichin; Gerber, Raphaele; Wu, John; Tsuruda, Trace; McCarter, John D

    2008-07-01

    Silent information regulator or sirtuin (SIRT) enzymes are beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (oxidized) (NAD(+))-dependent class III histone deacetylases. In this paper, two distinct assays to measure SIRT1 activity are described: a microfluidic mobility shift assay utilizing a fluorophore-labeled peptide substrate and a bioluminescence assay based upon quantitation of remaining NAD(+). The mobility shift assay involves the electrophoretic separation of an N-acetyl-lysine-containing peptide substrate from deacetylated product which bears an additional positive charge. Interference from fluorescent compounds is minimized during screening by direct visualization of separated fluorophore-labeled substrate and product. A preferred peptide substrate for SIRT1 was identified using this assay. The NAD(+) bioluminescence assay couples NAD(+) consumption to the bacterial luciferase-catalyzed oxidation of decanal. This assay does not require synthesis of a labeled peptide and is applicable to sirtuins of any specificity with respect to peptide substrate. The stoichiometry between NAD(+) consumption and peptide deacetylation was shown to be 1:1 by the NAD(+) bioluminescence assay. Kinetic parameters of peptide and NAD(+) cosubstrates and IC(50) values of standard reference inhibitors determined in either assay were similar. With robust Z' values (0.7), both assays are amenable to high-throughput screening.

  2. A High-Throughput Screen to Identify LRRK2 Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease Using RapidFire Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leveridge, Melanie; Collier, Lee; Edge, Colin; Hardwicke, Phil; Leavens, Bill; Ratcliffe, Steve; Rees, Mike; Stasi, Luigi Piero; Nadin, Alan; Reith, Alastair D

    2016-02-01

    LRRK2 is a large multidomain protein containing two functional enzymatic domains: a GTPase domain and a protein kinase domain. Dominant coding mutations in the LRRK2 protein are associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Among such pathogenic mutations, Gly2019Ser mutation in the LRRK2 kinase domain is the most frequent cause of familial PD in Caucasians and is also found in some apparently sporadic PD cases. This mutation results in 2- to 3-fold elevated LRRK2 kinase activity compared with wild type, providing a clear clinical hypothesis for the application of kinase inhibitors in the treatment of this disease. To date, reported screening assays for LRRK2 have been based on detection of labeled adenosine triphosphate and adenosine diphosphate or on antibody-based detection of phosphorylation events. While these assays do offer a high-throughput method of monitoring LRRK2 kinase activity, they are prone to interference from autofluorescent compounds and nonspecific events. Here we describe a label-free assay for LRRK2 kinase activity using the RapidFire mass spectrometry system. This assay format was found to be highly robust and enabled a screen of 100,000 lead-like small molecules. The assay successfully identified a number of known LRRK2 chemotypes that met stringent physicochemical criteria.

  3. Peptide microarray analysis of substrate specificity of the transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase KPI-2 reveals reactivity with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2006-11-01

    Human lemur (Lmr) kinases are predicted to be Tyr kinases based on sequences and are related to neurotrophin receptor Trk kinases. This study used homogeneous recombinant KPI-2 (Lmr2, LMTK2, Cprk, brain-enriched protein kinase) kinase domain and a library of 1,154 peptides on a microarray to analyze substrate specificity. We found that KPI-2 is strictly a Ser/Thr kinase that reacts with Ser either preceded by or followed by Pro residues but unlike other Pro-directed kinases does not strictly require an adjacent Pro residue. The most reactive peptide in the library corresponds to Ser-737 of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, and the recombinant R domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was a preferred substrate. Furthermore the KPI-2 kinase phosphorylated peptides corresponding to the single site in phosphorylase and purified phosphorylase b, making this only the second known phosphorylase b kinase. Phosphorylase was used as a specific substrate to show that KPI-2 is inhibited in living cells by addition of nerve growth factor or serum. The results demonstrate the utility of the peptide library to probe specificity and discover kinase substrates and offer a specific assay that reveals hormonal regulation of the activity of this unusual transmembrane kinase.

  4. Glycolysis without pyruvate kinase in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Daniel G.; Horl, Manuel; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cui, Jingxuan; Zhou, Jilai; Maloney, Marybeth I.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Tian, Liang; Sauer, Uwe; Lynd, Lee R.

    2016-12-01

    The metabolism of Clostridium thermocellum is notable in that it assimilates sugar via the EMP pathway but does not possess a pyruvate kinase enzyme. In the wild type organism, there are three proposed pathways for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which differ in their cofactor usage. One path uses pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), another pathway uses the combined activities of PEP carboxykinase (PEPCK) and oxaloacetate decarboxylase (ODC). Yet another pathway, the malate shunt, uses the combined activities of PEPCK, malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. First we showed that there is no flux through the ODC pathway by enzyme assay. Flux through the remaining two pathways (PPDK and malate shunt) was determined by dynamic 13C labeling. In the wild-type strain, the malate shunt accounts for about 33 ± 2% of the flux to pyruvate, with the remainder via the PPDK pathway. Deletion of the ppdk gene resulted in a redirection of all pyruvate flux through the malate shunt. Lastly, this provides the first direct evidence of the in-vivo function of the malate shunt.

  5. Glycolysis without pyruvate kinase in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Daniel G.; Horl, Manuel; Fuhrer, Tobias; ...

    2016-12-01

    The metabolism of Clostridium thermocellum is notable in that it assimilates sugar via the EMP pathway but does not possess a pyruvate kinase enzyme. In the wild type organism, there are three proposed pathways for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which differ in their cofactor usage. One path uses pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), another pathway uses the combined activities of PEP carboxykinase (PEPCK) and oxaloacetate decarboxylase (ODC). Yet another pathway, the malate shunt, uses the combined activities of PEPCK, malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. First we showed that there is no flux through the ODC pathway by enzyme assay.more » Flux through the remaining two pathways (PPDK and malate shunt) was determined by dynamic 13C labeling. In the wild-type strain, the malate shunt accounts for about 33 ± 2% of the flux to pyruvate, with the remainder via the PPDK pathway. Deletion of the ppdk gene resulted in a redirection of all pyruvate flux through the malate shunt. Lastly, this provides the first direct evidence of the in-vivo function of the malate shunt.« less

  6. The creatine kinase response to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Koch, A J; Pereira, R; Machado, M

    2014-03-01

    Resistance exercise can result in localized damage to muscle tissue. This damage may be observed in sarcolemma, basal lamina, as well as, in the contractile elements and the cytoskeleton. Usually the damage is accompanied by release of enzymes such as creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase, myoglobin and other proteins into the blood. Serum CK has been proposed as one of the best indirect indicators of muscle damage due to its ease of identification and the relatively low cost of assays to quantify it. Thus, CK has been used as an indicator of the training intensity and a diagnostic marker of overtraining. However, some issues complicate CK's use in this manner. There is great interindividual variability in serum CK, which complicates the assignment of reliable reference values for athletes. Furthermore, factors such as training level, muscle groups involved, and gender can influence CK levels to a greater extent than differences in exercise volume completed. This review will detail the process by which resistance exercise induces a rise in circulating CK, illuminate the various factors that affect the CK response to resistance exercise, and discuss the relative usefulness of CK as a marker of training status, in light of these factors.

  7. The receptor kinase family: primary structure of rhodopsin kinase reveals similarities to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W; Inglese, J; Palczewski, K; Onorato, J J; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1991-01-01

    Light-dependent deactivation of rhodopsin as well as homologous desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptors involves receptor phosphorylation that is mediated by the highly specific protein kinases rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK), respectively. We report here the cloning of a complementary DNA for RK. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology to beta ARK. In a phylogenetic tree constructed by comparing the catalytic domains of several protein kinases, RK and beta ARK are located on a branch close to, but separate from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C subfamilies. From the common structural features we conclude that both RK and beta ARK are members of a newly delineated gene family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor kinases that may function in diverse pathways to regulate the function of such receptors. Images PMID:1656454

  8. A novel family of serine/threonine kinases participating in spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kueng, P; Nikolova, Z; Djonov, V; Hemphill, A; Rohrbach, V; Boehlen, D; Zuercher, G; Andres, A C; Ziemiecki, A

    1997-12-29

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the spectacular cytodifferentiation observed during spermiogenesis are poorly understood. We have recently identified a murine testis-specific serine kinase (tssk) 1, constituting a novel subfamily of serine/threonine kinases. Using low stringency screening we have isolated and molecularly characterized a second closely related family member, tssk 2, which is probably the orthologue of the human DGS-G gene. Expression of tssk 1 and tssk 2 was limited to the testis of sexually mature males. Immunohistochemical staining localized both kinases to the cytoplasm of late spermatids and to structures resembling residual bodies. tssk 1 and tssk 2 were absent in released sperms in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules and the epididymis, demonstrating a tight window of expression restricted to the last stages of spermatid maturation. In vitro kinase assays of immunoprecipitates containing either tssk 1 or tssk 2 revealed no autophosphorylation of the kinases, however, they led to serine phosphorylation of a coprecipitating protein of approximately 65 kD. A search for interacting proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system with tssk 1 and tssk 2 cDNA as baits and a prey cDNA library from mouse testis, led to the isolation of a novel cDNA, interacting specifically with both tssk 1 and tssk 2, and encoding the coprecipitated 65-kD protein phosphorylated by both kinases. Interestingly, expression of the interacting clone was also testis specific and paralleled the developmental expression observed for the kinases themselves. These results represent the first demonstration of the involvement of a distinct kinase family, the tssk serine/threonine kinases, together with a substrate in the cytodifferentiation of late spermatids to sperms.

  9. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  10. Periostin Induces Intracellular Cross-talk between Kinases and Hyaluronan in Atrioventricular Valvulogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Misra, Suniti; Norris, Russell A.; Moreno-Rodriguez, Ricardo A.; Hoffman, Stanley; Levine, Robert A.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Markwald, Roger R.

    2014-01-01

    Periostin (PN), a novel fasciclin-related matricellular protein, has been implicated in cardiac development and postnatal remodeling, but the mechanism remains unknown. We examined the role of PN in mediating intracellular kinase activation for atrioventricular valve morphogenesis using well defined explant cultures, gene transfection systems, and Western blotting. The results show that valve progenitor (cushion) cells secrete PN into the extracellular matrix, where it can bind to INTEGRINs and activate INTEGRIN/focal adhesion kinase signaling pathways and downstream kinases, PI3K/AKT and ERK. Functional assays with prevalvular progenitor cells showed that activating these signaling pathways promoted adhesion, migration, and anti-apoptosis. Through activation of PI3K/ERK, PN directly enhanced collagen expression. Comparing PN-null to WT mice also revealed that expression of hyaluronan (HA) and activation of hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) are also enhanced upon PN/INTEGRIN/focal adhesion kinase-mediated activation of PI3K and/or ERK, an effect confirmed by the reduction of HA synthase-2 in PN-null mice. We also identified in valve progenitor cells a potential autocrine signaling feedback loop between PN and HA through PI3K and/or ERK. Finally, in a three-dimensional assay to simulate normal valve maturation in vitro, PN promoted collagen compaction in a kinase-dependent fashion. In summary, this study provides the first direct evidence that PN can act to stimulate a valvulogenic signaling pathway. PMID:24469446

  11. Identification and analysis of a novel protein-tyrosine kinase from bovine thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    A cytosolic protein-tyrosine kinase has been identified and purified to near homogeneity from calf thymus by using the phosphorylation of the tyrosine-containing peptide angiotensin I as an assay. Specific peptide phosphorylating activity was enhanced by carrying out the assay at high ionic strength (2M NaCl). The inclusion of NaCl at this concentration acts to stimulate endogenous protein-tyrosine kinase activity while simultaneously inhibiting other endogenous kinases. The purification procedure involved extraction of the enzyme from calf-thymus and sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-cellulose, heparin-agarose, casein-sepharose, butylagarose, and Sephadex G-75. Analysis of the most highly purified preparations by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single Coomassie blue-stained band of 41 KDa. This molecular weight was consistent with results obtained from gel filtration, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. The enzyme has also been found to catalyze an autophosphorylation reaction. Incubation of the enzyme with Mn/sup 2 +/ and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP led to its modification on a tyrosine residue. Phosphopeptide mapping experiments indicated that the 41 KDa kinase was distinct from p56, the major membrane-associated protein-tyrosine kinase in T lymphocytes.

  12. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  13. Identification of DW532 as a novel anti-tumor agent targeting both kinases and tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ting; Wu, Jian-rui; Tong, Lin-jiang; Li, Meng-yuan; Chen, Fang; Leng, Yi-xin; Qu, Rong; Han, Kun; Su, Yi; Chen, Yi; Duan, Wen-hu; Xie, Hua; Ding, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: 7,8-Dihydroxy-4-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (DW532) is one of simplified analogues of hematoxylin that has shown broad-spectrum inhibition on tyrosine kinases and in vitro anti-cancer activities. The aim of this study was to identify DW532 as a agent targeting both kinases and tubulin, and to investigate its anti-cancer and anti-angiogenesis activities. Methods: In vitro tyrosine kinases activity was examined with ELISA, and tyrosine kinases activity in cells was evaluated with Western blot analysis. Tubulin turbidity assay, surface plasmon resonance and immunofluorescence technique were used to characterize the tubulin inhibitory activity. Cell proliferation was examined with SRB assay, and cell apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were analyzed with Annexin-V/PI staining and flow cytometry. Tube formation, aortic ring and chick chorioallantoic membrane assays were used to evaluate the anti-angiogenesis efficacy. Results: DW532 inhibited EGFR and VEGFR2 in vitro kinase activity (the IC50 values were 4.9 and 5.5 μmol/L, respectively), and suppressed their downstream signaling. DW532 dose-dependently inhibited tubulin polymerization via direct binding to tubulin, thus disrupting the mitotic spindle assembly and leading to abnormal cell division. In a panel of human cancer cells, DW532 (1 and 10 μmol/L) induced G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis, which subsequently resulted in cytotoxicity. Knockdown of BubR1 or Mps1, the two core proteins of the spindle assembly checkpoint dramatically decreased DW532-induced cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-468 cells. Moreover, treatment with DW532 potently and dose-dependently suppressed angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: DW532 is a dual inhibitor against tubulin and tyrosine kinases, and deserves further development as a novel anti-cancer agent. PMID:24858311

  14. Glycerate kinase from leaves of C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, M R; Edwards, G E

    1983-07-01

    D-Glycerate-3-kinase (EC 2.7.1.31) in six C3 species, including dicots (Pisum sativum, Spinacea oleracea, Antirrhinum majus) and monocots (Secale cereale, Hordeum vulgare, Avena sativa), ranged in activity from 44 to 353 mumol X mg chl-1 X h-1. Studies with protoplast extracts of these species indicate that the enzyme is localized in the chloroplasts. Glycerate kinase was partially purified from Secale (rye, 288-fold) and Pisum (pea, 252-fold) chloroplasts by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, sucrose gradient centrifugation, and chromatofocusing. The enzymes from both species showed similar physical (Mr = 41,000, pI = 4.6-4.7) and kinetic (Km ATP = 655 to 692 microM, Km D-glycerate = 180-188 microM) properties. Activity of the enzyme was essentially insensitive to variations in assay pH from 6.4 to 9.0 and to energy charge variations from 0.4 to 1.0. Rye glycerate kinase was able to utilize UTP and GTP but less effectively than ATP. Neither ADP nor pyrophosphate served as an energy source. Mn2+, Co2+, Ca2+, and Sr2+ could function as metal cofactors, although to a lesser extent than Mg2+. Millimolar levels of sulfate were found to significantly inhibit the enzyme while similar concentrations of other anions (Cl-, NO-3, NO-2, and acetate) had little or no effect.

  15. Improved radioimmunoassay for creatine kinase isoenzymes in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, C.S.; Mumm, S.R.; Roberts, R.

    1981-11-01

    We describe convenient and relatively rapid procedures for purifying creatine kinase isoenzymes MM, BB, and MB, and their use in an improved radioimmunoassay for creatine kinase isoenzymes in plasma. The modifications include use of: (a) BB with a specific activity of 400 kU/G, which can be labeled with a specific radioactivity of 20 Ci/g; (b) albumin-free purified MB as inhibitor; (c) antiserum to MB creatine kinase; and (d) a second-antibody technique that necessitates only a 15-min incubation. The radioimmunoassay for MB has a sensitivity of 0.2 ..mu..g/L (80 mU/L) and a CV of <5%. Plasma MB average 22 (SD 12) ..mu..g/L in 200 normal subjects; 24 (SD 12) ..mu..g/L in 200 patients with chest pain without infarction; and 23 (SD 7) ..mu..g/L in 43 patients with renal disease, whether measured before or after dialysis. Peak values for plasma MB averaged 191 (SD 86) ..mu..g/L in 325 patients with documented myocardial infarction; BB was negligible. Extensive clinical experience indicates the radioimmunoassay to be suitably rapid, highly sensitive, and reliable as a diagnostic assay for MB on plasma.

  16. Aurora kinases: novel therapy targets in cancers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anqun; Gao, Keyu; Chu, Laili; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Junnian

    2017-01-29

    Aurora kinases, a family of serine/threonine kinases, consisting of Aurora A (AURKA), Aurora B (AURKB) and Aurora C (AURKC), are essential kinases for cell division via regulating mitosis especially the process of chromosomal segregation. Besides regulating mitosis, Aurora kinases have been implicated in regulating meiosis. The deletion of Aurora kinases could lead to failure of cell division and impair the embryonic development. Overexpression or gene amplification of Aurora kinases has been clarified in a number of cancers. And a growing number of studies have demonstrated that inhibition of Aurora kinases could potentiate the effect of chemotherapies. For the past decades, a series of Aurora kinases inhibitors (AKIs) developed effectively repress the progression and growth of many cancers both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that Aurora kinases could be a novel therapeutic target. In this review, we'll first briefly present the structure, localization and physiological functions of Aurora kinases in mitosis, then describe the oncogenic role of Aurora kinases in tumorigenesis, we shall finally discuss the outcomes of AKIs combination with conventional therapy.

  17. Digital Assays Part II: Digital Protein and Cell Assays.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amar S

    2017-08-01

    A digital assay is one in which the sample is partitioned into many containers such that each partition contains a discrete number of biological entities (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .). A powerful technique in the biologist's toolkit, digital assays bring a new level of precision in quantifying nucleic acids, measuring proteins and their enzymatic activity, and probing single-cell genotype and phenotype. Where part I of this review focused on the fundamentals of partitioning and digital PCR, part II turns its attention to digital protein and cell assays. Digital enzyme assays measure the kinetics of single proteins with enzymatic activity. Digital enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs) quantify antigenic proteins with 2 to 3 log lower detection limit than conventional ELISA, making them well suited for low-abundance biomarkers. Digital cell assays probe single-cell genotype and phenotype, including gene expression, intracellular and surface proteins, metabolic activity, cytotoxicity, and transcriptomes (scRNA-seq). These methods exploit partitioning to 1) isolate single cells or proteins, 2) detect their activity via enzymatic amplification, and 3) tag them individually by coencapsulating them with molecular barcodes. When scaled, digital assays reveal stochastic differences between proteins or cells within a population, a key to understanding biological heterogeneity. This review is intended to give a broad perspective to scientists interested in adopting digital assays into their workflows.

  18. ELISPOT assay on membrane microplates.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhny, Alexander E

    2009-01-01

    Membranes used for western blotting can be also used for ELISPOT, an enzyme-linked immunospot assay, which allows determining frequencies of cytokine-secreting immune system cells. In addition to their high antibody-retaining capacity PVDF and NC membranes provide good support to immune system cells cultured in vitro and do not affect their physiology. ELISPOT assays utilizing membrane-backed microplates are used in many areas of research including vaccine development, HIV research, cancer and infection disease research, autoimmune disease, and allergy research.ELISPOT utilizes the same antibody "sandwich" technique as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, but unlike the latter ELISPOT belongs to state-of-the-art techniques when outcome of the assay depends on skills and accuracy of the operator, a thorough selection of matched pairs of capture and detection antibodies, and using appropriate staining reagents. This review covers basics of ELISPOT assay including its immunochemical design, selection of reagents and membrane microplates, and some troubleshooting recommendations.

  19. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  20. From Antenna to Assay

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Evan G.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Ligand-sensitized, luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable importance because their unique photophysical properties (microsecond to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts) make them well suited as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived emission of lanthanide(III) cations can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence to vastly enhance measurement sensitivity. One challenge in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive complexes with sufficient stability and aqueous solubility for practical applications. In this Account, we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technology. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms and using multi-chromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity; earlier examples utilized a single pendant chromophore (that is, a single “antenna”). Ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to ∼60% that are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM chromophore and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally, we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong

  1. Capillary electrophoresis as a novel technique for screening natural flavonoids as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nehmé, Reine; Nehmé, Hala; Roux, Grégory; Destandau, Emilie; Claude, Bérengère; Morin, Philippe

    2013-11-29

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for the first time to evaluate the inhibition activity of aglycone flavonoids (such as quercetin and isorhamnetin) and some of their glycosylated derivatives toward human kinases. The cyclin-dependant kinase 5 (CDK5/p25) and the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) were chosen since they are very promising biological targets for developing treatments against neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. In a previous work, we developed an in-capillary kinase CE assay where the capillary was used as an enzymatic nanoreactor in which the kinase, its substrate, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and its potential inhibitor were mixed by using transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles (TDLFP). The product adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was then detected at 254nm and quantified. In this work, this assay was improved to reduce, for the first time, the dilution effect commonly observed with the TDLFP approach. Under the new conditions established herein, IC50 values for quercetin, kaempferol and flavopiridol were successfully obtained and were in the same order of magnitude of those reported in the literature using the conventional assay using radioactive (33)P-ATP. It was shown that aglycone flavonoids have an inhibition activity more important than their glycosylated derivatives. CE was also proved to be very efficient for evaluating inhibition activity of complex samples such as crude extracts of sea buckthorn (SBT) berries obtained by solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME). This novel approach to combine SFME technique to a CE-based enzymatic assay is very interesting for evaluating the biological activity of natural material in a fast, simple, economic (no use of neither fluorescent nor radiometric labels) and green (no organic solvents) manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of a plant SNF1-related protein kinase by glucose-6-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Toroser, D.; Plaut, Z.; Huber, S.C.

    2000-05-01

    One of the major protein kinases (PK{sub III}) that phosphorylates serine-158 of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), which is responsible for light/dark modulation of activity, is known to be a member of the SNF1-related family of protein kinases. In the present study, the authors have developed a fluorescence-based continuous assay for measurement of PK{sub III} activity. Using the continuous assay, along with the fixed-time-point {sup 32}P-incorporation assay, they demonstrate that PK{sub III} activity is inhibited by glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). Relative inhibition by Glc-6-P was increased by decreasing pH from 8.5 to 5.5 and by reducing the concentration of Mg{sup 2+} in the assay from 10 to 2 nM. Under likely physiological conditions (PH 7.0 and 2 mM Mg{sup 2+}), 10 nM Glc-6-P inhibited kinase activity approximately 70%. Inhibition by Glc-6-P could not be ascribed to contaminants in the commercial preparations. Other metabolites inhibited PK{sub III} in the following order: Glc-6-P > mannose-6-P, fructose-1,6P{sub 2} > ribose-5-P, 3-PGA, fructose-6-P. Inorganic phosphate, Glc, and AMP were not inhibitory, and free Glc did not reverse the inhibition by Glc-6-P. Because SNF1-related protein kinases are thought to function broadly in the regulation of enzyme activity and gene expression, Glc-6-P inhibition of PK{sub III} activity potentially provides a mechanism for metabolic regulation of the reactions catalyzed by these important protein kinases.

  3. Selective inhibition of Sarcocystis neurona calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis therapy.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Kayode K; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Verma, Shiv K; Scheele, Suzanne; DeRocher, Amy E; Yeargan, Michelle; Choi, Ryan; Smith, Tess R; Rivas, Kasey L; Hulverson, Matthew A; Barrett, Lynn K; Fan, Erkang; Maly, Dustin J; Parsons, Marilyn; Dubey, Jitender P; Howe, Daniel K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2016-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most frequent cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, a debilitating neurological disease of horses that can be difficult to treat. We identified SnCDPK1, the S. neurona homologue of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1), a validated drug target in Toxoplasma gondii. SnCDPK1 shares the glycine "gatekeeper" residue of the well-characterized T. gondii enzyme, which allows the latter to be targeted by bumped kinase inhibitors. This study presents detailed molecular and phenotypic evidence that SnCDPK1 can be targeted for rational drug development. Recombinant SnCDPK1 was tested against four bumped kinase inhibitors shown to potently inhibit both T. gondii (Tg) CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoite growth. SnCDPK1 was inhibited by low nanomolar concentrations of these BKIs and S. neurona growth was inhibited at 40-120nM concentrations. Thermal shift assays confirmed these bumped kinase inhibitors bind CDPK1 in S. neurona cell lysates. Treatment with bumped kinase inhibitors before or after invasion suggests that bumped kinase inhibitors interfere with S. neurona mammalian host cell invasion in the 0.5-2.5μM range but interfere with intracellular division at 2.5μM. In vivo proof-of-concept experiments were performed in a murine model of S. neurona infection. The experimental infected groups treated for 30days with compound BKI-1553 (n=10 mice) had no signs of disease, while the infected control group had severe signs and symptoms of infection. Elevated antibody responses were found in 100% of control infected animals, but only 20% of BKI-1553 treated infected animals. Parasites were found in brain tissues of 100% of the control infected animals, but only in 10% of the BKI-1553 treated animals. The bumped kinase inhibitors used in these assays have been chemically optimized for potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties, and hence are good candidates for treatment of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

  4. Phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit by integrin-linked kinase.

    PubMed

    Murányi, Andrea; MacDonald, Justin A; Deng, Jing Ti; Wilson, David P; Haystead, Timothy A J; Walsh, Michael P; Erdodi, Ferenc; Kiss, Eniko; Wu, Yue; Hartshorne, David J

    2002-08-15

    A mechanism proposed for regulation of myosin phosphatase (MP) activity is phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1). Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is associated with the contractile machinery and can phosphorylate myosin at the myosin light-chain kinase sites. The possibility that ILK may also phosphorylate and regulate MP was investigated. ILK was associated with the MP holoenzyme, shown by Western blots and in-gel kinase assays. MYPT1 was phosphorylated by ILK and phosphorylation sites in the N- and C-terminal fragments of MYPT1 were detected. From sequence analyses, three sites were identified: a primary site at Thr(709), and two other sites at Thr(695) and Thr(495). One of the sites for cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was Ser(694). Assays with the catalytic subunit of type 1 phosphatase indicated that only the C-terminal fragment of MYPT1 phosphorylated by zipper-interacting protein kinase, and ILK inhibited activity. The phosphorylated N-terminal fragment activated phosphatase activity and phosphorylation by PKA was without effect. Using full-length MYPT1 constructs phosphorylated by various kinases it was shown that Rho kinase gave marked inhibition; ILK produced an intermediate level of inhibition, which was considerably reduced for the Thr(695)-->Ala mutant; and PKA had no effect. In summary, phosphorylation of the various sites indicated that Thr(695) was the major inhibitory site, Thr(709) had only a slight inhibitory effect and Ser(694) had no effect. The findings that ILK phosphorylated both MYPT1 and myosin and the association of ILK with MP suggest that ILK may influence cytoskeletal structure or function.

  5. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  6. Induction of mitogen-activated protein kinases is proportional to the amount of pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Giovanni; Perrino, Cinzia; Schiattarella, Gabriele Giacomo; Belardo, Lorena; di Pietro, Elisa; Franzone, Anna; Capretti, Giuliana; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pironti, Gianluigi; Cannavo, Alessandro; Sannino, Anna; Izzo, Raffaele; Chiariello, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Pressure overload has been shown to induce mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and reactivate the atrial natriuretic factor in the heart. To test the sensitivity of these signals to pressure overload, we assayed the activity of MAPKs extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1, and p38 in protein lysates from the left ventricle (LV) or white blood cells (WBC) isolated from aortic banded mice with varying levels of pressure overload. In separated mice we measured atrial natriuretic factor mRNA levels by Northern blotting. As expected, a significant induction of atrial natriuretic factor mRNA levels was observed after aortic banding, and it significantly correlated with the trans-stenotic systolic pressure gradient but not with the LV weight:body weight ratio. In contrast, a significant correlation with systolic pressure gradient or LV weight:body weight ratio was observed for all of the MAPK activity detected in LV samples or WBCs. Importantly, LV activation of MAPKs significantly correlated with their activation in WBCs from the same animal. To test whether MAPK activation in WBCs might reflect uncontrolled blood pressure levels in humans, we assayed extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1, and p38 activation in WBCs isolated from normotensive volunteers, hypertensive patients with controlled blood pressure values, or hypertensive patients with uncontrolled blood pressure values. Interestingly, in hypertensive patients with controlled blood pressure values, LV mass and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation were significantly reduced compared with those in hypertensive patients with uncontrolled blood pressure values. These results suggest that MAPKs are sensors of pressure overload and that extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in WBCs might be used as a novel surrogate biomarker of uncontrolled human hypertension.

  7. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ. C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ has noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems. PMID:26489410

  8. Solubilization and characterization of a novel tyrosine kinase from rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yagaloff, K.A.; Czech, M.P.

    1987-05-01

    The authors report the efficient solubilization and characterization of a Triton X-100 insoluble tyrosine kinase from rat adipocytes. Plasma membranes were prepared from rat epididymal fat pads and were solubilized in 1% Triton X-100. Following centrifugation, the pellet was solubilized for 15 min at 4C using both ionic and non-ionic detergents. Tyrosine kinase activity was measured in the soluble and particulate fractions using the exogenous substrate poly(glu-tyr) in a TCA precipitation assay. Reactions were performed in 50mM Hepes, 10mM MgCl2 and 100 M gamma(TSP)-ATP (10Ci/mmol) at 4C with or without 1mg/ml of the polyaminoacid. Incorporation rates of 100 to 1000 pmol/min/mg were obtained, while endogenous (TSP) incorporation was typically less than 10% of that in the presence of poly(glu-tyr). More than 75% of the tyrosine kinase activity was recovered in the soluble supernatant using this assay methodology. The solubilized tyrosine kinase was found to require MgS or MnS but preferred MgS and was inhibited by high levels of MnS . Kinase activity was strongly inhibited by CaS (>50% at 1mM), NaCl (>50% at 250mM) and NH4SO4 (>50% at 50mM) but was activated by 10 M heparin and 5mM dithiothreitol. These properties distinguish the solubilized tyrosine kinase from other cellular tyrosine kinases.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  10. An inhibitor-driven study for enhancing the selectivity of indirubin derivatives towards leishmanial Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 over leishmanial cdc2-related protein kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, Antonia; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Smirlis, Despina; Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Alexandratos, Alexandros; Kritsanida, Marina; Mikros, Emmanuel; Soteriadou, Ketty; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2014-05-20

    In search of new antiparasitic agents for overcoming the limitations of current leishmaniasis chemotherapy, we have previously shown that 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (6BIO) and several other 6-substituted analogues of indirubin, a naturally occurring bis-indole present in mollusks and plants, displayed reverse selectivity from the respective mammalian kinases, targeting more potently the leishmanial Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-1 (CDK1) homologue [cdc2-related protein kinase 3 (LCRK3)] over leishmanial Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (LGSK-3). This reversal of selectivity in Leishmania parasites compared to mammalian cells makes the design of specific indirubin-based LGSK-3 inhibitors difficult. In this context, the identification of compounds bearing specific substitutions that shift indirubin inhibition towards LGSK-3, previously found to be a potential drug target, over LCRK3 is imperative for antileishmanial targeted drug discovery. A new in-house indirubin library, composed of 35 compounds, initially designed to target mammalian kinases (CDKs, GSK-3), was tested against Leishmania donovani promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes using the Alamar blue assay. Indirubins with antileishmanial activity were tested against LGSK-3 and LCRK3 kinases, purified from homologous expression systems. Flow cytometry (FACS) was used to measure the DNA content for cell-cycle analysis and the mode of cell death. Comparative structural analysis of the involved kinases was then performed using the Szmap algorithm. We have identified 7 new indirubin analogues that are selective inhibitors of LGSK-3 over LCRK3. These new inhibitors were also found to display potent antileishmanial activity with GI50 values of <1.5 μΜ. Surprisingly, all the compounds that displayed enhanced selectivity towards LGSK-3, were 6BIO analogues bearing an additional 3'-bulky amino substitution, namely a piperazine or pyrrolidine ring. A comparative structural analysis of the two aforementioned leishmanial

  11. Helicobacter pylori cell translocating kinase (CtkA/JHP0940) is pro-apoptotic in mouse macrophages and acts as auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Tenguria, Shivendra; Ansari, Suhail A; Khan, Nooruddin; Ranjan, Amit; Devi, Savita; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Lind, Judith; Backert, Steffen; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2014-11-01

    The Helicobacter pylori gene JHP0940 has been shown to encode a serine/threonine kinase which can induce cytokines in gastric epithelial cells relevant to chronic gastric inflammation. Here we demonstrate that JHP0940 can be secreted by the bacteria, triggers apoptosis in cultured mouse macrophages and acts as an auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinase. Recombinant JHP0940 protein was found to decrease the viability of RAW264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line) up to 55% within 24h of co-incubation. The decreased cellular viability was due to apoptosis, which was confirmed by TUNEL assay and Fas expression analysis by flow-cytometry. Further, we found that caspase-1 and IL-1beta were activated upon treatment with JHP0940. These results point towards possible action through the host inflammasome. Our in vitro studies using tyrosine kinase assays further demonstrated that JHP0940 acts as auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinase and induces pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW264.7 cells. Upon exposure with JHP0940, these cells secreted IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as detected by ELISA and transcript profiling by q-RT-PCR. The pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and other regulatory responses triggered by JHP0940 lead to the assumption of its possible role in inducing chronic inflammation for enhanced bacterial persistence and escape from host innate immune responses by apoptosis of macrophages.

  12. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  13. Radioimmunoassay for herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    McGuirt, P.V.; Keller, P.M.; Elion, G.B.

    1982-01-30

    A sensitive RIA for HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) has been developed. This assay is based on competition for the binding site of a rabbit antibody against purified HSV-1 TK, between a purified /sup 3/H-labeled HSV-1 TK and a sample containing an unknown amount of viral TK. The assay is capable of detecting 8 ng or more of the HSV enzyme. Purified HSV-1 TK denatured to <1% of its original kinase activity is as effective in binding to the antibody as is native HSV-1 TK. Viral TK is detectable at ranges of 150-460 ng/mg protein of cell extract from infected cells or cells transformed by HSV or HSV genetic material. HSV-2 TK appears highly cross-reactive, VZV TK is slightly less so, and the vaccinia TK shows little or no cross-reactivity. This RIA may serve as a tool for monitoring the expression of the HSV TK during an active herpes virus infection, a latent ganglionic infection, or in neoplastic cells which may have arisen by viral transformation.

  14. Using ovality to predict nonmutagenic, orally efficacious pyridazine amides as cell specific spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Matthew C; Bhagirath, Niala; Chiao, Eric; Goldstein, David M; Hermann, Johannes C; Hsu, Pei-Yuan; Kirchner, Stephan; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lukacs, Christine; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Padilla, Fernando; Peng, Ying; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Railkar, Aruna; Slade, Michelle; Soth, Michael; Xu, Daigen; Yadava, Preeti; Yee, Calvin; Zhou, Mingyan; Liao, Cheng

    2014-03-27

    Inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase has attracted much attention as a mechanism for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. We report the structure-guided optimization of pyridazine amide spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early representatives of this scaffold were highly potent and selective but mutagenic in an Ames assay. An approach that led to the successful identification of nonmutagenic examples, as well as further optimization to compounds with reduced cardiovascular liabilities is described. Select pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data are presented.

  15. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  16. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  17. Specific immune responses against epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Vanessa; Egenrieder, Stephanie; Götz, Marlies; Herbst, Cornelia; Greiner, Jochen; Hofmann, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases which play an important role in the process of mitosis and cell cycle regulation. Aurora kinase inhibitors are described to sensitize malignant cells to cytosine arabinoside and specific antibodies by mediating apoptosis. Aurora kinases are overexpressed in most acute leukemias but also in solid tumors. In this study we investigated whether epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B are able to elicit cellular immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to investigate their role as potential targets for specific immunotherapy. Samples of eight patients with AML were analyzed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays and compared with immune responses of nine healthy volunteers (HVs). Specific CD8 + T cell responses were detected against the epitopes Aura A1, A2, B1, B2, B3, B4 and B5. Immune responses for epitopes derived from Aura B were induced more frequently compared to Aura A. The antigens with the most frequent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses were Aura B3, B4 and B5, although the number of patients tested for these antigens was low. Aura B5 did not elicit specific CTL responses in HVs. For epitope Aura B6 no immune response was detected in HVs or patients. Taken together, with the combination of Aurora kinase inhibitors and an immunotherapeutic approach, an effective blast and minimal residual disease elimination might be achieved.

  18. Protein kinase CK2 triggers cytosolic zinc signaling pathways by phosphorylation of zinc channel ZIP7.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn M; Hiscox, Stephen; Nicholson, Robert I; Hogstrand, Christer; Kille, Peter

    2012-02-07

    The transition element zinc, which has recently been identified as an intracellular second messenger, has been implicated in various signaling pathways, including those leading to cell proliferation. Zinc channels of the ZIP (ZRT1- and IRT1-like protein) family [also known as solute carrier family 39A (SLC39A)] transiently increase the cytosolic free zinc (Zn(2+)) concentration in response to extracellular signals. We show that phosphorylation of evolutionarily conserved residues in endoplasmic reticulum zinc channel ZIP7 is associated with the gated release of Zn(2+) from intracellular stores, leading to activation of tyrosine kinases and the phosphorylation of AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2. Through pharmacological manipulation, proximity ligation assay, and mutagenesis, we identified protein kinase CK2 as the kinase responsible for ZIP7 activation. Together, the present results show that transition element channels in eukaryotes can be activated posttranslationally by phosphorylation, as part of a cell signaling cascade. Our study links the regulated release of zinc from intracellular stores to phosphorylation of kinases involved in proliferative responses and cell migration, suggesting a functional role for ZIP7 and zinc signals in these events. The connection with proliferation and migration, as well as the activation of ZIP7 by CK2, a kinase that is antiapoptotic and promotes cell division, suggests that ZIP7 may provide a target for anticancer drug development.

  19. Model of inhibition of the NPM-ALK kinase activity by herbimycin A.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Francesco; Arnold, Marilyn D; Frist, Audrey Y; Pulford, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) exhibiting the t(2;5) translocation is characterized by the resulting expression of the oncogenic fusion protein nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) gene product. The ALK domain of NPM-ALK contains kinase activity, which is responsible for the autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues of the oncogenic protein and phosphorylation of SH2-protein substrates. Herbimycin A is a general protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor active as an antiproliferative compound against different types of mammalian cells. Herbimycin A inhibited the NPM-ALK-associated autophosphorylating activity in an in vitro cell-free kinase assay. The inhibition was specific when tested against other kinase inhibitors and extended to other cell lines derived from t(2;5)-ALCL. SUDHL-1 cells showed increasing percentage of cells in G(1) after 18 h of incubation with a dose of herbimycin A. NPM-ALK, Akt, and pAkt were down-regulated after 24 h of incubation with herbimycin A. Apoptosis was observed only if the dose of inhibitor was given every 12 h for prolonged time. Our results show that herbimycin A interferes with NPM-ALK and Akt pathways in SUDHL-1 cells. It seems that prolonged inhibition of these biochemical pathways may lead to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This study supports the idea of investigating protein kinase inhibitors as therapeutic compounds for t(2;5)-ALCL.

  20. Design, synthesis and characterization of a highly effective inhibitor for analog-sensitive (as) kinases.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michael; Morillas, Montse; Vendrell, Alexandre; Brive, Lars; Gebbia, Marinella; Wallace, Iain M; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Posas, Francesc; Grøtli, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Highly selective, cell-permeable and fast-acting inhibitors of individual kinases are sought-after as tools for studying the cellular function of kinases in real time. A combination of small molecule synthesis and protein mutagenesis, identified a highly potent inhibitor (1-Isopropyl-3-(phenylethynyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine) of a rationally engineered Hog1 serine/threonine kinase (Hog1(T100G)). This inhibitor has been successfully used to study various aspects of Hog1 signaling, including a transient cell cycle arrest and gene expression changes mediated by Hog1 in response to stress. This study also underscores that the general applicability of this approach depends, in part, on the selectivity of the designed the inhibitor with respect to activity versus the engineered and wild type kinases. To explore this specificity in detail, we used a validated chemogenetic assay to assess the effect of this inhibitor on all gene products in yeast in parallel. The results from this screen emphasize the need for caution and for case-by-case assessment when using the Analog-Sensitive Kinase Allele technology to assess the physiological roles of kinases.

  1. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  2. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubule cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, N J; Stuart, J; Tobin, A B; Walls, J; Nahorski, S

    1998-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin is an important function of the kidney proximal tubule epithelium. We have measured endocytosis of [125I]-albumin in opossum kidney cells and examined the regulation of this process by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Albumin endocytosis was inhibited by both wortmannin (IC50 6.9 nM) and LY294002 (IC50 6.5 microM) at concentrations that suggested the involvement of PI 3-kinase in its regulation. Recycling rates were unaffected. We transfected OK cells with either a wild-type p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, or a dominant negative form of the p85 subunit (Deltap85) using the LacSwitch expression system. Transfects were screened by immunoblotting with anti-PI 3-kinase antibodies. Under basal conditions, transfects demonstrated no expression of p85 or Deltap85, but expression was briskly induced by treatment of the cells with IPTG (EC50 13.7 microM). Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity by Deltap85 was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay of anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from transfected cells stimulated with insulin. Expression of Deltap85 resulted in marked inhibition of albumin endocytosis, predominantly as a result of reduction of the Vmax of the transport process. Expression of p85 had no significant effect on albumin uptake. The results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase regulates an early step in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubular cells. PMID:9593770

  3. Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates S6 phosphorylation and induced activation of S6 protein kinase in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, C.; Okabayashi, Y.; Williams, J.

    1987-05-01

    CCK and insulin stimulate pancreatic protein synthesis at a post transcriptional step. To better understand this regulation the authors evaluated the phosphorylation state of ribosomal protein S6 and the presence of a specific S6 protein kinase in pancreatic acini from diabetic rats. Both CCK and insulin increased S6 phosphorylation by up to 400% in intact TSP-labelled acini. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate also stimulated both protein synthesis and S6 phosphorlyation suggesting a role for protein kinase C in mediating the effect of CCK. By contrast, the CaS ionophore ionomycin had no effect on either parameter. Recently, insulin has been shown to activate a unique S6 kinase in various cells. To test for its presence, cytosolic extracts were prepared from acini stimulated with CCK and insulin by homogenization in US -glycerophosphate buffer and assayed for the kinase using el-TSP ATP and rat pancreatic ribosomes followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CCK and insulin both increased S6 kinase activity which required neither CaS or phospholipid. The dose response for CCk was similar to S6 phosphorlyation in the intact acini. TPA did not stimulate the S6 kinase. Thus, CCK may induce S6 phosphorylation both via C kinase and by activation of a unique S6 kinase.

  4. An anticancer C-Kit kinase inhibitor is reengineered to make it more active and less cardiotoxic

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ariel; Sanguino, Angela; Peng, Zhenghong; Ozturk, Eylem; Chen, Jianping; Crespo, Alejandro; Wulf, Sarah; Shavrin, Aleksander; Qin, Chaoping; Ma, Jianpeng; Trent, Jonathan; Lin, Yvonne; Han, Hee-Dong; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri; Samarel, Allen; Bornmann, William; Sood, Anil K.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Targeting kinases is central to drug-based cancer therapy but remains challenging because the drugs often lack specificity, which may cause toxic side effects. Modulating side effects is difficult because kinases are evolutionarily and hence structurally related. The lack of specificity of the anticancer drug imatinib enables it to be used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia, where its target is the Bcr-Abl kinase, as well as a proportion of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), where its target is the C-Kit kinase. However, imatinib also has cardiotoxic effects traceable to its impact on the C-Abl kinase. Motivated by this finding, we made a modification to imatinib that hampers Bcr-Abl inhibition; refocuses the impact on the C-Kit kinase; and promotes inhibition of an additional target, JNK, a change that is required to reinforce prevention of cardiotoxicity. We established the molecular blueprint for target discrimination in vitro using spectrophotometric and colorimetric assays and through a phage-displayed kinase screening library. We demonstrated controlled inhibitory impact on C-Kit kinase in human cell lines and established the therapeutic impact of the engineered compound in a novel GIST mouse model, revealing a marked reduction of cardiotoxicity. These findings identify the reengineered imatinib as an agent to treat GISTs with curbed side effects and reveal a bottom-up approach to control drug specificity. PMID:18060038

  5. Combined inhibition of AXL, Lyn and p130Cas kinases block migration of triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pénzes, Kinga; Baumann, Christine; Szabadkai, István; Őrfi, László; Kéri, György; Ullrich, Axel; Torka, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the migration of metastatic cancer cells is a major goal in the therapy of cancer. The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is one of the main triggers for cancer cell migration in neoplasia of breast, colon, skin, thyroid and prostate. In our study we analyzed the effect of AXL inhibition on cell motility and viability in triple negative breast cancer cell lines overexpressing AXL. Thereby we reveal that the compound BMS777607, exhibiting the lowest IC50 values for inhibition of AXL kinase activity in the studied cell lines, attenuates cell motility to a lower extent than the kinase inhibitors MPCD84111 and SKI606. By analyzing the target kinases of MPCD84111 and SKI606 with kinase profiling assays we identified Lyn, a Src family kinase, as a target of both compounds. Knockdown of Lyn and the migration-related CRK-associated substrate (p130Cas), had a significant inhibitory effect on cell migration. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of combinatorial or multikinase inhibition of non-receptor tyrosine kinases and AXL receptor tyrosine kinase in the therapy of triple negative breast cancer. PMID:25482942

  6. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays.

  7. Protein kinase Cepsilon is important for migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Stensman, Helena; Larsson, Christer

    2008-01-01

    Background Migration is important for the metastatic capacity and thus for the malignancy of cancer cells. There is limited knowledge on regulatory factors that promote the migration of neuroblastoma cells. This study investigates the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms regulate neuroblastoma cell motility. Methods PKC isoforms were downregulated with siRNA or modulated with activators and inhibitors. Migration was analyzed with scratch and transwell assays. Protein phosphorylation and expression levels were measured with Western blot. Results Stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Treatment with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the inhibitor of classical isoforms Gö6976 inhibited migration while an inhibitor of PKCβ isoforms did not have an effect. Downregulation of PKCε, but not of PKCα or PKCδ, with siRNA led to a suppression of both basal and TPA-stimulated migration. Experiments using PD98059 and LY294002, inhibitors of the Erk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, respectively, showed that PI3K is not necessary for TPA-induced migration. The Erk pathway might be involved in TPA-induced migration but not in migration driven by PKCε. TPA induced phosphorylation of the PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) which was suppressed by the PKC inhibitors. Treatment with siRNA oligonucleotides against different PKC isoforms before stimulation with TPA did not influence the phosphorylation of MARCKS. Conclusion PKCε is important for migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Neither the Erk pathway nor MARCKS are critical downstream targets of PKCε but they may be involved in TPA-mediated migration. PMID:19077250

  8. The in vivo inactivation of MASTL kinase results in thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Jan; Gandhi, Manish J.; Shafizadeh, Ebrahim; Langer, Nathaniel B.; Pierce, Eric L.; Paw, Barry H.; Gilligan, Diana M.; Drachman, Jonathan G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective A missense mutation in the Microtubule Associated Serine/Threonine Like kinase gene (MASTL, FLJ14813) on human chromosome 10 was previously linked to a novel form of autosomal dominant inherited thrombocytopenia in a single pedigree. The mutation results in an amino acid change from glutamic acid at position 167 to aspartic acid and segregates perfectly with thrombocytopenic individuals within this extended family. The phenotype is characterized by mild thrombocytopenia with an average platelet count of 60,000 platelets per microliter of blood. We wanted to determine the expression and localization of MASTL, as well as its role in developing thrombocytes using an in vivo model system. Methods Northern blot analysis allowed us to examine expression patterns. Morpholino knockdown assays in zebrafish (Danio rerio) were employed to determine in vivo contribution to thrombocyte development. Transient expression in BHK cells resulted in localization of both the wild type and E167D mutant forms of MASTL kinase to the nucleus. Results Northern blot analysis indicates that MASTL mRNA is restricted in its expression to hematopoietic and cancer cell lines. A transient knockdown of MASTL in zebrafish results in deficiency of circulating thrombocytes. Transient expression of recombinant MASTL kinase in vitro demonstrates localization to the nucleus. Conclusions: Functional studies presented here demonstrate a direct relationship between the transient knockdown of the MASTL kinase expression and the reduction of circulating thrombocytes in zebrafish. This transient knockdown of MASTL in zebrafish correlates with a decrease in the expression of the thrombopoietin receptor, c-mpl, and the CD41 platelet adhesion protein, GpIIb, but has no effect on essential housekeeping zebrafish gene, EF1α. PMID:19460416

  9. Fer kinase limits neutrophil chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants.

    PubMed

    Khajah, Maitham; Andonegui, Graciela; Chan, Ronald; Craig, Andrew W; Greer, Peter A; McCafferty, Donna-Marie

    2013-03-01

    Neutrophil recruitment and directional movement toward chemotactic stimuli are important processes in innate immune responses. This study examines the role of Fer kinase in neutrophil recruitment and chemotaxis to various chemoattractants in vitro and in vivo. Mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation (Fer(DR/DR)) or wild type (WT) were studied using time-lapse intravital microscopy to examine leukocyte recruitment and chemotaxis in vivo. In response to keratinocyte-derived cytokine, no difference in leukocyte chemotaxis was observed between WT and Fer(DR/DR) mice. However, in response to the chemotactic peptide WKYMVm, a selective agonist of the formyl peptide receptor, a 2-fold increase in leukocyte emigration was noted in Fer(DR/DR) mice (p < 0.05). To determine whether these defects were due to Fer signaling in the endothelium or other nonhematopoietic cells, bone marrow chimeras were generated. WKYMVm-induced leukocyte recruitment in chimeric mice (WT bone marrow to Fer(DR/DR) recipients or vice versa) was similar to WT mice, suggesting that Fer kinase signaling in both leukocytes and endothelial cells serves to limit chemotaxis. Purified Fer(DR/DR) neutrophils demonstrated enhanced chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants (WKYMVm and C5a) compared with WT using an under-agarose gel chemotaxis assay. These defects were not observed in response to intermediate chemoattractants (keratinocyte-derived cytokine, MIP-2, or LTB(4)). Increased WKYMVm-induced chemotaxis of Fer(DR/DR) neutrophils correlated with sustained PI3K activity and reduced reliance on the p38 MAPK pathway compared with WT neutrophils. Together, these data identify Fer as a novel inhibitory kinase for neutrophil chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants through modulation of PI3K activity.

  10. Inhibitory activity for the interferon-induced protein kinase is associated with the reovirus serotype 1 sigma 3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imani, F; Jacobs, B L

    1988-01-01

    In this report we demonstrate that reovirus serotype 1-infected cells contain an inhibitor of the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase. We provide evidence that suggests that the virus-encoded sigma 3 protein is likely responsible for this kinase inhibitory activity. We could not detect activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated reovirus serotype 1-infected mouse L cells under conditions that led to activation of the kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated, uninfected cells. Extracts from reovirus-infected cells blocked activation of kinase in extracts from interferon-treated cells when the two were mixed prior to assay. The kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of reovirus-infected cells could be overcome by adding approximately 100-fold excess of dsRNA over the amount required to activate kinase in extracts of uninfected cells. Kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of interferon-treated, virus-infected cells could be overcome with somewhat less dsRNA (approximately 10-fold excess). Most of the inhibitory activity in the extracts could be removed by adsorption with immobilized anti-reovirus sigma 3 serum or immobilized dsRNA, suggesting that the dsRNA-binding sigma 3 protein is necessary for kinase inhibitory activity. Purified sigma 3 protein, when added to reaction mixtures containing partially purified kinase, inhibited enzyme activation. Control of activation of this kinase, which can modify eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 2, may be relevant to the sensitivity of reovirus replication to treatment of cells with interferon and to the shutoff of host protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2460857

  11. Arachidonic acid-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction through activation of Rho-kinase.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Ito, M; Kureishi, Y; Feng, J; Machida, H; Isaka, N; Amano, M; Kaibuchi, K; Hartshorne, D J; Nakano, T

    2001-02-01

    Arachidonic acid activates isolated Rho-kinase and contracts permeabilized smooth muscle fibres. Various assays were carried out to examine the mechanism of this activation. Native Rho-kinase was activated 5-6 times by arachidonic acid but an N-terminal, constitutively-active fragment of Rho-kinase, expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein and including the catalytic subunit (GST-Rho-kinase-CAT), was not. GST-Rho-kinase-CAT was inhibited by a C-terminal fragment of Rho-kinase and arachidonic acid removed this inhibition. These results suggest that the C-terminal part of Rho-kinase, containing the RhoA binding site and the pleckstrin homology domain, acts as an autoinhibitor. It is suggested further that activation by arachidonic acid is due to its binding to the autoinhibitory region and subsequent release from the catalytic site. Arachidonic acid, at concentrations greater than 30 microM, increases force in alpha-toxin-permeabilized femoral artery but not in Triton X-100-skinned fibres. The content of Rho-kinase in the latter was lower than in alpha-toxin-treated or intact fibres. The arachidonic acid-induced contraction was not observed at a pCa above 8.0 and was inhibited by Y-27632 and wortmannin, inhibitors of Rho-kinase and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), respectively. The activation of Rho-kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit inhibits myosin phosphatase and increases myosin phosphorylation.

  12. Use of a special Brazilian red-light emitting railroad worm Luciferase in bioassays of NEK7 protein Kinase and Creatine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Marina Perez, Arina; Aquino, Bruno; Viviani, Vadim; Kobarg, Jörg

    2017-07-19

    Luciferases, enzymes that catalyze bioluminescent reactions in different organisms, have been extensively used for bioanalytical purposes. The most well studied bioluminescent system is that of firefly and other beetles, which depends on a luciferase, a benzothiazolic luciferin and ATP, and it is being widely used as a bioanalytical reagent to quantify ATP. Protein kinases are proteins that modify other proteins by transferring phosphate groups from a nucleoside triphosphate, usually ATP. Here, we used a red-light emitting luciferase from Phrixotrix hirtus railroad worm to determine the activity of kinases in a coupled assay, based on luminescence that is generated when luciferase is in the presence of its substrate, the luciferin, and ATP. In this work we used, after several optimization reactions, creatine kinase isoforms as well as NEK7 protein kinase in the absence or presence of ATP analogous inhibitors  to validate this new luminescence method. With this new approach we validated a luminescence method to quantify kinase activity, with different substrates and inhibition screening tests, using a novel red-light emitting luciferase as a reporter enzyme.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5)-mediated signalling cascade regulates expression of iron superoxide dismutase gene in Arabidopsis under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yu; Chen, Wei-hua; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are involved in plant adaptive responses to biotic and abiotic stresses but the upstream signalling process that modulates their expression is not clear. Expression of two iron SODs, FSD2 and FSD3, was significantly increased in Arabidopsis in response to NaCl treatment but blocked in transgenic MKK5-RNAi plant, mkk5. Using an assay system for transient expression in protoplasts, it was found that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5) was also activated in response to salt stress. Overexpression of MKK5 in wild-type plants enhanced their tolerance to salt treatments, while mkk5 mutant exhibited hypersensitivity to salt stress in germination on salt-containing media. Moreover, another kinase, MPK6, was also involved in the MKK5-mediated iron superoxide dismutase (FSD) signalling pathway in salt stress. The kinase activity of MPK6 was totally turned off in mkk5, whereas the activity of MPK3 was only partially blocked. MKK5 interacted with the MEKK1 protein that was also involved in the salt-induced FSD signalling pathway. These data suggest that salt-induced FSD2 and FSD3 expressions are influenced by MEKK1 via MKK5-MPK6-coupled signalling. This MAP kinase cascade (MEKK1, MKK5, and MPK6) mediates the salt-induced expression of iron superoxide dismutases.

  14. Structure-Based Design of an Organoruthenium Phosphatidyl-inositol-3-Kinase Inhibitor Reveals a Switch Governing Lipid Kinase Potency and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Xie,P.; Williams, D.; Atilla-Gokcumen, G.; Milk, L.; Xiao, M.; Smalley, K.; Herlyn, M.; Meggers, E.; Marmorstein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations that constitutively activate the phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway, including alterations in PI3K, PTEN, and AKT, are found in a variety of human cancers, implicating the PI3K lipid kinase as an attractive target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat cancer and other related diseases. In this study, we report on the combination of a novel organometallic kinase inhibitor scaffold with structure-based design to develop a PI3K inhibitor, called E5E2, with an IC50 potency in the mid-low-nanomolar range and selectivity against a panel of protein kinases. We also show that E5E2 inhibits phospho-AKT in human melanoma cells and leads to growth inhibition. Consistent with a role for the PI3K pathway in tumor cell invasion, E5E2 treatment also inhibits the migration of melanoma cells in a 3D spheroid assay. The structure of the PI3K?/E5E2 complex reveals the molecular features that give rise to this potency and selectivity toward lipid kinases with implications for the design of a subsequent generation of PI3K-isoform-specific organometallic inhibitors.

  15. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  16. Discovery and characterization of non-ATP site inhibitors of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases.

    PubMed

    Comess, Kenneth M; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R; Gum, Rebecca J; Borhani, David W; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E; Haasch, Deanna L; Smith, Harriet T; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L; Cloutier, Timothy E; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J; Calderwood, David J; Hajduk, Philip J

    2011-03-18

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38α (involved in the formation of TNFα and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38α both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in similar fashion to Jnk-1 si

  17. Aurora kinase inhibitors as anticancer molecules.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed at detectable levels in all somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases leads to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Preclinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed.

  18. Protein kinase C-associated kinase can activate NFkappaB in both a kinase-dependent and a kinase-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Moran, Stewart T; Haider, Khaleda; Ow, Yongkai; Milton, Peter; Chen, Luojing; Pillai, Shiv

    2003-06-13

    Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK, also known as RIP4/DIK) activates NFkappaB when overexpressed in cell lines and is required for keratinocyte differentiation in vivo. However, very little is understood about the factors upstream of PKK or how PKK activates NFkappaB. Here we show that certain catalytically inactive mutants of PKK can activate NFkappaB, although to a lesser degree than wild type PKK. The deletion of specific domains of wild type PKK diminishes the ability of this enzyme to activate NFkappaB; the same deletions made on a catalytically inactive PKK background completely ablate NFkappaB activation. PKK may be phosphorylated by two specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases, MEKK2 and MEKK3, and this interaction may in part be mediated through a critical activation loop residue, Thr184. Catalytically inactive PKK mutants that block phorbol ester-induced NFkappaB activation do not interfere with, but unexpectedly enhance, the activation of NFkappaB by these two mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases. Taken together, these data indicate that PKK may function in both a kinase-dependent as well as a kinase-independent manner to activate NFkappaB.

  19. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Xin

    2017-08-31

    Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases), Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1), BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1), MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases), mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1), AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase) and protein kinase B (AKT). By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  20. Aurora Kinase inhibitors as Anticancer Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed in detectable levels in somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases lead to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Pre-clinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed. PMID:20863917

  1. Immunochemical characterization of rat brain protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.; Huang, F.L.

    1986-11-05

    Polyclonal antibodies against rat brain protein kinase C (the Ca/sup 2 +//phospholipid-dependent enzyme) were raised in goat. These antibodies can neutralize completely the kinase activity in purified enzyme preparation as well as that in the crude homogenate. Immunoblot analysis of the purified and the crude protein kinase C preparations revealed a major immunoreactive band of 80 kDa. The antibodies also recognize the same enzyme from other rat tissues. Neuronal tissues (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, and retina) and lymphoid organs (thymus and spleen) were found to be enriched in protein kinase C, whereas lung, kidney, liver, heart, and skeletal muscle contained relatively low amounts of this kinase. Limited proteolysis of the purified rat brain protein kinase C with trypsin results in an initial degradation of the kinase into two major fragments of 48 and 38 kDa. Both fragments are recognized by the antibodies. However, further digestion of the 48-kDa fragment to 45 kDa and the 38-kDa fragment to 33 kDa causes a loss of the immunoreactivity. Upon incubation of the cerebellar extract with Ca/sup 2 +/, the 48-kDa fragment was also identified as a major proteolytic product of protein kinase C. Proteolytic degradation of protein kinase C converts the Ca/sup 2 +//phospholipid-dependent kinase to an independent form without causing a large impairment of the binding of (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. The two major proteolytic fragments were separated by ion exchange chromatography and one of them (45-48 kDa) was identified as a protein kinase and the other (33-38 kDa) as a phorbol ester-binding protein. These results demonstrate that rat brain protein kinase C is composed of two functionally distinct units, namely, a protein kinase and a Ca/sup 2 +/-independent/phospholipid-dependent phorbol ester-binding protein.

  2. Fission yeast LAMMER kinase Lkh1 regulates the cell cycle by phosphorylating the CDK-inhibitor Rum1

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Eun-Young; Lee, Ju-Hee; Kang, Won-Hwa; Park, Yun-Hee; Kim, Lila; Park, Hee-Moon

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Deletion of lkh1{sup +} made cells pass the G1/S phase faster than the wild type. ► Lkh1 can interact with a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) Rum1. ► Lkh1 can phosphorylate Rum1 to activate its CKI activity. ► Thr110 was confirmed as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation site of Rum1. ► Positive acting mechanism for the Rum1 activation is reported for the first time. - Abstract: In eukaryotes, LAMMER kinases are involved in various cellular events, including the cell cycle. However, no attempt has been made to investigate the mechanisms that underlie the involvement of LAMMER kinase. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of LAMMER kinase using the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. FACS analyses revealed that deletion of the gene that encodes the LAMMER kinase Lkh1 made mutant cells pass through the G1/S phase faster than their wild-type counterparts. Co-immunoprecipitation and an in vitro kinase assay also revealed that Lkh1 can interact with and phosphorylate Rum1 to activate this molecule as a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which blocks cell cycle progression from the G1 phase to the S phase. Peptide mass fingerprinting and kinase assay with Rum1{sup T110A} confirmed T110 as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation residue. In this report we present for the first time a positive acting mechanism that is responsible for the CKI activity of Rum1, in which the LAMMER kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Rum1 is involved.

  3. Oestradiol assays: fitness for purpose?

    PubMed

    Middle, Jonathan G; Kane, John W

    2009-11-01

    In this review we discuss the analytical inadequacies of oestradiol assays in relation to the clinical requirements for performing them, and make recommendations for their improvement. The measurement of oestradiol can be requested in a number of clinical scenarios (precocious puberty, infertility, assisted conception, hormone replacement therapy). The very wide dynamic range of oestradiol concentrations is a huge challenge for routine assays, which they are unlikely to meet on theoretical as well as practical grounds. The EQA performance of oestradiol assays in terms of trueness, comparability, recovery and analytical sensitivity leaves much to be desired and indicates that calibration is compromised by poor analytical specificity. To make oestradiol assays fit for purpose requires concerted action by all stakeholders to define analytical quality specifications for the various clinical scenarios involved, and then to encourage concerted action by the diagnostic industry to use the steroid reference measurement system to improve specificity, trueness and traceability.

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase: enzymatic assays.

    PubMed

    Montalibet, Jacqueline; Skorey, Kathryn I; Kennedy, Brian P

    2005-01-01

    Activity assays for tyrosine phosphatases are based on the hydrolysis of a arylphosphate moiety from a synthetic substrate yielding a spectroscopically active product. Many different substrates can be used for these assays with p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), fluorescein diphosphate (FDP), and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbellyferyl phosphate (DiFMUP) being the most efficient and versatile. Equally, larger molecules such as phosphotyrosyl peptides can also be used to mimic more natural substrates. Activity assays include the determinations of the rate of dephosphorylation and calculations of kinetic constants such as k(cat) and K(M). These assays are useful to identify and characterize tyrosine phosphatases and are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of inhibitors.

  5. Leptin augments coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation via a Rho-kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Jillian N; Goodwill, Adam G; Sassoon, Daniel J; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2016-05-01

    Leptin has been implicated as a key upstream mediator of pathways associated with coronary vascular dysfunction and disease. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that leptin modifies the coronary artery proteome and promotes increases in coronary smooth muscle contraction and proliferation via influences on Rho kinase signaling. Global proteomic assessment of coronary arteries from lean swine cultured with obese concentrations of leptin (30 ng/mL) for 3 days revealed significant alterations in the coronary artery proteome (68 proteins) and identified an association between leptin treatment and calcium signaling/contraction (four proteins) and cellular growth and proliferation (35 proteins). Isometric tension studies demonstrated that both acute (30 min) and chronic (3 days, serum-free media) exposure to obese concentrations of leptin potentiated depolarization-induced contraction of coronary arteries. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced leptin-mediated increases in coronary artery contractions. The effects of leptin on the functional expression of Rho kinase were time-dependent, as acute treatment increased Rho kinase activity while chronic (3 day) exposure was associated with increases in Rho kinase protein abundance. Proliferation assays following chronic leptin administration (8 day, serum-containing media) demonstrated that leptin augmented coronary vascular smooth muscle proliferation and increased Rho kinase activity. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced these effects of leptin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes increases in coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation and indicate that these phenotypic effects are associated with alterations in the coronary artery proteome and dynamic effects on the Rho kinase pathway.

  6. An unbiased approach to identifying tau kinases that phosphorylate tau at sites associated with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Annalisa; Brewerton, Suzanne; Bell, Amanda; Sargent, Samantha; Glover, Sarah; Hardy, Clare; Moore, Roger; Calley, John; Ramachandran, Devaki; Poidinger, Michael; Karran, Eric; Davies, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Bose, Suchira

    2013-08-09

    Neurofibrillary tangles, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), are composed of paired helical filaments of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. The accumulation of these proteinaceous aggregates in AD correlates with synaptic loss and severity of dementia. Identifying the kinases involved in the pathological phosphorylation of tau may identify novel targets for AD. We used an unbiased approach to study the effect of 352 human kinases on their ability to phosphorylate tau at epitopes associated with AD. The kinases were overexpressed together with the longest form of human tau in human neuroblastoma cells. Levels of total and phosphorylated tau (epitopes Ser(P)-202, Thr(P)-231, Ser(P)-235, and Ser(P)-396/404) were measured in cell lysates using AlphaScreen assays. GSK3α, GSK3β, and MAPK13 were found to be the most active tau kinases, phosphorylating tau at all four epitopes. We further dissected the effects of GSK3α and GSK3β using pharmacological and genetic tools in hTau primary cortical neurons. Pathway analysis of the kinases identified in the screen suggested mechanisms for regulation of total tau levels and tau phosphorylation; for example, kinases that affect total tau levels do so by inhibition or activation of translation. A network fishing approach with the kinase hits identified other key molecules putatively involved in tau phosphorylation pathways, including the G-protein signaling through the Ras family of GTPases (MAPK family) pathway. The findings identify novel tau kinases and novel pathways that may be relevant for AD and other tauopathies.

  7. Association of protein kinase Cmu with type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, K; Toker, A; Wong, K; Marignani, P A; Johannes, F J; Cantley, L C

    1998-09-04

    Protein kinase Cmu (PKCmu), also named protein kinase D, is an unusual member of the PKC family that has a putative transmembrane domain and pleckstrin homology domain. This enzyme has a substrate specificity distinct from other PKC isoforms (Nishikawa, K., Toker, A., Johannes, F. J., Songyang, Z., and Cantley, L. C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 952-960), and its mechanism of regulation is not yet clear. Here we show that PKCmu forms a complex in vivo with a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. A region of PKCmu between the amino-terminal transmembrane domain and the pleckstrin homology domain is shown to be involved in the association with the lipid kinases. Interestingly, a kinase-dead point mutant of PKCmu failed to associate with either lipid kinase activity, indicating that autophosphorylation may be required to expose the lipid kinase interaction domain. Furthermore, the subcellular distribution of the PKCmu-associated lipid kinases to the particulate fraction depends on the presence of the amino-terminal region of PKCmu including the predicted transmembrane region. These results suggest a novel model in which the non-catalytic region of PKCmu acts as a scaffold for assembly of enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis at specific membrane locations.

  8. Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK), a novel membrane-associated, ankyrin repeat-containing protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Haider, K; Ponda, M; Cariappa, A; Rowitch, D; Pillai, S

    2001-06-15

    A novel murine membrane-associated protein kinase, PKK (protein kinase C-associated kinase), was cloned on the basis of its physical association with protein kinase Cbeta (PKCbeta). The regulated expression of PKK in mouse embryos is consistent with a role for this kinase in early embryogenesis. The human homolog of PKK has over 90% identity to its murine counterpart, has been localized to chromosome 21q22.3, and is identical to the PKCdelta-interacting kinase, DIK (Bahr, C., Rohwer, A., Stempka, L., Rincke, G., Marks, F., and Gschwendt, M. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 36350-36357). PKK comprises an N-terminal kinase domain and a C-terminal region containing 11 ankyrin repeats. PKK exhibits protein kinase activity in vitro and associates with cellular membranes. PKK exists in three discernible forms at steady state: an underphosphorylated form of 100 kDa; a soluble, cytosolic, phosphorylated form of 110 kDa; and a phosphorylated, detergent-insoluble form of 112 kDa. PKK is initially synthesized as an underphosphorylated soluble 100-kDa protein that is quantitatively converted to a detergent-soluble 110-kDa form. This conversion requires an active catalytic domain. Although PKK physically associates with PKCbeta, it does not phosphorylate this PKC isoform. However, PKK itself may be phosphorylated by PKCbeta. PKK represents a developmentally regulated protein kinase that can associate with membranes. The functional significance of its association with PKCbeta remains to be ascertained.

  9. Plaque assay for murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Bragazzi Cunha, Juliana; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-08-22

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is the only member of the Norovirus genus that efficiently grows in tissue culture. Cell lysis and cytopathic effect (CPE) are observed during MNV-1 infection of murine dendritic cells or macrophages. This property of MNV-1 can be used to quantify the number of infectious particles in a given sample by performing a plaque assay. The plaque assay relies on the ability of MNV-1 to lyse cells and to form holes in a confluent cell monolayer, which are called plaques. Multiple techniques can be used to detect viral infections in tissue culture, harvested tissue, clinical, and environmental samples, but not all measure the number of infectious particles (e.g. qRT-PCR). One way to quantify infectious viral particles is to perform a plaque assay, which will be described in detail below. A variation on the MNV plaque assay is the fluorescent focus assay, where MNV antigen is immunostained in cell monolayers. This assay can be faster, since viral antigen expression precedes plaque formation. It is also useful for titrating viruses unable to form plaques. However, the fluorescent focus assay requires additional resources beyond those of the plaque assay, such as antibodies and a microscope to count focus-forming units. Infectious MNV can also be quantified by determining the 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID50). This assay measures the amount of virus required to produce CPE in 50% of inoculated tissue culture cells by endpoint titration. However, its limit of detection is higher compared to a plaque assay. In this article, we describe a plaque assay protocol that can be used to effectively determine the number of infectious MNV particles present in biological or environmental samples. This method is based on the preparation of 10-fold serial dilutions of MNV-containing samples, which are used to inoculate a monolayer of permissive cells (RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells). Virus is allowed to attach to the cell monolayer for a given period of

  10. Characterization of PKACα enzyme kinetics and inhibition in an HPLC assay with a chromophoric substrate.

    PubMed

    Luzi, Nicole M; Lyons, Charles E; Peterson, Darrell L; Ellis, Keith C

    2017-09-01

    Here we describe a convenient, inexpensive, and non-hazardous method for the measurement of the kinase activity of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKACα). The assay is based on the separation of a substrate peptide labeled with a strong chromophore from the phosphorylated product peptide by high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and quantification of the product ratiometrically at a wavelength in the visual spectrum (Vis). The utility and reliability of the HPLC-Vis assay were demonstrated by characterizing the kinetic parameters (KM, Vmax) of the new Rh-MAB-Kemptide substrate, a commercially prepared TAMRA-Kemptide substrate, and ATP as well as the potency (IC50, Ki) of the known PKACα inhibitors H89 and PKI(5-24). The advantages of this assay are that it is convenient and inexpensive, uses readily synthesized or commercially available substrates that are shelf-stable, uses a common piece of laboratory equipment, and does not require any hazardous materials such as radioactive γ-(32)P-ATP. The assay format is also highly flexible and could be adapted for the testing of many different kinases by changing the peptide substrate sequence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methods to assay Drosophila behavior.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Becnel, Jaime; Pandey, Udai B

    2012-03-07

    Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, has been used to study molecular mechanisms of a wide range of human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and various neurological diseases(1). We have optimized simple and robust behavioral assays for determining larval locomotion, adult climbing ability (RING assay), and courtship behaviors of Drosophila. These behavioral assays are widely applicable for studying the role of genetic and environmental factors on fly behavior. Larval crawling ability can be reliably used for determining early stage changes in the crawling abilities of Drosophila larvae and also for examining effect of drugs or human disease genes (in transgenic flies) on their locomotion. The larval crawling assay becomes more applicable if expression or abolition of a gene causes lethality in pupal or adult stages, as these flies do not survive to adulthood where they otherwise could be assessed. This basic assay can also be used in conjunction with bright light or stress to examine additional behavioral responses in Drosophila larvae. Courtship behavior has been widely used to investigate genetic basis of sexual behavior, and can also be used to examine activity and coordination, as well as learning and memory. Drosophila courtship behavior involves the exchange of various sensory stimuli including visual, auditory, and chemosensory signals between males and females that lead to a complex series of well characterized motor behaviors culminating in successful copulation. Traditional adult climbing assays (negative geotaxis) are tedious, labor intensive, and time consuming, with significant variation between different trials(2-4). The rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay(5) has many advantages over more widely employed protocols, providing a reproducible, sensitive, and high throughput approach to quantify adult locomotor and negative geotaxis behaviors. In the RING assay, several genotypes or drug treatments can be tested simultaneously

  12. Label-Free Receptor Assays

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Label-free biosensors offer integrated, kinetic and multi-parametric measures of receptor biology and ligand pharmacology in whole cells. Being highly sensitive and pathway-unbiased, label-free receptor assays can be used to probe the systems cell biology including pleiotropic signaling of receptors, and to characterize the functional selectivity and phenotypic pharmacology of ligand molecules. These assays provide a new dimension for elucidating receptor biology and for facilitating drug discovery. PMID:21221420

  13. Label-Free Receptor Assays.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    Label-free biosensors offer integrated, kinetic and multi-parametric measures of receptor biology and ligand pharmacology in whole cells. Being highly sensitive and pathway-unbiased, label-free receptor assays can be used to probe the systems cell biology including pleiotropic signaling of receptors, and to characterize the functional selectivity and phenotypic pharmacology of ligand molecules. These assays provide a new dimension for elucidating receptor biology and for facilitating drug discovery.

  14. Functional Assays for Ricin Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezan, Eric; Duriez, Elodie; Fenaille, François; Becher, François

    In this review, we provide background information on ricin structure, present available functional assays for other toxins that are potential biothreat agents, and finish by describing the functional assay of ricin itself. Using appropriate sample preparation and optimized detection based on N-glycosidase activity, we demonstrate that specific detection of whole ricin at a level of around 0.1 ng/mL is possible and applicable to environmental samples.

  15. MAP kinase activator from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle is a protein threonine/tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Wu, J; Sturgill, T

    1992-01-01

    A 'MAP kinase activator' was purified several thousand-fold from insulin-stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle, which resembled the 'activator' from nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells in that it could be inactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase 2A, but not by protein tyrosine phosphatases and its apparent molecular mass was 45-50 kDa. In the presence of MgATP, 'MAP kinase activator' converted the normal 'wild-type' 42 kDa MAP kinase from an inactive dephosphorylated form to the fully active diphosphorylated species. Phosphorylation occurred on the same threonine and tyrosine residues which are phosphorylated in vivo in response to growth factors or phorbol esters. A mutant MAP kinase produced by changing a lysine at the active centre to arginine was phosphorylated in an identical manner by the 'MAP kinase activator', but no activity was generated. The results demonstrate that 'MAP kinase activator' is a protein kinase (MAP kinase kinase) and not a protein that stimulates the autophosphorylation of MAP kinase. MAP kinase kinase is the first established example of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate an exogenous protein on threonine as well as tyrosine residues. Images PMID:1318193

  16. Microbiological assay using bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V.

    1987-12-21

    This invention relates to testing processes for toxicity involving microorganisms and, more particularly, to testing processes for toxicity involving bioluminescent organisms. The present known method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity employs the mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia) as the assay organism. The shrimp are difficult to raise and handle as laboratory assay organisms. This method is labor-intensive, because it requires a assay time of about 96 hours. Summary of the Invention: A microbiological assay in which the assay organism is the dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula. A sample of a substance to be assayed is added to known numbers of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate and the mixture is agitated to subject the organisms to a shear stress causing them to emit light. The amount of light emitted is measured and compared with the amount of light emitted by a known non-toxic control mixture to determine if there is diminution or non-diminution of light emitted by the sample under test which is an indication of the presence or absence of toxicity, respectively. Accordingly, an object of the present invention is the provision of an improved method of testing substances for toxicity. A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity using bioluminescent dinoflagellate (Pyrocystis lunula).

  17. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  18. Pathway illuminated: visualizing protein kinase C signaling.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Newton, Alexandra C

    2003-12-01

    Protein kinase C has been at the center of cell signaling since the discovery 25 years ago that it transduces signals that promote phospholipid hydrolysis. In recent years, the use of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters has enabled studies of the regulation of protein kinase C signaling in living cells. Advances in imaging techniques have unveiled unprecedented detail of the signal processing mechanics of protein kinase C, from the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol that regulate protein kinase C activity, to the locations and kinetics of different protein kinase C isozymes, to the spatial and temporal dynamics of substrate phosphorylation by this key enzyme. This review discusses how fluorescence imaging studies have illuminated the fidelity with which protein kinase C transduces rapidly changing extracellular information into intracellular phosphorylation signals.

  19. Kinase-kernel models: accurate in silico screening of 4 million compounds across the entire human kinome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Eric; Mukherjee, Prasenjit

    2012-01-23

    Reliable in silico prediction methods promise many advantages over experimental high-throughput screening (HTS): vastly lower time and cost, affinity magnitude estimates, no requirement for a physical sample, and a knowledge-driven exploration of chemical space. For the specific case of kinases, given several hundred experimental IC(50) training measurements, the empirically parametrized profile-quantitative structure-activity relationship (profile-QSAR) and surrogate AutoShim methods developed at Novartis can predict IC(50) with a reliability approaching experimental HTS. However, in the absence of training data, prediction is much harder. The most common a priori prediction method is docking, which suffers from many limitations: It requires a protein structure, is slow, and cannot predict affinity. (1) Highly accurate profile-QSAR (2) models have now been built for roughly 100 kinases covering most of the kinome. Analyzing correlations among neighboring kinases shows that near neighbors share a high degree of SAR similarity. The novel chemogenomic kinase-kernel method reported here predicts activity for new kinases as a weighted average of predicted activities from profile-QSAR models for nearby neighbor kinases. Three different factors for weighting the neighbors were evaluated: binding site sequence identity to the kinase neighbors, similarity of the training set for each neighbor model to the compound being predicted, and accuracy of each neighbor model. Binding site sequence identity was by far most important, followed by chemical similarity. Model quality had almost no relevance. The median R(2) = 0.55 for kinase-kernel interpolations on 25% of the data of each set held out from method optimization for 51 kinase assays, approached the accuracy of median R(2) = 0.61 for the trained profile-QSAR predictions on the same held out 25% data of each set, far faster and far more accurate than docking. Validation on the full data sets from 18 additional kinase assays

  20. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Cantley, Lewis C

    2002-05-31

    Phosphorylated lipids are produced at cellular membranes during signaling events and contribute to the recruitment and activation of various signaling components. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), which catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate, in cell survival pathways; the regulation of gene expression and cell metabolism; and cytoskeletal rearrangements are highlighted. The PI3K pathway is implicated in human diseases including diabetes and cancer, and understanding the intricacies of this pathway may provide new avenues for therapuetic intervention.

  1. How do kinases transfer phosphoryl groups?

    PubMed

    Matte, A; Tari, L W; Delbaere, L T

    1998-04-15

    Understanding how phosphoryl transfer is accomplished by kinases, a ubiquitous group of enzymes, is central to many biochemical processes. Qualitative analysis of the crystal structures of enzyme-substrate complexes of kinases reveals structural features of these enzymes important to phosphoryl transfer. Recently determined crystal structures which mimic the transition state complex have added new insight into the debate as to whether kinases use associative or dissociative mechanisms of catalysis.

  2. Spatial gradients in kinase cascade regulation.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, B; Lipniacki, T

    2010-11-01

    The spatiotemporal kinetics of proteins and other substrates regulate cell fate and signaling. In this study, we consider a reaction-diffusion model of interaction of membrane receptors with a two-step kinase cascade. The receptors activate the 'up-stream' kinase, which may diffuse over cell volume and activate the 'down-stream' kinase, which is also diffusing. Both kinase species and receptors are inactivated by uniformly distributed phosphatases. The positive feedback, key to the considered dynamics, arises since the up-stream kinase activates the receptors. Such a mutual interaction is characteristic for immune cell receptors. Based on the proposed model, we demonstrated that cell sensitivity (measured as a critical value of phosphatase activity at which cell maybe activated) increases with decreasing motility of receptor-interacting kinases and with increasing polarity of receptors distribution. These two effects are cooperating, the effect of receptors localisation close to one pole of the cell grows with the decreasing kinase diffusion and vanishes in the infinite diffusion limit. As the cell sensitivity increases with decreasing diffusion of receptor-interacting kinase, the overall activity of the down-stream kinase increases with its diffusion. In conclusion, the analysis of the proposed model shows that, for the fixed substrate interaction rates, spatial distribution of the surface receptors together with the motility of intracellular kinases control cell signalling and sensitivity to extracellular signals. The increase of the cell sensitivity can be achieved by (i) localisation of receptors in a small subdomain of the cell membrane, (ii) lowering the motility of receptor-interacting kinase, (iii) increasing the motility of down-stream kinases which distribute the signal over the whole cell.

  3. Analysis of Histone Deacetylase-Dependent Effects on Cell Migration Using the Stripe Assay.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Sonja; Thanos, Solon

    2017-01-01

    For normal embryonic development/morphogenesis, cell migration and homing are well-orchestrated and important events requiring specific cellular mechanisms. In diseases such as cancer deregulated cell migration represents a major problem. Therefore, numerous efforts are under way to understand the molecular mechanisms of tumor cell migration and to generate more efficient tumor therapies. Cell migration assays are one of the most commonly used functional assays. The wound-healing assay or the Boyden chamber assay are variations of these assays. Nearly all of them are two-dimensional assays and the cells can only migrate on one substrate at a time. This is in contrast to the in vivo situation where the cells are faced simultaneously with different surfaces and interact with different cell types. To approach this in vivo situation we used a modified version of the stripe assay designed by Bonhoeffer and colleagues to examine mechanisms of axonal guidance. The design of this assay allows cells to decide between two different substrates offered at the same time. Utilizing alternating neuronal substrates for migration analyses we can partially mimic the complex in vivo situation for brain tumor cells. Here we describe the detailed protocol to perform a modified version of the stripe assay in order to observe substrate-dependent migration effects in vitro, to analyze the effect of Rho-dependent kinases (ROCKS), of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and of other molecules on glioma cells.

  4. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence quenching assay (LANCE) for caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Jarkko; Hurskainen, Pertti; Gopalakrishnan, Sujatha; Burns, David; Warrior, Usha; Hemmilä, Ilkka

    2002-06-01

    In addition to kinases and G protein-coupled receptors, proteases are one of the main targets in modern drug discovery. Caspases and viral proteases, for instance, are potential targets for new drugs. To satisfy the current need for fast and sensitive high-throughput screening for inhibitors, new homogeneous protease assays are needed. We used a caspase-3 assay as a model to develop a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence quenching assay technology. The assay utilizes a peptide labeled with both a luminescent europium chelate and a quencher. Cleavage of the peptide by caspase-3 separates the quencher from the chelate and thus recovers europium fluorescence. The sensitivity of the assay was 1 pg/microl for active caspase-3 and 200 pM for the substrate. We evaluated the assay for high-throughput usage by screening 9600 small-molecule compounds. We also evaluated this format for absorption/distribution/metabolism/excretion assays with cell lysates. Additionally, the assay was compared to a commercial fluorescence caspase-3 assay.

  5. Systematic functional analysis of kinases in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Tae; So, Yee-Seul; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Dong-Gi; Kwon, Hyojeong; Jang, Juyeong; Wang, Li Li; Cha, Soohyun; Meyers, Gena Lee; Jeong, Eunji; Jin, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Yeonseon; Hong, Joohyeon; Bang, Soohyun; Ji, Je-Hyun; Park, Goun; Byun, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Sung Woo; Park, Young-Min; Adedoyin, Gloria; Kim, Taeyup; Averette, Anna F.; Choi, Jong-Soon; Heitman, Joseph; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the leading cause of death by fungal meningoencephalitis; however, treatment options remain limited. Here we report the construction of 264 signature-tagged gene-deletion strains for 129 putative kinases, and examine their phenotypic traits under 30 distinct in vitro growth conditions and in two different hosts (insect larvae and mice). Clustering analysis of in vitro phenotypic traits indicates that several of these kinases have roles in known signalling pathways, and identifies hitherto uncharacterized signalling cascades. Virulence assays in the insect and mouse models provide evidence of pathogenicity-related roles for 63 kinases involved in the following biological categories: growth and cell cycle, nutrient metabolism, stress response and adaptation, cell signalling, cell polarity and morphology, vacuole trafficking, transfer RNA (tRNA) modification and other functions. Our study provides insights into the pathobiological signalling circuitry of C. neoformans and identifies potential anticryptococcal or antifungal drug targets. PMID:27677328

  6. Production of recombinant human apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Volynets, Galyna P; Gorbatiuk, Oksana B; Kukharenko, Oleksandr P; Usenko, Mariya O; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2016-10-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mediator of the MAPK signaling cascade, which regulates different cellular processes including apoptosis, cell survival, and differentiation. The increased activity of ASK1 is associated with a number of human diseases and this protein kinase is considered as promising therapeutic target. In the present study, the kinase domain of human ASK1 was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) in soluble form. The expression level of ASK1 was around 0.3-0.47 g per 1 L after using auto-induction protocol or IPTG induction. A one-step on column method for the efficient purification of recombinant ASK1 was performed. Our approach yields sufficient amount of recombinant ASK1, which can be used for inhibitor screening assays and different crystallographic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Discovery of 4-aminoquinazoline--urea derivatives as Aurora kinase inhibitors with antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jin; Li, Lili; Hong, Kwon Ho; Wu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Junqing; Wang, Peng; Cao, Meng; Zong, Xi; Ji, Min

    2014-11-01

    Two series of 20 novel 4-aminoquinazoline-urea derivatives have been designed and synthesized. The entire target compounds were investigated for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against six human cancer cell lines (K562, U937, A549, NCI-H661, HT29 and LoVo) using the MTT-based assay. Most compounds showed significant antiproliferative activities against four solid tumor cell lines, but no or poor activities against two leukemia cell lines. Furthermore, the target compounds were screened for Aurora A/B kinases inhibitory activity. Among them, 7c, 7d, 8c, and 8d are more potent against Aurora A kinase than ZM447439. Docking study of compounds 7d and ZM447439 revealed that they bound strongly to the ATP-binding sites of Aurora A and B. Thus, they may be promising lead compounds for the development of novel anti-tumor drug potentially via inhibiting Aurora kinases.

  8. Phosphorylation and activation of p40 tyrosine kinase by casein kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Vila, J; Payne, D M; Zioncheck, T F; Harrison, M L; Itarte, E; Weber, M J

    1990-05-07

    Because examination of regulatory trans-phosphorylations can help elucidate the cellular functions of tyrosyl protein kinases, we have investigated the effects of phosphorylation by casein kinase-1 on the activity of the p40 tyrosyl protein kinase. We find that casein kinase-1 can phosphorylate the p40 tyrosyl kinase on serine and threonine residues, in part on a unique tryptic peptide. The phosphorylation induces a substantial increase in the tyrosyl protein kinase activity of p40, in contrast to most instances in which serine/threonine phosphorylation inhibits activity of tyrosyl protein kinases. These findings raise the possibility that p40 might be part of a protein phosphorylation network in which casein kinase-1 participates.

  9. Tyrosine kinases in inflammatory dermatologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Ricardo T.; Fiorentino, David; Chung, Lorinda; Robinson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on protein substrates. They are key components of signaling pathways that drive an array of cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Specific tyrosine kinases have recently been identified as critical to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases are emerging as a novel class of therapy that may provide benefit in certain patient subsets. In this review, we highlight tyrosine kinase signaling implicated in inflammatory dermatologic diseases, evaluate strategies aimed at inhibiting these aberrant signaling pathways, and discuss prospects for future drug development. PMID:20584561

  10. MST kinases in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian MST kinase family, which is related to the Hippo kinase in Drosophila melanogaster, includes five related proteins: MST1 (also called STK4), MST2 (also called STK3), MST3 (also called STK24), MST4, and YSK1 (also called STK25 or SOK1). MST kinases are emerging as key signaling molecules that influence cell proliferation, organ size, cell migration, and cell polarity. Here we review the regulation and function of these kinases in normal physiology and pathologies, including cancer, endothelial malformations, and autoimmune disease. PMID:26370497

  11. Myosin, Transgelin, and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Laviolette, Michel; Bergeron, Celine; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kogut, Paul; Solway, Julian; Kachmar, Linda; Hamid, Qutayba; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Airway smooth muscle (SM) of patients with asthma exhibits a greater velocity of shortening (Vmax) than that of normal subjects, and this is thought to contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. A greater Vmax can result from increased myosin activation. This has been reported in sensitized human airway SM and in models of asthma. A faster Vmax can also result from the expression of specific contractile proteins that promote faster cross-bridge cycling. This possibility has never been addressed in asthma. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the expression of genes coding for SM contractile proteins is altered in asthmatic airways and contributes to their increased Vmax. Methods: We quantified the expression of several genes that code for SM contractile proteins in mild allergic asthmatic and control human airway endobronchial biopsies. The function of these contractile proteins was tested using the in vitro motility assay. Measurements and Main Results: We observed an increased expression of the fast myosin heavy chain isoform, transgelin, and myosin light chain kinase in patients with asthma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of these genes at the protein level. To address the functional significance of this overexpression, we purified tracheal myosin from the hyperresponsive Fisher rats, which also overexpress the fast myosin heavy chain isoform as compared with the normoresponsive Lewis rats, and found a faster rate of actin filament propulsion. Conversely, transgelin did not alter the rate of actin filament propulsion. Conclusions: Selective overexpression of airway smooth muscle genes in asthmatic airways leads to increased Vmax, thus contributing to the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. PMID:19011151

  12. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-03

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  13. Intein-mediated peptide arrays for epitope mapping and kinase/phosphatase assays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Qun; Ghosh, Inca; Kochinyan, Samvel; Sun, Luo

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are widely used for production and analysis of antibodies as well as in the study of protein modification enzymes. To circumvent the technical challenges of the existing techniques regarding peptide quantization and normalization, a new method of producing peptide arrays has been developed. This approach utilizes intein-mediated protein ligation that involves linkage of a carrier protein possessing a reactive carboxyl-terminal thioester to a peptide with an amino-terminal cysteine through a native peptide bond. Ligated protein substrates or enzyme-treated samples are arrayed on nitrocellulose membranes with a standard dot-blot apparatus and analyzed by immunoassay. This technique has improved sensitivity and reproducibility, and is suitable for various peptide-based applications. In this report, several experimental procedures including epitope mapping and the study of protein modifications were described.

  14. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-06

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  15. A Chrysin Derivative Suppresses Skin Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N. R.; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M.; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L.; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P+ cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  16. Green synthesis of peptide-templated gold nanoclusters as novel fluorescence probes for detecting protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Liang, Ru-Ping; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Li; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-06-21

    A green method was employed for synthesizing peptide-templated nanoclusters without requiring strong reducing agents. Using synthetic peptide-gold nanoclusters as fluorescence probes, a novel assay for detecting protein kinase is developed based on phosphorylation against carboxypeptidase Y digestion.

  17. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  18. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  19. TEC protein tyrosine kinase is involved in the Erk signaling pathway induced by HGF

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Feifei; Jiang, Yinan; Zheng, Qiping; Yang, Xiaoming; Wang, Siying

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} TEC is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated by HGF-stimulation in vivo or after partial hepatectomy in mice. {yields} TEC enhances the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE) in HGF signaling pathway in hepatocyte. {yields} TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation through the Erk-MAPK pathway. -- Abstract: Background/aims: TEC, a member of the TEC family of non-receptor type protein tyrosine kinases, has recently been suggested to play a role in hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration. This study aims to investigate the putative mechanisms of TEC kinase regulation of hepatocyte differentiation, i.e. to explore which signaling pathway TEC is involved in, and how TEC is activated in hepatocyte after hepatectomy and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation. Methods: We performed immunoprecipitation (IP) and immunoblotting (IB) to examine TEC tyrosine phosphorylation after partial hepatectomy in mice and HGF stimulation in WB F-344 hepatic cells. The TEC kinase activity was determined by in vitro kinase assay. Reporter gene assay, antisense oligonucleotide and TEC dominant negative mutant (TEC{sup KM}) were used to examine the possible signaling pathways in which TEC is involved. The cell proliferation rate was evaluated by {sup 3}H-TdR incorporation. Results: TEC phosphorylation and kinase activity were increased in 1 h after hepatectomy or HGF treatment. TEC enhanced the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE). Inhibition of MEK1 suppressed TEC phosphorylation. Blocking TEC activity dramatically decreased the activation of Erk. Reduced TEC kinase activity also suppressed the proliferation of WB F-344 cells. These results suggest TEC is involved in the Ras-MAPK pathway and acts between MEK1 and Erk. Conclusions: TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration and is involved in HGF-induced Erk signaling pathway.

  20. Phosphorylated testis-specific serine/threonine kinase 4 may phosphorylate Crem at Ser-117.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guolong; Wei, Youheng; Wang, Xiaoli; Yu, Long

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the internal existence status of testis-specific serine/threonine kinase 4 (Tssk4) and the interaction of Tssk4 and Cre-responsive element modulator (Crem). The internal existence status of Tssk4 in testis of mice was detected using western blotting and dephosphorylation method. The interaction of Tssk4 and Crem was analyzed by western blotting, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, in vitro co-immunoprecipitation assays, and in vitro kinase assay. The results revealed that Tssk4 existed in testis both in phosphorylation and unphosphorylation status by a temporal manner with the development of testis. Immunofluorescence results showed that Tssk4 had identical distribution pattern with Crem in testis, which was utterly different to the localization of Cre-responsive element binding (Creb). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that phosphorylated Tssk4 might participate in testis genes expressions by phosphorylating Crem at Ser-117.