Science.gov

Sample records for kinematically complete study

  1. Kinematically complete chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippel, S.; Stei, M.; Otto, R.; Hlavenka, P.; Mikosch, J.; Eichhorn, C.; Lourderaj, U.; Zhang, J. X.; Hase, W. L.; Weidemüller, M.; Wester, R.

    2009-11-01

    Kinematically complete studies of molecular reactions offer an unprecedented level of insight into the dynamics and the different mechanisms by which chemical reactions occur. We have developed a scheme to study ion-molecule reactions by velocity map imaging at very low collision energies. Results for the elementary nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- are presented and compared to high-level direct dynamics trajectory calculations. Furthermore, an improved design of the crossed-beam imaging spectrometer with full three-dimensional measurement capabilities is discussed and characterization measurements using photoionization of NH3 and photodissociation of CH3I are presented.

  2. Towards a Complete Study of the Initial Mass Function and Early Kinematics Evolution of the 25 Orionis Stellar Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, G.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Downes, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    We present the advances of an ongoing project to construct the photometric and spectroscopic system-IMF of the 25 Orionis stellar group with a statistically complete sample across the whole mass range of the group (0.01kinematic study of its intermediate- and high-mass members.

  3. A combined electron-ion spectrometer for studying complete kinematics of molecular dissociation upon shell selective ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, K.; Banerjee, S. B.; Bapat, B.

    2013-07-15

    A combined electron-ion spectrometer has been built to study dissociation kinematics of molecular ions upon various electronic decay processes ensuing from ionization of neutral molecules. The apparatus can be used with various ionization agents. Ion time-of-flight (ToF) spectra arising from various electronic decay processes are acquired by triggering the ToF measurement in coincidence with energy analyzed electrons. The design and the performance of the spectrometer in a photoionization experiment is presented in detail. Electron spectra and ion time of flight spectra resulting from valence and 2p{sub 1/2} ionization of Argon and those from valence ionization of CO are presented to demonstrate the capability of the instrument. The fragment ion spectra show remarkable differences (both kinematic and cross sectional) dependent on the energy of the ejected electron, corresponding to various electron loss and decay mechanisms in dissociative photoionization of molecules.

  4. Dissipative effects in fission investigated in complete kinematics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Taïeb, J.; Ramos, D.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2017-09-01

    The study of dissipative effects in fission has been carried out with fusion-fission reactions by using a limited number of observables, such as the fission probabilities, the mass distribution of the fission fragments, or the neutron multiplicities. However, the large angular momenta gained by the compound nucleus in this kind of reaction could affect the conclusions drawn from such experiments. In this work, we propose to investigate the fission dynamics by the use of spallation reactions on 208Pb because the fissioning systems are produced with low angular momentum, small deformations, and high excitation energies, enhancing the dissipative effects. The complete kinematics measurements of the fission fragments and light-charged particles were performed by the use of the SOFIA setup combined with the inverse kinematics technique, allowing us for the first time a full indentification in atomic and mass number of the two fission fragments. These measurements permit us to define new fission observables for the investigation of the temperature and deformation dependencies of the dissipation parameter.

  5. Complete 3D kinematics of upper extremity functional tasks.

    PubMed

    van Andel, Carolien J; Wolterbeek, Nienke; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Veeger, DirkJan H E J; Harlaar, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Upper extremity (UX) movement analysis by means of 3D kinematics has the potential to become an important clinical evaluation method. However, no standardized protocol for clinical application has yet been developed, that includes the whole upper limb. Standardization problems include the lack of a single representative function, the wide range of motion of joints and the complexity of the anatomical structures. A useful protocol would focus on the functional status of the arm and particularly the orientation of the hand. The aim of this work was to develop a standardized measurement method for unconstrained movement analysis of the UX that includes hand orientation, for a set of functional tasks for the UX and obtain normative values. Ten healthy subjects performed four representative activities of daily living (ADL). In addition, six standard active range of motion (ROM) tasks were executed. Joint angles of the wrist, elbow, shoulder and scapula were analyzed throughout each ADL task and minimum/maximum angles were determined from the ROM tasks. Characteristic trajectories were found for the ADL tasks, standard deviations were generally small and ROM results were consistent with the literature. The results of this study could form the normative basis for the development of a 'UX analysis report' equivalent to the 'gait analysis report' and would allow for future comparisons with pediatric and/or pathologic movement patterns.

  6. Exclusive measurements of quasi-free proton scattering reactions in inverse and complete kinematics

    DOE PAGES

    Panin, V.; Taylor, J. T.; Paschalis, S.; ...

    2016-02-01

    Quasi-free scattering reactions of the type (p, 2p)were measured for the first time exclusively in com-plete and inverse kinematics, using a 12C beam at an energy of ~400MeV/uas a benchmark. This new technique has been developed to study the single-particle structure of exotic nuclei in experiments with radioactive-ion beams. The outgoing pair of protons and the fragments were measured simultaneously, enabling an unambiguous identification of the reaction channels and a redundant measurement of the kinematic observables. Both valence and deeply-bound nucleon orbits are probed, including those leading to unbound states of the daughter nucleus. Exclusive (p, 2p)cross sections of 15.8(18)mb,more » 1.9(2)mb and 1.5(2)mb to the low-lying 0p-hole states overlapping with the ground state (3/2–) and with the bound excited states of 11B at 2.125MeV (1/2–) and 5.02MeV (3/2–), respectively, were determined via γ-ray spectroscopy. Particle-unstable deep-hole states, corresponding to proton removal from the 0s-orbital, were studied via the invariant-mass technique. Cross sections and momentum distributions were extracted and compared to theoretical calculations employing the eikonal formalism. The obtained results are in a good agreement with this theory and with direct-kinematics experiments. Furthermore, the dependence of the proton–proton scattering kinematics on the internal momentum of the struck proton and on its separation energy was investigated for the first time in inverse kinematics employing a large-acceptance measurement.« less

  7. Understanding patellofemoral pain with maltracking in the presence of joint laxity: complete 3D in vivo patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Frances T; Derasari, Aditya; Brindle, Timothy J; Alter, Katharine E

    2009-05-01

    Patellofemoral pain is widely accepted as one of the most common pathologies involving the knee, yet the etiology of this pain is still an open debate. Generalized joint laxity has been associated with patellofemoral pain, but is not often discussed as a potential source of patellar maltracking. Thus, the objective of this study was to compare the complete 6 degree of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics from a group of patients diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome and maltracking to those from an asymptomatic population. The following null hypotheses were tested: kinematic alterations in patellofemoral maltracking are limited to the axial plane; knee joint kinematics are the same in maltrackers with and without generalized joint laxity (defined by a clinical diagnosis of Ehlers Danlos Syndrome); and no correlations exist between tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics or within patellofemoral kinematics. This study demonstrated that alterations in patellofemoral kinematics, associated with patellofemoral pain, are not limited to the axial plane, minimal correlations exist between patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics, and distinct subgroups likely exist within the general population of maltrackers. Being able to identify subgroups correctly within the omnibus diagnosis of patellar maltracking is a crucial step in correctly defining the pathophysiology and the eventual treatment of these patients.

  8. Presaddle and postsaddle dissipative effects in fission using complete kinematics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Taïeb, J.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-12-01

    A complete kinematics measurement of the two fission fragments was used for the first time to investigate fission dynamics at small and large deformations. Fissioning systems with high excitation energies, compact shapes, and low angular momenta were produced in inverse kinematics by using spallation reactions of lead projectiles. A new generation experimental setup allowed for the first full and unambiguous identification in mass and atomic number of both fission fragments. This measurement permitted us to accurately determine fission cross sections, the charge distribution, and the neutron excess of the fission fragments as a function of the atomic number of the fissioning system. These data are compared with different model calculations to extract information on the value of the dissipation parameter at small and large deformations. The present results do not show any sizable dependence of the nuclear dissipation parameter on temperature or deformation.

  9. Two-dimensional kinematics of SLACS lenses - IV. The complete VLT-VIMOS data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoske, Oliver; Barnabè, Matteo; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Bolton, Adam S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the full Very Large Telescope (VLT)/VIMOS-IFU data set and related data products from an ESO Large Programme with the observational goal of obtaining two-dimensional kinematic data of early-type lens galaxies, out to one effective radius. The sample consists of 17 early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from the SLACS gravitational-lens survey. The galaxies cover the redshift range from 0.08 to 0.35 and have stellar velocity dispersions between 200 and 350 km s-1. This programme is complemented by a similar observational programme on Keck, using long-slit spectroscopy. In combination with multi-band imaging data, the kinematic data provide stringent constraints on the inner mass profiles of ETGs beyond the local Universe. Our Large Programme thus extends studies of nearby ETGs (e.g. SAURON/ATLAS3D) by an order of magnitude in distance and towards higher masses. We provide an overview of our observational strategy, the data products (luminosity-weighted spectra and Hubble Space Telescope images) and derived products (i.e. two-dimensional fields of velocity dispersions and streaming motions) that have been used in a number of published and forthcoming lensing, kinematic and stellar-population studies. These studies also pave the way for future studies of ETGs at z ≈ 1 with the upcoming extremely large telescopes. In fact, one system, J1250B, was downgraded to grade B ('possible lens') in Bolton et al. (2008). The SLACR package can be obtained from the first author on request.

  10. On the Kinematics, Stability and Lifetime of Kinematically Distinct Cores: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Felix; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    We present a case study of a early-type galaxy (ETG) hosting a kinematically distinct core (KDC) formed in a binary high resolution 1:1 spiral galaxy merger simulation. The runtime of the simulation is pushed up to 10Gyr to follow the complete evolution of various physical properties. To investigate the origin of the KDC, the stellar component residing within the KDC is dissected, revealing that the rotational signal is purely generated by stars that belong to the KDC for at least 0.5Gyr and are newly formed during the merging process. Following the orientation of the total stellar angular momentum of the KDC, we show that it performs a motion comparable to the precession of a gyroscope in a gravitational potential. We draw the conclusion that the motion of the KDC is a superposition of an intrinsic rotation and a global precession that gets gradually damped over cosmic time. Finally, the stability of the KDC over the complete runtime of the simulation is investigated by tracing the evolution of the widely used $\\lambda_{R}$ parameter and the misalignment angle distribution. We find that the KDC is stable for about 3Gyr after the merger and subsequently disperses completely on a timescale of ~1.5Gyr.

  11. Observation of two-α emission from high-lying excited states of Ne18 by complete-kinematics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. X.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yang, F.; Jia, F.; Wu, Z. D.; Zhang, S. T.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, H. Q.; Xu, H. S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Wang, J. S.; Hu, Z. G.; Wang, M.; Chen, R. F.; Zhang, X. Y.; Li, C.; Lei, X. G.; Xu, Z. G.; Xiao, G. Q.; Zhan, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Two-α emission from high-lying excited states of Ne18 was studied by complete-kinematics measurements. The Ne18 beam at the energy of 51.8 MeV/u was bombarding a Au197 target to populate the excited states via Coulomb excitation. Products of two-α emission, C10-α-α, were measured by an array of silicon strip detectors and a CsI + PIN telescope. With the help of Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental results show the characteristics of sequential two-α emission via O14 excited states. Sequential two-α and two-proton emissions from Ne18 via one-particle daughter states are compared and the distinction of the opening angles of these two modes originates from the difference of the mass ratio of emitted particles to daughter nuclei.

  12. Complete kinematics measurement of the 11B(p,γ)3α reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diget, C. Aa; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Laursen, K. L.; Madsbøl, K. O.; Jørgensen, L.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Riisager, K.

    2012-09-01

    One of the first nuclear reactions measured after the invention of the accelerator by Cockroft and Walton was 11B+p, measured by Rutherford and Oliphant in 1933 [1, 2]. This reaction, however, is not yet fully understood at low incident proton energies [3], and the present paper therefore presents a new measurement with complete-kinematics data utilising modern large-area segmented silicon-strip detectors. The aim of the measurement is twofold: firstly, to fully characterise the triple-α decay of the T=1, 2+ state at 16.11 MeV in 12C; secondly, to search for γ decay of the 2+ state to lower lying states, in particular the newly suggested 2+ state around 9-10 MeV [4]. The isovector M1 population of lower lying 2+ states is strongly favoured over isovector E2 transitions to 0+ states, and the method is therefore a promising method to elucidating this timely question.

  13. From nearby to distant galaxies: kinematical and dynamical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epinat, Benoit

    2009-09-01

    Kinematical studies of low and high redshift galaxies enables to probe galaxy formation and evolution scenarios. Integral field spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study with accuracy nearby galaxies kinematics. Recent observations also gives a new 2D vision of high redshift galaxies kinematics. This work mostly relies on the kinematical sample of galaxies GHASP. This control sample, composed of 203 local spiral and irregular galaxies in low density environments observed with Fabry-Perot techniques in the Ha line (6563 A), is by now the largest sample of Fabry-Perot data. After a revue on Fabry-Perot interferometry and a presentation of new data reduction procedures, my implications on both 3D-NTT Fabry-Perot instrument and the wide field spectrograph project (WFSpec) for galaxy evolution study with the european ELT are developed. The second section is dedicated to GHASP data. This sample have been fully reduced and analysed using new methods. The kinematical analysis of 2D kinematical maps has been undertaken with the study of the dark matter distribution, the rotation curves shape, bar signatures and the ionized gas velocity dispersion. In a third section, this local reference sample is used as a zero point for high redshift galaxies kinematical studies. The GHASP sample is projected at high redshift (z=1.7) in order to disentangle evolution effects from distance biases in high redshift galaxies kinematical data observed with SINFONI, OSIRIS and GIRAFFE. The kinematical analysis of new SINFONI high redshift observations is also presented and high redshift data found in the literature are compared with GHASP projected sample, suggesting some evolution of the galaxy dynamical support within the ages.

  14. Motor control of voluntary arm movements. Kinematic and modelling study.

    PubMed

    Corradini, M L; Gentilucci, M; Leo, T; Rizzolatti, G

    1992-01-01

    The motor control of pointing and reaching-to-grasp movements was investigated using two different approaches (kinematic and modelling) in order to establish whether the type of control varies according to modifications of arm kinematics. Kinematic analysis of arm movements was performed on subjects' hand trajectories directed to large and small stimuli located at two different distances. The subjects were required either to grasp and to point to each stimulus. The kinematics of the subsequent movement, during which subject's hand came back to the starting position, were also studied. For both movements, kinematic analysis was performed on hand linear trajectories as well as on joint angular trajectories of shoulder and elbow. The second approach consisted in the parametric identification of the black box (ARMAX) model of the controller driving the arm movement. Such controller is hypothesized to work for the correct execution of the motor act. The order of the controller ARMAX model was analyzed with respect to the different experimental conditions (distal task, stimulus size and distance). Results from kinematic analysis showed that target distance and size influenced kinematic parameters both of angular and linear displacements. Nevertheless, the structure of the motor program was found to remain constant with distance and distal task, while it varied with precision requirements due to stimulus size. The estimated model order of the controller confirmed the invariance of the control law with regard to movement amplitude, whereas it was sensitive to target size.

  15. Fission dynamics at high excitation energies investigated in complete kinematics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Taïeb, J.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; B´elier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J. F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Simon, H.; Vargas, J.

    2017-06-01

    Light-charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370A, 500A, and 650A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light-charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. The data were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  16. Towards a complete description of grasping kinematics: a framework for quantifying human grasping and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for tracking both human hand kinematics and object contour during grasping task. The framework is based on modeling the object as point cloud and the use of marker-based tracking. We introduce how to estimate contact sites on both the hand and object, hand enclosing space, and graspable features from recorded data. Two experiments were performed to 1) verify the accuracy of contact site estimation (less than 5 mm), and 2) validate the feature extraction. Our approach can provide significant insight into how humans plan grasping and manipulation based on object recognition.

  17. A comparative study of three methods for robot kinematics.

    PubMed

    Aspragathos, N A; Dimitros, J K

    1998-01-01

    Three methods for the formulation of the kinematic equations of robots with rigid links are presented in this paper. The first and most common method in the robotics community is based on 4x4 homogeneous matrix transformation, the second one is based on Lie algebra, and the third one on screw theory expressed via dual quaternions algebra. These three methods are compared in this paper for their use in the kinematic analysis of robot arms. The basic theory and the transformation operators, upon which every method is based, are referenced. Three analytic algorithms are presented for the solution of the direct kinematic problem corresponding to each method, and the geometric significance of the transformation operators and parameters is explained. Finally, a comparative study on the computation and storage requirements for the three methods is worked out.

  18. A kinematic study of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Sato, T.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to its confirmed nature as the remnant of a standard Type Ia supernova from spectroscopy of its light echo, Tycho's supernova remnant is a unique object that can provide a new perspective into thermonuclear supernova explosions. More than 400 years after its discovery as a supernova in November 1572, the remnant is now spread out over an 8 arcminute diameter region in a fairly symmetric, but patchy, shell-like morphology. The remnant's thermal X-ray emission is dominated by a strong Si Kalpha line and also shows line emission from other species such as S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Existing proper motion and X-ray line width measurements indicate that Tycho's Si-rich ejecta shell is expanding at ~4700 km/s. We have taken advantage of the huge number of Si line photons in the 750-ks Chandra ACIS observation from 2009 to make the first direct velocity measurements of ejecta in Tycho. The patchy nature of the ejecta shell allows for identification of red- and blue-shifted clumps of emission from the receding and approaching hemispheres. We use nonequilibrium ionization thermal models to jointly fit both ACIS-S and ACIS-I observations to determine the radial expansion velocity of individual clumps and associated systematic uncertainty. Red-shifted clumps have speeds of 3500-7800 km/s and blue-shifted clumps 1600--5000 km/s with a systematic uncertainty of 500-2000 km/s determined by intercomparison of the ACIS-S and ACIS-I spectral results. From our Chandra radial analysis of surface brightness, centroid energy, and line width, we have confirmed previous line width measurements from Suzaku, but are able to utilize finer radial bins that reveal additional structure in the kinematics of Tycho. In particular the Si and S line widths reach a deep minimum at the position of the peak surface brightness near the remnant's edge and where Doppler broadening from the shell expansion is minimum. From the measured line widths and assuming that Doppler and turbulent broadening can be

  19. High School Completion Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    While Alberta enjoys proven high, world-class results in student achievement, raising high school completion rates is one of the top priorities in improving the provincial education system. The 2011-12 targeted high school completion rate is 82% five years after entering Grade 10--a 2.5% increase from the current average rate of 79.5%. The purpose…

  20. Double-Pionic Fusion of Nuclear Systems and the 'ABC' Effect: Approaching a Puzzle by Exclusive and Kinematically Complete Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkanov, M.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Khakimova, O.; Kren, F.; Meier, R.; Pricking, A.; Skorodko, T.; Wagner, G. J.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Lindberg, K.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J.; Bogoslawsky, D.; Ivanov, G.; Jiganov, E.; Morosov, B.

    2009-02-06

    The ABC effect--a puzzling low-mass enhancement in the {pi}{pi} invariant mass spectrum, first observed by Abashian, Booth, and Crowe--is well known from inclusive measurements of two-pion production in nuclear fusion reactions. Here we report on the first exclusive and kinematically complete measurements of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} at beam energies of 1.03 and 1.35 GeV. The measurements, which have been carried out at CELSIUS-WASA, reveal the ABC effect to be a ({pi}{pi}){sub I=L=0} channel phenomenon associated with both a resonancelike energy dependence in the integral cross section and the formation of a {delta}{delta} system in the intermediate state. A corresponding simple s-channel resonance ansatz provides a surprisingly good description of the data.

  1. Double-pionic fusion of nuclear systems and the "ABC" effect: approaching a puzzle by exclusive and kinematically complete measurements.

    PubMed

    Bashkanov, M; Bargholtz, C; Berłowski, M; Bogoslawsky, D; Calén, H; Clement, H; Demiroers, L; Doroshkevich, E; Duniec, D; Ekström, C; Fransson, K; Geren, L; Gustafsson, L; Höistad, B; Ivanov, G; Jacewicz, M; Jiganov, E; Johansson, T; Khakimova, O; Keleta, S; Koch, I; Kren, F; Kullander, S; Kupść, A; Lindberg, K; Marciniewski, P; Meier, R; Morosov, B; Pauly, C; Pettersson, H; Petukhov, Y; Povtorejko, A; Pricking, A; Ruber, R J M Y; Schönning, K; Scobel, W; Shwartz, B; Skorodko, T; Sopov, V; Stepaniak, J; Tegner, P-E; Thörngren-Engblom, P; Tikhomirov, V; Turowiecki, A; Wagner, G J; Wolke, M; Zabierowski, J; Zartova, I; Złomanczuk, J

    2009-02-06

    The ABC effect-a puzzling low-mass enhancement in the pipi invariant mass spectrum, first observed by Abashian, Booth, and Crowe-is well known from inclusive measurements of two-pion production in nuclear fusion reactions. Here we report on the first exclusive and kinematically complete measurements of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction pn-->dpi;{0}pi;{0} at beam energies of 1.03 and 1.35 GeV. The measurements, which have been carried out at CELSIUS-WASA, reveal the ABC effect to be a (pipi)_{I=L=0} channel phenomenon associated with both a resonancelike energy dependence in the integral cross section and the formation of a DeltaDelta system in the intermediate state. A corresponding simple s-channel resonance ansatz provides a surprisingly good description of the data.

  2. Reaching and grasping behavior in Macaca fascicularis: a kinematic study.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    The prehensile hand is one of the major traits distinguishing primates from other mammal species. All primates, in fact, are able to grasp an object and hold it in part or entirely using a single hand. Although there is a wealth of behavioral data regarding grasping movements in humans and apes, there is relatively little material on macaques, the animal model often used to investigate neuronal mechanisms responsible for grip control in humans. To date, evidence regarding free-ranging macaques is confined to observational data, while quantitative reports describe studies carried out in laboratory settings or in captivity. The purpose of the present study was to provide the first kinematic descriptions of basic grip behavior with regard to precision and power grips in free-ranging macaque monkeys. Video footage of those animals grasping objects was analyzed frame-by-frame using digitalization techniques. The results revealed that the two types of grips considered are each characterized by specific kinematic signatures. It was also found that hand kinematics was scaled depending on the type of grasp needing to be adopted and the intrinsic properties of the object to be grasped. In accordance with data concerning humans, these findings indicate that the intrinsic features of an object affect the planning and control of reach-to-grasp movements even in free-ranging macaques. The data presented here take research in the field of comparative reach-to-grasp kinematics in human and non-human primates another step forward as they are based on precise measurements of spontaneous grasping movements by animals living/acting in their natural environment.

  3. The study of two barred galaxies with curious kinematical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saburova, A. S.; Katkov, I. Y.; Khoperskov, S. A.; Zasov, A. V.; Uklein, R. I.

    2017-09-01

    We performed long-slit spectral observations of two SB-type galaxies: NGC 5347 and UGC 1344. They were previously suspected as the galaxies with unusually low mass-to-light ratios (on the ground of mass estimates from the H i linewidths), which are in conflict with their observed colours. The observations were conducted at the Russian 6-m telescope. The aim of this study was to clarify the kinematics and structure, as well as the properties of stellar populations of the galaxies. The results of observations disproved the peculiarly low mass-to-light ratios of both galaxies. The most probable reasons of underestimation of their masses are discussed. We tried to reproduce the main observed features of kinematical profiles of the galaxies in the N-body simulations of barred galaxies. We found that both galaxies possess central components of different structures. Indeed, the age and velocity dispersion of stellar population in NGC 5347 are low in its innermost part in comparison to that of the bulge or a bar, which agrees with the presence of nuclear kinematically decoupled disc. It probably was formed due to the bar that supplied the inner region with gas. The kinematical profiles of the second galaxy UGC 1344 give evidence in favour of the central peanut-shaped bulge. In spite of the different luminosities of the two galaxies, they possess nearly equal (close to solar) central stellar abundance and the flattening of the stellar metallicity gradient in the bar regions. However, in the less luminous NGC 5347, the mean stellar age is younger than that in UGC 1344.

  4. Dislocation kinematics: a molecular dynamics study in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, E.; Yahel, E.; Makov, G.

    2017-02-01

    The kinematics and kinetics of edge and screw dislocations in FCC materials were studied by molecular dynamics, with Cu as a case study. It was found that with increasing stress screw dislocations enter into the transonic regime continuously and that they remain stable up to a velocity of about 2.2 km s-1. Edge dislocations are limited by the transverse sound velocity at low stresses and discontinuously cross into the transonic regime at higher stresses. For sufficiently long edge dislocations, the subsonic-transonic transition is initiated by an athermal nucleation process. Finally, an expression for the velocity dependence of the dislocation mobility was derived.

  5. Social intentions in Parkinson's disease patients: A kinematic study.

    PubMed

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-09-01

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic system leads to motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms in brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, the dopaminergic system plays an important role in social interactions. The dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia (BG) thought to integrate social cues during the planning and execution of voluntary movements remains, however, largely unexplored. Since PD provides a model to assess this function in humans, our study aimed to investigate the effects of social intentions on actions in non-demented PDpatients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. Participants were instructed to reach for and to grasp an object; they were then told to hand it to another person (social condition) or to place it on a concave frame (individual condition). A 'passive-observer' condition, which was similar to the 'individual' condition except for the presence of an onlooker who simply observed the scene, was also assessed to exclude the possibility that differences might be due to the presence of another person. Movement kinematics were recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Study results demonstrated that the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'social' and the 'individual' conditions; the PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. These results suggest that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating social intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients.

  6. Caspar Creek study completion report

    Treesearch

    C. S. Kabel; E. R. German

    1967-01-01

    The Department of Fish and Game assisted in an interagency study on Caspar Creek, a small coastal stream in Mendocino County. This study included the effects of logging on the stream and its population of silver salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdnerii).

  7. Kinematic characteristics of Andalusian, Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horses: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cano, M R; Vivo, J; Miró, F; Morales, J L; Galisteo, A M

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the kinematic trot characteristics of three different breeds of horse: Andalusian (AN, n = 15), Arabian (AR, n = 7) and Anglo-Arabian (AA, n = 5) using standard computer-assisted videography (25 Hz). Linear, temporal and angular parameters in fore- and hind limbs were analysed in six randomly selected strides per horse. Normalised angle-time diagrams along the complete stride were obtained for all joints angles in each breed and specific kinematic characteristics were detected graphically. AA horses displayed longer swing durations in both limbs ans a shorter angular range of motion (ARM) in scapula and pelvis inclination and in shoulder, hip and forelimb retraction-protraction angles. At lift off, stifle and tarsal joint angles were more flexed. In general, only small differences were observed in AR horse kinematics when compared with the other 2 breeds. AN horses presented negative overtracking length, which was positive in AR and AA. In AN horses the elbow and carpal joints were more flexed at the moment of maximal elevation, elbow and fore-fetlock joints also exhibited a larger ARM due to a smaller angle at maximal flexion. In the hind limbs, tarsal, hind fetlock and retraction-protraction angles presented a larger ARM in AN horses due to greater maximal flexion in the tarsal and hind fetlock joints. Fore- and hind fetlocks were also more flexed in horses from this breed. In conclusion, differences between kinematic variables at the trot were observed in the three breeds studied here, mainly in forelimb joints. The most outstanding feature was the greater forelimb flexion recorded in AN horses than in the other breeds which is consistent with the elevated movements in this breed. In AA horses, the ARM of proximal joints involved in retraction protraction in both fore- and hind limbs was smaller. All the differences observed highlighted the idiosyncratic nature of the trot in each breed; this may influence the functional

  8. Photometric and Kinematic Studies of Extragalactic Globular Cluster Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windschitl-Dowell, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are compact, luminous collections of stars created during the early stages of galaxy formation. As a result, the properties of GC systems provide important clues about the formation, merger history, and structure of their host galaxies. In particular, kinematic studies of GCs can be used to investigate the dark matter distribution in galaxy halos and provide observational evidence that can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation. I will present our study of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055, and show how we used wide-field BVR imaging from the WIYN 3.5-m telescope to detect the GC population and measure the global properties of the system. We quantified the radial distribution of the GC system and total number of GCs in these galaxies and compared the results to those of other galaxies.I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). Using spectra taken with AAT/AAOmega, WIYN/HYDRA, and MMT/Hectospec, I measured the radial velocities of GCs, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and V-band mass-to-light (M/LV) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). I compared our results to mass estimates from other kinematic tracers and also considered them in the context of galaxy formation models. For both galaxies, I found that the M/LV profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of our data. I also looked for evidence of rotation within the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. Finally, I examined the velocity dispersion of each GC system as a function of radius and found kinematic differences between the red, metal-rich and blue, metal-poor GC subpopulations.

  9. Mandibular kinematics after orthognathic surgical treatment a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Ugolini, Alessandro; Rocchetta, Davide; Galante, Domenico; Mapelli, Andrea; Giannì, Aldo Bruno

    2010-03-01

    We recorded three-dimensional mandibular movements, while the mouth was being opened and closed, using an optoelectronic motion analyser in 14 patients (5 skeletal Class II, 9 skeletal Class III) who were being assessed 7-49 months after orthognathic operations, and in 44 healthy subjects. All 14 patients had satisfactory healing on clinical examination, and function had been restored. Mandibular movement was divided into its rotational and translational components. On maximum mouth opening, the patients had significantly less total displacement of the mandibular interincisor point (p=0.05), and more mandibular movement that was explained by pure condylar rotation (p=0.006), than control subjects. There was no significant relation between maximum mouth opening and percentage rotation. While mandibular motion was well restored clinically by orthognathic surgery, the kinematics of the joint were modified. Larger studies and longitudinal investigations are necessary to appreciate the clinical relevance of the variations in condylar rotational and translational components.

  10. Integrated reservoir studies enhance well completions

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.S.; Aud, W.W.; Burns, R.

    1998-03-16

    Integrated reservoir studies, together with modern completion and stimulation techniques, enhance well productivity while lowering completion costs. Results from different areas show that this approach increased productivity from 40% to 100% over previous applied methods. These approaches incorporate detailed production response characterization with a technical examination of past completion and stimulation practices to: Quantify the effectiveness of prior completion methods; Customize completions by specifically tailoring stimulation procedures to match the individual reservoir with its specific producing and fracturing idiosyncrasies. Two case histories, the Deep Red Fork (oil) formation of Oklahoma and the Haynesville (natural gas) formation of Louisiana, are used to illustrate the method.

  11. A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, Rueben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of analyzing the kinematics of joint motion is developed. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) offers several distinct advantages. Past methods of studying anatomic joint motion have usually centered on four approaches. These methods are x-ray projection, goniometric linkage analysis, sonic digitization, and landmark measurement of photogrammetry. Of these four, only x-ray is applicable for in vivo studies. The remaining three methods utilize other types of projections of inter-joint measurements, which can cause various types of error. MRI offers accuracy in measurement due to its tomographic nature (as opposed to projection) without the problems associated with x-ray dosage. Once the data acquisition of MR images was complete, the images were processed using a 3D volume rendering workstation. The metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint of the left index finger was selected and reconstructed into a three-dimensional graphic display. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones were obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the MCP joint. Landmark positions were chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily two dimensional planar motion of this joint was then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three (or more) points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system described the location and orientation of a local target coordinate system. Future research involving volume rendering of MRI data focusing on the internal kinematics of the hand's individual ligaments, cartilage, tendons, etc. will follow. Its findings will show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove (power assisted) design for extravehicular activity (EVA).

  12. Intraoperative vs. weightbearing patellar kinematics in total knee arthroplasty: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Anglin, C; Brimacombe, J M; Wilson, D R; Masri, B A; Greidanus, N V; Tonetti, J; Hodgson, A J

    2008-01-01

    During knee replacement surgery, surgeons optimize intraoperative patellar tracking with the aim of optimizing postoperative tracking. This link has not been investigated to date. Our research questions were: (1) How well do patellar kinematics correlate between passive and weightbearing flexion across numerous changes in component placement? (2) How do the kinematics differ between the two loading configurations? Eight cadaveric knee joints with modified knee components that allowed 11 different femoral, tibial and patellar placements were tested in two experimental rigs simulating intraoperative and weightbearing dynamic flexion. Baseline placement had all components in neutral position. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for absolute baseline kinematics and for relative kinematics due to changes in component position (i.e., the 10 altered positions vs. baseline). Correlations between intraoperative and weightbearing rigs for absolute baseline kinematics were unpredictable, ranging from poor to excellent (mean 0.56 for tilt and mean 0.50 for shift). Correlations between rigs for changes in tilt and shift, i.e. relative kinematics, were strong (>0.8) or very strong (>0.9), with the exception of shift in early flexion (0.54). Differences in relative kinematics, which averaged 2.2 degrees in tilt (standard deviation 1.8 degrees ) and 1.6mm in shift (standard deviation 1.7mm), were notably smaller and less variable than differences in absolute kinematics, which averaged 4.2 degrees in tilt (standard deviation 3.6 degrees ) and 4.3mm in shift (standard deviation 3.9mm). The results of this study suggest that, while absolute kinematics may differ between conditions, if a surgeon adjusts a component position to improve patellar kinematics intraoperatively, the effects of such a geometric change will likely carry through to the postoperative joint.

  13. A KINEMATIC STUDY OF THE ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. Michael; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Penarrubia, Jorge; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2013-05-10

    We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I/LRIS and Keck II/DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g - i colors (taken with the CFHT/MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses, and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii ({approx}> 700 pc) and low velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} < 5 km s{sup -1}). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]{sub half}=10.3{sup +7.0}{sub -6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1{sigma} uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.

  14. Alternative Education Completers: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Becky L.; Holt, Carleton R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the elements of the alternative education experience significant to successful completion of the program. This phenomenological paradigm provided the framework for all aspects of the qualitative study. Students, parents, administrators, and staff members of two alternative programs in the southeast Kansas…

  15. The age of cataclysmic variables: A kinematical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ak, T.; Bilir, S.; Ak, S.; Coşkunoğlu, K. B.; Eker, Z.

    2010-08-01

    Using available astrometric and radial velocity data, the space velocities of cataclysmic variables (CVs) with respect to Sun were computed and kinematical properties of various sub-groups of CVs were investigated. Although observational errors of systemic velocities ( γ) are high, propagated errors are usually less than computed dispersions. According to the analysis of propagated uncertainties of the computed space velocities, available sample was refined by removing the systems with the largest propagated uncertainties so that the reliability of the space velocity dispersions was improved. Having a dispersion of 51±7kms-1 for the space velocities, CVs in the current refined sample (159 systems) are found to have 5 ± 1 Gyr mean kinematical age. After removing magnetic systems from the sample, it is found that non-magnetic CVs (134 systems) have a mean kinematical age of 4 ± 1 Gyr. According to 5 ± 1 and 4 ± 1 Gyr kinematical ages implied by 52 ± 8 and 45 ± 7 km s -1 dispersions for non-magnetic systems below and above the period gap, CVs below the period gap are older than systems above the gap, which is a result in agreement with the standard evolution theory of CVs. Age difference between the systems below and above the gap is smaller than that expected from the standard theory, indicating a similarity of the angular momentum loss time scales in systems with low-mass and high-mass secondary stars. Assuming an isotropic distribution, γ velocity dispersions of non-magnetic CVs below and above the period gap are calculated σγ=30±5kms-1 and σγ=26±4kms-1. The small difference of γ velocity dispersions between the systems below and above the gap may imply that magnetic braking does not operate in the detached phase, during which the system evolves from the post-common envelope orbit into contact.

  16. A complete analytical solution for the inverse instantaneous kinematics of a spherical-revolute-spherical (7R) redundant manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podhorodeski, R. P.; Fenton, R. G.; Goldenberg, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    Using a method based upon resolving joint velocities using reciprocal screw quantities, compact analytical expressions are generated for the inverse solution of the joint rates of a seven revolute (spherical-revolute-spherical) manipulator. The method uses a sequential decomposition of screw coordinates to identify reciprocal screw quantities used in the resolution of a particular joint rate solution, and also to identify a Jacobian null-space basis used for the direct solution of optimal joint rates. The results of the screw decomposition are used to study special configurations of the manipulator, generating expressions for the inverse velocity solution for all non-singular configurations of the manipulator, and identifying singular configurations and their characteristics. Two functions are therefore served: a new general method for the solution of the inverse velocity problem is presented; and complete analytical expressions are derived for the resolution of the joint rates of a seven degree of freedom manipulator useful for telerobotic and industrial robotic application.

  17. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  18. Can co-activation reduce kinematic variability? A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Selen, Luc P J; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2005-11-01

    Impedance modulation has been suggested as a means to suppress the effects of internal 'noise' on movement kinematics. We investigated this hypothesis in a neuro-musculo-skeletal model. A prerequisite is that the muscle model produces realistic force variability. We found that standard Hill-type models do not predict realistic force variability in response to variability in stimulation. In contrast, a combined motor-unit pool model and a pool of parallel Hill-type motor units did produce realistic force variability as a function of target force, largely independent of how the force was transduced to the tendon. To test the main hypothesis, two versions of the latter model were simulated as an antagonistic muscle pair, controlling the position of a frictionless hinge joint, with a distal segment having realistic inertia relative to the muscle strength. Increasing the impedance through co-activation resulted in less kinematic variability, except for the lowest levels of co-activation. Model behavior in this region was affected by the noise amplitude and the inertial properties of the model. Our simulations support the idea that muscular co-activation is in principle an effective strategy to meet accuracy demands.

  19. Development of prehension movements in children: a kinematic study.

    PubMed

    Kuhtz-Buschbeck, J P; Stolze, H; Jöhnk, K; Boczek-Funcke, A; Illert, M

    1998-10-01

    To evaluate the normal development of functional hand motor skill, the kinematics of prehension movements were analyzed in 54 healthy children (age 4-12 years). The subjects repeatedly reached out for cylindrical target objects and grasped them with a precision grip of their dominant hand. The trajectory of the reaching hand and the finger aperture were monitored by optoelectronic motion analysis. To obtain comparable conditions for the different age groups, the experimental setup was scaled according to the individual body proportions of each subject. Within the investigated age range, neither the movement duration nor the normalized (according to body proportions) peak spatial velocity of the reaching hand changed significantly. However, the hand trajectory straightened and the coordination between hand transport and grip formation improved, resulting in smooth and stereotyped kinematic profiles at the age of 12 years. The younger children opened their grip relatively wider than the older ones, thus grasping with a higher safety margin. The dependence on visual control of the movement declined during motor development. Only the oldest children were able to scale the grip aperture adequately, according to various sizes of the target objects, when visual control of the movement was lacking. The results suggest that the development of prehensile skills during childhood lasts until the end of the first decade of life. This functional maturation is discussed in relation to the development of neuronal pathways.

  20. Motor resonance facilitates movement execution: an ERP and kinematic study

    PubMed Central

    Ménoret, Mathilde; Curie, Aurore; des Portes, Vincent; Nazir, Tatjana A.; Paulignan, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Action observation, simulation and execution share neural mechanisms that allow for a common motor representation. It is known that when these overlapping mechanisms are simultaneously activated by action observation and execution, motor performance is influenced by observation and vice versa. To understand the neural dynamics underlying this influence and to measure how variations in brain activity impact the precise kinematics of motor behavior, we coupled kinematics and electrophysiological recordings of participants while they performed and observed congruent or non-congruent actions or during action execution alone. We found that movement velocities and the trajectory deviations of the executed actions increased during the observation of congruent actions compared to the observation of non-congruent actions or action execution alone. This facilitation was also discernible in the motor-related potentials of the participants; the motor-related potentials were transiently more negative in the congruent condition around the onset of the executed movement, which occurred 300 ms after the onset of the observed movement. This facilitation seemed to depend not only on spatial congruency but also on the optimal temporal relationship of the observation and execution events. PMID:24133437

  1. In vitro study of foot kinematics using a dynamic walking cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Nester, C J; Liu, A M; Ward, E; Howard, D; Cocheba, J; Derrick, T; Patterson, P

    2007-01-01

    There is a dearth of information on navicular, cuboid, cuneiform and metatarsal kinematics during walking and our objective was to study the kinematic contributions these bones might make to foot function. A dynamic cadaver model of walking was used to apply forces to cadaver feet and mobilise them in a manner similar to in vivo. Kinematic data were recorded from 13 cadaver feet. Given limitations to the simulation, the data describe what the cadaver feet were capable of in response to the forces applied, rather than exactly how they performed in vivo. The talonavicular joint was more mobile than the calcaneocuboid joint. The range of motion between cuneiforms and navicular was similar to that between talus and navicular. Metatarsals four and five were more mobile relative to the cuboid than metatarsals one, two and three relative to the cuneiforms. This work has confirmed the complexity of rear, mid and forefoot kinematics. The data demonstrate the potential for often-ignored foot joints to contribute significantly to the overall kinematic function of the foot. Previous emphasis on the ankle and sub talar joints as the principal articulating components of the foot has neglected more distal articulations. The results also demonstrate the extent to which the rigid segment assumptions of previous foot kinematics research have over simplified the foot.

  2. Proper-Motion Based Kinematics Study of Galactic RR Lyraes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambis, Andrei; Berdnikov, Leonid; Rastorguev, Alexei; Zabolotskikh, Marina

    2015-08-01

    We cross-match an extensive sample of almost 2000 RR Lyrae type stars located within ≈7 kpc from the Sun drawn from the lists of Torrealba et al. (2015) and Drake et al. (2013) with the US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalogue (UCAC4) and SDSS DR12 used as sources of proper motions and ALLWISE data release of the WISE infrared photometric catalog to analyze the kinematics of the RR Lyrae type star population in the extended solar neoghborhood. We find the mean velocities and the components of the velocity ellipsoid tensors of the halo and thick-disk subpopulations and the dependence of these parameters on Galactocentric distance and the height above the Galactic midplane.

  3. Arab light crude study focuses on kinematic viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, S.A.; Al-Mutawa, A.H.; Amin, M.B.

    1989-02-01

    Arab light crude oil has been characterized in terms of API gravity, total sulfur content, Reid vapor pressure, ash content, heating value, salt content, viscosity SUS, vanadium content as V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, pour point and analyses of various metals. The crude oil was fractionated into six true boiling point (TBP) fractions (IBP-95/sup 0/C, 95-205/sup 0/C, 205-260/sup 0/C, 260-345/sup 0/C, 345-455/sup 0/C and 455/sup 0/C+). These fractions were characterized in terms of API gravity, total sulfur, H/sub 2/S, mercaptan contents, molecular weight, elemental analyses for total carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, and analyses of various metals. The kinematic viscosity data have been obtained for 95/sup 0/C+ TBP fractions for a wide range of temperature up to 200/sup 0/C.

  4. Studying Upper-Limb Kinematics Using Inertial Sensors Embedded in Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been a great interest in analyzing upper-limb kinematics. Inertial measurement with mobile phones is a convenient and portable analysis method for studying humerus kinematics in terms of angular mobility and linear acceleration. Objective The aim of this analysis was to study upper-limb kinematics via mobile phones through six physical properties that correspond to angular mobility and acceleration in the three axes of space. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited healthy young adult subjects. Humerus kinematics was studied in 10 young adults with the iPhone4. They performed flexion and abduction analytical tasks. Mobility angle and lineal acceleration in each of its axes (yaw, pitch, and roll) were obtained with the iPhone4. This device was placed on the right half of the body of each subject, in the middle third of the humerus, slightly posterior. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results Descriptive graphics of analytical tasks performed were obtained. The biggest range of motion was found in pitch angle, and the biggest acceleration was found in the y-axis in both analytical tasks. Focusing on tridimensional kinematics, bigger range of motion and acceleration was found in abduction (209.69 degrees and 23.31 degrees per second respectively). Also, very strong correlation was found between angular mobility and linear acceleration in abduction (r=.845) and flexion (r=.860). Conclusions The use of an iPhone for humerus tridimensional kinematics is feasible. This supports use of the mobile phone as a device to analyze upper-limb kinematics and to facilitate the evaluation of the patient. PMID:28582241

  5. Studying Upper-Limb Kinematics Using Inertial Sensors Embedded in Mobile Phones.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Jimenez, Cristina; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio; Bennett, Paul

    2015-05-20

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in analyzing upper-limb kinematics. Inertial measurement with mobile phones is a convenient and portable analysis method for studying humerus kinematics in terms of angular mobility and linear acceleration. The aim of this analysis was to study upper-limb kinematics via mobile phones through six physical properties that correspond to angular mobility and acceleration in the three axes of space. This cross-sectional study recruited healthy young adult subjects. Humerus kinematics was studied in 10 young adults with the iPhone4. They performed flexion and abduction analytical tasks. Mobility angle and lineal acceleration in each of its axes (yaw, pitch, and roll) were obtained with the iPhone4. This device was placed on the right half of the body of each subject, in the middle third of the humerus, slightly posterior. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Descriptive graphics of analytical tasks performed were obtained. The biggest range of motion was found in pitch angle, and the biggest acceleration was found in the y-axis in both analytical tasks. Focusing on tridimensional kinematics, bigger range of motion and acceleration was found in abduction (209.69 degrees and 23.31 degrees per second respectively). Also, very strong correlation was found between angular mobility and linear acceleration in abduction (r=.845) and flexion (r=.860). The use of an iPhone for humerus tridimensional kinematics is feasible. This supports use of the mobile phone as a device to analyze upper-limb kinematics and to facilitate the evaluation of the patient.

  6. Kinematic characteristics of the ski jump inrun: a 10-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Janura, Miroslav; Cabell, Lee; Elfmark, Milan; Vaverka, Frantisek

    2010-05-01

    The athlete's inrun position affects the outcome for take-off in ski jumping. The purpose of this study was to examine the kinematic parameters between skiers' adjacent body segments during their first straight path of the inrun. Elite ski jumpers participated in the study at the World Cup events in Innsbruck, Austria, during the years 1992 through 2001. A video image was taken at a right angle to the tracks of the K-110 (meter) jumping hill. Kinematic data were collected from the lower extremities and trunk of the athletes. Findings indicated that jumpers had diminished ankle and knee joint angles and increased trunk and hip angles over the 10 years. In recent years, the best athletes achieved a further length of their jumps, while they experienced slower inrun average velocity. These results are perhaps explained by several possible contributing factors, such as new technique of the jumper's body kinematics, advancements in equipment technology, and somatotype of the jumpers.

  7. Effect of Anconeus Muscle Blocking on Elbow Kinematics: Electromyographic, Inertial Sensors and Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Andres, Israel; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Walmsley, Alan; Watts, Adam C

    2017-03-01

    The specific contribution of the anconeus muscle to elbow function is still uncertain. This study aimed to investigate the effect on elbow kinematics and kinetics of blocking anconeus using lidocaine. Ten healthy volunteers performed experimental trials involving flexion-extension and supination-pronation movements in horizontal and sagittal planes. Inertial sensors and surface electromyography were used to record elbow kinematics and kinetics and electrical activity from the anconeus, biceps and triceps brachii before and after blocking anconeus. Moreover, a finite element model of the elbow was created to further investigate the contribution of anconeus to elbow kinematics. The electrical activity results from the trials before blocking clearly indicated that activity of anconeus was increased during extension, suggesting that it behaves as an extensor. However, blocking anconeus had no effect on the elbow kinematics and kinetics, including the angular velocity, net torque and power of the joint. The electrical activity of the biceps and triceps brachii did not alter significantly following anconeus blocking. These results suggest that anconeus is a weak extensor, and the relative small contribution of anconeus to extension before blocking was compensated by triceps brachii. The finite element results indicated that anconeus does not contribute significantly to elbow kinematics.

  8. The case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: a kinematic study on social intention.

    PubMed

    Becchio, Cristina; Sartori, Luisa; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of social intentions on action. Participants (N=13) were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either pass it to another person (social condition) or put it on a concave base (single-agent condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to social intention. Movements performed for the 'social' condition were characterized by a kinematic pattern which differed from those obtained for the 'single-agent' condition. Results are discussed in terms of a motor simulation hypothesis, which assumes that the same mechanisms underlying motor intention are sensitive to social intentions.

  9. Lower extremity kinematics in children with and without flexible flatfoot: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A high percentage of young children present with flatfeet. Although the percentage of those with flatfeet declines with age, about 15% of the population maintains a flat arch. A reduction in longitudinal arch height usually combines with excessive subtalar joint pronation and may be related to other musculoskeletal problems of the lower extremity kinetic chain. The purpose of this study is to describe and compare the lower extremity kinematics between children with normal arches and those with flexible flatfeet, with the intent of providing practical information for decision making when treating children with flexible flatfeet. Methods Twenty children with flexible flatfeet (years age mean (SD), 9.7 (0.9) years) and 10 children with normal arches (yeas age mean (SD), 9.6 (1.2) years) were included. Kinematic data (maximum and minimum angles, and movement range, velocity, and excursion) of the hip, knee and rearfoot were collected during walking using Liberty Electromagnetic Tracking System. Kinematic variables were compared between the normal arches and flexible flatfeet groups using repeated measures mixed effects ANOVA. Results Movement patterns at the hip, knee and ankle joints were similar between children with flexible flatfeet and with normal arches. The results of ANOVA showed no significant main effect or interaction in any of the kinematic variables (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions This study identified no kinematic adaptation during walking in children with flexible flatfoot. We suggested that future research should take the influence of the mid-foot and forefoot into consideration when examining lower extremity kinematics in children with flexible flatfoot. PMID:22381254

  10. Lower extremity kinematics in children with and without flexible flatfoot: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yi-Fen; Chen, Chao-Yin; Chen, Wen-Yin; Lin, Hsiu-Chen

    2012-03-02

    A high percentage of young children present with flatfeet. Although the percentage of those with flatfeet declines with age, about 15% of the population maintains a flat arch. A reduction in longitudinal arch height usually combines with excessive subtalar joint pronation and may be related to other musculoskeletal problems of the lower extremity kinetic chain. The purpose of this study is to describe and compare the lower extremity kinematics between children with normal arches and those with flexible flatfeet, with the intent of providing practical information for decision making when treating children with flexible flatfeet. Twenty children with flexible flatfeet (years age mean (SD), 9.7 (0.9) years) and 10 children with normal arches (yeas age mean (SD), 9.6 (1.2) years) were included. Kinematic data (maximum and minimum angles, and movement range, velocity, and excursion) of the hip, knee and rearfoot were collected during walking using Liberty Electromagnetic Tracking System. Kinematic variables were compared between the normal arches and flexible flatfeet groups using repeated measures mixed effects ANOVA. Movement patterns at the hip, knee and ankle joints were similar between children with flexible flatfeet and with normal arches. The results of ANOVA showed no significant main effect or interaction in any of the kinematic variables (P ≥ 0.05). This study identified no kinematic adaptation during walking in children with flexible flatfoot. We suggested that future research should take the influence of the mid-foot and forefoot into consideration when examining lower extremity kinematics in children with flexible flatfoot.

  11. Novel Automated Morphometric and Kinematic Handwriting Assessment: A Validity Study in Children with ASD and ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirlikov, Benjamin; Younes, Laurent; Nebel, Mary Beth; Martinelli, Mary Katherine; Tiedemann, Alyssa Nicole; Koch, Carolyn A.; Fiorilli, Diana; Bastian, Amy J.; Denckla, Martha Bridge; Miller, Michael I.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents construct validity for a novel automated morphometric and kinematic handwriting assessment, including (1) convergent validity, establishing reliability of automated measures with traditional manual-derived Minnesota Handwriting Assessment (MHA), and (2) discriminant validity, establishing that the automated methods distinguish…

  12. A Kinematically Complete Measurement of the Proton Structure Function F2 in the Resonance Region and Evaluation of Its Moments

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail Osipenko; Et. Al.

    2003-05-01

    We measured the inclusive electron-proton cross section in the nucleon resonance region (W<2.5 GeV) at momentum transfers Q2 below 4.5 (GeV/c)2 with the CLAS detector. The large acceptance of CLAS allowed the measurement of the cross section in a large, contiguous two-dimensional range of Q2 and x, making it possible to perform an integration of the data at fixed Q2 over the significant x interval. >From these data we extracted the structure function F2 and, by including other world data, we studied the Q2 evolution of its moments, Mn(Q2), in order to estimate higher twist contributions. The small statistical and systematic uncertainties of the CLAS data allow a precise extraction of the higher twists and will require significant improvements in theoretical predictions if a meaningful comparison with these new experimental results is to be made.

  13. Kinematically complete measurement of the proton structure function F2 in the resonance region and evaluation of its moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipenko, M.; Ricco, G.; Taiuti, M.; Ripani, M.; Simula, S.; Adams, G.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Calarco, J. R.; Carman, D. S.; Carnahan, B.; Cazes, A.; Cetina, C.; Ciciani, L.; Clark, R.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; de Vita, R.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Domingo, J. J.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Eckhause, M.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Fatemi, R.; Fedotov, G.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Gai, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilad, S.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Griffioen, K.; Golovatch, E.; Gordon, C. I.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Kelley, J. H.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Lawrence, D.; Li, Ji; Livingston, K.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; McAleer, S.; McCarthy, J.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S. A.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Opper, A. K.; Park, K.; Paschke, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Sargsyan, M.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Todor, L.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zhang, B.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2003-05-01

    We measured the inclusive electron-proton cross section in the nucleon resonance region (W<2.5 GeV) at momentum transfers Q2 below 4.5 (GeV/c)2 with the CLAS detector. The large acceptance of CLAS allowed the measurement of the cross section in a large, contiguous two-dimensional range of Q2 and x, making it possible to perform an integration of the data at fixed Q2 over the significant x interval. From these data we extracted the structure function F2 and, by including other world data, we studied the Q2 evolution of its moments, Mn(Q2), in order to estimate higher twist contributions. The small statistical and systematic uncertainties of the CLAS data allow a precise extraction of the higher twists and will require significant improvements in theoretical predictions if a meaningful comparison with these new experimental results is to be made.

  14. Using kinematic reduction for studying grasping postures. An application to power and precision grasp of cylinders.

    PubMed

    Jarque-Bou, N; Gracia-Ibáñez, V; Sancho-Bru, J L; Vergara, M; Pérez-González, A; Andrés, F J

    2016-09-01

    The kinematic analysis of human grasping is challenging because of the high number of degrees of freedom involved. The use of principal component and factorial analyses is proposed in the present study to reduce the hand kinematics dimensionality in the analysis of posture for ergonomic purposes, allowing for a comprehensive study without losing accuracy while also enabling velocity and acceleration analyses to be performed. A laboratory study was designed to analyse the effect of weight and diameter in the grasping posture for cylinders. This study measured the hand posture from six subjects when transporting cylinders of different weights and diameters with precision and power grasps. The hand posture was measured using a Vicon(®) motion-tracking system, and the principal component analysis was applied to reduce the kinematics dimensionality. Different ANOVAs were performed on the reduced kinematic variables to check the effect of weight and diameter of the cylinders, as well as that of the subject. The results show that the original twenty-three degrees of freedom of the hand were reduced to five, which were identified as digit arching, closeness, palmar arching, finger adduction and thumb opposition. Both cylinder diameter and weight significantly affected the precision grasping posture: diameter affects closeness, palmar arching and opposition, while weight affects digit arching, palmar arching and closeness. The power-grasping posture was mainly affected by the cylinder diameter, through digit arching, closeness and opposition. The grasping posture was largely affected by the subject factor and this effect couldn't be attributed only to hand size. In conclusion, this kinematic reduction allowed identifying the effect of the diameter and weight of the cylinders in a comprehensive way, being diameter more important than weight.

  15. Deepwater completion and tieback -- A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiselin, D.

    1996-10-01

    Major operators are engaged in large-scale integrated projects around the world. Does integration favor the big boys, or can a small independent operator benefit from this approach? Independent partners Hardy Oil and Gas USA and Samedan Oil Corp. looked into integrated project management to successfully design and install subsea completions, subsea pipelines, and platform tiebacks and interfaces to two platforms operated by Texaco and Chevron, respectively. The paper describes the project management approach taken and results of the project.

  16. Kinematic and kinetic interactions during normal and ACL-deficient gait: a longitudinal in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Atarod, Mohammad; Frank, Cyril B; Shrive, Nigel G

    2014-03-01

    The interactions between different tissues within the knee joint and between different kinematic DOF and joint flexion during normal gait were investigated. These interactions change following ACL transection, in both short (4 weeks) and long (20 weeks) term. Ten skeletally mature sheep were used in control (N = 5) and experimental (N = 5) groups. The 6-DOF stifle joint motion was first measured during normal gait. The control group were then euthanized and mounted on a unique robotic testing platform for kinetic measurements. The experimental group underwent ACL transection surgery, and kinematics measurements were repeated 4 and 20 weeks post-operatively. The experimental group were then euthanized and underwent kinetic assessment using the robotic system. Results indicated significant couplings between joint flexion vs. abduction and internal tibial rotation, as well as medial, anterior, and superior tibial translations during both normal and ACL-deficient gait. Distinct kinetic interactions were also observed between different tissues within the knee joint. Direct relationships were found between ACL vs. LM/MM, and PCL vs. MCL loads during normal gait; inverse relationships were detected between ACL vs. PCL and PCL vs. LM/MM loads. These kinetic interaction patterns were considerably altered by ACL injury. Significant inter-subject variability in joint kinematics and tissue loading patterns during gait was also observed. This study provides further understanding of the in vivo function of different tissues within the knee joint and their couplings with joint kinematics during normal gait and over time following ACL transection.

  17. A Three-Dimensional Kinematic and Kinetic Study of the College-Level Female Softball Swing

    PubMed Central

    Milanovich, Monica; Nesbit, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper quantifies and discusses the three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the female softball swing as performed by fourteen female collegiate amateur subjects. The analyses were performed using a three-dimensional computer model. The model was driven kinematically from subject swings data that were recorded with a multi-camera motion analysis system. Each subject used two distinct bats with significantly different inertial properties. Model output included bat trajectories, subject/bat interaction forces and torques, work, and power. These data formed the basis for a detailed analysis and description of fundamental swing kinematic and kinetic quantities. The analyses revealed that the softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. In addition, the potential effects of bat properties on swing mechanics are discussed. The paths of the hands and the centre-of-curvature of the bat relative to the horizontal plane appear to be important trajectory characteristics of the swing. Descriptions of the swing mechanics and practical implications are offered based upon these findings. Key Points The female softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. The paths of the grip point, bat centre-of-curvature, CG, and COP are complex yet reveal consistent patterns among subjects indicating that these patterns are fundamental components of the swing. The most important mechanical quantity relative to generating bat speed is the total work applied to the bat from the batter. Computer modeling of the softball swing is a viable means for study of the fundamental mechanics of the swing motion, the interactions between the batter and the bat, and the energy transfers between the two. PMID:24570623

  18. A Morpho-kinematic and Spectroscopic study of Bipolar Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, Niall

    2015-09-01

    In this thesis, studies of the kinematic properties for a sample of Galactic bipolar planetary nebulae, based on optical and infrared observations, were performed using a morpho-kinematic code, optical and NIR diagnostic diagrams, and techniques using data analyses. The mechanisms that form complex bipolar planetary nebulae remain unclear, and their shapes can be generated either as a planetary or symbiotic nebula. The origin of the material ionised by the white dwarf is very different in these two scenarios, and it complicates the understanding of the morphologies of planetary nebulae. The physical properties, structure, and dynamics of the bipolar nebulae, MyCn 18, M 2-9, Mz 3, Hen 2-104, and Abell 14, are each investigated in detail with the aim of understanding their nature, shaping mechanisms, and evolutionary history. For MyCn 18, VLT infrared images, VLT ISAAC infrared spectra, and long-slit optical echelle spectra are used to investigate the inner and outer regions of the nebula. The morpho-kinematic modelling tool shape was used to firmly constrain the structure and kinematics of the source. A timescale analysis was used to help determine the kinematical age of the nebula and its main components. A spectroscopic study of MyCn 18's central region reveals the detailed make-up of its nebular composition. Molecular hydrogen, atomic helium, and Brackett gamma emission are detected in the central regions. ISAAC spectra from a slit position along the narrow waist of the nebula demonstrate that the ionised gas resides closer to the centre of the nebula than the molecular emission. A final reconstructed 3-D model of MyCn 18 was generated, providing kinematical information on the expansion velocity of its nebular components by means of position-velocity arrays (or observed long-slit spectra). A kinematical age of the nebula and its components were obtained using the position-velocity arrays and timescale analysis. For M 2-9, Mz 3, and Hen 2-104, long-slit optical

  19. Head kinematics and shoulder biomechanics in shoulder impacts similar to pedestrian crashes--a THUMS study.

    PubMed

    Paas, Ruth; Davidsson, Johan; Brolin, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Head injuries account for the largest percentage of fatalities among pedestrians in car crashes. To prevent or mitigate such injuries, safety systems that reduce head linear and rotational acceleration should be introduced. Human body models (HBMs) are valuable safety system evaluation tools for assessing both head injury risk and head kinematics prior to head contact. This article aims to evaluate the suitability of the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 4.0 for studying shoulder impacts, similar to pedestrian crashes, investigating head, spine, and shoulder kinematics as well as shoulder biomechanics. Shoulder impact experiments including volunteers and postmortem human subjects (PMHSs) were simulated with THUMS. Head linear and angular and vertebral linear displacements of THUMS were compared with volunteers and shoulder deflections with both volunteers and PMHSs. A parameter variation study was conducted to assess head response to shoulder impacts, by varying shoulder posture and impact directions mimicking shoulder-to-vehicle contacts. Functional biomechanics literature was compared with THUMS responses in view of pedestrian-like shoulder impacts. THUMS head linear displacement compared better with tensed than with relaxed volunteers. Head lateral rotation was comparable with volunteer responses up to 120 ms; head twist was greater in THUMS than in the volunteers. The THUMS spine appeared to be stiffer than in the volunteers. Shoulder deflections were smaller than in the relaxed volunteers but matched the PMHSs. Raised shoulder postures decreased the THUMS shoulder deflections and increased head lateral displacements. When the impactor surface orientation or the impact velocity angle was changed from lateral to superolateral, THUMS head lateral displacement decreased. THUMS scapula and clavicle kinematics compared well with previous experimental studies. The shoulder impact conditions influenced the scapula motion over the thorax, which had

  20. Effect of seated thoracic manipulation on changes in scapular kinematics and scapulohumeral rhythm in young asymptomatic participants: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Dayana P; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Salvini, Tania F; Camargo, Paula R

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects of seated thoracic manipulation on scapulothoracic kinematics and scapulohumeral rhythm during arm flexion in young asymptomatic participants. A convenience sample of 42 young asymptomatic participants was randomly divided in 2 groups: manipulation and sham group. Measurements were taken before and after the intervention. All participants completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire to assess pain and physical function. The manipulation group received the manipulation (high velocity, low amplitude), which was performed by a physical therapist with the patient in the seated position and with the arms crossed over the chest and hands passed over the shoulders. For the sham group, the same procedure was performed, with the exception that the high-velocity thrust was not applied. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematic data were collected with the participants in a relaxed standing position using a 3D electromagnetic tracking system. All participants performed 3 repetitions of arm flexion before and after manipulation. There were no differences (P = .79) in Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores when the manipulation (3.37 ± 3.72) was compared with the sham group (3.68 ± 4.27). The 3-way analysis of variance showed no significant interaction among group, angle, and time differences for the outcomes (scapulothoracic internal/external rotation [F = 0.43; P = .82], upward/downward rotation [F = 0.08; P = .99], tilt [F = 0.23; P = .94], and scapulohumeral rhythm [F = 4; P = .86]). The intragroup effect was small for the outcomes measured in both groups. Thoracic manipulation in the seated position did not affect scapulohumeral rhythm and 3D scapular kinematics during arm flexion in young asymptomatic participants. © 2013. Published by National University of Health Sciences All rights reserved.

  1. Study on kinematic and compliance test of suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lixin; Wu, Liguang; Li, Xuepeng; Zhang, Yu

    2017-09-01

    Chassis performance development is a major difficulty in vehicle research and development, which is the main factor restricting the independent development of vehicles in China. These years, through a large number of studies, chassis engineers have found that the suspension K&C characteristics as a quasi-static characteristic of the suspension provides a technical route for the suspension performance R&D, and the suspension K&C test has become an important means of vehicle benchmarking, optimization and verification. However, the research on suspension K&C test is less in china, and the test conditions and setting requirements vary greatly from OEM to OEM. In this paper, the influence of different settings on the characteristics of the suspension is obtained through experiments, and the causes of the differences are analyzed; in order to fully reflect the suspension characteristics, the author recommends the appropriate test case and settings.

  2. Proper-Motion Based Kinematics Study of Galactic RR Lyraes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambis, Andrei K.; Berdnikov, Leonid N.; Rastorguev, Alexei S.; Zabolotskikh, Marina V.

    2016-08-01

    We use the UCAC4 and SDSS proper motions of about 7500 RR Lyrae type variables located within ~10 kpc from the Sun to study the dependence of their velocity ellipsoid on Galactocentric distance in the R G = 3-17 kpc interval. The radial velocity dispersion, σ VR , decreases from ~190 km/s at R G = 3.5-5.5 kpc down to ~100 km/s at R G = 13-15 kpc, and the σ VT /σ VR ratio remains virtually constant (σ VT /σ VR ~0.54-0.64) in the Galactocentric distance interval from R G = 4.5 kpc to R G = 10.5 kpc increasing to ~0.9 both toward the Galactic center and beyond R G = 11 kpc.

  3. Walking and running on treadmill: the standard criteria for kinematics studies.

    PubMed

    Padulo, Johnny; Chamari, Karim; Ardigò, Luca Paolo

    2014-04-01

    In humans, walking and running represent the most studied locomotion forms. The motorized treadmill has always been a very useful scientific tool, because it allows administer a variety of speed/slope combinations, which is not always easy-to-find in nature. The purpose of this short communication is to help improve the scientific use of the treadmill and explain some simple kinematics variables together with simple ways to measure/calculate them.

  4. Walking and running on treadmill: the standard criteria for kinematics studies

    PubMed Central

    Padulo, Johnny; Chamari, Karim; Ardigò, Luca Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Summary In humans, walking and running represent the most studied locomotion forms. The motorized treadmill has always been a very useful scientific tool, because it allows administer a variety of speed/slope combinations, which is not always easy-to-find in nature. The purpose of this short communication is to help improve the scientific use of the treadmill and explain some simple kinematics variables together with simple ways to measure/calculate them. PMID:25332929

  5. Kinematically complete final state investigations of molecular photodissociation: two- and three-body decay of laser-prepared H 3 3 s 2 A 1 '

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galster, U.; Kaminski, P.; Beckert, M.; Helm, H.; Müller, U.

    2001-12-01

    We have performed kinematically complete investigations of molecular photodissociation of triatomic hydrogen in a fast beam translational spectrometer recently built in Freiburg. The apparatus allows us to investigate laser-induced dissociation of neutral molecules into two, three, or more neutral products. The fragments are detected in coincidence and their vectorial momenta in the center-of-mass frame are determined. We demonstrate the potential of the method at the fragmentation of the 3 s 2A1'(N = 1, K = 0) state of triatomic hydrogen. In this state, three-body decay into ground state hydrogen atoms H+H+H, two-body predissociation into H+H2(v, J), and photoemission to the H3 ground state surface with subsequent two-body decay are competing channels. In the case of two-body predissociation, we determine the rovibrational population in the H2(v, J) fragment. The vibrational distribution of H2 is compared with approximate theoretical predictions. For three-body decay, we measure the six-fold differential photodissociation cross-section. To determine accurate final state distributions, the geometric collection efficiency of the apparatus is calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation, and the raw data are corrected for apparatus efficiency. The final state momentum distribution shows pronounced correlation patterns which are characteristic for the dissociation mechanism. For a three-body decay process with a discrete kinetic energy release we have developed a novel data reduction procedure based on the detection of two fragments. The final state distribution determined by this independent method agrees extremely well with that observed in the triple-coincidence data. In addition, this method allows us to fully explore the phase space of the final state and to determine the branching ratios between the two- and three-body decay processes.

  6. 2MASS photometry and kinematical studies of open cluster NGC 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsanhoury, W. H.; Haroon, A. A.; Chupina, N. V.; Vereshchagin, S. V.; Sariya, Devesh P.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present our results for the photometric and kinematical studies of old open cluster NGC 188. We determined various astrophysical parameters like limited radius, core and tidal radii, distance, luminosity and mass functions, total mass, relaxation time etc. for the cluster using 2MASS catalog. We obtained the cluster's distance from the Sun as 1721 ± 41 pc and log (age)= 9.85 ± 0.05 at Solar metallicity. The relaxation time of the cluster is smaller than the estimated cluster age which suggests that the cluster is dynamically relaxed. Our results agree with the values mentioned in the literature. We also determined the clusters apex coordinates as (281°.88, -44∘ .76) using AD-diagram method. Other kinematical parameters like space velocity components, cluster center and elements of Solar motion etc. have also been computed.

  7. A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, Reuben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for analyzing the kinematics of joint motion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The reconstruction of the metacarpalphalangeal joint of the left index finger into a 3D graphic display is shown. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones are obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the joint. Landmark positions are chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily 2D planar motion of this joint is then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three or more points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system describes the location and orientation of the local target coordinate system. The findings show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove design for EVA.

  8. A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, Reuben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for analyzing the kinematics of joint motion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The reconstruction of the metacarpalphalangeal joint of the left index finger into a 3D graphic display is shown. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones are obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the joint. Landmark positions are chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily 2D planar motion of this joint is then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three or more points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system describes the location and orientation of the local target coordinate system. The findings show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove design for EVA.

  9. Swimming performance studies on the eastern Pacific bonito Sarda chiliensis, a close relative of the tunas (family Scombridae) II. Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Dowis, Hawkins J; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Graham, Jeffrey B; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2003-08-01

    The swimming kinematics of the eastern Pacific bonito Sarda chiliensis at a range of sustained speeds were analyzed to test the hypothesis that the bonito's swimming mode differs from the thunniform locomotor mode of tunas. Eight bonito (fork length FL 47.5+/-2.1 cm, mass 1.25+/-0.15 kg) (mean +/- S.D.) swam at speeds of 50-130 cm s(-1) at 18+/-2 degrees C in the same temperature-controlled water tunnel that was used in previous studies of tunas. Kinematics variables, quantified from 60 Hz video recordings and analyzed using a computerized, two-dimensional motion analysis system, were compared with published data for similar sized tunas at comparable speeds. Bonito tailbeat frequency, tailbeat amplitude and stride length all increased significantly with speed. Neither yaw (6.0+/-0.6%FL) nor propulsive wavelength (120+/-65% fish total length) varied with speed, and there were no mass or body-length effects on the kinematics variables for the size range of bonitos used. Relative to similar sized yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) tunas at similar speeds, the bonito has a lower tailbeat frequency, a higher yaw and a greater stride length. The lateral displacement and bending angle of each intervertebral joint during a complete tailbeat cycle were determined for the bonito at a swimming speed of 90 cm s(-1). The pattern of mean maximum lateral displacement (z(max)) and mean maximum bending angle (beta(max)) along the body in the bonito differed from that of both chub mackerel Scomber japonicus and kawakawa tuna Euthynnus affinis; z(max) was highest in the bonito. This study verifies that S. chiliensis is a carangiform swimmer and supports the hypothesis that the thunniform locomotor mode is a derived tuna characteristic associated with changes in this group's myotomal architecture. The finding that yaw and z(max) were greater in the bonito than in both mackerels and tunas suggests that swimming kinematics in the bonito is not intermediate

  10. Study determines better well completion practices

    SciTech Connect

    Venditto, J.J.; McMechan, D.E. ); Simpson, G. ); Hyde, P.V.; Friend, L.L.; Schindler, R.E. )

    1993-01-25

    The 9-month Halliburton Services and Columbia Natural Resources (CNR) study showed a number of ways for improving gas production from Devonian shale and other tight gas formations. This paper discusses these conclusions and the supporting evidence. In the West Virginia study well, the effects of perforation direction on fracture initiation were illustrated by breakdown pressure differences and fluid distribution. This was determined with a prototype directional gamma ray logging (DGRL) tool that measures azimuthal distribution of the tracer. The perforation (4,857-4,860 ft) aligned with the least principal stress broke down at 3,238 psi, while the perforations (4,850-4,853 ft) aligned perpendicular to the least principal stress broke down at 2,731 psi.

  11. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Moschovidis, Z.; Parker, C.

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  12. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  13. A SAURON Study of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster: Kinematics and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, Agnieszka; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús

    Dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) are the most common galaxy type in nearby galaxy clusters; even so, many of their basic properties have yet to be quantified. Here we present the results of our study of 4 Virgo dwarf ellipticals obtained with the SAURON integral field unit on the William Herschel Telescope (La Palma, Spain). While traditional long-slit observations are likely to miss more complicated kinematic features, with SAURON we are able to study both kinematics and stellar populations in two dimensions, obtaining a much more detailed view of the mass distribution and star formation histories. What is visible even in such a small sample is that dEs are not a uniform group, not only morphologically, but also as far as their kinematic and stellar population properties are concerned. We find the presence of substructures, varying degrees of flattening and of rotation, as well as differences in age and metallicity gradients. We confirm that two of our galaxies are significantly flattened, yet non-rotating objects, which makes them likely triaxial systems. The comparison between the dwarf and the giant groups shows that dEs could be a low-mass extension of Es in the sense that they do seem to follow the same trends with mass. However, dEs as progenitors of Es seem less likely as we have seen that dEs have much lower abundance ratios.

  14. The kinematics of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus artificial cervical disc: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Doron; Pickett, Gwynedd E; Bisnaire, Lynn; Duggal, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the management of cervical spondylosis may contribute to further degenerative changes at adjacent levels secondary to abnormal spinal motion. Insertion of a Bryan Cervical Disc (AD) (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) may prevent this accelerated degeneration. This retrospective study compares the in vivo x-ray cervical spine kinematics in patients with ACDF and AD. Ten patients with single-level AD were matched to 10 patients with single-level ACDF based on age and sex. Lateral neutral, flexion and extension cervical x-rays were obtained preoperatively and at regular intervals up to 24 months postoperatively. Kinematic parameters, including range of motion, anteroposterior translation, and disc height, were assessed for all cervical functional spinal units using quantitative motion analysis software. Changes in these parameters were compared between matched patients from both groups using paired Student's t tests. The range of motion at the operated level was greater in the AD group compared with the ACDF group at early (6.9 versus 0.89 degrees, P < 0.01) and late (8.4 versus 0.53 degrees, P < 0.01) follow-up evaluations. Translation was greater at the operated level in patients with AD at late follow-up (6.8 versus 0.8%, P < 0.03) evaluation. No significant between-group kinematic differences were seen at adjacent levels. Patients with AD and those with ACDF demonstrated similar in vivo adjacent level kinematics within the first 24 months after anterior cervical decompression.

  15. In vitro biomechanical study of femoral torsion disorders: effect on femoro-tibial kinematics.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, S; Dugailly, P-M; Baillon, B; Lefevre, P; Rooze, M; Salvia, P; Feipel, V

    2012-12-01

    Gonarthrosis is a degenerative disease mainly found in elderly persons. Frontal plane deviations are known to induce lateral and medial gonarthrosis. Nevertheless, patients suffer from gonarthrosis without frontal deviations. Lower limb torsions disorders have been considered as a factor inducing lateral and medial gonarthrosis. This paper reports an in vitro study aiming at quantifying the relationships between experimental femoral torsion disorders and femoro-tibial kinematics. Five fresh-frozen lower limbs were used. Specimens were fixed on an experimental jig and muscles were loaded. A six-degree-of-freedom Instrumented Spatial Linkage was used to measure femoro-tibial kinematics. Experimental femoral osteotomies were performed to simulate various degrees of medial and lateral torsion. Internal tibial rotation, abduction/adduction and proximo-distal, medio-lateral and antero-posterior translations were measured during knee flexion. Internal tibial rotation and abduction/adduction were significantly influenced (P<0.001) by femoral torsion disorder conditions. Medial femoral torsion increased tibial adduction and decreased internal rotation during knee flexion. Opposite changes were observed during lateral femoral torsion. Concerning translations, medial femoral torsion induced a significant (P<0.05) decrease of medial translation and inversely for lateral femoral torsion. No interactions between femoral torsion disorders and range of motion were observed. Our results showed that medial and lateral femoral torsion disorders induced alterations of femoro-tibial kinematics when applied in normally aligned lower limbs. These results highlight a potential clinical relevance of the effect of femoral torsion alterations on knee kinematics that may be related to the development of long-term knee disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inverse kinematics (p, n) reactions studies using the WINDS slow neutron detector and the SAMURAI spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, J.; Sasano, M.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Baba, H.; Chao, W.; Dozono, M.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jhang, G.; Kameda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Milman, E.; Motobayashi, T.; Otsu, H.; Panin, V.; Powell, W.; Sakai, H.; Sako, M.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Stuhl, L.; Suzuki, H.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Takeda, H.; Uesaka, T.; Yoneda, K.; Zenihiro, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Sumikama, T.; Tako, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.; Togano, Y.; Shikata, M.; Tsubota, J.; Yako, K.; Shimoura, S.; Ota, S.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Takaki, M.; Michimasa, S.; Kisamori, K.; Lee, C. S.; Tokieda, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koyama, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Wakasa, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Kaneko, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Mucher, D.; Reichert, S.; Bazin, D.; Lee, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined the low-energy neutron detector WINDS (Wide-angle Inverse-kinematics Neutron Detectors for SHARAQ) and the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIKEN Nishina Center RI Beam Factory (RIBF) in order to perform (p, n) reactions in inverse kinematics for unstable nuclei in the mass region around A ∼ 100 . In this setup, WINDS is used for detecting recoil neutrons and the SAMURAI spectrometer is used for tagging decay channel of heavy residue. The first experiment by using the setup was performed to study Gamow-Teller transitions from 132Sn in April 2014. The atomic number Z and mass-to-charge ratio A / Q of the beam residues were determined from the measurements of time of flight, magnetic rigidity and energy loss. The obtained A / Q and Z resolutions were σA/Q = 0.14 % and σZ = 0.22 , respectively. Furthermore, owing to the large momentum acceptance (50 %) of SAMURAI, the beam residues associated with the γ , 1n and 2n decay channel were measured in the same magnetic field setting. The kinematic loci of the measured recoil neutron energy and laboratory angle are clearly seen. It shows that the excitation energy up to about 20 MeV can be reconstructed.

  17. Total knee arthroplasty kinematics may be assessed using computer modeling: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William M; Williams, John L

    2012-10-01

    The next generational leap in computer navigation will hopefully aid surgeons in personalizing surgical techniques to patients' individual anatomical variables to optimize outcomes. To effectively use the information obtained in the operating room, a multitude of kinematic variables must be conveyed to the orthopedic surgeon in a usable and coherent manner. This study used an intraoperative navigation system to record passive knee kinematics after a total knee arthroplastyperformed. The clinical measures were taken via research software with the ability to record kinematic data in 10-second intervals. The data from 10 consecutive clinical cases were averaged, and the translation (anterior/posterior) and rotation (internal/external) were recorded and compared from 0° to 100° of flexion to allow for comparison with the previously recorded computer model. Model and clinical curves compared favorably, with less than 1° rotational and 1.5-mm differences, on average. The comparison of information and analyses were reviewed to indicate how they might be interpreted in the operating room for future use during surgery to allow a more personalized approach to improving functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

  18. A kinematic study of critical and non-critical articulators in emotional speech production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangwon; Toutios, Asterios; Lee, Sungbok; Narayanan, Shrikanth S

    2015-03-01

    This study explores one aspect of the articulatory mechanism that underlies emotional speech production, namely, the behavior of linguistically critical and non-critical articulators in the encoding of emotional information. The hypothesis is that the possible larger kinematic variability in the behavior of non-critical articulators enables revealing underlying emotional expression goal more explicitly than that of the critical articulators; the critical articulators are strictly controlled in service of achieving linguistic goals and exhibit smaller kinematic variability. This hypothesis is examined by kinematic analysis of the movements of critical and non-critical speech articulators gathered using eletromagnetic articulography during spoken expressions of five categorical emotions. Analysis results at the level of consonant-vowel-consonant segments reveal that critical articulators for the consonants show more (less) peripheral articulations during production of the consonant-vowel-consonant syllables for high (low) arousal emotions, while non-critical articulators show less sensitive emotional variation of articulatory position to the linguistic gestures. Analysis results at the individual phonetic targets show that overall, between- and within-emotion variability in articulatory positions is larger for non-critical cases than for critical cases. Finally, the results of simulation experiments suggest that the postural variation of non-critical articulators depending on emotion is significantly associated with the controls of critical articulators.

  19. Kinematic space and wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-dong; Chen, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The kinematic space could play a key role in constructing the bulk geometry from dual CFT. In this paper, we study the kinematic space from geometric points of view, without resorting to differential entropy. We find that the kinematic space could be intrinsically defined in the embedding space. For each oriented geodesic in the Poincaré disk, there is a corresponding point in the kinematic space. This point is the tip of the causal diamond of the disk whose intersection with the Poincaré disk determines the geodesic. In this geometric construction, the causal structure in the kinematic space can be seen clearly. Moreover, we find that every transformation in the SL(2,R) leads to a geodesic in the kinematic space. In particular, for a hyperbolic transformation defining a BTZ black hole, it is a timelike geodesic in the kinematic space. We show that the horizon length of the static BTZ black hole could be computed by the geodesic length of corresponding points in the kinematic space. Furthermore, we discuss the fundamental regions in the kinematic space for the BTZ blackhole and multi-boundary wormholes.

  20. Simulated stellar kinematics studies of high-redshift galaxies with the HARMONI Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, S.; Zieleniewski, S.; Houghton, R. C. W.; Thatte, N.; Devriendt, J.; Tecza, M.; Clarke, F.; O'Brien, K.; Häußler, B.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study into the capabilities of integrated and spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of galaxies at z = 2-4 with the future HARMONI spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) using the simulation pipeline, HSIM. We focus particularly on the instrument's capabilities in stellar absorption line integral field spectroscopy, which will allow us to study the stellar kinematics and stellar population characteristics. Such measurements for star-forming and passive galaxies around the peak star formation era will provide a critical insight into the star formation, quenching and mass assembly history of high-z, and thus present-day galaxies. First, we perform a signal-to-noise study for passive galaxies at a range of stellar masses for z = 2-4, assuming different light profiles; for this population, we estimate that integrated stellar absorption line spectroscopy with HARMONI will be limited to galaxies with M* ≳ 1010.7 M⊙. Secondly, we use HSIM to perform a mock observation of a typical star-forming 1010 M⊙ galaxy at z = 3 generated from the high-resolution cosmological simulation NUTFB. We demonstrate that the input stellar kinematics of the simulated galaxy can be accurately recovered from the integrated spectrum in a 15-h observation, using common analysis tools. Whilst spatially resolved spectroscopy is likely to remain out of reach for this particular galaxy, we estimate HARMONI's performance limits in this regime from our findings. This study demonstrates how instrument simulators such as HSIM can be used to quantify instrument performance and study observational biases on kinematics retrieval; and shows the potential of making observational predictions from cosmological simulation output data.

  1. Study of the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of a wormgear transmission for helicopter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1994-01-01

    The first phase of the study of the performance of a wormgear transmission is reported. In this phase the work included the selection of a double-enveloping wormgear type, and its dimensions, suitable for use in helicopter transmissions; the 3-D graphics representation of the selected wormgear using the I-DEAS software; the analysis of the kinematics of meshing; the analysis of load sharing among the meshing teeth; and the implementation of the analyses in a computer program. The report describes the analyses, their results, and the use of the computer programs.

  2. A numerical and experimental study of the kinematics of a tennis ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro Sorroche, Juan

    A numerical and experimental study of the kinematics of a tennis ball. An experimental apparatus to collect data of the tennis ball in motion is designed and constructed. Data collected by the experimental apparatus is corrected by the intrinsic and extrinsic camera distortions before numeric calculation predictions of the ball's point of impact with the court are made. The experimental apparatus constructed together with comprehensive numeric computations including atmospheric conditions and spin decay, allowed making predictions of the ball's point of impact with the court with and errors <0.029%

  3. A kinematic study on (un)intentional imitation in bottlenose dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Bulgheroni, Maria; Tizzi, Raffaella; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of observing other’s movements on subsequent performance in bottlenose dolphins. The imitative ability of non-human animals has intrigued a number of researchers. So far, however, studies in dolphins have been confined to intentional imitation concerned with the explicit request to imitate other agents. In the absence of instruction to imitate, do dolphins (un)intentionally replicate other’s movement features? To test this, dolphins were filmed while reaching and touching a stimulus before and after observing another dolphin (i.e., model) performing the same action. All videos were reviewed and segmented in order to extract the relevant movements. A marker was inserted post hoc via software on the videos upon the anatomical landmark of interest (i.e., rostrum) and was tracked throughout the time course of the movement sequence. The movement was analyzed using an in-house software developed to perform two-dimensional (2D) post hoc kinematic analysis. The results indicate that dolphins’ kinematics is sensitive to other’s movement features. Movements performed for the “visuomotor priming” condition were characterized by a kinematic pattern similar to that performed by the observed dolphin (i.e., model). Addressing the issue of spontaneous imitation in bottlenose dolphins might allow ascertaining whether the potential or impulse to produce an imitative action is generated, not just when they intend to imitate, but whenever they watch another conspecific’s behavior. In closing, this will clarify whether motor representational capacity is a by-product of factors specific to humans or whether more general characteristics such as processes of associative learning prompted by high level of encephalization could help to explain the evolution of this ability. PMID:26300764

  4. Kinematics of the Cervical Spine After Unilateral Facet Fracture: An In Vitro Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Chen, Linda; Uko, Linda; Zorrilla, Andres; Hauser, Spencer; Vives, Michael J

    2017-09-15

    Biomechanical study utilizing human cadaveric cervical spines. To quantitatively assess the effects on intervertebral motion of isolated unilateral cervical facet fracture, and after disruption of the intervertebral disc at the same level. Clinical evidence has indirectly suggested that cervical facet fractures involving 40% of the height of the lateral mass can cause instability of the involved segment. No study to date has demonstrated the kinematic effects of such an injury in a cadaveric model of the cervical spine. Nine six-segment cervical spines were defrosted and fixated to a spine motion simulator capable to apply unconstrained bending moments in the three anatomical planes. The spines were subjected to a maximum torque of 2 N · m in flexion, extension, left and right lateral bending, and of 4 N · m in left and right axial rotation. Each spine was tested in the intact configuration (INTACT), and following two increasing degrees of injury at C4-C5: fracture of the facet (CF1), and CF1 with disruption of the intervertebral disc at the same level (CF2). Intervertebral kinematics was tracked via clusters of active markers fixated on each vertebra. Differences in kinematics between INTACT and the two injured configurations were assessed via one-way Analysis of Variance (P < 0.05). No significant differences were detected between INTACT and CF1 across all kinematic parameters (P > 0.05) at C4-C5. CF2, however, resulted in significant increase of flexion, left axial rotation, and left lateral bending with respect to INTACT (flexion at C4-C5: INTACT = 8.7° ± 3.5°; CF2 = 14.3 ± 5.7; P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that superior articular facet fractures alone involving 40% of the lateral mass may not necessarily result in intervertebral instability under physiologic loading conditions. The addition of partial injury to the intervertebral disc, however, resulted in statistically significant increase in angular displacement

  5. Internal Kinematics of the Volume-reduced Tongue: A Longitudinal Microsonometric Study

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JIE; SHCHERBATYY, VOLODYMYR; LIU, ZI-JUN

    2015-01-01

    This study examined tongue internal kinematics during feeding over time after its volume reduction. Six ultrasonic crystals were implanted into the tongue to record distance changes in anterior width (AW), bilateral lengths (LENG), posterior thicknesses (THICK), posterior dorsal (PDW) and ventral (PVW) widths in 5 sibling pairs of Yucatan minipigs (n=10). In each pair, one received tongue volume reduction surgery (reduction) and the other had the identical incisions without tissue removal (sham). Functional deformation of the tongue from pre-implanted ultrasonic crystals was recorded during natural feeding 1 day before, 7–8, 13–15 and 28–30 days after the surgery. The results revealed that feeding behavior and tongue functional deformation were unchanged over time in the sham pigs. However, at day 7–8, more frequent and longer ingestion episodes were seen in the reduction as compared to the sham. Moreover, deformational changes in AW and LENG decreased while those in THICK, PDW and PVW increased significantly (P < 0.001). At day 13–15, the reduced deformational changes in LENG (P < 0.01) slightly restored and the increased deformation in THICK (P > 0.05), PDW (P < 0.01), and PVW (P < 0.05) diminished. At day 28–30, the restoration of AW and LENG continued (P < 0.01–0.05), but previously enhanced deformations in THICK, PDW and PVW were no longer significantly different from the baseline (P > 0.05). These results suggest that the tongue volume reduction has significant and persistent impacts on feeding behaviors and tongue internal kinematics, and the restoring capacity of internal kinematics in the anterior tongue is limited and incomplete over time. PMID:26456078

  6. Internal Kinematics of the Volume-Reduced Tongue: A Longitudinal Microsonometric Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Shcherbatyy, Volodymyr; Liu, Zi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study examined tongue internal kinematics during feeding over time after its volume reduction. Six ultrasonic crystals were implanted into the tongue to record distance changes in anterior width (AW), bilateral lengths (LENG), posterior thicknesses (THICK), and posterior dorsal (PDW) and ventral (PVW) widths in five sibling pairs of Yucatan minipigs (N = 10). In each pair, one received tongue volume reduction surgery (reduction), and the other had the identical incisions without tissue removal (sham). Functional deformation of the tongue from preimplanted ultrasonic crystals was recorded during natural feeding 1 day before, 7-8, 13-15, and 28-30 days after the surgery. The results revealed that feeding behavior and tongue functional deformation were unchanged over time in the sham pigs. However, at Days 7-8, more frequent and longer ingestion episodes were seen in the reduction as compared with the sham. Moreover, deformational changes in AW and LENG decreased, whereas those in THICK, PDW, and PVW increased significantly (P < 0.001). At Days 13-15, the reduced deformational changes in LENG (P < 0.01) slightly restored, and the increased deformation in THICK (P > 0.05), PDW (P < 0.01), and PVW (P < 0.05) diminished. At Days 28-30, the restoration of AW and LENG continued (P < 0.01-0.05), but previously enhanced deformations in THICK, PDW, and PVW were no longer significantly different from the baseline (P > 0.05). These results suggest that the tongue volume reduction has significant and persistent impacts on feeding behaviors and tongue internal kinematics, and the restoring capacity of internal kinematics in the anterior tongue is limited and incomplete over time.

  7. Study of the kinematic variables of unilateral and habitual mastication of healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Pasinato, Fernanda; Oliveira, Andréia Gussi de; Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C; Zeredo, Jorge Luis Lopes; Bolzan, Geovana de Paula; Macedo, Sergio Bruzadelli; Corrêa, Eliane C R

    2017-03-30

    To describe and compare the temporal-spatial kinematic variables of mandibular movement during deliberate unilateral and habitual mastication in healthy young-adult individuals. The study sample was composed of eight male healthy volunteers aged 19 to 24 years. The kinematic data were obtained using a motion analysis system - Qualisys Track Manager (QTM) ProReflex MCU. Recordings were performed during deliberate unilateral mastication (UM) and habitual mastication (HM) of firm-consistency gummy candy. The following variables were analyzed: (1) masticatory sequence: duration, number of masticatory cycles, and chewing rate; (2) masticatory cycle: duration, vertical and medial-lateral mandibular range of motion in relation to the skull, and maximum velocity during the opening and closing phases. Data of the variables were compared during UM and HM by the paired t test, and the effect sizes ('d' Cohen) were calculated. Regarding the variables of the masticatory sequence, smaller chewing rate was observed for UM compared with that for HM (1.19±0.21Hz and 1.29±0.16Hz, respectively, p=0.004, d=0.53). Smaller values of maximum velocity during the opening (MU=67.4 mm/s and MH=80.02, p=0.053, d=0.80) and closing (MU=71.77±9.35mm/s and MH=3.51±7mm/s, p=0.014, d=0.79) phases of the masticatory cycle were observed in deliberate unilateral mastication compared with those in habitual mastication. Kinematic variables associated with the sequence and cycle of mastication are influenced by the chewing pattern adopted - deliberate unilateral or habitual.

  8. Postural stability and vehicle kinematics during an evasive lane change manoeuvre: a driver training study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew; Barrett, Rod

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a 2-day driver-training course that emphasised postural stability maintenance during critical driving situations on postural stability and vehicle kinematics during an evasive lane change manoeuvre. Following training, the trainee group experienced enhanced postural stability during specific phases of the task. In terms of vehicle kinematics, the main adaptation to training was that trained drivers reduced the extent to which they experienced vehicle decelerations during rapid turning compared to controls. Such a strategy may confer a safety benefit due to the increased risks associated with simultaneous braking while turning during an evasive manoeuvre. The newly learned strategy was consistent with the strategy used by a group of highly skilled drivers (driving instructors). Taken together, the results of the study suggest postural stability may be a useful variable to consider in relation to the skill-based component of hierarchical driver training programmes. The findings of this study provide some preliminary evidence to suggest that postural stability may be an important consideration when instructing individuals on how to safely negotiate obstacles during driving.

  9. Using Hydrogen Recombination Masers to Study Disk and Wind Kinematics in MWC 349A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Deanna Lily; Zhang, Qizhou

    2017-06-01

    The kinematics of circumstellar disks and disk winds are poorly understood due to the difficulty of producing well resolved observational data. The bright hydrogen recombination-line maser emission originating from the circumstellar disk of MWC 349A offers a unique opportunity to study the disk at milli-arcsecond precision. Using high angular resolution observations of the maser emission from MWC 349A carried out by the SMA, we were able to produce and analyze rotation curves for the H26α, H30α, and H31α transitions. We found that maser features originating from the disk follow Keplerian motion. Furthermore, the H31α masers in the disk appear to form in a narrow annulus at a fixed radius from the star, consistent with previous studies of the H30α and H26α masers. Based on analysis of the rotation curves for the three maser transitions, we determined that maser transitions for lower quantum numbers occur in the inner and denser regions of the disk than the higher quantum transitions. Additionally, we derived the density distribution within the disk, which follows the relation ne ~ R-4.9 ± 0.6. Finally, we found that a stellar mass of M = 10 ± 3 M⊙ was most consistent with the kinematics of the maser features originating from the Keplerian disk.

  10. A Study of Prior Learning Assessment in Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jean Marie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of prior learning assessment (PLA) in postsecondary degree completion for adult community college students at Mountwest Community and Technical College (MCTC). The study group consisted of 339 MCTC graduates, who applied PLA credits toward degree completion between the academic year 2006 and 2011.…

  11. A Study of Prior Learning Assessment in Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jean Marie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of prior learning assessment (PLA) in postsecondary degree completion for adult community college students at Mountwest Community and Technical College (MCTC). The study group consisted of 339 MCTC graduates, who applied PLA credits toward degree completion between the academic year 2006 and 2011.…

  12. 2D kinematic study of the central region of NGC 4501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, P.; Faúndez-Abans, M.; Freitas-Lemes, P.; Rodrigues, I.; de Oliveira-Abans, M.

    2017-01-01

    Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph and its Integral Field Unit observational data were used to study the detailed 2D gas kinematics and morphological structures within the ˜500 × 421 pc2 of the active Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4501. We provide empirical pieces of evidence of possible outflowing material from the central zones of NGC 4501 to the observer. In addition, we performed a spectral synthesis and diagnostic diagram analysis to determine respectively the dominant stellar population in the inner disc of this galaxy and to unveil the actual nature of the central engine of NGC 4501. The principal finding of this work is that the central regions of NGC 4501 are dominated by non-circular motions connected to probable outflows of matter from the nuclear regions of this galaxy. A predominant old stellar population inhabits the internal zones of NGC 4501, excluding the possibility of ongoing starburst activity in the central parsecs of this galaxy. The latter result is confirmed by the diagnostic diagram analysis that establishes a preponderant active galactic nucleus character for NGC 4501. These outcomes together provide a general description of the gas motion and the corresponding nuclear activity in the internal disc of NGC 4501 in an attempt to elucidate the possible relation among the central activity and the induced kinematic properties of this nearby galaxy.

  13. A spectroscopy study of nearby late-type stars, possible members of stellar kinematic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Eiroa, C.; Montes, D.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Nearby late-type stars are excellent targets for seeking young objects in stellar associations and moving groups. The origin of these structures is still misunderstood, and lists of moving group members often change with time and also from author to author. Most members of these groups have been identified by means of kinematic criteria, leading to an important contamination of previous lists by old field stars. Aims: We attempt to identify unambiguous moving group members among a sample of nearby-late type stars by studying their kinematics, lithium abundance, chromospheric activity, and other age-related properties. Methods: High-resolution echelle spectra (R ~ 57 000) of a sample of nearby late-type stars are used to derive accurate radial velocities that are combined with the precise Hipparcos parallaxes and proper motions to compute galactic-spatial velocity components. Stars are classified as possible members of the classical moving groups according to their kinematics. The spectra are also used to study several age-related properties for young late-type stars, i.e., the equivalent width of the lithium Li i 6707.8 Å line or the R'HK index. Additional information like X-ray fluxes from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey or the presence of debris discs is also taken into account. The different age estimators are compared and the moving group membership of the kinematically selected candidates are discussed. Results: From a total list of 405 nearby stars, 102 have been classified as moving group candidates according to their kinematics. i.e., only ~25.2% of the sample. The number reduces when age estimates are considered, and only 26 moving group candidates (25.5% of the 102 candidates) have ages in agreement with the star having the same age as an MG member. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andaluc

  14. Comparison of kinematic variables obtained by inertial sensors among stroke survivors and healthy older adults in the Functional Reach Test: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Merchán-Baeza, José Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio

    2015-05-30

    Balance dysfunction is one of the most common problems in people who suffer stroke. To parameterize functional tests standardized by inertial sensors have been promoted in applied medicine. The aim of this study was to compare the kinematic variables of the Functional Reach Test (FRT) obtained by two inertial sensors placed on the trunk and lumbar region between stroke survivors (SS) and healthy older adults (HOA) and to analyze the reliability of the kinematic measurements obtained. Cross-sectional study. Five SS and five HOA over 65. A descriptive analysis of the average range as well as all kinematic variables recorded was developed. The intrasubject and intersubject reliability of the measured variables was directly calculated. In the same intervals, the angular displacement was greater in the HOA group; however, they were completed at similar times for both groups, and HOA conducted the test at a higher speed and greater acceleration in each of the intervals. The SS values were higher than HOA values in the maximum and minimum acceleration in the trunk and in the lumbar region. The SS show less functional reach, a narrower, slower and less accelerated movement during the FRT execution, but with higher peaks of acceleration and speed when they are compared with HOA.

  15. Probabilistic Completeness Studies of the INGV Seismic Network in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorlemmer, D.; Mele, F.; Marzocchi, W.

    2007-12-01

    An important characteristic of any seismic network is its detection completeness, which should be considered a function of space and time. Many researchers rely on robust estimates of detection completeness, especially when investigating statistical parameters of earthquake occurence. We apply the newly developed probabilistic magnitude of completeness (PMC) method to the INGV network in Italy and report on completeness and earthquake detection capabilities. We have (1) investigated the variation of detection completeness with time over the last two years, (2) conducted scenario computations on possible system failures, (3) estimated the completeness drops due to random failures of stations. The results show that the INGV network is largely stable and strongly affected only by large-scale station outages. This stability indicates that Italy can provide the data of required quality for CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability) testing.

  16. A novel probe design to study wetting front kinematics during forced convective quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Vergara-Hernandez, H.J.; Hernandez-Morales, B.

    2009-07-15

    The kinematics of the wetting front, i.e., the loci of the boundary between stable vapor film and the presence of bubbles, during quenching operations largely determines the evolution of the microstructural and displacement fields which, in turn, control the properties of the quenched product. Thus, it is important to develop techniques that allow its precise characterization. To this end, a novel probe design (conical-end cylinder) was coupled with an experimental set-up that guarantees fully developed flow to study wetting front kinematics during forced convective quenching of AISI 304 stainless steel probes in water at 60 C, flowing at 0.20 and 0.60 m/s. Conventional probes (flat-end cylinder) were also quenched for comparison. The wetting front was not symmetric when flat-end cylindrical probes were quenched, even for fully developed flow and relatively low values of quenchant velocity. Computer simulation of the vorticity field near the probe base (considering an isothermal system at ambient temperature) showed that there is a significant vorticity gradient in that region which may favour the chaotic collapse of the vapor film. In contrast, a similar calculation did not show any noticeable vorticity gradient for the conical-end cylindrical probe even at high quenchant velocities. The conical-end cylindrical probe and a fully developed flow ensured that the vapor film collapsed uniformly around the probe due to the fact that the formation of the wetting front was concentrated, initially, at the probe tip. This condition permits a constant advance of the wetting front and a stable transition between boiling regimes, facilitating the study of the kinematics of the wetting front. For the experimental conditions studied the following parameters were derived: (1) wetting front velocity, (2) nucleate boiling length, (3) duration of the nucleate boiling stage and (4) width of the vapor film. The duration of the nucleate boiling stage could be estimated using existing

  17. Effects of jump and balance training on knee kinematics and electromyography of female basketball athletes during a single limb drop landing: pre-post intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some research studies have investigated the effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs on knee kinematics during landing tasks; however the results were different among the studies. Even though tibial rotation is usually observed at the time of ACL injury, the effects of training programs for knee kinematics in the horizontal plane have not yet been analyzed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a jump and balance training program on knee kinematics including tibial rotation as well as on electromyography of the quadriceps and hamstrings in female athletes. Methods Eight female basketball athletes participated in the experiment. All subjects performed a single limb landing at three different times: the initial test, five weeks later, and one week after completing training. The jump and balance training program lasted for five weeks. Knee kinematics and simultaneous electromyography of the rectus femoris and Hamstrings before training were compared with those measured after completing the training program. Results After training, regarding the position of the knee at foot contact, the knee flexion angle for the Post-training trial (mean (SE): 24.4 (2.1) deg) was significantly larger than that for the Pre-training trial (19.3 (2.5) deg) (p < 0.01). The absolute change during landing in knee flexion for the Post-training trial (40.2 (1.9) deg) was significantly larger than that for the Pre-training trial (34.3 (2.5) deg) (p < 0.001). Tibial rotation and the knee varus/valgus angle were not significantly different after training. A significant increase was also found in the activity of the hamstrings 50 ms before foot contact (p < 0.05). Conclusions The jump and balance training program successfully increased knee flexion and hamstring activity of female athletes during landing, and has the possibility of producing partial effects to avoid the characteristic knee position observed in ACL injury, thereby

  18. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  19. Using three-dimensional kinematics to identify feedback for the Snatch: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kuok Wai Lester; Williams, Morgan D; Wilson, Cameron J; Meehan, Daniel L

    2011-10-01

    This case study evaluated the importance of peak bar velocity and starting posture adopted by a novice weightlifter to the outcome of a Snatch lift. Multiple observations of both successful and unsuccessful attempts were captured using 3D motion analysis (VICON MX: 500 Hz). The following data analysis was then used to derive feedback. In total, 133 attempts of loads ranging from 75 to 100% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) were performed by the subject (age = 25 years, stature = 171 cm, mass = 74.8 kg, Snatch 1RM = 80 kg). Variables included peak bar velocity, pelvis, hip, knee and ankle joint angles at the starting position for the right side and the difference between (left minus right) sides. No main effects for load, success, or their interactions were found for peak bar velocity. Starting position kinematics were mostly nonsignificant between the outcome of Snatch attempts. Right ankle joint angle was the only exception, where unsuccessful attempts displayed greater (p = 0.0228) dorsiflexion. A more comprehensive finding was achieved through the partition modeling; this analysis provided valuable insight and coaching feedback for the subject in relation to his lower body kinematics at the starting position. Furthermore, the accuracy of this feedback was verified using a holdback data set. Specifically, anterior pelvic tilt (>17.6°) and hip joint (<89.6°) angle were identified as the key features to increasing the likelihood of success. In conclusion, this case study outlines a method of data collection and analysis to assist coaching feedback for an individual.

  20. Decoding social intentions in human prehensile actions: Insights from a combined kinematics-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Di Bono, Maria Grazia; Begliomini, Chiara; Budisavljevic, Sanja; Sartori, Luisa; Miotto, Diego; Motta, Raffaella; Castiello, Umberto

    2017-01-01

    Consistent evidence suggests that the way we reach and grasp an object is modulated not only by object properties (e.g., size, shape, texture, fragility and weight), but also by the types of intention driving the action, among which the intention to interact with another agent (i.e., social intention). Action observation studies ascribe the neural substrate of this 'intentional' component to the putative mirror neuron (pMNS) and the mentalizing (MS) systems. How social intentions are translated into executed actions, however, has yet to be addressed. We conducted a kinematic and a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study considering a reach-to-grasp movement performed towards the same object positioned at the same location but with different intentions: passing it to another person (social condition) or putting it on a concave base (individual condition). Kinematics showed that individual and social intentions are characterized by different profiles, with a slower movement at the level of both the reaching (i.e., arm movement) and the grasping (i.e., hand aperture) components. fMRI results showed that: (i) distinct voxel pattern activity for the social and the individual condition are present within the pMNS and the MS during action execution; (ii) decoding accuracies of regions belonging to the pMNS and the MS are correlated, suggesting that these two systems could interact for the generation of appropriate motor commands. Results are discussed in terms of motor simulation and inferential processes as part of a hierarchical generative model for action intention understanding and generation of appropriate motor commands.

  1. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  2. Nonlinear deconvolution of hyperspectral data with MCMC for studying the kinematics of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Emma; Carfantan, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been an area of active research in image processing and analysis for more than 10 years, mainly for remote sensing applications. Astronomical ground-based hyperspectral imagers offer new challenges to the community, which differ from the previous ones in the nature of the observed objects, but also in the quality of the data, with a low signal-to-noise ratio and a low resolution, due to the atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we focus on a deconvolution problem specific to hyperspectral astronomical data, to improve the study of the kinematics of galaxies. The aim is to estimate the flux, the relative velocity, and the velocity dispersion, integrated along the line-of-sight, for each spatial pixel of an observed galaxy. Thanks to the Doppler effect, this is equivalent to estimate the amplitude, center, and width of spectral emission lines, in a small spectral range, for every spatial pixel of the hyperspectral data. We consider a parametric model for the spectral lines and propose to compute the posterior mean estimators, in a Bayesian framework, using Monte Carlo Markov chain algorithms. Various estimation schemes are proposed for this nonlinear deconvolution problem, taking advantage of the linearity of the model with respect to the flux parameters. We differentiate between methods taking into account the spatial blurring of the data (deconvolution) or not (estimation). The performances of the methods are compared with classical ones, on two simulated data sets. It is shown that the proposed deconvolution method significantly improves the resolution of the estimated kinematic parameters.

  3. Case studies from Oman for coiled tubing deployed completion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-09-01

    Although the use of ultra-large coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. This paper will detail the equipment necessary to perform an operation of this type and will present information from several case studies in Oman in which an operator has successfully deployed completion equipment on 3-1/2-inch-OD coiled tubing. In addition to a discussion of the equipment required to perform the necessary operations, the trial parameters that were established by this operator will be given. The information presented has been selected to allow an initial evaluation to be made of coiled tubing completions in general and will help to determine whether this method can prove to be less expensive than traditional rig-based completions. The topics presented have been chosen to provide the reader with a thorough understanding of the techniques and preparation needed to execute a coiled tubing completion. The summary of experiences will conclude that this innovative completion technique can be a viable method for completing wells. Although long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, the operator`s experiences to date have confirmed his initial belief that use of coiled tubing in ultra-large continuous-pipe applications can be cost effective.

  4. Pilot study of the impact sacroiliac joint manipulation has on walking kinematics using motion analysis technology

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John S.; Coats, Jesse; Sorrels, Kenneth; Walters, Mathew; Williams, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of engaging in a series of larger studies measuring the effect of sacroiliac joint manipulation on walking kinematics using motion analysis technology. Methods Twelve college students engaged in a baseline 90-second gait analysis at 1.5 mph using infrared VICON cameras. Following this, they underwent a prone heel comparison test for functional leg length inequality. Upon examination, participants were then classified as follows: left short leg, right short leg, or no short leg. Participants in each of the 2 short leg branches of this study were then randomized to receive either chiropractic manipulative therapy to the posterior superior iliac spine on the short limb side or no manipulation. Recruitment was ongoing for this pilot study until 1 participant was recruited in each of the following 5 comparative study groups: left short leg—manipulation, left short leg—no manipulation (control 1), right short leg—manipulation, right short leg—no manipulation (control 2), and no short leg (control 3). All participants then underwent another 90-second gait analysis. Data were then grouped and submitted to a blinded biomechanist to determine if there were any unique biomechanical differences between the groups. Results No statistically significant differences were measured because of this being a pilot study with a small sample size. Conclusions The data from this study indicate that a series of larger studies with this design is feasible. PMID:24396314

  5. Changes in sagittal component alignment alters patellar kinematics in TKA: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Keshmiri, Armin; Springorum, Hans Robert; Baier, Clemens; Zeman, Florian; Grifka, Joachim; Maderbacher, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Patellar maltracking due to incorrect component alignment is considered as a main reason for anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In contrast to coronal and axial component placement, the influence of sagittal component alignment on patellar kinematics has not been investigated so far. In ten lower cadaveric limbs, TKAs were implanted using a commercial computer navigation system. In six knees, the femoral component was aligned in 5° and in four knees in 0° of flexion, respectively. Patellar kinematics were registered by means of a computer navigation system using an additional patella tracking array and correlated with femoral and tibial sagittal component alignment. Sagittal component alignment significantly altered patellar mediolateral shift (p < 0.05). In contrast, patellar epicondylar distance, rotation and tilt were not significantly influenced. Sagittal component alignment in TKA has a major impact on patellar kinematics and should therefore be considered while addressing tibiofemoral kinematics intraoperatively.

  6. A single axis study of flight simulator kinematics by difference techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    The kinematic parameters of position, velocity, and acceleration of a flight simulator may be calculated by knowing the distance between two or more points on an axis and the time the simulator takes to traverse the space between each set of points. These parameters are calculated through the use of difference techniques. Given the true kinematic response of the simulator to computer generated commands, the entire motion system loop may be calibrated, and system operability verified.

  7. Effects of experimental insoles on body posture, mandibular kinematics and masticatory muscles activity. A pilot study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Marini, Ida; Alessandri Bonetti, Giulio; Bortolotti, Francesco; Bartolucci, Maria Lavinia; Gatto, Maria Rosaria; Michelotti, Ambra

    2015-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that different plantar sensory inputs could influence the whole body posture and dental occlusion but there is a lack of evidence on this possible association. To investigate the effects of experimental insoles redistributing plantar pressure on body posture, mandibular kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) activity of masticatory muscles on healthy subjects. A pilot study was conducted on 19 healthy volunteers that wore custom-made insoles normalizing the plantar pressure distribution for 2 weeks. Body posture parameters were measured by means of an optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric analysis; mandibular kinematics was analyzed by means of gothic arch tracings; superficial EMG activity of head and neck muscles was performed. Measurements were carried out 10 days before the insertion of the insoles, immediately before the insertion, the day after, 7 and 14 days after, in four different exteroceptive conditions. The outcomes of the present study show that insoles do not modify significantly over time the parameters of body posture, SEMG activity of head and neck muscles and mandibular kinematics. In this pilot study the experimental insoles did not significantly influence the body posture, the mandibular kinematics and the activity of masticatory muscles during a 14-day follow up period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of the Pathomechanisms of Dysphagia After Occipitospinal Fusion: Kinematic Analysis by Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study.

    PubMed

    Kaneyama, Shuichi; Sumi, Masatoshi; Takabatake, Masato; Kasahara, Koichi; Kanemura, Aritetsu; Koh, Akihiro; Hirata, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    Kinematic analysis of swallowing function using videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). The aims of this study were to analyze swallowing process in the patients who underwent occipitospinal fusion (OSF) and elucidate the pathomechanism of dysphagia after OSF. Although several hypotheses about the pathomechanisms of dysphagia after OSF were suggested, there has been little tangible evidence to support these hypotheses since these hypotheses were based on the analysis of static radiogram or CT. Considering that swallowing is a compositive motion of oropharyngeal structures, the etiology of postoperative dysphagia should be investigated through kinematic approaches. Each four patients with or without postoperative dysphagia (group D and N, respectively) participated in this study. For VFSS, all patients were monitored to swallow 5-mL diluted barium solution by fluoroscopy, and then dynamic passing pattern of the barium solution was analyzed. Additionally, O-C2 angle (O-C2A) was measured for the assessment of craniocervical alignment. O-C2A in group D was -7.5 degrees, which was relatively smaller than 10.3 degrees in group N (P = 0.07). In group D, all cases presented smooth medium passing without any obstruction at the upper cervical level regardless of O-C2A, whereas the obstruction to the passage of medium was detected at the apex of mid-lower cervical ocurvature, where the anterior protrusion of mid-lower cervical spine compressed directly the pharyngeal space. In group N, all cases showed smooth passing of medium through the whole process of swallowing. This study presented that postoperative dysphagia did not occur at the upper cervical level even though there was smaller angle of O-C2A and demonstrated the narrowing of the oropharyngeal space towing to direct compression by the anterior protrusion of mid-lower cervical spine was the etiology of dysphagia after OSF. Therefore, surgeon should pay attention to the alignment of mid-cervical spine as well as

  9. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a "soft" constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of "hard" constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO.

  10. Improving Course Completions in Distance Education: An Institutional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistoll, Tony; Yates, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article reports two studies undertaken at The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand, a vocational distance education (DE) provider, where course completion rates have risen to match those of face-to-face technical institutions. A simple model of student engagement is presented, which reflects the triality between the student, institution, and…

  11. Quadriceps function after TKA--an in vitro study in a knee kinematic simulator.

    PubMed

    Ostermeier, S; Hurschler, C; Stukenborg-Colsman, C

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the amount of quadriceps force required to extend the knee during an isokinetic extension cycle before and after total knee arthroplasty. The magnitude of the extension torque used in simulating a constant moment extension exercise was derived from tests made using a dynamometer on patients who had received a total knee arthroplasty. Quadriceps force needed to extend the knee was measured. Human knee specimens (n=8, mean age=65 SD 7 years, all male) were tested in a kinematic knee simulating machine untreated and after implantation of two different knee prosthesis. During simulation, a hydraulic cylinder applied sufficient force to the quadriceps tendon to produce an extension moment of 31 Nm about the knee. The quadriceps forces needed to extend the knee during the physiologic simulation reached levels as high as 1238.9 N (SD 46.6). After implantation the Interax-prosthesis, quadriceps force increased up to 13.9% (P=0.003), in conjunction with resurfacing of the patella 11.9% (P=0.01). With the LCS-prosthesis implanted, quadriceps force showed a somewhat smaller increase of up to 6.6% (P=0.007). The following study helps to clarify postoperative problems related to the extensor mechanisms of the knee after implantation of total knee arthroplasty.

  12. A Pilot Study on Gait Kinematics of Old Women with Bound Feet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Feng, Neng; Hu, Nanzhi; Gu, Yaodong

    2015-01-01

    Foot binding has a long and influential history in China. Little is known about biomechanical changes in gait caused by bound foot. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in lower limb kinematics between old women with bound feet and normal feet during walking. Six old women subjects (three with bound feet and three controls with normal feet) volunteered to participate in this study. Video data were recorded with a high speed video camera and analysed in the SIMI motion analysis software. Compared to normal controls, bound feet subjects had faster gait cadence with shorter stride length as well as smaller ankle and knee range of motion (ROM). During preswing phase, ankle remained to be dorsiflexion for bound foot subjects. The data from bound foot group also demonstrated that toe vertical displacement increased continuously during whole swing phase without a minimum toe clearance (MTC). The findings indicate that older women with bound feet exhibit significant differences in gait pattern compared to those with normal feet, which is characterised by disappeared propulsion/push-off and reduced mobility of lower limb segments. PMID:27019587

  13. A kinematic study of different populations in the galaxy NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Durán, S.; Peña, M.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; García-Rojas, J.

    2014-10-01

    The kinematics of planetary nebulae (PNe) and HII regions in the irregular galaxy NGC 6822 is analyzed through high resolution spectroscopy from LCO-Clay-MIKE and OAN-2.1m-MES telescopes-spectrographs. The data have a resolution better than 10 km/s. The heliocentric radial velocities of these objects are compared to the kinematics of the extended HI disk found in this galaxy. The analysis shows that HII regions and other members of the young stellar population follow closely the rotation of the HI disk. On the contrary, PNe are not moving along with the HI gas and their kinematics is closer to the behavior of the spheroid of C stars, which is a system with different spatial distribution and kinematics. Thus we confirm that NGC 6822 has at least two very different kinematical systems with different spatial distribution: the rotating HI disk where the young population resides, and the stellar spheroid containing the intermediate-old population.

  14. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Guirado, J. C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ros, E.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of ten years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of μas per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time). For one of our sources, 0615+820, the morphological and spectral properties in year 2010, as well as the relative astrometry between years 2000 and 2010, suggest the possibility of either a strong parsec-scale interaction of the AGN jet with the ISM, a gravitational lens with 1 mas diameter, or a resolved massive binary black hole. Reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A27

  15. High Resolution Studies Of Lensed z ∼ 2 Galaxies: Kinematics And Metal Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha

    2016-09-01

    We use the OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectograph to secure spatially-resolved strong emission lines of 15 gravitationally-lensed star-forming galaxies at redshift z ∼ 2. With the aid of gravitational lensing and Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics, the spatial resolution of these sub-luminous galaxies is at a few hundred parsecs. First, we demonstrate that high spatial resolution is crucial in diagnosing the kinematic properties and dynamical maturity of z ∼ 2 galaxies. We observe a significantly lower fraction of rotationally-supported systems than what has been claimed in lower spatial resolution surveys. Second, we find a much larger fraction of z ∼ 2 galaxies with weak metallicity gradients, contrary to the simple picture suggested by earlier studies that well-ordered rotation develops concurrently with established steep metal gradients in all but merging systems. Comparing our observations with the predictions of hydronamical simulations, strong feedback is likely to play a key role in flattening metal gradients in early star-forming galaxies.

  16. Study of the structure and kinematics of the NGC 7465/64/63 triplet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, O. A.; Karataeva, G. M.; Yakovleva, V. A.; Burenkov, A. N.

    2012-05-01

    We analyze new observational data obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the multimode SCORPIO instrument and the Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph for the group of galaxies NGC 7465/64/63. For one of the group members (NGC 7465), the presence of a polar ring has been suspected. We have constructed the large-scale brightness distributions, the ionized-gas velocity and velocity dispersion fields for all three galaxies as well as the line-of-sight velocity curves based on emission and absorption lines and the stellar velocity field in the central region for NGC 7465. As a result of our analysis of the data obtained, we have discovered an inner stellar disk ( r ≈ 0.5 kpc) and a warped gaseous disk in NGC 7465, in addition to the main stellar disk. Based on a joint study of our photometric and spectroscopic data, we have established that NGC 7464 is an irregular IrrI-type galaxy whose structural and kinematic peculiarities most likely resulted from its gravitational interaction with NGC 7465. The velocity field of the ionized gas in NGC 7463 turns out to be typical of barred spiral galaxies, and the warp of the outer parts of its disk could arise from a close encounter with one of the galaxies of the environment.

  17. Mass Mapping Abell 2261 with Kinematic Weak Lensing: A Pilot Study for NASAs WFIRST mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifler, Tim

    2015-02-01

    We propose to investigate a new method to extract cosmological information from weak gravitational lensing in the context of the mission design and requirements of NASAs Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). In a recent paper (Huff, Krause, Eifler, George, Schlegel 2013) we describe a new method for reducing the shape noise in weak lensing measurements by an order of magnitude. Our method relies on spectroscopic measurements of disk galaxy rotation and makes use of the well-established Tully-Fisher (TF) relation in order to control for the intrinsic orientations of galaxy disks. Whereas shape noise is one of the major limitations for current weak lensing experiments it ceases to be an important source of statistical error in our new proposed technique. Specifically, we propose a pilot study that maps the projected mass distribution in the massive cluster Abell 2261 (z=0.225) to infer whether this promising technique faces systematics that prohibit its application to WFIRST. In addition to the cosmological weak lensing prospects, these measurements will also allow us to test kinematic lensing in the context of cluster mass reconstruction with a drastically improved signal-to-noise (S/N) per galaxy.

  18. A study of kinematic cues and anticipatory performance in tennis using computational manipulation and computer graphics.

    PubMed

    Ida, Hirofumi; Fukuhara, Kazunobu; Kusubori, Seiji; Ishii, Motonobu

    2011-09-01

    Computer graphics of digital human models can be used to display human motions as visual stimuli. This study presents our technique for manipulating human motion with a forward kinematics calculation without violating anatomical constraints. A motion modulation of the upper extremity was conducted by proportionally modulating the anatomical joint angular velocity calculated by motion analysis. The effect of this manipulation was examined in a tennis situation--that is, the receiver's performance of predicting ball direction when viewing a digital model of the server's motion derived by modulating the angular velocities of the forearm or that of the elbow during the forward swing. The results showed that the faster the server's forearm pronated, the more the receiver's anticipation of the ball direction tended to the left side of the serve box. In contrast, the faster the server's elbow extended, the more the receiver's anticipation of the ball direction tended to the right. This suggests that tennis players are sensitive to the motion modulation of their opponent's racket-arm.

  19. Clinical trial participants' experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-03-24

    To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in 'missing' or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an intervention is a subjective experience, it seems important to create a

  20. Clinical trial participants’ experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. Setting The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. Participants The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. Outcomes We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Results Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Conclusions Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in ‘missing’ or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an

  1. Significant influence of rotational limb alignment parameters on patellar kinematics: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Keshmiri, Armin; Maderbacher, Günther; Baier, Clemens; Zeman, Florian; Grifka, Joachim; Springorum, Hans Robert

    2016-08-01

    Component malrotation has a major impact on patellar kinematics in total knee arthroplasty. The influence of natural rotational limb alignment on patellar kinematics is unclear so far. Based on recent clinical investigations, we hypothesized that rotational limb alignment significantly influences patellar kinematics. Patellar kinematics of ten cadaveric knees was measured using computer navigation during passive motion. Data were correlated with different rotational limb alignment parameters of preoperative CT scans. Femoral antetorsion showed a significant influence on patellar rotation, while tibial tubercle-posterior cruciate ligament distance additionally displayed a significant influence on patellar mediolateral shift (p < 0.05). Femoral posterior condylar angle was sensitive to patellar epicondylar distance, rotation and tilt (p < 0.05). Patellar rotation was influenced by five out of eight rotational limb alignment parameters (p < 0.05). Rotational limb alignment should be paid more attention in terms of clinical evaluation of patellar tracking and future biomechanical and clinical investigations.

  2. Kinematic Study of Ionized and Molecular Gases in Ultracompact HII Region in Monoceros R2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwihyun; Lacy, John H.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Monoceros R2 (Mon R2) is an UltraCompact HII region (UCHII) surrounded by several PhotoDissociation Regions (PDRs). It is an excellent example to investigate the chemistry and physics of early stage of massive star formation due to its proximity (830pc) and brightness. Previous studies suggest that the wind from the star holds the ionized gas up against the dense molecular core and the higher pressure at the head drives the ionized gas along the shell. In order for the model to work, there should be evidence for dense molecular gas along the shell walls, irradiated by the UCHII region and perhaps entrained into the flow along the walls.We obtained the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) spectra of Mon R2 to study the kinematic patterns in the areas where ionized and molecular gases interact. The position-velocity maps from the high resolution (R~45,000) H- and K-band (1.4-2.5μm) IGRINS spectra demonstrate that the ionized gases (Brackett and Pfund series, He and Fe emission lines; Δv ≈ 40km/s) flow along the walls of the surrounding clouds. This is consistent with the model by Zhu et al. (2008). In the PV maps of the H2 emission lines there is no obvious motion (Δv ≈ 10km/s) of the molecular hydrogen right at the ionization boundary. This implies that the molecular gas is not taking part in the flow as the ionized gas is moving along the cavity walls.This work used the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) that was developed under a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with the financial support of the US National Science Foundation (NSF; grant AST-1229522), of the University of Texas at Austin, and of the Korean GMTProject of KASI.

  3. Application of a photogrammetric kinematic model for prediction of lung volumes in adolescents: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are several ways to measure the respiratory system, among them inductance plethysmography and three-dimensional kinematic analysis, methods of high cost and difficult transportability. The objective of this study was to correlate respiratory volumes obtained by spirometry standard equipment with a biomechanical model photogrammetric analysis of adolescents. Methods We evaluated 50 subjects of both genders, aged between 14 and 17 years old, excluding those with respiratory obstruction or restriction. Stickers with markers, there was a five-point mapping for anatomical modeling and photogrammetry, with each evaluated in supine position, was sought to test the Forced Vital Capacity (FVC). The test was filmed and repeated three times. Images of the films were extracted for the moment of maximum exhalation and inhalation of proof with better breathing. With the use of a commercial software, defined the respiratory volumes to the thorax and abdomen. Results The photogrammetric analysis has found values strongly correlated with the spirometric measurements of FVC (0.812), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 – 0.708), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF – 0.762) in addition to post test performed Inspiration (IP- 0.816). There was a higher ventilatory mobility for boys than girls for Lower Chest and Lower and Upper Abdomen. It was possible to reach a regression R2 = 0.866 for proof of FVC and R2 = 0.776 for IP with the use of photogrammetry, presenting a standard error of 0.353 and 0.451, respectively. Conclusions Photogrammetry can be used to study thoracoabdominal movements by applying analytical two-dimensional and three-dimensional images acquired using a video camera being, applicable and reproducible. PMID:24571595

  4. Experimental study on flow kinematics and impact pressure in liquid sloshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youn Kyung; Chang, Kuang-An; Ryu, Yonguk; Kwon, Sun Hong

    2013-09-01

    This paper experimentally studied flow kinematics and impact pressure of a partially filled liquid sloshing flow produced by the periodic motion of a rectangular tank. The study focused on quantifying the flow velocities and impact pressures induced by the flow. Filled with water at a 30 % filling ratio, the tank oscillated at a resonant frequency and generated the violent sloshing flow. The flow propagated like breaking waves that plunged on both side walls and formed up-rushing jets that impacted on the top wall. Velocities of the multiphase flow were measured using the bubble image velocimetry technique. A total of 15 pressure sensors were mounted on the top wall and a side wall to measure the impact pressures. The local kinetic energy obtained by the measured local velocities was used to correlate with the corresponding pressures and determine the impact coefficient. In the sloshing flow, the flow direction was dominantly horizontal in the same direction of the tank motion before the wave crest broke and impinged on a side wall. At this stage, the maximum flow velocities reached 1.6 C with C being the wave phase speed. After the wave impingement, the uprising jet moved in the vertical direction with a maximum velocity reached 3.6 C before it impacted on the top wall. It was observed that the impact coefficients differed by almost one order of magnitude between the side wall impact and the top wall impact, mainly due to the large difference between the local velocities. A nearly constant impact coefficient was found for both side wall and top wall impacts if the impact pressures were directly correlated with the flow kinetic energy calculated using C instead of the local velocities.

  5. Kinematic Modeling of Normal Voluntary Mandibular Opening and Closing Velocity-Initial Study.

    PubMed

    Gawriołek, Krzysztof; Gawriołek, Maria; Komosa, Marek; Piotrowski, Paweł R; Azer, Shereen S

    2015-06-01

    Determination and quantification of voluntary mandibular velocity movement has not been a thoroughly studied parameter of masticatory movement. This study attempted to objectively define kinematics of mandibular movement based on numerical (digital) analysis of the relations and interactions of velocity diagram records in healthy female individuals. Using a computerized mandibular scanner (K7 Evaluation Software), 72 diagrams of voluntary mandibular velocity movements (36 for opening, 36 for closing) for women with clinically normal motor and functional activities of the masticatory system were recorded. Multiple measurements were analyzed focusing on the curve for maximum velocity records. For each movement, the loop of temporary velocities was determined. The diagram was then entered into AutoCad calculation software where movement analysis was performed. The real maximum velocity values on opening (Vmax ), closing (V0 ), and average velocity values (Vav ) as well as movement accelerations (a) were recorded. Additionally, functional (A1-A2) and geometric (P1-P4) analysis of loop constituent phases were performed, and the relations between the obtained areas were defined. Velocity means and correlation coefficient values for various velocity phases were calculated. The Wilcoxon test produced the following maximum and average velocity results: Vmax = 394 ± 102, Vav = 222 ± 61 for opening, and Vmax = 409 ± 94, Vav = 225 ± 55 mm/s for closing. Both mandibular movement range and velocity change showed significant variability achieving the highest velocity in P2 phase. Voluntary mandibular velocity presents significant variations between healthy individuals. Maximum velocity is obtained when incisal separation is between 12.8 and 13.5 mm. An improved understanding of the patterns of normal mandibular movements may provide an invaluable diagnostic aid to pathological changes within the masticatory system. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Effects of Global Postural Reeducation on gait kinematics in parkinsonian patients: a pilot randomized three-dimensional motion analysis study.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Valeria; Vitale, Carmine; Avella, Dario; Rucco, Rosaria; Santangelo, Gabriella; Sorrentino, Pierpaolo; Varriale, Pasquale; Sorrentino, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) method is a physical therapy based on the stretching of antigravity muscle chains with the parallel enhancement of the basal tone of antagonistic muscles addressed to improve static and dynamic stability. Through a three-dimensional motion analysis (3DMA) system, our study aims to investigate whether in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients a GPR program results in a more physiological gait pattern. The kinematic parameters of gait of twenty subjects with clinically diagnosed PD were calculated. The patients were randomly assigned to a study (10 or control (10) group. All subjects underwent neurological and 3DMA assessments at entry time (t 0), at 4 weeks (t 1, end of GPR program), and at 8 and 12 weeks (t 2 and t 3, follow-up evaluation). The study group underwent a four-week GPR program, three times a week, for 40 min individual sessions. Kinematic gait parameters of thigh (T), knee (K) and ankle (A) and UPDRS-III scores were evaluated. At the end of the GPR program, we observed an improvement of the kinematic gait pattern, documented by the increase in KΔc and TΔc values that respectively express the flexion amplitude of knee and thigh. The amelioration was persistent at follow-up assessments, with a parallel enhancement in clinical parameters. GPR intervention shows a long-term efficacy on gait pattern in PD patients. Furthermore, we validated 3DMA as a valuable tool to study the kinematics of gait thus refining the understanding of the effects of specific rehabilitation programs.

  7. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Outsole Hardness on Lower Limb Kinematics and Kinetics during Soccer Related Movements

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dong; Mei, Qichang; Baker, Julien S; Jia, Xuewen; Gu, Yaodong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different outsole hardness of turf cleats shoes on the lower limb kinematics and kinetics of soccer players playing on artificial turf. The participants were required to complete tasks of straight running and 45° left sidestep cutting movements, respectively, at the speed of 4.5 ± 0.2 m/s on artificial turf. They were asked to randomly select turf cleats shoes with a soft outsole (SO), medium hardness outsole (MO) and hard outsole (HO). During the stance phase of straight running, peak pressure and force-time integral in medial forefoot (MFF) of players wearing cleats shoes with MO were significantly higher than those wearing cleats shoes with SO. During the stance phase of a 45° cutting maneuver, players wearing cleats shoes with SO showed significantly higher peak knee flexion and abduction angles than the HO group. Players wearing cleats shoes with SO also showed higher ankle dorsiflexion and inversion angles compared with those wearing cleats shoes with HO. The vertical average loading rate (VALR) as well as peak pressure and force-time integral in the heel (H) and lateral forefoot (LFF) regions of players wearing cleats shoes with HO were significantly higher than those wearing shoes with SO. On the contrary, peak pressure and force-time integral of players wearing shoes with SO were significantly higher than those wearing shoes with HO in MFF. A higher vertical loading rate and plantar pressure of some areas may increase the potential risk of metatarsal stress fractures and plantar fasciitis. Therefore, this finding about turf cleats shoes could give some theoretic support for the design of turf cleats shoes and material optimization in the future. PMID:28713455

  8. 2D kinematical study in local luminous compact blue galaxies. Starburst origin in UCM2325+2318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Morales, A.; Pérez-Gallego, J.; Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Castander, F.; Garland, C.; Gruel, N.; Pisano, D. J.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Ocaña, F.; Zamorano, J.

    2013-05-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are small, but vigorously star forming galaxies. Their presence at different redshifts denotes their cosmological relevance and implies that local starburst galaxies, when properly selected, are unique laboratories for studying the complex ecosystem of the star formation process over time. We have selected a representative sample of 22 LCBGs from the SDSS and UCM databases which, although small, provides an excellent reference for comparison with current and future surveys of similar starbursts at high-z. We are carrying out a 2D optical spectroscopic study of this LCBG sample, including spatially resolved maps of kinematics, extinction, SFR and metallicity. This will help us to answer questions regarding the nature of these objects. In this poster we show our results on the kinematical study (Pérez-Gallego et al. 2011) which allows us to classify these galaxies into three different classes: rotating disk (RD) 48%, perturbed rotation (PR) 28% and complex kinematics (CK) 24%. We find 5% of objects show evidence of a recent major merger, 10% of a minor merger, and 45% of a companion. This argues in favor of ongoing interactions with close companions as a mechanism for the enhanced star formation activity in these galaxies. We find only 5% of objects with clear evidence of AGN activity, and 27% with kinematics consistent with SN-driven galactic winds. Therefore, a different mechanism may be responsible for quenching the star formation in LCBGs. The detailed analysis of the physical properties for each galaxy in the sample is on progress and we show in this poster the results on UCM2325+2318 as a prototype LCBG. Between the possible mechanisms to explain the starburst activity in this galaxy, our 2D spectroscopic data support the scenario of an on-going interaction with the possibility for clump B to be the dwarf satellite galaxy (Castillo-Morales et al. 2011, Pérez-Gallego et al. 2010).

  9. Indian Plate Kinematics studies by GPS GEODESY using 15 years of continuous GPS/GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EC, M.; Narayana Babu, R. N.

    2011-12-01

    Indian plate kinematics is continuously monitored using GNSS geodesy. 15 years of GPS/GNSS data from 1995 to 2010 from the Hyderabad IGS GPS Permanent Station (HYDE) have been processed using Bernese 5.0 in the global network solution in ITRF 2005 reference frame along with the data from other 11 IGS stations. A new global network was chosen spreading the geographical and azimuthal coverage, which almost includes all the plates surrounding India. The baseline lengths from Hyderabad to other chosen sites and the rate of changes were also estimated. Indian Plate motion was estimated to be at the rate of 37 ± 0.2 mm/yr towards NNE direction with respect to Eurasian Plate. Despite many large earthquakes in and around India, reorganization of the macro and micro plates and interaction between the plate pairs and its boundaries, the rate of on-going Indian plate motion remains to be the same. The angular velocity of Indian plate motion with respect to Eurasian plate and Indo-Eurasia plate pair have also been estimated. The global network solution has resulted in the estimation of the pole of the angular velocity vector of India with respect to Eurasia to be about a pole of rotation at 29.44 ± 1.2deg N, 13.2 ± 7.3 deg E with an angular velocity of 0.356 ± 0.035 deg Myr-1. Our estimated result of Indian plate motion mostly conforms to the REVEL-2000 Plate motion model but differs considerably from NUVEL-1A and other earlier studies. This departure could be attributed to the difference in geologic and geodetic estimations. The longer time span of GNSS data from the central part of India yields more accurate estimations since the analysis is in the global network solution, which doesn't take into account the plate-interior site velocities.

  10. Evaluation and training of hands and feet movements performed with different strategies: a kinematic study.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Roberto; Rocca, Maria A; Tettamanti, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2011-04-01

    To assess whether the ability to execute flexion/extension of hands and feet, in different patterns of in-phase and anti-phase association, is influenced by the planning of the movements according to the two body sides (i.e., right vs. left) compared to the upper and lower parts of the body (i.e., hands vs. feet); and to evaluate how training of these movements influences their performance. Fifteen healthy subjects were studied while performing four different tasks involving simultaneously in-phase and anti-phase movements of the hands and feet in the parasagittal plane. Hand and foot movements were represented by wrist and ankle kinematics, measured before and after training as duration of correct execution, median frequency of movements, median ranges of motion and discrete relative phase (AEø). During baseline assessment, subjects performed the task better when instructions were given to focus on in-phase or anti-phase movements of bilateral upper and lower extremities than when instructions were focused on the movements of the left and right side. After the training these differences disappeared. During all the conditions, the duration of correct execution and the movement frequency were significantly different between the baseline and the final assessment (p ranging from 0.001 to 0.04). The AEø did not differ among the four tasks, as well as between the baseline and the final assessment. Combination of movements of the hands and feet is easier when planning the movements with respect to the upper or lower segments of the body rather than right and left side. These findings might have important implications when subjects have to learn novel coordination patterns as it is the case in rehabilitative and sportive activities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamic measurement of patellofemoral kinematics and contact pressure after lateral retinacular release: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ostermeier, Sven; Holst, Marc; Hurschler, Christof; Windhagen, Henning; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of lateral retinacular release and medial and lateral retinacular deficiency on patellofemoral position and retropatellar contact pressure. Human knee specimens (n = 8, mean age = 65 SD 7 years, all male) were tested in a kinematic knee-simulating machine. During simulation of an isokinetic knee extension cycle from 120 degrees to full extension, a hydraulic cylinder applied sufficient force to the quadriceps tendon to produce an extension moment of 31 Nm. The position of the patella was measured using an ultrasound based motion analysis system (CMS 100, Zebris). The amount of patellofemoral contact pressure and its pressure distribution was measured using a pressure sensitive film (Tekscan, Boston). Patellar position and contact pressure were first investigated in intact knee conditions, after a lateral retinacular release and a release of the medial and lateral retinaculum. After lateral retinacular release the patella continuously moved from a significant medialised position at flexion (P = 0.01) to a lateralised position (P = 0.02) at full knee extension compared to intact conditions, the centre of patellofemoral contact pressure was significantly medialised (0.04) between 120 degrees and 60 degrees knee flexion. Patellofemoral contact pressure did not change significantly. In the deficient knee conditions the patella moved on a significant lateralised track (P = 0.04) through the entire extension cycle with a lateralised centre of patellofemoral pressure (P = 0.04) with a trend (P = 0.08) towards increased patellofemoral pressure. The results suggest that lateral retinacular release did not inevitably stabilise or medialise patellar tracking through the entire knee extension cycle, but could decrease pressure on the lateral patellar facet in knee flexion. Therefore lateral retinacular release should be considered carefully in cases of patellar instability.

  12. Experimental study of the optimal angle for arthrodesis of fingers based on kinematic analysis with tip-pinch manipulation.

    PubMed

    Arauz, Paul; Sisto, Sue Ann; Kao, Imin

    2016-12-08

    To evaluate the appropriate angle for arthrodesis of the index finger proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint, the functional range of motion (ROM) of the joints and manipulabilities at three selected tip-pinch manipulation postures of the finger were studied experimentally under imposed PIP joint arthrodesis angles. A kinematic model of the index finger was used in experiments which involved three postures. Experiments were conducted using seven healthy subjects in tip-pinch manipulation tasks to obtain the measurements of finger motions under imposed angles of joint constraint, including the functional ROM of the joints and the three criteria of kinematic manipulability. Data show that the functional ROM and the shape of the kinematic manipulability ellipses at the fingertip were influenced significantly by the imposed PIP joint constraint in the tip-pinch manipulation tests. Results suggest that a PIP arthrodesis angle between 40° and 60° led to the optimal performance of fingers in grasping and manipulation of fine objects. This theoretical and experimental study can help surgeons and clinicians to make more informed decisions on the appropriate constraint angles before the arthrodesis operation, and to customize this angle for individual patients in order to enhance not only the capability of manipulation of the finger but also the quality of life after such intervention.

  13. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? - A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Ashish; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-05-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (p<.1). The denture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures.

  14. Variability in static alignment and kinematics for kinematically aligned TKA.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Willy; Twiggs, Joshua; Kolos, Elizabeth; Roe, Justin; Fritsch, Brett; Dickison, David; Liu, David; Salmon, Lucy; Miles, Brad; Howell, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) significantly improves pain and restores a considerable degree of function. However, improvements are needed to increase patient satisfaction and restore kinematics to allow more physically demanding activities that active patients consider important. The aim of our study was to compare the alignment and motion of kinematically and mechanically aligned TKAs. A patient specific musculoskeletal computer simulation was used to compare the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral kinematics between mechanically aligned and kinematically aligned TKA in 20 patients. When kinematically aligned, femoral components on average resulted in more valgus alignment to the mechanical axis and internally rotated to surgical transepicondylar axis whereas tibia component on average resulted in more varus alignment to the mechanical axis and internally rotated to tibial AP rotational axis. With kinematic alignment, tibio-femoral motion displayed greater tibial external rotation and lateral femoral flexion facet centre (FFC) translation with knee flexion than mechanical aligned TKA. At the patellofemoral joint, patella lateral shift of kinematically aligned TKA plateaued after 20 to 30° flexion while in mechanically aligned TKA it decreased continuously through the whole range of motion. Kinematic alignment resulted in greater variation than mechanical alignment for all tibio-femoral and patello-femoral motion. Kinematic alignment places TKA components patient specific alignment which depends on the preoperative state of the knee resulting in greater variation in kinematics. The use of computational models has the potential to predict which alignment based on native alignment, kinematic or mechanical, could improve knee function for patient's undergoing TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-time measurement of rectus femoris muscle kinematics during drop jump using ultrasound imaging: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Eranki, Avinash; Cortes, Nelson; Ferencek Gregurić, Zrinka; Kim, John J; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an office based vector tissue Doppler imaging (vTDI) that can be used to quantitatively measure muscle kinematics using ultrasound. The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate if vTDI measures are repeatable and can be used robustly to measure and understand the kinematics of the rectus femoris muscle during a drop jump task. Data were collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Vector TDI along with a high speed camera video was used to better understand the dynamics of the drop jump. Our results indicate that the peak resultant vector velocity of the rectus femoris immediately following landing was repeatable across trials (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.9).The peak velocity had a relatively narrow range in 6 out of 8 subjects (48-62 cm/s), while in the remaining two subjects it exceeded 70 cm/s. The entire drop jump lasted for 1.45 0.27 seconds. The waveform of muscle velocity could be used to identify different phases of the jump. Also, the movement of the ultrasound transducer holder was minimal with peak deflection of 0.91 0.54 degrees over all trials. Vector TDI can be implemented in a clinical setting using an ultrasound system with a research interface to better understand the muscle kinematics in patients with ACL injuries.

  16. Psychological Vulnerability to Completed Suicide: A Review of Empirical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Kenneth R.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Conwell, Yeates; Seidlitz, Larry; Caine, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews empirical literature on psychological vulnerability to completed suicide. Five constructs have been consistently associated with completed suicide: impulsivity/aggression; depression; anxiety; hopelessness; and self-consciousness/social disengagement. Current knowledge of psychological vulnerability could inform social…

  17. Psychological Vulnerability to Completed Suicide: A Review of Empirical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Kenneth R.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Conwell, Yeates; Seidlitz, Larry; Caine, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews empirical literature on psychological vulnerability to completed suicide. Five constructs have been consistently associated with completed suicide: impulsivity/aggression; depression; anxiety; hopelessness; and self-consciousness/social disengagement. Current knowledge of psychological vulnerability could inform social…

  18. Study on general theory of kinematics and dynamics of wheeled mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukishima, Takahiro; Sasaki, Ken; Takano, Masaharu; Inoue, Kenji

    1992-03-01

    This paper proposes a general theory of kinematics and dynamics of wheeled mobile robots (WMRs). Unlike robotic manipulators which are modeled as 3-dimensional serial link mechanism, WMRs will be modeled as planar linkage mechanism with multiple links branching out from the base and/or another link. Since this model resembles a tree with branches, it will be called 'tree-structured-link'. The end of each link corresponds to the wheel which is in contact with the floor. In dynamics of WMR, equation of motion of a WMR is derived from joint input torques incorporating wheel dynamics. The wheel dynamics determines forces and moments acting on wheels as a function of slip velocity. This slippage of wheels is essential in dynamics of WMR. It will also be shown that the dynamics of WMR reduces to kinematics when slippage of wheels is neglected. Furthermore, the equation of dynamics is rewritten in velocity input form, since most of industrial motors are velocity controlled.

  19. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a “soft” constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of “hard” constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO. PMID:27314586

  20. Neural signatures of hand kinematics in leaders vs. followers: A dual-MEG study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2016-01-15

    During joint actions, people typically adjust their own actions according to the ongoing actions of the partner, which implies that the interaction modulates the behavior of both participants. However, the neural substrates of such mutual adaptation are still poorly understood. Here, we set out to identify the kinematics-related brain activity of leaders and followers performing hand actions. Sixteen participants as 8 pairs performed continuous, repetitive right-hand opening and closing actions with ~3-s cycles in a leader-follower task. Subjects played each role for 5min. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) brain signals were recorded simultaneously from both partners with a dual-MEG setup, and hand kinematics was monitored with accelerometers. Modulation index, a cross-frequency coupling measure, was computed between the hand acceleration and the MEG signals in the alpha (7-13Hz) and beta (13-25Hz) bands. Regardless of the participants' role, the strongest alpha and beta modulations occurred bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortices. In the occipital region, beta modulation was stronger in followers than leaders; these oscillations originated, according to beamformer source reconstructions, in early visual cortices. Despite differences in the modulation indices, alpha and beta power did not differ between the conditions. Our results indicate that the beta modulation in the early visual cortices depends on the subject's role as a follower or leader in a joint hand-action task. This finding could reflect the different strategies employed by leaders and followers in integrating kinematics-related visual information to control their own actions.

  1. A case study using kinematic quantities derived from a triangle of VHF Doppler wind profilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Catherine A.; Forbes, Gregory S.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal divergence, relative vorticity, kinematic vertical velocity, and geostrophic and ageostrophic winds are computed from Colorado profiler network data to investigate an upslope snowstorm in northeastern Colorado. Horizontal divergence and relative vorticity are computed using the Gauss and Stokes theorems, respectively. Kinematic vertical velocities are obtained from the surface to 9 km by vertically integrating the continuity equation. The geostrophic and ageostrophic winds are computed by applying a finite differencing technique to evaluate the derivatives in the horizontal equations of motion. Comparison of the synoptic-scale data with the profiler network data reveals that the two datasets are generally consistent. Also, the profiler-derived quantities exhibit coherent vertical and temporal patterns consistent with conceptual and theoretical flow fields of various meteorological phenomena. It is suggested that the profiler-derived quantities are of potential use to weather forecasters in that they enable the dynamic and kinematic interpretation of weather system structure to be made and thus have nowcasting and short-term forecasting value.

  2. Parse Completion: A Study of an Inductive Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-29

    of as a combination of top-down and bottom- up parsing (Fig. 1). When the derivation tree is as complete as possible, new rules are added to the...Incomplete derivation tree prior to Parse Completion Parse Completion is not a new idea. Specializations of it have been used in programs that learn plans [13...gap becomes a completion site, a point at which additional rules must be added to the grammar to complete the derivation tree. The new grammar will be a

  3. Knee joint kinematics after dynamic intraligamentary stabilization: cadaveric study on a novel anterior cruciate ligament repair technique.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Lenschow, Simon; Domnick, Christoph; Herbort, Mirco; Häberli, Janosch; Schulze, Martin; Wähnert, Dirk; Raschke, Michael J; Kösters, Clemens

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization (DIS) has been introduced for the repair of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears as an alternative to delayed reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to compare knee joint kinematics after DIS to those of the ACL-intact and ACL-deficient knee under simulated Lachman/KT-1000 and pivot-shift tests. We hypothesized that DIS provides knee joint kinematics equivalent to an intact ACL. With the use of a robotic knee simulator, knee kinematics were determined in simulated Lachman/KT-1000 and pivot-shift tests at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion in eight cadaveric knees under the following conditions: (1) intact ACL, (2) ACL deficiency, (3) DIS with a preload of 60 N, and (4) DIS with a preload of 80 N. Statistical analyses were performed using two-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance. The significance level was set at a p value of <0.05. After DIS with a preload of either 60 N or 80 N, the anterior translation was significantly reduced in the simulated Lachman/KT-1000 and pivot-shift tests when compared to the ACL-deficient knee (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed between the DIS reconstruction with a preload of 80 N and the intact ACL with regard to anterior laxity in either test. However, DIS with a preload of only 60 N was not able to restore knee joint kinematics to that of an intact knee in all degrees of flexion. DIS with a preload of 80 N restores knee joint kinematics comparable to that of an ACL-intact knee and is therefore capable of providing knee joint stability during ACL healing. DIS therefore provides a new technique for primary ACL repair with superior biomechanical properties in comparison with other techniques that have been described previously, although further clinical studies are required to determine its usefulness in clinical settings.

  4. Experimental study of pancreaticojejunostomy completed using anastomotic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei-Dong; Xu, Rui-Yun; Li, Nan; Fang, He-Ping; Pan, Cu-Zhi; Tang, Zhao-Feng

    2010-07-01

    The most difficult, time-consuming, and complication-prone step in pancreaticoduodenectomy is the pancreaticojejunostomy step. The largest disadvantage of this kind of anastomosis is the high incidence of postoperative anastomotic leakage. Once pancreatic leakage occurs, the patient death rate can be very high. The aim of this study was to design a pancreaticojejunostomy procedure using anastomotic chains, which results in the cut end of the jejunum being attached to the pancreatic stump without suturing, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure in domestic pigs. The pancreaticojejunal anastomotic chains had the following structures: the chains consisted of two braceletlike chains made of titanium, named chain A and chain B. The function of chain A was to attach the free jejunal end onto the pancreatic stump, whereas the function of chain B was to tighten the contact between the jejunal wall and the surface of the pancreatic stump to eliminate gaps between the two structures and ensure tightness that is sufficient to guarantee that there is no leakage of jejunal fluid or pancreatic juice. The following procedure was used to assess the safety and efficacy of the procedure: pancreaticojejunostomies were performed on ten domestic pigs using anastomotic chains. The time required to complete the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses, the pressure tolerance of the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses, the pig death rate, and the histopathological examinations of the pancreaticojejunostomy tissues were recorded. The average time required to complete the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis procedure was 13±2 min. The observed tolerance pressure of the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses was more than 90 mm H2O. All ten domestic pigs that underwent operations were still alive four weeks after the operations. Pathological examinations showed that the anastomotic surfaces were completely healed, and the pancreatic cutting surfaces were primarily epithelialized. In conclusion, the

  5. Exploring Homework Completion and Non-Completion in Post-Secondary Language Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gascoigne, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    While homework is something that language professionals often assign, based on the paucity of research on the topic, it is clearly not something to which much attention is given in terms of professional discourse or research. In the following pages, the author reviews the limited available research and describes a case study that seeks to examine…

  6. Sagdeev's approach to study the effect of the kinematic viscosity on the dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, Sarit; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2005-05-15

    Sagdeev's technique is used to study the dust ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) in a dusty plasma comprising ions, electrons, and charged dust grains taking into account the ion kinematic viscosity. Exact analytical results for the solitary wave solutions were obtained for small amplitude DIASW. The effects of the ion kinematic viscosity and the ion temperature on the feature of DIASW have been investigated.

  7. A kinematically complete, interdisciplinary, and co-institutional measurement of the 19F(α,n) cross section for nuclear safeguards science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, W. A.; Smith, M. S.; Pittman, S.; Thompson, S. J.; Clement, R. R. C.; Cizewski, J. A.; Pain, S. D.; Febbraro, M.; Chipps, K. A.; Burcher, S.; Manning, B.; Reingold, C.; Avetisyan, R.; Battaglia, A.; Chen, Y.; Long, A.; Lyons, S.; Marley, S. T.; Seymour, C.; Siegl, K. T.; Smith, M. K.; Strauss, S.; Talwar, R.; Bardayan, D. W.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Madurga, M.; Stech, E.; Tan, W. P.; Wiescher, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Tully, Z.; Grinder, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    Alpha particles emitted from the decay of uranium in a UF6 matrix can interact with fluorine and generate neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. These neutrons can be used to determine the uranium content in a UF6 storage cylinder. The accuracy of this self-interrogating, non-destructive assay (NDA) technique is, however, limited by the uncertainty of the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section. We have performed complementary measurements of the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction with both 4He and 19F beams to improve the precision of the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section over the alpha energy range that encompasses common actinide alpha decay needed for NDA studies. We have determined an absolute cross section for the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction to an average precision of 7.6% over the alpha energy range of 3.9 – 6.7 MeV. We utilized this cross section in a simulation of a 100 g spherical UF6 assembly and obtained a change in neutron emission rate values of approximately 10-12%, and a significant (factor of 3.6) decrease in the neutron emission rate uncertainty (from 50-51% to 13-14%), compared to simulations using the old cross section. Our new absolute cross section enables improved interpretations of NDAs of containers of arbitrary size and configuration.

  8. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  9. Compensation of kinematic geometric parameters error and comparative study of accuracy testing for robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Liang; Shi, Guangming; Guan, Weibin; Zhong, Yuansheng; Li, Jin

    2014-12-01

    Geometric error is the main error of the industrial robot, and it plays a more significantly important fact than other error facts for robot. The compensation model of kinematic error is proposed in this article. Many methods can be used to test the robot accuracy, therefore, how to compare which method is better one. In this article, a method is used to compare two methods for robot accuracy testing. It used Laser Tracker System (LTS) and Three Coordinate Measuring instrument (TCM) to test the robot accuracy according to standard. According to the compensation result, it gets the better method which can improve the robot accuracy apparently.

  10. Studying the dynamics of high-speed elastic kinematically controlled robot-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavrashina, T. V.; Zavrashina, N. M.

    The authors set out the problem on controlling kinematically spatial motions of a flexible multi-link space robot-manipulator under conditions of its high-speed manoevering. The constructed mathematical model of the system dynamics takes into account the distributed properties of elasticity and inertia of the manipulator links, which are at the state of compound motion. They give an example of the numerical investigation of the dynamical characteristics of two-link robot when it is employed to carry a load.

  11. Kinematics at the Intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley Fault Zones, California: Integration of TM Data and Field Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verosub, Kenneth L.; Brady, Roland H., III; Abrams, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Kinematic relationships at the intersection of the southern Death Valley and Garlock fault zones were examined to identify and delineate the eastern structural boundary between the Mojave and the Basin and Range geologic terrains, and to construct a model for the evolution of this boundary through time. In order to accomplish this, satellite imagery was combined with field investigations to study six areas in the vicinity of the intersection, or possible extensions, of the fault zones. The information gathered from these areas allows the test of various hypotheses that were proposed to explain the interaction between the Death Valley and Garlock fault zones.

  12. Catching a grown-up starfish planetary nebula - I. Morpho-kinematical study of PC 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, L.; Gómez-Muñoz, M. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zavala, S.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Vázquez, R.; Corral, L.; Blanco Cárdenas, M. W.; Guillén, P. F.; Olguín, L.; Morisset, C.; Navarro, S.

    2017-05-01

    We present the first part of an investigation on the planetary nebula (PN) PC 22 that focuses on the use of deep imaging and high-resolution echelle spectroscopy to perform a detailed morpho-kinematical analysis. PC 22 is revealed to be a multipolar PN emitting predominantly in [O iii] and displaying multiple non-symmetric outflows. Its central region is found to be also particularly inhomogeneous with a series of low-ionization structures (knots) located on the path of the outflows. The morpho-kinematical model obtained with shape indicates that (i) the de-projected velocities of the outflows are rather large, ≥100 km s-1, while the central region has expansion velocities in the range ˜25 to ˜45 km s-1 following the 'Wilson effect'; (ii) the majority of the measured structures share similar inclination, ≃100°, i.e. they are coplanar; (iii) and all outflows and lobes are coeval (within the uncertainties). All these results make us to suggest that PC 22 is an evolved starfish PN. We propose that the mechanism responsible for the morphology of PC 22 consists of a wind-shell interaction, where the fast post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) wind flows through a filamentary AGB shell with some large voids.

  13. The effect of various kinematics on postoperative pain after instrumentation: a prospective, randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Khalilov, Ruslan; Doğanay, Ezgi; Karatas, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate various kinematic movements on postoperative pain using a Reciproc system. Material and Methods: Fifty-six molar teeth were divided into four groups according to kinematics as follows: continuous rotation, 360° CCW – 30° CW, 270° CCW – 30° CW, and 150° CCW – 30° CW. Preoperative and postoperative pain levels using visual analogue scale (VAS), percussion pain, and analgesic intake were recorded for each subject. Postoperative pain levels at 1, 3, 5, and 7 d were evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically using the Kruskal-Walis, Mann-Whitney-U, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square tests (p=0.05). Results: Continuous rotation resulted in more pain at Day 1 when compared with the reciprocating groups (360° CCW – 30° CW and 270° CCW – 30° C) (p<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous rotation resulted in more postoperative pain at Day 1 than in reciprocating groups, and thereafter no significant pain was found among the groups. PMID:27812621

  14. Neck motion kinematics: an inter-tester reliability study using an interactive neck VR assessment in asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Sarig Bahat, Hilla; Sprecher, Elliot; Sela, Itamar; Treleaven, Julia

    2016-07-01

    The use of virtual reality (VR) for assessment and intervention of neck pain has previously been used and shown reliable for cervical range of motion measures. Neck VR enables analysis of task-oriented neck movement by stimulating responsive movements to external stimuli. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish inter-tester reliability of neck kinematic measures so that it can be used as a reliable assessment and treatment tool between clinicians. This reliability study included 46 asymptomatic participants, who were assessed using the neck VR system which displayed an interactive VR scenario via a head-mounted device, controlled by neck movements. The objective of the interactive assessment was to hit 16 targets, randomly appearing in four directions, as fast as possible. Each participant was tested twice by two different testers. Good reliability was found of neck motion kinematic measures in flexion, extension, and rotation (0.64-0.93 inter-class correlation). High reliability was shown for peak velocity globally (0.93), in left rotation (0.9), right rotation and extension (0.88), and flexion (0.86). Mean velocity had a good global reliability (0.84), except for left rotation directed movement with moderate reliability (0.68). Minimal detectable change for peak velocity ranged from 41 to 53 °/s, while mean velocity ranged from 20 to 25 °/s. The results suggest high reliability for peak and mean velocity as measured by the interactive Neck VR assessment of neck motion kinematics. VR appears to provide a reliable and more ecologically valid method of cervical motion evaluation than previous conventional methodologies.

  15. Non-magnetic equipment for the high-resolution quantification of finger kinematics during functional studies of bimanual coordination.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Cinzia; Bertollo, Maurizio; Comani, Silvia

    2010-09-30

    Simultaneous recording of behavioral and functional data is crucial in capturing the neural mechanisms underpinning human motor actions. We describe a non-magnetic equipment (NME) to record finger kinematics, in particular the absolute amplitude of finger oscillation, during bimanual coordination paradigms performed in functional studies. NME monitors finger movements with optic fiber signals that are post-processed off-line to quantify finger kinematics. A phantom experiment demonstrated no mutual interference between NME and fMRI, hence the usability of NME in environments sensitive to electro-magnetic fields. The spatial and temporal resolutions of NME data (1 mm and 1 ms), its reliability and feasibility when studying human subjects were verified with two comparative experiments performed with NME and a validated infrared camera (IRC) system. Results showed that the restrictions of NME (reduction of degrees of freedom of the coordinated system and potential haptic feedback) do not interfere with the correct reconstruction of finger kinematics. We also demonstrated that the recorded behavioral information can be used to detect neural activity associated with specific features of coordinated behavior. Therefore, we believe that the use of NME for the combined analysis of behavioral and functional data may help assessing an adequate interpretation of the cortical activity associated with specific tasks. This approach might as well help to explore the role of specific brain areas in motor processes, with a potential great impact in the diagnosis and subsequent intervention in brain injured patients, or in children affected by developmental coordination disorders. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints with functional ankle instability during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; No, Yumi; Yoneta, Kei; Sadakiyo, Masashi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics. However, reliable quantitative data for kinematics of FAI have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine if the abnormal kinematics exist in the talocrural and subtalar joints in patients with FAI. Five male subjects with unilateral FAI (a mean age of 33.4 ± 13.2 years) were enrolled. All subjects were examined with stress radiography and found to have no mechanical ankle instability (MAI). Lateral radiography at weight-bearing ankle internal rotation of 0° and 20° was taken with the ankle at 30° dorsiflexion and 30° plantar flexion. Patients underwent computed tomography scan at 1.0 mm slice pitch spanning distal one third of the lower leg and the distal end of the calcaneus. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints as well as the ankle joint complex (AJC) were determined using a 3D-to-2D registration technique using a 3D-to-2D registration technique with 3D bone models and plain radiography. FAI joints in ankle dorsiflexion demonstrated significantly greater subtalar internal rotation from 0° to 20° internal rotation. No statistical differences in plantar flexion were detected in talocrural, subtalar or ankle joint complex kinematics between the FAI and contralateral healthy joints. During ankle internal rotation in dorsiflexion, FAI joints demonstrated greater subtalar internal rotation. The FAI joints without mechanical instability presented abnormal kinematics. This suggests that abnormal kinematics of the FAI joints may contribute to chronic instability. FAI joints may involve unrecognized abnormal subtalar kinematics during internal rotation in ankle dorsiflexion which may contribute to chronic instability and frequent feelings of instability.

  17. Obstacle Crossing During Gait in Children With Cerebral Palsy: Cross-Sectional Study With Kinematic Analysis of Dynamic Balance and Trunk Control.

    PubMed

    Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; French, Helen; Saunders, Valerie; O'Brien, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Balance problems are common in children who have cerebral palsy (CP) but are active and ambulant. Control of the whole-body center of mass is critical in maintaining dynamic stability during challenging mobility tasks, such as clearing an obstacle while walking. The objective of this study was to compare trunk and lower limb kinematics and center-of-mass control in children with CP and those in children with typical development during obstacle crossing. This was a cross-sectional study. Thirty-four children who were 5 to 17 years of age (17 with CP and 17 with typical development) and matched in age and height completed 2 gait trials involving crossing a 10-cm obstacle. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were captured with a general-purpose 3-dimensional motion tracking system and forceplates. Trunk data were captured with a validated model. All children cleared the obstacle with similar hip and knee kinematics, step length, and single-support duration. In children with CP, step width was increased by 4.81 cm, and center-of-mass velocity was significantly slower at lead limb toe-off (0.31 m/s) and during lead limb clearance (0.2 m/s). Children with CP showed altered trunk and pelvis movement, characterized by significantly greater pelvic obliquity, pelvic tilt, and trunk rotation throughout the task, increased lateral trunk lean during lead limb crossing (3.7°), and greater sagittal trunk movement as the trail limb crossed (5.1°). The study was not powered to analyze differences between children with diplegia and those with hemiplegia. Children with CP required greater adjustments at the trunk and pelvis to achieve successful obstacle crossing. The increase in trunk movement could have been compensatory for reduced stability distally or for a primary problem reflecting poor proximal control. The findings suggest that rehabilitation should focus on both proximal trunk control and distal stability to improve balance. © 2016 American Physical Therapy

  18. Whole limb kinematics are preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Hui; Auyang, Arick G; Scholz, John P; Nichols, T Richard

    2009-11-01

    Biomechanics and neurophysiology studies suggest whole limb function to be an important locomotor control parameter. Inverted pendulum and mass-spring models greatly reduce the complexity of the legs and predict the dynamics of locomotion, but do not address how numerous limb elements are coordinated to achieve such simple behavior. As a first step, we hypothesized whole limb kinematics were of primary importance and would be preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after neuromuscular injury. We used a well-established peripheral nerve injury model of cat ankle extensor muscles to generate two experimental injury groups with a predictable time course of temporary paralysis followed by complete muscle self-reinnervation. Mean trajectories of individual joint kinematics were altered as a result of deficits after injury. By contrast, mean trajectories of limb orientation and limb length remained largely invariant across all animals, even with paralyzed ankle extensor muscles, suggesting changes in mean joint angles were coordinated as part of a long-term compensation strategy to minimize change in whole limb kinematics. Furthermore, at each measurement stage (pre-injury, paralytic and self-reinnervated) step-by-step variance of individual joint kinematics was always significantly greater than that of limb orientation. Our results suggest joint angle combinations are coordinated and selected to stabilize whole limb kinematics against short-term natural step-by-step deviations as well as long-term, pathological deviations created by injury. This may represent a fundamental compensation principle allowing animals to adapt to changing conditions with minimal effect on overall locomotor function.

  19. Stumbling reactions during perturbed walking: Neuromuscular reflex activity and 3-D kinematics of the trunk - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Juliane; Müller, Steffen; Engel, Tilman; Reschke, Antje; Baur, Heiner; Mayer, Frank

    2016-04-11

    Reflex activity of the lower leg muscles involved when compensating for falls has already been thoroughly investigated. However, the trunk׳s role in this compensation strategy remains unclear. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to analyze the kinematics and muscle activity of the trunk during perturbed walking. Ten subjects (29 ± 3 yr;79 ± 11 cm;74 ± 14 kg) walked (1m/s) on a split-belt treadmill, while 5 randomly timed, right-sided perturbations (treadmill belt deceleration: 40 m/s(2)) were applied. Trunk muscle activity was assessed with a 12-lead-EMG. Trunk kinematics were measured with a 3D-motion analysis system (12 markers framing 3 segments: upper thoracic area (UTA), lower thoracic area (LTA), lumbar area (LA)). The EMG-RMS [%] (0-200 ms after perturbation) was analyzed and then normalized to the RMS of normal walking. The total range of motion (ROM;[°]) for the extension/flexion, lateral flexion and rotation of each segment were calculated. Individual kinematic differences between walking and stumbling [%; ROM] were also computed. Data analysis was conducted descriptively, followed by one- and two-way ANOVAs (α=0.05). Stumbling led to an increase in ROM, compared to unperturbed gait, in all segments and planes. These increases ranged between 107 ± 26% (UTA/rotation) and 262 ± 132% (UTS/lateral flexion), significant only in lateral flexion. EMG activity of the trunk was increased during stumbling (abdominal: 665 ± 283%; back: 501 ± 215%), without significant differences between muscles. Provoked stumbling leads to a measurable effect on the trunk, quantifiable by an increase in ROM and EMG activity, compared to normal walking. Greater abdominal muscle activity and ROM of lateral flexion may indicate a specific compensation pattern occurring during stumbling.

  20. Influence of tibial rotation in total knee arthroplasty on knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, Arnd; Schröder, Christian; Woiczinski, Matthias; Müller, Tatjana; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar; Fottner, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Although continuous improvements have been made, there is still a considerable amount of unsatisfied patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A main reason for this high percentage is anterior knee pain, which is supposed to be provoked by post-operative increased retropatellar peak pressure. Since rotational malalignment of the implant is believed to contribute to post-operative pain, the aim of this study was to examine the influence of tibial component rotation on knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure. Eight fresh-frozen knee specimens were tested in a weight-bearing knee rig after fixed-bearing TKA under a loaded squat from 20° to 120° of flexion. To examine tibial components with different rotations, special inlays with 3° internal rotation and 3° external rotation were produced and retropatellar pressure distribution was measured with a pressure-sensitive film. The kinematics of the patella and the femorotibial joint were recorded with an ultrasonic-based motion analysis system. Retropatellar peak pressure decreased significantly from 3° internal rotation to neutral position and 3° external rotation of the tibial component (8.5 ± 2.3 vs. 8.2 ± 2.4 vs. 7.8 ± 2.5 MPa). Regarding knee kinematics femorotibial rotation and anterior-posterior translation, patella rotation and tilt were altered significantly, but relative changes remained minimal. Changing tibial rotation revealed a high in vitro influence on retropatellar peak pressure. We recommend the rotational alignment of the tibial component to the medial third of the tibial tuberosity or even more externally beyond that point to avoid anterior knee pain after TKA.

  1. Kinematic and Neurophysiological Consequences of an Assisted-Force-Feedback Brain-Machine Interface Training: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Silvoni, Stefano; Cavinato, Marianna; Volpato, Chiara; Cisotto, Giulia; Genna, Clara; Agostini, Michela; Turolla, Andrea; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Piccione, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In a proof-of-principle prototypical demonstration we describe a new type of brain-machine interface (BMI) paradigm for upper limb motor-training. The proposed technique allows a fast contingent and proportionally modulated stimulation of afferent proprioceptive and motor output neural pathways using operant learning. Continuous and immediate assisted-feedback of force proportional to rolandic rhythm oscillations during actual movements was employed and illustrated with a single case experiment. One hemiplegic patient was trained for 2 weeks coupling somatosensory brain oscillations with force-field control during a robot-mediated center-out motor-task whose execution approaches movements of everyday life. The robot facilitated actual movements adding a modulated force directed to the target, thus providing a non-delayed proprioceptive feedback. Neuro-electric, kinematic, and motor-behavioral measures were recorded in pre- and post-assessments without force assistance. Patient’s healthy arm was used as control since neither a placebo control was possible nor other control conditions. We observed a generalized and significant kinematic improvement in the affected arm and a spatial accuracy improvement in both arms, together with an increase and focalization of the somatosensory rhythm changes used to provide assisted-force-feedback. The interpretation of the neurophysiological and kinematic evidences reported here is strictly related to the repetition of the motor-task and the presence of the assisted-force-feedback. Results are described as systematic observations only, without firm conclusions about the effectiveness of the methodology. In this prototypical view, the design of appropriate control conditions is discussed. This study presents a novel operant-learning-based BMI-application for motor-training coupling brain oscillations and force feedback during an actual movement. PMID:24223567

  2. Kinematic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Fergal P.

    1995-01-01

    A new geometric formulation is given for the problem of determining position and orientation of a satellite scanner from error-prone ground control point observations in linear pushbroom imagery. The pushbroom satellite resection problem is significantly more complicated than that of the conventional frame camera because of irregular platform motion throughout the image capture period. Enough ephemeris data are typically available to reconstruct satellite trajectory and hence the interior orientation of the pushbroom imagery. The new approach to resection relies on the use of reconstructed scanner interior orientation to determine the relative orientations of a bundle of image rays. The absolute position and orientation which allows this bundle to minimize its distance from a corresponding set of ground control points may then be found. The interior orientation is represented as a kinematic chain of screw motions, implemented as dual-number quaternions. The motor algebra is used in the analysis since it provides a means of line, point, and motion manipulation. Its moment operator provides a metric of distance between the image ray and the ground control point.

  3. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  4. Kinematic and chemical study of planetary nebulae and H II regions in NGC 3109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Durán, S. N.; Peña, M.; Ruiz, M. T.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: We present high-resolution spectroscopy of a number of planetary nebulae (PNe) and H ii regions distributed along the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 3109 and compare their kinematical behavior with that of H i data. We aim to determine if there is a kinematical connection among these objects. We also aim to determine the chemical composition of some PNe and H ii regions in this galaxy and discuss it in comparison with stellar evolution models. Methods: Data for eight PNe and one H ii region were obtained with the high-resolution spectrograph Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Data for three PNe, six compact H ii regions, and nine knots or clumps in extended H ii regions were obtained with the high-resolution spectrograph Manchester Echelle Spectrometer (MES) attached to the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, SPM, B.C., Mexico. An additional object was obtained from The SPM Catalogue of Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae. Thus, in total we have high-quality data for nine of the 20 PNe detected in this galaxy, and many H ii regions. In the wavelength calibrated spectra, the heliocentric radial velocities were measured with a precision better than 7.8 km s-1. Data for blue supergiant stars were collected from the literature to be included in the analysis. The heliocentric radial velocities of the different objects were compared to the velocities of the H i disk at the same position. Physical conditions and ionic abundances of PNe and H ii regions were obtained from the emission lines, and we used recent ionization correction factors to derive the total chemical abundances. Results: From the analysis of radial velocities we found that H ii regions in NGC 3109 share the kinematics of the H i disk at the same projected position with very low dispersion in velocities. Blue supergiant stars and PNe rotate in the same direction as the H i disk but these objects have much larger dispersion; this larger dispersion

  5. A developmental study of the relationship between geometry and kinematics in drawing movements.

    PubMed

    Viviani, P; Schneider, R

    1991-02-01

    Trajectory and kinematics of drawing movements are mutually constrained by functional relationships that reduce the degrees of freedom of the hand-arm system. Previous investigations of these relationships are extended here by considering their development in children between 5 and 12 years of age. Performances in a simple motor task--the continuous tracing of elliptic trajectories--demonstrate that both the phenomenon of isochrony (increase of the average movement velocity with the linear extent of the trajectory) and the so-called two-thirds power law (relation between tangential velocity and curvature) are qualitatively present already at the age of 5. The quantitative aspects of these regularities evolve with age, however, and steady-state adult performance is not attained even by the oldest children. The power-law formalism developed in previous reports is generalized to encompass these developmental aspects of the control of movement.

  6. Study of human body: Kinematics and kinetics of a martial arts (Silat) performers using 3D-motion capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Ahmad Afiq Sabqi Awang; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Azraai, Nur Zaidi

    2015-04-01

    The Interest in this studies of human kinematics goes back very far in human history drove by curiosity or need for the understanding the complexity of human body motion. To find new and accurate information about the human movement as the advance computing technology became available for human movement that can perform. Martial arts (silat) were chose and multiple type of movement was studied. This project has done by using cutting-edge technology which is 3D motion capture to characterize and to measure the motion done by the performers of martial arts (silat). The camera will detect the markers (infrared reflection by the marker) around the performer body (total of 24 markers) and will show as dot in the computer software. The markers detected were analyzing using kinematic kinetic approach and time as reference. A graph of velocity, acceleration and position at time,t (seconds) of each marker was plot. Then from the information obtain, more parameters were determined such as work done, momentum, center of mass of a body using mathematical approach. This data can be used for development of the effectiveness movement in martial arts which is contributed to the people in arts. More future works can be implemented from this project such as analysis of a martial arts competition.

  7. Exploring MaNGA's kinematic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijmans, Anne-Marie; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Different galaxy formation processes leave different imprints on the gas and stellar kinematic patterns for a galaxy. With MaNGA, we now have after one year of observations an unprecedented sample of 1400 nearby galaxies for which we can study gas and stellar kinematics in much detail, based on integral-field spectroscopy. We are measuring kinematic quantities such as LambdaR (angular momentum) and their (possible) correlations with other galaxy properties such as mass, morphology and environment. By quantifying the kinematic (sub)structures in velocity and dispersion maps, we will construct a kinematic galaxy classification that can be linked to their formation processes.

  8. Abnormal tibiofemoral contact stress and its association with altered kinematics after center-center anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Imhauser, Carl; Mauro, Craig; Choi, Daniel; Rosenberg, Eric; Mathew, Stephen; Nguyen, Joseph; Ma, Yan; Wickiewicz, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Abnormal tibiofemoral contact stress and aberrant kinematics may influence the progression of osteoarthritis in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient and the ACL-reconstructed knee. However, relationships between contact stress and kinematics after ACL reconstruction are poorly understood. Therefore, we posed the following research questions: (1) How do ACL deficiency and reconstruction affect the kinematics of and contact stress in the tibiofemoral joint? (2) What kinematic differences are associated with abnormal contact stress after ACL reconstruction? Center-center ACL reconstruction will not restore knee kinematics and contact stress. Correlations will exist between abnormal contact stress and aberrant kinematics after ACL reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Clinical tests of anterior and rotational stability were simulated on 11 cadaveric knees using an industrial robot. Tests were conducted with the ACL intact, sectioned, and after single-bundle ACL reconstruction using a quadrupled hamstring autograft with tunnels drilled through the center of the native footprints. Kinematics were recorded during the tests. Contact stress was continuously recorded from a stress transducer fixed to the tibial plateau, and mean contact stress was calculated regionally. ACL deficiency resulted in increased mean contact stress in the posterior sectors of the medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loads, respectively. Reconstruction reduced stress in these locations; however, contact stress abnormalities remained. On average, kinematics were overconstrained after ACL reconstruction (≤1.8 mm and ≤2.6° in all directions). However, combinations of overconstrained and underconstrained motions in abduction/adduction and medial-lateral translation in response to combined moments, and anterior-posterior translation, medial-lateral translation, and axial rotation in response to an anterior load were associated with abnormal mean contact

  9. Action observation versus motor imagery in learning a complex motor task: a short review of literature and a kinematics study.

    PubMed

    Gatti, R; Tettamanti, A; Gough, P M; Riboldi, E; Marinoni, L; Buccino, G

    2013-04-12

    Both motor imagery and action observation have been shown to play a role in learning or re-learning complex motor tasks. According to a well accepted view they share a common neurophysiological basis in the mirror neuron system. Neurons within this system discharge when individuals perform a specific action and when they look at another individual performing the same or a motorically related action. In the present paper, after a short review of literature on the role of action observation and motor imagery in motor learning, we report the results of a kinematics study where we directly compared motor imagery and action observation in learning a novel complex motor task. This involved movement of the right hand and foot in the same angular direction (in-phase movement), while at the same time moving the left hand and foot in an opposite angular direction (anti-phase movement), all at a frequency of 1Hz. Motor learning was assessed through kinematics recording of wrists and ankles. The results showed that action observation is better than motor imagery as a strategy for learning a novel complex motor task, at least in the fast early phase of motor learning. We forward that these results may have important implications in educational activities, sport training and neurorehabilitation.

  10. Study on lumbar kinematics and the risk of low back disorder in female university students by using shoes of different heel heights.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Rauf; De, Amitabha; Mishra, Wricha; Maulik, Shreya; Chandra, A M

    2012-01-01

    The study was taken up to investigate the effects of heel heights on lumbar kinematics and the risk of Low Back Disorder (LBD) in females. Nineteen female university students (24.5 ± 3.36 yrs) volunteered in the study. Lumbar kinematics was measured by using Industrial Lumbar Motion Monitor (iLMM). The volunteers were asked to walk for a distance of 50 meters in 3 different given conditions i.e bare foot (Heel 0), with flat heels (Heel 1) and with high heels (Heel 2). Heights of Heel 1 and Heel 2 were 1.5 ± 0.84 cm and 5.5 ± 1.70 cm respectively. The Lumbar kinematic parameters studied were- Average Twisting Velocity (ATV), Maximum Sagital Flexion (MSF) and Maximum Lateral Velocity (MLV). It was observed that all the above mentioned Lumbar kinematics - ATV, MSF and MLV increases with increase of heel heights, which in turn increases the risk of LBD. As a result of increase in Lumbar kinematic values with increase in heel heights, LBD risk has also increased. Mean and SD of the LBD risk with Heel 0, Heel 1 and Heel 2 were 16.79 ± 6.04%, 19.00 ± 7.38% and 22.11 ± 6.98% respectively. Lower stature with high heels showed higher risk of LBD than the higher stature with high heels.

  11. Leonardian fluid mechanics. Part 1: History of kinematics. Part 2: Inception of modern kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macagno, E.

    1991-08-01

    A history of kinematics is given. Empirical kinematics, theoretical kinematics, experimental kinematics, the inception of modern kinematics, kinematics before and after Ampere, and Ampere's contribution are discussed.

  12. Kinematic Characteristics of Speaking Rate in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Nip, Ignatius S B

    2013-01-01

    Many individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have a slower speaking rate compared with their typically developing peers. Previous studies examining age-related changes in speaking rate in typical development suggest that (1) cognitive and linguistic processing increases account for most of these changes, and (2) changes to linguistic task demands affect the articulatory strategies used to produce the target stimuli (e.g., truncating movements for tasks with fewer linguistic demands). The purpose of this study was to determine the relations between linguistic and physiologic factors in individuals with CP to better understand how the pathophysiology of CP affects speech production in these individuals. Four participants with CP and 38 age-matched peers were asked to complete a diadochokinetic (DDK) task, a vowel-consonant-vowel syllable repetition task, and a sentence repetition task. Speaking rate for the tasks and lower lip maximum movement speed, range of movement, and duration of the closing and opening gestures common to each task were measured. In general, participants with CP have reduced speaking rates compared with their typically developing peers despite increased movement speeds. In both groups, linguistic task effects were observed; higher linguistic demands resulted in slower speaking rates and higher movement speeds. Range of movement was greater for participants with CP than their typically developing peers and may have contributed to the observed decreased speaking rates in individuals with CP.

  13. Study of the 19O(d , p) reaction in inverse kinematics with HELIOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, C. R.; Alcorta, M.; Back, B. B.; Baker, S. I.; Bertone, P. F.; Clark, J. A.; Digiovine, B.; Kay, B. P.; Pardo, R. C.; Rehm, K. E.; Schiffer, J. P.; Deibel, C. M.; Marley, S. T.; Lighthall, J. C.; Bedoor, S.; Shetty, D. V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Freeman, S. J.; Sharp, D. K.; Thomas, J. S.; Rojas, A.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    2011-10-01

    The neutron single-particle components of states in 20O have been probed through the (d, p) reaction in inverse kinematics. The experiment consisted of a 125 MeV radioactive 19O beam, produced by the ATLAS In-Flight facility at Argonne National Laboratory, impinging on a [(C2D4)n] target located inside the HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS). A Q-value resolution of ~150 KeV was achieved for states in 20O. Absolute cross sections and angular distributions have been determined for a number of levels in 20O up to 7 MeV in excitation energy. A strong candidate for the previously unobserved l = 0 3+ level at 5.2 MeV has been identified. The extracted spectroscopic factors for l = 2 (presumably ν 0d5 / 2) and l = 0 (ν 1s1 / 2) transitions will be compared to those along the Z = 8 isotopic chain and to microscopic calculations. Support from US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and No. DE-FG-2-04ER41320, NSF Grant No. PHY-08022648, and the UK STFC.

  14. A theoretical study of burrowing in dry soil using razor clam-inspired kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Amos; Isava, Monica

    2015-11-01

    This work investigates whether the digging kinematics of Ensis directus, the Atlantic razor clam, could be utilized in dry soil. In wet soil, E. directus uses contractions of its valves to relieve stress on the surrounding soil, and then draw water towards its body to create a pocket of fluidized substrate. This locally fluidized zone requires much less force to move through than static soil, resulting in burrowing energy that scales linearly with depth, rather than depth squared. In dry soil, if the valves of a clam-like device are contracted fast enough, the horizontal stress in the soil could be brought to a zero-stress state. This would correspondingly reduce the local vertical stresses to zero, which could drastically lower the forces required to burrow compared to moving through static dry soil. Using analytical models of soil failure mechanics, we investigated the critical timescales for inducing a zero-stress state in soil surrounding an E. directus-like device with contracting valves. This device was modeled as a similar size to a real razor clam (15 mm wide). It was found that for most dry soils, the device would have to contract its valves in 0.02 seconds, a speed within the realm of possibility for a mechanical system. These results suggest that the burrowing method used by E. directus could feasibly be adapted for digging in dry soil.

  15. A 3D kinematic study of the northern ejecta `jet' of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Christine S.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    We present moderate resolution [O III] λλ4959, 5007 line emission spectra of the Crab nebula's northern ejecta jet. These data along with an [O III] image of the Crab nebula were used to build three-dimensional kinematic maps of the jet and adjacent remnant nebulosity to better understand the jet's properties and thus its likely origin. We find the jet's systemic velocity to be +170 ± 15 km s-1 with radial velocities ranging from -190 to +480 km s-1. Our data indicate that the jet consists of thin filamentary walls (Vexp ≃ 40-75 km s-1), is virtually hollow in [O III] emission, and elliptical and funnel-like in shape rather than a straight cylindrical tube as previously thought. Examination of the Crab's 3D filamentary structure along the jet's base reveals a large and nearly emission-free opening in the remnant's thick outer ejecta shell. The jet's blueshifted and redshifted sides are surprisingly well defined and, like the jet's sharp western limb, appear radially aligned with the remnant's centre of expansion. These alignments, along with the opening in the nebula at the jet's base and proper motions indicating an expansion age in line with the 1054 supernova event, suggest a direct connection between the jet's formation and the Crab's radial expansion. While our analysis supports the scenario that the jet may simply represent the highest velocity material of the remnant's N-S bipolar expansion, the nature of this expansion asymmetry remains unclear.

  16. Grasping Kinematics from the Perspective of the Individual Digits: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Verheij, Rebekka; Brenner, Eli; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2012-01-01

    Grasping is a prototype of human motor coordination. Nevertheless, it is not known what determines the typical movement patterns of grasping. One way to approach this issue is by building models. We developed a model based on the movements of the individual digits. In our model the following objectives were taken into account for each digit: move smoothly to the preselected goal position on the object without hitting other surfaces, arrive at about the same time as the other digit and never move too far from the other digit. These objectives were implemented by regarding the tips of the digits as point masses with a spring between them, each attracted to its goal position and repelled from objects' surfaces. Their movements were damped. Using a single set of parameters, our model can reproduce a wider variety of experimental findings than any previous model of grasping. Apart from reproducing known effects (even the angles under which digits approach trapezoidal objects' surfaces, which no other model can explain), our model predicted that the increase in maximum grip aperture with object size should be greater for blocks than for cylinders. A survey of the literature shows that this is indeed how humans behave. The model can also adequately predict how single digit pointing movements are made. This supports the idea that grasping kinematics follow from the movements of the individual digits. PMID:22412997

  17. A Multi-epoch Kinematic Study of the Remote Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Meghin E.; Mateo, Mario; Walker, Matthew G.; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2017-02-01

    We conducted a large spectroscopic survey of 336 red giants in the direction of the Leo II dwarf galaxy using Hectochelle on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, and we conclude that 175 of them are members based on their radial velocities and surface gravities. Of this set, 40 stars have never before been observed spectroscopically. The systemic velocity of the dwarf is 78.3 ± 0.6 km s-1 with a velocity dispersion of 7.4 ± 0.4 km s-1. We identify one star beyond the tidal radius of Leo II but find no signatures of uniform rotation, kinematic asymmetries, or streams. The stars show a strong metallicity gradient of -1.53 ± 0.10 dex kpc-1 and have a mean metallicity of -1.70 ± 0.02 dex. There is also evidence of two different chemodynamic populations, but the signal is weak. A larger sample of stars would be necessary to verify this feature. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  18. An observational study assessing completion time and accuracy of completing the tactical combat casualty care card by combat medic trainees.

    PubMed

    Therien, Sean P; Andrews, James E; Nesbitt, Michael E; Mabry, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital care documentation is crucial to improving battlefield care outcomes. Developed by United States Army Ranger Special Operations Combat Medics (SOCMs), the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is currently fielded to deployed units to record prehospital injury data. This study documents length of time and accuracy of U.S. Army Combat Medic trainees in completing the minimum preestablished required fields on the TCCC card, establishing a baseline for point-of-injury cards. This was a prospective observational study in which U.S. Army combat medic trainees were timed while recording data on the TCCC card in both the classroom and simulated combat environment. We hypothesized that trainees could complete the TCCC card in less than 1 minute with 90% or greater accuracy. We enrolled 728 U.S. Army Combat Medic trainees in the study during May?June 2011 at Fort Sam Houston, TX. We observed an average TCCC card completion time of less than 1 minute with greater than 90% accuracy in the unstressed classroom environment but an increase to nearly 2 minutes on average and a decrease to 85% accuracy in the simulated combat environment. RESULTS imply that the TCCC card is well designed to quickly and accurately record prehospital combat injury information. Further investigation and future studies may compare other prehospital data collection methods with the TCCC card in terms of timely and accurate data collection. 2014.

  19. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2016-07-20

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry, obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. In conclusion, we discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.

  20. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; ...

    2016-07-20

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry,more » obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. In conclusion, we discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.« less

  1. A Project to Study Stellar and Gas Kinematics in 30 Dor with the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Brunet, Vincent; Evans, Christopher J.; Taylor, William D.; Gieles, Mark; VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Consortium

    2011-01-01

    The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey offers a unique opportunity to study the stellar and gas kinematics of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Using the nebular emission lines in the fibre spectra of ˜1000 stars, we can map the radial velocity structure of ionized gas across the 30 Doradus region, enabling us to study the environment of massive stars. Multi-epoch ARGUS-IFU observations and MEDUSA/UVES fibre spectroscopy in the young massive cluster R136, at the core of 30 Dor, will allow us to quantify the effect of binaries on the velocity dispersion of the cluster. The true velocity dispersion will be measured from the radial velocities of the identified single stars, providing an essential ingredient to estimate the dynamical mass and probe the dynamical state of R136.

  2. Boundary kinematic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, Andreas; Sully, James; Uhlemann, Christoph F.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2017-08-01

    We extend kinematic space to a simple scenario where the state is not fixed by conformal invariance: the vacuum of a conformal field theory with a boundary (bCFT). We identify the kinematic space associated with the boundary operator product expansion (bOPE) as a subspace of the full kinematic space. In addition, we establish representations of the corresponding bOPE blocks in a dual gravitational description. We show how the new kinematic dictionary and the dynamical data in bOPE allows one to reconstruct the bulk geometry. This is evidence that kinematic space may be a useful construction for understanding bulk physics beyond just kinematics.

  3. A Study of Sea Ice Kinematics and Their Relationship to Arctic Ambient Noise. Part 3. Section 1. Ambient Noise. Section 2. Ambient Noise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    D-R165 384 A STUDY OF SEA ICE KINEMATICS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO 1 /4ARCTIC AMBIENT NO..(U) HONEYWIELL INC DUARTE CA ORDNANCE DIV J K LEWIS ET AL...FEB 86 SAIC-85.񓞾-PT-3 UNCLASSIFIED NB4--B5-C-853F/G8112 NL L4 11111L lAO11 1211111111112.2 L25 [41.6 11111_!11 _____2 5 1 1 1 11111-111-_L6...SECTION 1 - AMBIENT NOISE ,-_f f it m- . 1 Science Applications International Corporation MAR 1 3 1986 ’ Aw ~A STUDY OF SEA ICE KINEMATICS AND THEIR

  4. A morpho-kinematic and spectroscopic study of the bipolar nebulae: M 2-9, Mz 3, and Hen 2-104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, N.; Akras, S.; Steffen, W.; Redman, M. P.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Harvey, E.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Complex bipolar shapes can be generated either as a planetary nebula or a symbiotic system. The origin of the material ionised by the white dwarf is very different in these two scenarios, and it complicates the understanding of the morphologies of planetary nebulae. Aims: The physical properties, structure, and dynamics of the bipolar nebulae, M 2-9, Mz 3, and Hen 2-104, are investigated in detail with the aim of understanding their nature, shaping mechanisms, and evolutionary history. Both a morpho-kinematic study and a spectroscopic analysis, can be used to more accurately determine the kinematics and nature of each nebula. Methods: Long-slit optical echelle spectra are used to investigate the morpho-kinematics of M 2-9, Mz 3, and Hen 2-104. The morpho-kinematic modelling software SHAPE is used to constrain both the morphology and kinematics of each nebula by means of detailed 3D models. Near-infrared (NIR) data, as well as optical, spectra are used to separate Galactic symbiotic-type nebulae from genuine planetary nebulae by means of a 2MASS J-H/H-Ks diagram and a λ4363/Hγ vs. λ5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram, respectively. Results: The best-fitted 3D models for M 2-9, Mz 3, and Hen 2-104 provide invaluable kinematical information on the expansion velocity of its nebular components by means of synthetic spectra. The observed spectra match up very well with the synthetic spectra for each model, thus showing that each model is tightly constrained both morphologically and kinematically. Kinematical ages of the different structures of M 2-9 and Mz 3 have also been determined. Both diagnostic diagrams show M 2-9 and Hen 2-104 to fall well within the category of having a symbiotic source, whereas Mz 3 borders the region of symbiotic and young planetary nebulae in the optical diagram but is located firmly in the symbiotic region of the NIR colour-colour diagram. The optical diagnostic diagram is shown to successfully separate the two types of nebulae, however

  5. The discriminant capabilities of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics in classifying successful and failed compensatory stepping responses by young adults.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Jeremy R; Rosenblatt, Noah J; Hurt, Christopher P; Grabiner, Mark D

    2012-01-03

    This study evaluated the discriminant capability of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics to classify successful and failed compensatory stepping responses. In addition, the shared variance between stability measures, step kinematics, and trunk kinematics is reported. The stability measures included the anteroposterior distance (d) between the body center of mass and the stepping limb toe, the margin of stability (MOS), as well as time-to-boundary considering velocity (TTB(v)), velocity and acceleration (TTB(a)), and MOS (TTB(MOS)). Kinematic measures included trunk flexion angle and angular velocity, step length, and the time after disturbance onset of recovery step completion. Fourteen young adults stood on a treadmill that delivered surface accelerations necessitating multiple forward compensatory steps. Thirteen subjects fell from an initial disturbance, but recovered from a second, identical disturbance. Trunk flexion velocity at completion of the first recovery step and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second step had the greatest overall classification of all measures (92.3%). TTB(v) and TTB(a) at completion of both steps had the greatest classification accuracy of all stability measures (80.8%). The length of the first recovery step (r ≤ 0.70) and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second recovery step (r ≤ -0.54) had the largest correlations with stability measures. Although TTB(v) and TTB(a) demonstrated somewhat smaller discriminant capabilities than trunk kinematics, the small correlations between these stability measures and trunk kinematics (|r| ≤ 0.52) suggest that they reflect two important, yet different, aspects of a compensatory stepping response.

  6. Do planning and visual integration difficulties underpin motor dysfunction in autism? A kinematic study of young children with autism.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Ariane M; McGinley, Jennifer L; Taffe, John R; Rinehart, Nicole J

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines the upper-limb movement kinematics of young children (3-7 years) with high-functioning autism using a point-to-point movement paradigm. Consistent with prior findings in older children, a difference in movement preparation was found in the autism group (n = 11) relative to typically developing children. In contrast to typically developing children, the presence of a visual distractor in the movement task did not appear to impact on early movement planning or execution in children with autism, suggesting that this group were not considering all available environmental cues to modulate movement. The findings from this study are consistent with the possibility that autism is associated with a difficulty using visual information to prime alternative movements in a responsive way to environmental demands.

  7. Use of high-speed cinematography and computer generated gait diagrams for the study of equine hindlimb kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kobluk, C N; Schnurr, D; Horney, F D; Sumner-Smith, G; Willoughby, R A; Dekleer, V; Hearn, T C

    1989-01-01

    High-speed cinematography with computer aided analysis was used to study equine hindlimb kinematics. Eight horses were filmed at the trot or the pace. Filming was done from the side (lateral) and the back (caudal). Parameters measured from the lateral filming included the heights of the tuber coxae and tailhead, protraction and retraction of the hoof and angular changes of the tarsus and stifle. Abduction and adduction of the limb and tarsal height changes were measured from the caudal filming. The maximum and minimum values plus the standard deviations and coefficients of variations are presented in tabular form. Three gait diagrams were constructed to represent stifle angle versus tarsal angle, metatarsophalangeal height versus protraction-retraction (fetlock height diagram) and tuber coxae and tailhead height versus stride (pelvic height diagram). Application of the technique to the group of horses revealed good repeatability of the gait diagrams within a limb and the diagrams appeared to be sensitive indicators of left/right asymmetries.

  8. A numerical study of linear and nonlinear kinematic models in fish swimming with the DSD/SST method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao

    2015-03-01

    Flow over two fish (modeled by two flexible plates) in tandem arrangement is investigated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations numerically with the DSD/SST method to understand the differences between the geometrically linear and nonlinear models. In the simulation, the motions of the plates are reconstructed from a vertically flowing soap film tunnel experiment with linear and nonlinear kinematic models. Based on the simulations, the drag, lift, power consumption, vorticity and pressure fields are discussed in detail. It is found that the linear and nonlinear models are able to reasonably predict the forces and power consumption of a single plate in flow. Moreover, if multiple plates are considered, these two models yield totally different results, which implies that the nonlinear model should be used. The results presented in this work provide a guideline for future studies in fish swimming.

  9. A novel spinal kinematic analysis using X-ray imaging and vicon motion analysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong K; Lee, Nam G; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    This study highlights a novel spinal kinematic analysis method and the feasibility of X-ray imaging measurements to accurately assess thoracic spine motion. The advanced X-ray Nash-Moe method and analysis were used to compute the segmental range of motion in thoracic vertebra pedicles in vivo. This Nash-Moe X-ray imaging method was compared with a standardized method using the Vicon 3-dimensional motion capture system. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent and significant correlation between the two methods (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.05), suggesting that the analysis of spinal segmental range of motion using X-ray imaging measurements was accurate and comparable to the conventional 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Clinically, this novel finding is compelling evidence demonstrating that measurements with X-ray imaging are useful to accurately decipher pathological spinal alignment and movement impairments in idiopathic scoliosis (IS).

  10. Resonant scattering of 22Na + p studied by the thick-target inverse-kinematic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S. J.; Wang, Y. B.; Su, J.; Yan, S. Q.; Li, Y. J.; Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Zeng, S.; Lian, G.; Bai, X. X.; Liu, W. P.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kubono, S.; Hu, J.; Kahl, D.; Jung, H. S.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, C. S.; Teranishi, T.; Wang, H. W.; Ishiyama, H.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Brown, B. A.

    2013-09-01

    Background: In presolar low-density graphite grains, an extraordinarily large 22Ne/20Ne ratio or even nearly pure 22Ne is found, pointing to the condensation of radioactive 22Na in grains. Supernovae and neon-rich novae are the main events that produce 22Na via the explosive hydrogen burning process. The 22Na(p, γ)23Mg reaction is one of the key reactions that influences the 22Na abundance in ejecta.Purpose:The present work aims to explore the proton resonant states in 23Mg relevant to the astrophysical 22Na(p, γ)23Mg reaction. The determined 23Mg resonant parameters can be used to evaluate the 22Na(p, γ)23Mg reaction rate.Method:A low-energy 22Na radioactive ion beam is produced via the 1H(22Ne, 22Na)n reaction, and used to measure the experimental excitation function of the 22Na + p resonant scattering with a conventional thick-target inverse kinematic method. R-matrix analysis is applied to deduce the 23Mg resonance parameters from the experimental excitation function.Results: Three proton resonance states in 23Mg are observed. Spins/parities and the proton partial widths are determined. The deduced excitation energies agree with the compiled values.Conclusions: The new spin and parity assignments allow us to perform a shell-model calculation of the γ widths of the 23Mg resonant states for the evaluation of the 22Na(p, γ)23Mg astrophysical reaction rate. The two s-wave resonant states established in this work at 8.793 and 8.916 MeV in 23Mg, respectively, increase the total reaction rate by about 5% at a temperature greater than 2 GK.

  11. Kinematic study at the junction of the East Anatolian fault and the Dead Sea fault from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Y.; Masson, F.; Meghraoui, M.; Cakir, Z.; Alchalbi, A.; Yavasoglu, H.; Yönlü, O.; Daoud, M.; Ergintav, S.; Inan, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Hatay triple junction (HTJ) is a tectonically complex area located at the intersection between the left-lateral East Anatolian Fault (EAF), the Cyprus subduction arc and the left-lateral Dead Sea fault (DSF) which is a transform boundary between the Arabian and Sinai plates as they converge towards Eurasia. Previous GPS studies indicate a velocity rate varying from 5 mm/yr (along the southern part) to 2 mm/yr (along the northern part) mm/yr along the DSF (Alchalbi et al., 2010, Gomez et al., 2007, Le Béon et al., 2008). Conversely, the EAF indicates a roughly constant velocity estimated to 9.7+0.9 mm/yr along strike (Reilinger et al., 2006). The HTJ contains several well-identified active fault segments (DSF, EAF, Osmaniye fault, Karasu fault, Latakia fault, Jisr-al-shuggur fault, Idleb fault and Afrin fault) (Meghraoui et al., 2011). Their kinematics and related fault-slip rates are poorly constrained. The main issue to address in this region is the geodetic velocities along the main strike-slip fault systems and the pattern of kinematic movements from the DSF to the EAF and across the dense network of active faults. We have established a network of 58 GPS sites in NW Syria and in SE Turkey. The first campaign was carried out in 2009 and a second campaign took place recently in September and November 2010. The GPS data were processed together with previously collected data from a set of 9 permanent sites in Turkey and 6 others in Syria using GAMIT/GLOBK program. Although the velocity field vectors computed from the 2009 and 2010 measurements appear consistent with other local studies, the results are hampered by large uncertainties. Preliminary interpretations confirm, however, the decreasing velocity along the DSF from south to north.

  12. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-07

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible.

  13. Do surgical patellar interventions restore patellar kinematics in fixed-bearing, cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty?: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Keshmiri, Armin; Maderbacher, Günther; Baier, Clemens; Müller, Werner; Grifka, Joachim; Springorum, Hans Robert

    2014-11-01

    Despite different surgical patellar interventions, the decision how to treat the patella during TKA remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of different reconstructive patellar interventions on patellar kinematics during TKA using optical computer navigation. We implanted ten navigated TKAs in full body specimens. During passive motion, the effect of different surgical patellar interventions on patellar kinematics was analysed. A contrarily tilt behaviour was observed in the TKA group without patellar intervention compared to the natural knee. Lateral release led to similar tilt values (P < 0.05). All surgical interventions led to a 3 to 5mm medial shift of the patella (P < 0.05). None of the analysed surgical patellar interventions could restore natural patellar kinematics after TKA.

  14. A Study of Primary Collision Dynamics in Inverse-Kinematics Reaction of 78Kr on 40Ca at a Bombarding Energy of 10 MeV per Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Eric M.

    The CHIMERA multi-detector array at LNS Catania has been used to study the inverse-kinematics reaction of 78Kr + 40Ca at a bombarding energy of 10 A MeV. The multi-detector is capable of detecting individual products of the collision essential for the reconstruction of the collision dynamics. This is the first time CHIMERA has been used at low-energy, which offered a unique challenge for the calibration and interpretation of experimental data. Initial interrogation of the calibrated data revealed a class of selected events characterized by two coincident heavy fragments (atomic number Z>3) that together account for the majority of the total mass of the colliding system. These events are consistent with the complete fusion and subsequent binary split (fission) of a composite nucleus. The observed fission fragments are characterized by a broad A, Z distribution and are centered about symmetric fission while exhibiting relative velocities significantly higher than given by Viola systematics. Additional analysis of the kinematic relationship between the fission fragments was performed. Of note, is that the center-of-mass angular distribution (dsigma/dtheta) of the fission fragments exhibits an unexpected anisotropy inconsistent with a compound-nucleus reaction. This anisotropy is indicative of a dynamic fusion/fission-like process. The observed angular distribution features a forward-backward anisotropy most prevalent for mass-asymmetric events. Furthermore, the more massive fragment of mass-asymmetric events appears to emerge preferentially in the forward direction, along the beam axis. Analysis of the angular distribution of alpha particles emitted from these fission fragments suggests the events are associated mostly with central collisions. The observations associated with this subset of events are similar to those reported for dynamic fragmentation of projectile-like fragments, but have not before been observed for a fusion/fission-like process. Comparisons to

  15. 75 FR 67999 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections Facility, Sonoma State University... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Anthropological Studies Center.... A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Anthropological Studies...

  16. Kinematics and load-sharing of an anterior thoracolumbar spinal reconstruction construct with PEEK rods: An in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruozhou; Huang, Zhiping; Liu, Xiang; Tong, Jie; Ji, Wei; Liu, Sheting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone rod constructs provide adequate spinal stability. Kinematics and load sharing of anterior thoracolumbar reconstruction with polyetheretherketone rods under preload remains unknown. Eight human cadaveric specimens (T11-L3) were subjected to a pure moment of 5.0Nm in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation, and flexion-extension with a compressive preload of 300N. An anterior reconstruction of L1 corpectomy was conducted with a surrogate bone graft and anterior rod constructs (polyetheretherketone or titanium rods). An axial load-cell was built in the surrogate bone graft to measure the compressive force in the graft. Range of motion, neutral zone and compressive force in the graft were compared between constructs. The polyetheretherketone rod construct resulted in more motion than the titanium rod construct, particularly in extension (P=0.011) and axial rotation (P=0.001), but less motion than the intact in all directions except in axial rotation. There was no difference in range of motion or neutral zone between constructs in flexion-extension under preload. The polyetheretherketone rod construct kept the graft compressed 52N which was similar to the titanium rod construct (63N), but allowed the graft compressed more under the preload (203N vs. 123N, P=0.003). The compressive forces fluctuated in flexion-extension without preload, but increased in flexion and decreased in extension under preload. The polyetheretherketone rod construct allowed more motion compared to the titanium rod construct, but provided stability in flexion and lateral bending without preload, and flexion and extension under preload. The anterior graft shared higher load under preload, particularly for the polyetheretherketone rod construct. The results of this study suggest that rigidity of rods in the anterior reconstruction affects kinematic behavior and load sharing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Successful Student Goal Completion: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Sara C.

    2013-01-01

    Research studies have shown that one half of all students who begin college fail to realize their goals. This case study of one community college provided a comprehensive examination of best practices developed over several years through strategic enrollment planning. Additionally, this dissertation examined the decision-making processes that…

  18. The Caspar Creek Watershed Study Completes 40 Years of Research

    Treesearch

    California Dept. of Forestry and Fire Protection

    2003-01-01

    This is the first issue of the State Forests Research and Demonstration program's newsletter. With this initial issue we have chosen to highlight the Caspar Creek Watershed Study and the contributions it is making toward a better understanding of the impacts of forest management on the environment.

  19. The Public Library Effectiveness Study: The Complete Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van House, Nancy A.; Childers, Thomas A.

    The purpose of the Public Library Effectiveness Study was to define effectiveness for the public library institution. The research was designed not to measure effectiveness or evaluate particular libraries or groups of libraries, but rather to identify the feature or features of a public library that most directly attest to its effectiveness. The…

  20. Kinematic and Dynamic Studies of Microbursts in the Subcloud Layer Derived from Jaws Dual-Doppler Radar for a Colorado Thunderstorm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coover, John Anthony, Jr.

    The kinematic, dynamic and thermodynamic features of a simple and a complex microburst event were calculated, and comparisons were made in order to find common and unique structural features that might lead to greater insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for microburst development. Dual-Doppler radar data from CP-3 and CP -4, collected near Denver, Colorado, during the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) project were judiciously edited, gridded and kinematically integrated upward from the surface, to produce a three-dimensional wind field. The retrieved pressure field from the three-dimensional wind field was used to compute a relative "goodness of fit" of the mass field to the momentum field. The perturbation temperature and thermodynamic variables were used to compute the momentum budgets and field was derived from the buoyancy equation, using the derived wind and pressure fields. The complete set of Doppler derived winds and thermodynamic variables were used to compute budgets of the momentum flux and the eddy kinetic energy within the microburst domain, to allow for a more definitive interpretation of the results. The results from this study reveal some basic similarities, along with some notable differences in structure. Both cases reveal a downward flux of mass, momentum, and eddying energy within the microburst; the boundary layer above 0.75 km is the source of the mass and momentum; an intermediate level near 0.75 km acts as a conduit for the downward flux; and the surface layer below 0.75 km that comprises the divergent flow enclosed in the microburst. The microburst also included a high reflectivity core at the center. The complex case contains a misocyclone above 0.75 km. The misocyclone will hereafter refer to the cyclonic circulation above the surface microburst. The role played by hail was more significant to the microburst's development. The most significant result of this study was that a combination of physical mechanisms, including

  1. Complete Study of Longitudinal Oscillation of a VE-7 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Brown, W G

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field in order to study as closely as possible the behavior of an airplane when it was making a longitudinal oscillation. The airspeed, the altitude, the angle with the horizon and the angle of attack were all recorded simultaneously and the resulting curves plotted to the same time scale. The results show that all the curves are very close to damped sine curves, with the curves for height and angle of attack in phase, that for angle with the horizon leading them by 18 per cent and that for path angle leading them by 25 per cent.

  2. Chladni figures for completely free parallelogram plates: an analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardell, N. S.

    1994-07-01

    This paper communicates the first comprehensive analytical study of the title problem. The Ritz method with admissible functions in the form of Legendre polynomials is used, and is shown to provide rapid convergence and highly economic eigensolutions for a given problem. The robustness of the method is demonstrated, and proof is given of its validity at extreme skew angles. Chladni figures are presented for the first six modes of plates with three different aspect ratios and six different skew angles, making a total of 108 cases. (Additional results can be inferred for two more plate aspect ratios, thus raising the total number of Chladni figures to 180.) Outstanding agreement is obtained between all the analytically derived nodal patterns from this work and the experimental work of other investigators. The dependence of frequency on the skew angle, the aspect ratio and the Poisson ratio is also investigated, and extensive results are presented in diagrammatic and graphical format.

  3. Shot-put kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, R.

    2005-11-01

    The problem of the optimum throw in the shot-put discipline is analysed by relaxing the assumption that the height H, from which the athlete releases the shot, does not depend on the angle θ which the arm of the putter makes with the horizontal axis. In this context, the kinematics of the shot-put is studied and results are compared with the traditional analysis, which considers the height H, the angle θ and the modulus V0 of the initial velocity of the metal sphere as independent parameters.

  4. Effects of a program for trunk strength and stability on pain, low back and pelvis kinematics, and body balance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Reinehr, Fernanda Beatriz; Mota, Carlos Bolli

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of trunk strength and stability training on body balance and low back and pelvis kinematics during gait in females. Six subjects volunteered to do 20 sessions of training. Data collection involved a qualitative pain grade test, low back stabilization tests, low back and pelvis kinematics, and body balance assessment. Results indicate the absence or decrease in the low back pain, and also an increase in the stabilization and strength of low back and pelvis complex. The 3-D kinematics showed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) when compared pre- to post-training. The body balance was improved as well as the range of motion (ROM) was improved for trunk rotation, pelvis inclination and low back flexion. The results suggest the influence of trunk strength and stability on low back and pelvis pain and kinematics as well as on body balance. Further studies with a larger sample and/or a control group must be conducted in an attempt to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. A Research Study To Determine a Profile for Student Success in Completing Self-Paced Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Beverly

    This research study was conducted to determine if certain characteristics were consistently present in students who completed self-paced study courses, as opposed to those who did not. The survey was conducted at the Santa Fe Community College Flex Lab (New Mexico), which was designed to provide students with an alternative, self-paced method of…

  6. Kinematic Analysis of Canoe Stroke and its Changes During Different Types of Paddling Pace – Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Zahálka, František; Malý, Tomáš; Malá, Lucie; Doktor, Martin; Větrovský, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate movements of an elite canoeist when different paddling paces are applied. One of the tasks consisted of finding differences in time-space characteristics of selected markers in the referencing system canoeist’s body - canoe. 3D kinematic analysis was used for identification and comparison of selected parameters. The study confirmed that an elite canoeist has a high level of movement similarity in all types of stroke rates; differences were mainly found in time sequence of applied strokes. To evaluate properly the racing stroke rate, start, flying start, 200m pace, 500m pace, and 1000m pace were chosen. One of the evaluated parameters was the boat velocity that was 2.1–4.5 ms−1 at start, 3.2–5.2 ms−1 at flying start, 3.9–6.1 ms−1 at 200m pace, 3.9–5.9 ms−1 at 500m pace and 3.0–5.4 ms−1 at 1000m pace. Vertical change of the position of the right hand was 0.77 m at start, 0.73 m at flying start, 0.87 at 200m pace, 0.89 at 500m pace and 0.81 m at 1000m pace. PMID:23486828

  7. Mapping the Nuclear Outflow of the Milky Way: Studying the Kinematics and Spatial Extent of the Northern Fermi Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Fox, Andrew J.; Lockman, Felix J.; Wakker, Bart P.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Savage, Blair D.; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2017-01-01

    We report new observations from a systematic, spectroscopic, ultraviolet absorption-line survey that maps the spatial and kinematic properties of the high velocity gas in the Galactic Center (GC) region. We examine the hypothesis that this gas traces the biconical nuclear outflow. We use an ultraviolet spectra of 47 background QSOs and halo stars projected inside and outside the northern Fermi Bubble from the Hubble Space Telescope to study the incidence of high velocity absorption around it. We use five lines of sight inside the northern Fermi Bubble to constrain the velocity and column densities of outflowing gas traced by O i, Al ii, C ii, C iv, Si ii, Si iii, Si iv, and other species. We find that all five lines of sight inside the northern Fermi Bubble exhibit blueshifted high velocity absorption components, whereas only 9 out of the 42 lines of sight outside the northern Fermi Bubble exhibit blueshifted high velocity absorption components. The observed outflow velocity profile decreases with Galactic latitude and radial distance (R) from the GC. The observed blueshifted velocities change from {v}{GSR}=-265 {km} {{{s}}}-1 at R ≈ 2.3 kpc to {v}{GSR}=-91 {km} {{{s}}}-1 at R ≈ 6.5 kpc. We derive the metallicity of the entrained gas along the 1H1613-097 sightline, one that passes through the center of the northern Fermi Bubble, finding [O/H] ≳ -0.54 ± 0.15. A simple kinematic model, tuned to match the observed absorption component velocities along the five lines of sight inside the Bubble, constrains the outflow velocities to ≈1000-1300 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and the age of the outflow to be ˜6-9 Myr. We estimate a minimum mass outflow rate for the nuclear outflow to be ≳ 0.2{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. Combining the age and mass outflow rates, we determine a minimum mass of total UV-absorbing cool gas entrained in the Fermi Bubbles to be ≳ 2× {10}6 {M}⊙ .

  8. A Gemini/GMOS study of the physical conditions and kinematics of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, Eduardo; Thuan, Trinh X.; Izotov, Yuri I.; Carrasco, Eleazar R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We present an integral field spectroscopic study with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) of the unusual blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Mrk 996. Methods: We show through velocity and dispersion maps, emission-line intensity and ratio maps, and by a new technique of electron density limit imaging that the ionization properties of different regions in Mrk 996 are correlated with their kinematic properties. Results: From the maps, we can spatially distinguish a very dense high-ionization zone with broad lines in the nuclear region, and a less dense low-ionization zone with narrow lines in the circumnuclear region. Four kinematically distinct systems of lines are identified in the integrated spectrum of Mrk 996, suggesting stellar wind outflows from a population of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the nuclear region, superposed on an underlying rotation pattern. From the intensities of the blue and red bumps, we derive a population of ~473 late nitrogen (WNL) stars and ~98 early carbon (WCE) stars in the nucleus of Mrk 996, resulting in a high N(WR)/N(O+WR) of 0.19. We derive, for the outer narrow-line region, an oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H) = 7.94 ± 0.30 (~0.2 Z⊙) by using the direct Te method derived from the detected narrow [O iii]λ4363 line. The nucleus of Mrk 996 is, however, nitrogen-enhanced by a factor of ~20, in agreement with previous CLOUDY modeling. This nitrogen enhancement is probably due to nitrogen-enriched WR ejecta, but also to enhanced nitrogen line emission in a high-density environment. Although we have made use here of two new methods - principal component analysis (PCA) tomography and a method for mapping low- and high-density clouds - to analyze our data, new methodology is needed to further exploit the wealth of information provided by integral field spectroscopy. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative

  9. Stellar kinematics across the Hubble sequence in the CALIFA survey: general properties and aperture corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-Barroso, J.; Lyubenova, M.; van de Ven, G.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Bekeraité, S.; Sánchez, S. F.; Husemann, B.; García-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Walcher, C. J.; Zibetti, S.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Galbany, L.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Singh, R.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Wild, V.; Zhu, L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cid Fernandes, R.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Gallazzi, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Marino, R. A.; Márquez, I.; Pérez, E.; Pérez, I.; Roth, M. M.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Califa Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present the stellar kinematic maps of a large sample of galaxies from the integral-field spectroscopic survey CALIFA. The sample comprises 300 galaxies displaying a wide range of morphologies across the Hubble sequence, from ellipticals to late-type spirals. This dataset allows us to homogeneously extract stellar kinematics up to several effective radii. In this paper, we describe the level of completeness of this subset of galaxies withrespect to the full CALIFA sample, as well as the virtues and limitations of the kinematic extraction compared to other well-known integral-field surveys. In addition, we provide averaged integrated velocity dispersion radial profiles for different galaxy types, which are particularly useful to apply aperture corrections for single aperture measurements or poorly resolved stellar kinematics of high-redshift sources. The work presented in this paper sets the basis for the study of more general properties of galaxies that will be explored in subsequent papers of the survey.

  10. Rattlesnake strike behavior: kinematics

    PubMed

    Kardong; v

    1998-03-01

    The predatory behavior of rattlesnakes includes many distinctive preparatory phases leading to an extremely rapid strike, during which venom is injected. The rodent prey is then rapidly released, removing the snake's head from retaliation by the prey. The quick action of the venom makes possible the recovery of the dispatched prey during the ensuing poststrike period. The strike is usually completed in less than 0.5 s, placing a premium on an accurate strike that produces no significant errors in fang placement that could result in poor envenomation and subsequent loss of the prey. To clarify the basis for effective strike performance, we examined the basic kinematics of the rapid strike using high-speed film analysis. We scored numerous strike variables. Four major results were obtained. (1) Neurosensory control of the strike is based primarily upon sensory inputs via the eyes and facial pits to launch the strike, and upon tactile stimuli after contact. Correction for errors in targeting occurs not by a change in strike trajectory, but by fang repositioning after the jaws have made contact with the prey. (2) The rattlesnake strike is based upon great versatility and variation in recruitment of body segments and body postures. (3) Forces generated during acceleration of the head are transferred to posterior body sections to decelerate the head before contact with the prey, thereby reducing impact forces upon the snake's jaws. (4) Body acceleration is based on two patterns of body displacement, one in which acute sections of the body open like a gate, the other in which body segments flow around postural curves similar to movements seen during locomotion. There is one major implication of these results: recruitment of body segments, launch postures and kinematic features of the strike may be quite varied from strike to strike, but the overall predatory success of each strike by a rattlesnake is very consistent.

  11. A soft-tissue preserving method for evaluating the impact of posterior tibial slope on kinematics during cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty: A validation study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yifei; Angibaud, Laurent D; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Hamad, Cyril; Jung, Amaury; Cross, Michael B

    2016-12-01

    The reconstructed posterior tibial slope (PTS) plays a significant role in restoring knee kinematics in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty. However, conventional methods for the investigation of PTS can be limited by sample size or prone to errors due to damages to the bone and/or soft tissues. The purpose of this study was to validate a novel method for the evaluation of the effects of PTS on knee kinematics. Seven computer-assisted cruciate-retaining TKAs were performed by two surgeons on healthy cadaveric knees. The implanted tibial baseplates allowed precise and easy modification of the PTS in situ. Knee kinematics were evaluated during passive full range of motion test. The evaluation was performed three times at each of the five PTSs in the order of 10°, seven degrees, four degrees, one degree, and back to ten degrees. The variability of the repeated measurements, inter-surgeon variation of the data, and test reproducibility were investigated. The test method was shown to be highly repeatable (low root-mean-squared errors) and has low sensitivity to surgeon variability (ANOVA). No statistical difference was found in the knee kinematics between the first and last measurements at 10° PTS (paired t-test). The results suggested that the developed method can be used to investigate the impact of PTS on knee kinematics without disrupting the soft-tissue environment of the knee. The use of the novel tibial baseplate allowed for adjusting the PTS without re-cutting the tibia and removing the components. The method may be applied to improve the future investigation of PTS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An instrumented spatial linkage for measuring knee joint kinematics.

    PubMed

    Rosvold, Joshua M; Atarod, Mohammad; Frank, Cyril B; Shrive, Nigel G

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the design and development of a highly accurate instrumented spatial linkage (ISL) for kinematic analysis of the ovine stifle joint is described. The ovine knee is a promising biomechanical model of the human knee joint. The ISL consists of six digital rotational encoders providing six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) to its motion. The ISL makes use of the complete and parametrically continuous (CPC) kinematic modeling method to describe the kinematic relationship between encoder readings and the relative positions and orientation of its two ends. The CPC method is useful when calibrating the ISL, because a small change in parameters corresponds to a small change in calculated positions and orientations and thus a smaller optimization error, compared to other kinematic models. The ISL is attached rigidly to the femur and the tibia for motion capture, and the CPC kinematic model is then employed to transform the angle sensor readings to relative motion of the two ends of the linkage, and thereby, the stifle joint motion. The positional accuracy for ISL after calibration and optimization was 0.3±0.2mm (mean +/- standard deviation). The ISL was also evaluated dynamically to ensure that accurate results were maintained, and achieved an accuracy of 0.1mm. Compared to the traditional motion capture methods, this system provides increased accuracy, reduced processing time, and ease of use. Future work will be on the application of the ISL to the ovine gait and determination of in vivo joint motions and tissue loads. Accurate measurement of knee joint kinematics is essential in understanding injury mechanisms and development of potential preventive or treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. PUMA: the first results of a nebular spectrograph for the study of the kinematics of interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langarica, Rosalia; Bernal, Abel; Rosado, Margarita; Cobos Duenas, Francisco J.; Garfias, Fernando; Gutierrez, Leonel; Le Coarer, Etienne; Tejada, Carlos; Tinoco, Silvio J.

    1998-07-01

    The kinematics of the interstellar medium may be studied by means of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (SFPI). This allows the coverage of a wider field of view with higher spatial and spectral resolution than when a high-dispersion classical spectrograph is used. The system called PUMA consists of a focal reducer and a SFPI installed in the 2.1 m telescope of the San Pedro Martir National Astronomical Observatory (SPM), Mexico, in its f/7.5 configuration. It covers a field of view of 10 arcmin providing direct images as well as interferograms which are focused on a 1024 X 1024 Tektronix CCD, covering a wide spectral range. It is considered the integration of other optical elements for further developments. The optomechanical system and the developed software allow exact, remote positioning of all movable parts and control the FPI scanning and data acquisition. The parallelism of the interferometer plates is automatically achieved by a custom method. The PUMA provides spectral resolutions of 0.414 Angstrom and a free spectral range of 19.8 Angstrom. Results of high quality that compete with those obtained by similar systems in bigger telescopes, are presented.

  14. A kinematic analysis of a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment: a study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Broeren, Jurgen; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Rydmark, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Background Virtual Reality provides new options for conducting motor assessment and training within computer-generated 3 dimensional environments. To date very little has been reported about normal performance in virtual environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of a clinical procedure measuring trajectories with a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment and to establish normative data in healthy subjects using this haptic device. Methods Fifty-eight normal subjects; aged from 20 to 69, performed 3 dimensional hand movements in a virtual environment using a haptic device on three occasions within one week. Test-retest stability and standardized normative data were obtained for all subjects. Results No difference was found between test and retest. The limits of agreement revealed that changes in an individual's performance could not be detected. There was a training effect between the first test occasion and the third test occasion. Normative data are presented. Conclusion A new test was developed for recording the kinematics of the handheld haptic stylus in a virtual environment. The normative data will be used for purposes of comparison in future assessments, such as before and after training of persons with neurological deficits. PMID:17490470

  15. MUSE sneaks a peek at extreme ram-pressure stripping events - I. A kinematic study of the archetypal galaxy ESO137-001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; Fossati, Matteo; Hau, George K. T.; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Bower, Richard; Sun, Ming; Boselli, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations of ESO137-001, a spiral galaxy infalling towards the centre of the massive Norma cluster at z ˜ 0.0162. During the high-velocity encounter of ESO137-001 with the intracluster medium, a dramatic ram-pressure stripping event gives rise to an extended gaseous tail, traced by our MUSE observations to >30 kpc from the galaxy centre. By studying the Hα surface brightness and kinematics in tandem with the stellar velocity field, we conclude that ram pressure has completely removed the interstellar medium from the outer disc, while the primary tail is still fed by gas from the inner regions. Gravitational interactions do not appear to be a primary mechanism for gas removal. The stripped gas retains the imprint of the disc rotational velocity to ˜20 kpc downstream, without a significant gradient along the tail, which suggests that ESO137-001 is fast moving along a radial orbit in the plane of the sky. Conversely, beyond ˜20 kpc, a greater degree of turbulence is seen, with velocity dispersion up to ≳100 km s-1. For a model-dependent infall velocity of vinf ˜ 3000 km s-1, we conclude that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the tail occurs on time-scales ≥6.5 Myr. Our work demonstrates the terrific potential of MUSE for detailed studies of how ram-pressure stripping operates on small scales, providing a deep understanding of how galaxies interact with the dense plasma of the cluster environment.

  16. Study of the kinematic and load sharing properties of wormgearing with non-symmetric tooth profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1995-01-01

    The geometry of non-symmetric tooth profiles, i.e. tooth profiles with different pressure angles on the two sides of the tooth, is studied. A feasible non-symmetric tooth profile for application in helicopter transmissions is laid out as the best compromise among several conflicting factors. The non-symmetric tooth profile is then compared with the symmetric tooth profile studied previously. Based on the detailed comparisons it is concluded that the use of the non-symmetric tooth profile would severely limit the face width of the worm, consequently reduce the number of meshing teeth and cause much higher normal load on the individual gear teeth.

  17. Study of the kinematic and load sharing properties of wormgearing with non-symmetric tooth profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1995-01-01

    The geometry of non-symmetric tooth profiles, i.e. tooth profiles with different pressure angles on the two sides of the tooth, is studied. A feasible non-symmetric tooth profile for application in helicopter transmissions is laid out as the best compromise among several conflicting factors. The non-symmetric tooth profile is then compared with the symmetric tooth profile studied previously. Based on the detailed comparisons it is concluded that the use of the non-symmetric tooth profile would severely limit the face width of the worm, consequently reduce the number of meshing teeth and cause much higher normal load on the individual gear teeth.

  18. Contributions to the study of students' ideas about the kinematics concepts velocity and acceleration: Implications in the didactic of the kinematic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbegoso-Sevillano, Victor Alfonso

    The concepts velocity and acceleration are within first whereupon all course of introductory physics begins and, later, they are continually applied in the development of the course when discussing dynamics, energy, electricity and waves, among other subjects. Therefore, this pair of concepts deserves special attention in the process of teaching and learning of physics. In this study, the ideas of the university students related to the velocity and acceleration concepts were identified and analyzed, and was determined the degree or level of understanding of such concepts. The study is of descriptive nature, and the results from this study it is tried to improve an aspect of the teaching and learning process in the course of physics. The guide questions were What are the previous conceptions on velocity and acceleration that university students have from courses of General Physics I (FISI 3001) and University Physics I (FISI 3011)? What is the genesis of those conceptions? How defer the previous ideas between students from different sex? What are the conceptual categories that stand out in the previous ideas of the students on velocity and acceleration? What difficulties find the students in the process of learning the concepts of velocity and acceleration? What degree of understanding have the students about the concepts of velocity and acceleration at the end of the semester compared to the beginning? The previous ideas that had the participants of low, average, and high academic performance about the concepts velocity and acceleration were identified by means of the analysis of the data obtained through questionnaires and interviews. This information allowed to suggest changes in the content, and the methodology, so that it was more relevant and can be more effective in accomplish objectives. The degree of understanding of the concepts velocity and acceleration was determined by means of the criterion of the ability that the student has to apply correctly such

  19. A 2D 3D registration with low dose radiographic system for in vivo kinematic studies.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, T; Burdin, V; Stindel, E; Roux, C

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of the poses and the positions of the knee bones and prostheses is of a great interest in the orthopedic and biomechanical applications. In this context, we use an ultra low dose bi-planar radiographic system called EOS to acquire two radiographs of the studied bones in each position. In this paper, we develop a new method for 2D 3D registration based on the frequency domain to determine the poses and the positions during quasi static motion analysis for healthy and prosthetic knees. Data of two healthy knees and four knees with unicompartimental prosthesis performing three different poses (full extension, 30° and 60° of flexion) were used in this work. The results we obtained are in concordance with the clinical accuracy and with the accuracy reported in other previous studies.

  20. Walking in a rotating space station, an electromyographic and kinematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Biomechanics were studied of locomotion in a rotating environment like that of a space station at various gravity levels. Comparisons were made of the walking gait patterns and the amplitudes of various leg muscle electrical outputs at different gravity levels. The results of these tests are applicable to planning future space missions by providing a part of the information that will be needed to determine the type of vehicle and the gravity level to be provided for the astronauts if it is decided that artificial gravity is to be utilized.

  1. Walking in a rotating space station, an electromyographic and kinematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Biomechanics were studied of locomotion in a rotating environment like that of a space station at various gravity levels. Comparisons were made of the walking gait patterns and the amplitudes of various leg muscle electrical outputs at different gravity levels. The results of these tests are applicable to planning future space missions by providing a part of the information that will be needed to determine the type of vehicle and the gravity level to be provided for the astronauts if it is decided that artificial gravity is to be utilized.

  2. Inverse Kinematics Studies of Intermediate-Energy Reactions Relevant for SEE and Medical Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Aichelin, J.; Bargholtz, Ch.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Blomgren, J.; Olsson, N.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Skwirczynska, I.; Chubarov, M.; Lozhkin, O.; Murin, Yu.; Pljuschev, V.; Zubkov, M.; Ekstroem, C.; Kolozhvari, A.; Persson, H.; Westerberg, L.; Jakobsson, B.

    2005-05-24

    The lack of systematic experimental checks on the intermediate-energy nuclear model simulations of heavily ionizing recoils from nucleon-nucleus collisions -- critical inputs for the Single Event Effect analysis of microelectronics and dosimetry calculations including high-LET components in the cancer tumor radiation therapy -- has been a primary motivation for a new experiment planned at the CELSIUS nuclear storage ring of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. Details of the experiment and the first results from a feasibility study are presented here.

  3. Effect of three remplissage techniques on tendon coverage and shoulder kinematics: a navigated robotic biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chung Hui James; Saier, Tim; von Deimling, Constantin; Martetschläger, Frank; Minzlaff, Philipp; Feucht, Matthias J; Martinez, Horazio; Braun, Sepp; Imhoff, Andreas B; Burgkart, Rainer

    2016-01-04

    In addition to Bankart repair engaging Hill-Sachs defects in glenohumeral instability have been treated successfully with remplissage procedure. The purpose of this study was to compare three remplissage techniques regarding (I) ability of preventing Hill-Sachs defect from engaging, (II) influence on glenohumeral rotational torque, and (III) resulting tendon coverage over the Hill-Sachs defect. Standardized engaging Hill-Sachs defects and Bankart lesions were created in n = 7 fresh frozen human shoulder specimens. Besides Bankart repair three remplissage techniques (T) with double anchor position in the valley of the defect zone were studied: T1, knots tied over anchors; T2, knots tied between anchors (double-pulley); T3, knotless anchors with a suture tape. A parallel position-orientation and force-moment controlled navigated roboticsystem was used to compare prevention of Hill-Sachs defect engagement and torque [Nm]. Pressure sensitive film was used to study area of infraspinatus tendon coverage over Hill-Sachs defect [%]. All remplissage techniques prevented engagement of the Hill-Sachs defect without showing any construct failures. Regarding humeral torque there were significant impairments observed between intact conditions and the three investigated repair techniques in 60° abduction and ≥30° external rotation (p < .04). There was no significant difference in torque between intervention groups (n.s.). With a mean coverage of 26.8 % over the defect zone the knotless suture tape technique (T3) significantly improved area of soft tissue coverage compared to the other techniques (p = .03). All remplissage techniques prevented engagement of the Hill Sachs defect. With high abduction and external rotation ≥30° all techniques showed significant higher humeral torque compared to the intact specimens, while there was not one technique superior over the others. The suture tape technique conferred the largest and most effective area of tendon

  4. A Study of Kinematics Modeling and the Computational Optimization of the Human Underwater Undulatory Kick by Comparison of Swimmers and Body Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoran; Liu, Geng; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2014-11-01

    Underwater Undulatory Swimming (UUS), better known as the underwater dolphin kick, is the most important technique in competitive swimming. Faster than three of the four strokes in swimming, UUS is permitted in the 15 m after dives and turns. In this study, we compared the UUS of a college-level swimmer and a younger swimmer. 3D human models were built and reconstructed using stereo-videos for identifying key components of undulatory kick kinematics with respect to strongly flexing joints. A gradient-based optimizer and an immersed boundary method based CFD solver was then used to study the hydrodynamic performance of each swimmer. Optimal settings of current kinematic models will help us to understand the efficiency of the observed undulatory kick mechanisms and further improvements of the human UUS strategy. This work is supported by NSF CEBT-1313217 and UVa HooS-STER program.

  5. Study of isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions for the ALICE kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharipour, Muhammad; Mehraban, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Prompt photon production is known as a powerful tool for testing perturbative QCD predictions and also the validity of parton densities in the nucleon and nuclei, especially of the gluon. In this work, we have performed a detailed study on this subject, focusing on the isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions at forward rapidity at the LHC. The impact of input nuclear modifications obtained from different global analyses by various groups on several quantities has been investigated to estimate the order of magnitude of the difference between their predictions. We have also studied in detail the theoretical uncertainties in the results due to various sources. We found that there is a remarkable difference between the predictions from the nCTEQ15 and other groups in all ranges of photon transverse momentum pTγ. Their differences become more explicit in the calculation of the nuclear modification ratio and also the yield asymmetry between the forward and backward rapidities rather than single differential cross sections. We emphasize that future measurements with ALICE will be very useful, not only for decreasing the uncertainty of the gluon nuclear modification, but also to accurately determine its central values, especially in the shadowing region.

  6. Kinematic MRI study of upper-airway biomechanics using electrical muscle stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennick, Michael J.; Margulies, Susan S.; Ford, John C.; Gefter, Warren B.; Pack, Allan I.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a new and powerful method to study the movement and function of upper airway muscles. Our method is to use direct electrical stimulation of individual upper airway muscles, while performing state of the art high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have adapted a paralyzed isolated UA cat model so that positive or negative static pressure in the UA can be controlled at specific levels while electrical muscle stimulation is applied during MRI. With these techniques we can assess the effect of muscle stimulation on airway cross-sectional area compliance and soft tissue motion. We are reporting the preliminary results and MRI techniques which have enabled us to examine changes in airway dimensions which result form electrical stimulation of specific upper airway dilator muscles. The results of this study will be relevant to the development of new clinical treatments for obstructive sleep apnea by providing new information as to exactly how upper airway muscles function to dilate the upper airway and the strength of stimulation required to prevent the airway obstruction when overall muscle tone may not be sufficient to maintain regular breathing.

  7. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  8. Do Planning and Visual Integration Difficulties Underpin Motor Dysfunction in Autism? A Kinematic Study of Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Ariane M.; McGinley, Jennifer L.; Taffe, John R.; Rinehart, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the upper-limb movement kinematics of young children (3-7 years) with high-functioning autism using a point-to-point movement paradigm. Consistent with prior findings in older children, a difference in movement preparation was found in the autism group (n = 11) relative to typically developing children. In contrast to typically…

  9. Motor planning of goal-directed action is tuned by the emotional valence of the stimulus: a kinematic study

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, P. O.; Oliveira, L. A. S.; Nogueira-Campos, A. A.; Saunier, G.; Pozzo, T.; Oliveira, J. M.; Rodrigues, E. C.; Volchan, E.; Vargas, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    The basic underpinnings of homeostatic behavior include interacting with positive items and avoiding negative ones. As the planning aspects of goal-directed actions can be inferred from their movement features, we investigated the kinematics of interacting with emotion-laden stimuli. Participants were instructed to grasp emotion-laden stimuli and bring them toward their bodies while the kinematics of their wrist movement was measured. The results showed that the time to peak velocity increased for bringing pleasant stimuli towards the body compared to unpleasant and neutral ones, suggesting higher easiness in undertaking the task with pleasant stimuli. Furthermore, bringing unpleasant stimuli towards the body increased movement time in comparison with both pleasant and neutral ones while the time to peak velocity for unpleasant stimuli was the same as for that of neutral stimuli. There was no change in the trajectory length among emotional categories. We conclude that during the “reach-to-grasp” and “bring-to-the-body” movements, the valence of the stimuli affects the temporal but not the spatial kinematic features of motion. To the best of our knowledge, we show for the first time that the kinematic features of a goal-directed action are tuned by the emotional valence of the stimuli. PMID:27364868

  10. Do Planning and Visual Integration Difficulties Underpin Motor Dysfunction in Autism? A Kinematic Study of Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Ariane M.; McGinley, Jennifer L.; Taffe, John R.; Rinehart, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the upper-limb movement kinematics of young children (3-7 years) with high-functioning autism using a point-to-point movement paradigm. Consistent with prior findings in older children, a difference in movement preparation was found in the autism group (n = 11) relative to typically developing children. In contrast to typically…

  11. 21 CFR 99.203 - Request to extend the time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... studies. 99.203 Section 99.203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... completing planned studies. (a) A manufacturer may request, prior to or at the time of making a submission to FDA under § 99.201, that FDA extend the 36-month time period for completing the studies and...

  12. A novel approach to study human posture control: "Principal movements" obtained from a principal component analysis of kinematic marker data.

    PubMed

    Federolf, Peter A

    2016-02-08

    Human upright posture is maintained by postural movements, which can be quantified by "principal movements" (PMs) obtained through a principal component analysis (PCA) of kinematic marker data. The current study expands the concept of "principal movements" in analogy to Newton's mechanics by defining "principal position" (PP), "principal velocity" (PV), and "principal acceleration" (PA) and demonstrates that a linear combination of PPs and PAs determines the center of pressure (COP) variance in upright standing. Twenty-one subjects equipped with 27-markers distributed over all body segments stood on a force plate while their postural movements were recorded using a standard motion tracking system. A PCA calculated on normalized and weighted posture vectors yielded the PPs and their time derivatives, the PVs and PAs. COP variance explained by the PPs and PAs was obtained through a regression analysis. The first 15 PMs quantified 99.3% of the postural variance and explained 99.60% ± 0.22% (mean ± SD) of the anterior-posterior and 98.82 ± 0.74% of the lateral COP variance in the 21 subjects. Calculation of the PMs thus provides a data-driven definition of variables that simultaneously quantify the state of the postural system (PPs and PVs) and the activity of the neuro-muscular controller (PAs). Since the definition of PPs and PAs is consistent with Newton's mechanics, these variables facilitate studying how mechanical variables, such as the COP motion, are governed by the postural control system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Study on Investigation of Crustal Deformation and Block Kinematics Along the Eastern Sector of the NAF by GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Kagawa, D.; Gulen, L.; Arpat, E.; Yilmaz, O.; Dogru, A. G.; Ogutcu, Z.; Yilmazer, M.; Gunes, Y.; Sanli, U.; Cakmak, R.; Turgut, B.

    2003-12-01

    This study constitutes part of an integrated project that have been carried out jointly by the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) and the TUBITAK-MAM to investigate crustal deformation and block kinematics by Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in and around the eastern sector of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) Zone. The integrated project is also include investigation of seismicity and earthquake potential. Additionally the Radon gas emissions will also be monitored on-line, near real-time along active fault zones in an attempt to predict earthquakes. The region is an ideal choice to carry out the above mentioned investigations, because due to the northward movement of the Arabian Plate, the Erzincan-Karliova region is squeezed, crushed, and expelled westward along the NAF and East Anatolian Fault Zones. The active fault pattern indicates that maximum crustal shortening and crustal deformation in Turkey takes place in this region. Despite this, the Yedisu segment of the NAF was identifed as a seismic gap and it has not been broken entirely since the 1784 earthquake. This region is the most tectonically active region in Turkey as far as the major earthquake occurences are concerned and it is capable of generating major earthquakes in every 3-4 years. It is quite obvious that following the 1992 Erzincan and 2003 Pulumur Earthquakes the Coulomb stress loading on the Yedisu segment of the NAF have been increased significantly and the region needs to be monitored vigilantly with the full armament of geophysical techniques such as seismic (network), geodetic (GPS, InSAR), and geochemical (Radon emissions) techniques. First period GPS measurements were performed at twelve GPS stations in the area. This study reports the evaluation of this GPS data.

  14. A KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE GALACTIC YOUNG STAR CLUSTER NGC 7380

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W. P.; Chen, C. W.; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Chen Li; Sperauskas, J.; Ogura, K.; Chuang, R. J.; Boyle, R. P.

    2011-09-15

    We present proper motions, radial velocities, and a photometric study of the Galactic open cluster NGC 7380, which is associated with prominent emission nebulosity and dark molecular clouds. On the basis of the sample of highly probable member stars, the star cluster is found to be at a distance of 2.6 {+-} 0.4 kpc, has an age of around 4 Myr, and a physical size of {approx}6 pc across with a tidal structure. The binary O-type star DH Cep is a member of the cluster in its late stage of clearing the surrounding material, and may have triggered the ongoing star formation in neighboring molecular clouds which harbor young stars that are coeval and comoving with, but not gravitationally bound by, the star cluster.

  15. Comparison of quasi-static and dynamic squats: a three-dimensional kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic study of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Hagemeister, Nicola; Aissaoui, Rachid; de Guise, Jacques A

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have described 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and electromyography (EMG) of the lower limbs during quasi-static or dynamic squatting activities. One study compared these two squatting conditions but only at low speed on healthy subjects, and provided no information on kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. The purpose of the present study was to contrast simultaneous recordings of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs during quasi-stat ic and fast-dynamic squats in healthy and pathological subjects. Ten subjects were recruited: five healthy and five osteoarthritis subjects. A motion-capture system, force plate, and surface electrodes respectively recorded 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. Each subject performed a quasi-static squat and several fast-dynamic squats from 0° to 70° of knee flexion. The two squatting conditions were compared for positions where quasi-static and fast-dynamic knee flexion-extension angles were similar. Mean differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were 1.5° for rotations, 1.9 mm for translations, 2.1% of subjects' body weight for ground reaction forces, 6.6 Nm for torques, 11.2 mm for center of pressure, and 6.3% of maximum fast-dynamic electromyographic activities for EMG. Some significant differences (p<0.05) were found in internal rotation, anterior translation, vertical force and EMG. All differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were small. 69.5% of compared data were equivalent. In conclusion, this study showed that quasi-static and fast-dynamic squatting activities are comparable in terms of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG, although some reservations still remain.

  16. Enhancing Digital Video Analysis of Bar Kinematics in Weightlifting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Dæhlin, Torstein E; Krosshaug, Tron; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2016-08-19

    Weightlifting technique can be objectively assessed from two-dimensional video recordings. Despite its importance, participants' bar trajectories in research involving the snatch or clean exercises are often not reported, potentially due to the time required to digitize video. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the use of an LED-based marker, digital video and open source software to automatically track the bar end during weightlifting exercises. A former national-level weightlifter was recorded with a digital video camera performing the snatch, clean and jerk, and squat exercises. An LED-based marker was placed on the right end of the bar. This marker was automatically tracked using two open source software programs to obtain vertical and horizontal position coordinates. The LED-based marker was successfully auto-tracked for all videos over a variety of camera settings. Further, the vertical and horizontal bar displacements and vertical bar velocity were consistent between the two software programs. The present study demonstrates that an LED-based marker can be automatically tracked using open source software. This combination of an LED-based marker, consumer camera and open source software is an accessible, low cost method to objectively evaluate weightlifting technique.

  17. Multifrequency studies of massive cores with complex spatial and kinematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, L. E.; Shul'ga, V. M.; Zinchenko, I. I.; Zemlyanukha, P. M.; Patoka, A. N.; Tomasson, M.

    2016-10-01

    Five regions of massive-star formation have been observed in various molecular lines in the frequency range˜85-89 GHz. The studied regions comprise dense cores, which host young stellar objects. The physical parameters of the cores are estimated, including the kinetic temperatures (˜20-40 K), the sizes of the emitting regions (˜0.1-0.6 pc), and the virial masses (˜40-500 M ⊙). The column densities and abundances of various molecules are calculated assuming Local Thermodynamical Equilibrium(LTE). The core in 99.982+4.17, which is associated with the weakest IRAS source, is characterized by reduced molecular abundances. The molecular line widths decrease with increasing distance from the core centers ( b). For b ≳ 0.1 pc, the dependences Δ V ( b) are close to power laws (∝ b - p ), where p varies from ~0.2 to ~0.5, depending on the object. In four cores, the asymmetries of the optically thick HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) lines indicates systematicmotions along the line of sight: collapse in two cores and expansion in two others. Approximate estimates of the accretion rates in the collapsing cores indicate that the forming stars have masses exceeding the solar mass.

  18. Enhancing Digital Video Analysis of Bar Kinematics in Weightlifting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Dæhlin, Torstein E; Krosshaug, Tron; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2017-06-01

    Weightlifting technique can be objectively assessed from two-dimensional video recordings. Despite its importance, participants' bar trajectories in research involving the snatch or clean exercises are often not reported, potentially due to the time required to digitize video. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the use of a light-emitting diode (LED)-based marker, digital video, and open-source software to automatically track the bar end during weightlifting exercises. A former national-level weightlifter was recorded with a digital video camera performing the snatch, clean and jerk, and squat exercises. An LED-based marker was placed on the right end of the bar. This marker was automatically tracked using 2 open-source software programs to obtain vertical and horizontal position coordinates. The LED-based marker was successfully auto-tracked for all videos over a variety of camera settings. Furthermore, the vertical and horizontal bar displacements and vertical bar velocity were consistent between the 2 software programs. This study demonstrates that an LED-based marker can be automatically tracked using open-source software. This combination of an LED-based marker, consumer camera, and open-source software is an accessible, low-cost method to objectively evaluate weightlifting technique.

  19. Measuring Kinematic Variables in Front Crawl Swimming Using Accelerometers: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Callaway, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective data on swimming performance is needed to meet the demands of the swimming coach and athlete. The purpose of this study is to use a multiple inertial measurement units to calculate Lap Time, Velocity, Stroke Count, Stroke Duration, Stroke Rate and Phases of the Stroke (Entry, Pull, Push, Recovery) in front crawl swimming. Using multiple units on the body, an algorithm was developed to calculate the phases of the stroke based on the relative position of the body roll. Twelve swimmers, equipped with these devices on the body, performed fatiguing trials. The calculated factors were compared to the same data derived to video data showing strong positive results for all factors. Four swimmers required individual adaptation to the stroke phase calculation method. The developed algorithm was developed using a search window relative to the body roll (peak/trough). This customization requirement demonstrates that single based devices will not be able to determine these phases of the stroke with sufficient accuracy. PMID:26007718

  20. PSR J1301+0833: A Kinematic Study of a Black-widow Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Graham, Melissa L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Zheng, WeiKang

    2016-12-01

    We have obtained spectroscopic measurements of the P s = 1.8 ms, P B = 6.5 hr black-widow (BW) pulsar PSR J1301+0833 as part of a program to investigate optical companions of wind-shrouded pulsars. The derived radial-velocity amplitude (259+/- 4 {km} {{{s}}}-1) and inclination (i≈ 52^\\circ ) imply a neutron star mass {M}p={1.74}-0.17+0.20 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ , smaller (for similar fit assumptions) than that of the well-studied original BW pulsar PSR J1959+2048, which shares similar values of P s and P B . This fit, which assumes d≈ 1 {kpc}, indicates a small heated region on the (anomalously faint) companion. With a free distance and full surface heating the best fit is statistically acceptable, but the large inferred d=4.7+/- 0.3 {kpc} is inconsistent with the observed pulsar proper motion. Improved photometry and heating models will be needed to refine these measurements.

  1. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Garbis, Nickolas G; Weber, Alexander E; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of young patients with glenohumeral arthritis is controversial. Resurfacing of the glenoid with biologic interposition and reaming of the glenoid have been suggested as potential treatment options. The goal of this study was to determine the change in glenohumeral contact pressures in interposition arthroplasty, as well as glenoid reaming in an arthritis model. We hypothesized that interposition with meniscal allograft will lead to the best normalization of contact pressure throughout the glenohumeral range of motion. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were tested in static positions of humeral abduction with a compressive load. Glenohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and peak force were determined sequentially for (1) intact glenoid (2) glenoid with cartilage removed (arthritis model) (3) placement of lateral meniscus allograft (4) placement of Achilles allograft (5) arthritis model with reamed glenoid. Results: The arthritis model demonstrated statistically higher peak pressures than intact glenoid and glenoid with interpositional allograft. Meniscal and Achilles allograft lowered mean contact pressure and increased contact area to a level equal to or more favorable than the control state. In contrast, the reamed glenoid did not show any statistical difference from the arthritis model for any of the recorded measures. Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear. PMID:27293292

  2. [Backward fall in Alpine skiing. Case study of the effect of the back spoiler of the ski shoe on muscle activity and kinematics].

    PubMed

    Senner, V; Schaff, P; Bubb, H; Ehrlenspiel, K

    1995-12-01

    For the investigation of the boot-induced anterior cruciate ligament injury and experimental case study with a prototype ski boot was performed. The back spoiler of this boot was designed to yield by only some degrees with a certain level of backward moment. A mechanical switch allowed to activate or to block this mechanism. Ten jumps over a prepared hill with activated and ten jumps with blocked spoiler mechanism were performed in randomised order. During the jump and landing the EMG of eight lower extremity muscles were recorded and synchronised to two S-VHS cameras suitable for 2D-analysis of the angle kinematics. The aim of these experiments was to quantify the muscular and kinematic effects caused by the new spoiler characteristics and also to establish a method for their judgement. For the quantification of the muscular effects an activity quotient was defined and for the analysis of the kinematics the time history of three body angles and their variation between the trials were found to be appropriate. The results of this case study showed an increase of the activity quotient for all observed muscles and a higher accuracy of motion with the activated spoiler mechanism. These findings an be taken as an indication for better muscular joint guiding in the knee and justify a randomised field study using the proposed methods.

  3. Occupant kinematics and shoulder belt retention in far-side lateral and oblique collisions: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Forman, Jason L; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco; Lessley, David J; Riley, Patrick; Sochor, Mark; Heltzel, Sara; Ash, Joseph; Perz, Rafal; Kent, Richard W; Seacrist, Thomas; Arbogast, Kristy B; Tanji, Hiromasa; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2013-11-01

    In far-side impacts, head contact with interior components is a key injury mechanism. Restraint characteristics have a pronounced influence on head motion and injury risk. This study performed a parametric examination of restraint, positioning, and collision factors affecting shoulder belt retention and occupant kinematics in far-side lateral and oblique sled tests with post mortem human subjects (PMHS). Seven PMHS were subjected to repeated tests varying the D-ring position, arm position, pelvis restraint, pre-tensioning, and impact severity. Each PMHS was subjected to four low-severity tests (6.6 g sled acceleration pulse) in which the restraint or position parameters were varied and then a single higher-severity test (14 g) with a chosen restraint configuration (total of 36 tests). Three PMHS were tested in a purely lateral (90° from frontal) impact direction; 4 were tested in an oblique impact (60° from frontal). All subjects were restrained by a 3-point seatbelt. Occupant motion was tracked with a 3D optoelectric high speed motion capture system. For all restraint configurations, the 60° oblique impact angle was associated with greater lateral head excursion than the 90° impact angle. This unexpected result reflects the increased axial rotation of the torso in the oblique impacts, which allowed the shoulder to displace more relative to the shoulder belt and thus the head to displace more relative to the sled buck. Restraint engagement of the torso and shoulder was actually greater in the purely lateral impacts than in the oblique impacts. Pretensioning significantly reduced lateral head excursion (175 mm average in the low-severity tests across all restraint configurations).

  4. A study of bicyclist kinematics and injuries based on reconstruction of passenger car-bicycle accident in China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jin; Yang, Jikuang

    2014-10-01

    Like pedestrians, bicyclists are vulnerable road users, representing a population with a high risk of fatal and severe injuries in traffic accidents as they are unprotected during vehicle collisions. The objective of this study is to investigate the kinematics response of bicyclists and the correlation of the injury severity with vehicle impact speed. Twenty-four car-bicyclist cases with detailed information were selected for accident reconstruction using mathematical models, which was implemented in the MADYMO program. The dynamic response of bicyclists in the typical impact configuration and the correlation of head impact conditions were analyzed and discussed with respect to the head impact speed, time of head impact and impact angle of bicyclists to vehicle impact speed. Furthermore, the injury distribution of bicyclists and the risk of head injuries and fractures of lower limbs were investigated in terms of vehicle impact speed. The results indicate that wrap-around distance (WAD), head impact speed, time of head impact, head impact angle, and throw-out distance (TOD) of the bicyclists have a strong relationship with vehicle impact speed. The vehicle impact speed corresponding to a 50% probability of head AIS 2+ injuries, head AIS 3+ injuries, and lower limb fracture risk for bicyclists is 53.8km/h, 58.9km/h, and 41.2km/h, respectively. A higher vehicle impact speed produces a higher injury risk to bicyclist. The results could provide background knowledge for the establishment or modification of pedestrian regulations considering bicyclist protection as well as being helpful for developing safety measures and protection devices for bicyclists.

  5. Study of Gamow-Teller transitions from 132Sn via the (p,n) reaction at 220 MeV/u in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, M.; Yasuda, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Baba, H.; Chao, W.; Dozono, M.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jhang, G.; Kamaeda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Milman, E.; Motobayashi, T.; Otsu, H.; Panin, V.; Powell, W.; Sakai, H.; Sako, M.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Stuhl, L.; Suzuki, H.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Takeda, H.; Uesaka, T.; Yoneda, K.; Zenihiro, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Sumikama, T.; Tako, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.; Togano, Y.; Shikata, M.; Tsubota, J.; Yako, K.; Shimoura, K.; Ota, S.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Takaki, M.; Michimasa, S.; Kisamori, K.; Lee, C. S.; Tokieda, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koyama, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Wakasa, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Kaneko, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Mucher, D.; Reichert, S.; Bazin, D.; Lee, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    The charge-exchange (p,n) reaction at 220 MeV has been measured to extract the strength distribution of Gamow-Teller transitions from the doubly magic unstable nucleus 132Sn. A recently developed experimental technique of measuring the (p,n) reaction in inverse kinematics has been applied to the study of unstable nuclei in the mass region around A˜100 for the first time. We have combined the low-energy neutron detector WINDS and the SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory (RIBF). The particle identification plot for the reaction residues obtained by the spectrometer provides the clear separation of the CE reaction channel from other background events, enabling us to identify kinematic curves corresponding the (p, n) reaction. Further analysis to reconstruct the excitation energy spectrum is ongoing.

  6. The effect of an augmentation patella prosthesis versus patelloplasty on revision patellar kinematics and quadriceps tendon force: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Mountney, John; Wilson, David R; Paice, Michael; Masri, Bassam A; Greidanus, Nelson V

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of 2 revision reconstructive interventions on patellofemoral joint mechanics in comparison to control. We flexed 8 cadaver knee specimens from 0 degrees to 60 degrees of flexion in a test rig designed to simulate weight-bearing flexion and extension (Oxford rig). Quadriceps tendon extensor force and patellar kinematics were recorded for control total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (normal primary TKA with patella resurfaced) and then for each of the 2 revision patellar interventions (after patelloplasty of typical revision knee patellar bone defect to leave a simple bony shell, and after TKA with augmentation patella resurfacing). Our results demonstrate that patellar kinematics and quadriceps extensor force are optimized when the patella is reconstructed to normal anteroposterior thickness.

  7. Opening-closing pattern of four pericardial prostheses: results from an in vitro study of leaflet kinematics.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giordano; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Mangini, Andrea; Romagnoni, Claudia; Gamba, Amando; Redaelli, Alberto; Antona, Carlo; Vismara, Riccardo

    2016-12-01

    Pericardial and porcine stented aortic valves have different leaflet kinematics. To study the biomechanics of a prosthesis thoroughly, the in vitro setting is the most appropriate. The aim of our study was to find out whether the prosthesis design in which the pericardial sheet is outside the stent post might influence the opening and closing patterns of the leaflets. Four pericardial prostheses (Magna Ease [MG] 21, Trifecta [TRI] 21, Soprano-Armonia [SA] 20 and Mitroflow [MF] 23) that fitted aortic roots with a native annulus diameter of 2.1 cm were implanted and their leaflet kinematics was studied by a high-speed digital camera. In the opening phase, MG showed the shortest RVOT and the highest RVOVI, with values of 12 ± 2 and 209 ± 17 ms, respectively. The RVOT of MG was significantly shorter than that of MF (p < 0.01), but not than that of TRI (p = 0.286). Both TRI and SA showed similar opening patterns (TRI: RVOT of 15 ± 3 ms and RVOVI of 132 ± 25 ms; SA: 17 ± 2 ms and 126 ± 19 ms), without statistically significant difference. Conversely, MF showed the slowest profile, with an RVOT of 23 ± 3 ms and an RVOVI of 94 ± 8 ms (Table 1; Fig. 3). The opening/closing profile is not influenced by the position of the pericardial leaflets, but depends on other intrinsic structural characteristics related to the material used for the stent and leaflets. Moreover, the kinematics does not affect the valve performance. Table 1 Kinematics and hydrodynamic results, reported as means and standard deviations, evaluated over the tested heart samples TRI SA MG MF ANOVA TRI versus SA TRI versus MG TRI versus MF SA versus MG SA versus MF MG versus MF p Value p Value p Value p Value p Value p Value p Value ET (ms) 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 RVOT (ms) 15 ± 3 17 ± 2 12 ± 2 23 ± 3 <0.01 1.0 0.286 <0.01 0.03 <0.01 <0.01 SVCT (ms) 247 ± 14 231 ± 15 256 ± 26 241 ± 11 0.170 0.463 0.853 0.931 0.213 1.0 1.0 RVCT (ms) 35 ± 19 52 ± 13 32

  8. O-star kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Karimova, D.K.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Proper motions determined by the authors are utilized to study the kinematics of 79 O-type stars at distance r< or =2.5 kpc. The sample is divided into two groups, having space-velocity dispersions tau/sub I/roughly-equal10 km/sec, sigma/sub II/roughly-equal35 km/sec. Solutions for the velocity-field parameters for group I yield a galactic angular rotation speed ..omega../sub 0/ = 24.9 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/ at the sun (for R/sub 0/ = 10.0 kpc) and an Oort constant A = 12.2 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/. Most of the O stars exhibit a small z-velocity directed away from the galactic plane. The velocity-ellipsoid parameters and box-orbit elements are calculated.

  9. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  10. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  11. A Study of Predictors of College Completion among SEEK Immigrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazon, Marie C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the strength of the relationship between eight situational and demographic variables and college completion among immigrant students in SEEK, an educational opportunity program. The eight variables studied as possible predictors of college completion included household composition, length of residency, English as a primary…

  12. Completion Time Dynamics of Doctoral Studies at Makerere University: A Hazard Model Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Oonyu, Joseph; Ocaya, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Issues related to attrition and completion time of graduate studies are certainly an internationally challenging and important area of higher education literature. In this paper, completion time dynamics of doctoral studies at Makerere University were investigated based on data extracted for all 295 candidates in the commencement cohorts from 2000…

  13. Influence of Motivational Design on Completion Rates in Online Self-Study Pharmacy-Content Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittenger, Amy; Doering, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Student retention rates are a constant concern in higher education, but this concern has become especially challenging as online courses become more common and there are widespread reports of low completion rates for online, self-study courses. We evaluated four self-study online pharmacy courses with a history of very high completion rates for…

  14. Influence of Motivational Design on Completion Rates in Online Self-Study Pharmacy-Content Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittenger, Amy; Doering, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Student retention rates are a constant concern in higher education, but this concern has become especially challenging as online courses become more common and there are widespread reports of low completion rates for online, self-study courses. We evaluated four self-study online pharmacy courses with a history of very high completion rates for…

  15. Perceptions of Student-Teacher Relationships and GED Completion: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hairston, Melissa Tynetta

    2013-01-01

    This study took an in depth look at student-teacher relationships as one institutional barrier affecting GED completion among adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of student-instructor relationships, specifically Instructor Connectedness and Instructor Anxiety, and its effects on adults seeking GED completion. Data from…

  16. New kinematic constraints on the Cantabrian orocline: A paleomagnetic study from the Peñalba and Truchas synclines, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lozano, Javier; Pastor-Galán, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Franco, Piedad

    2016-06-01

    The Cantabrian orocline is a large structure that bends the Variscan orogen of Western Europe in NW Iberia. The extensively studied kinematics of its core, the foreland of the orogen, indicates that the structure is secondary, i.e. acquired after the formation of the orogenic edifice. However, the extent of the Cantabrian orocline away from its core is under debate. In this paper we study the kinematics of the Cantabrian orocline beyond the foreland. We collected and analyzed samples from the northern and central parts of the Truchas syncline, which provides new data within the hinterland of the orogen in NW Iberia. The analysis of 320 samples shows a late Carboniferous remagnetization with an E to NE declination and shallow downward inclinations. These results suggest a counter-clockwise rotation of ~ 60° and peri-equatorial but still southern hemisphere latitude for Iberia during the uppermost Carboniferous-Early Permian. This rotation fits with the expected kinematic evolution of the Truchas syncline if it indeed was part of the Cantabrian orocline.

  17. Occupant Kinematics in Laboratory Rollover Tests: PMHS Response.

    PubMed

    Lessley, David J; Riley, Patrick; Zhang, Qi; Foltz, Patrick; Overby, Brian; Heltzel, Sara; Sochor, Mark; Crandall, Jeff; Kerrigan, Jason R

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the whole-body kinematic response of restrained PMHS in controlled laboratory rollover tests. A dynamic rollover test system (DRoTS) and a parametric vehicle buck were used to conduct 36 rollover tests on four adult male PMHS with varied test conditions to study occupant kinematics during the rollover event. The DRoTS was used to drop/catch and rotate the test buck, which replicated the occupant compartment of a typical mid-sized SUV, around its center of gravity without roof-to-ground contact. The studied test conditions included a quasi-static inversion (4 tests), an inverted drop and catch that produced a 3 g vertical deceleration (4 tests), a pure dynamic roll at 360 degrees/second (11 tests), and a roll with a superimposed drop and catch produced vertical deceleration (17 tests). Each PMHS was restrained with a three-point belt and was tested in both leading-side and trailing-side front-row seating positions. Whole-body kinematics were measured using a 3D motion capture system that quantified occupant displacement relative to the vehicle buck for the X-axis (longitudinal), Y-axis (lateral), and Z-axis (vertical) directions. Additionally the spine was divided into five segments to describe intrasegmental kinematics of the spine, including segment rotations as well as spinal extension and compression. The reported data represent the most complete set of kinematic response targets for a restrained occupant in a variety of dynamic rollover conditions, and are immediately useful for efforts to evaluate and improve existing ATDs and computational models for use in the rollover crash environment.

  18. South China Sea kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, J. C.; Gao, J.; Zhao, M.; Wu, J.; Ding, W.; Yeh, Y. C.; Lee, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    and proto-SCS slabs from seismic tomography indicate that the Eurasian margin has been maximum 500 km east of the Manila trench since the proto-SCS era, and we incorporate these restored slabs to define a more complete SCS kinematic history.

  19. Osteochondral lesions of the capitellum do not affect elbow kinematics and stability with intact collateral ligaments: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Marlis T; McDonald, Colin P; Ferreira, Louis M; Johnson, Jim A; King, Graham J

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum most commonly affects adolescent pitchers and gymnasts, who present with pain and mechanical symptoms. Patients with larger lesions have poorer outcomes, possibly related to increased contact pressures on the surrounding articular surface with or without instability. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether displaced OCD lesions of the capitellum lead to altered kinematics and stability of the elbow. We mounted 9 fresh-frozen cadaveric arms in an upper extremity joint testing system, with cables attaching the tendons of the major muscles to motors and pneumatic actuators. An electromagnetic receiver on the ulna enabled quantification of the kinematics of the radius and ulna with respect to the humerus. We used 3-dimensional computed tomography scans and computer-assisted techniques to navigate sequential osteochondral defects ranging in size from 12.5% to 100% of the capitellum. The arms were subjected to active and passive flexion in both the vertical and valgus positions with the forearm in both pronation and supination. We found no significant differences in valgus angulation or ulnar rotation between any of the OCD lesions and the intact elbow during flexion, regardless of arm position or forearm rotation. Osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the capitellum, both small and large, did not alter the ulnohumeral kinematics and stability with intact collateral ligaments. Therefore, excision of unfixable osteochondral fragments of the capitellum in the setting of intact collateral ligaments can be considered without the risk of creating instability. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Comparative Study of Acceptance and Adaptation to New Complete Dentures, Using Two Construction Protocols.

    PubMed

    Kamalakidis, Savvas N; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki; Sofou, Afrodite; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2016-10-01

    To validate patients' acceptance and adaptation to new complete dentures, fabricated using two construction protocols. Evaluation was achieved by means of two psychometric questionnaires and registration of total number of sore spots. Twenty complete denture wearers, who sought replacement dentures because of complaints (material degradation or unsatisfactory repaired fracture) associated with them, were selected according to specific inclusion criteria. The denture construction protocols were randomly assigned to the study participants. Ten participants received complete dentures using a duplication construction protocol with a bilateral balanced occlusal (BBO) scheme (duplicate complete denture group); ten participants received complete dentures using a traditional construction protocol with BBO (traditional complete denture group). All study participants completed the Complete Denture Satisfaction and the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) questionnaires before they received the new complete dentures (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. At the initial adaptation/adjustment visits, the location and number of sore spots were identified. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate differences between groups and within each group pre- and post-treatment. Denture satisfaction and oral health related quality of life scores were independent of the complete denture construction protocol. Within the traditional complete denture group there was a statistically significant increase in denture satisfaction and equivalent decrease (improvement) in OHIP-20 scores between pre- and post-treatment (both at 3-month and 6-month visits). This finding was consistent for OHIP-20 scores within the duplicate complete denture group, but not for denture satisfaction, which was not statistically significant. The total number of recorded sore spots was approximately double for the traditional complete denture group compared to the duplicate complete denture group

  1. 40 CFR 26.1607 - Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research. 26.1607 Section 26.1607 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1607 Human...

  2. 40 CFR 26.1607 - Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research. 26.1607 Section 26.1607 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1607 Human...

  3. A Case Study of English Language Learners Who Have Successfully Completed a Healthcare Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloud Smith, Theresa Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if English Language Learners (ELLs), who had successfully completed a healthcare education program, identified support services as having an impact on their academic success, and to identify what support services were critical to their successful completion of the healthcare education program. The…

  4. JCCC Career Program Completers 1986-87: A Three-Year Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In 1990, a follow-up study was conducted of 1986-87 Johnson County Community College (JCCC) career program completers to assess their career and educational experiences over an extended period of time. Data from 128 returned mail surveys and 166 completed telephone interviews represented responses from 86.2% of the 462 students who left JCCC with…

  5. JCCC Career Program Completers 1986-87: A Three-Year Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In 1990, a follow-up study was conducted of 1986-87 Johnson County Community College (JCCC) career program completers to assess their career and educational experiences over an extended period of time. Data from 128 returned mail surveys and 166 completed telephone interviews represented responses from 86.2% of the 462 students who left JCCC with…

  6. Kinematic, microphysical, and electrical structure and evolution of thunderstorms during the severe thunderstorm electrification and precipitation study (STEPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Kyle Cameron

    Doppler-polarimetric radar and state-of-the-art lightning mapping measurements are used for detailed investigations of the kinematic, microphysical, and electrical evolution of several storms observed during the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS). The focus is on determining what is different and/or unique about those storms that are dominated by positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes. The set of case studies includes a +CG-dominant supercell, multicellular storms of varying severity that experienced a shift from -CG-dominance to +CG-dominance, and an isolated storm that produced no CG flashes of either polarity despite frequent intra-cloud (IC) lightning. The parent charge structure of -CG-dominated storms differed significantly from that of +CG-dominated storms. In general, -CG-dominated storms exhibited the commonly observed normal tripole charge structure (positive over negative over positive charge), while the +CG-dominated storms exhibited what could be roughly described as an inverted tripole structure (negative over positive over negative charge). Neither polarity of ground flash occurred without the presence of a lower charge region (lower positive charge in the case of -CG flashes, and lower negative charge in the case of +CG flashes). The one storm that produced no CG flashes exhibited an inverted dipole charge structure consisting of a vertically thin upper negative charge region and a deep lower positive charge region. The absence of a lower negative charge in this latter storm is likely the reason for its lack of +CG flashes. The total (IC plus CG) flash rate was found to be well-correlated with the convective development of each of the storms, with a particularly robust correlation between total flash rate and echo volume of radar-inferred graupel. Dramatic increases in total flash rate and vertical extent of the lightning flashes often accompanied strong surges in updraft and hail growth aloft, showing that total

  7. The effect of the variation in ACL constitutive model on joint kinematics and biomechanics under different loads: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chao; Hao, Zhixiu; Wen, Shizhu

    2013-04-01

    The biomechanics and function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) have been widely studied using both experimental and simulation methods. It is known that a constitutive model of joint tissue is a critical factor in the numerical simulation. Some different ligament constitutive models have been presented to describe the ACL material behavior. However, the effect of the variation in the ligament constitutive model on joint kinematics and biomechanics has still not been studied. In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element model of an intact tibiofemoral joint was reconstructed. Three ACL constitutive models were compared under different joint loads (such as anterior tibial force, varus tibial torque, and valgus tibial torque) to investigate the effect of the change of the ACL constitutive model. The three constitutive models corresponded to an isotropic hyperelasticity model, a transversely isotropic hyperelasticity model with neo-Hookean ground substance description, and a transversely isotropic hyperelastic model with nonlinear ground substance description. Although the material properties of these constitutive equations were fitted on the same uniaxial tension stress-strain curve, the change of the ACL material constitutive model was found to induce altered joint kinematics and biomechanics. The effect of different ACL constitutive equations on joint kinematics depended on both deformation direction and load type. The variation in the ACL constitutive models would influence the joint kinematic results greatly in both the anterior and internal directions under anterior tibial force as well as some other deformations such as the anterior and medial tibial translations under valgus tibial torque, and the medial tibial translation and internal rotation under varus torque. It was revealed that the transversely isotropic hyperelastic model with nonlinear ground substance description (FE model III) was the best representation of the realistic ACL property by a

  8. In vivo kinematic study of the tarsal joints complex based on fluoroscopic 3D-2D registration technique.

    PubMed

    Chen Wang, M D; Geng, Xiang; Wang, Shaobai; Xin Ma, M D; Xu Wang, M D; Jiazhang Huang, M D; Chao Zhang, M D; Li Chen, M S; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Kan

    2016-09-01

    The tarsal bones articulate with each other and demonstrate complicated kinematic characteristics. The in vivo motions of these tarsal joints during normal gait are still unclear. Seven healthy subjects were recruited and fourteen feet in total were tested in the current study. Three dimensional models of the tarsal bones were first created using CT scanning. Corresponding local 3D coordinate systems of each tarsal bone was subsequently established for 6DOF motion decompositions. The fluoroscopy system captured the lateral fluoroscopic images of the targeted tarsal region whilst the subject was walking. Seven key pose images during the stance phase were selected and 3D to 2D bone model registrations were performed on each image to determine joint positions. The 6DOF motions of each tarsal joint during gait were then obtained by connecting these positions together. The TNJ (talo-navicular joint) exhibited the largest ROMs (range of motion) on all rotational directions with 7.39±2.75°of dorsi/plantarflexion, 21.12±4.68°of inversion/eversion, and 16.11±4.44°of internal/external rotation. From heel strike to midstance, the TNJ, STJ (subtalar joint), and CCJ (calcaneao-cuboid joint) were associated with 5.97°, 5.04°, and 3.93°of dorsiflexion; 15.46°, 8.21°, and 5.82°of eversion; and 9.75°, 7.6°, and 4.99°of external rotation, respectively. Likewise, from midstance to heel off, the TNJ, STJ, and CCJ were associated with 6.39, 6.19°, and 4.47°of plantarflexion; 18.57°, 11.86°, and 6.32°of inversion and 13.95°, 9.66°, and 7.58°of internal rotation, respectively. In conclusion, among the tarsal joints, the TNJ exhibited the greatest rotational mobility. Synchronous and homodromous rotational motions were detected for TNJ, STJ, and CCJ during the stance phase.

  9. Association study of MIF promoter polymorphisms with suicide completers in the Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Shimmyo, Naofumi; Hishimoto, Akitoyo; Otsuka, Ikuo; Okazaki, Satoshi; Boku, Shuken; Mouri, Kentaro; Horai, Tadasu; Takahashi, Motonori; Ueno, Yasuhiro; Shirakawa, Osamu; Sora, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Numerous studies suggest that inflammation plays a key role in suicidal behavior. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine, has received increasing attention in depression research. However, no study has investigated whether MIF has genetic involvement in completed suicide. In this study, we sought to explore the relationship between two functional polymorphisms on the MIF gene promoter (MIF-794CATT5–8 microsatellite and MIF-173G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism [SNP]) and completed suicide by using one of the largest samples of suicide completers ever reported. Methods The subjects comprised 602 suicide completers and 728 healthy controls. We genotyped MIF-794CATT5–8 microsatellite by polymerase chain reaction–based size discrimination assay and MIF-173G/C SNP by TaqMan® SNP genotyping assay. The allele-, genotype-, or haplotype-based association analyses between the suicide completers and the controls were carried out with the χ2 test, the Cochran–Armitage trend test, or Fisher’s exact test. Results Analyses of allele or genotype frequency distributions of the polymorphisms studied here did not reveal any significant differences between the suicide completers and the controls. Haplotype analysis also revealed no association with completed suicide. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that has examined the genetic association between MIF and completed suicide. Our results suggest that the effects of MIF-794CATT5–8 microsatellite and MIF-173G/C SNP on the MIF gene promoter might not contribute to the genetic risk of completed suicide in the Japanese population. PMID:28367056

  10. A Study Of The Kinematics Of Stellar Sub-populations In M31's Disk And Spheroid Using PHAT And SPLASH Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, C.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Gilbert, K.; Howley, K.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalirai, J.; Krause, T.; Lang, D.; Williams, B.; PHAT Team; SPLASH Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the kinematics of different types of stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Our fields of study span a range of projected radii from 2 to 15 kpc in the NE and SE quadrants of M31's disk and spheroid. The kinematical part of this study is based on radial velocity measurements of a few thousand stars obtained using the Keck II telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph as part of the SPLASH survey. The DEIMOS spectra have a spectral resolution of about 1.5 Angstrom (FWHM) and cover the wavelength range 6500-9000 Angstrom. The stellar populations part of this study - specifically, the division of stars into sub-populations - is based on high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) images and photometry in six filters: two ultraviolet bands (F275W and F336W), two optical bands (F475W and F814W), and two near-infrared bands (F110W and F160W). The stellar sub-populations we study include metal-rich, metal-intermediate, and metal-poor red giants, asymptotic giant branch stars, He-burning blue loop stars, massive main sequence stars, planetary nebulae, and X-ray binaries. Kinematical information allows us to measure the fraction of each sub-population that is associated with M31's disk versus its spheroid. The excellent synergy between HST and Keck provides insight into the relationship between the dynamical, star formation, and chemical enrichment histories of the structural sub-components of M31 and, by association, other large spiral galaxies. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Science Internship Program (SIP) at UCSC.

  11. Glass fibre reinforced acrylic resin complete dentures: a 5-year clinical study.

    PubMed

    Goguţă, Luciana Maria; Bratu, Dorin; Jivănescu, Anca; Erimescu, Raluca; Mărcăuţeanu, Corina

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the wear resistance of the glass fiber reinforced complete dentures comparative to the traditional acrylic complete dentures. Complete new dentures were made to replace old fractured 'un'-reinforced acrylic dentures. The total number of dentures was 30 and woven E-glass fibre reinforcements were used in maxillary complete dentures. Unidirectional E-glass fibre reinforcements were used as partial fibre reinforcements in mandibular complete dentures. Ten complete acrylic un-reinforced dentures were used as control. The follow-up period was 5 years and the recalls were made at 6 months. After 5 years of wearing the new dentures, the control dentures suffered seven fractures. After 5 years all the mandibular reinforced dentures were in good shape. The maxillary complete reinforced dentures suffered four partial fractures. Fracture lines were restricted by the glass fibre net and the patients could still use their dentures. Pre-impregnated E-glass fibre nets and polymer pre-impregnated E-glass unidirectional fibres are useful in reinforcing acrylic resin complete dentures especially were heavy occlusal forces are involved. Glass fibre reinforcement will be applied on the tension side in both cases (total fibre reinforcement and partial fibre reinforcement). The reinforcement cannot replace the necessary linings and occlusal adjustments. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Comparing lower lumbar kinematics in cyclists with low back pain (flexion pattern) versus asymptomatic controls--field study using a wireless posture monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Wannes; Volkaerts, Koen; O'Sullivan, Kieran; Verschueren, Sabine; Dankaerts, Wim

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine lower lumbar kinematics in cyclists with and without non-specific chronic low back pain (NS-CLBP) during a cross-sectional cycling field study. Although LBP is a common problem among cyclists, studies investigating the causes of LBP during cycling are scarce and are mainly focussed on geometric bike-related variables. Until now no cycling field studies have investigated the relationship between maladaptive lumbar kinematics and LBP during cycling. Eight cyclists with NS-CLBP classified as having a 'Flexion Pattern' (FP) disorder and nine age- and gender-matched asymptomatic cyclists were tested. Subjects performed a 2 h outdoor cycling task on their personal race bike. Lower lumbar kinematics was measured with the BodyGuard™ monitoring system. Pain intensity during and after cycling was measured using a numerical pain rating scale. The NS-CLBP (FP) subjects were significantly more flexed at the lower lumbar spine during cycling compared to healthy controls (p = 0.018), and reported a significant increase in pain over the 2 h of cycling (p < 0.001). One-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for group (p = 0.035, F = 5.546) which remained just significant when adding saddle angle as a covariate (p = 0.05, F = 4.747). The difference in posture between groups did not change over time. These findings suggest that a subgroup of cyclists with NS-CLBP (FP) demonstrate an underlying maladaptive motor control pattern resulting in greater lower lumbar flexion during cycling which is related to a significant increase in pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A numerical study of the effects of fluid rheology and stroke kinematics on flagellar swimming in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanbin; Guy, Robert; Thomases, Becca

    2016-11-01

    It is observed in experiments that as the fluid rheology is changed, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits changes in both flagellar kinematics and the swimming speed. To understand this phenomenon, we develop a computational model of the swimmer, using flagellar strokes fit from experimental data. We conduct numerical simulations by changing strokes and fluid rheology independently to dissect the effects of these two factors. We discover that stroke patterns extracted from viscoelastic fluids generate much lower stress and have higher efficiency at the cost of lower swimming speed. We also discover that higher fluid elasticity hinders swimming for a fixed stroke pattern.

  14. Trunk kinematics and low back pain during pruning among vineyard workers-A field study at the Chateau Larose-Trintaudon.

    PubMed

    Balaguier, Romain; Madeleine, Pascal; Rose-Dulcina, Kévin; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of low back disorders is dramatically high in viticulture. Field measurements that objectively quantify work exposure can provide information on the relationship between the adopted trunk postures and low back pain. The purposes of the present study were three-fold (1) to carry out a kinematics analysis of vineyard-workers' pruning activity by extracting the duration of bending and rotation of the trunk, (2) to question separately the relationship between the duration of forward bending or trunk rotation with low back pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity and (3) to question the relationship between the combined duration of forward bending and trunk rotation on low back pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity. Fifteen vineyard-workers were asked to perform pruning activity for 12 minutes with a wireless triaxial accelerometer placed on their trunk. Kinematic analysis of the trunk showed that vineyard-workers spent more than 50% of the time with the trunk flexed greater than 30° and more than 20% with the trunk rotated greater than 10°. These results show that pruning activity lead to the adoption of forward bended and rotated trunk postures that could significantly increase the risk of work related musculoskeletal disorders in the low back. However, this result was mitigated by the observation of an absence of significant association between the duration of forward bending and trunk rotation with low back pain intensity or pressure pain sensitivity. Even if prospective field measurements and studies assessing the effects of low back pain confounders are needed, this field study provides new genuine information on trunk kinematics during pruning activity.

  15. An optimization-based method for prediction of lumbar spine segmental kinematics from the measurements of thorax and pelvic kinematics.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, I; Arjmand, N; Bazrgari, B

    2015-12-01

    Given measurement difficulties, earlier modeling studies have often used some constant ratios to predict lumbar segmental kinematics from measurements of total lumbar kinematics. Recent imaging studies suggested distribution of lumbar kinematics across its vertebrae changes with trunk rotation, lumbar posture, and presence of load. An optimization-based method is presented and validated in this study to predict segmental kinematics from measured total lumbar kinematics. Specifically, a kinematics-driven biomechanical model of the spine is used in a heuristic optimization procedure to obtain a set of segmental kinematics that, when prescribed to the model, were associated with the minimum value for the sum of squared predicted muscle stresses across all the lower back muscles. Furthermore, spinal loads estimated using the predicted kinematics by the present method were compared with those estimated using constant ratios. Predicted segmental kinematics were in good agreement with those obtained by imaging with an average error of ~10%. Compared with those obtained using constant ratios, predicted spinal loads using segmental kinematics obtained here were in general smaller. In conclusion, the proposed method offers an alternative tool for improving model-based estimates of spinal loads where image-based measurement of lumbar kinematics is not feasible. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Calibration of parallel kinematic devices using sequential determination of kinematic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR.,BERNHARD; BIEG,LOTHAR F.; ZIEGERT,JOHN C.

    2000-04-06

    In PKM Machines, the Cartesian position and orientation of the tool point carried on the platform is obtained from a kinematic model of the particular machine. Accurate positioning of these machines relies on the accurate knowledge of the parameters of the kinematic model unique to the particular machine. The parameters in the kinematic model include the spatial locations of the joint centers on the machine base and moving platform, the initial strut lengths, and the strut displacements. The strut displacements are readily obtained from sensors on the machine. However, the remaining kinematic parameters (joint center locations, and initial strut lengths) are difficult to determine when these machines are in their fully assembled state. The size and complexity of these machines generally makes it difficult and somewhat undesirable to determine the remaining kinematic parameters by direct inspection such as in a coordinate measuring machine. In order for PKMs to be useful for precision positioning applications, techniques must be developed to quickly calibrate the machine by determining the kinematic parameters without disassembly of the machine. A number of authors have reported techniques for calibration of PKMs (Soons, Masory, Zhuang et. al., Ropponen). In two other papers, the authors have reported on work recently completed by the University of Florida and Sandia National Laboratories on calibration of PKMs, which describes a new technique to sequentially determine the kinematic parameters of an assembled parallel kinematic device. The technique described is intended to be used with a spatial coordinate measuring device such as a portable articulated CMM measuring arm (Romer, Faro, etc.), a Laser Ball Bar (LBB), or a laser tracker (SMX< API, etc.). The material to be presented is as follows: (1) methods to identify the kinematic parameters of 6--6 variant Stewart platform manipulators including joint center locations relative to the workable and spindle nose

  17. Frontal and transverse plane hip kinematics and gluteus maximus recruitment correlate with frontal plane knee kinematics during single-leg squat tests in women.

    PubMed

    Hollman, John H; Galardi, Christy M; Lin, I-Hsuan; Voth, Brandon C; Whitmarsh, Crystal L

    2014-04-01

    Hip muscle dysfunction may be associated with knee valgus that contributes to problems like patellofemoral pain syndrome. The purpose of this study was to (1) compare knee and hip kinematics and hip muscle strength and recruitment between "good" and "poor" performers on a single-leg squat test developed to assess hip muscle dysfunction and (2) examine relationships between hip muscle strength, recruitment and frontal plane knee kinematics to see which variables correlated with knee valgus during the test. Forty-one active women classified via visual rating as "good" or "poor" performers on the test participated. Participants completed 5-repetition single-leg squat tests. Isometric hip extension and abduction strength, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius recruitment, and 3-dimensional hip and knee kinematics during the test were compared between groups and examined for their association with frontal plane knee motion. "Poor" performers completed the test with more hip adduction (mean difference=7.6°) and flexion (mean difference=6.3°) than "good" performers. No differences in knee kinematics, hip strength or hip muscle recruitment occurred. However, the secondary findings indicated that increased medial hip rotation (partial r=0.94) and adduction (partial r=0.42) and decreased gluteus maximus recruitment (partial r=0.35) correlated with increased knee valgus. Whereas hip muscle function and knee kinematics did not differ between groups as we'd hypothesized, frontal plane knee motion correlated with transverse and frontal plane hip motions and with gluteus maximus recruitment. Gluteus maximus recruitment may modulate frontal plane knee kinematics during single-leg squats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete Study of Hadroproduction of a ϒ Meson Associated with a Prompt J/ψ.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Yu-Jie

    2016-08-05

    We present the first complete study of ϒ and prompt J/ψ production from single-parton scattering, including the complete O(α_{S}^{6}) color-singlet contribution, the O(α_{S}^{2}α^{2}) electroweak contribution, and the complete nonrelativistic S-wave and P-wave color-octet contribution as well as the feeddown contribution. Our study was motivated by the recent evidence reported by the D0 Collaboration of prompt J/ψ and ϒ simultaneous production at the Tevatron. With our complete evaluation, we are able to refine the determination of the double-parton scattering contribution made by the D0 Collaboration. We find that the effective cross section characterizing the importance of double-parton scatterings is σ_{eff}≤8.2  mb at 68% confidence level from the D0 measurement.

  19. Integrating concepts and skills: Slope and kinematics graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonelli, Edward P., Jr.

    The concept of force is a foundational idea in physics. To predict the results of applying forces to objects, a student must be able to interpret data representing changes in distance, time, speed, and acceleration. Comprehension of kinematics concepts requires students to interpret motion graphs, where rates of change are represented as slopes of line segments. Studies have shown that majorities of students who show proficiency with mathematical concepts fail accurately to interpret motion graphs. The primary aim of this study was to examine how students apply their knowledge of slope when interpreting kinematics graphs. To answer the research questions a mixed methods research design, which included a survey and interviews, was adopted. Ninety eight (N=98) high school students completed surveys which were quantitatively analyzed along with qualitative information collected from interviews of students (N=15) and teachers ( N=2). The study showed that students who recalled methods for calculating slopes and speeds calculated slopes accurately, but calculated speeds inaccurately. When comparing the slopes and speeds, most students resorted to calculating instead of visual inspection. Most students recalled and applied memorized rules. Students who calculated slopes and speeds inaccurately failed to recall methods of calculating slopes and speeds, but when comparing speeds, these students connected the concepts of distance and time to the line segments and the rates of change they represented. This study's findings will likely help mathematics and science educators to better assist their students to apply their knowledge of the definition of slope and skills in kinematics concepts.

  20. [Effects of aquatic physical exercise on the kinematic gait pattern in patients with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Paula; Cancela, José M; Ayan, Carlos; do Nascimento, Carla; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel

    2013-03-16

    AIM. To determine the effects of an aquatic-based physical exercise program on gait parameters of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS. A total of nine patients diagnosed with idiopathic PD (stages I-III according to the Hoehn and Yahr scale) carried out an aquatic physical exercise program which lasted for five months, with one session per week. A three-dimensional biomechanical analysis was used to determine the effects of the program on several kinematic variables (walking speed, cadence, stride length, step time, single and double support time, angles of the hip, knee and ankle joints) which were assessed by a treadmill-walking test. RESULTS. At the end of the program, significant improvement in walking speed, stride length and on the relationship between single and double support time (p < 0,05). Although improvements in all tested ranges of motion were obtained, these did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS. Aquatic-based physical exercise seems to have positive effects in some aspects of the gait kinematics parameters present in the typical gait pattern of patients with PD.

  1. Kinematics at the intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley fault zones, California: Integration of TM data and field studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Verosub, Ken; Finnerty, Tony; Brady, Roland

    1987-01-01

    The Garlock and Death Valley fault zones in SE California are two active strike-slip faults coming together on the east side of the Avawatz Mtns. The kinematics of this intersection, and the possible continuation of either fault zone, are being investigated using a combination of field mapping, and processing and interpretation of remotely sensed image data. Regional and local relationships are derivable from Thematic Mapper data (30 m resolution), including discrimination and relative age dating of alluvial fans, bedrock mapping, and fault mapping. Aircraft data provide higher spatial resolution over more limited areas. Hypotheses being considered are: (1) the Garlock fault extends east of the intersection; (2) the Garlock fault terminates at the intersection and the Death Valley fault continues southeastward; and (3) the Garlock fault has been offset right laterally by the Death Valley fault which continues to the southeast. Preliminary work indicates that the first hypothesis is invalid. From kinematic considerations, image analysis, and field work the third hypothesis is favored. The projected continuation of the Death Valley zone defines the boundary between the Mojave crustal block and the Basin and Range block.

  2. 75 FR 57493 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies... ] object in the possession of the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las... assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of...

  3. 21 CFR 99.303 - Extension of time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extension of time for completing planned studies... planned studies. (a) Upon review of a drug or device manufacturer's proposed protocols and schedules for conducting studies needed for the submission of a supplemental application for a new use, FDA may, with...

  4. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattione, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  5. Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow A. Z. Escudero, Ja. Álvarez, L. Leija. Center of Research and Advanced Studies of the IPN...replacement above elbow are serial mechanisms driven by a DC motor and they include only one active articulation for the elbow [1]. Parallel mechanisms...are rather scarce [2]. The inverse kinematics model of a 3-degree of freedom parallel prosthetic elbow mechanism is reported. The mathematical

  6. The effect of design parameters of dynamic pedicle screw systems on kinematics and load bearing: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, S.; Grupp, T. M.; Duda, G. N.; Blömer, W.; Rohlmann, A.

    2010-01-01

    As an alternative treatment for chronic back pain due to disc degeneration motion preserving techniques such as posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) has been clinically introduced, with the intention to alter the load transfer and the kinematics at the affected level to delay degeneration. However, up to the present, it remains unclear when a PDS is clinically indicated and how the ideal PDS mechanism should be designed to achieve this goal. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare different PDS devices against rigid fixation to investigate the biomechanical impact of PDS design on stabilization and load transfer in the treated and adjacent cranial segment. Six human lumbar spine specimens (L3–L5) were tested in a spine loading apparatus. In vitro flexibility testing was performed by applying pure bending moments of 7.5 Nm without and with additional preload of 400 N in the three principal motion planes. Four PDS devices, “DYN” (Dynesys®, Zimmer GmbH, Switzerland), “DSS™” (Paradigm Spine, Wurmlingen, Germany), and two prototypes of dynamic rods, “LSC” with a leaf spring, and “STC” with a spring tube (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany), were tested in comparison to a rigid fixation device S4 (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) “RIG”, to the native situation “NAT” and to a defect situation “DEF” of the specimens. The instrumented level was L4–L5. The tested PDS devices comprising a stiffness range for axial stiffness of 10 N/mm to 230 N/mm and for bending stiffness of 3 N/mm to 15 N/mm. Range of motion (ROM), neutral zone (NZ), and intradiscal pressure (IDP) were analyzed for all instrumentation steps and load cases of the instrumented and non-instrumented level. In flexion, extension, and lateral bending, all systems, except STC, showed a significant reduction of ROM and NZ compared to the native situation (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found no significant difference between DYN and RIG (p > 0.1). In axial

  7. Technology Acceptance and Course Completion Rates in Online Education: A Non-experimental, Mixed Method Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Colelia

    As the need for quality online courses increase in demand, the acceptance of technology and completion rates become the focus of higher education. The purpose of this non-experimental, mixed method study was to examine the relationship between the university students' perceptions and acceptance of technology and learner completion rates with respect to the development of online courses. This study involved 61 participants from two universities regarding their perceived usefulness (PU) of technology, intent to use technology, and intent to complete a course. Two research questions were examined regarding student perceptions regarding technology employed in an online course and the relationship, if any, between technology acceptance and completion of an online university course. The technology acceptance model (TAM) was used to collect data on the usefulness of course activities and student intent to complete the course. An open-ended questionnaire was administered to collect information concerning student perceptions of course activities. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS and Qualtrics, which indicated there was not a significant relationship between technology acceptance and course completion (p = .154). Qualitative data were examined by pattern matching to create a concept map of the theoretical patterns between constructs. Pattern matching revealed many students favored the use of the Internet over Canvas. Furthermore, data showed students enrolled in online courses because of the flexibility and found the multimedia used in the courses as helpful in course completion. Insight was investigated to offer reasons and decisions concerning choice that were made by the students. Future recommendations are to expand mixed methods studies of technology acceptance in various disciplines to gain a better understanding of student perceptions of technology uses, intent to use, and course completion.

  8. The Glasgow-Maastricht foot model, evaluation of a 26 segment kinematic model of the foot.

    PubMed

    Oosterwaal, Michiel; Carbes, Sylvain; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Tørholm, Søren; Al-Munajjed, Amir A; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Meijer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Accurately measuring of intrinsic foot kinematics using skin mounted markers is difficult, limited in part by the physical dimensions of the foot. Existing kinematic foot models solve this problem by combining multiple bones into idealized rigid segments. This study presents a novel foot model that allows the motion of the 26 bones to be individually estimated via a combination of partial joint constraints and coupling the motion of separate joints using kinematic rhythms. Segmented CT data from one healthy subject was used to create a template Glasgow-Maastricht foot model (GM-model). Following this, the template was scaled to produce subject-specific models for five additional healthy participants using a surface scan of the foot and ankle. Forty-three skin mounted markers, mainly positioned around the foot and ankle, were used to capture the stance phase of the right foot of the six healthy participants during walking. The GM-model was then applied to calculate the intrinsic foot kinematics. Distinct motion patterns where found for all joints. The variability in outcome depended on the location of the joint, with reasonable results for sagittal plane motions and poor results for transverse plane motions. The results of the GM-model were comparable with existing literature, including bone pin studies, with respect to the range of motion, motion pattern and timing of the motion in the studied joints. This novel model is the most complete kinematic model to date. Further evaluation of the model is warranted.

  9. CME Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Gallagher, P. T.

    The goal of this study is to investigate the driving mechanisms of CMEs and to infer the magnetic field properties at the onset of the instability. We use EIT 195 Å images and LASCO white-light coronagraph data of a CME event that occurred on 17 December 2006. It was a long-duration event, and was associated with an occulted C2.1 class flare. To determine the driving mechanism, we quantitatively and qualitatively compared the observationally obtained kinematic evolution with that predicted by three CME models: the breakout model (BO, see Antiochos et al. 1999; Lynch et al. 2008; DeVore and Antiochos 2008), the catastrophe model (CM, see Priest and Forbes 2000), and the toroidal instability model (TI, see Chen 1989; Kliem and Török 2006). Our results indicate that this CME is best represented by the CM model. We infer that, at the onset of the instability, the Alfvén speed is approximately 120 km s-1 and the height of the flux rope is roughly 100-200Mm. These parameter values are related to the magnetic environment and the loop geometry and can be used to infer the magnetic condition at the onset of the eruption.We intend to submit the full analysis to A&A.

  10. The cutaneous manifestations of atypical complete DiGeorge syndrome: a histopathologic and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Selim, Maria Angelica; Markert, Mary L; Burchette, James L; Herman, Christopher M; Turner, John W

    2008-04-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a congenital anomaly with a constellation of findings that includes thymic hypoplasia. Only a small subset of patients with DiGeorge syndrome has complete athymia, classified as complete DiGeorge anomaly; one third of these patients show an eczematous dermatitis, oligoclonal T-cells and lymphadenopathy, known as atypical complete DiGeorge anomaly. Six biopsies from six patients with the distinctive clinical phenotype of atypical complete DiGeorge anomaly were studied. Every biopsy showed exocytosis (100%), parakeratosis, often confluent and spongiosis (100%). Neutrophilic abscesses (50%), dyskeratosis (67%) and satellite cell necrosis (50%) were seen. Perieccrine and perivascular inflammation were seen in half of the cases. Eosinophils were identified (83%); most commonly in both the epidermis and dermis. All of lymphocytes were CD3 positive. Most (83%) of cases contained T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1) positive cells. Special testing of the selected patients using spectratyping identified oligoclonal T-cell populations. The presence of dyskeratotic keratinocytes, satellite cell necrosis and parakeratotic scale with neutrophils characterizes the cutaneous rash seen in this subset of complete DiGeorge syndrome patients. Such skin lesions from patients with DiGeorge anomaly should alert the pathologist to the potential diagnosis of atypical complete DiGeorge anomaly. The pathophysiologic role of the oligoclonal T-cells in this entity requires additional study.

  11. Differential topology of the inverse kinematic problem for redundant robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Tchon, K. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper a program of singularity theory is proclaimed to be of systematic use in robotics. Complete lists of normal forms are proposed and are regarded as candidate models of kinematics of robot manipulators. Arguments for the applicability of candidate normal forms to manipulator kinematics are provided. Singularities and bifurcation diagrams of the normal forms are examined and consequences derived for the inverse kinematic problem in redundant kinematics with singularities.

  12. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  13. KINEMATIC SYNERGIES DURING SACCADES INVOLVING WHOLE-BODY ROTATION: A STUDY BASED ON THE UNCONTROLLED MANIFOLD HYPOTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Adriana M.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Robert, Thomas; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis to study the coordination of body segments and eye movements in standing persons during the task of shifting the gaze to a target positioned behind the body. The task was performed at a comfortable speed and fast. Multi-segment and head-eye synergies were quantified as co-varied changes in elemental variables (body segment rotations and eye rotation) that stabilized (reduced the across trials variability) of head rotation in space and gaze trajectory. Head position in space was stabilized by co-varied rotations of body segments prior to the action, during its later stages, and after its completion. The synergy index showed a drop that started prior to the action initiation (anticipatory synergy adjustment) and continued during the phase of quick head rotation. Gaze direction was stabilized only at the movement completion and immediately after the saccade at movement initiation under the “fast” instruction. The study documents for the first time anticipatory synergy adjustments during whole-body actions. It shows multi-joint synergies stabilizing head trajectory in space. In contrast, there was no synergy between head and eye rotations during saccades that would achieve a relatively invariant gaze trajectory. PMID:20346529

  14. The Evolution of Dwarf-Irregular Galaxy NGC 1569: A Kinematic Study of the Stars and Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Megan C.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution and formation of dwarf galaxies has great importance to our knowledge of cosmological history from the Big Bang through the present day structure we observe in our local universe. Dwarf galaxies are believed to be the "building blocks" of larger galaxies, which implies that interactions and mergers of these small systems must have occurred frequently in the early universe. There is a population of starburst dwarf irregular (dIm) galaxies that seem to have characteristics indicative of interactions or mergers. One of these dIm galaxies is the nearby post-starburst NGC 1569. This dissertation project explores the stellar and gas kinematics of NGC 1569 as well as examines a deep neutral Hydrogen (HI) map made using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). From these observations, this dissertation analyzes the evolution of NGC 1569 by understanding the three-dimensional shape of this dIm system for the first time. The structure of dIm galaxies is an important fundamental, physical property necessary to understand the evolution and formation of these common systems. However, the intrinsic shape of dIm galaxies remains controversial. Projected minor-to-major axis ratios provide insufficient data to determine the shapes of dIm galaxies. Fortunately, there is another method by which accurate structures can be measured. The stellar velocity dispersion, coupled with the maximum rotational velocity derived from HI observations, gives a measure of how kinematically hot a system is, and, therefore, indicates its structure. In this dissertation, we present the stellar kinematics, including the stellar velocity dispersion, of NGC 1569 obtained using the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) Mayall 4-m+Echelle spectrograph. These data are combined with an in depth analysis of high resolution HI data and a discussion of the nature of this starburst dwarf system. The dissertation concludes with a deep HI map of NGC 1569 and three of its nearest neighbors in the

  15. 75 FR 52364 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV... of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV. The human remains... in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology...

  16. Predicting High School Completion Using Student Performance in High School Algebra: A Mixed Methods Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiado, Wendy S.

    2012-01-01

    Too many of our nation's youth have failed to complete high school. Determining why so many of our nation's students fail to graduate is a complex, multi-faceted problem and beyond the scope of any one study. The study presented herein utilized a thirteen-step mixed methods model developed by Leech and Onwuegbuzie (2007) to demonstrate within a…

  17. Completion Time Dynamics for Master's and Doctoral Studies at Makerere University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Oonyu, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the dynamics of completion time of master's studies and how such dynamics relate to those of doctoral studies at Makerere University, Uganda. The assessment is based on administrative data of 605 master's degree students at the University in the 2004 and 2005 enrollment cohorts. The total elapsed time from first enrollment to…

  18. Continuation and Completion Patterns of Management Distance Learners: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivaswaroop, P.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a case study of continuation and completion patterns of distance-education students at the Bhopal Regional Center of Indira Gandhi National Open University. Findings revealed that the first semester of study is more crucial for distance learning and the distance-learning institute must provide more support to students during this period.…

  19. 21 CFR 99.303 - Extension of time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES FDA Action on Submissions, Requests, and Applications § 99.303 Extension of time for completing... conducting studies needed for the submission of a supplemental application for a new use, FDA may, with or... writing that FDA extend the time period for conducting studies needed for the submission of a...

  20. Kinematic top analyses at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Cobal-Grassman, M.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    We present an update of the top quark analysis using kinematic techniques in {rho}{ovr string {rho}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We reported before on a study which used 19.3 pb{sup -1} of data from the 1992-93 collider run, but now we use a larger data sample of 67 pb{sup -1}. First, we analyze the total transverse energy of the hard collision in W+{ge}3 jet events, showing the likely presence of a t{ovr string t} component in the event sample. Next, we compare in more detail the kinematic structure of W+{ge}3 jet events with expectations for top pair production and with background processes, predominantly direct W+ jet production. We again find W+{ge}3 jet events which cannot be explained in terms of background, but show kinematic features as expected from top. These events also show evidence for beauty quarks. The findings confirm the observation of top events made earlier in the data of the 1992-93 collider run.

  1. Qualitative Kinematics of Linkages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    links and the connections between them, the following algorithm computes an envisionment for that system . lotatioa(P1,P2) - CCV lotatioa(P1,P2) CCV...1988 Appendix A : Slider-Crank Envisionment Each qualitative state consists of a kinematic state representing the orientation of each link, and a...8 +++ 6 -- . f. 6 000 , 7 --0 7 ++0 8 +- -+ > 1 000 1 +0+ 8 000 8 000 7 --0 7 000 8 --- m 8 +++ Appendix B : Drag-Link Envisionment Kinematic State

  2. Effects of resisted sled towing on sprint kinematics in field-sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Spinks, Christopher D

    2003-11-01

    Weighted sled towing is a common resisted sprint training technique even though relatively little is known about the effects that such practice has on sprint kinematics. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of sled towing on acceleration sprint kinematics in field-sport athletes. Twenty men completed a series of sprints without resistance and with loads equating to 12.6 and 32.2% of body mass. Stride length was significantly reduced by approximately 10 and approximately 24% for each load, respectively. Stride frequency also decreased, but not to the extent of stride length. In addition, sled towing increased ground contact time, trunk lean, and hip flexion. Upper-body results showed an increase in shoulder range of motion with added resistance. The heavier load generally resulted in a greater disruption to normal acceleration kinematics compared with the lighter load. The lighter load is likely best for use in a training program.

  3. Influence of defective complete dentures renewal on TMD; an MRI and clinical controlled prospective study.

    PubMed

    Abdelnabi, Mohamed H; Swelem, Amal A

    2015-09-01

    The influence of complete denture occlusion on temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is controversial. Some studies found that defective occlusion contributes to the development of TMD, while others found no correlation. This prospective controlled study evaluated the relationship between renewal of old defective complete dentures and TMD as evidenced both by clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The study included 25 complete denture patients with signs and symptoms of TMD and 21 asymptomatic controls. Clicking was a common finding in all symptomatic joints. All selected participants needed complete denture renewal. MRI and clinical assessment following research diagnostic criteria for TMD guidelines (RDC/TMD) were carried out at baseline and 2 years after new complete denture insertion. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, muscle pain, clicking and movement limitation were the assessed signs and symptoms. MRIs were conducted to evaluate the TMJs for disc displacement, disc morphology and joint effusion. Complete denture renewal significantly improved the signs and symptoms of TMD in symptomatic group (p < 0.01). Only in the symptomatic group, treatment resulted in a significant increase in joints displaying superior (normal) disc position (symptomatic p < 0.001; asymptomatic p = 0.157). New dentures did not affect disc morphology in both groups (p = 0.5 for both groups) but significantly reduced joint effusion in the symptomatic group (symptomatic p < 0.001; asymptomatic p = 0.5). Relationship between clinical and MRI findings was not one to one. New complete dentures had a positive impact on TMD signs and symptoms, disc position and joint effusion but not on disc morphology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Locomotion mode identification for lower limbs using neuromuscular and joint kinematic signals.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Taimoor; White, Gannon; Wright, Andrew B; Iqbal, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Recent development in lower limb prosthetics has seen an emergence of powered prosthesis that have the capability to operate in different locomotion modes. However, these devices cannot transition seamlessly between modes such as level walking, stair ascent and descent and up slope and down slope walking. They require some form of user input that defines the human intent. The purpose of this study was to develop a locomotion mode detection system and evaluate its performance for different sensor configurations and to study the effect of locomotion mode detection with and without electromyography (EMG) signals while using kinematic data from hip joint of non-dominant/impaired limb and an accelerometer. Data was collected from four able bodied subjects that completed two circuits that contained standing, level-walking, ramp ascent and descent and stair ascent and descent. By using only the kinematic data from the hip joint and accelerometer data the system was able to identify the transitions, stance and swing phases with similar performance as compared to using only EMG and accelerometer data. However, significant improvement in classification error was observed when EMG, kinematic and accelerometer data were used together to identify the locomotion modes. The higher recognition rates when using the kinematic data along with EMG shows that the joint kinematics could be beneficial in intent recognition systems of locomotion modes.

  5. Feasibility of a Cost-Effective, Video Analysis Software–Based Mobility Protocol for Objective Spine Kinematics and Gait Metrics: A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Justin C.; Petrizzo, Anthony; Rizzo, John-Ross; Bianco, Kristina; Maier, Stephen; Errico, Thomas J.; Lafage, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a high-throughput, easily implemented, cost-effective, video analysis software–based mobility protocol to quantify spine kinematics. This prospective cohort study of clinical biomechanics implemented 2-dimensional (2D) image processing at a tertiary-care academic institution. Ten healthy, able-bodied volunteers were recruited for 2D videography of gait and functional motion. The reliability of a 2D video analysis software program for gait and range of motion metrics was evaluated over 2 independent experimental sessions, assessing for inter-trial, inter-session, and inter-rater reliability. Healthy volunteers were evaluated for simple forward and side bending, rotation, treadmill stride length, and more complex seated-to-standing tasks. Based on established intraclass correlation coefficients, results indicated that reliability was considered good to excellent for simple forward and side bending, rotation, stride length, and more complex sit-to-standing tasks. In conclusion, a cost-effective, 2D, video analysis software–based mobility protocol represents a feasible and clinically useful approach for objective spine kinematics and gait metrics. As the complication rate of operative management in the setting of spinal deformity is weighed against functional performance and quality of life measures, an objective analysis tool in combination with an appropriate protocol will aid in clinical assessments and lead to an increased evidence base for management options and decision algorithms. PMID:25543099

  6. Feasibility of a cost-effective, video analysis software-based mobility protocol for objective spine kinematics and gait metrics: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Paul, Justin C; Petrizzo, Anthony; Rizzo, John-Ross; Bianco, Kristina; Maier, Stephen; Errico, Thomas J; Lafage, Virginie

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a high-throughput, easily implemented, cost-effective, video analysis software-based mobility protocol to quantify spine kinematics. This prospective cohort study of clinical biomechanics implemented 2-dimensional (2D) image processing at a tertiary-care academic institution. Ten healthy, able-bodied volunteers were recruited for 2D videography of gait and functional motion. The reliability of a 2D video analysis software program for gait and range of motion metrics was evaluated over 2 independent experimental sessions, assessing for inter-trial, inter-session, and inter-rater reliability. Healthy volunteers were evaluated for simple forward and side bending, rotation, treadmill stride length, and more complex seated-to-standing tasks. Based on established intraclass correlation coefficients, results indicated that reliability was considered good to excellent for simple forward and side bending, rotation, stride length, and more complex sit-to-standing tasks. In conclusion, a cost-effective, 2D, video analysis software-based mobility protocol represents a feasible and clinically useful approach for objective spine kinematics and gait metrics. As the complication rate of operative management in the setting of spinal deformity is weighed against functional performance and quality of life measures, an objective analysis tool in combination with an appropriate protocol will aid in clinical assessments and lead to an increased evidence base for management options and decision algorithms.

  7. Comparison of the retention strengths of three complete denture adhesives: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Mañes, Jose F; Selva, Eduardo J; De-Barutell, Alfonso; Bouazza, Kheira

    2011-01-01

    One of the main problems posed by complete dentures is retention and stability. In order to solve this problem, dentists and the dental industry for a long time have attempted to improve denture adhesion by developing a range of "glues" of highly varied composition and efficacy. The present in vivo clinical study evaluates whether the adhesives used to improve complete denture retention are truly effective and able to increase denture adhesion to the mucosa covering the edentulous alveolar ridge.of the mandibular dentures. An in vivo clinical study is made of 30 patients with complete mandibular dentures to evaluate the retention afforded by three commercial complete denture adhesives (Benfix®, Fittydent® and Supercorega®). A spring scale was used to measure retention strength (in grams). The purpose was to determine whether the use of complete denture adhesives is effective, and to establish which commercial brands offer the highest retention strengths. The results obtained indicate that retention is enhanced by the use of such adhesives, and that Fittydent® offers the best retention performance, followed by Benfix® and Supercorega® The study of denture adhesives and his efficiency are necessary to improve the edentulous patient satisfaction. More in vivo investigations are necessary in dental literature.

  8. Patellar thickness and lateral retinacular release affects patellofemoral kinematics in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Merican, Azhar M; Ghosh, Kanishka M; Baena, Ferdinando Rodriguez Y; Deehan, David J; Amis, Andrew A

    2014-03-01

    To study the effect of increasing patellar thickness (overstuffing) on patellofemoral kinematics in total knee arthroplasty and whether subsequent lateral retinacular release would restore the change in kinematics. The quadriceps of eight fresh-frozen knees were loaded on a custom-made jig. Kinematic data were recorded using an optical tracking device for the native knee, following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), then with patellar thicknesses from -2 to +4 mm, during knee extension motion. Staged lateral retinacular releases were performed to examine the restoration of normal patellar kinematics. Compared to the native knee, TKA led to significant changes in patellofemoral kinematics, with significant increases in lateral shift, tilt and rotation. When patellar composite thickness was increased, the patella tilted further laterally. Lateral release partly corrected this lateral tilt but caused abnormal tibial external rotation. With complete release of the lateral retinaculum and capsule, the patella with an increased thickness of 4 mm remained more laterally tilted compared to the TKA with normal patellar thickness between 45° and 55° knee flexion and from 75° onwards. This was on average by 2.4° ± 2.9° (p < 0.05) and 2.°9 ± 3.0° (p < 0.01), respectively. Before the release, for those flexion ranges, the patella was tilted laterally by 4.7° ± 3.2° and 5.4° ± 2.7° more than in the TKA with matched patellar thickness. Patellar thickness affects patellofemoral kinematics after TKA. Although lateral tilt was partly corrected by lateral retinacular release, this affected the tibiofemoral kinematics. IV.

  9. Monitoring diver kinematics with dielectric elastomer sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher R.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2017-04-01

    Diving, initially motivated for food purposes, is crucial to the oil and gas industry, search and rescue, and is even done recreationally by millions of people. There is a growing need however, to monitor the health and activity of divers. The Divers Alert Network has reported on average 90 fatalities per year since 1980. Furthermore an estimated 1000 divers require recompression treatment for dive-related injuries every year. One means of monitoring diver activity is to integrate strain sensors into a wetsuit. This would provide kinematic information on the diver potentially improving buoyancy control assessment, providing a platform for gesture communication, detecting panic attacks and monitoring diver fatigue. To explore diver kinematic monitoring we have coupled dielectric elastomer sensors to a wetsuit worn by the pilot of a human-powered wet submarine. This provided a unique platform to test the performance and accuracy of dielectric elastomer strain sensors in an underwater application. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of strain sensors to monitor the kinematics of a diver. This study was in collaboration with the University of Auckland's human-powered submarine team, Team Taniwha. The pilot, completely encapsulated in a hull, pedals to propel the submarine forward. Therefore this study focused on leg motion as that is the primary motion of the submarine pilot. Four carbon-filled silicone dielectric elastomer sensors were fabricated and coupled to the pilot's wetsuit. The first two sensors were attached over the knee joints, with the remaining two attached between the pelvis and thigh. The goal was to accurately measure leg joint angles thereby determining the position of each leg relative to the hip. A floating data acquisition unit monitored the sensors and transmitted data packets to a nearby computer for real-time processing. A GoPro Hero 4 silver edition was used to capture the experiments and provide a means of post-validation. The

  10. Patients' Evaluations of Complete Denture Therapy and Their Association with Related Variables: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Santos, Beatriz Ferreira Oliveira; dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Santos, Jarbas Francisco Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2015-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important goal in complete denture therapy, and many factors influence this parameter. This study aimed to evaluate expectations before and satisfaction after therapy with complete dentures. As a secondary objective, other variables that may interfere with patient satisfaction were also evaluated. A representative sample of 99 patients assigned visual analog scale (VAS) scores to their expectations before and satisfaction after therapy regarding chewing, esthetics, comfort, and phonetics. Demographic data and answers to a questionnaire concerning the dentists' conduct were recorded. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the association among studied variables and patients' expectation and satisfaction with their dentures. The average VAS scores were high for both expectations and satisfaction, and satisfaction exceeded expectations. Patients' expectations about esthetics and comfort were associated with age and self-reported time of using complete dentures. Patient satisfaction regarding chewing was associated with the number of postdelivery adjustments. Also, patient satisfaction regarding esthetics was associated with gender and esthetic expectations. In regard to phonetic satisfaction, associations were verified among self-reported time of using complete dentures, comfort and phonetics expectations, and dentists' explanations. Comfort satisfaction was associated only with educational level. Patient satisfaction regarding complete dentures exceeded expectations and an expressive majority of positive evaluations of the dentists was noticed. Many patient-related variables seemed to influence their evaluations of their dentures. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Different strategies in solving series completion inductive reasoning problems: an fMRI and computational study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peipeng; Jia, Xiuqin; Taatgen, Niels A; Zhong, Ning; Li, Kuncheng

    2014-08-01

    Neural correlate of human inductive reasoning process is still unclear. Number series and letter series completion are two typical inductive reasoning tasks, and with a common core component of rule induction. Previous studies have demonstrated that different strategies are adopted in number series and letter series completion tasks; even the underlying rules are identical. In the present study, we examined cortical activation as a function of two different reasoning strategies for solving series completion tasks. The retrieval strategy, used in number series completion tasks, involves direct retrieving of arithmetic knowledge to get the relations between items. The procedural strategy, used in letter series completion tasks, requires counting a certain number of times to detect the relations linking two items. The two strategies require essentially the equivalent cognitive processes, but have different working memory demands (the procedural strategy incurs greater demands). The procedural strategy produced significant greater activity in areas involved in memory retrieval (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, DLPFC) and mental representation/maintenance (posterior parietal cortex, PPC). An ACT-R model of the tasks successfully predicted behavioral performance and BOLD responses. The present findings support a general-purpose dual-process theory of inductive reasoning regarding the cognitive architecture.

  12. Along-strike variation in deformation style inferred from kinematic reconstruction and strain rate analysis: A case study of the Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muluneh, Ameha A.; Cuffaro, Marco; Kidane, Tesfaye

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we combine kinematic reconstruction and seismic strain rate analysis to understand the along-strike variation in strain accommodation in the Ethiopian Rift (ER) evolution. The reconstruction poles close the southern and central ER at 19 and 15 Myr, respectively whereas there is 34 ± 14 km overlap in the northern ER at 11 Myr. Using Kostrov summation, seismic strain rates of 6.81 ×10-9 yr-1 and 0.06 × 10-9 yr-1 are obtained for the south-central and northern ER, respectively. Comparison of the seismic and geodetic strain rates shows that seismic deformation dominates the south and central ER contrary to the northern ER that deforms aseismically. The results obtained indicate that Nubia/Somalia plate reconstructions together with information on the onset of rifting overestimate the kinematics of the northern ER. We argue that magmatic processes play significant role in accommodating the ∼ 2 Myr opening of the rift. Our findings agree well with previous geophysical and geological studies in the Ethiopian Rift.

  13. Factors associated with study completion in patients with premature acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Factors associated with study completion in younger adults are not well understood. This study sought to describe psychosocial, clinical, and demographic features associated with completion of a study of men and women with premature acute coronary syndrome. Methods As part of the GENdEr and Sex determInantS of cardiovascular disease: From bench to beyond-Premature Acute Coronary Syndrome (GENESIS-PRAXY) study, demographic, psychosocial, and clinical variables were assessed in 1213 patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (≤ 55 years; 30% women). Patients were followed for 12 months. Dropouts withdrew from the study or were lost to follow-up after 12 months; completers were still enrolled after 12 months. Results Of 1213 patients initially enrolled, 777 (64.1%) completed 12-month follow-up. Fully adjusted models suggested that being older (OR = 1.04, 95% CI [1.01, 1.06]), higher subjective social status within one’s country (OR = 1.11, 95% CI [1.01, 1.22]), being free of type II diabetes, (OR = 0.66, 95% CI [0.45, 0.97]), non-smoking status (OR = 0.70, 95% CI [0.51, 0.95]) and being free of depression (OR = 1.52, 95% CI [1.11, 2.07]) were independently associated with study completion. Conclusions Recruitment/retention strategies targeting individuals who smoke, are younger, have low subjective social status within one’s country, have diabetes, or have depression may improve participant follow-up in cardiovascular cohort studies. PMID:28301532

  14. Teaching about Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written by Jim and Jane Nelson, Teaching About Kinematics is the latest AAPT/PTRA resource book. Based on physics education research, the book provides teachers with the resources needed to introduce students to some of the fundamental building blocks of physics. It is a carefully thought-out, step-by-step laboratory-based introduction to the…

  15. Teaching about Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written by Jim and Jane Nelson, Teaching About Kinematics is the latest AAPT/PTRA resource book. Based on physics education research, the book provides teachers with the resources needed to introduce students to some of the fundamental building blocks of physics. It is a carefully thought-out, step-by-step laboratory-based introduction to the…

  16. Kinematics of Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes mathematics of the nonliner relationships between a constant-speed, capstan-driven magnetic tape transport mechanism and a constant-angular-velocity take-up reel. The relationship, derived from the sum of a partial, serves in recognition of a finite tape. Thickness can serve as an example of rotational kinematics. (Author/SK)

  17. Kinematically redundant robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baillieul, J.; Hollerbach, J.; Brockett, R.; Martin, D.; Percy, R.; Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Research on control, design and programming of kinematically redundant robot manipulators (KRRM) is discussed. These are devices in which there are more joint space degrees of freedom than are required to achieve every position and orientation of the end-effector necessary for a given task in a given workspace. The technological developments described here deal with: kinematic programming techniques for automatically generating joint-space trajectories to execute prescribed tasks; control of redundant manipulators to optimize dynamic criteria (e.g., applications of forces and moments at the end-effector that optimally distribute the loading of actuators); and design of KRRMs to optimize functionality in congested work environments or to achieve other goals unattainable with non-redundant manipulators. Kinematic programming techniques are discussed, which show that some pseudo-inverse techniques that have been proposed for redundant manipulator control fail to achieve the goals of avoiding kinematic singularities and also generating closed joint-space paths corresponding to close paths of the end effector in the workspace. The extended Jacobian is proposed as an alternative to pseudo-inverse techniques.

  18. A kinematic study of 0509-67.5, the second youngest supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovey, Luke

    2016-05-01

    Supernova remnants are the lasting interactions of shock waves that develop in the wake of supernovae. These remnants, especially those in our galaxy and our companion galaxies, allow us to study supernovae for thousands of years after the initial stellar explosions. Remnants that are formed from Ia supernovae, which are the explosions and complete annihilation of white dwarf stars, are of particular interest due to the explosions' value as standard candles in cosmological studies. The shock waves in these young supernova remnants offer an unparalleled look into the physical processes that take place there, especially since these shocks are often simpler to study than shocks with strong radiative components that are present in remnants that are formed from the core-collapse supernovae of massive stars. I will detail the work of my kinematic study of the second youngest remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, 0509--67.5, which has been confirmed to be the result of a Ia supernova. Chapter 2 details the proper motion measurements made on the forward shock of this remnant, which has led to many key results. I was able to use the results of ii the global shock speed in the remnant to measure the density of neutral hydrogen in the ambient medium into which these shocks expand. In addition, I use the measurements of the shock speed for select portions of the forward shock to search for signatures of efficient cosmic-ray acceleration. Hydrodynamic simulations are then employed to constrain the age and ambient medium density of 0509--67.5, as well as to place limits on the compression factor at the immediate location of the blast wave. Chapter 3 uses the proper motion results from chapter 2 to determine possible asymmetries in the expansion of the remnant for the eastern and western limbs. These measurements are then used as constraints in hydrodynamic simulations to assess the possible dynamical offset of the explosion site compared to the geometric center of 0509

  19. Emerging Adulthood and Gender Differences in Adult Bachelor Degree Completion: A Multi-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riley, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    Adult undergraduate students constitute 40% of the total undergraduates studying in the United States. However, male undergraduates and male undergraduates over the age of 25 are less likely to enroll in and complete a bachelor's degree than their female counterparts. Given the detrimental employment impacts of not earning a bachelor's…

  20. State Constitutionalism: Completing the Interdisciplinary Study of Constitutional Law and Political Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that a complete and accurate understanding of constitutional history and constitutional law requires the study of state constitutions. Maintains that state constitutions contain a coherent political theory that is, in important respects, at variance with the concept of federalism. (CFR)

  1. Emerging Adulthood and Gender Differences in Adult Bachelor Degree Completion: A Multi-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riley, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    Adult undergraduate students constitute 40% of the total undergraduates studying in the United States. However, male undergraduates and male undergraduates over the age of 25 are less likely to enroll in and complete a bachelor's degree than their female counterparts. Given the detrimental employment impacts of not earning a bachelor's…

  2. Online Notes: Differential Effects of Studying Complete or Partial Graphically Organized Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Crooks, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors investigated in this study the effects of two electronic notes conditions (complete vs. partial) and two testing conditions (immediate vs. delayed) on three types of tests (fact, structure, and application). A 2 x 2 factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) yielded no significant main effects for notes conditions on the fact…

  3. The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoffstall, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by…

  4. The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoffstall, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by…

  5. Kinesiographic study of deglutition in dentate individuals and complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    de Sadalla, Karina Buainain Freitas; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; de Assis Mollo, Francisco; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Swallowing is used as a clinical method in prosthodontics to determine and record jaw relationships. The aim of this study was to perform a quantitative evaluation, in naturally dentate subjects and complete denture wearers, of three measurements associated with the mandibular position during the act of swallowing water: 1. intermaxillary distance on vertical axis; 2. anteroposterior deviation; and 3. lateral deviation. Two groups were selected: Group I (GI) included 40 subjects with complete dentition (mean age 45.27 yrs) and Group II (GII) included 40 bimaxillary edentate subjects, complete denture wearers (mean age 63.92 yrs). A kinesiographic instrument was used for analysis. Three records were taken for each measurement and a mean value obtained. It was concluded that: 1. intermaxillary distance on vertical axis and horizontal deviation were similar for both groups; 2. there was a significant intermaxillary distance on the vertical axis; and 3. for anteroposterior and lateral axis, results showed moderate deviation in relation to maximal intercuspation (MI).

  6. Nursing Students’ Self-Graded Motivation to Complete their Programme of Study

    PubMed Central

    Stomberg, Margareta Warrén; Nilsson, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore variation in nursing students’ motivation to complete their programme of study, as well as factors relating to low versus high motivation and students’ opinions of what would increase their motivation to complete their programme of study. A study was carried out between April 2006 and December 2007. A total of 872 students registered in a 3-year nursing programme randomly participated in self-rating their motivation score once each semester. Descriptive statistics, statistical calculations and content analysis regarding open-ended questions were performed. Most of the students, 73%, rated their motivation as ≥6 on a 0-10 Likert scale; and 16% gave a rating of ≤4. The desire to become a registered nurse (RN) and having a positive attitude towards the studies were the main factors influencing high motivation to complete the programme of study. Having a negative attitude towards the studies was an explanation of decreased motivation. There was a significant decrease (p=0.001) in the motivation score with respect to number of semesters, and motivation increased with the student’s age (p=0.0119). Suggestions for increasing motivation given by those who rated their motivation as ≤4 mainly focused on improvements in didactics and study organisation. PMID:21347211

  7. A study of the lived experiences of African American women STEM doctoral degree completers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Stephanie Michelle

    This study examined the lived experiences of African American women (AAW) who completed doctoral degrees in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) discipline in the United States. This study sought to fill the gap in the literature by examining how AAW described and made meaning of lived STEM educational experiences during doctoral degree completion in the context of the intersection of being African American and a woman. This study utilized a theoretical perspective based upon three theories: (a) critical race theory as a framework to gather AAW's narratives about STEM doctorate education, (b) Black feminist thought as a framework to view the intersection of being African American and a woman in the United States, and (c) the science identity model as a framework to view how women of color successfully complete scientific graduate degrees. Participants revealed that being an African American and a woman in a STEM doctoral program often complicated an already difficult process of completing the doctoral degree. The participants described the educational experience as challenging, particularly the writing of the dissertation. The challenges that the participants faced were due to various factors such as difficult advisor/advisee relationships, tedious writing and revision processes, politics, and lack of information regarding the doctoral degree process. The findings suggested that AAW participants confronted intrinsic bias while completing STEM doctoral degrees, which led to isolation and feelings of being an impostor---or feelings of not belonging in scientific studies. The findings also indicated that the women in this study ascribed success in dissertation writing and degree completion to one or more of the following attributes: (a) having a clear plan, (b) taking ownership of the writing process, (c) having an engaged advisor, (d) learning the writing style of the advisor, (e) understanding the temperament of the advisor, (f) personal will

  8. A Clinical Study to Examine the Effect of Complete Denture on Head Posture/Craniovertical Angle

    PubMed Central

    Nandeeshwar, D.B.; Sangur, Rajashekar; Makkar, Sumit; Khare, Pooja; Chitumalla, Rajkiran; Prasad, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Edentulous patients show some significant changes in ridge relationship caused by resorption of alveolar ridge. The changes are characterized by an upward rotation of mandible, increase in mandibular prognathism that ultimately results in change of natural head posture. Aim This clinical study was planned to know the effect of complete denture on head posture in different age groups of Indian completely edentulous population, after placement of complete denture at various time intervals. Materials and Methods The sample consisted of completely edentulous patients without previous experience of the dentures. They were divided into 2 age groups: Group A (45-60) and Group B (61-75). During placement of complete denture craniovertical angle was measured with the help of custom made ruler protector device. Readings were taken before denture placement, immediately after denture placement, 30 minutes, 24 hours and 30 days after dentures placement. Results The results of this study indicated that in most of the patients (90%) despite their age, change in head posture (extension) occurred immediately after the denture placement. Thereafter reading remains same for measurement at 30 minutes and 24 hours of denture placement. However after 30 days, observation revealed that all the patients showed reduced craniovertical angle (flexion). Even though the values of craniovertical angle remain higher than its baseline in both groups, significant changes were noticed only in Group A. Conclusion Findings revealed that head posture was significantly altered by the placement of dentures in completely edentulous patients. Within the time interval of 30 minutes and 24 hours extension of head posture remained constant with slight variation. Although after 30 days, changes remained significant for group ‘A’, but no significant changes were observed in the subjects of group ‘B’. PMID:27190938

  9. Interaction Between Leg Muscle Performance and Sprint Acceleration Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lockie, Robert G.; Jalilvand, Farzad; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Murphy, Aron J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between 10 m sprint acceleration, step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time), and leg muscle performance (power, stiffness, strength). Twenty-eight field sport athletes completed 10 m sprints that were timed and filmed. Velocity and step kinematics were measured for the 0–5, 5–10, and 0–10 m intervals to assess acceleration. Leg power was measured via countermovement jumps (CMJ), a five-bound test (5BT), and the reactive strength index (RSI) defined by 40 cm drop jumps. Leg stiffness was measured by bilateral and unilateral hopping. A three-repetition maximum squat determined strength. Pearson’s correlations and stepwise regression (p ≤ 0.05) determined velocity, step kinematics, and leg muscle performance relationships. CMJ height correlated with and predicted velocity in all intervals (r = 0.40–0.54). The 5BT (5–10 and 0–10 m intervals) and RSI (5–10 m interval) also related to velocity (r = 0.37–0.47). Leg stiffness did not correlate with acceleration kinematics. Greater leg strength related to and predicted lower 0–5 m flight times (r = −0.46 to −0.51), and a longer 0–10 m step length (r = 0.38). Although results supported research emphasizing the value of leg power and strength for acceleration, the correlations and predictive relationships (r2 = 0.14–0.29) tended to be low, which highlights the complex interaction between sprint technique and leg muscle performance. Nonetheless, given the established relationships between speed, leg power and strength, strength and conditioning coaches should ensure these qualities are expressed during acceleration in field sport athletes. PMID:26839607

  10. Mathematical modeling and kinematics: A study of emerging themes and their implications for learning mathematics through an inquiry-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrejo, David John

    In recent years, emphasis on student learning of mathematics through "real world" problems has intensified. With both national and state standards calling for more conceptual learning and understanding of mathematics, teachers must be prepared to learn and implement more innovative approaches to teaching mathematical content. Mathematical modeling of physical phenomena is presented as a subject for new and developing research areas in both teacher and student learning. Using a grounded theory approach to qualitative research, this dissertation presents two related studies whose purpose was to examine the process by which in-service teachers and students enrolled in an undergraduate physics course constructed mathematical models to describe and predict the motion of an object in both uniform and non-uniform (constant acceleration) contexts. This process provided the framework for the learners' study of kinematics. Study One involved twenty-three in-service physics and math teachers who participated in an intensive six-hour-a-day, five-day unit on kinematics as part of a professional development institute. Study Two involved fifteen students participating in the same unit while enrolled in a physics course designed for pre-service teachers and required in their undergraduate or graduate degree programs in math and science education. Qualitative data, including videotapes of classroom sessions, field notes, researcher reflections, and interviews are the focus of analysis. The dissertation presents and analyzes tensions between learner experience, learning standard concepts in mathematics and learning standard concepts in physics within a framework that outlines critical aspects of mathematical modeling (Pollak, 2003): (1) understanding a physical situation, (2) deciding what to keep and what not to keep when constructing a model related to the situation, and (3) determining whether or not the model is sufficient for acceptance and use. Emergent themes related to the

  11. Robotic training and kinematic analysis of arm and hand after incomplete spinal cord injury: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Z; Sullivan, J L; Eng, D P; Pehlivan, A U; O'Malley, M K; Yozbatiran, N; Francisco, G E

    2011-01-01

    Regaining upper extremity function is the primary concern of persons with tetraplegia caused by spinal cord injury (SCI). Robotic rehabilitation has been inadequately tested and underutilized in rehabilitation of the upper extremity in the SCI population. Given the acceptance of robotic training in stroke rehabilitation and SCI gait training, coupled with recent evidence that the spinal cord, like the brain, demonstrates plasticity that can be catalyzed by repetitive movement training such as that available with robotic devices, it is probable that robotic upper-extremity training of persons with SCI could be clinically beneficial. The primary goal of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of using a novel robotic device for the upper extremity (RiceWrist) and to evaluate robotic rehabilitation using the RiceWrist in a tetraplegic person with incomplete SCI. A 24-year-old male with incomplete SCI participated in 10 sessions of robot-assisted therapy involving intensive upper limb training. The subject successfully completed all training sessions and showed improvements in movement smoothness, as well as in the hand function. Results from this study provide valuable information for further developments of robotic devices for upper limb rehabilitation in persons with SCI. © 2011 IEEE

  12. A new approach to kinematic feature extraction from the human right ventricle for classification of hypertension: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia; Wang, Yingqian; Simon, Marc A.; Brigham, John C.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a novel approach to analyze the function of the human right ventricle (RV) by deriving kinematic features of the relative change in shape throughout the cardiac cycle. The approach is anatomically consistent, allows direct comparison across populations of individuals, and potentially provides new metrics to improve the diagnosis and understanding of cardiovascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). The details of the approach are presented, which includes a variation of harmonic topological mapping and proper orthogonal decomposition techniques, with particular focus on their applicability with respect to untagged cardiac imaging data. Results are shown for the decomposition of a collection of clinically obtained human RV endocardial surfaces segmented from cardiac computed tomography imaging into the fundamental shape change features for individuals both with and without PH. The features are shown to be consistent and converging towards intrinsically physiological components for the heart, and may potentially represent a new set of features for classifying the progressive change in RV function caused by PH, particularly in comparison to traditional clinical metrics.

  13. A VLT/FLAMES STUDY OF THE PECULIAR INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 1846. I. KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, A. D.; Da Costa, G. S.; Yong, D.; Ferguson, A. M. N.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present high-resolution VLT/FLAMES observations of red giant stars in the massive intermediate-age Large Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC 1846, which, on the basis of its extended main-sequence turnoff (EMSTO), possesses an internal age spread of Almost-Equal-To 300 Myr. We describe in detail our target selection and data reduction procedures, and construct a sample of 21 stars possessing radial velocities indicating their membership of NGC 1846 at high confidence. We consider high-resolution spectra of the planetary nebula Mo-17, and conclude that this object is also a member of the cluster. Our measured radial velocities allow us to conduct a detailed investigation of the internal kinematics of NGC 1846, the first time this has been done for an EMSTO system. The key result of this work is that the cluster exhibits a significant degree of systemic rotation, of a magnitude comparable to the mean velocity dispersion. Using an extensive suite of Monte Carlo models we demonstrate that, despite our relatively small sample size and the substantial fraction of unresolved binary stars in the cluster, the rotation signal we detect is very likely to be genuine. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of simulations modeling the formation of multiple populations of stars in globular clusters, where a dynamically cold, rapidly rotating second generation is a common feature. NGC 1846 is less than one relaxation time old, so any dynamical signatures encoded during its formation ought to remain present.

  14. Studies of the local interstellar medium. VIII - Morphology and kinematics of the diffuse interstellar clouds toward Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Sembach, K.; York, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Interstellar clouds in the direction of the Orion association show only positive velocities for target stars within 190 pc of the sun, and both positive and negative velocities for more distant target stars, confirming an earlier prediction by Cowie, Songaila, and York (1979). The nearby positive velocity cloud, designated here as Orion-Lepus 70 (OL 70), is a standard diffuse interstellar cloud: it is subject to the ambient galactic radiation field, with properties consistent with T about equal to 100 K and n about equal to 3/cu cm. Combined with a column density log N(H) = 19.8-20.0/sq cm, these values imply a cloud thickness of about 7 pc. The kinematics of OL 70 are consistent with either an origin as part of the expanding Loop I superbubble shell, or as part of Lindbald's expanding ring, or a synthesis of the two models. The negative velocity interstellar components seen in stars at d not less than 200 pc are caused by interstellar matter accelerated by the expanding Ori-Eri superbubble. Relatively dense interstellar gas at positive LSR velocities is also found within the Orion association, so that it is difficult to pick out OL 70 components in the spectra of the distant stars.

  15. Coupled objective function to study the role of abdominal muscle forces in lifting using the kinematics-driven model.

    PubMed

    El Ouaaid, Z; Shirazi-Adl, A; Arjmand, N; Plamondon, A

    2013-01-01

    To circumvent the existing shortcoming of optimisation algorithms in trunk biomechanical models, both agonist and antagonist trunk muscle stresses to different powers are introduced in a novel objective function to evaluate the role of abdominal muscles in trunk stability and spine compression. This coupled objective function is introduced in our kinematics-driven finite element model to estimate muscle forces and to identify the role of abdominal muscles in upright standing while lifting symmetrically a weight at different heights. Predictive equations for the compression and buckling forces are developed. Results are also compared with the conventional objective function that neglects abdominal muscle forces. An overall optimal solution involving smaller spinal compression but higher trunk stability is automatically attained when choosing muscle stress powers at and around 3. Results highlight the internal oblique muscle as the most efficient abdominal muscle during the tasks investigated. The estimated relative forces in abdominal muscles are found to be in good agreement with the respective ratios of recorded electromyography activities.

  16. Remagnetizations used to unravel large-scale fold kinematics: A case study in the Cameros Basin (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lasanta, C.; Casas-Sainz, A.; Villalaín, J. J.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; Mochales, T.; Speranza, F.

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of a generalized remagnetization at 100 Ma makes the Cameros Basin, an 8 km thick Cretaceous extensional trough inverted during the Cenozoic, a perfect natural frame to apply paleomagnetic vectors to geometrical reconstructions. The widespread remagnetization that occurred between the extensional and compressional episodes, linked to low-grade metamorphism, provides a tool to reconstruct the attitude of beds at the remagnetization time, thus giving a picture of basin geometry during the Cretaceous. This snapshot is compared with the present-day geometry to constrain the large-scale kinematic evolution of folds between these two stages. According to this methodology, a syncline, preinversion geometry of the sedimentary basin was determined and the position of its main axial surface was accurately located. Comparing with the present-day, postinversion geometry, a northward hinge migration of around 5 km is inferred. This migration is the result of the southward back thrusting in the southern basin border, favored by the detachment level at the base of the Mesozoic cover. Conversely, the main northward directed thrust, which involved both the Paleozoic basement and the Mesozoic cover, did not significantly affect the internal structure of the basin in spite of its overall displacement of more than 20 km.

  17. Kinematic coupling in continuum atomic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael Jay

    1999-12-01

    I present here a new three-body wavefunction which is a product of five Kinematically Coupled Coulomb waves. The KC5C wavefunction is valid through second order in all scattering regions and satisfies all asymptotic boundary conditions of the Schrödinger equation. The Brauner, Briggs and Klar (BBK) and Alt and Mukhanedzhanov (AM) continuum state wavefunction models are developed here within a unified notation. The new, Kinematic Coupling model incorporates aspects of both of these previous models and combines the reduced charge potential, discussed in the AM model, with the kinetic energy and allows me to retain the exact three-body Hamiltonian by introducing an exact interaction potential. With this, I assert a triple product form for the wavefunction, which incorporates the known continuum Coulomb eigenstates of the asymptotic Hamiltonian in the region Ωα and a third unknown function. This ansatz is then substituted into the exact Schrödinger equation and I find solutions that match smoothly with the Redmond-Merkuriev 3C wavefunction in region ΩO, where all of the particles are far apart. I also find that a symmetric and complete description of the local momenta arises naturally. Unlike the local momenta of the AM model however, these depend on the conjugate coordinates and yield both distortion and coupling effects. The strength of the Kinematic Coupling model is then illustrated by showing that it contains the appropriate two-body coalescence, and reproduces and improves upon the results of the BBK and AM models in the region Ωα, where two of the particles remain close. Moreover, because the distortion terms are vanishingly small at large radial separations and all energies, and identically zero along curves that are determined by the TDCS scattering angles, the KC5C wavefunction may be extended into the interior region. While the Kinematic Coupling framework indicates why the paradigm 3C wavefunction is so successful at describing both electron

  18. Factors influencing attempted and completed suicide in postnatal women: A population-based study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Jung-Chen; Yeh, Ming-Kung; Wang, Shun-Mu; Chen, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The aims of study were to investigate risk factors associated with attempted and completed suicide. This nested case–control study was conducted using the medical and death data of nearly all pregnant women for the period 2002–2012 in Taiwan. A total of 139 cases of attempted suicide and 95 cases of completed suicide were identified; for each case, 10 controls were randomly selected and matched to the cases according to age and year of delivery. A conditional logistic regression model was used. The mean attempted and completed suicide rates were 9.91 and 6.86 per 100,000 women with live births, respectively. Never having married and postpartum depression also increased the risk of attempted suicide (OR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.09–3.88 and OR = 2.51; 95% CI = 1.10–5.75, respectively) and completed suicide (OR = 20.27; 95% CI = 8.99–45.73 and OR = 21.72; 95% CI = 8.08–58.37, respectively). Other factors for attempted suicide included being widowed or divorced, and having a caesarean delivery or suicide history. Other factors for completed suicide included lower education level, low infant birth weight, and diagnosis of anxiety or mood disorder. These results suggest that people should appropriately assess potential risk factors and provide assistance for postnatal women to reduce the occurrence of suicide events. PMID:27173845

  19. Statistical analysis of modified complete randomized designs: applications to chemo-orientation studies.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Ramani S; Kitska, David J; Loader, Catherine

    2005-04-01

    Often experimental scientists employ a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) to study the effect of treatments on different subjects. Under a 'complete randomization', the order of the apparatus setups within each block, including all replications of each treatment across all subjects, is completely randomized. However, in many experimental settings complete randomization is impractical due to the cost involved in re-adjusting the device to administer a new treatment. One typically resorts to a type of 'restricted randomization', in which multiple subjects are tested under each treatment before the apparatus is re-adjusted. The order of the treatments as well as the assignment of subjects to each block are random. If the data obtained under any type of restricted randomization are treated as if the data were collected under an RCBD with complete randomization within each block, then there is potential to increase the risk of false positives (Type I error). This is of concern to animal orientation studies and other areas such as chemical ecology where it is impractical to reset the experimental device for each subject tested. The goal of the research presented in this article is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the consequences of constructing an F-statistic based on a mean square error for testing the significance of treatment effects under the restricted randomization; (2) to describe an alternative method, based on split-plot analysis of variance, to analyze designed experiments that yield better power under the restricted randomization. The statistical analyses of simulated experiments and data involving virgin male Periplaneta americana substantiate the benefits of the alternative approach under the restricted randomization. The methodology and analysis employed for the simulated experiment is equally applicable to any organism or artificial agent tested under a restricted randomization protocol.

  20. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  1. Kinematics of robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The theory and methodology of design of general-purpose machines that may be controlled by a computer to perform all the tasks of a set of special-purpose machines is the focus of modern machine design research. These seventeen contributions chronicle recent activity in the analysis and design of robot manipulators that are the prototype of these general-purpose machines. They focus particularly on kinematics, the geometry of rigid-body motion, which is an integral part of machine design theory. The challenges to kinematics researchers presented by general-purpose machines such as the manipulator are leading to new perspectives in the design and control of simpler machines with two, three, and more degrees of freedom. Researchers are rethinking the uses of gear trains, planar mechanisms, adjustable mechanisms, and computer controlled actuators in the design of modern machines.

  2. On steady kinematic helical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltayeb, I. A.; Loper, D. E.

    The equations governing steady kinematic helical dynamos are studied, using the formalism of Benton (1979), when the flow has no radial component (in cylindrical coordinates). It is shown that all solutions must decay exponentially to zero at large distances, s, from the axis of the helix. When the flow depends on s only it is shown that a necessary condition for dynamo action is that the flow possesses components along both the primary and secondary helices. It is also found that periodic motion of one mode along the primary helix cannot support dynamo action even if the field is composed of mean and periodic parts.

  3. Kinematic Stirling Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, J. R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Computer program developed for analyzing thermodynamic characteristics of kinematic Stirling engine. Computes time-varying piston positions, pressures, and gas temperatures in each of gas-control volumes into which engine working space is divided. Engine performance characterized by calculations of power and efficiency (both indicated and brake). Inputs to code are engine geometrical parameter, engine-operating conditions, and indexes that specify various options available.

  4. The brown dwarf kinematics project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jackie K.

    2010-10-01

    Brown dwarfs are a recent addition to the plethora of objects studied in Astronomy. With theoretical masses between 13 and 75 MJupiter , they lack sustained stable Hydrogen burning so they never join the stellar main sequence. They have physical properties similar to both planets and low-mass stars so studies of their population inform on both. The distances and kinematics of brown dwarfs provide key statistical constraints on their ages, moving group membership, absolute brightnesses, evolutionary trends, and multiplicity. Yet, until my thesis, fundamental measurements of parallax and proper motion were made for only a relatively small fraction of the known population. To address this deficiency, I initiated the Brown Dwarf Kinematics (BDKP). Over the past four years I have re-imaged the majority of spectroscopically confirmed field brown dwarfs (or ultracool dwarfs---UCDs) and created the largest proper motion catalog for ultracool dwarfs to date. Using new astrometric information I examined population characteristics such as ages calculated from velocity dispersions and correlations between kinematics and colors. Using proper motions, I identified several new wide co-moving companions and investigated binding energy (and hence formation) limitations as well as the frequency of hierarchical companions. Concurrently over the past four years I have been conducting a parallax survey of 84 UCDs including those showing spectral signatures of youth, metal-poor brown dwarfs, and those within 20 pc of the Sun. Using absolute magnitude relations in J,H, and K, I identified overluminous binary candidates and investigated known flux-reversal binaries. Using current evolutionary models, I compared the MK vs J-K color magnitude diagram to model predictions and found that the low-surface gravity dwarfs are significantly red-ward and underluminous of predictions and a handful of late-type T dwarfs may require thicker clouds to account for their scatter.

  5. Natural and Man-Made Chemicals in North American Soils--Continental-Scale Pilot Study Completed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada recently completed a continental-scale pilot study for a proposed geochemical survey of North American soils. This survey will provide baseline soil chemistry data against which future changes in soil composition can be measured and that can be used by Federal, State/Provincial, and local agencies when making risk-assessment and land-use decisions.

  6. Collecting Kinematic Data on a Ski Track with Optoelectronic Stereophotogrammetry: A Methodological Study Assessing the Feasibility of Bringing the Biomechanics Lab to the Field.

    PubMed

    Spörri, Jörg; Schiefermüller, Christian; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the laboratory, optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry is one of the most commonly used motion capture systems; particularly, when position- or orientation-related analyses of human movements are intended. However, for many applied research questions, field experiments are indispensable, and it is not a priori clear whether optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric systems can be expected to perform similarly to in-lab experiments. This study aimed to assess the instrumental errors of kinematic data collected on a ski track using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, and to investigate the magnitudes of additional skiing-specific errors and soft tissue/suit artifacts. During a field experiment, the kinematic data of different static and dynamic tasks were captured by the use of 24 infrared-cameras. The distances between three passive markers attached to a rigid bar were stereophotogrammetrically reconstructed and, subsequently, were compared to the manufacturer-specified exact values. While at rest or skiing at low speed, the optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system's accuracy and precision for determining inter-marker distances were found to be comparable to those known for in-lab experiments (< 1 mm). However, when measuring a skier's kinematics under "typical" skiing conditions (i.e., high speeds, inclined/angulated postures and moderate snow spraying), additional errors were found to occur for distances between equipment-fixed markers (total measurement errors: 2.3 ± 2.2 mm). Moreover, for distances between skin-fixed markers, such as the anterior hip markers, additional artifacts were observed (total measurement errors: 8.3 ± 7.1 mm). In summary, these values can be considered sufficient for the detection of meaningful position- or orientation-related differences in alpine skiing. However, it must be emphasized that the use of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry on a ski track is seriously constrained by limited practical usability, small-sized capture volumes

  7. [Changes in knee kinematics and quadriceps and hamstrings moment arms after high valgus and varus tibial "dome" osteotomy: An in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Baillon, B; Salvia, P; Feipel, V; Rooze, M

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the correction or over-correction of high valgus and varus tibial osteotomies is generally limited to the frontal plane. Most likely however, the deformation observed radiographically in the frontal plane is simply a one-dimensional expression of a more complex three-dimensional deformation. This might be one of the causes for certain failures after surgery and recurrent problems which are difficult to solve. We proposed using 3D electrogoniometric to measure of the effect of a "dome" osteotomy on patellar and femoro-tibial kinematics and the changes in the moment arms of the knee muscles. We used five lower limbs harvested from non-fixed cadavers. A "dome" osteotomy was stabilized by external fixation. Three-dimensional analysis of the femoro-tibial and femoro-patellar kinematics was performed using two electrogoniometers with six degrees of freedom. Changes in the lengths of the hamstrings and quadriceps was measured using four LVDT linear variable differential transformers. The muscles lever arms were measured with the tendon excursion method. At 90 degrees flexion, varus osteotomy induced internal rotation while valgus osteotomy induced the opposite effect. Beyond 40 degrees flexion, there was a clear internal rotation of the patella for varus and neutral corrections. Valgus corrections however induced external rotation. The peak lever arm of the quadriceps increased with valgus, while the angle of the peak was higher for varus correction. Valgus appeared to increase the lever arm of the semitendinous. Our study demonstrated that the effect of tibial osteotomy is not limited to the frontal plane. Tibial rotations are observed systematically for all corrections in the frontal plane. Varus correction tends to create internal rotation while valgus correction tends to have the opposite effect. Axial correction also affects patellar kinematics. Interanal rotation is induced by varus correction and external rotation by valgus correction. This patellar

  8. Collecting Kinematic Data on a Ski Track with Optoelectronic Stereophotogrammetry: A Methodological Study Assessing the Feasibility of Bringing the Biomechanics Lab to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the laboratory, optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry is one of the most commonly used motion capture systems; particularly, when position- or orientation-related analyses of human movements are intended. However, for many applied research questions, field experiments are indispensable, and it is not a priori clear whether optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric systems can be expected to perform similarly to in-lab experiments. This study aimed to assess the instrumental errors of kinematic data collected on a ski track using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, and to investigate the magnitudes of additional skiing-specific errors and soft tissue/suit artifacts. During a field experiment, the kinematic data of different static and dynamic tasks were captured by the use of 24 infrared-cameras. The distances between three passive markers attached to a rigid bar were stereophotogrammetrically reconstructed and, subsequently, were compared to the manufacturer-specified exact values. While at rest or skiing at low speed, the optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system’s accuracy and precision for determining inter-marker distances were found to be comparable to those known for in-lab experiments (< 1 mm). However, when measuring a skier’s kinematics under “typical” skiing conditions (i.e., high speeds, inclined/angulated postures and moderate snow spraying), additional errors were found to occur for distances between equipment-fixed markers (total measurement errors: 2.3 ± 2.2 mm). Moreover, for distances between skin-fixed markers, such as the anterior hip markers, additional artifacts were observed (total measurement errors: 8.3 ± 7.1 mm). In summary, these values can be considered sufficient for the detection of meaningful position- or orientation-related differences in alpine skiing. However, it must be emphasized that the use of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry on a ski track is seriously constrained by limited practical usability, small-sized capture

  9. Systematic study of the experimental measurements on J/ψ cross sections and kinematic distributions in p+p collisions at different energies

    DOE PAGES

    Zha, Wangmei; Huang, Bingchu; Ma, Rongrong; ...

    2016-02-29

    The world experimental data on cross section and kinematic distribution in p + p and p + A collisions at √s = 6.8 – 7000 GeV are systematically examined in this work. The √s dependence of the inclusive cross section, rapidity, and transverse momentum distributions are studied phenomenologically. Also, we explore empirical formulas to obtain the total cross section, rapidity, and transverse momentum (pT) distribution. This is crucial for the interpretation of A + A J/ψ results at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider when the p + p reference data are not available. In addition, the cross section atmore » midrapidity and transverse momentum distributions in p + p collisions at √s = 39 and 62.4 GeV are evaluated.« less

  10. Complete data acquisition and analysis system for low-energy electron-molecule collision studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2015-09-01

    A complete data acquisition system has been developed that can work with any personal computer irrespective of the operating system installed on it. The software can be used in low and intermediate electron-energy collision studies with ground-state molecules in gas phase using a combination of RS-232, GPIB, and USB-interfaced devices. Various tabletop instruments and nuclear instrumentation module (NIM) -based electronics have been interfaced and have communicated with the software, which is based on LabVIEW. This is tested with dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and polar dissociation studies to oxygen molecule and successfully used in a DEA study of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

  11. The effect of breast support and breast pain on upper-extremity kinematics during running: implications for females with large breasts.

    PubMed

    White, Jennifer; Mills, Chris; Ball, Nick; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between inappropriate breast support and upper-extremity kinematics for female runners is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of breast support and breast pain on upper-extremity kinematics during running. Eleven female recreational runners with larger breasts (UK D and E cup) completed a 7 min 20 s treadmill run (2.58 m · s(-1)) in a high and low breast support condition. Multi-planar breast and upper-extremity kinematic data were captured in each breast support condition by eight infrared cameras for 30 s towards the end of the run. Breast pain was rated at the end of each treadmill run using a numeric analogue scale. The high support bra reduced breast kinematics and decreased breast pain (P < 0.05). Upper-extremity kinematics did not differ between breast support conditions (P > 0.05), although some moderate positive correlations were found between thorax range of motion and breast kinematics (r = 0.54 to 0.73). Thorax and arm kinematics do not appear to be influenced by breast support level in female runners with large breasts. A high support bra that offers good multi-planar breast support is recommended for female runners with larger breasts to reduce breast pain.

  12. Effect of complete denture wearing on deglutition time: a cine-magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gokce, H S; Gokce, S M; Akin, E; Bulakbasi, N; Akyol, M

    2012-03-01

    Purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of complete denture wearing on deglutition time (DT), hyoid bone and larynx movements in edentulous patients with real-time balanced turbo field echo cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects were examined by cine-magnetic resonance imaging in supine position during swallowing water. Two sets of images for 23 edentulous (with/without wearing complete dentures) and one for 23 dentulous patients were obtained. Radiographic outputs representing three consecutive deglutition stages (oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal) were provided to perform measurements. Deglutition time significantly increased when edentulous patients wore their dentures (mean 0·75 s increased to 1·17 s), whereas dentulous patients' DT was about 0·91 s (P ≤ 0.05). The duration of deglutition is crucial because prolonged pharyngeal transit times increases the risk of aspiration. Within the limitations of the study, complete denture wearing could increase the shortened DT of the edentulous patients. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Economy of effort in different speaking conditions. II. Kinematic performance spaces for cyclical and speech movements.

    PubMed

    Perkell, Joseph S; Zandipour, Majid

    2002-10-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the kinematic manipulations used by speakers in different speaking conditions are influenced by kinematic performance limits. A range of kinematic parameter values was elicited by having seven subjects produce cyclical CV movements of lips, tongue blade and tongue dorsum (/ba/, /da/, /ga/), at rates ranging from 1 to 6 Hz. The resulting measures were used to establish speaker- and articulator-specific kinematic performance spaces, defined by movement duration, displacement and peak speed. These data were compared with speech movement data produced by the subjects in several different speaking conditions in the companion study (Perkell et al., 2002). The amount of overlap of the speech data and cyclical data varied across speakers, from almost no overlap to complete overlap. Generally, for a given movement duration, speech movements were larger than cyclical movements, indicating that the speech movements were faster and were produced with greater effort, according to the performance space analysis. It was hypothesized that the cyclical movements of the tongue and lips were slower than the speech movements because they were more constrained by (coupled to) the relatively massive mandible. To test this hypothesis, a comparison was made of cyclical movements in maxillary versus mandibular frames of reference. The results indicate that the cyclical movements were not strongly constrained by mandible movements. The overall results generally indicate that the cyclical task did not succeed in defining the upper limits of kinematic performance spaces within which the speech data were confined. Thus, the hypothesis that performance limits influence speech kinematics could not be tested effectively. The differences between the speech and cyclical movements may be due to other factors, such as differences in speakers' "skill" with the two types of movement, or the size of the movements--the speech movements were larger

  14. Kinematics of 2 reciprocating endodontic motors: the difference between actual and set values.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Aleš

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of 2 reciprocating motors and compare it with manufacturers' declared values. VDW Silver (VDW, Munich, Germany) and ATR Tecnika (Tecnika, Pistoia, Italy) were used in the study in 5 working modes: continuous rotation at 400 rpm on VDW Silver and ATR Tecnika and reciprocating motion on ATR Tecnika at 400 rpm and on VDW Silver in Reciproc and WaveOne mode. The polishing disk with an optical target was inserted in the contra-angle and recorded with a 1000-frames per second video camera. The direction and the amount of rotation were analyzed by computer, and the following kinematics parameters were calculated: engaging and disengaging angles, cycle rotational speeds, engaging and disengaging rotational speeds, net cycle angle, total cycle angle, and number of cycles to complete full rotation. One-way analysis of variance followed by planned pair-wise comparisons was used to compare kinematics parameters. The alpha error was set to 0.05. Analysis of variance revealed a difference between actual and set values of all 3 reciprocating modes in all kinematics parameters (P < .001). No significant difference between the actual engaging angle of Reciproc and that of the WaveOne mode was found. For reciprocating motion on the ATR Tecnika at 400 rpm, the actual engaging and disengaging angles were 8- and 9-fold greater, respectively, compared with set angles (P < .001). The kinematics of reciprocating instrumentation is more complex than it seems as described only with angles and rotational speed. Actual kinematics values differ from manufacturers' declared values. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Complete denture wear during sleep in elderly sleep apnea patients--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda R; Furuyama, Ricardo Jun; Chaccur, Danilo Chucralla; Lowe, Alan A; Chen, Hui; Bittencourt, Lia Rita; Frigeiro, Maria L M A; Tsuda, Hiroko

    2012-09-01

    There is no consensus in the literature about the impact of complete denture wear on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The goal of this randomized clinical study was to assess if complete denture wear during sleep interferes with the quality of sleep. Elderly edentulous OSA patients from a complete denture clinic were enrolled and received new complete dentures. An objective sleep analysis was determined with polysomnography performed at the sleep laboratory for all patients who slept either with or without their dentures. Twenty-three patients (74% females) completed the study with a mean age of 69.6 years and a mean body mass index of 26.7 kg/m(2). The apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) was significantly higher when patients slept with dentures compared to without (25.9 ± 14.8/h vs. 19.9 ± 10.2/h; p > 0.005). In the mild OSA group, the AHI was significantly higher when patients slept with the dentures (16.6 ± 6.9 vs. 8.9 ± 2.4; p < 0.05), while in moderate to severe OSA patients, the AHI was not significantly different when sleeping with dentures (.30.8 ± 15.6 vs. 25.7 ± 7.5; p = 0.2). The supine AHI in mild patients was related to a higher increase in AHI while wearing dentures (12.7 ± 8.4/h vs. 51.9 ± 28.6/h; p < 0.001). A limitation of the study is that the mild OSA patients had a higher BMI when compared to the moderate to severe OSA patients. Ten out of 14 patients who preferred to sleep with their upper and lower dentures showed an increase in their AHI while wearing dentures to sleep. Contrary to previous studies, we found that OSA patients may experience more apneic events if they sleep with their dentures in place. Specifically, in mild OSAS patients, the use of dentures substantially increases the AHI especially when in the supine position.

  16. Differences in Kinematic Variables in Single-Leg Stance between Patients with Stroke and Healthy Elderly People Measured with Inertial Sensors: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cruzado, David; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio

    2017-09-19

    The study aimed to analyze the differences between kinematic parameters in the single-leg stance (SLS) in patients with stroke and in healthy elderly people measured with 2 inertial sensors-1 in the trunk and 1 in the lumbar region. Two groups of participants were measured: the first group consisted of 5 healthy elderly people over 65 years of age; the second group consisted of 5 patients with stroke over 65 years of age, recovering for more than 6 months after suffering a stroke, and who had been undergoing rehabilitation treatment for at least 6 months. Two inertial sensors were located in the participants: in the trunk region (T7-T8) and in the lumbar region (L5-S1). The SLS test was performed in 4 conditions: right-dominant leg, open eyes; right-dominant leg, closed eyes; left-nondominant leg, open eyes; and left-nondominant leg, closed eyes. Significant differences in displacement in the lumbar and trunk sensors are highlighted in 6 of 36 variables. In the velocity variables, significant differences were only found in 1 variable. Differences during SLS between the affected and the nonaffected legs in patients with stroke were found in 5 of the 36 analyzed variables and in 1 variable in velocity. The intraclass correlation coefficients were higher than .866 (95% confidence interval: .828-.857) for all variables. Only significant differences were found in 7 of the 128 kinematic variables analyzed in both groups, so that it could be confirmed that there are no significant differences in the static balance between healthy elderly people and people with stroke who undergo the rehabilitative treatment. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Towards complete and accurate reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy: the STARD initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bossuyt, Patrick M; Reitsma, Johannes B; Bruns, David E; Gatsonis, Constantine A; Glasziou, Paul P; Irwig, Les M; Lijmer, Jeroen G; Moher, David; Rennie, Drummond; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2003-01-01

    Objective To improve the accuracy and completeness of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy, to allow readers to assess the potential for bias in a study, and to evaluate a study's generalisability. Methods The Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) steering committee searched the literature to identify publications on the appropriate conduct and reporting of diagnostic studies and extracted potential items into an extensive list. Researchers, editors, and members of professional organisations shortened this list during a two day consensus meeting, with the goal of developing a checklist and a generic flow diagram for studies of diagnostic accuracy. Results The search for published guidelines about diagnostic research yielded 33 previously published checklists, from which we extracted a list of 75 potential items. At the consensus meeting, participants shortened the list to a 25 item checklist, by using evidence, whenever available. A prototype of a flow diagram provides information about the method of patient recruitment, the order of test execution, and the numbers of patients undergoing the test under evaluation and the reference standard, or both. Conclusions Evaluation of research depends on complete and accurate reporting. If medical journals adopt the STARD checklist and flow diagram, the quality of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy should improve to the advantage of clinicians, researchers, reviewers, journals, and the public. PMID:12511463

  18. KINEMATIC AND SPATIAL SUBSTRUCTURE IN NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario; Fűrész, Gabor

    2015-04-15

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from Fűrész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular ({sup 13}CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation.

  19. Comparison of Knee Kinematics After Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction via the Medial Portal Technique With a Central Femoral Tunnel and an Eccentric Femoral Tunnel and After Anatomic Double-Bundle Reconstruction: A Human Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Herbort, Mirco; Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael Johannes; Lenschow, Simon; Förster, Tim; Petersen, Wolf; Zantop, Thore

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic femoral tunnel placement in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is considered to be a key to good primary stability of the knee. There is still no consensus on whether a centrally placed single bundle in the anatomical femoral footprint can compare with anatomic double-bundle (DB) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to determine knee kinematics after single-bundle ACL reconstruction via the medial portal technique using 2 different femoral tunnel positions and to compare results with those of the anatomic DB technique. The hypotheses were that (1) single-bundle reconstruction using the medial portal technique with a centrally placed femoral tunnel relative to the native footprint (SB-central technique) would more closely restore intact knee kinematics compared with the same reconstruction technique with an eccentric femoral tunnel drilled in the anteromedial bundle footprint (SB-AM technique) and (2) DB reconstruction would result in superior kinematics compared with the SB-central technique. Controlled laboratory study. Knee kinematics was examined in 10 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees using a robotic/universal force-moment sensor system. Kinematics in simulated pivot-shift and 134-N anterior tibial loading tests were determined in different conditions within the same specimen: (1) intact ACL, (2) deficient ACL, (3) SB-AM, (4) SB-central, and (5) DB. All reconstruction techniques significantly reduced anterior tibial translation (ATT) compared with a deficient ACL at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° in the anterior tibial loading test (P < .01, repeated-measures analysis of variance) and at 0°, 15°, and 30° in the simulated pivot-shift test (P < .001). There were no significant differences in the SB-central group and the DB group compared with the intact ACL. Reconstruction in the SB-AM group resulted in significantly increased ATT compared with the intact ACL in near-to-extension angles in both tests (0°, 15°, and 30°; P

  20. Clinical diagnosis of completeness of medical abortion by nurses: a reliability study in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Gebreselassie, Hailemichael; Ustá, Momade; Andersen, Kathryn L; Mitchell, Ellen M H

    2012-07-01

    The provision of medical abortion continues to rely on routine use of ultrasound to confirm expulsion of pregnancy. However, the absence of ultrasound in most of the health facilities in developing countries and the additional training required to enable providers to use ultrasound is often prohibitive. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical history and physical examination with ultrasound in confirming completion of abortion. A total of 718 women consented for medical abortion with misoprostol and were assessed for pregnancy expulsion by nurses and gynecologists. Nurses used history and physical examination while gynecologists used ultrasound to establish their diagnoses. Nurses' clinical diagnoses for complete abortion, incomplete abortion and ongoing pregnancy were 83% (SE 0.01), 15% (SE 0.01) and 2% (SE 0.01), respectively. When gynecologists used ultrasound, the diagnoses for complete abortion, incomplete abortion, an ongoing pregnancy were 80% (SE 0.01), 17% (SE 0.01) and 3% (SE 0.01), respectively. Overall, nurses agreed with gynecologist diagnoses in 84% of cases, with a κ coefficient of 0.49 (SE 0.06) and chance-corrected first-order agreement (AC(1)) of 0.81 (SE 0.02). Agreement was very high for the diagnosis of complete abortion (AC(1) 0.89; SE 0.02), while it was moderate for ongoing pregnancy (AC(1) 0.58; SE 0.22) and incomplete abortion (AC(1) 0.45; SE 0.08). Clinical history and physical examination alone, without the use of ultrasonography, are effective for the determination of successful pregnancy expulsion. However, greater emphasis is required on the clinical identification of ongoing pregnancy during any training of providers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC2548 clumpy spatial and kinematic structure (Vicente+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, B.; Sanchez, N.; Alfaro, E.

    2016-10-01

    We used precise astrometric data from the Carte du Ciel - San Fernando catalogue to study the clumpy structure in NGC 2548. We have completed our spatial and kinematic information with photometric data from the UCAC4 catalogue. With this, we derived positions and proper motions for each of the detected cores in this cluster. This table contains all the astrometric and photometric data for the 1655 stars toward NGC 2548. (1 data file).

  2. Internal Kinematics of Distant Field Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, Kristine Mei Lan

    1998-08-01

    We study faint blue field galaxies in two complementary ways by targeting red-shifted, broadened emission lines: (1) a detailed study of a small but representative sample using resolved images that reveal the internal kinematics of individual galaxies, and analyzing effects like ionized gas distribution and galaxy inclination that tend to bias the results obtained from spatially unresolved galaxy spectra; and (2) a study of a spatially unresolved but statistically complete sample within our color, magnitude, and redshift cuts. In order to facilitate comparison of distant and local galaxies, we have developed a methodology to study distant galaxies in as much detail as is customary for nearby galaxies, using state-of-the-art data. The ultimate goal of such a comparison is to determine the amount of evolution of the mass-to-light ratio of individual galaxies and to thereby constrain models of galaxy formation and evolution. In a followup to our recent multifiber spectroscopic study of the linewidth-vs-luminosity relation in faint blue galaxies at < z>~ 0.25 (Rix et al. 1997, MNRAS, 285, 779), we have carried out a detailed study of the internal kinematics of 10 distant (z = 0.30[-]0.44), faint (B = 20[-]24), blue (B-R <= 1.2) field galaxies using the Rutgers Fabry-Perot (RFP) instrument on the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory's 4-meter telescope. In deriving rotation speeds from fiber spectra, we had to rely on large and somewhat uncertain statistical corrections for the effects of non-uniform gas distribution, disk inclination, shape of the rotation curve, and seeing. Using fitting disk models to the RFP datacube, complemented by surface photometry and isophotal shapes derived from high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 images in the F814W ('I') or F555W ('V') Band and deep H-Band (1.6 μm) images obtained with the Near InfraRed Camera on the Keck 10-meter telescope, the RFP study addresses these issues directly and yields

  3. Decoding intentions from movement kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Andrea; Koul, Atesh; Ansuini, Caterina; Capozzi, Francesca; Becchio, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    How do we understand the intentions of other people? There has been a longstanding controversy over whether it is possible to understand others’ intentions by simply observing their movements. Here, we show that indeed movement kinematics can form the basis for intention detection. By combining kinematics and psychophysical methods with classification and regression tree (CART) modeling, we found that observers utilized a subset of discriminant kinematic features over the total kinematic pattern in order to detect intention from observation of simple motor acts. Intention discriminability covaried with movement kinematics on a trial-by-trial basis, and was directly related to the expression of discriminative features in the observed movements. These findings demonstrate a definable and measurable relationship between the specific features of observed movements and the ability to discriminate intention, providing quantitative evidence of the significance of movement kinematics for anticipating others’ intentional actions. PMID:27845434

  4. Essential Study Skills: The Complete Guide to Success at University. Second Edition. Sage Study Skills Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Tom; Sinfield, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The eagerly-awaited new edition of the successful "Essential Study Skills" continues to provide a truly practical guide to achieving success at university. Whether you are going to university straight from school, a mature student, or an overseas student studying in the UK for the first time, this is the book that will help you to better…

  5. Essential Study Skills: The Complete Guide to Success at University. Second Edition. Sage Study Skills Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Tom; Sinfield, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The eagerly-awaited new edition of the successful "Essential Study Skills" continues to provide a truly practical guide to achieving success at university. Whether you are going to university straight from school, a mature student, or an overseas student studying in the UK for the first time, this is the book that will help you to better…

  6. Preliminary results on the study of the environment of a complete sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Rafanelli, P.

    1997-07-01

    The results of the study of the environment of a complete sample of Seyfert galaxies taken from the CfA Redshift Survey (Davis et al. 1983; Huchra et al. 1983) are shown. In particular we compare the distribution of the positions of all galaxies located within five diameters from each Seyfert galaxy of our sample with the analogous distribution observed in a control sample of normal galaxies taken from the Merged Catalogue of Galaxies (hereafter MERCG) (Kogoshvili 1986). This research is based on the analysis of the digitized images of the "Digitized Sky Survey" and on the on--line catalogues APM (Automatic Plate Measuring System) and APS (Automated Plate Scanner).

  7. Complete synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems via a single proportional adaptive controller: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Israr Saaban, Azizan Bin Ibrahim, Adyda Binti; Shahzad, Mohammad

    2015-12-11

    This paper addresses a comparative computational study on the synchronization quality, cost and converging speed for two pairs of identical chaotic and hyperchaotic systems with unknown time-varying parameters. It is assumed that the unknown time-varying parameters are bounded. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory and using the adaptive control method, a single proportional controller is proposed to achieve the goal of complete synchronizations. Accordingly, appropriate adaptive laws are designed to identify the unknown time-varying parameters. The designed control strategy is easy to implement in practice. Numerical simulations results are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization scheme.

  8. Capsulotomy Size Affects Hip Joint Kinematic Stability.

    PubMed

    Wuerz, Thomas H; Song, Sang H; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S; Martin, Hal D; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Nho, Shane J

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of capsulotomy size and subsequent repair on the biomechanical stability of hip joint kinematics through external rotation of a cadaveric hip in neutral flexion. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric hip specimens were used in this study. Each hip was tested under torsional loads of 6 N·m applied by a servohydraulic frame and transmitted by a pulley system. The test conditions were (1) neutral flexion with the capsule intact, (2) neutral flexion with a 4-cm interportal capsulotomy, (3) neutral flexion with a 6-cm capsulotomy, and (4) neutral flexion with capsulotomy repair. Soft tissue was retained during all interventions. Measures indicating joint kinematics (range of motion [ROM], hysteresis area [HA], and neutral zone [NZ]) were obtained for each condition. For all hip specimens, the average ROM, HA, and NZ were calculated relative to the intact capsular state (100%) and expressed in terms of percentage (± SD). The findings for ROM were as follows: intact, 100%; 4 cm, 107.42% ± 5.69%; 6 cm, 113.40% ± 7.92%; and repair, 99.78% ± 3.77%. The findings for HA were as follows: intact, 100%; 4 cm, 108.30% ± 9.30%; 6 cm, 115.30% ± 13.92%; and repair, 99.47% ± 4.12%. The findings for NZ were as follows: intact, 100%; 4 cm, 139.61% ± 62.35%; 6 cm, 169.25% ± 78.19%; and repair, 132.03% ± 64.38%. Statistically significant differences in ROM existed between the intact and 4-cm conditions (P = .039), the intact and 6-cm conditions (P < .0001), the 4-cm and repair conditions (P = .033), and the 6-cm and repair conditions (P < .0001). There was no statistically significant difference between the intact and repair conditions (P > .99) or between the 4- and 6-cm conditions (P = .126). Under laboratory-based conditions, larger-sized capsulotomies were accompanied by increases in all 3 measures of joint mobility: ROM, HA, and NZ at time zero. Complete capsular closure effectively restored these measures when compared with the intact condition

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of Sika deer Cervus nippon hortulorum (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) and phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Hua; Liu, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Ming-Hai

    2016-07-01

    Sika deer (Cervus nippon Temminck 1836) are classified in the order Artiodactyla, family Cervidae, subfamily Cervinae. At present, the phylogenetic studies of C. nippon are problematic. In this study, we first determined and described the complete mitochondrial sequence of the wild C. nippon hortulorum. The complete mitogenome sequence is 16 566 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a putative control region (CR) and a light-strand replication origin (OL). The overall base composition was 33.4% A, 28.6% T, 24.5% C, 13.5% G, with a 62.0% AT bias. The 13 protein-coding genes encode 3782 amino acids in total. To further validate the new determined sequences and phylogeny of Sika deer, phylogenetic trees involving 15 most closely related species available in GenBank database were constructed. These results are expected to provide useful molecular data for deer species identification and further phylogenetic studies of Artiodactyla.

  10. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ashish; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. Materials and Methods For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. Results It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (p<.1). Conclusion The denture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures. PMID:26155561

  11. Failure tolerant operation of kinematically redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Christopher L.; Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    1994-01-01

    Redundant manipulators may compensate for failed joints with their additional degrees of freedom. In this paper such a manipulator is considered fault tolerant if it can guarantee completion of a task after any one of its joints has failed. This fault tolerance of kinematically redundant manipulators is insured here. Methods to analyze the manipulator's work space find regions inherently suitable for critical tasks because of their high level of failure tolerance. Constraints are then placed on the manipulator's range of motion to guarantee completion of a task.

  12. Predictors of Death among Patients Who Completed Tuberculosis Treatment: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Juan-Pablo; Orcau, Angels; Rius, Cristina; Casals, Marti; de Olalla, Patricia Garcia; Moreno, Antonio; Nelson, Jeanne L.; Caylà, Joan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mortality among patients who complete tuberculosis (TB) treatment is still high among vulnerable populations. The objective of the study was to identify the probability of death and its predictive factors in a cohort of successfully treated TB patients. Methods A population-based retrospective longitudinal study was performed in Barcelona, Spain. All patients who successfully completed TB treatment with culture-confirmation and available drug susceptibility testing between 1995–1997 were retrospectively followed-up until December 31, 2005 by the Barcelona TB Control Program. Socio-demographic, clinical, microbiological and treatment variables were examined. Mortality, TB Program and AIDS registries were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and a Cox regression methods with time-dependent covariates were used for the survival analysis, calculating the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Among the 762 included patients, the median age was 36 years, 520 (68.2%) were male, 178 (23.4%) HIV-infected, and 208 (27.3%) were alcohol abusers. Of the 134 (17.6%) injecting drug users (IDU), 123 (91.8%) were HIV-infected. A total of 30 (3.9%) recurrences and 173 deaths (22.7%) occurred (mortality rate: 3.4/100 person-years of follow-up). The predictors of death were: age between 41–60 years old (HR: 3.5; CI:2.1–5.7), age greater than 60 years (HR: 14.6; CI:8.9–24), alcohol abuse (HR: 1.7; CI:1.2–2.4) and HIV-infected IDU (HR: 7.9; CI:4.7–13.3). Conclusions The mortality rate among TB patients who completed treatment is associated with vulnerable populations such as the elderly, alcohol abusers, and HIV-infected IDU. We therefore need to fight against poverty, and promote and develop interventions and social policies directed towards these populations to improve their survival. PMID:21980423

  13. Completing multi-wavelength studies of the REFLEX-DXL sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2005-10-01

    To use massive clusters as the most sensitive probes to study the evolution of cosmic structure and to test cosmological models, it is important to control the systematics of the mass--observable relations. To meet this requirements, we constructed a morphology-unbiased and volume-limited sample with a well defined flux limit, consisting of 14 distant X-ray luminous clusters in the REFLEX survey (the REFLEX-DXL sample). The sample was observed in AO1 and AO3. We published detailed studies of 13 clusters. However, the observations of RXCJ2011.3-5725 were seriously spoiled by flares. To complete the REFLEX-DXL sample to finish the multi-wavelength studies, we request a re-observation of 36 ks for RXCJ2011.3-5725.

  14. Complete dataset for 2-treatment, 2-sequence, 2-period efavirenz bioequivalence study conducted with nightly dosing

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Manuel; Magallanes, Laura; Lorier, Marianela; Vázquez, Marta; Fagiolino, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The efavirenz pharmacokinetic raw data presented in this article was obtained in an average bioequivalence study between a local brand and Stocrin (Merck Sharp & Dohme, purchased from Australia, batch H009175, expiration date November 2013). Dose was administered at night (9:00 p.m.) two hours after food intake. Fourteen healthy subjects, 8 women and 6 men, completed the study. For each subject, 15 data points until 96 h post-administration are included. Subject demographic characteristics and sequences of administration are provided along with individual pharmacokinetic profiles of efavirenz obtained for both formulations after a single oral dose of 600 mg. This data provides information in support of the research article “Sex-by-formulation interaction assessed through a bioequivalence study of efavirenz tablets” [1]. PMID:27054190

  15. Complete dataset for 2-treatment, 2-sequence, 2-period efavirenz bioequivalence study conducted with nightly dosing.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Manuel; Magallanes, Laura; Lorier, Marianela; Vázquez, Marta; Fagiolino, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    The efavirenz pharmacokinetic raw data presented in this article was obtained in an average bioequivalence study between a local brand and Stocrin (Merck Sharp & Dohme, purchased from Australia, batch H009175, expiration date November 2013). Dose was administered at night (9:00 p.m.) two hours after food intake. Fourteen healthy subjects, 8 women and 6 men, completed the study. For each subject, 15 data points until 96 h post-administration are included. Subject demographic characteristics and sequences of administration are provided along with individual pharmacokinetic profiles of efavirenz obtained for both formulations after a single oral dose of 600 mg. This data provides information in support of the research article "Sex-by-formulation interaction assessed through a bioequivalence study of efavirenz tablets" [1].

  16. Vacation Study Abroad, 1994/95. The Complete Guide to Summer and Short-Term Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sara J., Ed.

    This book describes over 2,100 academic programs sponsored by U.S. and foreign universities, language schools, and a wide variety of other organizations for summer and short-term study abroad programs. Entries are based on a 1993 survey. While most programs listed are available to undergraduates, many programs are also open to precollege students,…

  17. Vacation Study Abroad. 1990. The Most Complete Guide to Planning Summer Study Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, E. Marguerite, Ed.

    The book presents concise descriptions of over 1,300 summer study programs and short courses (geared to all levels of postsecondary education) worldwide sponsored by U.S. colleges and universities, foreign universities and language schools, and nonprofit and proprietary educational organizations. Programs are arranged first by the geographical…

  18. Postoperative alar base symmetry in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate:A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vyloppilli, Suresh; Krishnakumar, K S; Sayd, Shermil; Latheef, Sameer; Narayanan, Saju V; Pati, Ajit

    2017-06-09

    In the evolution of cleft lip repair, there have been continuous attempts to minimize local trauma and to improve lip and nasal appearances. In order to obtain an aesthetically balanced development of midface, the primary surgical correction of the nasolabial area is of paramount importance. In this study, the importance of a back-cut extending cephalically above the inferior turbinate at the mucocutaneous junction which elevates the nostril floor on the cleft side for the purpose of achieving symmetry of the alar bases are analyzed by pre and postoperative photographic anthropometry. This study comprised of fifty cases of the unilateral complete cleft lip. At the time of surgery, the patient age ranged from 3-9 months. The surgeries, performed by a single surgeon, employed the standard Millard technique, incorporating Mohler modifications of lip repair. Anthropometric analysis revealed that the preoperative mean difference between the normal side and the cleft side was 0.2056 with a standard deviation of 0.133. In the postoperative analysis, the mean difference was reduced to 0.0174 with a standard deviation of 0.141. The paired t-test showed that the p-value is <0.001, indicating high statistical significance. To conclude, in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, the geometrically placed nasal back-cut incision has a definite role in the correction of the alar base symmetry during primary surgery. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Tajima, Fumihiro; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Hosomi, Koichi; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-06-15

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury.

  20. Numerical analysis of kinematic soil—pile interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele; Mylonakis, George

    2008-07-01

    In the present study, the response of singles pile to kinematic seismic loading is investigated using the computer program SAP2000@. The objectives of the study are: (1) to develop a numerical model that can realistically simulate kinematic soil-structure interaction for piles accounting for discontinuity conditions at the pile-soil interface, energy dissipation and wave propagation; (2) to use the model for evaluating kinematic interaction effects on pile response as function of input ground motion; and (3) to present a case study in which theoretical predictions are compared with results obtained from other formulations. To evaluate the effects of kinematic loading, the responses of both the free-field soil (with no piles) and the pile were compared. Time history and static pushover analyses were conducted to estimate the displacement and kinematic pile bending under seismic loadings.

  1. Catalog of Completed Studies, US Army Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-10

    Environment Substudy: AD A139001 Effects of Chemical Protective Clothing on the Performance of Basic Medical Tasks (HCSD Report #83-001) 8 DATE TITLE...Contact urticaria to parabens , Arch. Dermatol, 1979, 115:1231-1232. *13 Smith, E. B., Padilla, R. S., McCabe, J. M., Becker, L. E., Benzoyl...Chemical Environment . --3-Report #83-001. Ft. Sam Houston, TX: Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity, December 1982. 19 Penetar, D. M

  2. Kinematics of Strong Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K.; Nguyen, G.; Sulsky, D.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides a detailed view of the Arctic ice cover. When processed with the RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS), it provides estimates of sea ice motion and deformation over large regions of the Arctic for extended periods of time. The deformation is dominated by the appearance of linear kinematic features that have been associated with the presence of leads. The RGPS deformation products are based on the assumption that the displacement and velocity are smooth functions of the spatial coordinates. However, if the dominant deformation of multiyear ice results from the opening, closing and shearing of leads, then the displacement and velocity can be discontinuous. This presentation discusses the kinematics associated with strong discontinuities that describe possible jumps in displacement or velocity. Ice motion from SAR data are analyzed using this framework. It is assumed that RGPS cells deform due to the presence of a lead. The lead orientation is calculated to optimally account for the observed deformation. It is shown that almost all observed deformation can be represented by lead opening and shearing. The procedure used to reprocess motion data to account for leads will be described and applied to regions of the Beaufort Sea. The procedure not only provides a new view of ice deformation, it can be used to obtain information about the presence of leads for initialization and/or validation of numerical simulations.

  3. Predictors of study completion and withdrawal in a randomized clinical trial of a pediatric diabetes adherence intervention.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Kimberly A; Killian, Michael; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Silverstein, Janet H; Deeb, Larry C

    2009-05-01

    Loss of participants in randomized clinical trials threatens the validity of study findings. The purpose of this study was to determine pre-randomization predictors of study completion status throughout the course of a randomized clinical trial involving young children with type 1 diabetes and their primary caregivers. An intervention to improve adherence to the diabetes treatment regimen was delivered as part of the child's regular 3-month diabetes clinic visit. The study protocol involved 7 clinic visits across 18 months for the Immediate Treatment group and 9 clinic visits across 24 months for the Delayed Treatment group. Among those who completed the study and regardless of treatment group, participants were categorized into two groups: On-Time Completers (n=41) and Late Completers (n=39). Demographic, disease, and psychosocial characteristics of children and their primary caregivers measured prior to study randomization were tested for their association with the participants' completion status (i.e., On-Time Completers, Late Completers, or Withdrawals). Of the 108 participants, 28 (25.9%) withdrew and 80 (74.1%) completed the study. On-Time Completers (i.e., study completed within 4 months of expected date) were more likely to have private insurance and primary caregivers with some college education. Late Completers (i.e., study completion took longer than 4 months) were more likely to be boys and to have primary caregivers who reported mild to moderate levels of depression. Children who subsequently withdrew from the study reported poorer diabetes-related quality of life and poorer school-related quality of life at study inception and were more likely to have primary caregivers who did not work outside the home. Pre-randomization screening of participants on both demographic and psychological variables may help identify those at greatest risk for study withdrawal or poor study protocol adherence, permitting the investigators to develop retention strategies

  4. Kinematics and Control of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paden, Bradley Evan

    This dissertation focuses on the kinematics and control of robot manipulators. The contribution to kinematics is a fundamental theorem on the design of manipulators with six revolute joints. The theorem states, roughly speaking, that manipulators which have six revolute joints and are modeled after the human arm are optimal and essentially unique. In developing the mathematical framework to prove this theorem, we define precisely the notions of length of a manipulator, well-connected-workspace, and work-volume. We contribute to control a set of analysis techniques for the design of variable structure (sliding mode) controllers for manipulators. The organization of the dissertation is the following. After introductory remarks in chapter one, the group of proper rigid motions, G, is introduced in chapter two. The tangent bundle of G is introduced and it is shown that the velocity of a rigid body can be represented by an element in the Lie algebra of G (commonly called a twist). Further, rigid motions which are exponentials of twists are used to describe four commonly occurring subproblems in robot kinematics. In chapter three, the exponentials of twists are used to write the forward kinematic map of robot manipulators and the subproblems of chapter two are used to solve the Stanford manipulator and an elbow manipulator. Chapter four focuses on manipulator singularities. Twist coordinates are used to find critical points of the forward kinematic map. The contribution to kinematics is contained in chapter five where a mathematical framework for studying the relationship between the design of 6R manipulators and their performance is developed. Chapter seven contains the contribution to control. The work of A. F. Filippov on differential equations with discontinuous right-hand-side and the work of F. H. Clarke on generalized gradients are combined to obtain a calculus for analyzing nonsmooth gradient systems. The techniques developed are applied to design a simple

  5. Complete method to obtain, culture, and transfer mouse blastocysts nonsurgically to study implantation and development.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Moya, Juan Manuel; Ramírez, Leslie; Vilella, Felipe; Martínez, Sebastián; Quiñonero, Alicia; Noguera, Inmaculada; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    To illustrate an efficient, complete, step-by-step protocol for studying implantation in mice. Video presentation of an animal model for research in reproductive biology. Mouse (Mus musculus). A nonsurgical embryo transfer system very similar to that used for human embryo transfer. The protocols with recipient and donor mice are performed in parallel in the same week. For the donor mice: the first step is ovarian stimulation, followed by ovulation induction and mating; finally, the mice are sacrificed, and the embryos are collected and cultured. For recipient mice: first estrous synchrony is induced, followed by mating with a vasectomized male, visualization of the vaginal plug, and nonsurgical transfer of the embryos. Finally (optionally), the implantation sites can be visualized on day 7.5 of development. (All animal experiments were performed with the approval of the institutional review board.) Implantation is an essential step in human reproduction although, because of technical and ethics considerations, still relatively little is known about human implantation and early development. Conversely, mouse models are well established and can be used for preliminary experiments. However, there are various bottlenecks in the procedure for obtaining and transferring murine embryos, which makes experimentation with this model more difficult. These difficulties include pseudopregnancy, ovarian hyperstimulation, and embryo collection, culture, and transfer. We have proposed a complete, efficient method for obtaining, culturing, and transferring mouse blastocysts that can be easily applied in research. Potential applications include testing new media components that do not affect preimplantation but do affect implantation and early development. The embryo transfer method proposed here has been demonstrated to achieve embryo implantation easier and faster than, and in approximately similar rates as other traditional surgery methods. This workflow is the first set of

  6. Galactic warp kinematics: model vs. observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, H.; Figueras, F.; Aguilar, L.; Mateu, C.; Romero-Gómez, M.; López-Corredoira, M.; Garzón, F.

    2015-05-01

    We test the capability of several methods to identify and characterise the warping of the stellar disc of our Galaxy in the Gaia era. We have developed a first kinematic model for the galactic warp and derived the analytical expressions for the force field of a warped Miyamoto- Nagai potential. We have generated realistic mock catalogues of OB, A and red clump stars within the warped galactic disc, where a very complete model of Gaia observables and their expected errors are included. We use the family of Great Circle Cell Counts (GC3) methods and LonKin methods for detecting and characterising the galactic warp. As a complementary work, we look into one of the existing proper motion catalogue namely the UCAC4, and look for the kinematic signature of the warp. We demonstrate the necessity of correcting for a possible residual rotation of the Hipparcos celestial reference frame with respect to the extra galactic inertial one.

  7. Complete decongestive physiotherapy with and without pneumatic compression for treatment of lipedema: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Szolnoky, G; Borsos, B; Bársony, K; Balogh, M; Kemény, L

    2008-03-01

    Lipedema is a disproportional obesity for which evidence-based treatment is not currently available. We studied whether complete decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) alone or combined with intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) could improve the treatment outcome in women with lipedema using a prospective, randomized trial. Eleven patients received CDP (60 min) and thirteen CDP (30 min) plus IPC (30 min) once daily in a 5-day-course. Subsequent to drainage, all subjects received multilayered compression bandaging, physical exercise and skin care. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by limb volume reduction. Both groups achieved significant reductions in mean lower extremity volume (p < 0.05). The addition of IPC is safe, although it provides no synergistic benefit to CDP in leg volume reduction under these study conditions.

  8. Asymptotic study of a complete magnetic attitude control cycle providing a single-axis orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.

    2012-08-01

    The angular motion of an axisymmetrical satellite equipped with the active magnetic attitude control system is examined. Attitude control system has to ensure necessary orientation of the axis of symmetry in the inertial space. It implements the following strategy: coarse reorientation of the axis of symmetry with nutation damping or "-Bdot" without initial detumbling; spinning-up about the axis of symmetry to achieve the property of a gyro; fine reorientation of the axis in the inertial space. Dynamics of the satellite is analytically studied using averaging technique on the complete control loop consisting of five algorithms. Solutions of the equations of motion are obtained in terms of quadratures for most cases or even in closed-form. The latter allowed to study the dependence of motion parameters including time-response with respect to the orbit inclination and other parameters for all algorithms.

  9. A pilot study of RN-BSN completion students' preferred instructor online classroom caring behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mann, Judith C

    2014-01-01

    Definitions of caring include the global concept of showing concern and empathy of others. This may be especially true in the online classroom in the absence of face to face interactions. This quantitative study focused on RN-BSN completion students' preferred online instructor caring behaviors. Online RN-BSN students (N = 100) were invited to participate in the study. The research question was: What are historically black colleges universities nursing students' preferred instructor caring behaviors in the online classroom? All of the respondents (N = 48) agreed that an instructor can create a caring online learning environment, while the vast majority agreed that the presence of a caring environment influenced their success in the course. As ranked by the respondents the three most important items in creating a caring online learning environment were instructors': 1) attention to detail in organization and clarity, 2) prompt and detailed feedback to assignments, and 3) prompt response to students' questions.

  10. A complete database of international chess players and chess performance ratings for varied longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Howard, Robert W

    2006-11-01

    Chess is an oft-used study domain in psychology and artificial intelligence because it is well defined, its performance rating systems allow ea sy identification o f experts and their development, andchess playing is a complex intellectual task However, usable computerized chess data have been very limited. The present article has two aims. The first is to highlight the methodological value of chess data and how researchers can use them to address questions in quite different areas. The second is to present a computerized database of all international chess players and official performance ratings beginning from the inaugural 1970 international rating list. The database has millions of records and gives complete longitudinal official performance data for over 60,000 players from 1970 to the present. Like a time series of population censuses, these data can be used for many different research and teaching purposes. Three quite different studies, conducted by the author using the database, are described.

  11. Pain and risk of completed suicide in Japanese men: a population-based cohort study in Japan (Ohsaki Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Nobutaka; Ohmori-Matsuda, Kaori; Shimazu, Taichi; Sone, Toshimasa; Kakizaki, Masako; Nakaya, Naoki; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2009-03-01

    Unrelieved pain is a major factor that influences suicide risk among terminally ill patients, but little is known about the relationship between pain and the risk of completed suicide in the general population. We prospectively examined the association between self-reports of pain and subsequent risk of completed suicide in 26,481 men aged 40 to 79 years from the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort study, a population-based, prospective cohort study initiated in 1994. On the basis of a five-item questionnaire on pain, individuals were classified as having no pain, very mild pain, mild pain, or moderate or severe pain. Completed suicide cases were documented from 1995 to 2001. During 131,027 person-years, 64 completed suicides were documented. After adjustment for covariates, the risk for completed suicide was significantly higher in the subjects with more pain. Multivariate hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) relative to the subjects who had no pain were 1.36 (0.67-2.75), 2.11 (1.02-4.33), and 2.93 (1.34-6.42) in the subjects who had very mild pain, mild pain, and moderate or severe pain, respectively (P for trend=0.004). Stratified analysis showed that the positive association between pain and suicide risk was robust in the subjects with good health, low stress, adequate sleep, good physical activity, and no history of chronic diseases. Our results suggest that pain is associated with an increased risk of completed suicide among Japanese men. The association was consistently observed among apparently healthy subjects.

  12. A 2-Year Psychological Autopsy Study of Completed Suicides in the Athens Greater Area, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Christos; Koutsaftis, Filippos; Lykouras, Lefteris; Douzenis, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of a sample of suicide victims from the Athens Greater Area using the psychological autopsy method for the first time in Greece. Methods We studied all recorded cases of completed suicide for the 2-year time period November 2007-October 2009 collecting data from the victims' forensic records as well as from the completion of a psychological autopsy questionnaire. Results 335 persons were recorded as suicide victims. We contacted relatives of 256 victims interviewing those of 248 of them (96.9%). The differences regarding sex, marital and employment status between our sample and the general population were statistically significant (p<0.001). The male/female ratio was 3:1. Comparatively more victims were divorced, separated or single and a greater proportion were pensioners or unemployed. 26.0% of the victims had history of prior attempts (64.4% once, 20.3% twice and 15.3% more times). 42.6% were taking psychiatric medication-significantly more women than men according to blood tests; 14.2% had been hospitalized in a psychiatric clinic the year prior to their death. 84.8% have deceased at the place of suicide and 15.2% died in the hospital; 80.3% died indoors and 19.7% outdoors. Men died primarily by hanging or shooting by a firearm while women preferred jumping from height instead (p<0.001). As many as 48.8% had expressed their intention to die to their relatives; 26.6% left a suicide note. Conclusion Our study has shown that the psychological autopsy method is applicable and widely accepted yielding results comparable to the international literature. Specific parameters associated with suicide have been studied for the first time in Greece. PMID:25866522

  13. A 2-year psychological autopsy study of completed suicides in the athens greater area, Greece.

    PubMed

    Paraschakis, Antonios; Michopoulos, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Christos; Koutsaftis, Filippos; Lykouras, Lefteris; Douzenis, Athanassios

    2015-04-01

    To study the characteristics of a sample of suicide victims from the Athens Greater Area using the psychological autopsy method for the first time in Greece. We studied all recorded cases of completed suicide for the 2-year time period November 2007-October 2009 collecting data from the victims' forensic records as well as from the completion of a psychological autopsy questionnaire. 335 persons were recorded as suicide victims. We contacted relatives of 256 victims interviewing those of 248 of them (96.9%). The differences regarding sex, marital and employment status between our sample and the general population were statistically significant (p<0.001). The male/female ratio was 3:1. Comparatively more victims were divorced, separated or single and a greater proportion were pensioners or unemployed. 26.0% of the victims had history of prior attempts (64.4% once, 20.3% twice and 15.3% more times). 42.6% were taking psychiatric medication-significantly more women than men according to blood tests; 14.2% had been hospitalized in a psychiatric clinic the year prior to their death. 84.8% have deceased at the place of suicide and 15.2% died in the hospital; 80.3% died indoors and 19.7% outdoors. Men died primarily by hanging or shooting by a firearm while women preferred jumping from height instead (p<0.001). As many as 48.8% had expressed their intention to die to their relatives; 26.6% left a suicide note. Our study has shown that the psychological autopsy method is applicable and widely accepted yielding results comparable to the international literature. Specific parameters associated with suicide have been studied for the first time in Greece.

  14. The evolution of human influenza A viruses from 1999 to 2006: A complete genome study

    PubMed Central

    Bragstad, Karoline; Nielsen, Lars P; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the complete genome constellation of seasonal influenza A viruses from different countries is valuable for monitoring and understanding of the evolution and migration of strains. Few complete genome sequences of influenza A viruses from Europe are publicly available at the present time and there have been few longitudinal genome studies of human influenza A viruses. We have studied the evolution of circulating human H3N2, H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A viruses from 1999 to 2006, we analysed 234 Danish human influenza A viruses and characterised 24 complete genomes. Results H3N2 was the prevalent strain in Denmark during the study period, but H1N1 dominated the 2000–2001 season. H1N2 viruses were first observed in Denmark in 2002–2003. After years of little genetic change in the H1N1 viruses the 2005–2006 season presented H1N1 of greater variability than before. This indicates that H1N1 viruses are evolving and that H1N1 soon is likely to be the prevalent strain again. Generally, the influenza A haemagglutinin (HA) of H3N2 viruses formed seasonal phylogenetic clusters. Different lineages co-circulating within the same season were also observed. The evolution has been stochastic, influenced by small "jumps" in genetic distance rather than constant drift, especially with the introduction of the Fujian-like viruses in 2002–2003. Also evolutionary stasis-periods were observed which might indicate well fit viruses. The evolution of H3N2 viruses have also been influenced by gene reassortments between lineages from different seasons. None of the influenza genes were influenced by strong positive selection pressure. The antigenic site B in H3N2 HA was the preferred site for genetic change during the study period probably because the site A has been masked by glycosylations. Substitutions at CTL-epitopes in the genes coding for the neuraminidase (NA), polymerase acidic protein (PA), matrix protein 1 (M1), non-structural protein 1 (NS1) and

  15. Glucose metabolism in completed suicide: a forensic-pathological pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, Jonas; Keltanen, Terhi; Liberg, Benny; Sajantila, Antti; Masterman, Thomas; Lindroos, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    Aim To determine whether antemortem blood levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose predict completed suicide and, by extension, whether markers of glucose metabolism might be associated with a prosuicidal trait or state. Method From consecutively performed autopsies, samples of blood and vitreous humor from 17 suicide victims and 27 non-suicide controls were compared with regard to levels of glucose, lactate, and HbA1c. Results Mean HbA1c was higher and mean estimated blood glucose was lower among suicide victims, although tests revealed no significant differences (P = 0.171 and P = 0.395, respectively). HbA1c levels exceeding 48.0 mmol/mol, which were indicative of persistent hyperglycemia, were twice as common in suicide victims (59% vs 30%; P = 0.068). Conclusion The finding of this pilot study suggest that deranged glucose metabolism may reflect biological events antecedent to, or concomitant with, completed suicide, with the following clinical implications: recurring hyperglycemia due to defective glucose transport, which may give rise to depression and suicidal ideation, and elevated HbA1c levels, which may represent an assayable correlate to neurobiological conditions predisposing to suicide. PMID:28252873

  16. Retrospective study of 100 autotransplanted teeth with complete root formation and subsequent orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kokai, Satoshi; Kanno, Zuisei; Koike, Sarina; Uesugi, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Yuzo; Ono, Takashi; Soma, Kunimichi

    2015-12-01

    Autotransplantation has become a major therapeutic option for replacing missing teeth in adult orthodontic patients. However, little systematic information is available about the long-term stability of autotransplanted teeth with complete root formation after the application of an orthodontic force. The objective of this study was to investigate the outcomes of autotransplanted teeth with complete root formation that underwent orthodontic treatment. One hundred teeth, autotransplanted in 89 patients, were examined over a mean observation period of 5.8 years. Orthodontic force was applied with nickel-titanium wires 4 to 8 weeks after autotransplantation. Root resorption, ankylosis, mobility, pocket depth, and inflammation at the recipient site were investigated clinically and with radiographs. The survival rate of the autotransplanted teeth was 93.0%. Abnormal findings were found in 29 teeth, including 7 lost teeth, for a success rate of 71.0%. Donor tooth type and occlusal condition of the donor tooth before transplantation were associated with abnormal findings. The early application of orthodontic force may increase the success rate of autotransplanted teeth, and the type and presurgical occlusal condition of donor teeth affect the success rate. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Restraints and occupant kinematics in vehicular rollovers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Steven E; Herbst, Brian; Forrest, Stephen; Syson, Stephen R; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2002-01-01

    Occupant kinematics and the potential for injury in vehicular rollover crashes are dramatically affected by various restraint system characteristics. This study reviews previous research that utilized various methodologies and test fixtures to evaluate restrained occupant motions, primarily in the vertical direction, during both inverted and quasi-static simulated rollover environments. Additional laboratory tests were conducted in order to understand the static and dynamic excursion of restrained humans and surrogates in typical production motor vehicles under inverted circumstances. These tests indicated that volunteer occupants restrained within a complete vehicle by typical production 3 point seat belts will move vertically towards the vehicle roof structure by approximately 50-150 mm in production vehicles, depending on occupant size and belt configuration, when inverted and subjected to a static 1 g acceleration. Dynamic inverted vehicle drop testing in 3-point belt production vehicles, resulting in 4 to 11 g impacts, resulted in surrogates moving only about an additional 23 to 55 mm beyond the static inverted 1 g excursions.

  18. Effects of the rider on the kinematics of the equine spine under the saddle during the trot using inertial measurement units: Methodological study and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Cheze, L; Pourcelot, P; Desquilbet, L; Duray, L; Chateau, H

    2017-03-01

    Many factors associated with the saddle and the rider could produce pain in horses thus reducing performance. However, studies of horse-saddle-rider interactions are limited and determining their effects remains challenging. The aim of this study was to test a novel method for assessing equine thoracic and lumbar spinal movement under the saddle and collect data during trotting. Back movement was measured using inertial measurement units (n = 5) fixed at the levels of thoracic vertebrae T6, T12 and T16, and lumbar vertebrae L2 and L5. To compare unridden and ridden conditions, three horses were trotted in hand then at the rising trot (seated phase: left diagonal, rider seated; standing phase: right diagonal, rider standing). The protraction-retraction angles of the forelimbs and the hind limbs were also calculated in two dimensions (2D) using reflective markers. To compare conditions, linear mixed-effects regression models were used and estimated means (standard error) were calculated. The range of motion (ROM) of the caudal thoracic and thoracolumbar regions decreased respectively by -1.3 (0.4)° and -0.6 (0.2)° during the seated phase compared to the unridden condition. Concomitantly, the ROM of protraction and retraction angles increased in the ridden condition. This study demonstrated the ability of inertial measurement units to assess equine vertebral movements under the saddle. The rider, at the rising trot, affected the horse's global locomotion with measurable changes in the vertebral kinematics under the saddle.

  19. Engineered nanomaterial risk. Lessons learnt from completed nanotoxicology studies: potential solutions to current and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Helinor; Pojana, Giulio; Zuin, Stefano; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; McGuiness, Catherine; Balharry, Dominique; Marcomini, Antonio; Wallin, Håkan; Kreyling, Wolfgang; Donaldson, Ken; Tran, Lang; Stone, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    PARTICLE_RISK was one of the first multidisciplinary projects funded by the European Commission's Framework Programme that was responsible for evaluating the implications of nanomaterial (NM) exposure on human health. This project was the basis for this review which identifies the challenges that exist within the assessment of NM risk. We have retrospectively reflected on the findings of completed nanotoxicology studies to consider what progress and advances have been made within the risk assessment of NMs, as well as discussing the direction that nanotoxicology research is taking and identifying the limitations and failings of existing research. We have reflected on what commonly encountered challenges exist and explored how these issues may be resolved. In particular, the following is discussed (i) NM selection (ii) NM physico-chemical characterisation; (iii) NM dispersion; (iv) selection of relevant doses and concentrations; (v) identification of relevant models, target sites and endpoints; (vi) development of alternatives to animal testing; and (vii) NM risk assessment. These knowledge gaps are relatively well recognised by the scientific community and recommendations as to how they may be overcome in the future are provided. It is hoped that this will help develop better defined hypothesis driven research in the future that will enable comprehensive risk assessments to be conducted for NMs. Importantly, the nanotoxicology community has responded and adapted to advances in knowledge over recent years to improve the approaches used to assess NM hazard, exposure and risk. It is vital to learn from existing information provided by ongoing or completed studies to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort, and to offer guidance on aspects of the experimental design that should be carefully considered prior to the start of a new study.

  20. In vivo six-degree-of-freedom knee-joint kinematics in overground and treadmill walking following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Schache, Anthony G; Feller, Julian; de Steiger, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2017-08-01

    No data are available to describe six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) knee-joint kinematics for one complete cycle of overground walking following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aims of this study were firstly, to measure 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics and condylar motion for overground walking following TKA; and secondly, to determine whether such data differed between overground and treadmill gait when participants walked at the same speed during both tasks. A unique mobile biplane X-ray imaging system enabled accurate measurement of 6-DOF TKA knee kinematics during overground walking by simultaneously tracking and imaging the joint. The largest rotations occurred for flexion-extension and internal-external rotation whereas the largest translations were associated with joint distraction and anterior-posterior drawer. Strong associations were found between flexion-extension and adduction-abduction (R(2)  = 0.92), joint distraction (R(2)  = 1.00), and anterior-posterior translation (R(2)  = 0.77), providing evidence of kinematic coupling in the TKA knee. Although the measured kinematic profiles for overground walking were grossly similar to those for treadmill walking, several statistically significant differences were observed between the two conditions with respect to temporo-spatial parameters, 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics, and condylar contact locations and sliding. Thus, caution is advised when making recommendations regarding knee implant performance based on treadmill-measured knee-joint kinematic data. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1634-1643, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Complete decongestive physiotherapy and the Lerner Lymphedema Services Academy of Lymphatic Studies (the Lerner School).

    PubMed

    Lerner, R

    1998-12-15

    Lymphedema is more common than most physicians realize. It is also an incurable, life long condition that has never been treated effectively in the past in our country. The author describes complete decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) and his contribution to making it available all across the United States. This was done by establishing a network of outpatient CDP clinics where patients can be treated effectively and a training school, the Lerner Lymphedema Services Academy of Lymphatic Studies (the Lerner School), where physicians and therapists can be trained in all facets of the lymphedema problem and where the CDP method with all of its components is taught. The superiority of CDP to pneumatic pumps and to surgical procedures used to treat lymphedema is discussed. A description of the Lerner School's philosophy and curriculum is included.

  2. Responsible reporting of health research studies: transparent, complete, accurate and timely

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Douglas G.; Simera, Iveta

    2010-01-01

    Complete, accurate and transparent reporting is an integral part of responsible research conduct. However, many studies have shown that health research publications frequently lack crucial information. Reporting guidelines like the CONSORT Statement help to improve the quality of research reports. Unfortunately, their uptake by journals and authors is still limited and does not maximize their potential. The EQUATOR Network, a new international initiative, leads the effort to promote transparent reporting of research and the use of reporting guidelines. It provides online resources and training relating to the reporting of health research, and assists in the development, dissemination and implementation of reporting guidelines (www.equator-network.org). Poor reporting practices can be decreased only through close collaboration of all parties involved in research and its publication; EQUATOR can facilitate the process. PMID:19900949

  3. XMM-Subaru:Complete High Precision Study of Galaxy Clusters for Modern Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2011-10-01

    We request 382 ks data for 12 clusters to complete our survey of a volume-limited sample of 55 clusters. We investigated the existing data, which hints a mass dependent bias in the X-ray to weak lensing mass ratios for disturbed ones. X-ray mass proxies, e.g., Yx, show low scatter, but the best fits, particularly the slopes, of the mass-observable relations may be biased due to this mass dependence. Our program will quantify any mass/radial dependent bias based on three independent probes (X-ray/lensing/velocity dispersion) for such a volume-limited sample, and deliver definitive constraints on systematics for upcoming cluster cosmology surveys. The dataset will be a major asset for programs aiming to measure dark energy and programs adding a multi-wavelength focus to studies of cluster physics.

  4. Completeness and accuracy of crash outcome data in a cohort of cyclists: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2013-05-01

    Bicycling, despite its health and other benefits, raises safety concerns for many people. However, reliable information on bicycle crash injury is scarce as current statistics rely on a single official database of limited quality. This paper evaluated the completeness and accuracy of crash data collected from multiple sources in a prospective cohort study involving cyclists. The study recruited 2438 adult cyclists from New Zealand's largest mass cycling event in November 2006 and another 190 in 2008, and obtained data regarding bicycle crashes that were attended by medical personnel or the police and occurred between the date of recruitment and 30 June 2011, through linkage to insurance claims, hospital discharges, mortality records and police reports. The quality of the linked data was assessed by capture-recapture methods and by comparison with self-reported injury data collected in a follow-up survey. Of the 2590 cyclists who were resident in New Zealand at recruitment, 855 experienced 1336 crashes, of which 755 occurred on public roads and 120 involved a collision with a motor vehicle, during a median follow-up of 4.6 years. Log-linear models estimated that the linked data were 73.7% (95% CI: 68.0%-78.7%) complete with negligible differences between on- and off-road crashes. The data were 83.3% (95% CI: 78.9%-87.6%) complete for collisions. Agreement with the self-reported data was moderate (kappa: 0.55) and varied by personal factors, cycling exposure and confidence in recalling crash events. If self-reports were considered as the gold standard, the linked data had 63.1% sensitivity and 93.5% specificity for all crashes and 40.0% sensitivity and 99.9% specificity for collisions. Routinely collected databases substantially underestimate the frequency of bicycle crashes. Self-reported crash data are also incomplete and inconsistent. It is necessary to improve the quality of individual data sources as well as record linkage techniques so that all available data

  5. Completeness and accuracy of crash outcome data in a cohort of cyclists: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bicycling, despite its health and other benefits, raises safety concerns for many people. However, reliable information on bicycle crash injury is scarce as current statistics rely on a single official database of limited quality. This paper evaluated the completeness and accuracy of crash data collected from multiple sources in a prospective cohort study involving cyclists. Methods The study recruited 2438 adult cyclists from New Zealand’s largest mass cycling event in November 2006 and another 190 in 2008, and obtained data regarding bicycle crashes that were attended by medical personnel or the police and occurred between the date of recruitment and 30 June 2011, through linkage to insurance claims, hospital discharges, mortality records and police reports. The quality of the linked data was assessed by capture-recapture methods and by comparison with self-reported injury data collected in a follow-up survey. Results Of the 2590 cyclists who were resident in New Zealand at recruitment, 855 experienced 1336 crashes, of which 755 occurred on public roads and 120 involved a collision with a motor vehicle, during a median follow-up of 4.6 years. Log-linear models estimated that the linked data were 73.7% (95% CI: 68.0%-78.7%) complete with negligible differences between on- and off-road crashes. The data were 83.3% (95% CI: 78.9%-87.6%) complete for collisions. Agreement with the self-reported data was moderate (kappa: 0.55) and varied by personal factors, cycling exposure and confidence in recalling crash events. If self-reports were considered as the gold standard, the linked data had 63.1% sensitivity and 93.5% specificity for all crashes and 40.0% sensitivity and 99.9% specificity for collisions. Conclusions Routinely collected databases substantially underestimate the frequency of bicycle crashes. Self-reported crash data are also incomplete and inconsistent. It is necessary to improve the quality of individual data sources as well as record

  6. An Integrated Study of the Kinematics and Evolution of Fault Systems in the Hellenic Margin, Crete, Greece: Insight into Forearc Development above a Retreating Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, S. F.; Wegmann, K. W.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Accommodating ~ 36 mm/yr of convergence between the African and Eurasian tectonic plates the Hellenic Subduction zone is the largest, fastest and most seismically active subduction zone in the Mediterranean. Long-lived Cenozoic subduction of the African slab has resulted in the construction of a large south-facing subduction wedge. Rollback of the African slab likely initiated sometime in the Eocene and continues today. This geodynamic setting has given rise to a forearc characterized by a series of dramatic 2-4 km high topographic escarpments south of the Island of Crete; one of the few subaerial forearc highs along the Hellenic margin. It is generally agreed that these escarpments represent the surface expression of large intra-crust faults, yet the kinematics of faulting remains contentious in contemporary scientific literature. Different geologic and geophysical datasets have been used to argue that these structures accommodate either shortening due to continued plate convergence or extension driven by processes related to slab rollback. Resolving the debate over the kinematics of the large-scale structures embedded in the Hellenic forearc is paramount to our understanding of seismic hazards, the development of forearc basins, and the geodynamic processes operating in this region. We present results from a study of the tectonic geomorphology and structural geology of the south-central coastline of Crete that constrain the kinematics and evolution of one of the aforementioned fault systems that is related to the construction of a large forearc basin known as the Ptolemy trough. Field surveys and geochronology of marine terraces reveal the pattern of late Quaternary uplift along the south-central coastline. Two large south-dipping extensional faults, which extend offshore into the Ptolemy trough, are found to offset Pleistocene marine terraces and are inferred to be active with average slip rates of ca. 0.5 mm/yr. The hanging walls and footwalls of these faults

  7. A factorization-based approach for articulated nonrigid shape, motion and kinematic chain recovery from video.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jingyu; Pollefeys, Marc

    2008-05-01

    Recovering articulated shape and motion, especially human body motion, from video is a challenging problem with a wide range of applications in medical study, sport analysis and animation, etc. Previous work on articulated motion recovery generally requires prior knowledge of the kinematic chain and usually does not concern the recovery of the articulated shape. The non-rigidity of some articulated part, e.g. human body motion with nonrigid facial motion, is completely ignored. We propose a factorization-based approach to recover the shape, motion and kinematic chain of an articulated object with nonrigid parts altogether directly from video sequences under a unified framework. The proposed approach is based on our modeling of the articulated non-rigid motion as a set of intersecting motion subspaces. A motion subspace is the linear subspace of the trajectories of an object. It can model a rigid or non-rigid motion. The intersection of two motion subspaces of linked parts models the motion of an articulated joint or axis. Our approach consists of algorithms for motion segmentation, kinematic chain building, and shape recovery. It handles outliers and can be automated. We test our approach through synthetic and real experiments and demonstrate how to recover articulated structure with non-rigid parts via a single-view camera without prior knowledge of its kinematic chain.

  8. In silico phylogenomics using complete genomes: a case study on the evolution of hominoids

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Igor Rodrigues; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Jennings, W. Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of complete genome data is facilitating the acquisition of phylogenomic data sets, but the process of obtaining orthologous sequences from other genomes and assembling multiple sequence alignments remains piecemeal and arduous. We designed software that performs these tasks and outputs anonymous loci (AL) or anchored enrichment/ultraconserved element loci (AE/UCE) data sets in ready-to-analyze formats. We demonstrate our program by applying it to the hominoids. Starting with human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan genomes, our software generated an exhaustive data set of 292 ALs (∼1 kb each) in ∼3 h. Not only did analyses of our AL data set validate the program by yielding a portrait of hominoid evolution in agreement with previous studies, but the accuracy and precision of our estimated ancestral effective population sizes and speciation times represent improvements. We also used our program with a published set of 512 vertebrate-wide AE “probe” sequences to generate data sets consisting of 171 and 242 independent loci (∼1 kb each) in 11 and 13 min, respectively. The former data set consisted of flanking sequences 500 bp from adjacent AEs, while the latter contained sequences bordering AEs. Although our AE data sets produced the expected hominoid species tree, coalescent-based estimates of ancestral population sizes and speciation times based on these data were considerably lower than estimates from our AL data set and previous studies. Accordingly, we suggest that loci subjected to direct or indirect selection may not be appropriate for coalescent-based methods. Complete in silico approaches, combined with the burgeoning genome databases, will accelerate the pace of phylogenomics. PMID:27435933

  9. In silico phylogenomics using complete genomes: a case study on the evolution of hominoids.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor Rodrigues; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Jennings, W Bryan

    2016-09-01

    The increasing availability of complete genome data is facilitating the acquisition of phylogenomic data sets, but the process of obtaining orthologous sequences from other genomes and assembling multiple sequence alignments remains piecemeal and arduous. We designed software that performs these tasks and outputs anonymous loci (AL) or anchored enrichment/ultraconserved element loci (AE/UCE) data sets in ready-to-analyze formats. We demonstrate our program by applying it to the hominoids. Starting with human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan genomes, our software generated an exhaustive data set of 292 ALs (∼1 kb each) in ∼3 h. Not only did analyses of our AL data set validate the program by yielding a portrait of hominoid evolution in agreement with previous studies, but the accuracy and precision of our estimated ancestral effective population sizes and speciation times represent improvements. We also used our program with a published set of 512 vertebrate-wide AE "probe" sequences to generate data sets consisting of 171 and 242 independent loci (∼1 kb each) in 11 and 13 min, respectively. The former data set consisted of flanking sequences 500 bp from adjacent AEs, while the latter contained sequences bordering AEs. Although our AE data sets produced the expected hominoid species tree, coalescent-based estimates of ancestral population sizes and speciation times based on these data were considerably lower than estimates from our AL data set and previous studies. Accordingly, we suggest that loci subjected to direct or indirect selection may not be appropriate for coalescent-based methods. Complete in silico approaches, combined with the burgeoning genome databases, will accelerate the pace of phylogenomics.

  10. Effect of team training on improving MRI study completion rates and no-show rates.

    PubMed

    Norbash, Alexander; Yucel, Kent; Yuh, William; Doros, Gheorghe; Ajam, Amna; Lang, Elvira; Pauker, Stephen; Mayr, Nina

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a high-cost imaging modality, and an optimized encounter ideally provides high-quality care, patient satisfaction, and capacity utilization. Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of team training and its impact on patient show-up and completion rates for their MRI examinations. A total of 97,712 patient visits from three tertiary academic medical centers over 1-year intervals were evaluated, totaling 49,733 visits at baseline and 47,979 after training. Each center's MRI team received team training skill training including advanced communication and team training techniques training. This training included onsite instruction including case simulation with scenarios requiring appropriate behavioral and communicative interventions. Orientation and training also utilized customized online tools and proctoring. The study completion rate and patient show-up rate during consecutive year-long intervals before and after team training were compared to assess its effectiveness. Two-sided chi-square tests for proportions using were applied at a 0.05 significance level. Despite differing no-show rates (5-22.2%) and study incompletion rates (0.7-3.7%) at the three academic centers, the combined patients' data showed significant (P < 0.0001) improvement in the patients' no-show rates (combined decreases from 11.2% to 8.7%) and incompletion rates (combined decreases from 2.3% to 1.4%). Our preliminary results suggest training of the imaging team can improve the no-show and incompletion rates of the MRI service, positively affecting throughput and utilization. Team training can be readily implemented and may help address the needs of the current cost-conscious and consumer-sensitive healthcare environment. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:1040-1047. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. A Theoretical Study of the Build-up of the Sun’s Polar Magnetic Field by using a 3D Kinematic Dynamo Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Gopal; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Miesch, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a three-dimensional kinematic self-sustaining model of the solar dynamo in which the poloidal field generation is from tilted bipolar sunspot pairs placed on the solar surface above regions of strong toroidal field by using the SpotMaker algorithm, and then the transport of this poloidal field to the tachocline is primarily caused by turbulent diffusion. We obtain a dipolar solution within a certain range of parameters. We use this model to study the build-up of the polar magnetic field and show that some insights obtained from surface flux transport models have to be revised. We present results obtained by putting a single bipolar sunspot pair in a hemisphere and two symmetrical sunspot pairs in two hemispheres. We find that the polar fields produced by them disappear due to the upward advection of poloidal flux at low latitudes, which emerges as oppositely signed radial flux and which is then advected poleward by the meridional flow. We also study the effect that a large sunspot pair, violating Hale’s polarity law, would have on the polar field. We find that there would be some effect—especially if the anti-Hale pair appears at high latitudes in the mid-phase of the cycle—though the effect is not very dramatic.

  12. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Snoek, Govert J; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V; Jannink, Michiel J A

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation); however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional explorative study to study these effects. Nine subjects with a CSCI performed two goal-directed arm movements (maximal reach, reach and retrieval) with and without gravity compensation. Angles at elbow and shoulder joints and muscle activation were measured and compared. Seven subjects reduced elbow extension (range 1.8°-4.5°) during the maximal reaching task with gravity compensation. In the reach and retrieval task with gravity compensation, all subjects decreased elbow extension (range 0.1°-11.0°). Eight subjects executed movement closer to the body. Regarding muscle activation, gravity compensation did not influence timing; however, the amplitude of activation decreased, especially in antigravity muscles, namely mean change +/- standard deviation of descending part of trapezius (18.2% +/- 37.5%), anterior part of deltoid (37.7% +/- 16.7%), posterior part of deltoid (32.0% +/- 13.9%), and long head biceps (49.6% +/- 20.0%). Clinical implications for the use of gravity compensation in rehabilitation (during activities of daily living or exercise therapy) should be further investigated with a larger population.

  13. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  14. Kinematics in CTB 80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greidanus, H.; Strom, R. G.

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents data describing the radial kinematics of the core of the complex object CTB 80, believed to be a supernova remnant. The radial velocity of the CTB 80 was found to extend between -130 and 95 km/sec (LSR), with the emission being brightest and most concentrated in filaments around -30 km/sec, and weaker at higher velocities. The character of the position-velocity diagrams was found to be consistent with models of expanding ellipsoidal shells. A comparison with these models indicated a short dimension for the core along the line of sight, and favors a momentum-driven expansion. This type of expansion is indicative of a neutron star excitation for the core of CTB 80, as opposed to a normal supernova shock.

  15. Analytical and semi-analytical inverse kinematics of SSRMS-type manipulators with single joint locked failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenfu; She, Yu; Xu, Yangsheng

    2014-12-01

    Redundant space manipulators, including Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and European Robotic Arm (ERA), have been playing important roles in the construction and maintenance of International Space Station (ISS). They all have 7 revolute joints arranged in similar configurations, and are referred to as SSRMS-type manipulators. When a joint is locked in an arbitrary position due to some failures, a 7R manipulator degrades to a 6R manipulator. Without a spherical wrist or three consecutive parallel joints, the inverse kinematics of the 6R manipulator is very complex. In this paper, we propose effective methods to resolve the inverse kinematics for different cases of any joint locked in an arbitrary position. Firstly, configuration characteristics of the SSRMS-type redundant manipulators are analyzed. Then, an existing of closed-form inverse kinematics is discussed for locking different joints. Secondly, D-H frames and corresponding D-H parameters of the new 6-DOF manipulator formed by locking a joint in an arbitrary position are re-constructed. A unified table is then created to describe the kinematics for all possible cases of single joint locking failure. Thirdly, completely analytical and semi-analytical methods are presented to solve the inverse kinematics equations, and the former is used for locking joint 1, 2, 6 or 7 while the latter for locking joint 3, 4 or 5. Finally, typical cases for single joint locking are studied. The results verify the proposed methods.

  16. KINEMATICS OF STELLAR POPULATIONS IN POSTSTARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hiner, Kyle D.; Canalizo, Gabriela E-mail: khiner@astro-udec.cl

    2015-01-20

    Poststarburst galaxies host a population of early-type stars (A or F) but simultaneously lack indicators of ongoing star formation such as [O II] emission. Two distinct stellar populations have been identified in these systems: a young poststarburst population superimposed on an older host population. We present a study of nine poststarburst galaxies with the following objectives: (1) to investigate whether and how kinematical differences between the young and old populations of stars can be measured, and (2) to gain insight into the formation mechanism of the young population in these systems. We fit high signal-to-noise spectra with two independent populations in distinct spectral regions: the Balmer region, the Mg IB region, and the Ca triplet when available. We show that the kinematics of the two populations largely track one another if measured in the Balmer region with high signal-to-noise data. Results from examining the Faber-Jackson relation and the fundamental plane indicate that these objects are not kinematically disturbed relative to more evolved spheroids. A case study of the internal kinematics of one object in our sample shows it to be pressure supported and not rotationally dominated. Overall our results are consistent with merger-induced starburst scenarios where the young population is observed during the later stages of the merger.

  17. Comparative Study of Hemodynamics Electrolyte and Metabolic Changes During Prone and Complete Supine Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Khoshrang, Hosein; Falahatkar, Siavash; Ilat, Sara; Akbar, Manzar Hossein; Shakiba, Maryam; Farzan, Alireza; Herfeh, Nadia Rastjou; Allahkhah, Aliakbar

    2012-01-01

    Background Nowadays Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is performed in prone and supine positions. Physiologic solutions should be used to irrigate during PCNL. Irrigation can cause hemodynamic, electrolyte and acid-base changes during PCNL. Objectives The current study aimed to compare the electrolyte, hemodynamic and metabolic changes of prone and complete supine PCNL. Patients and Methods It was a randomized clinical trial study on 40 ASA class I and II patients. Twenty of patients underwent prone PCNL (Group A) and the other twenty underwent complete supine PCNL (Group B). The two groups received the same premedication and induction of anesthesia. Blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean) and pulse rate were recorded before, during and after anesthesia and Hb, Hct, BUN, Cr, Na, and K were also measured before and after operation in the two groups. The volume of irrigation fluid, total effluent fluid (the fluid in the bucket and the gazes) and volume of absorbed fluid were measured. Results There were no significant differences in Na, K, BUN, Cr, Hb and Hct between the two groups. Absorption volume was significantly different between the two groups (335 ± 121.28 mL in group A and 159.45 ± 73.81 mL in group B, respectively) (P = 0.0001). The mean anesthesia time was significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.012). There was a significant difference in bleeding volume between supine and prone PCNL (270.4 ± 229.14 in group A and 594.2 ± 290 in group B, respectively) (P = 0.0001). Mean systolic blood pressure during operation and recovery was 120.2 ± 10.9 and 140.7 ± 25.1 in group B, and 113.4 ± 6.4 and 126.2 ± 12.7 in group A, respectively. Systolic blood pressure between the two groups during operation and recovery was significantly different (P = 0.027 and P = 0.022, respectively). Mean diastolic blood pressure in supine group during operation and recovery was 80.53 ± 7.57 and 95.75 ± 17.48, and 73.95 ± 3.94 and 83.4 ± 12.54 in prone

  18. Incomplete polyp resection during colonoscopy-results of the complete adenoma resection (CARE) study.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Heiko; Srivastava, Amitabh; Bensen, Steve P; Anderson, Peter; Rothstein, Richard I; Gordon, Stuart R; Levy, L Campbell; Toor, Arifa; Mackenzie, Todd A; Rosch, Thomas; Robertson, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    Although the adenoma detection rate is used as a measure of colonoscopy quality, there are limited data on the quality of endoscopic resection of detected adenomas. We determined the rate of incompletely resected neoplastic polyps in clinical practice. We performed a prospective study on 1427 patients who underwent colonoscopy at 2 medical centers and had at least 1 nonpedunculated polyp (5-20 mm). After polyp removal was considered complete macroscopically, biopsies were obtained from the resection margin. The main outcome was the percentage of incompletely resected neoplastic polyps (incomplete resection rate [IRR]) determined by the presence of neoplastic tissue in post-polypectomy biopsies. Associations between IRR and polyp size, morphology, histology, and endoscopist were assessed by regression analysis. Of 346 neoplastic polyps (269 patients; 84.0% men; mean age, 63.4 years) removed by 11 gastroenterologists, 10.1% were incompletely resected. IRR increased with polyp size and was significantly higher for large (10-20 mm) than small (5-9 mm) neoplastic polyps (17.3% vs 6.8%; relative risk = 2.1), and for sessile serrated adenomas/polyps than for conventional adenomas (31.0% vs 7.2%; relative risk = 3.7). The IRR for endoscopists with at least 20 polypectomies ranged from 6.5% to 22.7%; there was a 3.4-fold difference between the highest and lowest IRR after adjusting for size and sessile serrated histology. Neoplastic polyps are often incompletely resected, and the rate of incomplete resection varies broadly among endoscopists. Incomplete resection might contribute to the development of colon cancers after colonoscopy (interval cancers). Efforts are needed to ensure complete resection, especially of larger lesions. ClinicalTrials.gov Number: NCT01224444. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Photometric and Kinematic Structure of Face-on Disk Galaxies. III. Kinematic Inclinations from Hα Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained Hα velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i kin = 23° for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20° and 6% at 30°. Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical "face-on" Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15° and 5% at 30°. This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  20. Complete solubilization of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue may improve proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Taylor, Clive R; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2013-04-01

    Tissue-based proteomic approaches (tissue proteomics) are essential for discovering and evaluating biomarkers for personalized medicine. In any proteomics study, the most critical issue is sample extraction and preparation. This problem is especially difficult when recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, improving and standardizing protein extraction from FFPE tissue is a critical need because of the millions of archival FFPE tissues available in tissue banks worldwide. Recent progress in the application of heat-induced antigen retrieval principles for protein extraction from FFPE tissue has resulted in a number of published FFPE tissue proteomics studies. However, there is currently no consensus on the optimal protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue or accepted standards for quantitative evaluation of the extracts. Standardization is critical to ensure the accurate evaluation of FFPE protein extracts by proteomic methods such as reverse phase protein arrays, which is now in clinical use. In our view, complete solubilization of FFPE tissue samples is the best way to achieve the goal of standardizing the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. However, further studies are recommended to develop standardized protein extraction methods to ensure quantitative and qualitative reproducibility in the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues.

  1. Complete Solubilization of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue May Improve Proteomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Taylor, Clive R; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-based proteomic approaches (tissue proteomics) are essential for discovering and evaluating biomarkers for personalized medicine. In any proteomics study, the most critical issue is sample extraction and preparation. This problem is especially difficult when recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, improving and standardizing protein extraction from FFPE tissue is a critical need because of the millions of archival FFPE tissues available in tissue banks worldwide. Recent progress in the application of heat-induced antigen retrieval (AR) principles for protein extraction from FFPE tissue has resulted in a number of published FFPE tissue proteomics studies. However, there is currently no consensus on the optimal protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue or accepted standards for quantitative evaluation of the extracts. Standardization is critical to ensure the accurate evaluation of FFPE protein extracts by proteomic methods such as reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA), which is now in clinical use. In our view, complete solubilization of FFPE tissue samples is the best way to achieve the goal of standardizing the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. However, further studies are recommended to develop standardized protein extraction methods to ensure quantitative and qualitative reproducibility in the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. PMID:23339100

  2. Predictors of treatment acceptance and completion in anorexia nervosa: implications for future study designs.

    PubMed

    Halmi, Katherine A; Agras, W Stewart; Crow, Scott; Mitchell, James; Wilson, G Terence; Bryson, Susan W; Kraemer, Helena C

    2005-07-01

    There have been very few randomized controlled treatment studies of anorexia nervosa. To evaluate factors leading to nonacceptance and noncompletion of treatment for 2 specific therapies and their combination in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Randomized prospective study. Weill-Cornell Medical Center, White Plains, NY; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; and Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. Patients One hundred twenty-two patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for anorexia nervosa. Treatment with cognitive-behavioral therapy, fluoxetine hydrochloride, or their combination for 1 year. Dropout rate and acceptance of treatment (defined as staying in treatment at least 5 weeks). Of the 122 randomized cases, 21 (17%) were withdrawn; the overall dropout rate was 46% (56/122) in the remaining patients. Treatment acceptance occurred in 89 (73%) of the 122 randomized cases. Of the 41 assigned to medication alone, acceptance occurred in 23 (56%). In the other 2 groups, acceptance rate was differentiated by high and low obsessive preoccupation scores (rates of 91% and 60%, respectively). The only predictor of treatment completion was high self-esteem, which was associated with a 51% rate of treatment acceptance. Acceptance of treatment and relatively high dropout rates pose a major problem for research in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Differing characteristics predict dropout rates and acceptance, which need to be carefully studied before comparative treatment trials are conducted.

  3. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  4. Frontal plane knee and hip kinematics during sit-to-stand and proximal lower extremity strength in persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hoglund, Lisa T; Hillstrom, Howard J; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E; Lockard, Margery A; Barbe, Mary F; Song, Jinsup

    2014-02-01

    Increased joint stress and malalignment are etiologic factors in osteoarthritis. Static tibiofemoral frontal plane malalignment is associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA). Patellofemoral joint stress is increased by activities such as sit-to-stand (STS); this stress may be even greater if dynamic frontal plane tibiofemoral malalignment occurs. If hip muscle or quadriceps weakness is present in persons with PFOA, aberrant tibiofemoral frontal plane movement may occur, with increased patellofemoral stress. No studies have investigated frontal plane tibiofemoral and hip kinematics during STS in persons with PFOA or the relationship of hip muscle and quadriceps strength to these motions. Eight PFOA and seven control subjects performed STS from a stool during three-dimensional motion capture. Hip muscle and quadriceps strength were measured as peak isometric force. The PFOA group demonstrated increased peak tibial abduction angles during STS, and decreased hip abductor, hip extensor, and quadriceps peak force versus controls. A moderate inverse relationship between peak tibial abduction angle and peak hip abductor force was present. No difference between groups was found for peak hip adduction angle or peak hip external rotator force. Dynamic tibiofemoral malalignment and proximal lower extremity weakness may cause increased patellofemoral stress and may contribute to PFOA incidence or progression.

  5. Drinking, Drug Use, and Related Consequences Among University Students Completing Study Abroad Experiences: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Aresi, Giovanni; Moore, Simon; Marta, Elena

    2016-12-05

    University students who complete study abroad experiences are potentially exposed to behaviors, in particular alcohol and drug use, that place their health at risk. There is a need to identify risk and protective factors and highlight knowledge gaps. A systematic review adopting the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology. Relevant bibliographic databases and online repositories were systematically searched for both qualitative and quantitative peer-reviewed studies. Eighteen articles were eligible for inclusion. Degree mobility students (DMSs-students pursuing a full bachelor or master degree in a foreign country) and Credit Mobility Students (CMSs-students participating in short term or semester study abroad programmes) show different patterns of at-risk behaviors compared to pre-departure, and to domestic or non-study abroad students. DMSs mostly consumed less alcohol and illicit substances compared to domestic students, but little information on pre-travel behavior and predictors of at-risk behaviors while abroad was available on DMSs. Most studies indicated that CMSs increased their alcohol use while abroad and reduced it when they returned home. However, there is no evidence of an increase in the negative consequences associated with alcohol misuse while abroad. Different pre-departure and abroad factors (e.g., perceptions of peer drinking norms, psychological and sociocultural adjustment abroad) were related to at-risk behaviors in the host country. University students who study abroad are understudied and potentially at risk from alcohol and drug use. Knowledge gaps are discussed in relation to possible future qualitative, mixed methods and longitudinal research.

  6. Hyoid and laryngeal excursion kinematics - magnitude, duration and velocity - changes following successful exercise-based dysphagia rehabilitation: MDTP.

    PubMed

    Sia, I; Carvajal, P; Lacy, A A; Carnaby, G D; Crary, M A

    2015-05-01

    Variability in magnitude of deglutitional hyolaryngeal excursion in patients with dysphagia suggests that it does not adequately represent the kinematics of swallowing difficulties or recovery following rehabilitation. On the other hand, reduced hyolaryngeal excursion velocity has been reported in patients with dysphagia. While increased movement velocity often accompanies clinical and functional recovery in many diseases, velocity changes in swallowing-related movement following dysphagia therapy have not been well studied. This study evaluated changes in hyoid and laryngeal excursion (magnitude, duration and velocity) before and following successful dysphagia therapy to provide a more comprehensive representation of improvement to swallowing kinematics in patients who have experienced successful rehabilitation. A secondary analysis of case series data was completed. Eight patients with severe, chronic dysphagia completed a standard course of an exercise-based dysphagia treatment programme (McNeill dysphagia therapy program, MDTP). Pre- and post-treatment, kinematic aspects of swallowing were evaluated for thin liquid, thick liquid and pudding swallows. Maximum hyoid and laryngeal excursion magnitude and excursion duration were measured. Excursion velocities were calculated from excursion magnitude and duration measures. Successful treatment for dysphagia facilitated increased hyolaryngeal excursion magnitude, duration and velocity. These changes were most prominent for the hyoid and most often observed with thin liquids. By examining hyoid and laryngeal excursion velocity in patients who have experienced successful dysphagia rehabilitation, this study demonstrated the value of evaluating spatial and temporal aspects of swallowing kinematics in a single measure for a more comprehensive representation of positive changes underlying functional recovery.

  7. The kinematics of table tennis racquet: differences between topspin strokes.

    PubMed

    Bańkosz, Ziemowit; Winiarski, Sławomir

    2017-03-01

    Studies of shot kinematics in table tennis have not been sufficiently described in the literature. The assessment of the racquet trajectory, its speed and time characteristics makes it possible to emphasize on certain technical elements in the training process in order, for example, to increase strength, speed of rotation or speed of the shot while maintaining its accuracy. The aim of this work was to measure selected kinematic parameters of table tennis racquet during forehand and backhand topspin shots, while considering the differences between these strokes in table tennis. The measurements took place in a certified biomechanical laboratory using a motion analysis system. The study involved 12 female table tennis players in high-level sports training and performance. Each subject had to complete series of six tasks, presenting different varieties of topspin shots. The longest racquet trajectory was related to forehand shots, shots played against a ball with backspin and winner shots. The maximum racquet velocity was precisely in the moment of impact with the ball. The individual of velocity and distance were larger in the direction of the acting force, depending on the individual shot. Changing the type of topspin shot requires changes of time, velocity and primarily distance parameters as well as the direction of the playing racquet. The maximum speed of the racquet occurring at the moment of the impact is probably the most important principle in playing technique. The results can be directly used in improving training of table tennis techniques, especially in the application and use of topspin shots.

  8. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Non-Completers in Online Doctor of Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Bernadette Marie

    2012-01-01

    The chance of an individual completing a traditional doctorate program is 50% (Bowen & Rudenstine, 1992; Council of Graduate Schools Ph.D. Completion Project, 2008; Ivankova & Stick, 2007). Student attrition in online programs is 10% to 20% greater than that of traditional, residential programs (Allen & Seaman, 2010; Carr, 2000; Diaz,…

  9. KINEMATIC DISTANCE ASSIGNMENTS WITH H I ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Courtney; Dickey, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Using H I absorption spectra from the International Galactic Plane Survey, a new method is implemented to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity for 75 H II regions with known systemic velocities from radio recombination lines. A further 40 kinematic distance determinations are made for H II region candidates without known systemic velocities through an investigation of the presence of H I absorption around the terminal velocity. New kinematic distance determinations can be used to further constrain spiral arm parameters and the location and extent of other structures in the Milky Way disk. H I absorption toward continuum sources beyond the solar circle is also investigated. Follow-up studies of H I at higher resolution than the 1' to 2' of existing Galactic Plane Surveys will provide kinematic distances to many more H II regions on the far side of the Galactic center. On the basis of the velocity channel summation technique developed in this paper, a much larger sample of H II regions will be analyzed in a future paper to remove the near-far distance ambiguity.

  10. Kinematics of Einstein-Cartan universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmatsiou, Klaountia; Tsagas, Christos G.; Barrow, John D.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the kinematics of cosmological spacetimes with nonzero torsion, in the framework of the classical Einstein-Cartan gravity. After a brief introduction to the basic features of spaces with nonvanishing torsion, we consider a family of observers moving along timelike worldlines and focus on their kinematic behavior. In so doing, we isolate the irreducible variables monitoring the observers' motion and derive their evolution formulas and associated constraint equations. Our aim is to identify the effects of spacetime torsion, and the changes they introduce into the kinematics of the standard, torsion-free, cosmological models. We employ a fully geometrical approach, imposing no restrictions on the material content, or any a priori couplings between torsion and spin. Also, we do not apply the familiar splitting of the equations, into a purely Riemannian component plus a torsion/spin part, at the start of our study, but only introduce it at the very end. With the general formulas at hand, we use the Einstein-Cartan field equations to incorporate explicitly the spin of the matter. The resulting formulas fully describe the kinematics of dynamical spacetimes within the framework of the Einstein-Cartan gravity, while in the special case of the so-called Weyssenhoff fluid, they recover results previously reported in the literature.

  11. Speech-Associated Labiomandibular Movement in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Kinematic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Yang, Fan-pei Gloria; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wong, Alice May-kuen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the speech-associated labiomandibular movement during articulation production in Mandarin-speaking children with spastic quadriplegic (SQ) cerebral palsy (CP). Twelve children with SQ CP (aged 7-11 years) and 12 age-matched healthy children as controls were enrolled for the study. All children underwent…

  12. Speech-Associated Labiomandibular Movement in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Kinematic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Yang, Fan-pei Gloria; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wong, Alice May-kuen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the speech-associated labiomandibular movement during articulation production in Mandarin-speaking children with spastic quadriplegic (SQ) cerebral palsy (CP). Twelve children with SQ CP (aged 7-11 years) and 12 age-matched healthy children as controls were enrolled for the study. All children underwent…

  13. Occlusal Pressure Analysis of Complete Dentures after Microwave Disinfection: A Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Basso, Michael Frederico Manzolli; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Jorge, Janaina Habib

    2017-10-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effect of microwave disinfection protocols on the occlusal pressure pattern of dentures. Dentures were constructed for 40 patients and evaluated as follows (n = 20). Group 1: Patients had the maxillary dentures submitted to microwave disinfection, once a week, for 4 weeks. Group 2: Patients had the maxillary dentures submitted to microwave disinfection, three times a week, for 4 weeks. Occlusal contacts were recorded on five occasions: 30 days after denture insertion and before first disinfection (baseline or control group); 1 week after disinfection; 2 weeks after disinfection; 3 weeks after disinfection; 4 weeks after disinfection. Occlusal contacts were analyzed by T-Scan III. Intergroup analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney test and intragroup analysis using the Friedman test with significance of 5%. The results showed no significant difference between groups during the periods. The data on parameters loss of denture adaptation or complaints showed that patients used their dentures regularly for eating and expressed comfort and satisfaction in all experimental periods. The evaluation of functional occlusion revealed that the distribution of the occlusal contacts remained unaltered after disinfection. Microwave disinfection protocols as studied in this report did not influence occlusal contacts of the complete dentures. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Chocolate frogs do not increase completion of parent survey: randomised study.

    PubMed

    Price, Anna M H; Coates, Cathy; Symeonides, Christos; Hiscock, Harriet; Smith, Libby; York, Elissa; Hennel, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    Four months into a year-long, national survey assessing parents' experiences of a child's diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, our response fraction was only 23%. We aimed to determine whether including a chocolate incentive in the postal survey would increase the response fraction. Families enrolled between 15 March and 25 May 2012 were randomised to receive a chocolate frog versus no chocolate frog. Both groups received a written reminder and replacement survey 2 weeks after the survey was posted and up to two telephone reminders thereafter. We analysed the effect of the incentive using χ(2) tests for the categorical response variable and t-tests for the continuous reminder and length of response variables at the end of (i) randomisation and (ii) the study (1 November 2012). A total of 137 families were randomised in the 6-week period. Parents who received an incentive were more likely to return a completed survey in the 6 weeks than those who did not (21% vs. 6%, P = 0.009). This effect faded by the end of the study (53% vs. 42%, P = 0.4). There were no differences between groups at either follow-up in the number of reminders that parents received or the number of days it took parents to return the survey. Including a chocolate-based incentive does not significantly increase response rate in a postal survey over and above standard reminder techniques like posting follow-up survey packs or phoning families.

  15. The Maiden Voyage of a Kinematics Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwolfe, Matthew L.

    2015-04-01

    In a Montessori preschool classroom, students work independently on tasks that absorb their attention in part because the apparatus are carefully designed to make mistakes directly observable and limit exploration to one aspect or dimension. Control of error inheres in the apparatus itself, so that teacher intervention can be minimal.1 Inspired by this example, I created a robotic kinematics apparatus that also shapes the inquiry experience. Students program the robot by drawing kinematic graphs on a computer and then observe its motion. Exploration is at once limited to constant velocity and constant acceleration motion, yet open to complex multi-segment examples difficult to achieve in the lab in other ways. The robot precisely and reliably produces the motion described by the students' graphs, so that the apparatus itself provides immediate visual feedback about whether their understanding is correct as they are free to explore within the hard-coded limits. In particular, the kinematic robot enables hands-on study of multi-segment constant velocity situations, which lays a far stronger foundation for the study of accelerated motion. When correction is anonymous—just between one group of lab partners and their robot—students using the kinematic robot tend to flow right back to work because they view the correction as an integral part of the inquiry learning process. By contrast, when correction occurs by the teacher and/or in public (e.g., returning a graded assignment or pointing out student misconceptions during class), students all too often treat the event as the endpoint to inquiry. Furthermore, quantitative evidence shows a large gain from pre-test to post-test scores using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K).

  16. Pelvis and torso kinematics and their relationship to shoulder kinematics in high-school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Keeley, David W

    2010-12-01

    It was the purpose of our study to examine the kinematics of the pelvis and torso and determine their relationship to the kinematics of the shoulder in high-school baseball pitchers. A single group, repeated-measures design was used to collect pelvis, torso, and shoulder kinematics throughout the pitching motion. Subjects threw a series of maximal effort fastballs to a catcher located the regulation distance (18.44m) from the pitching mound, and those data from the fastest pitch passing through the strike zone were analyzed. After test trials, kinematic data were analyzed using a series of descriptive statistics to identify outliers and determine the nature of the distribution before testing for the presence of relationships between the various parameters. Results indicated that for several parameters, the actions at and about the shoulder are strongly related to the actions of the pelvis and torso throughout the pitching motion. However, although pelvis and torso kinematics throughout the pitching motion were inversely related to both shoulder elevation and the plane of shoulder elevation, only the rate of axial torso rotation was significantly related to these shoulder parameters. More importantly, the rate of axial torso rotation is significantly related to these shoulder parameters in a way that may help explain the high rate of shoulder injury in high-school pitchers. Therefore, strength training should focus on developing a strong stable core including the gluteal musculature in an attempt to control the rate of torso rotation during the pitch.

  17. Multiparameter Radar and Aircraft Based Studies of the Micro-Physical, Kinematic and Electrical Structure of Convective Clouds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-14

    study is related to multiparameter radar studies of lightning echoes and a triggered lightning event. q 6 C , 3 O7444/S,•~e ,•,=g vo, 4• - 074 14...SIUIICT TERMS WAMiRN Of PAGES Radar , electrical, storms, lightning jI WA COM. i?. 11cunty cSWICATsON I 13. sECUouTy c •A1SIDCArflO 1%. SECURITY $ASSWI...hence- _ ,, . forth all times are UTC and all heights are msl). For > c e 1 1 B e a few minutes the dual-frequency (S/X- band ) reflectivity ratio, DFR, was

  18. Complete effect-profile assessment in association studies with multiple genetic and multiple environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Maity, Arnab; Luo, Yiwen; Neely, Megan L; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Studying complex diseases in the post genome-wide association studies (GWAS) era has led to developing methods that consider factor-sets rather than individual genetic/environmental factors (i.e., Multi-G-Multi-E studies), and mining for potential gene-environment (G×E) interactions has proven to be an invaluable aid in both discovery and deciphering underlying biological mechanisms. Current approaches for examining effect profiles in Multi-G-Multi-E analyses are either underpowered due to large degrees of freedom, ill-suited for detecting G×E interactions due to imprecise modeling of the G and E effects, or lack of capacity for modeling interactions between two factor-sets (e.g., existing methods focus primarily on a single E factor). In this work, we illustrate the issues encountered in constructing kernels for investigating interactions between two factor-sets, and propose a simple yet intuitive solution to construct the G×E kernel that retains the ease-of-interpretation of classic regression. We also construct a series of kernel machine (KM) score tests to evaluate the complete effect profile (i.e., the G, E, and G×E effects individually or in combination). We show, via simulations and a data application, that the proposed KM methods outperform the classic and PC regressions across a range of scenarios, including varying effect size, effect structure, and interaction complexity. The largest power gain was observed when the underlying effect structure involved complex G×E interactions; however, the proposed methods have consistent, powerful performance when the effect profile is simple or complex, suggesting that the proposed method could be a useful tool for exploratory or confirmatory G×E analysis. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  19. Factors Associated With Persistent Subfoveal Fluid and Complete Macular Hole Closure in the PIONEER Study

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Justis P.; Itoh, Yuji; Xu, Lucy T.; Kaiser, Peter K.; Singh, Rishi P.; Srivastava, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate preoperative and intraoperative factors associated with persistent subfoveal fluid in surgically closed macular holes (MHs). Methods. This was a prospective consecutive case series of eyes undergoing surgical repair for full-thickness MH in the PIONEER study, a prospective intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) multisurgeon single-center study. Thirty-seven eyes (36 patients) with surgically closed MH were studied. Quantitative OCT analysis was performed including intraoperative MH area, volume, ellipsoid zone to retinal pigment epithelium (EZ-RPE) height, extent of subretinal hyporeflectivity (SRHR), and the amount of postoperative subfoveal fluid. Results. Persistent subfoveal fluid was identified in 58% of eyes at 2 weeks following surgery. The mean time to two-line improvement in visual acuity was greater in eyes with persistent subfoveal fluid (P = 0.03). Final visual acuity did not correlate with the initial presence of fluid. Two intraoperative factors following internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling were associated with the formation of persistent subfoveal fluid: EZ-RPE height and SRHR width (P < 0.01). These were both negatively correlated with amount of postoperative subfoveal fluid (P = 0.028 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusions. Persistent subfoveal fluid following MH surgery is a common finding that appears to delay visual recovery but not effect final visual outcome. The incidence of persistent subfoveal fluid appears to be related to intraoperative alterations after ILM peeling in the outer retinal architecture (e.g., increased EZ-RPE height and SRHR width). This finding suggests a novel mechanism for facilitating MH closure through ILM peeling (e.g., altering photoreceptor/RPE adherence and increasing retinal mobility that allows for complete hole closure). PMID:25525173

  20. Significance of complete right bundle-branch block when an isolated finding. An echocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Dancy, M; Leech, G; Leatham, A

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with complete right bundle-branch block as the only abnormal finding were studied using high speed M-mode echocardiography to determine the effect of the electrical delay on the mechanical events of right ventricular systole. Pulmonary valve opening (PVOm) was delayed in all cases. In some the delay was mainly between mitral valve closure (MVC) and tricuspid valve closure (TVC), and this was designated proximal block. In the others the main delay was between tricuspid valve closure and pulmonary valve opening and this was designated distal block. The patients were divided into those with proximal and those with distal block by calculating the ratio TVC-PVOm/MVC-TVC. Twelve out of 13 of those with distal delay but only one out of 14 of those with proximal delay had episodes of syncope or near syncope. These results are consistent with previous theories about the pathophysiology of right bundle-branch block. Echocardiography may offer a non-invasive method to estimate the prognosis in isolated right bundle-branch block. PMID:7104112

  1. A study of ventricular contraction sequence in complete right bundle branch block by phase analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T; Toyama, H; Iida, K; Masuoka, T; Ajisaka, R; Kuga, K; Satoh, M; Sugahara, S; Jin, W; Ishikawa, N

    1991-03-01

    Twenty-four patients with complete right bundle branch block (CRBBB) combined with and without left axis deviation (LAD) on ECG, were compared with 17 normal subjects to evaluate the right ventricular contraction sequence and pattern in detail. Blood pool scintigrams were obtained in the left anterior oblique projection, and these images were analyzed by first component Fourier harmonics. In the normal subjects, the phase value distribution representing the pattern of ventricular contraction was almost homogeneous in both the right and left ventricles (RV & LV). In the CRBBB patients without LAD, the phase images showed apparent phase delay in the right ventricle. In the CRBBB patients with LAD, the phase images showed many different contraction patterns varying from normal to RV phase delay, owing to the effects of the hemi-block. Quantitative analysis of the absolute values, showed that the mean (RV-LV) value was 6.6 +/- 8.4 msec in the normal subjects. In the CRBBB patients without LAD, the duration of the QRS complex correlated with the mean (RV-LV) value, whereas no difference was observed between the duration of the QRS complex and the standard deviation of the right ventricle. Using phase analysis the degree of the RBBB can be determined from the phase images, and can be quantitatively analyzed as in electrical studies.

  2. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: an anatomic evaluation and sexual function questionnaire pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jason M; Arnhym, Anne; Champeau, Angie; Ebbers, Michele; Coakley, Fergus; Baskin, Laurence

    2011-08-01

    To further characterize the anatomy and sexual function of women with CAIS compared to normal females, and assess the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to distinguish anatomical differences. In a prospective cohort pilot study, five individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome and six, normal, nulliparous women underwent an interview, physical examination, questionnaire completion and MRI of the pelvis. Statistical analysis was performed with emphasis on determining significant differences in anatomical findings and sexual satisfaction. MRI demonstrated statistically significant differences in vaginal depth and size that were not confirmed on physical exam. MRI and physical exam demonstrated a non-significant difference in average phallic thickness between the two groups, although the CAIS group clitoral width tended to be smaller. Physical exam demonstrated a higher average erect height and longer arm span in the CAIS patients but this was not statistically significant. No significant differences were noted in categories designed to assess satisfaction with ability to achieve orgasm, vaginal appearance and frequency of sexual intercourse between the two groups. The women with CAIS were as satisfied with sexual function as were the women within the control group. Physical exam and MRI did not find any statistically significant clinically relevant differences between the two groups. Copyright © 2010 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Speech outcome in unilateral complete cleft lip and palate patients: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Rullo, R; Di Maggio, D; Addabbo, F; Rullo, F; Festa, V M; Perillo, L

    2014-09-01

    In this study, resonance and articulation disorders were examined in a group of patients surgically treated for cleft lip and palate, considering family social background, and children's ability of self monitoring their speech output while speaking. Fifty children (32 males and 18 females) mean age 6.5 ± 1.6 years, affected by non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft of the lip and palate underwent the same surgical protocol. The speech level was evaluated using the Accordi's speech assessment protocol that focuses on intelligibility, nasality, nasal air escape, pharyngeal friction, and glottal stop. Pearson product-moment correlation analysis was used to detect significant associations between analysed parameters. A total of 16% (8 children) of the sample had severe to moderate degree of nasality and nasal air escape, presence of pharyngeal friction and glottal stop, which obviously compromise speech intelligibility. Ten children (10%) showed a barely acceptable phonological outcome: nasality and nasal air escape were mild to moderate, but the intelligibility remained poor. Thirty-two children (64%) had normal speech. Statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between the severity of nasal resonance and nasal air escape (p ≤ 0.05). No statistical significant correlation was found between the final intelligibility and the patient social background, neither between the final intelligibility nor the age of the patients. The differences in speech outcome could be explained with a specific, subjective, and inborn ability, different for each child, in self-monitoring their speech output.

  4. Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton training: Case studies for complete spinal cord injury walking.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward D; Smith, Andrew J; Herbert-Copley, Andrew; Sreenivasan, Vidya

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in exoskeleton technology has made lower extremity powered exoskeletons (LEPE) a viable treatment tool to restore upright walking mobility to persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Evaluate ARKE exoskeleton training within a rehabilitation centre environment. Case studies are presented for two male participants, age 41 and 30, motor complete SCI at T6 (N01) and T12 (N02), respectively, as they progress from new LEPE users to independent walking. The ARKE 2.0 LEPE (Bionik Laboratories Inc., Toronto, Canada) was used for all training (hip and knee powered, forearm crutches, control tablet). Data were collected on session times, activity metrics from ARKE system logs, and qualitative questionnaire feedback. N01 required 18, 30-minute training sessions to achieve independent walking. N01 walked independently within the 12 session target. Foot strikes were frequently before the end of the programmed swing phase, which were handled by the ARKE control system. Subjective ratings of LEPE learning, comfort, pain, fatigue, and overall experience were high for sitting-standing and moderate to high for walking. This reflected the complexity of learning to safely walk. Qualitative feedback supported the continuation of LEPE use in rehabilitation settings based on end-user desire for upright mobility.

  5. [Studies on the status of immune memory after completion of hepatitis B vaccination].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-ping; Li, Rong-cheng; Fang, Kong-xiong; Li, He-min; Hu, Zhong-yu; He, Peng; Wu, Xiao-yin; Zhang, Rui; Liang, Zheng-lun; Zhuang, Hui

    2007-04-01

    To study the immune memory in vaccinees after the completion of a full schedule hepatitis B immunization. One thousand and two hundred one infants born in 1987 -1989 were immunized with 3 doses of plasma derived hepatitis B vaccine, while 2484 newborn babies during 1996-1999 were injected with 3 doses of the yeast recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. All of the infants under observation were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc, in 2005. Of 959 individuals negative for anti-HBs (< 10 mIU/ml), HBsAg and anti-HBc, 228 were immunized with plasma-derived vaccine and 731 with yeast recombinant vaccine after birth. All of them were detected for anti-HBs 15 days after a booster of 10 Ipg yeast recombinant vaccine. In addition, interleukin-2 (IL-2) was detected in 11 non-responders and 22 responders after boostering, using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT). The anti-HBs levels of 190 individuals (91 with plasma derived vaccine and 99 with yeast recombinant vaccine) who had had quantitative data on their antibody status after the primary hepatitis B vaccination, were compared with that after the boostering. Among the individuals who received plasma derived vaccine 16-18 years ago, 79.82% of them showed the signs of immune memory after one booster, with a geometric mean titer (GMT)of 325.69 mIU/ml. Of the individuals who received the yeast recombinant vaccine 6-9 years ago, 95.62% showed immune memory after one booster,with its GMT of 745.18 mIU/ml. Anti-HBs levels induced by the booster were associated with that after the primary immunization. The positive rate of IL-2 was 40.91% in subjects with good immune memory. However, IL-2 was not detected in non-responders after the booster (P < 0.01). Most of the individuals who had received a completed schedule of primary hepatitis B vaccination and seroconverted from anti-HBs positive to negative,showed the signs of having immune memory after the booster. Only a small proportion of the vaccinees had lost their immune memory

  6. Molecular studies of a patient with complete androgen insensitivity and a 47,XXY karyotype.

    PubMed

    Girardin, C M; Deal, C; Lemyre, E; Paquette, J; Lumbroso, R; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A; Van Vliet, G

    2009-09-01

    A phenotypic female with complete androgen insensitivity from a maternally inherited mutation in the androgen receptor had a 47,XXY karyotype. Partial maternal X isodisomy explained the expression of androgen insensitivity despite the presence of 2 X chromosomes.

  7. A GMOS-N IFU study of the central H ii region in the blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 4449: kinematics, nebular metallicity and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Nimisha; James, Bethan L.; Irwin, Mike J.

    2017-10-01

    We use integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations from the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph North (GMOS-N) to study the central H ii region in a nearby blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy NGC 4449. The IFS data enable us to explore the variation of physical and chemical conditions of the star-forming region and the surrounding gas on spatial scales as small as 5.5 pc. Our kinematical analysis shows possible signatures of shock ionization and shell structures in the surroundings of the star-forming region. The metallicity maps of the region, created using direct Te and indirect strong line methods (R23, O3N2 and N2), do not show any chemical variation. From the integrated spectrum of the central H ii region, we find a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.88 ± 0.14 ({˜ }0.15^{+0.06}_{-0.04} Z⊙) using the direct method. Comparing the central H ii region metallicity derived here with those of H ii regions throughout this galaxy from previous studies, we find evidence of increasing metallicity with distance from the central nucleus. Such chemical inhomogeneities can be due to several mechanisms, including gas loss via supernova blowout, galactic winds or metal-poor gas accretion. However, we find that the localized area of decreased metallicity aligns spatially with the peak of star-forming activity in the galaxy, suggesting that gas accretion may be at play here. Spatially resolved IFS data for the entire galaxy are required to confirm the metallicity inhomogeneity found in this study and determine its possible cause.

  8. A Quantitative Study of a Software Tool that Supports a Part-Complete Solution Method on Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a quantitative research study into the use of a software tool that was built to support a part-complete solution method (PCSM) for the learning of computer programming. The use of part-complete solutions to programming problems is one of the methods that can be used to reduce the cognitive load that students…

  9. Effects of diagonal shoulder training in a closed kinematic chain for secondary impingement syndrome: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Han; Park, Du-Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of diagonal shoulder training on an individual with secondary impingement due to scapular dyskinesis. [Subject] A 54 year-old female with secondary impingement participated in this study. [Methods] The patient performed diagonal shoulder training in 4-point kneeling, 3 times per day for 20 minutes over a period of 6 weeks. Evaluations of shoulder pain, range of motion, upper trapezius/lower serratus anterior ratio, and impingement were performed before training and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. [Results] The patient’s parameters improved gradually. All parameters returned to normal ranges at 4 weeks. [Conclusion] Diagonal shoulder training is effective for improving dysfunction in individuals with secondary impingement. In addition, this training should be applied for more than 4 weeks. PMID:26180371

  10. Kinematic Downsizing at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Raymond C.; Kassin, Susan A.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Guo, Yicheng; Pacifici, Camilla; Koekemoer, Anton; Stephens, Andrew W.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a survey of the internal kinematics of 49 star-forming galaxies at z˜ 2 in the CANDELS fields with the Keck/MOSFIRE spectrograph, Survey in the near-Infrared of Galaxies with Multiple position Angles (SIGMA). Kinematics (rotation velocity V rot and gas velocity dispersion {σ }g) are measured from nebular emission lines which trace the hot ionized gas surrounding star-forming regions. We find that by z˜ 2, massive star-forming galaxies ({log} {M}* /{M}⊙ ≳ 10.2) have assembled primitive disks: their kinematics are dominated by rotation, they are consistent with a marginally stable disk model, and they form a Tully-Fisher relation. These massive galaxies have values of {V}{rot}/{σ }g that are factors of 2-5 lower than local well-ordered galaxies at similar masses. Such results are consistent with findings by other studies. We find that low-mass galaxies ({log} {M}* /{M}⊙ ≲ 10.2) at this epoch are still in the early stages of disk assembly: their kinematics are often dominated by gas velocity dispersion and they fall from the Tully-Fisher relation to significantly low values of V rot. This “kinematic downsizing” implies that the process(es) responsible for disrupting disks at z˜ 2 have a stronger effect and/or are more active in low-mass systems. In conclusion, we find that the period of rapid stellar mass growth at z˜ 2 is coincident with the nascent assembly of low-mass disks and the assembly and settling of high-mass disks.

  11. Kinematic and Spatial Substructure in NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Fűrész, Gabor; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario

    2015-04-01

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from Fűrész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular (13CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  12. Kinematic orbits and the structure of the internal space for systems of five or more bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Kevin A.; Littlejohn, Robert G.

    1999-10-01

    The internal space for a molecule, atom, or other n-body system can be conveniently parameterized by 3n - 9 kinematic angles and three hematic invariants. For a fixed set of kinematic invariants, the kinematic angles parameterize a subspace, called a kinematic orbit, of the n-body internal space. Building on an earlier analysis of the three- and four-body problems, we derive the form of these kinematic orbits (that is, their topology) for the general n-body problem. The case n = 5 is studied in detail, along with the previously studied cases n = 3,4.

  13. Applying the physically complete EMI models to the ESTCP Camp Sibert Pilot Study EM-63 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamatava, Irma; Shubitidze, Fridon; Barrowes, Benjamin; Fernández, Juan Pablo; Pasion, Leonard R.; O'Neill, Kevin

    2009-05-01

    Recently the SERDP/ESTCP office under the UXO Discrimination Pilot Study Program acquired high-density data over hundreds of targets using time-domain EM-63 sensor at Camp Sibert. The data were inverted and analyzed by various research groups using a simple dipole model approach and different classification tools. The studies demonstrated high discrimination probability with a low false-alarm rate. However in order to further improve discrimination between UXO and non-UXO items a better understanding is needed of the limits of current and emerging processing approaches. In this paper, the simple dipole model and a physically complete model called the normalized surface magnetic source (NSMS) the Camp Sibert data sets. The simple, infinitesimal dipole representation is by far the most widely employed model for UXO modeling. In this model, one approximates a target's response when excited by a primary (transmitted) field using an induced infinitesimal dipole (in turn described by a single magnetic polarizability matrix). The greatest advantage of the dipole model is that it is simple and imposes low computation costs. However, researchers have recently begun to realize the limitations of the simple dipole model as an inherently coarse description of the EMI behavior of complex, heterogeneous targets like UXO. To address these limitations, here the NSMS is employed as a more powerful forward model for data inversion and object discrimination. This method is extremely fast and equally applicable to the time or frequency domains. The object's location and orientation are estimated by using a standard nonlinear inversion-scattering approach. The discrimination performance between the dipole and NSMS models are conducted by investigating model fidelity and data density issues, positional accuracy and geological noise effects.

  14. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component.

  15. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  16. A Comparative Study on the Kinematic Biomechanical Effects of Tibia Vara in the Healthy and Diseased Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmohammadi, Mehrdad; Karami, Hossein; Bani, Milad Salimi; Zadeh, Hossein Bahreini; Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Malalignment about the knee leads to a pathological-mechanical load that may cause early osteoarthritis of the knee joint and high degree of deformity which may need surgical treatment. Analysis of the leg movements in the experimental cases and comparing acquired results to the normal ones during the gait is used as a practical method to evaluate the effects of the disease. METHOD: In this study, gait differences between the patients with tibia vara and normal people were studied according to the data obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) motion analyzer. Various parameters, including positions, linear and angular velocities, linear and angular accelerations, total velocity, total acceleration, and path length at different angels were extracted and processed via a 3D motion analyzer. Then the results of the patient and control groups were compared to identify the differences. RESULTS: The maximum and average values as well as sample entropy were also calculated for all the mentioned parameters. Among all, only nine remarkable differences between these two groups were observed. The results revealed that the great difference between the patients with tibia vara compared to the normal ones in gait cycle lies on the abnormal movement of fibula bone and less irregularities along the z-axis. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may have implications not only for understanding the differences between the tibia vara in the healthy and diseased individuals, but also for providing a practical understanding for the medical and orthopedic experts to propose a better treatment method.

  17. Scaling and kinematics of a floating wind turbine under ocean waves and variable thrust: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Chris; Ruehl, Kelley; Guala, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Scale model wave channel experiments were performed to study the motion of an offshore floating wind turbine in operational sea states. The model tests were conducted on a 1:100 Froude scaled Sandia National Labs 13.2 MW prototype offshore wind turbine with a barge style floating platform. The platform is modeled after the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge designed for the 5MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine. The wave environment used in the model tests is representative of the deep-water sea states off the coast of Maine as well as the Pacific Northwest. The purpose of the tests is to validate a computational model of the turbine-wave interaction where the effects of airflow are not considered. To simplify the tests and validation, the platform motion is restricted to two degrees of freedom, pitch and heave, by attaching two roller support types at the center of gravity along the pitch axis. The major aerodynamic force acting on the turbine, i.e. the rotor thrust, is provided by spinning a scaled rotor at a controlled rotational speed. A subset of experiments were performed to study the effect of a mean or fluctuating rotor thrust on the platform dynamics, exploring strategies to control the thrust as a function of platform pitch angle and minimize platform oscillations.

  18. Kinematic design considerations for minimally invasive surgical robots: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Hsing; Dai, Jian S; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2012-06-01

    Kinematic design is a predominant phase in the design of robotic manipulators for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). However, an extensive overview of the kinematic design issues for MIS robots is not yet available to both mechanisms and robotics communities. Hundreds of archival reports and articles on robotic systems for MIS are reviewed and studied. In particular, the kinematic design considerations and mechanism development described in the literature for existing robots are focused on. The general kinematic design goals, design requirements, and design preferences for MIS robots are defined. An MIS-specialized mechanism, namely the remote center-of-motion (RCM) mechanism, is revisited and studied. Accordingly, based on the RCM mechanism types, a classification for MIS robots is provided. A comparison between eight different RCM types is given. Finally, several open challenges for the kinematic design of MIS robotic manipulators are discussed. This work provides a detailed survey of the kinematic design of MIS robots, addresses the research opportunity in MIS robots for kinematicians, and clarifies the kinematic point of view to MIS robots as a reference for the medical community. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Relationships between kinematics, microphysics, and lightning in High Plains storms observed during the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessendorf, Sarah Anne

    The Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) was established to improve our understanding of electrification mechanisms and lightning in High Plains storms. In particular, STEPS focused on investigating anomalous positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning, which had been documented to occur more often in this region than in the rest of the U.S. Radar and lightning observations of four storms observed during the STEPS field campaign are analyzed and discussed. The four cases include a predominantly positive CG-producing (PPCG) supercell on 29 June, a supercell on 3 June that produced no CG lightning of either polarity, a negative CG-producing multicellular storm on 19 June, and a PPCG multicellular storm on 22 June. The purpose of this study is to determine what features are unique for storms that produce predominantly positive CG lightning, and attempt to reveal the processes that lead to this behavior. The results indicate that PPCG storms tend to have larger updrafts (both wider and larger in volume), which is consistent with previous studies. Large updrafts and enhanced vertical vorticity also play an important role in the production of large hail. Furthermore, low-level negative charge (below a larger region of positive charge) was observed in the cases that produced positive CG lightning, which may be the impetus needed for the flash to come to ground. This lower negative charge, in essence, represents the lowest charge layer of an inverted tripolar charge structure. The charge structures observed during the production of negative CG lightning were a normal tripole (with negative charge situated between upper and lower positive charge layers) on 19 June and an inverted dipole (with negative charge above positive) in the anvil on 22 June. Cloud-to-ground flash rates (of either polarity) decreased when either the lower charge layer of the corresponding tripolar structure was absent, or when the low-level charge layer exhibited an enhanced

  20. Adult patients with treated complete cleft lip and palate. Methodological and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Marcusson, A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present thesis was to investigate the quality of life, satisfaction with treatment, prevalence of temporomandibular disorders, psychosocial distress, and occlusal stability in a treated group of adults with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP). Sixty-eight adults (44 men and 24 women) with a mean age of 24.2 years (range 19.5-29.2) with treated CLP were compared with a gender- and age-matched group with no clefts. The CLP subjects were born between 1968 and 1977 and had undergone standardised plastic surgery at the Department of Plastic Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. Logopaedic, phoniatric, otological, and orthodontic examinations and treatment had been provided locally, supervised by the Cleft Plate Team. The subjects answered a multidimensional, self-report, standardised questionnaire regarding psychological and somatic conditions. The subjects underwent a clinical TMD examination and an evaluation of the occlusion. The reliability of the multidimensional questionnaire was analysed for the CLP group by a test-retest study within a 2-3 week interval and most questions showed an overall good reliability. A panel of professionals judged the outcome of the surgical treatment on colour slides of the CLP subjects. The dental plaster casts of 39 subjects born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were analysed (mean age 24.7 years, range 20.2-29.3) and compared with the dental plaster casts taken at mean age of 19.1 years (range 16.0-20.6). The overall level of quality of life was rather high in both groups. The CLP group rated some detached aspects, such as life meaning, family life, and private economy, significantly lower than did the group without clefts. Overall aspects such as well-being and social life were affected by having a treated cleft but not the more practical and tangible aspects of their daily living. There was an overall high level of satisfaction with all the different part of the body in both groups

  1. Childhood bullying behaviors as a risk for suicide attempts and completed suicides: a population-based birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Sourander, Andre; Niemelä, Solja; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Piha, Jorma; Tamminen, Tuula; Almqvist, Fredrik; Gould, Madelyn S

    2009-03-01

    There are no previous studies about the association of childhood bullying behavior with later suicide attempts and completed suicides among both sexes. The aim was to study associations between childhood bullying behaviors at age 8 years and suicide attempts and completed suicides up to age 25 years in a large representative population-based birth cohort. The sample includes 5,302 Finnish children born in 1981. Information about bullying was gathered at age 8 years from self-report, as well as parent and teacher reports. Information about suicide attempts requiring hospital admission and completed suicides was gathered from three different Finnish registries until the study participants were 25 years old. Regression analyses were conducted to determine whether children who experience childhood bullying behaviors are at risk for later suicide attempts and completed suicides after controlling for baseline conduct and depression symptoms. The association between bullying behavior at age 8 years and later suicide attempts and completed suicides varies by sex. Among boys, frequent bullying and victimization are associated with later suicide attempts and completed suicides but not after controlling for conduct and depression symptoms; frequent victimization among girls is associated with later suicide attempts and completed suicides, even after controlling for conduct and depression symptoms. When examining childhood bullying behavior as a risk factor for later suicide attempts and completed suicides, each sex has a different risk profile.

  2. ACCURACY AND PRECISION OF A METHOD TO STUDY KINEMATICS OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT: COMBINATION OF MOTION DATA AND CT IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Baltali, Evre; Zhao, Kristin D.; Koff, Matthew F.; Keller, Eugene E.; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the precision and accuracy of a method used to track selected landmarks during motion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A precision phantom device was constructed and relative motions between two rigid bodies on the phantom device were measured using optoelectronic (OE) and electromagnetic (EM) motion tracking devices. The motion recordings were also combined with a 3D CT image for each type of motion tracking system (EM+CT and OE+CT) to mimic methods used in previous studies. In the OE and EM data collections, specific landmarks on the rigid bodies were determined using digitization. In the EM+CT and OE+CT data sets, the landmark locations were obtained from the CT images. 3D linear distances and 3D curvilinear path distances were calculated for the points. The accuracy and precision for all 4 methods were evaluated (EM, OE, EM+CT and OE+CT). In addition, results were compared with and without the CT imaging (EM vs. EM+CT, OE vs. OE+CT). All systems overestimated the actual 3D curvilinear path lengths. All systems also underestimated the actual rotation values. The accuracy of all methods was within 0.5 mm for 3D curvilinear path calculations, 0.05 mm for 3D linear distance calculations, and 0.2° for rotation calculations. In addition, Bland-Altman plots for each configuration of the systems suggest that measurements obtained from either system are repeatable and comparable. PMID:18617178

  3. Kinematic study at the junction of the East Anatolian fault and the Dead Sea fault from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Yasser; Masson, Frederic; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Cakir, Ziyadin; Alchalbi, Abdulmutaleb; Yavasoglu, Hakan; Yönlü, Onder; Daoud, Mohamed; Ergintav, Semih; Inan, Sedat

    2013-07-01

    The Hatay Triple Junction (HTJ) is a tectonically complex area located at the intersection between the left-lateral East Anatolian fault (EAF), the Cyprus subduction arc and the left-lateral Dead Sea fault (DSF) which is a transform boundary between the Arabian and Sinai plates as they converge toward Eurasia. Previous GPS studies indicate a left-lateral strike-slip rate across the DSF varying from 5 mm/yr (along the southern part) to 2 mm/yr (along the northern part) (Alchalbi et al., 2010; Gomez et al., 2007; Le Béon et al., 2008; Mahmoud et al., 2005; Al-Tarazi et al., 2011). In contrast, the EAF has a roughly constant velocity along strike estimated at 9.7 + 0.9 mm/yr (Reilinger et al., 2006). The HTJ contains several well-identified active fault segments (DSF, EAF, Osmaniye fault, Karasu fault, Latakia fault, Jisr-al-shuggur fault, Idleb fault and Afrin fault) (Meghraoui et al., 2011), the fault-slip rates for which are poorly constrained. In order to constrain better the slip rate on faults, we established a network of 57 GPS sites in NW Syria and in SE Turkey. The first campaign was carried out in September 2009; a second took place in September and November 2010 and a third (only in Turkey) in September 2011. Although the velocity field vectors computed from the 2009, 2010 and 2011 measurements appear consistent with other local studies, the results are hampered by large uncertainties due to the short observation period. However, preliminary interpretations are consistent with decreasing velocity along the DSF from south to north reported previously.

  4. A statistical kinematic source inversion approach based on the QUESO library for uncertainty quantification and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Olaf; McDougall, Damon; Mai, Martin; Babuska, Ivo

    2014-05-01

    Seismic, often augmented with geodetic data, are frequently used to invert for the spatio-temporal evolution of slip along a rupture plane. The resulting images of the slip evolution for a single event, inferred by different research teams, often vary distinctly, depending on the adopted inversion approach and rupture model parameterization. This observation raises the question, which of the provided kinematic source inversion solutions is most reliable and most robust, and — more generally — how accurate are fault parameterization and solution predictions? These issues are not included in "standard" source inversion approaches. Here, we present a statistical inversion approach to constrain kinematic rupture parameters from teleseismic body waves. The approach is based a) on a forward-modeling scheme that computes synthetic (body-)waves for a given kinematic rupture model, and b) on the QUESO (Quantification of Uncertainty for Estimation, Simulation, and Optimization) library that uses MCMC algorithms and Bayes theorem for sample selection. We present Bayesian inversions for rupture parameters in synthetic earthquakes (i.e. for which the exact rupture history is known) in an attempt to identify the cross-over at which further model discretization (spatial and temporal resolution of the parameter space) is no longer attributed to a decreasing misfit. Identification of this cross-over is of importance as it reveals the resolution power of the studied data set (i.e. teleseismic body waves), enabling one to constrain kinematic earthquake rupture histories of real earthquakes at a resolution that is supported by data. In addition, the Bayesian approach allows for mapping complete posterior probability density functions of the desired kinematic source parameters, thus enabling us to rigorously assess the uncertainties in earthquake source inversions.

  5. Treadmill Kinematics Baseline Data Collection

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-12

    PHOTO DATE: 5-12-11 LOCATION: Building 261 - Room 138 SUBJECT: Expedition 29 Preflight Training with Dan Burbank during Treadmill Kinematics Baseline Data Collection. WORK ORDER: 2011-1214 PHOTOGRAPHER: Lauren Harnett

  6. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32733

  7. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory.

  8. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32733

  9. Peak-ring structure and kinematics from a multi-disciplinary study of the Schrödinger impact basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kring, David A.; Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Collins, Gareth S.; Potter, Ross W. K.; Chandnani, Mitali

    2016-10-01

    The Schrödinger basin on the lunar farside is ~320 km in diameter and the best-preserved peak-ring basin of its size in the Earth-Moon system. Here we present spectral and photogeologic analyses of data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument on the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on the LRO spacecraft, which indicates the peak ring is composed of anorthositic, noritic and troctolitic lithologies that were juxtaposed by several cross-cutting faults during peak-ring formation. Hydrocode simulations indicate the lithologies were uplifted from depths up to 30 km, representing the crust of the lunar farside. Through combining geological and remote-sensing observations with numerical modelling, we show that a Displaced Structural Uplift model is best for peak rings, including that in the K-T Chicxulub impact crater on Earth. These results may help guide sample selection in lunar sample return missions that are being studied for the multi-agency International Space Exploration Coordination Group.

  10. Peak-ring structure and kinematics from a multi-disciplinary study of the Schrödinger impact basin.

    PubMed

    Kring, David A; Kramer, Georgiana Y; Collins, Gareth S; Potter, Ross W K; Chandnani, Mitali

    2016-10-20

    The Schrödinger basin on the lunar farside is ∼320 km in diameter and the best-preserved peak-ring basin of its size in the Earth-Moon system. Here we present spectral and photogeologic analyses of data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument on the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on the LRO spacecraft, which indicates the peak ring is composed of anorthositic, noritic and troctolitic lithologies that were juxtaposed by several cross-cutting faults during peak-ring formation. Hydrocode simulations indicate the lithologies were uplifted from depths up to 30 km, representing the crust of the lunar farside. Through combining geological and remote-sensing observations with numerical modelling, we show that a Displaced Structural Uplift model is best for peak rings, including that in the K-T Chicxulub impact crater on Earth. These results may help guide sample selection in lunar sample return missions that are being studied for the multi-agency International Space Exploration Coordination Group.

  11. Study of 20O via the (d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics employing the active gas target detector ANASEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Baby, L. T.; Koshchiy, E.; Rogachev, G. V.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.

    2013-10-01

    The energetic location of the d3/2-orbital in neutron-rich nuclei is of particular interest as it determines the location of the drip-line in the oxygen isotopes. Its behavior has recently been described as a consequence of three-body forces. Manifestations of such forces are traced through the location of the d3/2 orbital, which closer to stability leads to highly excited states. In order to study the location and fragmentation of this orbital in 20O a beam of the short-lived 19O was produced at the RESOLUT radioactive beam facility of the Florida State University with an intensity of 1 ×105 pps, 65 % purity and 4.11 MeV/u. The chamber of the active gas target detector ANASEN was filled with molecular deuterium gas (D2) which yielded 20O via the 19O (d , p) reaction. The ejected protons were measured with large solid angle coverage and for beam energies between 2.9 and 3.7 MeV/u. Data from the 17O(d , p) 18O reaction was acquired to verify our experimental methods and analysis techniques. We will present the latest advances in the analysis of the 19O(d , p) 20O data and demonstrate the capabilities of ANASEN. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Peak-ring structure and kinematics from a multi-disciplinary study of the Schrödinger impact basin

    PubMed Central

    Kring, David A.; Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Collins, Gareth S.; Potter, Ross W. K.; Chandnani, Mitali

    2016-01-01

    The Schrödinger basin on the lunar farside is ∼320 km in diameter and the best-preserved peak-ring basin of its size in the Earth–Moon system. Here we present spectral and photogeologic analyses of data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument on the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on the LRO spacecraft, which indicates the peak ring is composed of anorthositic, noritic and troctolitic lithologies that were juxtaposed by several cross-cutting faults during peak-ring formation. Hydrocode simulations indicate the lithologies were uplifted from depths up to 30 km, representing the crust of the lunar farside. Through combining geological and remote-sensing observations with numerical modelling, we show that a Displaced Structural Uplift model is best for peak rings, including that in the K–T Chicxulub impact crater on Earth. These results may help guide sample selection in lunar sample return missions that are being studied for the multi-agency International Space Exploration Coordination Group. PMID:27762265

  13. Relationship between jump landing kinematics and peak ACL force during a jump in downhill skiing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, D; van den Bogert, A J; Nachbauer, W

    2014-06-01

    Recent data highlight that competitive skiers face a high risk of injuries especially during off-balance jump landing maneuvers in downhill skiing. The purpose of the present study was to develop a musculo-skeletal modeling and simulation approach to investigate the cause-and-effect relationship between a perturbed landing position, i.e., joint angles and trunk orientation, and the peak force in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) during jump landing. A two-dimensional musculo-skeletal model was developed and a baseline simulation was obtained reproducing measurement data of a reference landing movement. Based on the baseline simulation, a series of perturbed landing simulations (n = 1000) was generated. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between peak ACL force and the perturbed landing posture. Increased backward lean, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion as well as an asymmetric position were related to higher peak ACL forces during jump landing. The orientation of the trunk of the skier was identified as the most important predictor accounting for 60% of the variance of the peak ACL force in the simulations. Teaching of tactical decisions and the inclusion of exercise regimens in ACL injury prevention programs to improve trunk control during landing motions in downhill skiing was concluded.

  14. Improved kinematic options in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Grant V.; Robinson, Allen Conrad

    2003-12-01

    Algorithms for higher order accuracy modeling of kinematic behavior within the ALEGRA framework are presented. These techniques improve the behavior of the code when kinematic errors are found, ensure orthonormality of the rotation tensor at each time step, and increase the accuracy of the Lagrangian stretch and rotation tensor update algorithm. The implementation of these improvements in ALEGRA is described. A short discussion of issues related to improving the accuracy of the stress update procedures is also included.

  15. Very long time series of 14 years for the studies on Indian Plate Kinematics with GPS/GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ec, M.; Narayana Babu, R. N.

    2009-12-01

    14 years of GPS/GNSS data from 1995 to 2009 from the Hyderabad IGS GPS Permanent Station (HYDE) have been processed using Bernese 5.0 in the global network solution in ITRF 2005 reference frame along with the data from other 11 IGS stations. A new global network was chosen spreading the geographical and azimuthal coverage, which almost includes all the plates surrounding India. The baseline lengths from Hyderabad to other chosen sites and the rate of changes were also estimated. Indian Plate motion was estimated to be at the rate of 37 ± 0.2 mm/yr towards NNE direction with respect to Eurasian Plate. Despite many large earthquakes in and around India, reorganization of the macro and micro plates and interaction between the plate pairs and its boundaries, the rate of on-going Indian plate motion remains to be the same. The angular velocity of Indian plate motion with respect to Eurasian plate and Indo-Eurasia plate pair have also been estimated. The global network solution has resulted in the estimation of the pole of the angular velocity vector of India with respect to Eurasia to be about a pole of rotation at 29.44 ± 1.2deg N, 13.2 ± 7.3deg E with an angular velocity of 0.356 ± 0.035 deg Myr-1. Our estimated result of Indian plate motion mostly conforms to the REVEL-2000 Plate motion model but differs considerably from NUVEL-1A and other earlier studies. This departure could be attributed to the difference in geologic and geodetic estimations. The longer time span of GNSS data from the central part of India yields more accurate estimations since the analysis is in the global network solution, which doesn’t take into account the plate-interior site velocities.

  16. Gender differences in effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) lifestyle intervention: an Australasian study.

    PubMed

    Kent, Lillian M; Morton, Darren P; Rankin, Paul M; Mitchell, Brett G; Chang, Esther; Diehl, Hans

    2014-12-01

    Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a lifestyle modification program that promotes healthy diet, physical activity and stress management techniques. Among US CHIP participants, differences in gender responsiveness to improvements in chronic disease risk factors were demonstrated. This study examined gender differences in outcomes to the CHIP intervention in Australasia. Changes in body weight, blood pressure (BP), blood lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were assessed in 925 participants (34.3% men, mean age=56.0±12.5 years; 65.7% women, mean age=54.4±13.5 years) 30 days after program commencement. Significant reductions (P<0.001) in all biometrics measured were found for men and women but were greater among men for total (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), triglycerides (TG), FPG, body mass index (BMI) and TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) ratio. Participants with highest baseline classifications of BMI, systolic BP, blood lipids and FPG showed greatest reductions in 30 days. CHIP more effectively reduced chronic disease risk factors among men than women. All participants, but particularly men, entering the program with the greatest risk achieved the largest reductions. Possible physiological or behavioural factors include food preferences, making commitments and differential support modes. SO WHAT?: Developers of lifestyle intervention programs should consider gender differences in physiological and behavioural factors when planning interventions. In particular, developers should manage expectations of people entering lifestyle interventions to increase awareness that men tend to respond better than women. In addition, this is a call for further research to identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for the disproportionate responsiveness of males.

  17. Estimating the dose-toxicity curve in completed phase I studies

    PubMed Central

    Iasonos, Alexia; Ostrovnaya, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Summary While there is an extensive amount of literature covering prospective designs for phase I trials, the methodology for analyzing these data is limited. Prospective designs select the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) through a dose-escalation scheme based on a model or empirical rules. For example, the “3+3” method (standard method: SM), assigns patients in cohorts of three and expands to six if one toxicity is observed. It has been shown previously that the MTD chosen by the SM may be low, possibly leading to a non-efficacious dose. Additionally, when deviation from the original trial design occurs, the rules for determining MTD might not be applicable. We hypothesize that a retrospective analysis would suggest a MTD that is more accurate than the one obtained by the SM. A weighted Continual Reassessment Method (CRM-w) has been suggested (O'Quigley 2005) for analyzing data obtained from designs other than the prospective Continual Reassessment Method (CRM). However, CRM-w has not been evaluated in trials that follow the SM design. In this study, we propose a method to analyze completed phase I trials and possibly confirm or amend the recommended Phase II dose, based on a constrained maximum likelihood estimation (CMLE). A comparison of CRM, CRM-w, isotonic regression and CMLE in analyzing simulated SM trials shows that CMLE more accurately selects the true MTD than SM, and is better or comparable to CRM-w. Confidence intervals around the toxicity probabilities at each dose level are estimated using the cumulative toxicity data. A programming code is included. PMID:21341302

  18. Study of Minor Physical Anomalies in Complete Nuclear Mexican Families. Evidence of Neurodevelopmental Problems in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio-Gallardo, Félix; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Heinze-Martin, Gerhard; Caraveo-Anduaga, Jorge; Cortés-Sotres, José

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Minor physical anomalies (MPA) are dysmorphic features that reflect deviations in early development, are morphological variants that appear during the first trimester of pregnancy and could be used as a marker of disease risk in susceptible people. The literature agrees that the number of MPA is higher in patients with schizophrenia compared with their relatives and healthy subjects. The purpose of this study is to compare the MPA, assessed using the Gourion Scale, in complete nuclear families (families with a member with schizophrenia and control families) by determining the MPA mean, concordance and heritability for the total score on the MPA Gourion Scale for each anomaly. Method The sample consisted of 60 families with at least one schizophrenic patient (284 members) and 61 control families (249 members). Results: The mean total score for the scale was 5.72 ± 2.3 MPA in the case of families with at least one schizophrenic patient and 1.8 ± 4.46 MPA for control families. The average for families of patients without considering the patient in the analysis was 5.59 ± 2.3 MPA; for patients, the mean was 6.14 ± 2.4 MPA. In the analysis by anomaly differences were found only in eleven anomalies found no evidence of heritability or concordance. Conclusions MPA occur more frequently in patients, but a pattern of low consistency between them persists. It is concluded that MPA could be a marker of neurodevelopmental problems, but it is not suitable to consider them a Gourion scale as endophenotype. PMID:25612094

  19. Multidisciplinary approach to constrain kinematics of fault zones at shallow depths: a case study from the Cameros-Demanda thrust (North Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas-Sainz, A. M.; Román-Berdiel, T.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; García-Lasanta, C.; Villalaín, J. J.; Aldega, L.; Corrado, S.; Caricchi, C.; Invernizzi, C.; Osácar, M. C.

    2017-04-01

    Thrusting at shallow depths often precludes analysis by means of structural indicators effective in other geological contexts (e.g., mylonites, sheath folds, shear bands). In this paper, a combination of techniques (including structural analysis, magnetic methods, as anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and paleomagnetism, and paleothermometry) is used to define thrusting conditions, deformation, and transport directions in the Cameros-Demanda thrust (North Spain). Three outcrops were analyzed along this intraplate, large-scale major structure having 150 km of outcropping length, 30 km of maximum horizontal displacement, and 5 km of vertical throw. Results obtained by means of the different techniques are compared with data derived from cross sections and stratigraphic analysis. Mixed-layer illite-smectite and vitrinite reflectance indicating deep diagenetic conditions and matur