Science.gov

Sample records for kinematically complete study

  1. Complete kinematical study of the 3α breakup of the 16.11 MeV state in 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laursen, K. L.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Madsbøll, K. S.; Riisager, K.

    2016-09-01

    The reaction 11 B + p has been used to populate the (J^{π},T) = (2+,1) state at an excitation energy of 16.11 MeV in 12C, and the breakup of the state into three α-particles has been studied in complete kinematics. A two-step breakup model which includes interference effects is found to provide the most accurate description of the experimental data. The branching ratio to the ground state of 8Be is determined to be 5.1(5)% in agreement with previous findings, but more precise by a factor of two, while the decay to the first excited state in 8Be is found to be dominated by d-wave emission.

  2. A combined electron-ion spectrometer for studying complete kinematics of molecular dissociation upon shell selective ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, K.; Banerjee, S. B.; Bapat, B.

    2013-07-15

    A combined electron-ion spectrometer has been built to study dissociation kinematics of molecular ions upon various electronic decay processes ensuing from ionization of neutral molecules. The apparatus can be used with various ionization agents. Ion time-of-flight (ToF) spectra arising from various electronic decay processes are acquired by triggering the ToF measurement in coincidence with energy analyzed electrons. The design and the performance of the spectrometer in a photoionization experiment is presented in detail. Electron spectra and ion time of flight spectra resulting from valence and 2p{sub 1/2} ionization of Argon and those from valence ionization of CO are presented to demonstrate the capability of the instrument. The fragment ion spectra show remarkable differences (both kinematic and cross sectional) dependent on the energy of the ejected electron, corresponding to various electron loss and decay mechanisms in dissociative photoionization of molecules.

  3. Kinematically Complete Experiments on Single Ionization in Simple Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael

    2006-10-01

    Fully differential studies on atomic reaction dynamics are crucially important to advance our understanding of the few-body problem. In the case of electron impact, fully differential cross sections for single ionization have been measured for several decades. The vast majority of these studies were restricted to electrons ejected into specific planes. More importantly, for ion impact such experiments are much more challenging and fully differential cross sections (FDCS) became only available a few years ago. However, at the same time these measurements for ion impact also yielded the first complete three-dimensional images of the FDCS. The sobering conclusion of these studies was that our understanding of ionization processes in atomic collisions is much less complete than assumed previously. In this talk new unexpected results on three-dimensional FDCS will be presented for kinematic regimes for which so far no experimental FDCS have been obtained yet. These include collisions involving highly relativistic and highly charged ions as well as relatively slow p projectiles. In collaboration with Ahmad Hasan, Natasha Maydanyuk, Matt Foster, Brian Tooke and Don Madison, University of Missouri-Rolla.

  4. Complete 3D kinematics of upper extremity functional tasks.

    PubMed

    van Andel, Carolien J; Wolterbeek, Nienke; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Veeger, DirkJan H E J; Harlaar, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Upper extremity (UX) movement analysis by means of 3D kinematics has the potential to become an important clinical evaluation method. However, no standardized protocol for clinical application has yet been developed, that includes the whole upper limb. Standardization problems include the lack of a single representative function, the wide range of motion of joints and the complexity of the anatomical structures. A useful protocol would focus on the functional status of the arm and particularly the orientation of the hand. The aim of this work was to develop a standardized measurement method for unconstrained movement analysis of the UX that includes hand orientation, for a set of functional tasks for the UX and obtain normative values. Ten healthy subjects performed four representative activities of daily living (ADL). In addition, six standard active range of motion (ROM) tasks were executed. Joint angles of the wrist, elbow, shoulder and scapula were analyzed throughout each ADL task and minimum/maximum angles were determined from the ROM tasks. Characteristic trajectories were found for the ADL tasks, standard deviations were generally small and ROM results were consistent with the literature. The results of this study could form the normative basis for the development of a 'UX analysis report' equivalent to the 'gait analysis report' and would allow for future comparisons with pediatric and/or pathologic movement patterns.

  5. Exclusive measurements of quasi-free proton scattering reactions in inverse and complete kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, V.; Taylor, J. T.; Paschalis, S.; Wamers, F.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Caesar, C.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Heil, M.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Nilsson, T.; Petri, M.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Rossi, D.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.; Weick, H.; Wimmer, C.

    2016-02-01

    Quasi-free scattering reactions of the type (p , 2 p) were measured for the first time exclusively in complete and inverse kinematics, using a 12C beam at an energy of ˜ 400 MeV /u as a benchmark. This new technique has been developed to study the single-particle structure of exotic nuclei in experiments with radioactive-ion beams. The outgoing pair of protons and the fragments were measured simultaneously, enabling an unambiguous identification of the reaction channels and a redundant measurement of the kinematic observables. Both valence and deeply-bound nucleon orbits are probed, including those leading to unbound states of the daughter nucleus. Exclusive (p , 2 p) cross sections of 15.8(18) mb, 1.9(2) mb and 1.5(2) mb to the low-lying 0p-hole states overlapping with the ground state (3 /2-) and with the bound excited states of 11B at 2.125 MeV (1 /2-) and 5.02 MeV (3 /2-), respectively, were determined via γ-ray spectroscopy. Particle-unstable deep-hole states, corresponding to proton removal from the 0s-orbital, were studied via the invariant-mass technique. Cross sections and momentum distributions were extracted and compared to theoretical calculations employing the eikonal formalism. The obtained results are in a good agreement with this theory and with direct-kinematics experiments. The dependence of the proton-proton scattering kinematics on the internal momentum of the struck proton and on its separation energy was investigated for the first time in inverse kinematics employing a large-acceptance measurement.

  6. Understanding patellofemoral pain with maltracking in the presence of joint laxity: complete 3D in vivo patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Frances T; Derasari, Aditya; Brindle, Timothy J; Alter, Katharine E

    2009-05-01

    Patellofemoral pain is widely accepted as one of the most common pathologies involving the knee, yet the etiology of this pain is still an open debate. Generalized joint laxity has been associated with patellofemoral pain, but is not often discussed as a potential source of patellar maltracking. Thus, the objective of this study was to compare the complete 6 degree of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics from a group of patients diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome and maltracking to those from an asymptomatic population. The following null hypotheses were tested: kinematic alterations in patellofemoral maltracking are limited to the axial plane; knee joint kinematics are the same in maltrackers with and without generalized joint laxity (defined by a clinical diagnosis of Ehlers Danlos Syndrome); and no correlations exist between tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics or within patellofemoral kinematics. This study demonstrated that alterations in patellofemoral kinematics, associated with patellofemoral pain, are not limited to the axial plane, minimal correlations exist between patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics, and distinct subgroups likely exist within the general population of maltrackers. Being able to identify subgroups correctly within the omnibus diagnosis of patellar maltracking is a crucial step in correctly defining the pathophysiology and the eventual treatment of these patients. PMID:19009601

  7. Completing the forward kinematic calibration of open loop manipulators when single point position sensors are used

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Louis J.

    1989-01-01

    Single-point sensors can measure the position of one point fixed to a manipulator's end effector. When single-point sensors have been used for calibration, it has not been possible to calibrate the orientation of the tool. Furthermore, it can be difficult to calibrate the sensor system. Results in the literature seldom provide a complete kinematic calibration of the manipulator. Presented here is a technique that enables single-point sensors to gather sufficient information to complete kinematic calibration. In addition, the method can reduce the burden of calibrating the sensor system.

  8. Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, J. S.

    The notation, theory, and applications of kinematical concepts are explored in detail. Transformations are defined for coordinates, vector components, direction cosines, and the inertia matrix. Attitude is investigated in terms of characteristics of the direction cosine matrix, Euler's angles and angular placement theorem, and inertial navigation. Displacement and motion are considered, as are Euler's parameters as quaternions, and non-Cartesian coordinate systems. Applications of kinematics to gyro output transitions from one attitude to another, to linkage mechanisms, and to contacting surfaces are presented. Geometrical optics problems are examined, together with the dynamics of rigid bodies, coning, and the kinematics of steering a tractor and trailer.

  9. Learning Kinematics with a V-Scope: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumper, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    Studies the effect of V-Scope activities on the performance of 11th-grade students in analyzing kinematics graphs. Students were challenged to construct different kinds of graphs using their own movements as well as the motion of a dynamics cart. Results indicate that the V-Scope kinematics laboratory activities can promote kinematics concepts and…

  10. A Kinematical Approach to Dark Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-06

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to cosmological ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t) = 1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to the three best available sets of redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t) = j, we measure q{sub 0} = -0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j = 2.16{sub -0.75}{sup +0.81}, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. A standard ''dynamical'' analysis of the same data, employing the Friedmann equations and modeling the dark energy as a fluid with an equation of state parameter, w (constant), gives {Omega}{sub m} = 0.306{sub -0.040}{sup +0.042} and w = -1.15{sub -0.18}{sup +0.14}, also consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible. Our results provide further interesting support for the concordance {Lambda}CDM paradigm.

  11. A Kinematic Study of Finswimming at Surface

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Jimmy; Baly, Laurent; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Watier, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Finswimming is a sport of speed practiced on the surface or underwater, in which performance is based on whole-body oscillations. The present study investigated the undulatory motion performed by finswimmers at the surface. This study aiming to analyze the influence of the interaction of gender, practice level, and race distance on selected kinematic parameters. Six elite and six novices finswimmers equipped with joints markers (wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, and ankle) were recorded in the sagittal plane. The position of these anatomical marks was digitized at 50 Hz. An automated motion analysis software yielded velocity, vertical amplitude, frequency, and angular position. Results showed that stroke frequency decreased whereas the mean amplitude of all joints increased with increasing race distance (p < 0.01). Mean joint amplitude for the upper limbs (wrist, elbow and shoulder) was smaller for experts than for novices. Whereas that of the ankle was larger, so that the oscillation amplitude increased from shoulder to ankle. Elite male finswimmers were pitching more acutely than female. Moreover, elite male finswimmers showed a smaller knee bending than novices and than elite females (p < 0.01). This indicated that elite male finswimmers attempt to reduce drag forces thanks to a weak knee bending and a low upper limbs pitch. To sum up, gender, expertise, and race distance affect the performance and its kinematics in terms frontal drag. Expertise in finswimming requires taking advantage of the mechanical constraints pertaining to hydrodynamic constraints in order to optimize performance. Key Points Finswimmers are at one and the same time a propelling and a propelled body. This study investigates the undulatory motion performed by finswimmers at the surface. Elite male finswimmers were pitching more acutely than female swimmers and showed a smaller knee bending than both novices and elite female swimmers. Finswimmers tended to perform a dolphin-like motion

  12. A kinematic study of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Sato, T.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to its confirmed nature as the remnant of a standard Type Ia supernova from spectroscopy of its light echo, Tycho's supernova remnant is a unique object that can provide a new perspective into thermonuclear supernova explosions. More than 400 years after its discovery as a supernova in November 1572, the remnant is now spread out over an 8 arcminute diameter region in a fairly symmetric, but patchy, shell-like morphology. The remnant's thermal X-ray emission is dominated by a strong Si Kalpha line and also shows line emission from other species such as S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Existing proper motion and X-ray line width measurements indicate that Tycho's Si-rich ejecta shell is expanding at ~4700 km/s. We have taken advantage of the huge number of Si line photons in the 750-ks Chandra ACIS observation from 2009 to make the first direct velocity measurements of ejecta in Tycho. The patchy nature of the ejecta shell allows for identification of red- and blue-shifted clumps of emission from the receding and approaching hemispheres. We use nonequilibrium ionization thermal models to jointly fit both ACIS-S and ACIS-I observations to determine the radial expansion velocity of individual clumps and associated systematic uncertainty. Red-shifted clumps have speeds of 3500-7800 km/s and blue-shifted clumps 1600--5000 km/s with a systematic uncertainty of 500-2000 km/s determined by intercomparison of the ACIS-S and ACIS-I spectral results. From our Chandra radial analysis of surface brightness, centroid energy, and line width, we have confirmed previous line width measurements from Suzaku, but are able to utilize finer radial bins that reveal additional structure in the kinematics of Tycho. In particular the Si and S line widths reach a deep minimum at the position of the peak surface brightness near the remnant's edge and where Doppler broadening from the shell expansion is minimum. From the measured line widths and assuming that Doppler and turbulent broadening can be

  13. a Kinematically Complete Measurement of Positive Pion Production from Protons Near Threshold.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, John George

    The total cross section for the reaction pp to pnpi^+ was measured at 294, 300, 307, 314, and 320 MeV. Angular distributions for the same reaction were measured at 294, 300 and 320 MeV. This is the first measurement of this reaction channel within 50 MeV of threshold. Study of pion production near threshold allows examination of the short range parts of the NN interaction, particularly the non-resonant partial waves. The data indicates that the contribution of p-waves to the pp to pnpi^+ reaction remains smaller than 20% up to 320 MeV. The total cross section data is compared to the theoretical calculations of Schillaci, Silbar and Young (1969) and Lee and Matsuyama (1987). Both reproduce some features of the data, but neither theory completely explains all the features of the data. There are no angular distribution predictions for comparison, but the data is symmetric around 90 degrees and appears to follow a 1+bcos^2theta _pi distribution, with the parameter b being consistent with zero for 294 MeV, about 0.05 at 300 MeV and about 0.18 at 320 MeV. This indicates that the higher partial waves are still weak at 320 MeV, although they are beginning to come into the reaction.

  14. High School Completion Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    While Alberta enjoys proven high, world-class results in student achievement, raising high school completion rates is one of the top priorities in improving the provincial education system. The 2011-12 targeted high school completion rate is 82% five years after entering Grade 10--a 2.5% increase from the current average rate of 79.5%. The purpose…

  15. Social intentions in Parkinson's disease patients: A kinematic study.

    PubMed

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-09-01

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic system leads to motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms in brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, the dopaminergic system plays an important role in social interactions. The dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia (BG) thought to integrate social cues during the planning and execution of voluntary movements remains, however, largely unexplored. Since PD provides a model to assess this function in humans, our study aimed to investigate the effects of social intentions on actions in non-demented PDpatients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. Participants were instructed to reach for and to grasp an object; they were then told to hand it to another person (social condition) or to place it on a concave frame (individual condition). A 'passive-observer' condition, which was similar to the 'individual' condition except for the presence of an onlooker who simply observed the scene, was also assessed to exclude the possibility that differences might be due to the presence of another person. Movement kinematics were recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Study results demonstrated that the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'social' and the 'individual' conditions; the PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. These results suggest that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating social intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients.

  16. Experimental studies on the kinematics of cutting in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, T. G.; Saldana, C.; Yadav, S.; Du, F.

    2013-06-01

    Slow flow in granular materials is characterized by high solid fraction and sustained inter-particle interaction. The kinematics of trawling or cutting is encountered in processes such as locomotion of organisms in sand; trawl gear movement on a soil deposit; plow movement; movement of rovers, earth moving equipment etc. Additionally, this configuration is very akin to shallow drilling configuration encountered in the mining and petroleum industries. An experimental study has been made in order to understand velocity and deformation fields in cutting of a model rounded sand. Under nominal plane strain conditions, sand is subjected to orthogonal cutting at different tool-rake angles. High-resolution optical images of the region of cutting were obtained during the flow of the granular ensemble around the tool. Interesting kinematics underlying the formation of a chip and the evolution of the deformation field is seen in these experiments. These images are also analyzed using a PIV algorithm and detailed information of the deformation parameters such as velocity, strain rate and volume change is obtained.

  17. Kinematic characteristics of Andalusian, Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horses: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cano, M R; Vivo, J; Miró, F; Morales, J L; Galisteo, A M

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the kinematic trot characteristics of three different breeds of horse: Andalusian (AN, n = 15), Arabian (AR, n = 7) and Anglo-Arabian (AA, n = 5) using standard computer-assisted videography (25 Hz). Linear, temporal and angular parameters in fore- and hind limbs were analysed in six randomly selected strides per horse. Normalised angle-time diagrams along the complete stride were obtained for all joints angles in each breed and specific kinematic characteristics were detected graphically. AA horses displayed longer swing durations in both limbs ans a shorter angular range of motion (ARM) in scapula and pelvis inclination and in shoulder, hip and forelimb retraction-protraction angles. At lift off, stifle and tarsal joint angles were more flexed. In general, only small differences were observed in AR horse kinematics when compared with the other 2 breeds. AN horses presented negative overtracking length, which was positive in AR and AA. In AN horses the elbow and carpal joints were more flexed at the moment of maximal elevation, elbow and fore-fetlock joints also exhibited a larger ARM due to a smaller angle at maximal flexion. In the hind limbs, tarsal, hind fetlock and retraction-protraction angles presented a larger ARM in AN horses due to greater maximal flexion in the tarsal and hind fetlock joints. Fore- and hind fetlocks were also more flexed in horses from this breed. In conclusion, differences between kinematic variables at the trot were observed in the three breeds studied here, mainly in forelimb joints. The most outstanding feature was the greater forelimb flexion recorded in AN horses than in the other breeds which is consistent with the elevated movements in this breed. In AA horses, the ARM of proximal joints involved in retraction protraction in both fore- and hind limbs was smaller. All the differences observed highlighted the idiosyncratic nature of the trot in each breed; this may influence the functional

  18. Photometric and Kinematic Studies of Extragalactic Globular Cluster Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windschitl-Dowell, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are compact, luminous collections of stars created during the early stages of galaxy formation. As a result, the properties of GC systems provide important clues about the formation, merger history, and structure of their host galaxies. In particular, kinematic studies of GCs can be used to investigate the dark matter distribution in galaxy halos and provide observational evidence that can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation. I will present our study of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055, and show how we used wide-field BVR imaging from the WIYN 3.5-m telescope to detect the GC population and measure the global properties of the system. We quantified the radial distribution of the GC system and total number of GCs in these galaxies and compared the results to those of other galaxies.I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). Using spectra taken with AAT/AAOmega, WIYN/HYDRA, and MMT/Hectospec, I measured the radial velocities of GCs, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and V-band mass-to-light (M/LV) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). I compared our results to mass estimates from other kinematic tracers and also considered them in the context of galaxy formation models. For both galaxies, I found that the M/LV profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of our data. I also looked for evidence of rotation within the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. Finally, I examined the velocity dispersion of each GC system as a function of radius and found kinematic differences between the red, metal-rich and blue, metal-poor GC subpopulations.

  19. Mandibular kinematics after orthognathic surgical treatment a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Ugolini, Alessandro; Rocchetta, Davide; Galante, Domenico; Mapelli, Andrea; Giannì, Aldo Bruno

    2010-03-01

    We recorded three-dimensional mandibular movements, while the mouth was being opened and closed, using an optoelectronic motion analyser in 14 patients (5 skeletal Class II, 9 skeletal Class III) who were being assessed 7-49 months after orthognathic operations, and in 44 healthy subjects. All 14 patients had satisfactory healing on clinical examination, and function had been restored. Mandibular movement was divided into its rotational and translational components. On maximum mouth opening, the patients had significantly less total displacement of the mandibular interincisor point (p=0.05), and more mandibular movement that was explained by pure condylar rotation (p=0.006), than control subjects. There was no significant relation between maximum mouth opening and percentage rotation. While mandibular motion was well restored clinically by orthognathic surgery, the kinematics of the joint were modified. Larger studies and longitudinal investigations are necessary to appreciate the clinical relevance of the variations in condylar rotational and translational components.

  20. A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, Rueben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of analyzing the kinematics of joint motion is developed. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) offers several distinct advantages. Past methods of studying anatomic joint motion have usually centered on four approaches. These methods are x-ray projection, goniometric linkage analysis, sonic digitization, and landmark measurement of photogrammetry. Of these four, only x-ray is applicable for in vivo studies. The remaining three methods utilize other types of projections of inter-joint measurements, which can cause various types of error. MRI offers accuracy in measurement due to its tomographic nature (as opposed to projection) without the problems associated with x-ray dosage. Once the data acquisition of MR images was complete, the images were processed using a 3D volume rendering workstation. The metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint of the left index finger was selected and reconstructed into a three-dimensional graphic display. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones were obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the MCP joint. Landmark positions were chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily two dimensional planar motion of this joint was then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three (or more) points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system described the location and orientation of a local target coordinate system. Future research involving volume rendering of MRI data focusing on the internal kinematics of the hand's individual ligaments, cartilage, tendons, etc. will follow. Its findings will show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove (power assisted) design for extravehicular activity (EVA).

  1. Kinematics of Interacting ICMEs and Related Forbush Decrease: Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maričić, D.; Vršnak, B.; Dumbović, M.; Žic, T.; Roša, D.; Hržina, D.; Lulić, S.; Romštajn, I.; Bušić, I.; Salamon, K.; Temmer, M.; Rollett, T.; Veronig, A.; Bostanjyan, N.; Chilingarian, A.; Mailyan, B.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mujić, N.

    2014-01-01

    We study heliospheric propagation and some space weather aspects of three Earth-directed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), successively launched from the active region AR 11158 in the period 13 - 15 February 2011. From the analysis of the ICME kinematics, morphological evolution, and in situ observations, we infer that the three ICMEs interacted on their way to Earth, arriving together at 1 AU as a single interplanetary disturbance. Detailed analysis of the in situ data reveals complex internal structure of the disturbance, where signatures of the three initially independent ICMEs could be recognized. The analysis also reveals compression and heating of the middle ICME, as well as ongoing magnetic reconnection between the leading and the middle ICME. We present evidence showing that the propagation of these two, initially slower ICMEs, was boosted by the fastest, third ICME. Finally, we employ the ground-based cosmic ray observations, to show that this complex disturbance produced a single cosmic ray event, i.e., a simple Forbush decrease (FD). The results presented provide a better understanding of the ICME interactions and reveal effects that should be taken into account in forecasting of the arrival of such compound structures.

  2. A KINEMATIC STUDY OF THE ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. Michael; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Penarrubia, Jorge; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2013-05-10

    We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I/LRIS and Keck II/DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g - i colors (taken with the CFHT/MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses, and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii ({approx}> 700 pc) and low velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} < 5 km s{sup -1}). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]{sub half}=10.3{sup +7.0}{sub -6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1{sigma} uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.

  3. Alternative Education Completers: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Becky L.; Holt, Carleton R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the elements of the alternative education experience significant to successful completion of the program. This phenomenological paradigm provided the framework for all aspects of the qualitative study. Students, parents, administrators, and staff members of two alternative programs in the southeast Kansas…

  4. Studying aerodynamic drag for modeling the kinematical behavior of CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.; Moestl, C.; Zic, T.; Veronig, A. M.; Rollett, T.

    2013-12-01

    With the SECCHI instrument suite aboard STEREO, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be observed from multiple vantage points during their entire propagation all the way from the Sun to 1 AU. The propagation behavior of CMEs in interplanetary space is mainly influenced by the ambient solar wind flow. CMEs that are faster than the ambient solar wind get decelerated, whereas slower ones are accelerated until the CME speed is finally adjusted to the solar wind speed. On a statistical basis, empirical models taking into account the drag force acting on CMEs, are able to describe the observed kinematical behaviors. For several well observed CME events we derive the kinematical evolution by combining remote sensing and in situ data. The observed kinematical behavior is compared to results from current empirical and numerical propagation models. For this we mainly use the drag based model DBM as well as the MHD model ENLIL. We aim to obtain the distance regime at which the solar wind drag force is dominating the CME propagation and quantify differences between different model results. This work has received funding from the FWF: V195-N16, and the European Commission FP7 Projects eHEROES (284461, www.eheroes.eu) and COMESEP (263252, www.comesep.eu).

  5. Normative three-dimensional patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics: a dynamic, in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Seisler, Andrea R; Sheehan, Frances T

    2007-07-01

    In order to advance biomechanical modeling, knee joint implant design and clinical treatment of knee joint pathology, accurate in vivo kinematic data of the combined patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joint during volitional activity are critical. For example, one cause of the increased prevalence of anterior knee pain in the female population is hypothesized to be altered tibiofemoral kinematics, resulting in pathological patellofemoral kinematics. Thus, the objectives of this paper were to test the hypothesis that knee joint kinematics vary based on gender and to explore the correlation between the 3-D kinematics of the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joints. In order to accomplish these goals, a large (n = 34) normative database of combined six degree of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics, acquired noninvasively during volitional knee extension-flexion using fast-PC (dynamic) magnetic resonance imaging, was established. In this normative database, few correlations between tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics were found. Specifically, tibial external rotation did not predict lateral patellar tilt, as has been stated in previous studies. In general, significant differences could not be found based on gender. Further investigation into these relationships in the presence of pathology is warranted.

  6. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  7. A complete analytical solution for the inverse instantaneous kinematics of a spherical-revolute-spherical (7R) redundant manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podhorodeski, R. P.; Fenton, R. G.; Goldenberg, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    Using a method based upon resolving joint velocities using reciprocal screw quantities, compact analytical expressions are generated for the inverse solution of the joint rates of a seven revolute (spherical-revolute-spherical) manipulator. The method uses a sequential decomposition of screw coordinates to identify reciprocal screw quantities used in the resolution of a particular joint rate solution, and also to identify a Jacobian null-space basis used for the direct solution of optimal joint rates. The results of the screw decomposition are used to study special configurations of the manipulator, generating expressions for the inverse velocity solution for all non-singular configurations of the manipulator, and identifying singular configurations and their characteristics. Two functions are therefore served: a new general method for the solution of the inverse velocity problem is presented; and complete analytical expressions are derived for the resolution of the joint rates of a seven degree of freedom manipulator useful for telerobotic and industrial robotic application.

  8. Motor resonance facilitates movement execution: an ERP and kinematic study

    PubMed Central

    Ménoret, Mathilde; Curie, Aurore; des Portes, Vincent; Nazir, Tatjana A.; Paulignan, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Action observation, simulation and execution share neural mechanisms that allow for a common motor representation. It is known that when these overlapping mechanisms are simultaneously activated by action observation and execution, motor performance is influenced by observation and vice versa. To understand the neural dynamics underlying this influence and to measure how variations in brain activity impact the precise kinematics of motor behavior, we coupled kinematics and electrophysiological recordings of participants while they performed and observed congruent or non-congruent actions or during action execution alone. We found that movement velocities and the trajectory deviations of the executed actions increased during the observation of congruent actions compared to the observation of non-congruent actions or action execution alone. This facilitation was also discernible in the motor-related potentials of the participants; the motor-related potentials were transiently more negative in the congruent condition around the onset of the executed movement, which occurred 300 ms after the onset of the observed movement. This facilitation seemed to depend not only on spatial congruency but also on the optimal temporal relationship of the observation and execution events. PMID:24133437

  9. A mechanical supination sprain simulator for studying ankle supination sprain kinematics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yue-Yan; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Fung, Kwai-Yau; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2008-08-01

    This study presents a free-fall mechanical supination sprain simulator for evaluating the ankle joint kinematics during a simulated ankle supination sprain injury. The device allows the foot to be in an anatomical position before the sudden motion, and also allows different degrees of supination, or a combination of inversion and plantarflexion. Five subjects performed simulated supination sprain trials in five different supination angles. Ankle motion was captured by a motion analysis system, and the ankle kinematics were reported in plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, inversion/eversion and internal/external rotation planes. Results showed that all sprain motions were not pure single-plane motions but were accompanied by motion in other two planes, therefore, different degrees of supination were achieved. The presented sprain simulator allows a more comprehensive study of the kinematics of ankle sprain when compared with some previous laboratory research designs.

  10. The case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: a kinematic study on social intention.

    PubMed

    Becchio, Cristina; Sartori, Luisa; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of social intentions on action. Participants (N=13) were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either pass it to another person (social condition) or put it on a concave base (single-agent condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to social intention. Movements performed for the 'social' condition were characterized by a kinematic pattern which differed from those obtained for the 'single-agent' condition. Results are discussed in terms of a motor simulation hypothesis, which assumes that the same mechanisms underlying motor intention are sensitive to social intentions.

  11. The case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: a kinematic study on social intention.

    PubMed

    Becchio, Cristina; Sartori, Luisa; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of social intentions on action. Participants (N=13) were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either pass it to another person (social condition) or put it on a concave base (single-agent condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to social intention. Movements performed for the 'social' condition were characterized by a kinematic pattern which differed from those obtained for the 'single-agent' condition. Results are discussed in terms of a motor simulation hypothesis, which assumes that the same mechanisms underlying motor intention are sensitive to social intentions. PMID:17446089

  12. Using kinematic reduction for studying grasping postures. An application to power and precision grasp of cylinders.

    PubMed

    Jarque-Bou, N; Gracia-Ibáñez, V; Sancho-Bru, J L; Vergara, M; Pérez-González, A; Andrés, F J

    2016-09-01

    The kinematic analysis of human grasping is challenging because of the high number of degrees of freedom involved. The use of principal component and factorial analyses is proposed in the present study to reduce the hand kinematics dimensionality in the analysis of posture for ergonomic purposes, allowing for a comprehensive study without losing accuracy while also enabling velocity and acceleration analyses to be performed. A laboratory study was designed to analyse the effect of weight and diameter in the grasping posture for cylinders. This study measured the hand posture from six subjects when transporting cylinders of different weights and diameters with precision and power grasps. The hand posture was measured using a Vicon(®) motion-tracking system, and the principal component analysis was applied to reduce the kinematics dimensionality. Different ANOVAs were performed on the reduced kinematic variables to check the effect of weight and diameter of the cylinders, as well as that of the subject. The results show that the original twenty-three degrees of freedom of the hand were reduced to five, which were identified as digit arching, closeness, palmar arching, finger adduction and thumb opposition. Both cylinder diameter and weight significantly affected the precision grasping posture: diameter affects closeness, palmar arching and opposition, while weight affects digit arching, palmar arching and closeness. The power-grasping posture was mainly affected by the cylinder diameter, through digit arching, closeness and opposition. The grasping posture was largely affected by the subject factor and this effect couldn't be attributed only to hand size. In conclusion, this kinematic reduction allowed identifying the effect of the diameter and weight of the cylinders in a comprehensive way, being diameter more important than weight.

  13. Using kinematic reduction for studying grasping postures. An application to power and precision grasp of cylinders.

    PubMed

    Jarque-Bou, N; Gracia-Ibáñez, V; Sancho-Bru, J L; Vergara, M; Pérez-González, A; Andrés, F J

    2016-09-01

    The kinematic analysis of human grasping is challenging because of the high number of degrees of freedom involved. The use of principal component and factorial analyses is proposed in the present study to reduce the hand kinematics dimensionality in the analysis of posture for ergonomic purposes, allowing for a comprehensive study without losing accuracy while also enabling velocity and acceleration analyses to be performed. A laboratory study was designed to analyse the effect of weight and diameter in the grasping posture for cylinders. This study measured the hand posture from six subjects when transporting cylinders of different weights and diameters with precision and power grasps. The hand posture was measured using a Vicon(®) motion-tracking system, and the principal component analysis was applied to reduce the kinematics dimensionality. Different ANOVAs were performed on the reduced kinematic variables to check the effect of weight and diameter of the cylinders, as well as that of the subject. The results show that the original twenty-three degrees of freedom of the hand were reduced to five, which were identified as digit arching, closeness, palmar arching, finger adduction and thumb opposition. Both cylinder diameter and weight significantly affected the precision grasping posture: diameter affects closeness, palmar arching and opposition, while weight affects digit arching, palmar arching and closeness. The power-grasping posture was mainly affected by the cylinder diameter, through digit arching, closeness and opposition. The grasping posture was largely affected by the subject factor and this effect couldn't be attributed only to hand size. In conclusion, this kinematic reduction allowed identifying the effect of the diameter and weight of the cylinders in a comprehensive way, being diameter more important than weight. PMID:27184310

  14. Deepwater completion and tieback -- A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiselin, D.

    1996-10-01

    Major operators are engaged in large-scale integrated projects around the world. Does integration favor the big boys, or can a small independent operator benefit from this approach? Independent partners Hardy Oil and Gas USA and Samedan Oil Corp. looked into integrated project management to successfully design and install subsea completions, subsea pipelines, and platform tiebacks and interfaces to two platforms operated by Texaco and Chevron, respectively. The paper describes the project management approach taken and results of the project.

  15. A Kinematically Complete Measurement of the Proton Structure Function F2 in the Resonance Region and Evaluation of Its Moments

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail Osipenko; Et. Al.

    2003-05-01

    We measured the inclusive electron-proton cross section in the nucleon resonance region (W<2.5 GeV) at momentum transfers Q2 below 4.5 (GeV/c)2 with the CLAS detector. The large acceptance of CLAS allowed the measurement of the cross section in a large, contiguous two-dimensional range of Q2 and x, making it possible to perform an integration of the data at fixed Q2 over the significant x interval. >From these data we extracted the structure function F2 and, by including other world data, we studied the Q2 evolution of its moments, Mn(Q2), in order to estimate higher twist contributions. The small statistical and systematic uncertainties of the CLAS data allow a precise extraction of the higher twists and will require significant improvements in theoretical predictions if a meaningful comparison with these new experimental results is to be made.

  16. A Three-Dimensional Kinematic and Kinetic Study of the College-Level Female Softball Swing

    PubMed Central

    Milanovich, Monica; Nesbit, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper quantifies and discusses the three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the female softball swing as performed by fourteen female collegiate amateur subjects. The analyses were performed using a three-dimensional computer model. The model was driven kinematically from subject swings data that were recorded with a multi-camera motion analysis system. Each subject used two distinct bats with significantly different inertial properties. Model output included bat trajectories, subject/bat interaction forces and torques, work, and power. These data formed the basis for a detailed analysis and description of fundamental swing kinematic and kinetic quantities. The analyses revealed that the softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. In addition, the potential effects of bat properties on swing mechanics are discussed. The paths of the hands and the centre-of-curvature of the bat relative to the horizontal plane appear to be important trajectory characteristics of the swing. Descriptions of the swing mechanics and practical implications are offered based upon these findings. Key Points The female softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. The paths of the grip point, bat centre-of-curvature, CG, and COP are complex yet reveal consistent patterns among subjects indicating that these patterns are fundamental components of the swing. The most important mechanical quantity relative to generating bat speed is the total work applied to the bat from the batter. Computer modeling of the softball swing is a viable means for study of the fundamental mechanics of the swing motion, the interactions between the batter and the bat, and the energy transfers between the two. PMID:24570623

  17. A Morpho-kinematic and Spectroscopic study of Bipolar Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, Niall

    2015-09-01

    In this thesis, studies of the kinematic properties for a sample of Galactic bipolar planetary nebulae, based on optical and infrared observations, were performed using a morpho-kinematic code, optical and NIR diagnostic diagrams, and techniques using data analyses. The mechanisms that form complex bipolar planetary nebulae remain unclear, and their shapes can be generated either as a planetary or symbiotic nebula. The origin of the material ionised by the white dwarf is very different in these two scenarios, and it complicates the understanding of the morphologies of planetary nebulae. The physical properties, structure, and dynamics of the bipolar nebulae, MyCn 18, M 2-9, Mz 3, Hen 2-104, and Abell 14, are each investigated in detail with the aim of understanding their nature, shaping mechanisms, and evolutionary history. For MyCn 18, VLT infrared images, VLT ISAAC infrared spectra, and long-slit optical echelle spectra are used to investigate the inner and outer regions of the nebula. The morpho-kinematic modelling tool shape was used to firmly constrain the structure and kinematics of the source. A timescale analysis was used to help determine the kinematical age of the nebula and its main components. A spectroscopic study of MyCn 18's central region reveals the detailed make-up of its nebular composition. Molecular hydrogen, atomic helium, and Brackett gamma emission are detected in the central regions. ISAAC spectra from a slit position along the narrow waist of the nebula demonstrate that the ionised gas resides closer to the centre of the nebula than the molecular emission. A final reconstructed 3-D model of MyCn 18 was generated, providing kinematical information on the expansion velocity of its nebular components by means of position-velocity arrays (or observed long-slit spectra). A kinematical age of the nebula and its components were obtained using the position-velocity arrays and timescale analysis. For M 2-9, Mz 3, and Hen 2-104, long-slit optical

  18. A Gemini/GMOS Study of Intermediate Luminosity Early-type Virgo Cluster Galaxies. I. Globular Cluster and Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biao; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hong-xin; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Puzia, Thomas H.; Takamiya, Marianne; Trancho, Gelys; West, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster (GC) systems and diffuse stellar light of four intermediate luminosity (sub-L*) early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster based on Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs (GMOS) data. Our galaxy sample is fainter (-23.8\\lt {{M}K}\\lt -22.7) than most previous studies, nearly doubling the number of galaxies in this magnitude range that now have GC kinematics. The data for the diffuse light extends to 4Re, and the data for the GCs reaches 8-12Re. We find that the kinematics in these outer regions are all different despite the fact that these four galaxies have similar photometric properties, and are uniformly classified as “fast rotators” from their stellar kinematics within 1Re. The GC systems exhibit a wide range of kinematic morphology. The rotation axis and amplitude can change between the inner and outer regions, including a case of counter-rotation. This difference shows the importance of wide-field kinematic studies, and shows that stellar and GC kinematics can change significantly as one moves beyond the inner regions of galaxies. Moreover, the kinematics of the GC systems can differ from that of the stars, suggesting that the formation of the two populations are also distinct.

  19. Improving Homework Completion of Students through Tutored Study Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicken, Kori S.; Foreman, Carol D.; Jensen, Robin L.; Sherwood, Justin A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a guided study hall on homework completion. Two groups of students were analyzed in their homework completion rates. Homework completion rates of the students that participated in Site A were reviewed in their five core subjects, while the homework completion rates of the students at Site B…

  20. Kinematic Pattern of the Drag-Flick: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, María; López de Subijana, Cristina; Antonio, Raquel; Navarro, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The drag-flick is more efficient than hits or pushes when a penalty corner situation is in effect in field hockey. Previous research has studied the biomechanical pattern of the drag-flick, trying to find the cues for an optimal performance. On the other hand, some other studies have examined the most effective visual pick-up of relevant information in shots and goalkeeper anticipation. The aim of this study was to analyse the individual differences in the drag-flick pattern in order to provide relevant information for goalkeepers. One female skilled drag-flicker participated in the study. A VICON optoelectronic system (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, UK) was used to capture the drag-flicks with six cameras. The results showed that the main significant differences between right and left shots (p<0.05) in the stick angles, stick minimum angular velocity and front foot-ball distance were when the front foot heel contacted the floor (T1) and at the minimum velocity of the stick, before the dragging action (T3). The findings showed that the most relevant information might be picked up at the ball-and-stick location before the dragging action. PMID:23487429

  1. A kinematic study of the Lupus star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the southern star-forming region located in Lupus that constitutes one of the richest associations of T Tauri stars. Based on the convergent point (CP) method combined with a k-NN analysis we identify 109 pre-main sequence stars in this region that define the Lupus association of comoving stars, and derive individual distances for all group members.

  2. Proper-Motion Based Kinematics Study of Galactic RR Lyraes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambis, Andrei K.; Berdnikov, Leonid N.; Rastorguev, Alexei S.; Zabolotskikh, Marina V.

    2016-08-01

    We use the UCAC4 and SDSS proper motions of about 7500 RR Lyrae type variables located within ~10 kpc from the Sun to study the dependence of their velocity ellipsoid on Galactocentric distance in the R G = 3-17 kpc interval. The radial velocity dispersion, σ VR , decreases from ~190 km/s at R G = 3.5-5.5 kpc down to ~100 km/s at R G = 13-15 kpc, and the σ VT /σ VR ratio remains virtually constant (σ VT /σ VR ~0.54-0.64) in the Galactocentric distance interval from R G = 4.5 kpc to R G = 10.5 kpc increasing to ~0.9 both toward the Galactic center and beyond R G = 11 kpc.

  3. Studying primate carpal kinematics in three dimensions using a computed-tomography-based markerless registration method.

    PubMed

    Orr, Caley M; Leventhal, Evan L; Chivers, Spencer F; Marzke, Mary W; Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J

    2010-04-01

    The functional morphology of the wrist pertains to a number of important questions in primate evolutionary biology, including that of hominins. Reconstructing locomotor and manipulative capabilities of the wrist in extinct species requires a detailed understanding of wrist biomechanics in extant primates and the relationship between carpal form and function. The kinematics of carpal movement, and the role individual joints play in providing mobility and stability of the wrist, is central to such efforts. However, there have been few detailed biomechanical studies of the nonhuman primate wrist. This is largely because of the complexity of wrist morphology and the considerable technical challenges involved in tracking the movements of the many small bones that compose the carpus. The purpose of this article is to introduce and outline a method adapted from human clinical studies of three-dimensional (3D) carpal kinematics for use in a comparative context. The method employs computed tomography of primate cadaver forelimbs in increments throughout the wrist's range of motion, coupled with markerless registration of 3D polygon models based on inertial properties of each bone. The 3D kinematic principles involved in extracting motion axis parameters that describe bone movement are reviewed. In addition, a set of anatomically based coordinate systems embedded in the radius, capitate, hamate, lunate, and scaphoid is presented for the benefit of other primate functional morphologists interested in studying carpal kinematics. Finally, a brief demonstration of how the application of these methods can elucidate the mechanics of the wrist in primates illustrates the closer-packing of carpals in chimpanzees than in orangutans, which may help to stabilize the midcarpus and produce a more rigid wrist beneficial for efficient hand posturing during knuckle-walking locomotion.

  4. Feasibility of using combined EMG and kinematic signals for prosthesis control: A simulation study using a virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Blana, Dimitra; Kyriacou, Theocharis; Lambrecht, Joris M; Chadwick, Edward K

    2016-08-01

    Transhumeral amputation has a significant effect on a person's independence and quality of life. Myoelectric prostheses have the potential to restore upper limb function, however their use is currently limited due to lack of intuitive and natural control of multiple degrees of freedom. The goal of this study was to evaluate a novel transhumeral prosthesis controller that uses a combination of kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from the person's proximal humerus. Specifically, we trained a time-delayed artificial neural network to predict elbow flexion/extension and forearm pronation/supination from six proximal EMG signals, and humeral angular velocity and linear acceleration. We evaluated this scheme with ten able-bodied subjects offline, as well as in a target-reaching task presented in an immersive virtual reality environment. The offline training had a target of 4° for flexion/extension and 8° for pronation/supination, which it easily exceeded (2.7° and 5.5° respectively). During online testing, all subjects completed the target-reaching task with path efficiency of 78% and minimal overshoot (1.5%). Thus, combining kinematic and muscle activity signals from the proximal humerus can provide adequate prosthesis control, and testing in a virtual reality environment can provide meaningful data on controller performance. PMID:26190031

  5. 2MASS photometry and kinematical studies of open cluster NGC 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsanhoury, W. H.; Haroon, A. A.; Chupina, N. V.; Vereshchagin, S. V.; Sariya, Devesh P.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present our results for the photometric and kinematical studies of old open cluster NGC 188. We determined various astrophysical parameters like limited radius, core and tidal radii, distance, luminosity and mass functions, total mass, relaxation time etc. for the cluster using 2MASS catalog. We obtained the cluster's distance from the Sun as 1721 ± 41 pc and log (age)= 9.85 ± 0.05 at Solar metallicity. The relaxation time of the cluster is smaller than the estimated cluster age which suggests that the cluster is dynamically relaxed. Our results agree with the values mentioned in the literature. We also determined the clusters apex coordinates as (281°.88, -44∘ .76) using AD-diagram method. Other kinematical parameters like space velocity components, cluster center and elements of Solar motion etc. have also been computed.

  6. A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, Reuben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for analyzing the kinematics of joint motion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The reconstruction of the metacarpalphalangeal joint of the left index finger into a 3D graphic display is shown. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones are obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the joint. Landmark positions are chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily 2D planar motion of this joint is then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three or more points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system describes the location and orientation of the local target coordinate system. The findings show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove design for EVA.

  7. Swimming performance studies on the eastern Pacific bonito Sarda chiliensis, a close relative of the tunas (family Scombridae) II. Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Dowis, Hawkins J; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Graham, Jeffrey B; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2003-08-01

    The swimming kinematics of the eastern Pacific bonito Sarda chiliensis at a range of sustained speeds were analyzed to test the hypothesis that the bonito's swimming mode differs from the thunniform locomotor mode of tunas. Eight bonito (fork length FL 47.5+/-2.1 cm, mass 1.25+/-0.15 kg) (mean +/- S.D.) swam at speeds of 50-130 cm s(-1) at 18+/-2 degrees C in the same temperature-controlled water tunnel that was used in previous studies of tunas. Kinematics variables, quantified from 60 Hz video recordings and analyzed using a computerized, two-dimensional motion analysis system, were compared with published data for similar sized tunas at comparable speeds. Bonito tailbeat frequency, tailbeat amplitude and stride length all increased significantly with speed. Neither yaw (6.0+/-0.6%FL) nor propulsive wavelength (120+/-65% fish total length) varied with speed, and there were no mass or body-length effects on the kinematics variables for the size range of bonitos used. Relative to similar sized yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) tunas at similar speeds, the bonito has a lower tailbeat frequency, a higher yaw and a greater stride length. The lateral displacement and bending angle of each intervertebral joint during a complete tailbeat cycle were determined for the bonito at a swimming speed of 90 cm s(-1). The pattern of mean maximum lateral displacement (z(max)) and mean maximum bending angle (beta(max)) along the body in the bonito differed from that of both chub mackerel Scomber japonicus and kawakawa tuna Euthynnus affinis; z(max) was highest in the bonito. This study verifies that S. chiliensis is a carangiform swimmer and supports the hypothesis that the thunniform locomotor mode is a derived tuna characteristic associated with changes in this group's myotomal architecture. The finding that yaw and z(max) were greater in the bonito than in both mackerels and tunas suggests that swimming kinematics in the bonito is not intermediate

  8. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  9. Inverse kinematics (p, n) reactions studies using the WINDS slow neutron detector and the SAMURAI spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, J.; Sasano, M.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Baba, H.; Chao, W.; Dozono, M.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jhang, G.; Kameda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Milman, E.; Motobayashi, T.; Otsu, H.; Panin, V.; Powell, W.; Sakai, H.; Sako, M.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Stuhl, L.; Suzuki, H.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Takeda, H.; Uesaka, T.; Yoneda, K.; Zenihiro, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Sumikama, T.; Tako, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.; Togano, Y.; Shikata, M.; Tsubota, J.; Yako, K.; Shimoura, S.; Ota, S.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Takaki, M.; Michimasa, S.; Kisamori, K.; Lee, C. S.; Tokieda, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koyama, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Wakasa, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Kaneko, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Mucher, D.; Reichert, S.; Bazin, D.; Lee, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined the low-energy neutron detector WINDS (Wide-angle Inverse-kinematics Neutron Detectors for SHARAQ) and the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIKEN Nishina Center RI Beam Factory (RIBF) in order to perform (p, n) reactions in inverse kinematics for unstable nuclei in the mass region around A ∼ 100 . In this setup, WINDS is used for detecting recoil neutrons and the SAMURAI spectrometer is used for tagging decay channel of heavy residue. The first experiment by using the setup was performed to study Gamow-Teller transitions from 132Sn in April 2014. The atomic number Z and mass-to-charge ratio A / Q of the beam residues were determined from the measurements of time of flight, magnetic rigidity and energy loss. The obtained A / Q and Z resolutions were σA/Q = 0.14 % and σZ = 0.22 , respectively. Furthermore, owing to the large momentum acceptance (50 %) of SAMURAI, the beam residues associated with the γ , 1n and 2n decay channel were measured in the same magnetic field setting. The kinematic loci of the measured recoil neutron energy and laboratory angle are clearly seen. It shows that the excitation energy up to about 20 MeV can be reconstructed.

  10. [In vivo study of kinematics of the elbow using electromagnetic goniometer].

    PubMed

    Chantelot, C; Fontaine, C; Diop, A; Migaud, H; Lavaste, F; Duquennoy, A

    1998-01-01

    We used an electromagnetic goniometer to study the angular and translations displacements between the humerus and the 2 bones of the forearm. The electromagnetic gionometer allows acquisition of the coordinates and analysis of the 6 degrees of motion. To validate our external fixation apparatus, we used a fresh body upper limb. At first, a series of measurements was conducted with the apparatus. We then performed a series of measurements, by fixing the transmitter and receiver with external fixation pins directly inserted into the bones of the arm and forearm. To assess the reproducibility of our method, we chose a healthy subject. We performed 20 measurements over his right and left elbows. In order to study normal elbow kinematics, we performed measurements on 10 healthy subjects. The study of rotation showed that the apparatus was adapted to measure flexion-extension. It limited pronation-supination movement to about 26.7 degrees. Abduction was increased by 19.7 degrees by our apparatus during flexion-extension, but abduction was reliable within a 2 degrees range for pronation-supination. The sliding movements recorded during flexion-extension were reliable within approximately 3 mm for frontal translations, 6 mm for fitting, and 1 mm for external translations. For the sliding movements recorded in pronation-supination, frontal translations were reliable within about 7 mm, fitting was reliable within 1.9 mm and external translations were reliable within about 2.9 mm. During flexion-extension of the elbow, flexion-extension, frontal translations and external translations were reproducible. The reproducibility test showed that only 6 measurements were reproducible. The kinematic elbow study of a healthy subject showed that the average amplitude of flexion-extension was close to the measurement observed with the manual goniometer. The results in the healthy subject showed that the elbow is more stable during pronation-supination than during flexion-extension. This

  11. Simulated stellar kinematics studies of high-redshift galaxies with the HARMONI Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, S.; Zieleniewski, S.; Houghton, R. C. W.; Thatte, N.; Devriendt, J.; Tecza, M.; Clarke, F.; O'Brien, K.; Häußler, B.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study into the capabilities of integrated and spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of galaxies at z = 2-4 with the future HARMONI spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) using the simulation pipeline, HSIM. We focus particularly on the instrument's capabilities in stellar absorption line integral field spectroscopy, which will allow us to study the stellar kinematics and stellar population characteristics. Such measurements for star-forming and passive galaxies around the peak star formation era will provide a critical insight into the star formation, quenching and mass assembly history of high-z, and thus present-day galaxies. First, we perform a signal-to-noise study for passive galaxies at a range of stellar masses for z = 2-4, assuming different light profiles; for this population, we estimate that integrated stellar absorption line spectroscopy with HARMONI will be limited to galaxies with M* ≳ 1010.7 M⊙. Secondly, we use HSIM to perform a mock observation of a typical star-forming 1010 M⊙ galaxy at z = 3 generated from the high-resolution cosmological simulation NUTFB. We demonstrate that the input stellar kinematics of the simulated galaxy can be accurately recovered from the integrated spectrum in a 15-h observation, using common analysis tools. Whilst spatially resolved spectroscopy is likely to remain out of reach for this particular galaxy, we estimate HARMONI's performance limits in this regime from our findings. This study demonstrates how instrument simulators such as HSIM can be used to quantify instrument performance and study observational biases on kinematics retrieval; and shows the potential of making observational predictions from cosmological simulation output data.

  12. Study of the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of a wormgear transmission for helicopter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1994-01-01

    The first phase of the study of the performance of a wormgear transmission is reported. In this phase the work included the selection of a double-enveloping wormgear type, and its dimensions, suitable for use in helicopter transmissions; the 3-D graphics representation of the selected wormgear using the I-DEAS software; the analysis of the kinematics of meshing; the analysis of load sharing among the meshing teeth; and the implementation of the analyses in a computer program. The report describes the analyses, their results, and the use of the computer programs.

  13. A numerical and experimental study of the kinematics of a tennis ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro Sorroche, Juan

    A numerical and experimental study of the kinematics of a tennis ball. An experimental apparatus to collect data of the tennis ball in motion is designed and constructed. Data collected by the experimental apparatus is corrected by the intrinsic and extrinsic camera distortions before numeric calculation predictions of the ball's point of impact with the court are made. The experimental apparatus constructed together with comprehensive numeric computations including atmospheric conditions and spin decay, allowed making predictions of the ball's point of impact with the court with and errors <0.029%

  14. A kinematic study on (un)intentional imitation in bottlenose dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Bulgheroni, Maria; Tizzi, Raffaella; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of observing other’s movements on subsequent performance in bottlenose dolphins. The imitative ability of non-human animals has intrigued a number of researchers. So far, however, studies in dolphins have been confined to intentional imitation concerned with the explicit request to imitate other agents. In the absence of instruction to imitate, do dolphins (un)intentionally replicate other’s movement features? To test this, dolphins were filmed while reaching and touching a stimulus before and after observing another dolphin (i.e., model) performing the same action. All videos were reviewed and segmented in order to extract the relevant movements. A marker was inserted post hoc via software on the videos upon the anatomical landmark of interest (i.e., rostrum) and was tracked throughout the time course of the movement sequence. The movement was analyzed using an in-house software developed to perform two-dimensional (2D) post hoc kinematic analysis. The results indicate that dolphins’ kinematics is sensitive to other’s movement features. Movements performed for the “visuomotor priming” condition were characterized by a kinematic pattern similar to that performed by the observed dolphin (i.e., model). Addressing the issue of spontaneous imitation in bottlenose dolphins might allow ascertaining whether the potential or impulse to produce an imitative action is generated, not just when they intend to imitate, but whenever they watch another conspecific’s behavior. In closing, this will clarify whether motor representational capacity is a by-product of factors specific to humans or whether more general characteristics such as processes of associative learning prompted by high level of encephalization could help to explain the evolution of this ability. PMID:26300764

  15. A kinematic study on (un)intentional imitation in bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Bulgheroni, Maria; Tizzi, Raffaella; Castiello, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of observing other's movements on subsequent performance in bottlenose dolphins. The imitative ability of non-human animals has intrigued a number of researchers. So far, however, studies in dolphins have been confined to intentional imitation concerned with the explicit request to imitate other agents. In the absence of instruction to imitate, do dolphins (un)intentionally replicate other's movement features? To test this, dolphins were filmed while reaching and touching a stimulus before and after observing another dolphin (i.e., model) performing the same action. All videos were reviewed and segmented in order to extract the relevant movements. A marker was inserted post hoc via software on the videos upon the anatomical landmark of interest (i.e., rostrum) and was tracked throughout the time course of the movement sequence. The movement was analyzed using an in-house software developed to perform two-dimensional (2D) post hoc kinematic analysis. The results indicate that dolphins' kinematics is sensitive to other's movement features. Movements performed for the "visuomotor priming" condition were characterized by a kinematic pattern similar to that performed by the observed dolphin (i.e., model). Addressing the issue of spontaneous imitation in bottlenose dolphins might allow ascertaining whether the potential or impulse to produce an imitative action is generated, not just when they intend to imitate, but whenever they watch another conspecific's behavior. In closing, this will clarify whether motor representational capacity is a by-product of factors specific to humans or whether more general characteristics such as processes of associative learning prompted by high level of encephalization could help to explain the evolution of this ability.

  16. Internal Kinematics of the Volume-Reduced Tongue: A Longitudinal Microsonometric Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Shcherbatyy, Volodymyr; Liu, Zi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study examined tongue internal kinematics during feeding over time after its volume reduction. Six ultrasonic crystals were implanted into the tongue to record distance changes in anterior width (AW), bilateral lengths (LENG), posterior thicknesses (THICK), and posterior dorsal (PDW) and ventral (PVW) widths in five sibling pairs of Yucatan minipigs (N = 10). In each pair, one received tongue volume reduction surgery (reduction), and the other had the identical incisions without tissue removal (sham). Functional deformation of the tongue from preimplanted ultrasonic crystals was recorded during natural feeding 1 day before, 7-8, 13-15, and 28-30 days after the surgery. The results revealed that feeding behavior and tongue functional deformation were unchanged over time in the sham pigs. However, at Days 7-8, more frequent and longer ingestion episodes were seen in the reduction as compared with the sham. Moreover, deformational changes in AW and LENG decreased, whereas those in THICK, PDW, and PVW increased significantly (P < 0.001). At Days 13-15, the reduced deformational changes in LENG (P < 0.01) slightly restored, and the increased deformation in THICK (P > 0.05), PDW (P < 0.01), and PVW (P < 0.05) diminished. At Days 28-30, the restoration of AW and LENG continued (P < 0.01-0.05), but previously enhanced deformations in THICK, PDW, and PVW were no longer significantly different from the baseline (P > 0.05). These results suggest that the tongue volume reduction has significant and persistent impacts on feeding behaviors and tongue internal kinematics, and the restoring capacity of internal kinematics in the anterior tongue is limited and incomplete over time.

  17. A Study of Prior Learning Assessment in Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jean Marie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of prior learning assessment (PLA) in postsecondary degree completion for adult community college students at Mountwest Community and Technical College (MCTC). The study group consisted of 339 MCTC graduates, who applied PLA credits toward degree completion between the academic year 2006 and 2011.…

  18. Bayesian Hierarchical Poisson Regression Models: An Application to a Driving Study with Kinematic Events

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungduk; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Zhiwei; Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Albert, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Although there is evidence that teenagers are at a high risk of crashes in the early months after licensure, the driving behavior of these teenagers is not well understood. The Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study (NTDS) is the first U.S. study to document continuous driving performance of newly-licensed teenagers during their first 18 months of licensure. Counts of kinematic events such as the number of rapid accelerations are available for each trip, and their incidence rates represent different aspects of driving behavior. We propose a hierarchical Poisson regression model incorporating over-dispersion, heterogeneity, and serial correlation as well as a semiparametric mean structure. Analysis of the NTDS data is carried out with a hierarchical Bayesian framework using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms to accommodate the flexible mean structure. We show that driving with a passenger and night driving decrease kinematic events, while having risky friends increases these events. Further the within-subject variation in these events is comparable to the between-subject variation. This methodology will be useful for other intensively collected longitudinal count data, where event rates are low and interest focuses on estimating the mean and variance structure of the process. This article has online supplementary materials. PMID:24076760

  19. Study on individual stochastic model of GNSS observations for precise kinematic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Próchniewicz, Dominik; Szpunar, Ryszard

    2015-04-01

    The proper definition of mathematical positioning model, which is defined by functional and stochastic models, is a prerequisite to obtain the optimal estimation of unknown parameters. Especially important in this definition is realistic modelling of stochastic properties of observations, which are more receiver-dependent and time-varying than deterministic relationships. This is particularly true with respect to precise kinematic applications which are characterized by weakening model strength. In this case, incorrect or simplified definition of stochastic model causes that the performance of ambiguity resolution and accuracy of position estimation can be limited. In this study we investigate the methods of describing the measurement noise of GNSS observations and its impact to derive precise kinematic positioning model. In particular stochastic modelling of individual components of the variance-covariance matrix of observation noise performed using observations from a very short baseline and laboratory GNSS signal generator, is analyzed. Experimental test results indicate that the utilizing the individual stochastic model of observations including elevation dependency and cross-correlation instead of assumption that raw measurements are independent with the same variance improves the performance of ambiguity resolution as well as rover positioning accuracy. This shows that the proposed stochastic assessment method could be a important part in complex calibration procedure of GNSS equipment.

  20. 2D kinematic study of the central region of NGC 4501.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, P.; Faúndez-Abans, M.; Freitas-Lemes, P.; Rodrigues, I.; de Oliveira-Abans, M.

    2016-09-01

    GMOS-IFU observational data were used to study the detailed two dimensional gas kinematics and morphological structures within the ˜ 500 × 421 pc2 of the active Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4501. We provide empirical evidences of possible outflowing material from the central zones of NGC 4501 to the observer. In addition, we performed a spectral synthesis and diagnostic diagram analysis to determine respectively the dominant stellar population in the inner disc of this galaxy and to unveil the actual nature of the central engine of NGC 4501. The principal finding of this work is that the central regions of NGC 4501 are dominated by non circular motions connected to probable outflows of matter from the nuclear regions of this galaxy. A predominant old stellar population inhabits the internal zones of NGC 4501 excluding the possibility of ongoing starburst activity in the central parsecs of this galaxy. The latter result is confirmed by the diagnostic diagram analysis that establishes a preponderant active galactic nucleus character for NGC 4501. These outcomes together provide a general description of the gas motion and the corresponding nuclear activity in the internal disc of NGC 4501 in an attempt to elucidate the possible relation among the central activity and the induced kinematic properties of this nearby galaxy.

  1. Augmented kinematic feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andert, Ed P., Jr.; Archipley-Smith, Donna K.

    1994-07-01

    This paper discusses a real-time augmented kinematic feedback system which can be used as a diagnosis tool for individuals with motor disabilities. The system captures and analyzes movement via color targets attached to an individual and then feeds back information about movement kinematics. This target tracking approach has a high potential for achieving a real- time kinematic assessment capability. The approach recognizes distinct moving colored targets using video data. Multiple colored targets are attached to an individual at strategic locations and then target movement is tracked using a video data acquisition system. The ability to track and assess movement in real-time allows researchers and practitioners to better study and potentially treat various motor disabilities. Recent research has suggested that kinematic feedback can enhance motor recovery of disabled individuals. This approach addresses the need for a real-time measure of human movement and discusses using kinematic feedback to enhance disability recovery.

  2. A Study of Knee Joint Kinematics and Mechanics using a Human FE Model.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Junji; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Posterior translation of the tibia with respect to the femur can stretch the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Fifteen millimeters of relative displacement between the femur and tibia is known as the Injury Assessment Reference Value (IARV) for the PCL injury. Since the anterior protuberance of the tibial plateau can be the first site of contact when the knee is flexed, the knee bolster is generally designed with an inclined surface so as not to directly load the projection in frontal crashes. It should be noted, however, that the initial flexion angle of the occupant knee can vary among individuals and the knee flexion angle can change due to the occupant motion. The behavior of the tibial protuberance related to the knee flexion angle has not been described yet. The instantaneous angle of the knee joint at the timing of restraining the knee should be known to manage the geometry and functions of knee restraint devices. The purposes of this study are first to understand the kinematics of the knee joint during flexion, and second to characterize the mechanics of the knee joint under anterior-posterior loading. A finite element model of the knee joint, extracted from the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS), was used to analyze the mechanism. The model was validated against kinematics and mechanical responses of the human knee joint. By tracking the relative positions and angles between the patella and the tibia in a knee flexing simulation, the magnitude of the tibial anterior protuberance was described as a function of the knee joint angle. The model revealed that the mechanics of the knee joint was characterized as a combination of stiffness of the patella-femur structure and the PCL It was also found that the magnitude of the tibial anterior protuberance determined the amount of initial stretch of the PCL in anterior-posterior loading. Based on the knee joint kinematics and mechanics, an interference boundary was proposed for different knee flexion angles, so

  3. Lower Extremity Kinematic Profile of Gait of Patients After Ankle Fracture: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Avi; Mor, Amit; Segal, Ganit; Bar, Dana; Monda, Maureen K; Kish, Benjamin; Nyska, Meir; Palmanovich, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the differences in the lower extremity gait kinematic profile of patients recovering from ankle fracture compared with healthy controls. In addition, we inquired whether the profile would differ among fracture severity groups. A total of 48 patients participated in the present prospective, case-control study. The gait of 24 patients recovering from an ankle fracture injury and 24 healthy matched controls was examined using an inertial measurement unit sensor system. The following gait parameters were evaluated: knee range of motion (ROM) during the swing phase, maximum knee flexion angle during stance, thigh and calf ROM, and stride duration. Statistically significant differences were found between the ankle fracture group and the control group for all parameters. The patients with ankle fracture had a lower knee ROM during swing phase compared with the control group (mean ± standard deviation 43.0° ± 15.5° compared with 66.7° ± 5.1°, respectively; p < .001). The maximum knee flexion angle during stance was lower in the patients with ankle fracture than in the control group (mean ± standard deviation 10.5° ± 6.1° compared with 21.2° ± 4.5°, respectively; p < .001). Patients with ankle fracture also had lower gait cycle thigh and calf ROM angles (p < .001) and a longer stride duration (p < .001) compared with the control group. No statistically significant differences were found among the severity groups. These results suggest that the gait kinematic characteristics vary between healthy people and patients recovering from an ankle fracture injury during the short-term period after injury. PMID:27267411

  4. Lithospheric Structure, Crustal Kinematics, and Earthquakes in North China: An Integrated Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Yang, Y.; Sandvol, E.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.; Zhou, S.; Shen, Z.; Wang, Q.

    2007-12-01

    The North China block (NCB) is geologically part of the Archaean Sino-Korean craton. But unusual for a craton, it was thermally rejuvenated since late Mesozoic, and experienced widespread extension and volcanism through much of the Cenozoic. Today, the NCB is characterized by strong internal deformation and seismicity, including the 1976 Tangshan earthquake that killed ~250,000 people. We have started a multidisciplinary study to image the lithospheric and upper mantle structure using seismological methods, to delineate crustal kinematics and deformation via studies of neotectonics and space geodesy, and to investigate the driving forces, the stress states and evolution, and seismicity using geodynamic modeling. Both seismic imaging and GPS results indicate that the Ordos plateau, which is the western part of the NCB and a relic of the Sino-Korean craton, has been encroached around its southern margins by mantle flow and thus is experiencing active cratonic destruction. Some of the mantle flow may be driven by the Indo-Asian collision, although the cause of the broad mantle upwelling responsible for the Mesozoic thinning of the NCB lithosphere remains uncertain. At present, crustal deformation in the NCB is largely driven by gravitational spreading of the expanding Tibetan Plateau. Internal deformation within the NCB is further facilitated by the particular tectonic boundary conditions around the NCB, and the large lateral contrasts of lithospheric strength and rheology. Based on the crustal kinematics and lithospheric structure, we have developed a preliminary geodynamic model for stress states and strain energy in the crust of the NCB. The predicted long-term strain energy distribution is comparable with the spatial pattern of seismic energy release in the past 2000 years. We are exploring the cause of the spatiotemporal occurrence of large earthquakes in the NCB, especially the apparent migration of seismicity from the Weihe-Shanxi grabens around the Ordos to

  5. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  6. Nonlinear deconvolution of hyperspectral data with MCMC for studying the kinematics of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Emma; Carfantan, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been an area of active research in image processing and analysis for more than 10 years, mainly for remote sensing applications. Astronomical ground-based hyperspectral imagers offer new challenges to the community, which differ from the previous ones in the nature of the observed objects, but also in the quality of the data, with a low signal-to-noise ratio and a low resolution, due to the atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we focus on a deconvolution problem specific to hyperspectral astronomical data, to improve the study of the kinematics of galaxies. The aim is to estimate the flux, the relative velocity, and the velocity dispersion, integrated along the line-of-sight, for each spatial pixel of an observed galaxy. Thanks to the Doppler effect, this is equivalent to estimate the amplitude, center, and width of spectral emission lines, in a small spectral range, for every spatial pixel of the hyperspectral data. We consider a parametric model for the spectral lines and propose to compute the posterior mean estimators, in a Bayesian framework, using Monte Carlo Markov chain algorithms. Various estimation schemes are proposed for this nonlinear deconvolution problem, taking advantage of the linearity of the model with respect to the flux parameters. We differentiate between methods taking into account the spatial blurring of the data (deconvolution) or not (estimation). The performances of the methods are compared with classical ones, on two simulated data sets. It is shown that the proposed deconvolution method significantly improves the resolution of the estimated kinematic parameters.

  7. Nonlinear deconvolution of hyperspectral data with MCMC for studying the kinematics of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Emma; Carfantan, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been an area of active research in image processing and analysis for more than 10 years, mainly for remote sensing applications. Astronomical ground-based hyperspectral imagers offer new challenges to the community, which differ from the previous ones in the nature of the observed objects, but also in the quality of the data, with a low signal-to-noise ratio and a low resolution, due to the atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we focus on a deconvolution problem specific to hyperspectral astronomical data, to improve the study of the kinematics of galaxies. The aim is to estimate the flux, the relative velocity, and the velocity dispersion, integrated along the line-of-sight, for each spatial pixel of an observed galaxy. Thanks to the Doppler effect, this is equivalent to estimate the amplitude, center, and width of spectral emission lines, in a small spectral range, for every spatial pixel of the hyperspectral data. We consider a parametric model for the spectral lines and propose to compute the posterior mean estimators, in a Bayesian framework, using Monte Carlo Markov chain algorithms. Various estimation schemes are proposed for this nonlinear deconvolution problem, taking advantage of the linearity of the model with respect to the flux parameters. We differentiate between methods taking into account the spatial blurring of the data (deconvolution) or not (estimation). The performances of the methods are compared with classical ones, on two simulated data sets. It is shown that the proposed deconvolution method significantly improves the resolution of the estimated kinematic parameters. PMID:25073172

  8. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  9. Studies of the central regions in globular clusters: Kinematics, mass modeling, and a search for binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bingrong

    Globular clusters (GCs) are one of the oldest structures in the universe. The strongest constraints on the predictions of dynamical models of GCs come from the kinematics in the central few arcminutes, where the effects of mass segregation, core collapse, or a possible massive black hole (if any) are most significant. In my dissertation, I have conducted a variety of studies in the central regions of GCs using the Rutgers Fabry-Perot Imaging Spectrometer, including the kinematics, mass modeling, searching for binary stars, and searching for the correlation between kinematics and the metallicity. We performed non-parametric mass modeling of NGC 6752 and found that there is no evidence of a large central mass-to-light ratio for NGC 6752 from the measured velocity dispersion. We addressed a series of studies of o Centauri (NGC 5139, hereafter o Cen). In one, we measured the velocity dispersion profile, the projected rotation map, and the mass-to-light ratio profile. In another, we correlated our kinematics data and the metallicities from Stromgren photometry to give constraints on the pictures of the origin of o Cen. In another, we used Monte Carlo simulations to calculate a binary fraction and found that o Cen is not deficient in binary stars compared to other GCs.

  10. Improving Course Completions in Distance Education: An Institutional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistoll, Tony; Yates, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article reports two studies undertaken at The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand, a vocational distance education (DE) provider, where course completion rates have risen to match those of face-to-face technical institutions. A simple model of student engagement is presented, which reflects the triality between the student, institution, and…

  11. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a "soft" constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of "hard" constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO.

  12. Application of a photogrammetric kinematic model for prediction of lung volumes in adolescents: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are several ways to measure the respiratory system, among them inductance plethysmography and three-dimensional kinematic analysis, methods of high cost and difficult transportability. The objective of this study was to correlate respiratory volumes obtained by spirometry standard equipment with a biomechanical model photogrammetric analysis of adolescents. Methods We evaluated 50 subjects of both genders, aged between 14 and 17 years old, excluding those with respiratory obstruction or restriction. Stickers with markers, there was a five-point mapping for anatomical modeling and photogrammetry, with each evaluated in supine position, was sought to test the Forced Vital Capacity (FVC). The test was filmed and repeated three times. Images of the films were extracted for the moment of maximum exhalation and inhalation of proof with better breathing. With the use of a commercial software, defined the respiratory volumes to the thorax and abdomen. Results The photogrammetric analysis has found values strongly correlated with the spirometric measurements of FVC (0.812), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 – 0.708), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF – 0.762) in addition to post test performed Inspiration (IP- 0.816). There was a higher ventilatory mobility for boys than girls for Lower Chest and Lower and Upper Abdomen. It was possible to reach a regression R2 = 0.866 for proof of FVC and R2 = 0.776 for IP with the use of photogrammetry, presenting a standard error of 0.353 and 0.451, respectively. Conclusions Photogrammetry can be used to study thoracoabdominal movements by applying analytical two-dimensional and three-dimensional images acquired using a video camera being, applicable and reproducible. PMID:24571595

  13. Effects of Global Postural Reeducation on gait kinematics in parkinsonian patients: a pilot randomized three-dimensional motion analysis study.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Valeria; Vitale, Carmine; Avella, Dario; Rucco, Rosaria; Santangelo, Gabriella; Sorrentino, Pierpaolo; Varriale, Pasquale; Sorrentino, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) method is a physical therapy based on the stretching of antigravity muscle chains with the parallel enhancement of the basal tone of antagonistic muscles addressed to improve static and dynamic stability. Through a three-dimensional motion analysis (3DMA) system, our study aims to investigate whether in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients a GPR program results in a more physiological gait pattern. The kinematic parameters of gait of twenty subjects with clinically diagnosed PD were calculated. The patients were randomly assigned to a study (10 or control (10) group. All subjects underwent neurological and 3DMA assessments at entry time (t 0), at 4 weeks (t 1, end of GPR program), and at 8 and 12 weeks (t 2 and t 3, follow-up evaluation). The study group underwent a four-week GPR program, three times a week, for 40 min individual sessions. Kinematic gait parameters of thigh (T), knee (K) and ankle (A) and UPDRS-III scores were evaluated. At the end of the GPR program, we observed an improvement of the kinematic gait pattern, documented by the increase in KΔc and TΔc values that respectively express the flexion amplitude of knee and thigh. The amelioration was persistent at follow-up assessments, with a parallel enhancement in clinical parameters. GPR intervention shows a long-term efficacy on gait pattern in PD patients. Furthermore, we validated 3DMA as a valuable tool to study the kinematics of gait thus refining the understanding of the effects of specific rehabilitation programs. PMID:26700803

  14. Effects of Global Postural Reeducation on gait kinematics in parkinsonian patients: a pilot randomized three-dimensional motion analysis study.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Valeria; Vitale, Carmine; Avella, Dario; Rucco, Rosaria; Santangelo, Gabriella; Sorrentino, Pierpaolo; Varriale, Pasquale; Sorrentino, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) method is a physical therapy based on the stretching of antigravity muscle chains with the parallel enhancement of the basal tone of antagonistic muscles addressed to improve static and dynamic stability. Through a three-dimensional motion analysis (3DMA) system, our study aims to investigate whether in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients a GPR program results in a more physiological gait pattern. The kinematic parameters of gait of twenty subjects with clinically diagnosed PD were calculated. The patients were randomly assigned to a study (10 or control (10) group. All subjects underwent neurological and 3DMA assessments at entry time (t 0), at 4 weeks (t 1, end of GPR program), and at 8 and 12 weeks (t 2 and t 3, follow-up evaluation). The study group underwent a four-week GPR program, three times a week, for 40 min individual sessions. Kinematic gait parameters of thigh (T), knee (K) and ankle (A) and UPDRS-III scores were evaluated. At the end of the GPR program, we observed an improvement of the kinematic gait pattern, documented by the increase in KΔc and TΔc values that respectively express the flexion amplitude of knee and thigh. The amelioration was persistent at follow-up assessments, with a parallel enhancement in clinical parameters. GPR intervention shows a long-term efficacy on gait pattern in PD patients. Furthermore, we validated 3DMA as a valuable tool to study the kinematics of gait thus refining the understanding of the effects of specific rehabilitation programs.

  15. 2D kinematical study in local luminous compact blue galaxies. Starburst origin in UCM2325+2318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Morales, A.; Pérez-Gallego, J.; Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Castander, F.; Garland, C.; Gruel, N.; Pisano, D. J.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Ocaña, F.; Zamorano, J.

    2013-05-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are small, but vigorously star forming galaxies. Their presence at different redshifts denotes their cosmological relevance and implies that local starburst galaxies, when properly selected, are unique laboratories for studying the complex ecosystem of the star formation process over time. We have selected a representative sample of 22 LCBGs from the SDSS and UCM databases which, although small, provides an excellent reference for comparison with current and future surveys of similar starbursts at high-z. We are carrying out a 2D optical spectroscopic study of this LCBG sample, including spatially resolved maps of kinematics, extinction, SFR and metallicity. This will help us to answer questions regarding the nature of these objects. In this poster we show our results on the kinematical study (Pérez-Gallego et al. 2011) which allows us to classify these galaxies into three different classes: rotating disk (RD) 48%, perturbed rotation (PR) 28% and complex kinematics (CK) 24%. We find 5% of objects show evidence of a recent major merger, 10% of a minor merger, and 45% of a companion. This argues in favor of ongoing interactions with close companions as a mechanism for the enhanced star formation activity in these galaxies. We find only 5% of objects with clear evidence of AGN activity, and 27% with kinematics consistent with SN-driven galactic winds. Therefore, a different mechanism may be responsible for quenching the star formation in LCBGs. The detailed analysis of the physical properties for each galaxy in the sample is on progress and we show in this poster the results on UCM2325+2318 as a prototype LCBG. Between the possible mechanisms to explain the starburst activity in this galaxy, our 2D spectroscopic data support the scenario of an on-going interaction with the possibility for clump B to be the dwarf satellite galaxy (Castillo-Morales et al. 2011, Pérez-Gallego et al. 2010).

  16. Real-time measurement of rectus femoris muscle kinematics during drop jump using ultrasound imaging: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Eranki, Avinash; Cortes, Nelson; Ferencek Gregurić, Zrinka; Kim, John J; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an office based vector tissue Doppler imaging (vTDI) that can be used to quantitatively measure muscle kinematics using ultrasound. The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate if vTDI measures are repeatable and can be used robustly to measure and understand the kinematics of the rectus femoris muscle during a drop jump task. Data were collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Vector TDI along with a high speed camera video was used to better understand the dynamics of the drop jump. Our results indicate that the peak resultant vector velocity of the rectus femoris immediately following landing was repeatable across trials (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.9).The peak velocity had a relatively narrow range in 6 out of 8 subjects (48-62 cm/s), while in the remaining two subjects it exceeded 70 cm/s. The entire drop jump lasted for 1.45 0.27 seconds. The waveform of muscle velocity could be used to identify different phases of the jump. Also, the movement of the ultrasound transducer holder was minimal with peak deflection of 0.91 0.54 degrees over all trials. Vector TDI can be implemented in a clinical setting using an ultrasound system with a research interface to better understand the muscle kinematics in patients with ACL injuries.

  17. Psychological Vulnerability to Completed Suicide: A Review of Empirical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Kenneth R.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Conwell, Yeates; Seidlitz, Larry; Caine, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews empirical literature on psychological vulnerability to completed suicide. Five constructs have been consistently associated with completed suicide: impulsivity/aggression; depression; anxiety; hopelessness; and self-consciousness/social disengagement. Current knowledge of psychological vulnerability could inform social…

  18. Neural signatures of hand kinematics in leaders vs. followers: A dual-MEG study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2016-01-15

    During joint actions, people typically adjust their own actions according to the ongoing actions of the partner, which implies that the interaction modulates the behavior of both participants. However, the neural substrates of such mutual adaptation are still poorly understood. Here, we set out to identify the kinematics-related brain activity of leaders and followers performing hand actions. Sixteen participants as 8 pairs performed continuous, repetitive right-hand opening and closing actions with ~3-s cycles in a leader-follower task. Subjects played each role for 5min. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) brain signals were recorded simultaneously from both partners with a dual-MEG setup, and hand kinematics was monitored with accelerometers. Modulation index, a cross-frequency coupling measure, was computed between the hand acceleration and the MEG signals in the alpha (7-13Hz) and beta (13-25Hz) bands. Regardless of the participants' role, the strongest alpha and beta modulations occurred bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortices. In the occipital region, beta modulation was stronger in followers than leaders; these oscillations originated, according to beamformer source reconstructions, in early visual cortices. Despite differences in the modulation indices, alpha and beta power did not differ between the conditions. Our results indicate that the beta modulation in the early visual cortices depends on the subject's role as a follower or leader in a joint hand-action task. This finding could reflect the different strategies employed by leaders and followers in integrating kinematics-related visual information to control their own actions.

  19. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a “soft” constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of “hard” constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO. PMID:27314586

  20. The Kinematics of Late-Type Stars in the Solar Cylinder Studied with SDSS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Burkhard; Dettbarn, Christian; Rix, Hans-Walter; Beers, Timothy C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Jahreiß, Hartmut; Klement, Rainer; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    We study the velocity distribution of Milky Way disk stars in a kiloparsec-sized region around the Sun, based on ~2 million M-type stars from DR7 of SDSS, which have newly re-calibrated absolute proper motions from combining SDSS positions with the USNO-B catalogue. We estimate photometric distances to all stars, accurate to ~20%, and combine them with the proper motions to derive tangential velocities for this kinematically unbiased sample of stars. Based on a statistical deprojection method we then derive the vertical profiles (to heights of Z = 800 pc above the disk plane) for the first and second moments of the three-dimensional stellar velocity distribution. We find that langWrang = -7 ± 1 km s-1 and langUrang = -9 ± 1 km s-1, independent of height above the mid-plane, reflecting the Sun's motion with respect to the local standard of rest. In contrast, langVrang changes distinctly from -20 ± 2 km s-1 in the mid-plane to langVrang = -32 km s-1 at Z = 800 pc, reflecting an asymmetric drift of the stellar mean velocity that increases with height. All three components of the M-star velocity dispersion show a strong linear rise away from the mid-plane, most notably σ ZZ , which grows from 18 km s-1 (Z = 0) to 40 km s-1 (at Z = 800 pc). We determine the orientation of the velocity ellipsoid, and find a significant vertex deviation of 20°-25°, which decreases only slightly to heights of Z = 800 pc. Away from the mid-plane, our sample exhibits a remarkably large tilt of the velocity ellipsoid toward the Galactic plane, which reaches 20° at Z = 800 pc and which is not easily explained. Finally, we determine the ratio σ2 phiphi/σ2 RR near the mid-plane, which in the epicyclic approximation implies an almost perfectly flat rotation curve at the solar radius.

  1. THE KINEMATICS OF LATE-TYPE STARS IN THE SOLAR CYLINDER STUDIED WITH SDSS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Burkhard; Dettbarn, Christian; Jahreiss, Hartmut; Rix, Hans-Walter; Klement, Rainer; Beers, Timothy C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2009-05-15

    We study the velocity distribution of Milky Way disk stars in a kiloparsec-sized region around the Sun, based on {approx}2 million M-type stars from DR7 of SDSS, which have newly re-calibrated absolute proper motions from combining SDSS positions with the USNO-B catalogue. We estimate photometric distances to all stars, accurate to {approx}20%, and combine them with the proper motions to derive tangential velocities for this kinematically unbiased sample of stars. Based on a statistical deprojection method we then derive the vertical profiles (to heights of Z = 800 pc above the disk plane) for the first and second moments of the three-dimensional stellar velocity distribution. We find that (W) = -7 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1} and (U) = -9 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1}, independent of height above the mid-plane, reflecting the Sun's motion with respect to the local standard of rest. In contrast, (V) changes distinctly from -20 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} in the mid-plane to (V) = -32 km s{sup -1} at Z = 800 pc, reflecting an asymmetric drift of the stellar mean velocity that increases with height. All three components of the M-star velocity dispersion show a strong linear rise away from the mid-plane, most notably {sigma} {sub ZZ}, which grows from 18 km s{sup -1} (Z = 0) to 40 km s{sup -1} (at Z = 800 pc). We determine the orientation of the velocity ellipsoid, and find a significant vertex deviation of 20{sup 0}-25{sup 0}, which decreases only slightly to heights of Z = 800 pc. Away from the mid-plane, our sample exhibits a remarkably large tilt of the velocity ellipsoid toward the Galactic plane, which reaches 20{sup 0} at Z = 800 pc and which is not easily explained. Finally, we determine the ratio {sigma}{sup 2} {sub {phi}}{sub {phi}}/{sigma}{sup 2} {sub RR} near the mid-plane, which in the epicyclic approximation implies an almost perfectly flat rotation curve at the solar radius.

  2. Kinematically complete study of low-energy electron-impact ionization of argon: Internormalized cross sections in three-dimensional kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueguang; Amami, Sadek; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Pflüger, Thomas; Weyland, Marvin; Dorn, Alexander; Madison, Don; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    As a further test of advanced theoretical methods to describe electron-impact single-ionization processes in complex atomic targets, we extended our recent work on Ne (2 p ) ionization [X. Ren, S. Amami, O. Zatsarinny, T. Pflüger, M. Weyland, W. Y. Baek, H. Rabus, K. Bartschat, D. Madison, and A. Dorn, Phys. Rev. A 91, 032707 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.032707] to Ar (3 p ) ionization at the relatively low incident energy of E0=66 eV. The experimental data were obtained with a reaction microscope, which can cover nearly the entire 4 π solid angle for the secondary electron emission. We present experimental data for detection angles of 10, 15, and 20∘ for the faster of the two outgoing electrons as a function of the detection angle of the secondary electron with energies of 3, 5, and 10 eV, respectively. Comparison with theoretical predictions from a B -spline R -matrix (BSR) with pseudostates approach and a three-body distorted-wave (3DW) approach, for detection of the secondary electron in three orthogonal planes as well as the entire solid angle, shows overall satisfactory agreement between experiment and the BSR results, whereas the 3DW approach faces difficulties in predicting some of the details of the angular distributions. These findings are different from our earlier work on Ne (2 p ), where both the BSR and 3DW approaches yielded comparable levels of agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Experimental study of pancreaticojejunostomy completed using anastomotic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei-Dong; Xu, Rui-Yun; Li, Nan; Fang, He-Ping; Pan, Cu-Zhi; Tang, Zhao-Feng

    2010-07-01

    The most difficult, time-consuming, and complication-prone step in pancreaticoduodenectomy is the pancreaticojejunostomy step. The largest disadvantage of this kind of anastomosis is the high incidence of postoperative anastomotic leakage. Once pancreatic leakage occurs, the patient death rate can be very high. The aim of this study was to design a pancreaticojejunostomy procedure using anastomotic chains, which results in the cut end of the jejunum being attached to the pancreatic stump without suturing, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure in domestic pigs. The pancreaticojejunal anastomotic chains had the following structures: the chains consisted of two braceletlike chains made of titanium, named chain A and chain B. The function of chain A was to attach the free jejunal end onto the pancreatic stump, whereas the function of chain B was to tighten the contact between the jejunal wall and the surface of the pancreatic stump to eliminate gaps between the two structures and ensure tightness that is sufficient to guarantee that there is no leakage of jejunal fluid or pancreatic juice. The following procedure was used to assess the safety and efficacy of the procedure: pancreaticojejunostomies were performed on ten domestic pigs using anastomotic chains. The time required to complete the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses, the pressure tolerance of the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses, the pig death rate, and the histopathological examinations of the pancreaticojejunostomy tissues were recorded. The average time required to complete the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis procedure was 13±2 min. The observed tolerance pressure of the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses was more than 90 mm H2O. All ten domestic pigs that underwent operations were still alive four weeks after the operations. Pathological examinations showed that the anastomotic surfaces were completely healed, and the pancreatic cutting surfaces were primarily epithelialized. In conclusion, the

  4. Experimental study of pancreaticojejunostomy completed using anastomotic chains.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei-Dong; Xu, Rui-Yun; Li, Nan; Fang, He-Ping; Pan, Cu-Zhi; Tang, Zhao-Feng

    2010-07-01

    The most difficult, time-consuming, and complication-prone step in pancreaticoduodenectomy is the pancreaticojejunostomy step. The largest disadvantage of this kind of anastomosis is the high incidence of postoperative anastomotic leakage. Once pancreatic leakage occurs, the patient death rate can be very high. The aim of this study was to design a pancreaticojejunostomy procedure using anastomotic chains, which results in the cut end of the jejunum being attached to the pancreatic stump without suturing, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure in domestic pigs. The pancreaticojejunal anastomotic chains had the following structures: the chains consisted of two braceletlike chains made of titanium, named chain A and chain B. The function of chain A was to attach the free jejunal end onto the pancreatic stump, whereas the function of chain B was to tighten the contact between the jejunal wall and the surface of the pancreatic stump to eliminate gaps between the two structures and ensure tightness that is sufficient to guarantee that there is no leakage of jejunal fluid or pancreatic juice. The following procedure was used to assess the safety and efficacy of the procedure: pancreaticojejunostomies were performed on ten domestic pigs using anastomotic chains. The time required to complete the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses, the pressure tolerance of the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses, the pig death rate, and the histopathological examinations of the pancreaticojejunostomy tissues were recorded. The average time required to complete the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis procedure was 13+/-2 min. The observed tolerance pressure of the pancreaticojejunal anastomoses was more than 90 mm H(2)O. All ten domestic pigs that underwent operations were still alive four weeks after the operations. Pathological examinations showed that the anastomotic surfaces were completely healed, and the pancreatic cutting surfaces were primarily epithelialized. In conclusion

  5. Compensation of kinematic geometric parameters error and comparative study of accuracy testing for robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Liang; Shi, Guangming; Guan, Weibin; Zhong, Yuansheng; Li, Jin

    2014-12-01

    Geometric error is the main error of the industrial robot, and it plays a more significantly important fact than other error facts for robot. The compensation model of kinematic error is proposed in this article. Many methods can be used to test the robot accuracy, therefore, how to compare which method is better one. In this article, a method is used to compare two methods for robot accuracy testing. It used Laser Tracker System (LTS) and Three Coordinate Measuring instrument (TCM) to test the robot accuracy according to standard. According to the compensation result, it gets the better method which can improve the robot accuracy apparently.

  6. Studying the dynamics of high-speed elastic kinematically controlled robot-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavrashina, T. V.; Zavrashina, N. M.

    The authors set out the problem on controlling kinematically spatial motions of a flexible multi-link space robot-manipulator under conditions of its high-speed manoevering. The constructed mathematical model of the system dynamics takes into account the distributed properties of elasticity and inertia of the manipulator links, which are at the state of compound motion. They give an example of the numerical investigation of the dynamical characteristics of two-link robot when it is employed to carry a load.

  7. Exploring Homework Completion and Non-Completion in Post-Secondary Language Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gascoigne, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    While homework is something that language professionals often assign, based on the paucity of research on the topic, it is clearly not something to which much attention is given in terms of professional discourse or research. In the following pages, the author reviews the limited available research and describes a case study that seeks to examine…

  8. Computer Assisted Mechanical Axis and Kinematic TKA

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Peter; Mahoharan, Varaguna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has traditionally been and largely continues to be aligned mechanically, that being with a neutral coronal plane mechanical tibiofemoral axis and a joint line orientated at 900 to this axis. Femoral component rotation is set by gap balancing or by externally rotating 30 from any of a number femoral reference lines. This produces a rectangular flexion gap and relaxes patellar tracking. Kinematic alignment (KA) is an alternative technique that aims to restore premorbid alignment, joint orientation and ligament tension. The basic premise for this technique is based on evidence that the medial and lateral femoral condyles consistently equate to cylinders of equal or near equal size and that therefore with a fixed radius, cruciate retaining implant, matched distal femoral, posterior femoral and proximal tibial resections, accounting for bone and cartilage already lost will reproduce the premorbid joint line and restore native premorbid kinematics. Femoral rotation is therefore referenced off the prearthritic posterior condylar axis (PCA) that is on average internally rotated to the AP axis. Kinematic alignment therefore has the potential to challenge patellar tracking, increase patellar load and potentially increase patellar complications. Method: Case control study – level of evidence III-2. Between November 2012 and June 2013 the senior author completed 104 consecutive computer assisted (CAS) kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with a cruciate retaining, fixed bearing, single radius implant. The results of these surgeries were compared with the results of 91 consecutive CAS mechanically aligned TKA done between November 2011 and October 2012 using the same navigation system and implant Implant sizing and positioning as well as gap measurement and ligament balance was done with computer assistance in all cases. Data was collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Results: The Oxford Knee Score

  9. A study of the kinematic characteristic of a coupling device between the buffer system and the flexible pipe of a deep-seabed mining system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae-Won; Lee, Chang-Ho; Hong, Sup; Bae, Dae-Sung; Cho, Hui-Je; Kim, Hyung-Woo

    2014-09-01

    This paper concerns the kinematic characteristics of a coupling device in a deep-seabed mining system. This coupling device connects the buffer system and the flexible pipe. The motion of the buffer system, flexible pipe and mining robot are affected by the coupling device. So the coupling device should be considered as a major factor when this device is designed. Therefore, we find a stable kinematic device, and apply it to the design coupling device through this study. The kinematic characteristics of the coupling device are analyzed by multi-body dynamics simulation method, and finite element method. The dynamic analysis model was built in the commercial software DAFUL. The Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) method is applied to build the deep-seabed environment. Hydrodynamic force and moment are applied in the dynamic model for the FSI method. The loads and deformation of flexible pipe are estimated for analysis results of the kinematic characteristics

  10. Kinematics at the Intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley Fault Zones, California: Integration of TM Data and Field Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verosub, Kenneth L.; Brady, Roland H., III; Abrams, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Kinematic relationships at the intersection of the southern Death Valley and Garlock fault zones were examined to identify and delineate the eastern structural boundary between the Mojave and the Basin and Range geologic terrains, and to construct a model for the evolution of this boundary through time. In order to accomplish this, satellite imagery was combined with field investigations to study six areas in the vicinity of the intersection, or possible extensions, of the fault zones. The information gathered from these areas allows the test of various hypotheses that were proposed to explain the interaction between the Death Valley and Garlock fault zones.

  11. The effect of various kinematics on postoperative pain after instrumentation: a prospective, randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Khalilov, Ruslan; Doğanay, Ezgi; Karatas, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate various kinematic movements on postoperative pain using a Reciproc system. Material and Methods: Fifty-six molar teeth were divided into four groups according to kinematics as follows: continuous rotation, 360° CCW – 30° CW, 270° CCW – 30° CW, and 150° CCW – 30° CW. Preoperative and postoperative pain levels using visual analogue scale (VAS), percussion pain, and analgesic intake were recorded for each subject. Postoperative pain levels at 1, 3, 5, and 7 d were evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically using the Kruskal-Walis, Mann-Whitney-U, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square tests (p=0.05). Results: Continuous rotation resulted in more pain at Day 1 when compared with the reciprocating groups (360° CCW – 30° CW and 270° CCW – 30° C) (p<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous rotation resulted in more postoperative pain at Day 1 than in reciprocating groups, and thereafter no significant pain was found among the groups. PMID:27812621

  12. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  13. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints with functional ankle instability during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; No, Yumi; Yoneta, Kei; Sadakiyo, Masashi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics. However, reliable quantitative data for kinematics of FAI have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine if the abnormal kinematics exist in the talocrural and subtalar joints in patients with FAI. Five male subjects with unilateral FAI (a mean age of 33.4 ± 13.2 years) were enrolled. All subjects were examined with stress radiography and found to have no mechanical ankle instability (MAI). Lateral radiography at weight-bearing ankle internal rotation of 0° and 20° was taken with the ankle at 30° dorsiflexion and 30° plantar flexion. Patients underwent computed tomography scan at 1.0 mm slice pitch spanning distal one third of the lower leg and the distal end of the calcaneus. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints as well as the ankle joint complex (AJC) were determined using a 3D-to-2D registration technique using a 3D-to-2D registration technique with 3D bone models and plain radiography. FAI joints in ankle dorsiflexion demonstrated significantly greater subtalar internal rotation from 0° to 20° internal rotation. No statistical differences in plantar flexion were detected in talocrural, subtalar or ankle joint complex kinematics between the FAI and contralateral healthy joints. During ankle internal rotation in dorsiflexion, FAI joints demonstrated greater subtalar internal rotation. The FAI joints without mechanical instability presented abnormal kinematics. This suggests that abnormal kinematics of the FAI joints may contribute to chronic instability. FAI joints may involve unrecognized abnormal subtalar kinematics during internal rotation in ankle dorsiflexion which may contribute to chronic instability and frequent feelings of instability.

  14. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Stereotyped and Challenged Locomotion after Lesion of the Striatum: A 3D Kinematic Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Perrot, Olivier; Laroche, Davy; Pozzo, Thierry; Marie, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the striatum is in position to regulate motor function, the role of the structure in locomotor behaviour is poorly understood. Therefore, a detailed analysis of locomotion- and obstacle avoidance-related parameters was performed after unilateral lesion of the striatum in rats. Methods and Results Using the three dimensional motion capture technology, kinematics of walking and clearing obstacles, head and body orientation were analyzed before and up to 60 days after the lesion. Recordings were performed in treadmill running rats with or without obstacles attached to the treadmill belt. The lesion, which was induced by the direct injection of the mitochondrial toxin malonate into the left caudoputamen resulted in the complete destruction of the dorsal striatum. During the first three days following the lesion, rats were unable to run on the treadmill. Thereafter, rats showed normal looking locomotion, yet the contralesional limbs exhibited changes in length and timing parameters, and were overflexed. Moreover, the head of lesioned rats was orientated towards the side of the lesion, and their postural vertical shifted towards the contralesional side. During obstructed running, the contralesional limbs when they were leading the crossing manoeuvre stepped on the obstacle rather than to overcome obstacle without touching it, yet more frequently with the forelimb than the hindlimb. Unsuccessful crossings appeared to be due to a paw placement farther away from the front of the obstacles, and not to an inappropriate limb elevation. Importantly, deficit in locomotor behaviour did not regress over the time. Conclusion Our results argue that the striatum of one hemisphere controls kinematics of contralateral limbs during stereotyped locomotion and plays a prominent role in the selection of the right motor program so that these limbs successfully cross over obstacle. PMID:19859550

  16. Study of human body: Kinematics and kinetics of a martial arts (Silat) performers using 3D-motion capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Ahmad Afiq Sabqi Awang; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Azraai, Nur Zaidi

    2015-04-01

    The Interest in this studies of human kinematics goes back very far in human history drove by curiosity or need for the understanding the complexity of human body motion. To find new and accurate information about the human movement as the advance computing technology became available for human movement that can perform. Martial arts (silat) were chose and multiple type of movement was studied. This project has done by using cutting-edge technology which is 3D motion capture to characterize and to measure the motion done by the performers of martial arts (silat). The camera will detect the markers (infrared reflection by the marker) around the performer body (total of 24 markers) and will show as dot in the computer software. The markers detected were analyzing using kinematic kinetic approach and time as reference. A graph of velocity, acceleration and position at time,t (seconds) of each marker was plot. Then from the information obtain, more parameters were determined such as work done, momentum, center of mass of a body using mathematical approach. This data can be used for development of the effectiveness movement in martial arts which is contributed to the people in arts. More future works can be implemented from this project such as analysis of a martial arts competition.

  17. Exploring MaNGA's kinematic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijmans, Anne-Marie; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Different galaxy formation processes leave different imprints on the gas and stellar kinematic patterns for a galaxy. With MaNGA, we now have after one year of observations an unprecedented sample of 1400 nearby galaxies for which we can study gas and stellar kinematics in much detail, based on integral-field spectroscopy. We are measuring kinematic quantities such as LambdaR (angular momentum) and their (possible) correlations with other galaxy properties such as mass, morphology and environment. By quantifying the kinematic (sub)structures in velocity and dispersion maps, we will construct a kinematic galaxy classification that can be linked to their formation processes.

  18. A kinematic study and membership analysis of the Lupus star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: A precise determination of the distance to individual stars is required to reliably determine the fundamental parameters (mass and age) of young stellar objects. This paper is dedicated to investigating the kinematic properties of the Lupus moving group of young stars with the primary objective of deriving individual parallaxes for each group member. Methods: We identify those stars in the Lupus star-forming region that define the comoving association of young stars by utilizing our new and improved convergent point search method that allows us to derive the precise position of the convergent point of the comoving association from the stars' proper motions. We used published proper motion catalogs and searched the literature for radial velocities, which are needed to compute individual parallaxes. We supplemented the radial velocity data with new measurements from spectroscopic observations performed with the FEROS spectrograph mounted on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope at La Silla. Results: We identify a comoving group with 109 pre-main sequence stars and candidates that define the kinematic properties of the Lupus low-mass star-forming region. We derive individual parallaxes for stars with known radial velocity and tentative parallaxes for the remaining group members by assuming that all stars share the same space motion. The convergent point method, combined with the k-NN algorithm, makes it possible to distinguish the Lupus and Upper Centaurus Lupus stars from the adjacent Scorpius-Centaurus association. We find significant depth effects in this region and show that the classical T Tauri stars, located in the close vicinity of the Lupus molecular clouds, form a background population, while the weak-emission line T Tauri stars are dispersed not only in angular extent but also in depth. Conclusions: The newly derived individual parallaxes will be used in a forthcoming paper to refine the masses and ages of Lupus T Tauri stars, with the aim of better

  19. A 3D kinematic study of the northern ejecta `jet' of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Christine S.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    We present moderate resolution [O III] λλ4959, 5007 line emission spectra of the Crab nebula's northern ejecta jet. These data along with an [O III] image of the Crab nebula were used to build three-dimensional kinematic maps of the jet and adjacent remnant nebulosity to better understand the jet's properties and thus its likely origin. We find the jet's systemic velocity to be +170 ± 15 km s-1 with radial velocities ranging from -190 to +480 km s-1. Our data indicate that the jet consists of thin filamentary walls (Vexp ≃ 40-75 km s-1), is virtually hollow in [O III] emission, and elliptical and funnel-like in shape rather than a straight cylindrical tube as previously thought. Examination of the Crab's 3D filamentary structure along the jet's base reveals a large and nearly emission-free opening in the remnant's thick outer ejecta shell. The jet's blueshifted and redshifted sides are surprisingly well defined and, like the jet's sharp western limb, appear radially aligned with the remnant's centre of expansion. These alignments, along with the opening in the nebula at the jet's base and proper motions indicating an expansion age in line with the 1054 supernova event, suggest a direct connection between the jet's formation and the Crab's radial expansion. While our analysis supports the scenario that the jet may simply represent the highest velocity material of the remnant's N-S bipolar expansion, the nature of this expansion asymmetry remains unclear.

  20. A theoretical study of burrowing in dry soil using razor clam-inspired kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Amos; Isava, Monica

    2015-11-01

    This work investigates whether the digging kinematics of Ensis directus, the Atlantic razor clam, could be utilized in dry soil. In wet soil, E. directus uses contractions of its valves to relieve stress on the surrounding soil, and then draw water towards its body to create a pocket of fluidized substrate. This locally fluidized zone requires much less force to move through than static soil, resulting in burrowing energy that scales linearly with depth, rather than depth squared. In dry soil, if the valves of a clam-like device are contracted fast enough, the horizontal stress in the soil could be brought to a zero-stress state. This would correspondingly reduce the local vertical stresses to zero, which could drastically lower the forces required to burrow compared to moving through static dry soil. Using analytical models of soil failure mechanics, we investigated the critical timescales for inducing a zero-stress state in soil surrounding an E. directus-like device with contracting valves. This device was modeled as a similar size to a real razor clam (15 mm wide). It was found that for most dry soils, the device would have to contract its valves in 0.02 seconds, a speed within the realm of possibility for a mechanical system. These results suggest that the burrowing method used by E. directus could feasibly be adapted for digging in dry soil.

  1. A kinematic study of the upper-limb motion of wheelchair basketball shooting in tetraplegic adults.

    PubMed

    Nunome, Hiroyuki; Doyo, Wataru; Sakurai, Shinji; Ikegmai, Yasuo; Yabe, Kyonosuke

    2002-01-01

    Kinematic aspects of the reduced shooting ability of tetraplegic (TP) wheelchair basketball players were investigated and compared with those of able-bodied (AB) basketball players. TP showed significantly smaller values for the vertical component of ball release velocity (4.26 (degree/s) versus 5.45 (degree/s)) and maximum wrist flexion angular velocity (878.4 (degree/s) versus 1445.9 degrees) than AB. Moreover, for a specific shoulder horizontal adduction motion, a larger range of shoulder abduction motion and larger displacements of the right shoulder were observed in TP. The reduced ball velocity of TP subjects with lesions at the C7 to C8 levels depended on an insufficient wrist flexion angular velocity, where dysfunction of available musculature may be a causal determinant. Further, the specific motions observed in TP subjects most likely maximize the function of available musculature, thereby partially compensating for the dysfunction of the wrist flexor muscles and contributing to resultant ball release velocity.

  2. Joint kinematic calculation based on clinical direct kinematic versus inverse kinematic gait models.

    PubMed

    Kainz, H; Modenese, L; Lloyd, D G; Maine, S; Walsh, H P J; Carty, C P

    2016-06-14

    Most clinical gait laboratories use the conventional gait analysis model. This model uses a computational method called Direct Kinematics (DK) to calculate joint kinematics. In contrast, musculoskeletal modelling approaches use Inverse Kinematics (IK) to obtain joint angles. IK allows additional analysis (e.g. muscle-tendon length estimates), which may provide valuable information for clinical decision-making in people with movement disorders. The twofold aims of the current study were: (1) to compare joint kinematics obtained by a clinical DK model (Vicon Plug-in-Gait) with those produced by a widely used IK model (available with the OpenSim distribution), and (2) to evaluate the difference in joint kinematics that can be solely attributed to the different computational methods (DK versus IK), anatomical models and marker sets by using MRI based models. Eight children with cerebral palsy were recruited and presented for gait and MRI data collection sessions. Differences in joint kinematics up to 13° were found between the Plug-in-Gait and the gait 2392 OpenSim model. The majority of these differences (94.4%) were attributed to differences in the anatomical models, which included different anatomical segment frames and joint constraints. Different computational methods (DK versus IK) were responsible for only 2.7% of the differences. We recommend using the same anatomical model for kinematic and musculoskeletal analysis to ensure consistency between the obtained joint angles and musculoskeletal estimates.

  3. The Kepler Completeness Study: A Pipeline Throughput Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jessie L.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Burke, Christopher J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Jenkins

    2014-04-01

    The Kepler Mission was designed to measure the frequency of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. A requirement for determining the underlying planet population from a sample of detected planets is understanding the completeness of that sample-what fraction of the planets that could have been discovered in a given data set were actually detected. Here we describe an experiment designed to address a specific aspect of that question, which is the issue of signal throughput efficiency. We investigate the extent to which the Kepler pipeline preserves transit signals by injecting simulated transit signals into the pixel-level data, processing the modified pixels through the pipeline, and measuring their detection statistics. For the single channel that we examine initially, we inject simulated transit signal trains into the pixel time series of each of the 1801 targets for the 89 days that constitute Quarter 3. For the 1680 that behave as expected in the pipeline, on average we find the strength of the injected signal is recovered at 99.6% of the strength of the original signal. Finally we outline the further work required to characterise the completeness of the Kepler pipeline.

  4. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2016-07-20

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry,more » obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. In conclusion, we discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.« less

  5. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2016-07-01

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry, obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. We discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.

  6. A novel spinal kinematic analysis using X-ray imaging and vicon motion analysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong K; Lee, Nam G; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    This study highlights a novel spinal kinematic analysis method and the feasibility of X-ray imaging measurements to accurately assess thoracic spine motion. The advanced X-ray Nash-Moe method and analysis were used to compute the segmental range of motion in thoracic vertebra pedicles in vivo. This Nash-Moe X-ray imaging method was compared with a standardized method using the Vicon 3-dimensional motion capture system. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent and significant correlation between the two methods (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.05), suggesting that the analysis of spinal segmental range of motion using X-ray imaging measurements was accurate and comparable to the conventional 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Clinically, this novel finding is compelling evidence demonstrating that measurements with X-ray imaging are useful to accurately decipher pathological spinal alignment and movement impairments in idiopathic scoliosis (IS).

  7. A numerical study of linear and nonlinear kinematic models in fish swimming with the DSD/SST method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao

    2015-03-01

    Flow over two fish (modeled by two flexible plates) in tandem arrangement is investigated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations numerically with the DSD/SST method to understand the differences between the geometrically linear and nonlinear models. In the simulation, the motions of the plates are reconstructed from a vertically flowing soap film tunnel experiment with linear and nonlinear kinematic models. Based on the simulations, the drag, lift, power consumption, vorticity and pressure fields are discussed in detail. It is found that the linear and nonlinear models are able to reasonably predict the forces and power consumption of a single plate in flow. Moreover, if multiple plates are considered, these two models yield totally different results, which implies that the nonlinear model should be used. The results presented in this work provide a guideline for future studies in fish swimming.

  8. Study of 12C excited states decaying into three α particles using the thick target inverse kinematic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; de Souza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We will show that the Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be used to investigate the breakup of excited selfconjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. Two test runs were performed at Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University to study the reaction 20Ne+α at maximum beam energies of 10 and 12 AMeV. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature.

  9. A Study of Primary Collision Dynamics in Inverse-Kinematics Reaction of 78Kr on 40Ca at a Bombarding Energy of 10 MeV per Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Eric M.

    The CHIMERA multi-detector array at LNS Catania has been used to study the inverse-kinematics reaction of 78Kr + 40Ca at a bombarding energy of 10 A MeV. The multi-detector is capable of detecting individual products of the collision essential for the reconstruction of the collision dynamics. This is the first time CHIMERA has been used at low-energy, which offered a unique challenge for the calibration and interpretation of experimental data. Initial interrogation of the calibrated data revealed a class of selected events characterized by two coincident heavy fragments (atomic number Z>3) that together account for the majority of the total mass of the colliding system. These events are consistent with the complete fusion and subsequent binary split (fission) of a composite nucleus. The observed fission fragments are characterized by a broad A, Z distribution and are centered about symmetric fission while exhibiting relative velocities significantly higher than given by Viola systematics. Additional analysis of the kinematic relationship between the fission fragments was performed. Of note, is that the center-of-mass angular distribution (dsigma/dtheta) of the fission fragments exhibits an unexpected anisotropy inconsistent with a compound-nucleus reaction. This anisotropy is indicative of a dynamic fusion/fission-like process. The observed angular distribution features a forward-backward anisotropy most prevalent for mass-asymmetric events. Furthermore, the more massive fragment of mass-asymmetric events appears to emerge preferentially in the forward direction, along the beam axis. Analysis of the angular distribution of alpha particles emitted from these fission fragments suggests the events are associated mostly with central collisions. The observations associated with this subset of events are similar to those reported for dynamic fragmentation of projectile-like fragments, but have not before been observed for a fusion/fission-like process. Comparisons to

  10. The discriminant capabilities of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics in classifying successful and failed compensatory stepping responses by young adults.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Jeremy R; Rosenblatt, Noah J; Hurt, Christopher P; Grabiner, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the discriminant capability of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics to classify successful and failed compensatory stepping responses. In addition, the shared variance between stability measures, step kinematics, and trunk kinematics is reported. The stability measures included the anteroposterior distance (d) between the body center of mass and the stepping limb toe, the margin of stability (MOS), as well as time-to-boundary considering velocity (TTB(v)), velocity and acceleration (TTB(a)), and MOS (TTB(MOS)). Kinematic measures included trunk flexion angle and angular velocity, step length, and the time after disturbance onset of recovery step completion. Fourteen young adults stood on a treadmill that delivered surface accelerations necessitating multiple forward compensatory steps. Thirteen subjects fell from an initial disturbance, but recovered from a second, identical disturbance. Trunk flexion velocity at completion of the first recovery step and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second step had the greatest overall classification of all measures (92.3%). TTB(v) and TTB(a) at completion of both steps had the greatest classification accuracy of all stability measures (80.8%). The length of the first recovery step (r ≤ 0.70) and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second recovery step (r ≤ -0.54) had the largest correlations with stability measures. Although TTB(v) and TTB(a) demonstrated somewhat smaller discriminant capabilities than trunk kinematics, the small correlations between these stability measures and trunk kinematics (|r| ≤ 0.52) suggest that they reflect two important, yet different, aspects of a compensatory stepping response.

  11. Gender differences in non-standard mapping tasks: A kinematic study using pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions.

    PubMed

    Copley-Mills, Freya; Connolly, Jason D; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana

    2016-09-01

    Comparison between real and pantomimed actions is used in neuroscience to dissociate stimulus-driven (real) as compared to internally driven (pantomimed) visuomotor transformations, with the goal of testing models of vision (Milner & Goodale, 1995) and diagnosing neuropsychological deficits (apraxia syndrome). Real actions refer to an overt movement directed toward a visible target whereas pantomimed actions refer to an overt movement directed either toward an object that is no longer available. Although similar, real and pantomimed actions differ in their kinematic parameters and in their neural substrates. Pantomimed-reach-to-grasp-actions show reduced reaching velocities, higher wrist movements, and reduced grip apertures. In addition, seminal neuropsychological studies and recent neuroimaging findings confirmed that real and pantomimed actions are underpinned by separate brain networks. Although previous literature suggests differences in the praxis system between males and females, no research to date has investigated whether or not gender differences exist in the context of real versus pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions. We asked ten male and ten female participants to perform real and pantomimed reach-to-grasp actions toward objects of different sizes, either with or without visual feedback. During pantomimed actions participants were required to pick up an imaginary object slightly offset relative to the location of the real one (which was in turn the target of the real reach-to-grasp actions). Results demonstrate a significant difference between the kinematic parameters recorded in male and female participants performing pantomimed, but not real reach-to-grasp tasks, depending on the availability of visual feedback. With no feedback both males and females showed smaller grip aperture, slower movement velocity and lower reach height. Crucially, these same differences were abolished when visual feedback was available in male, but not in female participants

  12. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-07

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible.

  13. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-01

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible. PMID:26248884

  14. Successful Student Goal Completion: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Sara C.

    2013-01-01

    Research studies have shown that one half of all students who begin college fail to realize their goals. This case study of one community college provided a comprehensive examination of best practices developed over several years through strategic enrollment planning. Additionally, this dissertation examined the decision-making processes that…

  15. A Complete Reanalysis of Horner's Classic "Fear of Success" Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, David A.; Kline, Kay H.

    The well-known study on fear of success (FOS) by Horner (1968) asserted that women low in FOS do better on achievement-oriented tasks under competitive conditions, while women high in the motive do better when the situation is non-competitive. This paper critically reviews the methodology of this study and concludes that the statistical test…

  16. Predicting Computer Science Ph.D. Completion: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, G. W.; Hughes, W. E., Jr.; Etzkorn, L. H.; Weisskopf, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of indicators that can be used to predict whether a student will succeed in a Computer Science Ph.D. program. The analysis was conducted by studying the records of 75 students who have been in the Computer Science Ph.D. program of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Seventy-seven variables were…

  17. Marijuana safety study completed: weight gain, no safety problems.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    2000-08-01

    No safety problems specific to HIV or protease inhibitors were found in a study in which volunteers stayed in a research hospital 24 hours a day and were randomly assigned to either smoke marijuana, take oral THC, or take an oral placebo. Marijuana and THC use was associated with weight gain. PMID:12170987

  18. Internal kinematic and physical properties in a BCD galaxy: Haro 15 in detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firpo, V.; Bosch, G.; Hägele, G. F.; Díaz, A. I.; Morrell, N.

    2011-11-01

    We present a detailed study of the kinematic and physical properties of the ionized gas in multiple knots of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Haro 15. Using echelle and long slit spectroscopy data, obtained with different instruments at Las Campanas Observatory, we study the internal kinematic and physical conditions (electron density and temperature), ionic and total chemical abundances of several atoms, reddening and ionization structure. Applying direct and empirical methods for abundance determination, we perform a comparative analysis between these regions and in their different components. On the other hand, our echelle spectra show complex kinematics in several conspicuous knots within the galaxy. To perform an in-depth 2D spectroscopic study we complete this work with high spatial and spectral resolution spectroscopy using the Integral Field Unit mode on the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument at the Gemini South telescope. With these data we are able to resolve the complex kinematical structure within star forming knots in Haro 15 galaxy.

  19. Effects of a program for trunk strength and stability on pain, low back and pelvis kinematics, and body balance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Reinehr, Fernanda Beatriz; Mota, Carlos Bolli

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of trunk strength and stability training on body balance and low back and pelvis kinematics during gait in females. Six subjects volunteered to do 20 sessions of training. Data collection involved a qualitative pain grade test, low back stabilization tests, low back and pelvis kinematics, and body balance assessment. Results indicate the absence or decrease in the low back pain, and also an increase in the stabilization and strength of low back and pelvis complex. The 3-D kinematics showed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) when compared pre- to post-training. The body balance was improved as well as the range of motion (ROM) was improved for trunk rotation, pelvis inclination and low back flexion. The results suggest the influence of trunk strength and stability on low back and pelvis pain and kinematics as well as on body balance. Further studies with a larger sample and/or a control group must be conducted in an attempt to confirm this hypothesis.

  20. A study of cervical spine kinematics and joint capsule strain in rear impacts using a human FE model.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Junji

    2006-11-01

    Many efforts have been made to understand the mechanism of whiplash injury. Recently, the cervical facet joint capsules have been focused on as a potential site of injury. An experimental approach has been taken to analyze the vertebral motion and to estimate joint capsule stretch that was thought to be a potential cause of pain. The purpose of this study is to analyze the kinematics of the cervical facet joint using a human FE model in order to better understand the injury mechanism. The Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) was used to visually analyze the local and global kinematics of the spine. Soft tissues in the neck were newly modeled and introduced into THUMS for estimating the loading level in rear impacts. The model was first validated against human test data in the literature by comparing vertebrae motion as well as head and neck responses. Joint capsule strain was estimated from a maximum principal strain output from the elements representing the capsule tissues. A rear-end collision was then simulated using THUMS and a prototype seat model, assuming a delta-V of 25 km/h. The trajectory of the vertebrae was analyzed in a local coordinate system defined along the joint surface. Strain growth in the joint capsules was explained, as related to contact events between the occupant and the seat. A new seat concept was proposed to help lessen the loading level to the neck soft tissues. The foam material of the seat back was softened, the initial gap behind the head was reduced and the head restraint was stiffened for firm support. The lower seat back frame was also reinforced to withstand the impact severity at the given delta-V. Another rear impact simulation was conducted using the new seat concept model to examine the effectiveness of the new concept. The joint capsule strain was found to be relatively lower with the new seat concept. The study also discusses the influence of seat parameters to the vertebral motion and the resultant strain in the joint

  1. Pre-clinical and clinical walking kinematics in female breeding pigs with lameness: A nested case-control cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stavrakakis, S; Guy, J H; Syranidis, I; Johnson, G R; Edwards, S A

    2015-07-01

    Gait profiles were investigated in a cohort of female pigs experiencing a lameness period prevalence of 29% over 17 months. Gait alterations before and during visually diagnosed lameness were evaluated to identify the best quantitative clinical lameness indicators and early predictors for lameness. Pre-breeding gilts (n= 84) were recruited to the study over a period of 6 months, underwent motion capture every 5 weeks and, depending on their age at entry to the study, were followed for up to three successive gestations. Animals were subject to motion capture in each parity at 8 weeks of gestation and on the day of weaning (28 days postpartum). During kinematic motion capture, the pigs walked on the same concrete walkway and an array of infra-red cameras was used to collect three dimensional coordinate data of reflective skin markers attached to the head, trunk and limb anatomical landmarks. Of 24 pigs diagnosed with lameness, 19 had preclinical gait records, whilst 18 had a motion capture while lame. Depending on availability, data from one or two preclinical motion capture 1-11 months prior to lameness and on the day of lameness were analysed. Lameness was best detected and evaluated using relative spatiotemporal gait parameters, especially vertical head displacement and asymmetric stride phase timing. Irregularity in the step-to-stride length ratio was elevated (deviation  ≥ 0.03) in young pigs which presented lameness in later life (odds ratio 7.2-10.8). PMID:25986130

  2. A Gemini/GMOS study of the physical conditions and kinematics of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, Eduardo; Thuan, Trinh X.; Izotov, Yuri I.; Carrasco, Eleazar R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We present an integral field spectroscopic study with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) of the unusual blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Mrk 996. Methods: We show through velocity and dispersion maps, emission-line intensity and ratio maps, and by a new technique of electron density limit imaging that the ionization properties of different regions in Mrk 996 are correlated with their kinematic properties. Results: From the maps, we can spatially distinguish a very dense high-ionization zone with broad lines in the nuclear region, and a less dense low-ionization zone with narrow lines in the circumnuclear region. Four kinematically distinct systems of lines are identified in the integrated spectrum of Mrk 996, suggesting stellar wind outflows from a population of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the nuclear region, superposed on an underlying rotation pattern. From the intensities of the blue and red bumps, we derive a population of ~473 late nitrogen (WNL) stars and ~98 early carbon (WCE) stars in the nucleus of Mrk 996, resulting in a high N(WR)/N(O+WR) of 0.19. We derive, for the outer narrow-line region, an oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H) = 7.94 ± 0.30 (~0.2 Z⊙) by using the direct Te method derived from the detected narrow [O iii]λ4363 line. The nucleus of Mrk 996 is, however, nitrogen-enhanced by a factor of ~20, in agreement with previous CLOUDY modeling. This nitrogen enhancement is probably due to nitrogen-enriched WR ejecta, but also to enhanced nitrogen line emission in a high-density environment. Although we have made use here of two new methods - principal component analysis (PCA) tomography and a method for mapping low- and high-density clouds - to analyze our data, new methodology is needed to further exploit the wealth of information provided by integral field spectroscopy. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative

  3. U.S. Virtual School Trial Period and Course Completion Policy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Abigail; Barbour, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in policies virtual schools use to calculate course completion and retention rates impacts the comparability of these quality metrics. This study surveyed 159 U.S. virtual schools examining the variability in trial period and course completion policies--two policies that affect course completion rates. Of the 86 respondents, almost 70%…

  4. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  5. A kinematic analysis of a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment: a study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Broeren, Jurgen; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Rydmark, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Background Virtual Reality provides new options for conducting motor assessment and training within computer-generated 3 dimensional environments. To date very little has been reported about normal performance in virtual environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of a clinical procedure measuring trajectories with a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment and to establish normative data in healthy subjects using this haptic device. Methods Fifty-eight normal subjects; aged from 20 to 69, performed 3 dimensional hand movements in a virtual environment using a haptic device on three occasions within one week. Test-retest stability and standardized normative data were obtained for all subjects. Results No difference was found between test and retest. The limits of agreement revealed that changes in an individual's performance could not be detected. There was a training effect between the first test occasion and the third test occasion. Normative data are presented. Conclusion A new test was developed for recording the kinematics of the handheld haptic stylus in a virtual environment. The normative data will be used for purposes of comparison in future assessments, such as before and after training of persons with neurological deficits. PMID:17490470

  6. Rattlesnake strike behavior: kinematics

    PubMed

    Kardong; v

    1998-03-01

    The predatory behavior of rattlesnakes includes many distinctive preparatory phases leading to an extremely rapid strike, during which venom is injected. The rodent prey is then rapidly released, removing the snake's head from retaliation by the prey. The quick action of the venom makes possible the recovery of the dispatched prey during the ensuing poststrike period. The strike is usually completed in less than 0.5 s, placing a premium on an accurate strike that produces no significant errors in fang placement that could result in poor envenomation and subsequent loss of the prey. To clarify the basis for effective strike performance, we examined the basic kinematics of the rapid strike using high-speed film analysis. We scored numerous strike variables. Four major results were obtained. (1) Neurosensory control of the strike is based primarily upon sensory inputs via the eyes and facial pits to launch the strike, and upon tactile stimuli after contact. Correction for errors in targeting occurs not by a change in strike trajectory, but by fang repositioning after the jaws have made contact with the prey. (2) The rattlesnake strike is based upon great versatility and variation in recruitment of body segments and body postures. (3) Forces generated during acceleration of the head are transferred to posterior body sections to decelerate the head before contact with the prey, thereby reducing impact forces upon the snake's jaws. (4) Body acceleration is based on two patterns of body displacement, one in which acute sections of the body open like a gate, the other in which body segments flow around postural curves similar to movements seen during locomotion. There is one major implication of these results: recruitment of body segments, launch postures and kinematic features of the strike may be quite varied from strike to strike, but the overall predatory success of each strike by a rattlesnake is very consistent.

  7. Study of the kinematic and load sharing properties of wormgearing with non-symmetric tooth profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1995-01-01

    The geometry of non-symmetric tooth profiles, i.e. tooth profiles with different pressure angles on the two sides of the tooth, is studied. A feasible non-symmetric tooth profile for application in helicopter transmissions is laid out as the best compromise among several conflicting factors. The non-symmetric tooth profile is then compared with the symmetric tooth profile studied previously. Based on the detailed comparisons it is concluded that the use of the non-symmetric tooth profile would severely limit the face width of the worm, consequently reduce the number of meshing teeth and cause much higher normal load on the individual gear teeth.

  8. MUSE sneaks a peek at extreme ram-pressure stripping events - I. A kinematic study of the archetypal galaxy ESO137-001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; Fossati, Matteo; Hau, George K. T.; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Bower, Richard; Sun, Ming; Boselli, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations of ESO137-001, a spiral galaxy infalling towards the centre of the massive Norma cluster at z ˜ 0.0162. During the high-velocity encounter of ESO137-001 with the intracluster medium, a dramatic ram-pressure stripping event gives rise to an extended gaseous tail, traced by our MUSE observations to >30 kpc from the galaxy centre. By studying the Hα surface brightness and kinematics in tandem with the stellar velocity field, we conclude that ram pressure has completely removed the interstellar medium from the outer disc, while the primary tail is still fed by gas from the inner regions. Gravitational interactions do not appear to be a primary mechanism for gas removal. The stripped gas retains the imprint of the disc rotational velocity to ˜20 kpc downstream, without a significant gradient along the tail, which suggests that ESO137-001 is fast moving along a radial orbit in the plane of the sky. Conversely, beyond ˜20 kpc, a greater degree of turbulence is seen, with velocity dispersion up to ≳100 km s-1. For a model-dependent infall velocity of vinf ˜ 3000 km s-1, we conclude that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the tail occurs on time-scales ≥6.5 Myr. Our work demonstrates the terrific potential of MUSE for detailed studies of how ram-pressure stripping operates on small scales, providing a deep understanding of how galaxies interact with the dense plasma of the cluster environment.

  9. Photometric and Kinematical Study of Nearby Groups of Galaxies Around IC 65 and NGC 6962

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, J.; Tago, E.

    The IC 65 group (z = 0.0089) of four late type galaxies - IC 65, UGC 608, UGC 622, and PGC 138291 - has been studied earlier in the 21 cm HI line by van Moorsel (1983, A&AS, 54, 1), who found disturbed HI envelopes of bright group members, and detected a new HI-rich LSB galaxy.

  10. Contributions to the study of students' ideas about the kinematics concepts velocity and acceleration: Implications in the didactic of the kinematic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbegoso-Sevillano, Victor Alfonso

    The concepts velocity and acceleration are within first whereupon all course of introductory physics begins and, later, they are continually applied in the development of the course when discussing dynamics, energy, electricity and waves, among other subjects. Therefore, this pair of concepts deserves special attention in the process of teaching and learning of physics. In this study, the ideas of the university students related to the velocity and acceleration concepts were identified and analyzed, and was determined the degree or level of understanding of such concepts. The study is of descriptive nature, and the results from this study it is tried to improve an aspect of the teaching and learning process in the course of physics. The guide questions were What are the previous conceptions on velocity and acceleration that university students have from courses of General Physics I (FISI 3001) and University Physics I (FISI 3011)? What is the genesis of those conceptions? How defer the previous ideas between students from different sex? What are the conceptual categories that stand out in the previous ideas of the students on velocity and acceleration? What difficulties find the students in the process of learning the concepts of velocity and acceleration? What degree of understanding have the students about the concepts of velocity and acceleration at the end of the semester compared to the beginning? The previous ideas that had the participants of low, average, and high academic performance about the concepts velocity and acceleration were identified by means of the analysis of the data obtained through questionnaires and interviews. This information allowed to suggest changes in the content, and the methodology, so that it was more relevant and can be more effective in accomplish objectives. The degree of understanding of the concepts velocity and acceleration was determined by means of the criterion of the ability that the student has to apply correctly such

  11. Inverse Kinematics Studies of Intermediate-Energy Reactions Relevant for SEE and Medical Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aichelin, J.; Bargholtz, Ch.; Blomgren, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Chubarov, M.; Czech, B.; Ekström, C.; Gerén, L.; Jakobsson, B.; Kolozhvari, A.; Lozhkin, O.; Murin, Yu.; Nomokonov, P.; Olsson, N.; Persson, H.; Pljuschev, V.; Skwirczynska, I.; Tang, H. H. K.; Tegnér, P.-E.; Westerberg, L.; Zartova, I.; Zubkov, M.; Watanabe, Y.

    2005-05-01

    The lack of systematic experimental checks on the intermediate-energy nuclear model simulations of heavily ionizing recoils from nucleon-nucleus collisions — critical inputs for the Single Event Effect analysis of microelectronics and dosimetry calculations including high-LET components in the cancer tumor radiation therapy — has been a primary motivation for a new experiment planned at the CELSIUS nuclear storage ring of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. Details of the experiment and the first results from a feasibility study are presented here.

  12. Kinematic evolution and quantification of deformation in external orogenic zones: a case study from the Tunisian Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensalem, Mohamed Sadok; Amamria, Soulef; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Zargouni, Fouad

    2016-08-01

    The quantification of deformation is one of the main objectives studied by geologists in order to control the evolution of tectonic structures and their kinematics during different tectonic phases. One of the most reliable methods of this theme is the direct calculation of quantity of deformation based on field data, while respecting several parameters such as the notion of tectonic inheritance and reactivation of pre-existing faults, or the relationship between the elongation and shortening axis with major faults. Thus, such a quantification of deformation in an area may explain the relations of thin- and thick-skinned tectonics during this deformation. The study of structural evolution of the Jebel Elkebar domain in the southern-central Tunisian Atlas permits us to quantify the deformation during the extensional phase by a direct calculation of the vertical throw along normal faults. This approach is verified by calculation of thickness of eroded strata in the uplifted compartment and of resedimented series, named the Kebar Formation, in the downthrown compartment. The obtained results confirm the importance of the Aptian-Albian extensional tectonic regime. The extent of deformation during the compressional phase, related to reactivation of pre-existing faults, is less than that of extensional phases; indeed the compressive reactivation did not compensate the vertical throw of normal faults. The geometry of the Elkebar fold is interpreted in terms of the "fault-related fold" model with a décollement level in the Triassic series. This permitted the partition of deformation between the basement and cover, so that the basement was allowed for a limited transport only, and the maximum of observed deformation was concentrated in the thin-skinned tectonics.

  13. A Study of Kinematics Modeling and the Computational Optimization of the Human Underwater Undulatory Kick by Comparison of Swimmers and Body Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoran; Liu, Geng; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2014-11-01

    Underwater Undulatory Swimming (UUS), better known as the underwater dolphin kick, is the most important technique in competitive swimming. Faster than three of the four strokes in swimming, UUS is permitted in the 15 m after dives and turns. In this study, we compared the UUS of a college-level swimmer and a younger swimmer. 3D human models were built and reconstructed using stereo-videos for identifying key components of undulatory kick kinematics with respect to strongly flexing joints. A gradient-based optimizer and an immersed boundary method based CFD solver was then used to study the hydrodynamic performance of each swimmer. Optimal settings of current kinematic models will help us to understand the efficiency of the observed undulatory kick mechanisms and further improvements of the human UUS strategy. This work is supported by NSF CEBT-1313217 and UVa HooS-STER program.

  14. Radial velocities of three poorly studied clusters and the kinematics of open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Christian R.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu

    2014-04-01

    We present radial velocities for stars in the field of the open star clusters Berkeley 44, Berkeley 81, and NGC 6802 from spectra obtained using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) 3.5 m telescope. These clusters are of intermediate age (1-3 Gyr), located within the solar Galactocentric radius, and have no previous radial velocity measurements. We find mean radial velocities of –9.6 ± 3.0 km s{sup –1}, 48.1 ± 2.0 km s{sup –1}, and 12.4 ± 2.8 km s{sup –1} for Be 44, Be 81, and NGC 6802, respectively. We present an analysis of radial velocities of 134 open clusters of a wide range of ages using data obtained in this study and the literature. Assuming the system of clusters rotates about the Galactic center with a constant velocity, we find older clusters exhibit a slower rotation and larger line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion than younger clusters. The gradual decrease in rotational velocity of the cluster system with age is accompanied by a smooth increase in LOS velocity dispersion, which we interpret as the effect of heating on the open cluster system over time.

  15. Multifrequency studies of massive cores with complex spatial and kinematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, L. E.; Shul'ga, V. M.; Zinchenko, I. I.; Zemlyanukha, P. M.; Patoka, A. N.; Tomasson, M.

    2016-10-01

    Five regions of massive-star formation have been observed in various molecular lines in the frequency range˜85-89 GHz. The studied regions comprise dense cores, which host young stellar objects. The physical parameters of the cores are estimated, including the kinetic temperatures (˜20-40 K), the sizes of the emitting regions (˜0.1-0.6 pc), and the virial masses (˜40-500 M ⊙). The column densities and abundances of various molecules are calculated assuming Local Thermodynamical Equilibrium(LTE). The core in 99.982+4.17, which is associated with the weakest IRAS source, is characterized by reduced molecular abundances. The molecular line widths decrease with increasing distance from the core centers ( b). For b ≳ 0.1 pc, the dependences Δ V ( b) are close to power laws (∝ b - p ), where p varies from ~0.2 to ~0.5, depending on the object. In four cores, the asymmetries of the optically thick HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) lines indicates systematicmotions along the line of sight: collapse in two cores and expansion in two others. Approximate estimates of the accretion rates in the collapsing cores indicate that the forming stars have masses exceeding the solar mass.

  16. A Kinematic Study of the Nuclear Stellar Populations in Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rissmann, Aurea; Cid Fernandes, Roberto; Asari, N. V.; Vega, Luis Rodolfo; Schmitt, Henrique; González Delgado, Rosa

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies in the optical and UV have detected circumnuclear starbursts in 40% of nearby Seyfert-2 galaxies; about half of the remaining 60% present a UV excess whose nature is not well known, mainly because of the limitations of the current stellar population analysis techniques in the optical and UV domains. A possible way to circumvent these difficulties is to use a determination of the mass-to-light (M/L) ratio, obtained with a combination of velocity dispersion measurements and photometric information. Dynamical information in AGN (particularly in type 2) is better determined from NIR spectroscopic data, where the stellar absorption features are less affected by the nuclear continuum dilution. In this work, we present preliminary results of a spectroscopic survey of more than 60 Seyfert nuclei (mainly Seyfert 2s), conducted at ESO/La Silla and at KPNO. For many of these objects we have complementary data, such as HST images, optical and (in some cases) UV spectroscopy. The long-slit spectroscopy for the purpose of this project was performed around the NIR Ca II triplet lines at 8498, 8542 and 8662Å. Here we describe the analysis steps taken so far, and present the first results concerning velocity dispersion measurements in nuclear regions. With these data we aim to investigate the ambiguous Seyfert 2 nuclei nature, thus contributing to a better understanding of the AGN-starburst connection.

  17. Measuring Kinematic Variables in Front Crawl Swimming Using Accelerometers: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Callaway, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective data on swimming performance is needed to meet the demands of the swimming coach and athlete. The purpose of this study is to use a multiple inertial measurement units to calculate Lap Time, Velocity, Stroke Count, Stroke Duration, Stroke Rate and Phases of the Stroke (Entry, Pull, Push, Recovery) in front crawl swimming. Using multiple units on the body, an algorithm was developed to calculate the phases of the stroke based on the relative position of the body roll. Twelve swimmers, equipped with these devices on the body, performed fatiguing trials. The calculated factors were compared to the same data derived to video data showing strong positive results for all factors. Four swimmers required individual adaptation to the stroke phase calculation method. The developed algorithm was developed using a search window relative to the body roll (peak/trough). This customization requirement demonstrates that single based devices will not be able to determine these phases of the stroke with sufficient accuracy. PMID:26007718

  18. Motor planning of goal-directed action is tuned by the emotional valence of the stimulus: a kinematic study

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, P. O.; Oliveira, L. A. S.; Nogueira-Campos, A. A.; Saunier, G.; Pozzo, T.; Oliveira, J. M.; Rodrigues, E. C.; Volchan, E.; Vargas, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    The basic underpinnings of homeostatic behavior include interacting with positive items and avoiding negative ones. As the planning aspects of goal-directed actions can be inferred from their movement features, we investigated the kinematics of interacting with emotion-laden stimuli. Participants were instructed to grasp emotion-laden stimuli and bring them toward their bodies while the kinematics of their wrist movement was measured. The results showed that the time to peak velocity increased for bringing pleasant stimuli towards the body compared to unpleasant and neutral ones, suggesting higher easiness in undertaking the task with pleasant stimuli. Furthermore, bringing unpleasant stimuli towards the body increased movement time in comparison with both pleasant and neutral ones while the time to peak velocity for unpleasant stimuli was the same as for that of neutral stimuli. There was no change in the trajectory length among emotional categories. We conclude that during the “reach-to-grasp” and “bring-to-the-body” movements, the valence of the stimuli affects the temporal but not the spatial kinematic features of motion. To the best of our knowledge, we show for the first time that the kinematic features of a goal-directed action are tuned by the emotional valence of the stimuli. PMID:27364868

  19. Motor planning of goal-directed action is tuned by the emotional valence of the stimulus: a kinematic study.

    PubMed

    Esteves, P O; Oliveira, L A S; Nogueira-Campos, A A; Saunier, G; Pozzo, T; Oliveira, J M; Rodrigues, E C; Volchan, E; Vargas, C D

    2016-07-01

    The basic underpinnings of homeostatic behavior include interacting with positive items and avoiding negative ones. As the planning aspects of goal-directed actions can be inferred from their movement features, we investigated the kinematics of interacting with emotion-laden stimuli. Participants were instructed to grasp emotion-laden stimuli and bring them toward their bodies while the kinematics of their wrist movement was measured. The results showed that the time to peak velocity increased for bringing pleasant stimuli towards the body compared to unpleasant and neutral ones, suggesting higher easiness in undertaking the task with pleasant stimuli. Furthermore, bringing unpleasant stimuli towards the body increased movement time in comparison with both pleasant and neutral ones while the time to peak velocity for unpleasant stimuli was the same as for that of neutral stimuli. There was no change in the trajectory length among emotional categories. We conclude that during the "reach-to-grasp" and "bring-to-the-body" movements, the valence of the stimuli affects the temporal but not the spatial kinematic features of motion. To the best of our knowledge, we show for the first time that the kinematic features of a goal-directed action are tuned by the emotional valence of the stimuli.

  20. Do Planning and Visual Integration Difficulties Underpin Motor Dysfunction in Autism? A Kinematic Study of Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Ariane M.; McGinley, Jennifer L.; Taffe, John R.; Rinehart, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the upper-limb movement kinematics of young children (3-7 years) with high-functioning autism using a point-to-point movement paradigm. Consistent with prior findings in older children, a difference in movement preparation was found in the autism group (n = 11) relative to typically developing children. In contrast to typically…

  1. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Garbis, Nickolas G; Weber, Alexander E; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of young patients with glenohumeral arthritis is controversial. Resurfacing of the glenoid with biologic interposition and reaming of the glenoid have been suggested as potential treatment options. The goal of this study was to determine the change in glenohumeral contact pressures in interposition arthroplasty, as well as glenoid reaming in an arthritis model. We hypothesized that interposition with meniscal allograft will lead to the best normalization of contact pressure throughout the glenohumeral range of motion. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were tested in static positions of humeral abduction with a compressive load. Glenohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and peak force were determined sequentially for (1) intact glenoid (2) glenoid with cartilage removed (arthritis model) (3) placement of lateral meniscus allograft (4) placement of Achilles allograft (5) arthritis model with reamed glenoid. Results: The arthritis model demonstrated statistically higher peak pressures than intact glenoid and glenoid with interpositional allograft. Meniscal and Achilles allograft lowered mean contact pressure and increased contact area to a level equal to or more favorable than the control state. In contrast, the reamed glenoid did not show any statistical difference from the arthritis model for any of the recorded measures. Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear. PMID:27293292

  2. Comparison of quasi-static and dynamic squats: a three-dimensional kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic study of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Hagemeister, Nicola; Aissaoui, Rachid; de Guise, Jacques A

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have described 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and electromyography (EMG) of the lower limbs during quasi-static or dynamic squatting activities. One study compared these two squatting conditions but only at low speed on healthy subjects, and provided no information on kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. The purpose of the present study was to contrast simultaneous recordings of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs during quasi-stat ic and fast-dynamic squats in healthy and pathological subjects. Ten subjects were recruited: five healthy and five osteoarthritis subjects. A motion-capture system, force plate, and surface electrodes respectively recorded 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. Each subject performed a quasi-static squat and several fast-dynamic squats from 0° to 70° of knee flexion. The two squatting conditions were compared for positions where quasi-static and fast-dynamic knee flexion-extension angles were similar. Mean differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were 1.5° for rotations, 1.9 mm for translations, 2.1% of subjects' body weight for ground reaction forces, 6.6 Nm for torques, 11.2 mm for center of pressure, and 6.3% of maximum fast-dynamic electromyographic activities for EMG. Some significant differences (p<0.05) were found in internal rotation, anterior translation, vertical force and EMG. All differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were small. 69.5% of compared data were equivalent. In conclusion, this study showed that quasi-static and fast-dynamic squatting activities are comparable in terms of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG, although some reservations still remain.

  3. Recent Inversion, Seismic Potential, and Neogene Kinematics of the Algerian Margin (Western Mediterranean) from Offshore Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deverchere, J.; Yelles, K.; Bracene, R.; Mercier de Lepinay, B. F.; Cattaneo, A.; Medaouri, M.; Gaullier, V.; Babonneau, N.; Ratzov, G.; Boudiaf, A.; Graindorge, D.; Kherroubi, A.; Strzerzynski, P. H.; Authemayou, C.; Djellit, H.; Heddar, A.; Maradja'03; Maradja-Samra'05 Scientific Teams

    2011-12-01

    The reasons to study the Algerian margin (Western Mediterranean) are at least threefold: (1) the seismic hazard offshore is obviously present but unconstrained, (2) the way the opening of the Algerian basin occurred is highly debated, and (3) this margin represents one of the rare examples on Earth of an ongoing subduction inception. We present an overview of recent findings on the tectonic evolution of this margin, where most of the plate convergence between Africa and Europe is taken up today, mostly from cruises MARADJA and MARADJA2/SAMRA led by joint Algerian and French teams. Large, overlapping active thrust faults and folds apparently dominate the seismotectonic pattern from the Atlas domain on land to the foot of the margin offshore, with a clear segmentation. Strain is distributed across the whole area, with a significant part of the relative plate convergence taken up offshore. Fault activity offshore is tenuous and most often indirect (Plio-Quaternary growth strata, folds, uplifted basins, scars and slope breaks). Along the eastern margin, faults form stepwise, en-échelon systems on the slope and in the deep basin. Some thrusts identified turn to fault-propagation folds at the sub-surface. Thrusts interact with the sediment flux, Messinian salt and seafloor currents, forming complex structures at deep-sea fans and scarps or scars on the main slope breaks. The 2003 Mw 6.9 Boumerdes rupture is correlated segmented cumulative scarps on the slope and at the foot of the margin. Using various VHR seismic reflection and coring analyses, we show that the record of turbidite deposition since ca. 10.000 yrs can be identified and correlated over long distances within or across large segments of the margin affected by the 1954, 1980 and 2003 events. The consequences in term of earthquake size and recovery of their recurrences (identification of paleo-events) are explored and discussed. Although we cannot associate the triggering of large turbidity currents to a

  4. A study of bicyclist kinematics and injuries based on reconstruction of passenger car-bicycle accident in China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jin; Yang, Jikuang

    2014-10-01

    Like pedestrians, bicyclists are vulnerable road users, representing a population with a high risk of fatal and severe injuries in traffic accidents as they are unprotected during vehicle collisions. The objective of this study is to investigate the kinematics response of bicyclists and the correlation of the injury severity with vehicle impact speed. Twenty-four car-bicyclist cases with detailed information were selected for accident reconstruction using mathematical models, which was implemented in the MADYMO program. The dynamic response of bicyclists in the typical impact configuration and the correlation of head impact conditions were analyzed and discussed with respect to the head impact speed, time of head impact and impact angle of bicyclists to vehicle impact speed. Furthermore, the injury distribution of bicyclists and the risk of head injuries and fractures of lower limbs were investigated in terms of vehicle impact speed. The results indicate that wrap-around distance (WAD), head impact speed, time of head impact, head impact angle, and throw-out distance (TOD) of the bicyclists have a strong relationship with vehicle impact speed. The vehicle impact speed corresponding to a 50% probability of head AIS 2+ injuries, head AIS 3+ injuries, and lower limb fracture risk for bicyclists is 53.8km/h, 58.9km/h, and 41.2km/h, respectively. A higher vehicle impact speed produces a higher injury risk to bicyclist. The results could provide background knowledge for the establishment or modification of pedestrian regulations considering bicyclist protection as well as being helpful for developing safety measures and protection devices for bicyclists.

  5. Perceptions of Student-Teacher Relationships and GED Completion: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hairston, Melissa Tynetta

    2013-01-01

    This study took an in depth look at student-teacher relationships as one institutional barrier affecting GED completion among adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of student-instructor relationships, specifically Instructor Connectedness and Instructor Anxiety, and its effects on adults seeking GED completion. Data from…

  6. Influence of Motivational Design on Completion Rates in Online Self-Study Pharmacy-Content Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittenger, Amy; Doering, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Student retention rates are a constant concern in higher education, but this concern has become especially challenging as online courses become more common and there are widespread reports of low completion rates for online, self-study courses. We evaluated four self-study online pharmacy courses with a history of very high completion rates for…

  7. Completion Time Dynamics of Doctoral Studies at Makerere University: A Hazard Model Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Oonyu, Joseph; Ocaya, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Issues related to attrition and completion time of graduate studies are certainly an internationally challenging and important area of higher education literature. In this paper, completion time dynamics of doctoral studies at Makerere University were investigated based on data extracted for all 295 candidates in the commencement cohorts from 2000…

  8. A Study of Predictors of College Completion among SEEK Immigrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazon, Marie C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the strength of the relationship between eight situational and demographic variables and college completion among immigrant students in SEEK, an educational opportunity program. The eight variables studied as possible predictors of college completion included household composition, length of residency, English as a primary…

  9. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  10. AN OSIRIS STUDY OF THE GAS KINEMATICS IN A SAMPLE OF UV-SELECTED GALAXIES: EVIDENCE OF 'HOT AND BOTHERED' STARBURSTS IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Goncalves, Thiago S.; Martin, Chris; Wyder, Ted; Overzier, Roderik; Law, David R.; Heckman, Tim E-mail: ds@astro.columbia.edu E-mail: tsg@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: wyder@srl.caltech.edu E-mail: heckman@pha.jhu.edu

    2009-07-10

    We present data from Integral Field Spectroscopy for three supercompact UV-Luminous Galaxies (ScUVLGs). As nearby (z {approx} 0.2) compact (R {sub 50} {approx} 1-2 kpc) bright Paschen-{alpha} sources, with unusually high star formation rates (SFR = 3-100 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}), ScUVLGs are an ideal population for studying detailed kinematics and dynamics in actively star-forming galaxies. In addition, ScUVLGs appear to be excellent analogs to high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), and our results may offer additional insight into the dynamics of LBGs. Previous work by our team has shown that the morphologies of these galaxies exhibit tidal features and companions, and in this study we find that the dynamics of ScUVLGs are dominated by disturbed kinematics of the emission line gas-suggesting that these galaxies have undergone recent feedback, interactions, or mergers. While two of the three galaxies do display rotation, v/{sigma}<1-suggesting dispersion-dominated kinematics rather than smooth rotation. We also simulate how these observations would appear at z {approx} 2. Lower resolution and loss of low surface brightness features cause some apparent discrepancies between the low-z (observed) and high-z (simulated) interpretations and quantitatively gives different values for v/{sigma}, yet simulations of these low-z analogs manage to detect the brightest regions well and resemble actual high-z observations of LBGs.

  11. On the kinematic analysis of robotic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.; Roth, B.

    1999-12-01

    The kinematic analyses, of manipulators and other robotic devices composed of mechanical links, usually depend on the solution of sets of nonlinear equations. There are a variety of both numerical and algebraic techniques available to solve such systems of equations and to give bounds on the number of solutions. These solution methods have also led to an understanding of how special choices of the various structural parameters of a mechanism influence the number of solutions inherent to the kinematic geometry of a given structure. In this paper, results from studying the kinematic geometry of such systems are reviewed, and the three most useful solution techniques are summarized. The solution techniques are polynomial continuation, Groebner bases, and elimination. The authors then discuss the results that have been obtained with these techniques in the solution of two basic problems, namely, the inverse kinematics for serial-chain manipulators, and the direct kinematics of in-parallel platform devices.

  12. Kinematically Detected Halo Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Martin C.

    Clues to the origins and evolution of our Galaxy can be found in the kinematics of stars around us. Remnants of accreted satellite galaxies produce over-densities in velocity-space, which can remain coherent for much longer than spatial over-densities. This chapter reviews a number of studies that have hunted for these accretion relics, both in the nearby solar-neighborhood and the more-distant stellar halo. Many observational surveys have driven this field forwards, from early work with the Hipparcos mission, to contemporary surveys like RAVE and SDSS. This active field continues to flourish, providing many new discoveries, and will be revolutionized as the Gaia mission delivers precise proper motions for a billion stars in our Galaxy.

  13. O-star kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Karimova, D.K.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Proper motions determined by the authors are utilized to study the kinematics of 79 O-type stars at distance r< or =2.5 kpc. The sample is divided into two groups, having space-velocity dispersions tau/sub I/roughly-equal10 km/sec, sigma/sub II/roughly-equal35 km/sec. Solutions for the velocity-field parameters for group I yield a galactic angular rotation speed ..omega../sub 0/ = 24.9 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/ at the sun (for R/sub 0/ = 10.0 kpc) and an Oort constant A = 12.2 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/. Most of the O stars exhibit a small z-velocity directed away from the galactic plane. The velocity-ellipsoid parameters and box-orbit elements are calculated.

  14. Feeding kinematics of phyllomedusine tree frogs.

    PubMed

    Gray, L A; Nishikawa, K C

    1995-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the phyllomedusine hylids possess highly protrusible tongues, a derived characteristic within the family Hylidae. In the present study, the kinematics of the feeding behavior of a phyllomedusine species, Pachymedusa dacnicolor, was analyzed using high-speed video (180 frames s-1). Its behavior was compared with that of Hyla cinerea, a species with a weakly protrusible tongue. P. dacnicolor exhibits a faster rate of tongue protraction, a longer gape cycle and more variable feeding kinematics than H. cinerea. In addition, the tongue is used in a unique 'fly-swatter' fashion, to pin the prey to the substratum as the frog completes the lunge. The rapid tongue protraction, extended gape cycle and fly-swatter action may have evolved in response to a diet of large, rapidly moving insects. In addition, several duration variables of the feeding cycle were greater for misses than for captures and drops, which suggests that sensory feedback rather than biomechanics controls gape cycle duration.

  15. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  16. Occupant Kinematics in Laboratory Rollover Tests: PMHS Response.

    PubMed

    Lessley, David J; Riley, Patrick; Zhang, Qi; Foltz, Patrick; Overby, Brian; Heltzel, Sara; Sochor, Mark; Crandall, Jeff; Kerrigan, Jason R

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the whole-body kinematic response of restrained PMHS in controlled laboratory rollover tests. A dynamic rollover test system (DRoTS) and a parametric vehicle buck were used to conduct 36 rollover tests on four adult male PMHS with varied test conditions to study occupant kinematics during the rollover event. The DRoTS was used to drop/catch and rotate the test buck, which replicated the occupant compartment of a typical mid-sized SUV, around its center of gravity without roof-to-ground contact. The studied test conditions included a quasi-static inversion (4 tests), an inverted drop and catch that produced a 3 g vertical deceleration (4 tests), a pure dynamic roll at 360 degrees/second (11 tests), and a roll with a superimposed drop and catch produced vertical deceleration (17 tests). Each PMHS was restrained with a three-point belt and was tested in both leading-side and trailing-side front-row seating positions. Whole-body kinematics were measured using a 3D motion capture system that quantified occupant displacement relative to the vehicle buck for the X-axis (longitudinal), Y-axis (lateral), and Z-axis (vertical) directions. Additionally the spine was divided into five segments to describe intrasegmental kinematics of the spine, including segment rotations as well as spinal extension and compression. The reported data represent the most complete set of kinematic response targets for a restrained occupant in a variety of dynamic rollover conditions, and are immediately useful for efforts to evaluate and improve existing ATDs and computational models for use in the rollover crash environment.

  17. Occupant Kinematics in Laboratory Rollover Tests: PMHS Response.

    PubMed

    Lessley, David J; Riley, Patrick; Zhang, Qi; Foltz, Patrick; Overby, Brian; Heltzel, Sara; Sochor, Mark; Crandall, Jeff; Kerrigan, Jason R

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the whole-body kinematic response of restrained PMHS in controlled laboratory rollover tests. A dynamic rollover test system (DRoTS) and a parametric vehicle buck were used to conduct 36 rollover tests on four adult male PMHS with varied test conditions to study occupant kinematics during the rollover event. The DRoTS was used to drop/catch and rotate the test buck, which replicated the occupant compartment of a typical mid-sized SUV, around its center of gravity without roof-to-ground contact. The studied test conditions included a quasi-static inversion (4 tests), an inverted drop and catch that produced a 3 g vertical deceleration (4 tests), a pure dynamic roll at 360 degrees/second (11 tests), and a roll with a superimposed drop and catch produced vertical deceleration (17 tests). Each PMHS was restrained with a three-point belt and was tested in both leading-side and trailing-side front-row seating positions. Whole-body kinematics were measured using a 3D motion capture system that quantified occupant displacement relative to the vehicle buck for the X-axis (longitudinal), Y-axis (lateral), and Z-axis (vertical) directions. Additionally the spine was divided into five segments to describe intrasegmental kinematics of the spine, including segment rotations as well as spinal extension and compression. The reported data represent the most complete set of kinematic response targets for a restrained occupant in a variety of dynamic rollover conditions, and are immediately useful for efforts to evaluate and improve existing ATDs and computational models for use in the rollover crash environment. PMID:26192958

  18. 40 CFR 26.1607 - Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research. 26.1607 Section 26.1607 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1607...

  19. 40 CFR 26.1607 - Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research. 26.1607 Section 26.1607 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1607...

  20. An Exploration of the Relationship between Optimistic Explanatory Style and Doctoral Study Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Constance V. S.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have explored the positive characteristics that motivate doctoral students to pursue and complete their degree; research has historically focused on doctoral student attrition. To fully understand doctoral student success, research must focus on factors that contribute to completion. Based on Seligman's theory of explanatory…

  1. A Case Study of English Language Learners Who Have Successfully Completed a Healthcare Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloud Smith, Theresa Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if English Language Learners (ELLs), who had successfully completed a healthcare education program, identified support services as having an impact on their academic success, and to identify what support services were critical to their successful completion of the healthcare education program. The…

  2. Augmented kinematic feedback from haptic virtual reality for dental skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Haddawy, Peter; Rhienmora, Phattanapon; Jittimanee, Pannapa; Viratket, Piyanuch

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a haptic virtual reality system for dental skill training. In this study we examined several kinds of kinematic information about the movement provided by the system supplement knowledge of results (KR) in dental skill acquisition. The kinematic variables examined involved force utilization (F) and mirror view (M). This created three experimental conditions that received augmented kinematic feedback (F, M, FM) and one control condition that did not (KR-only). Thirty-two dental students were randomly assigned to four groups. Their task was to perform access opening on the upper first molar with the haptic virtual reality system. An acquisition session consisted of two days of ten trials of practice in which augmented kinematic feedback was provided for the appropriate experimental conditions after each trial. One week after, a retention test consisting of two trials without augmented feedback was completed. The results showed that the augmented kinematic feedback groups had larger mean performance scores than the KR-only group in Day 1 of the acquisition and retention sessions (ANOVA, p<0.05). The apparent differences among feedback groups were not significant in Day 2 of the acquisition session (ANOVA, p>0.05). The trends in acquisition and retention sessions suggest that the augmented kinematic feedback can enhance the performance earlier in the skill acquisition and retention sessions. PMID:21123503

  3. The effect of design parameters of dynamic pedicle screw systems on kinematics and load bearing: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Schilling, C; Krüger, S; Grupp, T M; Duda, G N; Blömer, W; Rohlmann, A

    2011-02-01

    As an alternative treatment for chronic back pain due to disc degeneration motion preserving techniques such as posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) has been clinically introduced, with the intention to alter the load transfer and the kinematics at the affected level to delay degeneration. However, up to the present, it remains unclear when a PDS is clinically indicated and how the ideal PDS mechanism should be designed to achieve this goal. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare different PDS devices against rigid fixation to investigate the biomechanical impact of PDS design on stabilization and load transfer in the treated and adjacent cranial segment. Six human lumbar spine specimens (L3-L5) were tested in a spine loading apparatus. In vitro flexibility testing was performed by applying pure bending moments of 7.5 Nm without and with additional preload of 400 N in the three principal motion planes. Four PDS devices, "DYN" (Dynesys(®), Zimmer GmbH, Switzerland), "DSS™" (Paradigm Spine, Wurmlingen, Germany), and two prototypes of dynamic rods, "LSC" with a leaf spring, and "STC" with a spring tube (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany), were tested in comparison to a rigid fixation device S(4) (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) "RIG", to the native situation "NAT" and to a defect situation "DEF" of the specimens. The instrumented level was L4-L5. The tested PDS devices comprising a stiffness range for axial stiffness of 10 N/mm to 230 N/mm and for bending stiffness of 3 N/mm to 15 N/mm. Range of motion (ROM), neutral zone (NZ), and intradiscal pressure (IDP) were analyzed for all instrumentation steps and load cases of the instrumented and non-instrumented level. In flexion, extension, and lateral bending, all systems, except STC, showed a significant reduction of ROM and NZ compared to the native situation (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found no significant difference between DYN and RIG (p > 0.1). In axial rotation, only DSS and STC reduced the ROM

  4. A Study Of The Kinematics Of Stellar Sub-populations In M31's Disk And Spheroid Using PHAT And SPLASH Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, C.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Gilbert, K.; Howley, K.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalirai, J.; Krause, T.; Lang, D.; Williams, B.; PHAT Team; SPLASH Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the kinematics of different types of stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Our fields of study span a range of projected radii from 2 to 15 kpc in the NE and SE quadrants of M31's disk and spheroid. The kinematical part of this study is based on radial velocity measurements of a few thousand stars obtained using the Keck II telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph as part of the SPLASH survey. The DEIMOS spectra have a spectral resolution of about 1.5 Angstrom (FWHM) and cover the wavelength range 6500-9000 Angstrom. The stellar populations part of this study - specifically, the division of stars into sub-populations - is based on high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) images and photometry in six filters: two ultraviolet bands (F275W and F336W), two optical bands (F475W and F814W), and two near-infrared bands (F110W and F160W). The stellar sub-populations we study include metal-rich, metal-intermediate, and metal-poor red giants, asymptotic giant branch stars, He-burning blue loop stars, massive main sequence stars, planetary nebulae, and X-ray binaries. Kinematical information allows us to measure the fraction of each sub-population that is associated with M31's disk versus its spheroid. The excellent synergy between HST and Keck provides insight into the relationship between the dynamical, star formation, and chemical enrichment histories of the structural sub-components of M31 and, by association, other large spiral galaxies. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Science Internship Program (SIP) at UCSC.

  5. Single bundle anterior cruciate reconstruction does not restore normal knee kinematics at six months: an upright MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J A; Sutherland, A G; Smith, F W

    2011-10-01

    Abnormal knee kinematics following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament may exist despite an apparent resolution of tibial laxity and functional benefit. We performed upright, weight-bearing MR scans of both knees in the sagittal plane at different angles of flexion to determine the kinematics of the knee following unilateral reconstruction (n = 12). The uninjured knee acted as a control. Scans were performed pre-operatively and at three and six months post-operatively. Anteroposterior tibial laxity was determined using an arthrometer and patient function by validated questionnaires before and after reconstruction. In all the knees with deficient anterior cruciate ligaments, the tibial plateau was displaced anteriorly and internally rotated relative to the femur when compared with the control contralateral knee, particularly in extension and early flexion (mean lateral compartment displacement: extension 7.9 mm (sd 4.8), p = 0.002 and 30° flexion 5.1 mm (sd 3.6), p = 0.004). In all ten patients underwent post-operative scans. Reconstruction reduced the subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau at three months, with resolution of anterior displacement in early flexion, but not in extension (p = 0.015). At six months, the reconstructed knee again showed anterior subluxation in both the lateral (mean: extension 4.2 mm (sd 4.2), p = 0.021 and 30° flexion 3.2 mm (sd 3.3), p = 0.024) and medial compartments (extension, p = 0.049). Our results show that despite improvement in laxity and functional benefit, abnormal knee kinematics remain at six months and actually deteriorate from three to six months following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

  6. Uncertainty Propagation in Calibration of Parallel Kinematic Machines

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR.,BERNHARD; ZIERGERT,JOHN C.

    1999-11-02

    Over the last decade, multi-axis machine tools and robots based on parallel kinematic mechanisms (PKMs) have been developed and marketed worldwide. Positional accuracy in these machines is controlled by accurate knowledge of the kinematic parameters which consists of the joint center locations and distances between joint pairs. Since these machines tend to be rather large in size, the kinematic parameters (joint center locations, and initial strut lengths) are difficult to determine when these machines are in their fully assembled state. Work recently completed by the University of Florida and Sandia National Laboratories has yielded a method for determining all of the kinematic parameters of an assembled parallel kinematic device. This paper contains a brief synopsis of the calibration method created, an error budget, an uncertainty analysis for the recovered kinematic parameters and the propagation of these uncertainties to the tool tip.

  7. Complete Study of Hadroproduction of a ϒ Meson Associated with a Prompt J/ψ.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Yu-Jie

    2016-08-01

    We present the first complete study of ϒ and prompt J/ψ production from single-parton scattering, including the complete O(α_{S}^{6}) color-singlet contribution, the O(α_{S}^{2}α^{2}) electroweak contribution, and the complete nonrelativistic S-wave and P-wave color-octet contribution as well as the feeddown contribution. Our study was motivated by the recent evidence reported by the D0 Collaboration of prompt J/ψ and ϒ simultaneous production at the Tevatron. With our complete evaluation, we are able to refine the determination of the double-parton scattering contribution made by the D0 Collaboration. We find that the effective cross section characterizing the importance of double-parton scatterings is σ_{eff}≤8.2  mb at 68% confidence level from the D0 measurement. PMID:27541462

  8. Complete Study of Hadroproduction of a ϒ Meson Associated with a Prompt J /ψ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Yu-Jie

    2016-08-01

    We present the first complete study of ϒ and prompt J /ψ production from single-parton scattering, including the complete O (αS6) color-singlet contribution, the O (αS2α2) electroweak contribution, and the complete nonrelativistic S -wave and P -wave color-octet contribution as well as the feeddown contribution. Our study was motivated by the recent evidence reported by the D0 Collaboration of prompt J /ψ and ϒ simultaneous production at the Tevatron. With our complete evaluation, we are able to refine the determination of the double-parton scattering contribution made by the D0 Collaboration. We find that the effective cross section characterizing the importance of double-parton scatterings is σeff≤8.2 mb at 68% confidence level from the D0 measurement.

  9. Complete Study of Hadroproduction of a ϒ Meson Associated with a Prompt J/ψ.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Yu-Jie

    2016-08-01

    We present the first complete study of ϒ and prompt J/ψ production from single-parton scattering, including the complete O(α_{S}^{6}) color-singlet contribution, the O(α_{S}^{2}α^{2}) electroweak contribution, and the complete nonrelativistic S-wave and P-wave color-octet contribution as well as the feeddown contribution. Our study was motivated by the recent evidence reported by the D0 Collaboration of prompt J/ψ and ϒ simultaneous production at the Tevatron. With our complete evaluation, we are able to refine the determination of the double-parton scattering contribution made by the D0 Collaboration. We find that the effective cross section characterizing the importance of double-parton scatterings is σ_{eff}≤8.2  mb at 68% confidence level from the D0 measurement.

  10. Using EMGs and kinematics data to study the take-off technique of experts and novices for a pole vaulting short run-up educational exercise.

    PubMed

    Bassement, Maud; Garnier, Cyril; Goss-Sampson, Mark; Watelain, Eric; Lepoutre, François-Xavier

    2010-09-01

    This study attempts to characterise the electromyographic activity and kinematics exhibited during the performance of take-off for a pole vaulting short run-up educational exercise, for different expertise levels. Two groups (experts and novices) participated in this study. Both groups were asked to execute their take-off technique for that specific exercise. Among the kinematics variables studied, the knee, hip and ankle angles and the hip and knee angular velocities were significantly different. There were also significant differences in the EMG variables, especially in terms of (i) biceps femoris and gastrocnemius lateralis activity at touchdown and (ii) vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius lateralis activity during take-off. During touchdown, the experts tended to increase the stiffness of the take-off leg to decrease braking. Novices exhibited less stiffness in the take-off leg due to their tendency to maintain a tighter knee angle. Novices also transferred less energy forward during take-off due to lack of contraction in the vastus lateralis, which is known to contribute to forward energy transfers. This study highlights the differences in both groups in terms of muscular and angular control according to the studied variables. Such studies of pole vaulting could be useful to help novices to learn expert's technique.

  11. A hydrodynamical study of multiple-shell planetary nebulae. III. Expansion properties and internal kinematics: Theory versus observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönberner, D.; Jacob, R.; Lehmann, H.; Hildebrandt, G.; Steffen, M.; Zwanzig, A.; Sandin, C.; Corradi, R. L. M.

    We present the result of a study on the expansion properties and internal kinematics of round/elliptical planetary nebulae of the Milky Way disk, the halo, and of the globular cluster M 15. The purpose of this study is to considerably enlarge the small sample of nebulae with precisely determined expansion properties (Schönberner et al. \\cite{SJSPCA.05}). To this aim, we selected a representative sample of objects with different evolutionary stages and metallicities and conducted high-resolution échelle spectroscopy. In most cases we succeeded in detecting the weak signals from the outer nebular shell which are attached to the main line emission from the bright nebular rim. Next to the measurement of the motion of the rim gas by decomposition of the main line components into Gaussians, we were able to measure separately, for most objects for the first time, the gas velocity immediately behind the leading shock of the shell, i.e. the post-shock velocity. We more than doubled the number of objects for which the velocities of both rim and shell are known and confirm that the overall expansion of planetary nebulae is accelerating with time. There are, however, differences between the expansion behaviour of the shell and the rim: The post-shock velocity is starting at values as low as around 20 km s-1 for the youngest nebulae, just above the AGB wind velocity of ˜ 10-15 km s-1, and is reaching values of about 40 km s-1 for the nebulae around hotter central stars. Contrarily, the rim matter is at first decelerated below the typical AGB-wind velocity and remains at about 5-10 km s-1 for a while until finally a typical flow velocity of up to 30 km s-1 is reached. This observed distinct velocity evolution of both rim and shell is explained by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, at least qualitatively: It is due to the ever changing stellar radiation field and wind-wind interaction together with the varying density profile ahead of the leading shock during the progress

  12. Non-equilibrium Kinematics in Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihos, J. C.

    Measurements of the kinematics of merging galaxies are often used to derive dynamical masses, study evolution onto the fundamental plane, or probe relaxation processes. These measurements are often compromised to some degree by strong non-equilibrium motions in the merging galaxies. This talk focuses on the evolution of the kinematics of merging galaxies, and highlights some pitfalls which occur when studying non-equilibrium systems.

  13. 75 FR 52364 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies... in possession of the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las... made by the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas,...

  14. Kinematics at the intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley fault zones, California: Integration of TM data and field studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Verosub, Ken; Finnerty, Tony; Brady, Roland

    1987-01-01

    The Garlock and Death Valley fault zones in SE California are two active strike-slip faults coming together on the east side of the Avawatz Mtns. The kinematics of this intersection, and the possible continuation of either fault zone, are being investigated using a combination of field mapping, and processing and interpretation of remotely sensed image data. Regional and local relationships are derivable from Thematic Mapper data (30 m resolution), including discrimination and relative age dating of alluvial fans, bedrock mapping, and fault mapping. Aircraft data provide higher spatial resolution over more limited areas. Hypotheses being considered are: (1) the Garlock fault extends east of the intersection; (2) the Garlock fault terminates at the intersection and the Death Valley fault continues southeastward; and (3) the Garlock fault has been offset right laterally by the Death Valley fault which continues to the southeast. Preliminary work indicates that the first hypothesis is invalid. From kinematic considerations, image analysis, and field work the third hypothesis is favored. The projected continuation of the Death Valley zone defines the boundary between the Mojave crustal block and the Basin and Range block.

  15. Integrating concepts and skills: Slope and kinematics graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonelli, Edward P., Jr.

    The concept of force is a foundational idea in physics. To predict the results of applying forces to objects, a student must be able to interpret data representing changes in distance, time, speed, and acceleration. Comprehension of kinematics concepts requires students to interpret motion graphs, where rates of change are represented as slopes of line segments. Studies have shown that majorities of students who show proficiency with mathematical concepts fail accurately to interpret motion graphs. The primary aim of this study was to examine how students apply their knowledge of slope when interpreting kinematics graphs. To answer the research questions a mixed methods research design, which included a survey and interviews, was adopted. Ninety eight (N=98) high school students completed surveys which were quantitatively analyzed along with qualitative information collected from interviews of students (N=15) and teachers ( N=2). The study showed that students who recalled methods for calculating slopes and speeds calculated slopes accurately, but calculated speeds inaccurately. When comparing the slopes and speeds, most students resorted to calculating instead of visual inspection. Most students recalled and applied memorized rules. Students who calculated slopes and speeds inaccurately failed to recall methods of calculating slopes and speeds, but when comparing speeds, these students connected the concepts of distance and time to the line segments and the rates of change they represented. This study's findings will likely help mathematics and science educators to better assist their students to apply their knowledge of the definition of slope and skills in kinematics concepts.

  16. KINEMATIC SYNERGIES DURING SACCADES INVOLVING WHOLE-BODY ROTATION: A STUDY BASED ON THE UNCONTROLLED MANIFOLD HYPOTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Adriana M.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Robert, Thomas; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis to study the coordination of body segments and eye movements in standing persons during the task of shifting the gaze to a target positioned behind the body. The task was performed at a comfortable speed and fast. Multi-segment and head-eye synergies were quantified as co-varied changes in elemental variables (body segment rotations and eye rotation) that stabilized (reduced the across trials variability) of head rotation in space and gaze trajectory. Head position in space was stabilized by co-varied rotations of body segments prior to the action, during its later stages, and after its completion. The synergy index showed a drop that started prior to the action initiation (anticipatory synergy adjustment) and continued during the phase of quick head rotation. Gaze direction was stabilized only at the movement completion and immediately after the saccade at movement initiation under the “fast” instruction. The study documents for the first time anticipatory synergy adjustments during whole-body actions. It shows multi-joint synergies stabilizing head trajectory in space. In contrast, there was no synergy between head and eye rotations during saccades that would achieve a relatively invariant gaze trajectory. PMID:20346529

  17. Calibration of parallel kinematic devices using sequential determination of kinematic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR.,BERNHARD; BIEG,LOTHAR F.; ZIEGERT,JOHN C.

    2000-04-06

    In PKM Machines, the Cartesian position and orientation of the tool point carried on the platform is obtained from a kinematic model of the particular machine. Accurate positioning of these machines relies on the accurate knowledge of the parameters of the kinematic model unique to the particular machine. The parameters in the kinematic model include the spatial locations of the joint centers on the machine base and moving platform, the initial strut lengths, and the strut displacements. The strut displacements are readily obtained from sensors on the machine. However, the remaining kinematic parameters (joint center locations, and initial strut lengths) are difficult to determine when these machines are in their fully assembled state. The size and complexity of these machines generally makes it difficult and somewhat undesirable to determine the remaining kinematic parameters by direct inspection such as in a coordinate measuring machine. In order for PKMs to be useful for precision positioning applications, techniques must be developed to quickly calibrate the machine by determining the kinematic parameters without disassembly of the machine. A number of authors have reported techniques for calibration of PKMs (Soons, Masory, Zhuang et. al., Ropponen). In two other papers, the authors have reported on work recently completed by the University of Florida and Sandia National Laboratories on calibration of PKMs, which describes a new technique to sequentially determine the kinematic parameters of an assembled parallel kinematic device. The technique described is intended to be used with a spatial coordinate measuring device such as a portable articulated CMM measuring arm (Romer, Faro, etc.), a Laser Ball Bar (LBB), or a laser tracker (SMX< API, etc.). The material to be presented is as follows: (1) methods to identify the kinematic parameters of 6--6 variant Stewart platform manipulators including joint center locations relative to the workable and spindle nose

  18. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattione, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  19. Predicting High School Completion Using Student Performance in High School Algebra: A Mixed Methods Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiado, Wendy S.

    2012-01-01

    Too many of our nation's youth have failed to complete high school. Determining why so many of our nation's students fail to graduate is a complex, multi-faceted problem and beyond the scope of any one study. The study presented herein utilized a thirteen-step mixed methods model developed by Leech and Onwuegbuzie (2007) to demonstrate…

  20. Effect of Device Rigidity and Physiological Loading on Spinal Kinematics after Dynamic Stabilization : An In-Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kwonsoo; Yang, Inchul; Kim, Namhoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of posterior implant rigidity on spinal kinematics at adjacent levels by utilizing a cadaveric spine model with simulated physiological loading. Methods Five human lumbar spinal specimens (L3 to S1) were obtained and checked for abnormalities. The fresh specimens were stripped of muscle tissue, with care taken to preserve the spinal ligaments and facet joints. Pedicle screws were implanted in the L4 and L5 vertebrae of each specimen. Specimens were tested under 0 N and 400 N axial loading. Five different posterior rods of various elastic moduli (intact, rubber, low-density polyethylene, aluminum, and titanium) were tested. Segmental range of motion (ROM), center of rotation (COR) and intervertebral disc pressure were investigated. Results As the rigidity of the posterior rods increased, both the segmental ROM and disc pressure at L4-5 decreased, while those values increased at adjacent levels. Implant stiffness saturation was evident, as the ROM and disc pressure were only marginally increased beyond an implant stiffness of aluminum. Since the disc pressures of adjacent levels were increased by the axial loading, it was shown that the rigidity of the implants influenced the load sharing between the implant and the spinal column. The segmental CORs at the adjacent disc levels translated anteriorly and inferiorly as rigidity of the device increased. Conclusion These biomechanical findings indicate that the rigidity of the dynamic stabilization implant and physiological loading play significant roles on spinal kinematics at adjacent disc levels, and will aid in further device development. PMID:26713140

  1. Feasibility of a cost-effective, video analysis software-based mobility protocol for objective spine kinematics and gait metrics: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Paul, Justin C; Petrizzo, Anthony; Rizzo, John-Ross; Bianco, Kristina; Maier, Stephen; Errico, Thomas J; Lafage, Virginie

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a high-throughput, easily implemented, cost-effective, video analysis software-based mobility protocol to quantify spine kinematics. This prospective cohort study of clinical biomechanics implemented 2-dimensional (2D) image processing at a tertiary-care academic institution. Ten healthy, able-bodied volunteers were recruited for 2D videography of gait and functional motion. The reliability of a 2D video analysis software program for gait and range of motion metrics was evaluated over 2 independent experimental sessions, assessing for inter-trial, inter-session, and inter-rater reliability. Healthy volunteers were evaluated for simple forward and side bending, rotation, treadmill stride length, and more complex seated-to-standing tasks. Based on established intraclass correlation coefficients, results indicated that reliability was considered good to excellent for simple forward and side bending, rotation, stride length, and more complex sit-to-standing tasks. In conclusion, a cost-effective, 2D, video analysis software-based mobility protocol represents a feasible and clinically useful approach for objective spine kinematics and gait metrics. As the complication rate of operative management in the setting of spinal deformity is weighed against functional performance and quality of life measures, an objective analysis tool in combination with an appropriate protocol will aid in clinical assessments and lead to an increased evidence base for management options and decision algorithms.

  2. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.C.

    2000-05-23

    A three tooth kinematic coupling is disclosed based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  3. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  4. Effects of resisted sled towing on sprint kinematics in field-sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Spinks, Christopher D

    2003-11-01

    Weighted sled towing is a common resisted sprint training technique even though relatively little is known about the effects that such practice has on sprint kinematics. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of sled towing on acceleration sprint kinematics in field-sport athletes. Twenty men completed a series of sprints without resistance and with loads equating to 12.6 and 32.2% of body mass. Stride length was significantly reduced by approximately 10 and approximately 24% for each load, respectively. Stride frequency also decreased, but not to the extent of stride length. In addition, sled towing increased ground contact time, trunk lean, and hip flexion. Upper-body results showed an increase in shoulder range of motion with added resistance. The heavier load generally resulted in a greater disruption to normal acceleration kinematics compared with the lighter load. The lighter load is likely best for use in a training program.

  5. Different strategies in solving series completion inductive reasoning problems: an fMRI and computational study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peipeng; Jia, Xiuqin; Taatgen, Niels A; Zhong, Ning; Li, Kuncheng

    2014-08-01

    Neural correlate of human inductive reasoning process is still unclear. Number series and letter series completion are two typical inductive reasoning tasks, and with a common core component of rule induction. Previous studies have demonstrated that different strategies are adopted in number series and letter series completion tasks; even the underlying rules are identical. In the present study, we examined cortical activation as a function of two different reasoning strategies for solving series completion tasks. The retrieval strategy, used in number series completion tasks, involves direct retrieving of arithmetic knowledge to get the relations between items. The procedural strategy, used in letter series completion tasks, requires counting a certain number of times to detect the relations linking two items. The two strategies require essentially the equivalent cognitive processes, but have different working memory demands (the procedural strategy incurs greater demands). The procedural strategy produced significant greater activity in areas involved in memory retrieval (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, DLPFC) and mental representation/maintenance (posterior parietal cortex, PPC). An ACT-R model of the tasks successfully predicted behavioral performance and BOLD responses. The present findings support a general-purpose dual-process theory of inductive reasoning regarding the cognitive architecture.

  6. Different strategies in solving series completion inductive reasoning problems: an fMRI and computational study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peipeng; Jia, Xiuqin; Taatgen, Niels A; Zhong, Ning; Li, Kuncheng

    2014-08-01

    Neural correlate of human inductive reasoning process is still unclear. Number series and letter series completion are two typical inductive reasoning tasks, and with a common core component of rule induction. Previous studies have demonstrated that different strategies are adopted in number series and letter series completion tasks; even the underlying rules are identical. In the present study, we examined cortical activation as a function of two different reasoning strategies for solving series completion tasks. The retrieval strategy, used in number series completion tasks, involves direct retrieving of arithmetic knowledge to get the relations between items. The procedural strategy, used in letter series completion tasks, requires counting a certain number of times to detect the relations linking two items. The two strategies require essentially the equivalent cognitive processes, but have different working memory demands (the procedural strategy incurs greater demands). The procedural strategy produced significant greater activity in areas involved in memory retrieval (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, DLPFC) and mental representation/maintenance (posterior parietal cortex, PPC). An ACT-R model of the tasks successfully predicted behavioral performance and BOLD responses. The present findings support a general-purpose dual-process theory of inductive reasoning regarding the cognitive architecture. PMID:24841995

  7. A kinematic study of 0509-67.5, the second youngest supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovey, Luke

    Supernova remnants are the lasting interactions of shock waves that develop in the wake of supernovae. These remnants, especially those in our galaxy and our companion galaxies, allow us to study supernovae for thousands of years after the initial stellar explosions. Remnants that are formed from Ia supernovae, which are the explosions and complete annihilation of white dwarf stars, are of particular interest due to the explosions' value as standard candles in cosmological studies. The shock waves in these young supernova remnants offer an unparalleled look into the physical processes that take place there, especially since these shocks are often simpler to study than shocks with strong radiative components that are present in remnants that are formed from the core-collapse supernovae of massive stars. I will detail the work of my kinematic study of the second youngest remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, 0509--67.5, which has been confirmed to be the result of a Ia supernova. Chapter 2 details the proper motion measurements made on the forward shock of this remnant, which has led to many key results. I was able to use the results of ii the global shock speed in the remnant to measure the density of neutral hydrogen in the ambient medium into which these shocks expand. In addition, I use the measurements of the shock speed for select portions of the forward shock to search for signatures of efficient cosmic-ray acceleration. Hydrodynamic simulations are then employed to constrain the age and ambient medium density of 0509--67.5, as well as to place limits on the compression factor at the immediate location of the blast wave. Chapter 3 uses the proper motion results from chapter 2 to determine possible asymmetries in the expansion of the remnant for the eastern and western limbs. These measurements are then used as constraints in hydrodynamic simulations to assess the possible dynamical offset of the explosion site compared to the geometric center of 0509

  8. Kinematic and kinetic evaluation of the stance phase of stair ambulation in persons with stroke and healthy adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Novak, Alison C; Brouwer, Brenda

    2013-08-01

    This study describes and contrasts the kinematics and kinetics of stair ambulation in people with chronic stroke and healthy control subjects. Three-dimensional motion data were collected from 10 persons with stroke (7 males) and 10 sex and age-matched older adults as they ascended and descended an instrumented staircase at self-selected speed with and without a handrail. Ankle, knee and hip joint angle and moment profiles were generated during stance and range of motion and peak moments were contrasted between groups, sides (stroke only) and condition. Cadence was lower in stroke than controls, although the kinematic profiles appeared similar during ascent and decent. Notable differences in joint kinetics were evident as the peak extensor moments were typically lower on the affected side in stroke compared with controls and the less affected side. These differences accounted for the lower magnitude net extensor support moment. The lower affected side hip abductor moments likely limited lateral stability. Handrail use tended to reduce the peak moments on the affected side only leading to more side-to-side differences than occurred without the handrail. The findings reveal differences in task performance between stroke and healthy groups that help inform rehabilitation practice.

  9. A Keck Adaptive Optics Survey of a Representative Sample of Gravitationally Lensed Star-forming Galaxies: High Spatial Resolution Studies of Kinematics and Metallicity Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Jones, Tucker A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Stark, Daniel P.; Richard, Johan; Zitrin, Adi; Auger, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    We discuss spatially resolved emission line spectroscopy secured for a total sample of 15 gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at a mean redshift of z≃ 2 based on Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics observations undertaken with the recently improved OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph. By exploiting gravitationally lensed sources drawn primarily from the CASSOWARY survey, we sample these sub-L{}* galaxies with source-plane resolutions of a few hundred parsecs ensuring well-sampled 2D velocity data and resolved variations in the gas-phase metallicity. Such high spatial resolution data offer a critical check on the structural properties of larger samples derived with coarser sampling using multiple-IFU instruments. We demonstrate how kinematic complexities essential to understanding the maturity of an early star-forming galaxy can often only be revealed with better sampled data. Although we include four sources from our earlier work, the present study provides a more representative sample unbiased with respect to emission line strength. Contrary to earlier suggestions, our data indicate a more diverse range of kinematic and metal gradient behavior inconsistent with a simple picture of well-ordered rotation developing concurrently with established steep metal gradients in all but merging systems. Comparing our observations with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations suggests that gas and metals have been mixed by outflows or other strong feedback processes, flattening the metal gradients in early star-forming galaxies.

  10. Study of the kinematic dependences of Λ {/b 0} production in pp collisions and a measurement of the Λ {/b 0} → Λ {/c +} π - branching fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-08-01

    The kinematic dependences of the relative production rates, , of Λ {/b 0} baryons and B 0 mesons are measured using Λ {/b 0} → Λ {/c +} π - and decays. The measurements use proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, recorded in the forward region with the LHCb experiment. The relative production rates are observed to depend on the transverse momentum, p T, and pseudorapidity, η, of the beauty hadron, in the studied kinematic region 1 .5 < p T < 40 GeV /c and 2 < η < 5. Using a previous LHCb measurement of in semileptonic decays, the branching fraction ℬ( Λ {/b 0} → Λ {/c +} π -) = (4.30 ± 0.03{-/0.11 + 0.12} ± 0.26 ± 0.21) × 10- 3 is obtained, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, the third is from the previous LHCb measurement of and the fourth is due to the b branching fraction. This is the most precise measurement of a Λ {/b 0} branching fraction to date. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. 21 CFR 99.303 - Extension of time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extension of time for completing planned studies. 99.303 Section 99.303 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... and submitted within 36 months. The agency may exercise its discretion in extending the time...

  12. 21 CFR 99.303 - Extension of time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extension of time for completing planned studies. 99.303 Section 99.303 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... and submitted within 36 months. The agency may exercise its discretion in extending the time...

  13. 21 CFR 99.303 - Extension of time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extension of time for completing planned studies. 99.303 Section 99.303 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION ON UNAPPROVED/NEW USES FOR MARKETED DRUGS, BIOLOGICS, AND DEVICES FDA Action on Submissions, Requests,...

  14. 21 CFR 99.303 - Extension of time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extension of time for completing planned studies. 99.303 Section 99.303 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... and submitted within 36 months. The agency may exercise its discretion in extending the time...

  15. 21 CFR 99.303 - Extension of time for completing planned studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extension of time for completing planned studies. 99.303 Section 99.303 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... and submitted within 36 months. The agency may exercise its discretion in extending the time...

  16. The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoffstall, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by…

  17. Vocational Technical and Adult Education Student Follow-Up Study of 1974-1975 Completions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jim

    The survey population for the study consisted of 1,025 Vocational Preparatory completions in Sarasota County, Florida, from whom a 63% response rate was obtained. Information was sought concerning their availability for employment, employment experience, relevance of education to employment, place of work, wages, method used in securing work,…

  18. 75 FR 67999 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections Facility, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given...

  19. Facilitating Independence amongst Chinese International Students Completing a Bachelor of Applied Business Studies Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warring, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on facilitating independent learning amongst Chinese international students completing a Bachelor's Degree. A rationale for cultivating independence is provided and a model of independent learning developed, based on Grow's Staged Self-Directed Learning model and the 1996 Situational Leadership model of Hersey and Blanchard.…

  20. When Mothers Return to School: A Study of Women Completing an MSW Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Esther; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Existing literature on anticipated role problems by mothers who reenter higher education after marriage and child rearing is examined, and data from a study of the characteristics, role difficulties, and role satisfactions of a group of women with children who recently completed an MSW program is presented. (Author/MLW)

  1. Emerging Adulthood and Gender Differences in Adult Bachelor Degree Completion: A Multi-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riley, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    Adult undergraduate students constitute 40% of the total undergraduates studying in the United States. However, male undergraduates and male undergraduates over the age of 25 are less likely to enroll in and complete a bachelor's degree than their female counterparts. Given the detrimental employment impacts of not earning a bachelor's…

  2. Online Notes: Differential Effects of Studying Complete or Partial Graphically Organized Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Crooks, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors investigated in this study the effects of two electronic notes conditions (complete vs. partial) and two testing conditions (immediate vs. delayed) on three types of tests (fact, structure, and application). A 2 x 2 factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) yielded no significant main effects for notes conditions on the fact…

  3. A study of the lived experiences of African American women STEM doctoral degree completers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Stephanie Michelle

    This study examined the lived experiences of African American women (AAW) who completed doctoral degrees in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) discipline in the United States. This study sought to fill the gap in the literature by examining how AAW described and made meaning of lived STEM educational experiences during doctoral degree completion in the context of the intersection of being African American and a woman. This study utilized a theoretical perspective based upon three theories: (a) critical race theory as a framework to gather AAW's narratives about STEM doctorate education, (b) Black feminist thought as a framework to view the intersection of being African American and a woman in the United States, and (c) the science identity model as a framework to view how women of color successfully complete scientific graduate degrees. Participants revealed that being an African American and a woman in a STEM doctoral program often complicated an already difficult process of completing the doctoral degree. The participants described the educational experience as challenging, particularly the writing of the dissertation. The challenges that the participants faced were due to various factors such as difficult advisor/advisee relationships, tedious writing and revision processes, politics, and lack of information regarding the doctoral degree process. The findings suggested that AAW participants confronted intrinsic bias while completing STEM doctoral degrees, which led to isolation and feelings of being an impostor---or feelings of not belonging in scientific studies. The findings also indicated that the women in this study ascribed success in dissertation writing and degree completion to one or more of the following attributes: (a) having a clear plan, (b) taking ownership of the writing process, (c) having an engaged advisor, (d) learning the writing style of the advisor, (e) understanding the temperament of the advisor, (f) personal will

  4. A Clinical Study to Examine the Effect of Complete Denture on Head Posture/Craniovertical Angle

    PubMed Central

    Nandeeshwar, D.B.; Sangur, Rajashekar; Makkar, Sumit; Khare, Pooja; Chitumalla, Rajkiran; Prasad, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Edentulous patients show some significant changes in ridge relationship caused by resorption of alveolar ridge. The changes are characterized by an upward rotation of mandible, increase in mandibular prognathism that ultimately results in change of natural head posture. Aim This clinical study was planned to know the effect of complete denture on head posture in different age groups of Indian completely edentulous population, after placement of complete denture at various time intervals. Materials and Methods The sample consisted of completely edentulous patients without previous experience of the dentures. They were divided into 2 age groups: Group A (45-60) and Group B (61-75). During placement of complete denture craniovertical angle was measured with the help of custom made ruler protector device. Readings were taken before denture placement, immediately after denture placement, 30 minutes, 24 hours and 30 days after dentures placement. Results The results of this study indicated that in most of the patients (90%) despite their age, change in head posture (extension) occurred immediately after the denture placement. Thereafter reading remains same for measurement at 30 minutes and 24 hours of denture placement. However after 30 days, observation revealed that all the patients showed reduced craniovertical angle (flexion). Even though the values of craniovertical angle remain higher than its baseline in both groups, significant changes were noticed only in Group A. Conclusion Findings revealed that head posture was significantly altered by the placement of dentures in completely edentulous patients. Within the time interval of 30 minutes and 24 hours extension of head posture remained constant with slight variation. Although after 30 days, changes remained significant for group ‘A’, but no significant changes were observed in the subjects of group ‘B’. PMID:27190938

  5. Kinematics of Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes mathematics of the nonliner relationships between a constant-speed, capstan-driven magnetic tape transport mechanism and a constant-angular-velocity take-up reel. The relationship, derived from the sum of a partial, serves in recognition of a finite tape. Thickness can serve as an example of rotational kinematics. (Author/SK)

  6. Kinematically redundant robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baillieul, J.; Hollerbach, J.; Brockett, R.; Martin, D.; Percy, R.; Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Research on control, design and programming of kinematically redundant robot manipulators (KRRM) is discussed. These are devices in which there are more joint space degrees of freedom than are required to achieve every position and orientation of the end-effector necessary for a given task in a given workspace. The technological developments described here deal with: kinematic programming techniques for automatically generating joint-space trajectories to execute prescribed tasks; control of redundant manipulators to optimize dynamic criteria (e.g., applications of forces and moments at the end-effector that optimally distribute the loading of actuators); and design of KRRMs to optimize functionality in congested work environments or to achieve other goals unattainable with non-redundant manipulators. Kinematic programming techniques are discussed, which show that some pseudo-inverse techniques that have been proposed for redundant manipulator control fail to achieve the goals of avoiding kinematic singularities and also generating closed joint-space paths corresponding to close paths of the end effector in the workspace. The extended Jacobian is proposed as an alternative to pseudo-inverse techniques.

  7. Mathematical modeling and kinematics: A study of emerging themes and their implications for learning mathematics through an inquiry-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrejo, David John

    In recent years, emphasis on student learning of mathematics through "real world" problems has intensified. With both national and state standards calling for more conceptual learning and understanding of mathematics, teachers must be prepared to learn and implement more innovative approaches to teaching mathematical content. Mathematical modeling of physical phenomena is presented as a subject for new and developing research areas in both teacher and student learning. Using a grounded theory approach to qualitative research, this dissertation presents two related studies whose purpose was to examine the process by which in-service teachers and students enrolled in an undergraduate physics course constructed mathematical models to describe and predict the motion of an object in both uniform and non-uniform (constant acceleration) contexts. This process provided the framework for the learners' study of kinematics. Study One involved twenty-three in-service physics and math teachers who participated in an intensive six-hour-a-day, five-day unit on kinematics as part of a professional development institute. Study Two involved fifteen students participating in the same unit while enrolled in a physics course designed for pre-service teachers and required in their undergraduate or graduate degree programs in math and science education. Qualitative data, including videotapes of classroom sessions, field notes, researcher reflections, and interviews are the focus of analysis. The dissertation presents and analyzes tensions between learner experience, learning standard concepts in mathematics and learning standard concepts in physics within a framework that outlines critical aspects of mathematical modeling (Pollak, 2003): (1) understanding a physical situation, (2) deciding what to keep and what not to keep when constructing a model related to the situation, and (3) determining whether or not the model is sufficient for acceptance and use. Emergent themes related to the

  8. A new approach to kinematic feature extraction from the human right ventricle for classification of hypertension: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia; Wang, Yingqian; Simon, Marc A.; Brigham, John C.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a novel approach to analyze the function of the human right ventricle (RV) by deriving kinematic features of the relative change in shape throughout the cardiac cycle. The approach is anatomically consistent, allows direct comparison across populations of individuals, and potentially provides new metrics to improve the diagnosis and understanding of cardiovascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). The details of the approach are presented, which includes a variation of harmonic topological mapping and proper orthogonal decomposition techniques, with particular focus on their applicability with respect to untagged cardiac imaging data. Results are shown for the decomposition of a collection of clinically obtained human RV endocardial surfaces segmented from cardiac computed tomography imaging into the fundamental shape change features for individuals both with and without PH. The features are shown to be consistent and converging towards intrinsically physiological components for the heart, and may potentially represent a new set of features for classifying the progressive change in RV function caused by PH, particularly in comparison to traditional clinical metrics.

  9. Studies of the local interstellar medium. VIII - Morphology and kinematics of the diffuse interstellar clouds toward Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Sembach, K.; York, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Interstellar clouds in the direction of the Orion association show only positive velocities for target stars within 190 pc of the sun, and both positive and negative velocities for more distant target stars, confirming an earlier prediction by Cowie, Songaila, and York (1979). The nearby positive velocity cloud, designated here as Orion-Lepus 70 (OL 70), is a standard diffuse interstellar cloud: it is subject to the ambient galactic radiation field, with properties consistent with T about equal to 100 K and n about equal to 3/cu cm. Combined with a column density log N(H) = 19.8-20.0/sq cm, these values imply a cloud thickness of about 7 pc. The kinematics of OL 70 are consistent with either an origin as part of the expanding Loop I superbubble shell, or as part of Lindbald's expanding ring, or a synthesis of the two models. The negative velocity interstellar components seen in stars at d not less than 200 pc are caused by interstellar matter accelerated by the expanding Ori-Eri superbubble. Relatively dense interstellar gas at positive LSR velocities is also found within the Orion association, so that it is difficult to pick out OL 70 components in the spectra of the distant stars.

  10. A VLT/FLAMES STUDY OF THE PECULIAR INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 1846. I. KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, A. D.; Da Costa, G. S.; Yong, D.; Ferguson, A. M. N.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present high-resolution VLT/FLAMES observations of red giant stars in the massive intermediate-age Large Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC 1846, which, on the basis of its extended main-sequence turnoff (EMSTO), possesses an internal age spread of Almost-Equal-To 300 Myr. We describe in detail our target selection and data reduction procedures, and construct a sample of 21 stars possessing radial velocities indicating their membership of NGC 1846 at high confidence. We consider high-resolution spectra of the planetary nebula Mo-17, and conclude that this object is also a member of the cluster. Our measured radial velocities allow us to conduct a detailed investigation of the internal kinematics of NGC 1846, the first time this has been done for an EMSTO system. The key result of this work is that the cluster exhibits a significant degree of systemic rotation, of a magnitude comparable to the mean velocity dispersion. Using an extensive suite of Monte Carlo models we demonstrate that, despite our relatively small sample size and the substantial fraction of unresolved binary stars in the cluster, the rotation signal we detect is very likely to be genuine. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of simulations modeling the formation of multiple populations of stars in globular clusters, where a dynamically cold, rapidly rotating second generation is a common feature. NGC 1846 is less than one relaxation time old, so any dynamical signatures encoded during its formation ought to remain present.

  11. Interaction Between Leg Muscle Performance and Sprint Acceleration Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lockie, Robert G.; Jalilvand, Farzad; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Murphy, Aron J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between 10 m sprint acceleration, step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time), and leg muscle performance (power, stiffness, strength). Twenty-eight field sport athletes completed 10 m sprints that were timed and filmed. Velocity and step kinematics were measured for the 0–5, 5–10, and 0–10 m intervals to assess acceleration. Leg power was measured via countermovement jumps (CMJ), a five-bound test (5BT), and the reactive strength index (RSI) defined by 40 cm drop jumps. Leg stiffness was measured by bilateral and unilateral hopping. A three-repetition maximum squat determined strength. Pearson’s correlations and stepwise regression (p ≤ 0.05) determined velocity, step kinematics, and leg muscle performance relationships. CMJ height correlated with and predicted velocity in all intervals (r = 0.40–0.54). The 5BT (5–10 and 0–10 m intervals) and RSI (5–10 m interval) also related to velocity (r = 0.37–0.47). Leg stiffness did not correlate with acceleration kinematics. Greater leg strength related to and predicted lower 0–5 m flight times (r = −0.46 to −0.51), and a longer 0–10 m step length (r = 0.38). Although results supported research emphasizing the value of leg power and strength for acceleration, the correlations and predictive relationships (r2 = 0.14–0.29) tended to be low, which highlights the complex interaction between sprint technique and leg muscle performance. Nonetheless, given the established relationships between speed, leg power and strength, strength and conditioning coaches should ensure these qualities are expressed during acceleration in field sport athletes. PMID:26839607

  12. Interaction Between Leg Muscle Performance and Sprint Acceleration Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Jalilvand, Farzad; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Murphy, Aron J

    2015-12-22

    This study investigated relationships between 10 m sprint acceleration, step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time), and leg muscle performance (power, stiffness, strength). Twenty-eight field sport athletes completed 10 m sprints that were timed and filmed. Velocity and step kinematics were measured for the 0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m intervals to assess acceleration. Leg power was measured via countermovement jumps (CMJ), a five-bound test (5BT), and the reactive strength index (RSI) defined by 40 cm drop jumps. Leg stiffness was measured by bilateral and unilateral hopping. A three-repetition maximum squat determined strength. Pearson's correlations and stepwise regression (p ≤ 0.05) determined velocity, step kinematics, and leg muscle performance relationships. CMJ height correlated with and predicted velocity in all intervals (r = 0.40-0.54). The 5BT (5-10 and 0-10 m intervals) and RSI (5-10 m interval) also related to velocity (r = 0.37-0.47). Leg stiffness did not correlate with acceleration kinematics. Greater leg strength related to and predicted lower 0-5 m flight times (r = -0.46 to -0.51), and a longer 0-10 m step length (r = 0.38). Although results supported research emphasizing the value of leg power and strength for acceleration, the correlations and predictive relationships (r(2) = 0.14-0.29) tended to be low, which highlights the complex interaction between sprint technique and leg muscle performance. Nonetheless, given the established relationships between speed, leg power and strength, strength and conditioning coaches should ensure these qualities are expressed during acceleration in field sport athletes.

  13. Factors influencing attempted and completed suicide in postnatal women: A population-based study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Jung-Chen; Yeh, Ming-Kung; Wang, Shun-Mu; Chen, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The aims of study were to investigate risk factors associated with attempted and completed suicide. This nested case–control study was conducted using the medical and death data of nearly all pregnant women for the period 2002–2012 in Taiwan. A total of 139 cases of attempted suicide and 95 cases of completed suicide were identified; for each case, 10 controls were randomly selected and matched to the cases according to age and year of delivery. A conditional logistic regression model was used. The mean attempted and completed suicide rates were 9.91 and 6.86 per 100,000 women with live births, respectively. Never having married and postpartum depression also increased the risk of attempted suicide (OR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.09–3.88 and OR = 2.51; 95% CI = 1.10–5.75, respectively) and completed suicide (OR = 20.27; 95% CI = 8.99–45.73 and OR = 21.72; 95% CI = 8.08–58.37, respectively). Other factors for attempted suicide included being widowed or divorced, and having a caesarean delivery or suicide history. Other factors for completed suicide included lower education level, low infant birth weight, and diagnosis of anxiety or mood disorder. These results suggest that people should appropriately assess potential risk factors and provide assistance for postnatal women to reduce the occurrence of suicide events. PMID:27173845

  14. Natural and Man-Made Chemicals in North American Soils--Continental-Scale Pilot Study Completed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada recently completed a continental-scale pilot study for a proposed geochemical survey of North American soils. This survey will provide baseline soil chemistry data against which future changes in soil composition can be measured and that can be used by Federal, State/Provincial, and local agencies when making risk-assessment and land-use decisions.

  15. Complete data acquisition and analysis system for low-energy electron-molecule collision studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2015-09-01

    A complete data acquisition system has been developed that can work with any personal computer irrespective of the operating system installed on it. The software can be used in low and intermediate electron-energy collision studies with ground-state molecules in gas phase using a combination of RS-232, GPIB, and USB-interfaced devices. Various tabletop instruments and nuclear instrumentation module (NIM) -based electronics have been interfaced and have communicated with the software, which is based on LabVIEW. This is tested with dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and polar dissociation studies to oxygen molecule and successfully used in a DEA study of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

  16. The 8Li + 2H reaction studied in inverse kinematics at 3.15 MeV/nucleon using the REX-ISOLDE post-accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengborn, E.; Moro, A. M.; Nilsson, T.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cederkäll, J.; Diget, C.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Knudsen, H. H.; Madurga, M.; Nyman, G.; Richter, A.; Riisager, K.; Schrieder, G.; Tengblad, O.; Timofeyuk, N.; Turrion, M.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.

    2011-12-01

    The reaction 8Li + 2H has been studied in inverse kinematics at the incident energy of 3.15 MeV/nucleon, using the REX-ISOLDE post-accelerator. The reaction channels corresponding to (d,p), (d,d), and (d,t) reactions populating ground states and low-lying excited states in 7-9Li have been identified and the related angular distributions extracted and compared with coupled-channels, distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), and coupled-reaction-channels calculations. For the inelastic and (d,t) channels we find that higher order effects are very important and hence one needs to go beyond the simple DWBA to extract reliable structure information from these processes.

  17. Collecting Kinematic Data on a Ski Track with Optoelectronic Stereophotogrammetry: A Methodological Study Assessing the Feasibility of Bringing the Biomechanics Lab to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the laboratory, optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry is one of the most commonly used motion capture systems; particularly, when position- or orientation-related analyses of human movements are intended. However, for many applied research questions, field experiments are indispensable, and it is not a priori clear whether optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric systems can be expected to perform similarly to in-lab experiments. This study aimed to assess the instrumental errors of kinematic data collected on a ski track using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, and to investigate the magnitudes of additional skiing-specific errors and soft tissue/suit artifacts. During a field experiment, the kinematic data of different static and dynamic tasks were captured by the use of 24 infrared-cameras. The distances between three passive markers attached to a rigid bar were stereophotogrammetrically reconstructed and, subsequently, were compared to the manufacturer-specified exact values. While at rest or skiing at low speed, the optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system’s accuracy and precision for determining inter-marker distances were found to be comparable to those known for in-lab experiments (< 1 mm). However, when measuring a skier’s kinematics under “typical” skiing conditions (i.e., high speeds, inclined/angulated postures and moderate snow spraying), additional errors were found to occur for distances between equipment-fixed markers (total measurement errors: 2.3 ± 2.2 mm). Moreover, for distances between skin-fixed markers, such as the anterior hip markers, additional artifacts were observed (total measurement errors: 8.3 ± 7.1 mm). In summary, these values can be considered sufficient for the detection of meaningful position- or orientation-related differences in alpine skiing. However, it must be emphasized that the use of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry on a ski track is seriously constrained by limited practical usability, small-sized capture

  18. Collecting Kinematic Data on a Ski Track with Optoelectronic Stereophotogrammetry: A Methodological Study Assessing the Feasibility of Bringing the Biomechanics Lab to the Field.

    PubMed

    Spörri, Jörg; Schiefermüller, Christian; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the laboratory, optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry is one of the most commonly used motion capture systems; particularly, when position- or orientation-related analyses of human movements are intended. However, for many applied research questions, field experiments are indispensable, and it is not a priori clear whether optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric systems can be expected to perform similarly to in-lab experiments. This study aimed to assess the instrumental errors of kinematic data collected on a ski track using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, and to investigate the magnitudes of additional skiing-specific errors and soft tissue/suit artifacts. During a field experiment, the kinematic data of different static and dynamic tasks were captured by the use of 24 infrared-cameras. The distances between three passive markers attached to a rigid bar were stereophotogrammetrically reconstructed and, subsequently, were compared to the manufacturer-specified exact values. While at rest or skiing at low speed, the optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system's accuracy and precision for determining inter-marker distances were found to be comparable to those known for in-lab experiments (< 1 mm). However, when measuring a skier's kinematics under "typical" skiing conditions (i.e., high speeds, inclined/angulated postures and moderate snow spraying), additional errors were found to occur for distances between equipment-fixed markers (total measurement errors: 2.3 ± 2.2 mm). Moreover, for distances between skin-fixed markers, such as the anterior hip markers, additional artifacts were observed (total measurement errors: 8.3 ± 7.1 mm). In summary, these values can be considered sufficient for the detection of meaningful position- or orientation-related differences in alpine skiing. However, it must be emphasized that the use of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry on a ski track is seriously constrained by limited practical usability, small-sized capture volumes

  19. Collecting Kinematic Data on a Ski Track with Optoelectronic Stereophotogrammetry: A Methodological Study Assessing the Feasibility of Bringing the Biomechanics Lab to the Field.

    PubMed

    Spörri, Jörg; Schiefermüller, Christian; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the laboratory, optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry is one of the most commonly used motion capture systems; particularly, when position- or orientation-related analyses of human movements are intended. However, for many applied research questions, field experiments are indispensable, and it is not a priori clear whether optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric systems can be expected to perform similarly to in-lab experiments. This study aimed to assess the instrumental errors of kinematic data collected on a ski track using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, and to investigate the magnitudes of additional skiing-specific errors and soft tissue/suit artifacts. During a field experiment, the kinematic data of different static and dynamic tasks were captured by the use of 24 infrared-cameras. The distances between three passive markers attached to a rigid bar were stereophotogrammetrically reconstructed and, subsequently, were compared to the manufacturer-specified exact values. While at rest or skiing at low speed, the optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system's accuracy and precision for determining inter-marker distances were found to be comparable to those known for in-lab experiments (< 1 mm). However, when measuring a skier's kinematics under "typical" skiing conditions (i.e., high speeds, inclined/angulated postures and moderate snow spraying), additional errors were found to occur for distances between equipment-fixed markers (total measurement errors: 2.3 ± 2.2 mm). Moreover, for distances between skin-fixed markers, such as the anterior hip markers, additional artifacts were observed (total measurement errors: 8.3 ± 7.1 mm). In summary, these values can be considered sufficient for the detection of meaningful position- or orientation-related differences in alpine skiing. However, it must be emphasized that the use of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry on a ski track is seriously constrained by limited practical usability, small-sized capture volumes

  20. Kinematic links between the Eastern Mosha Fault and the North Tehran Fault, Alborz range, northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Mohammad R.; Fattahi, Morteza; Landgraf, Angela; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Ballato, Paolo; Tabatabaei, Saeid H.

    2014-05-01

    Kinematic interaction of faults is an important issue for detailed seismic hazard assessments in seismically active regions. The Eastern Mosha Fault (EMF) and the North Tehran Fault (NTF) are two major active faults of the southern central Alborz mountains, located in proximity of Tehran (population ~ 9 million). We used field, geomorphological and paleoseismological data to explore the kinematic transition between the faults, and compare their short-term and long-term history of activity. We introduce the Niknamdeh segment of the NTF along which the strike-slip kinematics of EMF is transferred onto the NTF, and which is also responsible for the development of a pull-apart basin between the eastern segments of the NTF. The Ira trench site at the linkage zone between the two faults reveals the history of interaction between rock avalanches, active faulting and sag-pond development. The kinematic continuity between the EMF and NTF requires updating of seismic hazard models for the NTF, the most active fault adjacent to the Tehran Metropolis. Study of offsets of large-scale morphological features along the EMF, and comparison with estimated slip rates along the fault indicates that the EMF has started its left-lateral kinematics between 3.2 and 4.7 Ma. According to our paleoseismological data and the morphology of the nearby EMF and NTF, we suggest minimum and maximum values of about 1.8 and 3.0 mm/year for the left-lateral kinematics on the two faults in their linkage zone, averaged over Holocene time scales. Our study provides a partial interpretation, based on available data, for the fault activity in northeastern Tehran region, which may be completed with studies of other active faults of the region to evaluate a more realistic seismic hazard analysis for this heavily populated major city.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC2548 clumpy spatial and kinematic structure (Vicente+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, B.; Sanchez, N.; Alfaro, E.

    2016-10-01

    We used precise astrometric data from the Carte du Ciel - San Fernando catalogue to study the clumpy structure in NGC 2548. We have completed our spatial and kinematic information with photometric data from the UCAC4 catalogue. With this, we derived positions and proper motions for each of the detected cores in this cluster. This table contains all the astrometric and photometric data for the 1655 stars toward NGC 2548. (1 data file).

  2. Essential Study Skills: The Complete Guide to Success at University. Second Edition. Sage Study Skills Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Tom; Sinfield, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The eagerly-awaited new edition of the successful "Essential Study Skills" continues to provide a truly practical guide to achieving success at university. Whether you are going to university straight from school, a mature student, or an overseas student studying in the UK for the first time, this is the book that will help you to better…

  3. KINEMATIC AND SPATIAL SUBSTRUCTURE IN NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario; Fűrész, Gabor

    2015-04-15

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from Fűrész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular ({sup 13}CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation.

  4. Influence of microwave disinfection on the linear dimensional stability of complete dentures: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Basso, Michael Frederico Manzolli; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effect of two microwave disinfection protocols at 650 W for 3 minutes (group 1, once a week; group 2, three times a week) on the linear dimensional stability of complete dentures. Measurements were taken across four reference points: before the first microwave disinfection (baseline) and after each week of disinfection. Furthermore, the dentures were monitored clinically. Group 2 showed significantly greater shrinkage than group 1 in all evaluated weeks. During clinical monitoring, no significant findings were observed. Even though dimensional changes occurred, the clinical evaluation did not yield any changes in either group.

  5. Complete synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems via a single proportional adaptive controller: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Israr Saaban, Azizan Bin Ibrahim, Adyda Binti; Shahzad, Mohammad

    2015-12-11

    This paper addresses a comparative computational study on the synchronization quality, cost and converging speed for two pairs of identical chaotic and hyperchaotic systems with unknown time-varying parameters. It is assumed that the unknown time-varying parameters are bounded. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory and using the adaptive control method, a single proportional controller is proposed to achieve the goal of complete synchronizations. Accordingly, appropriate adaptive laws are designed to identify the unknown time-varying parameters. The designed control strategy is easy to implement in practice. Numerical simulations results are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization scheme.

  6. Complete synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems via a single proportional adaptive controller: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Israr; Saaban, Azizan Bin; Ibrahim, Adyda Binti; Shahzad, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses a comparative computational study on the synchronization quality, cost and converging speed for two pairs of identical chaotic and hyperchaotic systems with unknown time-varying parameters. It is assumed that the unknown time-varying parameters are bounded. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory and using the adaptive control method, a single proportional controller is proposed to achieve the goal of complete synchronizations. Accordingly, appropriate adaptive laws are designed to identify the unknown time-varying parameters. The designed control strategy is easy to implement in practice. Numerical simulations results are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization scheme.

  7. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ashish; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. Materials and Methods For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. Results It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (p<.1). Conclusion The denture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures. PMID:26155561

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of Sika deer Cervus nippon hortulorum (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) and phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Hua; Liu, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Ming-Hai

    2016-07-01

    Sika deer (Cervus nippon Temminck 1836) are classified in the order Artiodactyla, family Cervidae, subfamily Cervinae. At present, the phylogenetic studies of C. nippon are problematic. In this study, we first determined and described the complete mitochondrial sequence of the wild C. nippon hortulorum. The complete mitogenome sequence is 16 566 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a putative control region (CR) and a light-strand replication origin (OL). The overall base composition was 33.4% A, 28.6% T, 24.5% C, 13.5% G, with a 62.0% AT bias. The 13 protein-coding genes encode 3782 amino acids in total. To further validate the new determined sequences and phylogeny of Sika deer, phylogenetic trees involving 15 most closely related species available in GenBank database were constructed. These results are expected to provide useful molecular data for deer species identification and further phylogenetic studies of Artiodactyla. PMID:26258510

  9. Studies on nitrile rubber degradation in zinc bromide completion fluid and its prevention by surface fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Cantu, Yadira Itzel

    Poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) or nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) is frequently used as an O-ring material in the oil extraction industry due to its excellent chemical properties and resistance to oil. However, degradation of NBR gaskets is known to occur during the well completion and oil extraction process where packers are exposed to completion fluids such as ZnBr2 brine. Under these conditions NBR exhibits accelerated chemical degradation resulting in embrittlement and cracking. Samples of NBR, poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) and poly(butadiene) (PB) have been exposed to ZnBr2 based completion fluid, and analyzed by ATR and diffuse reflectance IR. Analysis shows the ZnBr2 based completion fluid promotes hydrolysis of the nitrile group to form amides and carboxylic groups. Analysis also shows that carbon-carbon double bonds in NBR are unaffected after short exposure to zinc bromide based completion fluid, but are quickly hydrolyzed in acidic bromide mixtures. Although fluoropolymers have excellent chemical resistance, their strength is less than nitrile rubber and replacing the usual gasket materials with fluoroelastomers is expensive. However, a fluoropolymer surface on a nitrile elastomer can provide the needed chemical resistance while retaining their strength. In this study, we have shown that this can be achieved by direct fluorination, a rather easy and inexpensive process. Samples of NBR O-rings have been fluorinated by exposure to F2 and F2/HF mixtures at various temperatures. Fluorination with F 2 produces the desired fluoropolymer layer; however, fluorination by F2/HF mixtures gave a smoother fluorinated layer at lower temperatures and shorter times. Fluorinated samples were exposed to ZnBr2 drilling fluid and solvents. Elemental analysis shows that the fluorinated layer eliminates ZnBr2 diffusion into the NBR polymeric matrix. It was also found that surface fluorination significantly retards the loss of mechanical properties such as elasticity, tensile

  10. Predictors of Death among Patients Who Completed Tuberculosis Treatment: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Juan-Pablo; Orcau, Angels; Rius, Cristina; Casals, Marti; de Olalla, Patricia Garcia; Moreno, Antonio; Nelson, Jeanne L.; Caylà, Joan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mortality among patients who complete tuberculosis (TB) treatment is still high among vulnerable populations. The objective of the study was to identify the probability of death and its predictive factors in a cohort of successfully treated TB patients. Methods A population-based retrospective longitudinal study was performed in Barcelona, Spain. All patients who successfully completed TB treatment with culture-confirmation and available drug susceptibility testing between 1995–1997 were retrospectively followed-up until December 31, 2005 by the Barcelona TB Control Program. Socio-demographic, clinical, microbiological and treatment variables were examined. Mortality, TB Program and AIDS registries were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and a Cox regression methods with time-dependent covariates were used for the survival analysis, calculating the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Among the 762 included patients, the median age was 36 years, 520 (68.2%) were male, 178 (23.4%) HIV-infected, and 208 (27.3%) were alcohol abusers. Of the 134 (17.6%) injecting drug users (IDU), 123 (91.8%) were HIV-infected. A total of 30 (3.9%) recurrences and 173 deaths (22.7%) occurred (mortality rate: 3.4/100 person-years of follow-up). The predictors of death were: age between 41–60 years old (HR: 3.5; CI:2.1–5.7), age greater than 60 years (HR: 14.6; CI:8.9–24), alcohol abuse (HR: 1.7; CI:1.2–2.4) and HIV-infected IDU (HR: 7.9; CI:4.7–13.3). Conclusions The mortality rate among TB patients who completed treatment is associated with vulnerable populations such as the elderly, alcohol abusers, and HIV-infected IDU. We therefore need to fight against poverty, and promote and develop interventions and social policies directed towards these populations to improve their survival. PMID:21980423

  11. Vacation Study Abroad. 1990. The Most Complete Guide to Planning Summer Study Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, E. Marguerite, Ed.

    The book presents concise descriptions of over 1,300 summer study programs and short courses (geared to all levels of postsecondary education) worldwide sponsored by U.S. colleges and universities, foreign universities and language schools, and nonprofit and proprietary educational organizations. Programs are arranged first by the geographical…

  12. Numerical algebraic geometry and algebraic kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, Charles W.; Sommese, Andrew J.

    In this article, the basic constructs of algebraic kinematics (links, joints, and mechanism spaces) are introduced. This provides a common schema for many kinds of problems that are of interest in kinematic studies. Once the problems are cast in this algebraic framework, they can be attacked by tools from algebraic geometry. In particular, we review the techniques of numerical algebraic geometry, which are primarily based on homotopy methods. We include a review of the main developments of recent years and outline some of the frontiers where further research is occurring. While numerical algebraic geometry applies broadly to any system of polynomial equations, algebraic kinematics provides a body of interesting examples for testing algorithms and for inspiring new avenues of work.

  13. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    IWATSUKI, Koichi; TAJIMA, Fumihiro; OHNISHI, Yu-ichiro; NAKAMURA, Takeshi; ISHIHARA, Masahiro; HOSOMI, Koichi; NINOMIYA, Koshi; MORIWAKI, Takashi; YOSHIMINE, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury. PMID:27053327

  14. Parallel Kinematic Machines (PKM)

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.S.

    2000-03-17

    The purpose of this 3-year cooperative research project was to develop a parallel kinematic machining (PKM) capability for complex parts that normally require expensive multiple setups on conventional orthogonal machine tools. This non-conventional, non-orthogonal machining approach is based on a 6-axis positioning system commonly referred to as a hexapod. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) was the lead site responsible for a multitude of projects that defined the machining parameters and detailed the metrology of the hexapod. The role of the Kansas City Plant (KCP) in this project was limited to evaluating the application of this unique technology to production applications.

  15. A comparative study on complete and implant retained denture treatments: a biomechanics perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Suenaga, Hanako; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although implant-retained overdenture allows edentulous patients to take higher occlusal forces than the conventional complete dentures, the biomechanical influences have not been explored yet. Clinically, there is limited knowledge and means for predicting localized bone remodelling after denture treatment with and without implant support. By using finite element (FE) analysis, this article provides an in-silico approach to exploring the treatment effects on the oral mucosa and potential resorption of residual ridge under three different denture configurations in a patient-specific manner. Based on cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans, a 3D heterogeneous FE model was created; and the supportive tissue, mucosa, was characterized as a hyperelastic material. A measured occlusal load (63N) was applied onto three virtual models, namely complete denture, two and four implant-retained overdentures. Clinically, the bone resorption was measured after one year in the two implant-retained overdenture treatment. Despite the improved stability and enhanced masticatory function, the implant-retained overdentures demonstrated higher hydrostatic stress in mucosa (43.6kPa and 39.9kPa for two and four implants) at the posterior ends of the mandible due to the cantilever effect, than the complete denture (33.4kPa). Hydrostatic pressure in the mucosa signifies a critical indicator and can be correlated with clinically measured bone resorption, pointing to severer mandibular ridge resorption posteriorly with implant-retained overdentures. This study provides a biomechanical basis for denture treatment planning to improve long-term outcomes with minimal residual ridge resorption.

  16. A pilot study of RN-BSN completion students' preferred instructor online classroom caring behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mann, Judith C

    2014-01-01

    Definitions of caring include the global concept of showing concern and empathy of others. This may be especially true in the online classroom in the absence of face to face interactions. This quantitative study focused on RN-BSN completion students' preferred online instructor caring behaviors. Online RN-BSN students (N = 100) were invited to participate in the study. The research question was: What are historically black colleges universities nursing students' preferred instructor caring behaviors in the online classroom? All of the respondents (N = 48) agreed that an instructor can create a caring online learning environment, while the vast majority agreed that the presence of a caring environment influenced their success in the course. As ranked by the respondents the three most important items in creating a caring online learning environment were instructors': 1) attention to detail in organization and clarity, 2) prompt and detailed feedback to assignments, and 3) prompt response to students' questions.

  17. Predictors of Study Completion and Withdrawal in a Randomized Clinical Trial of a Pediatric Diabetes Adherence Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Kimberly A.; Killian, Michael; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Silverstein, Janet H.; Deeb, Larry C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Loss of participants in randomized clinical trials threatens the validity of study findings. The purpose of this study was to determine pre-randomization predictors of study withdrawal throughout the course of a randomized clinical trial involving young children with type 1 diabetes and their primary caregivers. Methods An intervention to improve adherence to the diabetes treatment regimen was delivered as part of the child’s regular 3-month diabetes clinic visit. The study protocol involved 7 clinic visits across 18 months for the Immediate Treatment group and 9 clinic visits across 24 months for the Delayed Treatment group. Among those who completed the study and regardless of treatment group, participants were categorized into two groups: On-Time Completers (n = 41) and Late Completers (n = 39). Demographic, disease, and psychosocial characteristics of children and their primary caregivers measured prior to study randomization were tested for their association with the participants’ completion status (i.e., On-Time Completers, Late Completers, or Withdrawals). Results Of the 108 participants, 28 (25.9%) withdrew and 80 (74.1%) completed the study. On-Time Completers (i.e., study completed within 4 months of expected date) were more likely to have private insurance and primary caregivers with some college education. Late Completers (i.e., study completion took longer than 4 months) were more likely to be boys and to have primary caregivers who reported mild to moderate levels of depression. Children who subsequently withdrew from the study reported poorer diabetes-related quality of life and poorer school-related quality of life at study inception and were more likely to have primary caregivers who did not work outside the home. Conclusions Pre-randomization screening of participants on both demographic and psychological variables may help identify those at greatest risk for study withdrawal or poor study protocol adherence, permitting the

  18. Derivation and reliability of kinematic measures of sperm motion.

    PubMed

    Davis, R O; Siemers, R J

    1995-01-01

    Studies of sperm movement are relevant in the diagnosis of sperm function and in investigations of cellular biology. Such studies have been traditionally performed by analysing the kinematics of the flagellum or the head. Analysis of the flagellum can provide insights into the cell biological mechanisms responsible for the control of movement. However, the mathematical correspondence between head kinematics and flagellum kinematics is not unique. Therefore, it is not possible to use head kinematics to obtain detailed insights into cell mechanisms or physiology. The accuracy and precision of kinematic measurements are limited by a number of technical and biological factors. Therefore, the interpretation of kinematic data is dependent on a thorough understanding of the assumptions and conditions underlying the analysis. Evaluation of the reliability of kinematic measurements has suffered because no absolute standard for measurement has existed. The development and application of a new standard based on images which were simulated using the equations of motion is described. Because the kinematics of these images are known prior to empirical measurement, the performance of different methods can be determined absolutely. Some kinematic measures are unreliable because they are inappropriate analogues for engineering concepts. The development and use of appropriate engineering measures for the frequency and amplitude of sperm motion is also described. Some types of sperm motion cannot be analysed using kinematic measures (e.g. hyperactivated movement). The concept of the fractal dimension as a more accurate measurement for such motions is introduced. It is concluded that kinematic measurements of sperm motion can provide valuable information about cell biological mechanisms (in the case of the flagellum) and about general membrane and axoneme function (in the case of the head) when the measurements are made under the appropriate conditions, when standard techniques are

  19. The stages of implementation completion for evidence-based practice: protocol for a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This protocol describes the ‘development of outcome measures and suitable methodologies for dissemination and implementation approaches,’ a priority for implementation research. Although many evidence-based practices (EBPs) have been developed, large knowledge gaps remain regarding how to routinely move EBPs into usual care. The lack of understanding of ‘what it takes’ to install EBPs has costly public health consequences, including a lack of availability of the most beneficial services, wasted efforts and resources on failed implementation attempts, and the potential for engendering reluctance to try implementing new EBPs after failed attempts. The Stages of Implementation Completion (SIC) is an eight-stage tool of implementation process and milestones, with stages spanning three implementation phases (pre-implementation, implementation, sustainability). Items delineate the date that a site completes implementation activities, yielding an assessment of duration (time to complete a stage), proportion (of stage activities completed), and a general measure of how far a site moved in the implementation process. Methods/Design We propose to extend the SIC to EBPs operating in child service sectors (juvenile justice, schools, substance use, child welfare). Both successful and failed implementation attempts will be scrutinized using a mixed methods design. Stage costs will be measured and examined. Both retrospective data (from previous site implementation efforts) and prospective data (from newly adopting sites) will be analyzed. The influence of pre-implementation on implementation and sustainability outcomes will be examined (Aim 1). Mixed methods procedures will focus on increasing understanding of the process of implementation failure in an effort to determine if the SIC can provide early detection of sites that are unlikely to succeed (Aim 2). Study activities will include cost mapping of SIC stages and an examination of the relationship between

  20. Numerical analysis of kinematic soil-pile interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele; Mylonakis, George

    2008-07-08

    In the present study, the response of singles pile to kinematic seismic loading is investigated using the computer program SAP2000. The objectives of the study are: (1) to develop a numerical model that can realistically simulate kinematic soil-structure interaction for piles accounting for discontinuity conditions at the pile-soil interface, energy dissipation and wave propagation; (2) to use the model for evaluating kinematic interaction effects on pile response as function of input ground motion; and (3) to present a case study in which theoretical predictions are compared with results obtained from other formulations. To evaluate the effects of kinematic loading, the responses of both the free-field soil (with no piles) and the pile were compared. Time history and static pushover analyses were conducted to estimate the displacement and kinematic pile bending under seismic loadings.

  1. Kinematics of Strong Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K.; Nguyen, G.; Sulsky, D.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides a detailed view of the Arctic ice cover. When processed with the RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS), it provides estimates of sea ice motion and deformation over large regions of the Arctic for extended periods of time. The deformation is dominated by the appearance of linear kinematic features that have been associated with the presence of leads. The RGPS deformation products are based on the assumption that the displacement and velocity are smooth functions of the spatial coordinates. However, if the dominant deformation of multiyear ice results from the opening, closing and shearing of leads, then the displacement and velocity can be discontinuous. This presentation discusses the kinematics associated with strong discontinuities that describe possible jumps in displacement or velocity. Ice motion from SAR data are analyzed using this framework. It is assumed that RGPS cells deform due to the presence of a lead. The lead orientation is calculated to optimally account for the observed deformation. It is shown that almost all observed deformation can be represented by lead opening and shearing. The procedure used to reprocess motion data to account for leads will be described and applied to regions of the Beaufort Sea. The procedure not only provides a new view of ice deformation, it can be used to obtain information about the presence of leads for initialization and/or validation of numerical simulations.

  2. Kinematics and Control of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paden, Bradley Evan

    This dissertation focuses on the kinematics and control of robot manipulators. The contribution to kinematics is a fundamental theorem on the design of manipulators with six revolute joints. The theorem states, roughly speaking, that manipulators which have six revolute joints and are modeled after the human arm are optimal and essentially unique. In developing the mathematical framework to prove this theorem, we define precisely the notions of length of a manipulator, well-connected-workspace, and work-volume. We contribute to control a set of analysis techniques for the design of variable structure (sliding mode) controllers for manipulators. The organization of the dissertation is the following. After introductory remarks in chapter one, the group of proper rigid motions, G, is introduced in chapter two. The tangent bundle of G is introduced and it is shown that the velocity of a rigid body can be represented by an element in the Lie algebra of G (commonly called a twist). Further, rigid motions which are exponentials of twists are used to describe four commonly occurring subproblems in robot kinematics. In chapter three, the exponentials of twists are used to write the forward kinematic map of robot manipulators and the subproblems of chapter two are used to solve the Stanford manipulator and an elbow manipulator. Chapter four focuses on manipulator singularities. Twist coordinates are used to find critical points of the forward kinematic map. The contribution to kinematics is contained in chapter five where a mathematical framework for studying the relationship between the design of 6R manipulators and their performance is developed. Chapter seven contains the contribution to control. The work of A. F. Filippov on differential equations with discontinuous right-hand-side and the work of F. H. Clarke on generalized gradients are combined to obtain a calculus for analyzing nonsmooth gradient systems. The techniques developed are applied to design a simple

  3. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Snoek, Govert J; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V; Jannink, Michiel J A

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation); however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional explorative study to study these effects. Nine subjects with a CSCI performed two goal-directed arm movements (maximal reach, reach and retrieval) with and without gravity compensation. Angles at elbow and shoulder joints and muscle activation were measured and compared. Seven subjects reduced elbow extension (range 1.8°-4.5°) during the maximal reaching task with gravity compensation. In the reach and retrieval task with gravity compensation, all subjects decreased elbow extension (range 0.1°-11.0°). Eight subjects executed movement closer to the body. Regarding muscle activation, gravity compensation did not influence timing; however, the amplitude of activation decreased, especially in antigravity muscles, namely mean change +/- standard deviation of descending part of trapezius (18.2% +/- 37.5%), anterior part of deltoid (37.7% +/- 16.7%), posterior part of deltoid (32.0% +/- 13.9%), and long head biceps (49.6% +/- 20.0%). Clinical implications for the use of gravity compensation in rehabilitation (during activities of daily living or exercise therapy) should be further investigated with a larger population.

  4. An Integrated Study of the Kinematics and Evolution of Fault Systems in the Hellenic Margin, Crete, Greece: Insight into Forearc Development above a Retreating Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, S. F.; Wegmann, K. W.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Accommodating ~ 36 mm/yr of convergence between the African and Eurasian tectonic plates the Hellenic Subduction zone is the largest, fastest and most seismically active subduction zone in the Mediterranean. Long-lived Cenozoic subduction of the African slab has resulted in the construction of a large south-facing subduction wedge. Rollback of the African slab likely initiated sometime in the Eocene and continues today. This geodynamic setting has given rise to a forearc characterized by a series of dramatic 2-4 km high topographic escarpments south of the Island of Crete; one of the few subaerial forearc highs along the Hellenic margin. It is generally agreed that these escarpments represent the surface expression of large intra-crust faults, yet the kinematics of faulting remains contentious in contemporary scientific literature. Different geologic and geophysical datasets have been used to argue that these structures accommodate either shortening due to continued plate convergence or extension driven by processes related to slab rollback. Resolving the debate over the kinematics of the large-scale structures embedded in the Hellenic forearc is paramount to our understanding of seismic hazards, the development of forearc basins, and the geodynamic processes operating in this region. We present results from a study of the tectonic geomorphology and structural geology of the south-central coastline of Crete that constrain the kinematics and evolution of one of the aforementioned fault systems that is related to the construction of a large forearc basin known as the Ptolemy trough. Field surveys and geochronology of marine terraces reveal the pattern of late Quaternary uplift along the south-central coastline. Two large south-dipping extensional faults, which extend offshore into the Ptolemy trough, are found to offset Pleistocene marine terraces and are inferred to be active with average slip rates of ca. 0.5 mm/yr. The hanging walls and footwalls of these faults

  5. XMM-Subaru:Complete High Precision Study of Galaxy Clusters for Modern Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2011-10-01

    We request 382 ks data for 12 clusters to complete our survey of a volume-limited sample of 55 clusters. We investigated the existing data, which hints a mass dependent bias in the X-ray to weak lensing mass ratios for disturbed ones. X-ray mass proxies, e.g., Yx, show low scatter, but the best fits, particularly the slopes, of the mass-observable relations may be biased due to this mass dependence. Our program will quantify any mass/radial dependent bias based on three independent probes (X-ray/lensing/velocity dispersion) for such a volume-limited sample, and deliver definitive constraints on systematics for upcoming cluster cosmology surveys. The dataset will be a major asset for programs aiming to measure dark energy and programs adding a multi-wavelength focus to studies of cluster physics.

  6. Kinematics of luminous blue compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, Göran; Amram, Philippe; Boulesteix, Jaques; Bergvall, Nils; Masegosa, Josefa; Márquez, Isabel

    We present results from a Fabry-Perot study of the Hα velocity fields and morphologies of a sample of luminous blue compact galaxies. We estimate masses from photometry and kinematics and show that many of these BCGs are not rotationally supported. Mergers or strong interactions appear to be the triggering mechanism of the extreme starbursts seen in these galaxies.

  7. Insomnia medication: do published studies reflect the complete picture of efficacy and safety?

    PubMed

    Mattila, Taina; Stoyanova, Violeta; Elferink, André; Gispen-de Wied, Christine; de Boer, Anthonius; Wohlfarth, Tamar

    2011-07-01

    Selective publication can have a deleterious effect on evidence based medicine, health policy decision making and treatment guidelines. Using the European Public Assessment Reports (EPARs) as reference, this study examined selective publication and selective reporting of efficacy and safety of insomnia medication. EPARs of with three insomnia medications were used to identify all clinical trials that were performed between 1998 and 2007 for the purpose of registration in the EU. The matching publication for each trial was searched through a systematic literature search. Accuracy of information in the publications was examined by comparison to the information in the EPARs. Only 55% of the trials with insomnia medications identified in EPARs were published. Positive trials were approximately two times more likely to be published. The lag time from study completion to publication was shorter for the positive compared to the negative trials. Sample size did not correlate with publication of negative trials. The meta-analysis of the effect size of insomnia medication was 1.6 times larger in the published data compared to the complete data. While the primary end points of the trials were reported reliably in the publications, remarkable inconsistencies were detected in the reporting of the secondary end points, methods, results and, especially safety. In conclusion, selective publication and reporting lead to an overestimation of efficacy and underestimation of safety of insomnia products. Authors of treatment guidelines should be aware of this bias. EPARs/FDA reviews provide a more unbiased view of the benefit-risk balance of insomnia and other medications and hence these documents should be consulted by e.g. authors of meta-analyses and of treatment guidelines.

  8. In silico phylogenomics using complete genomes: a case study on the evolution of hominoids.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor Rodrigues; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Jennings, W Bryan

    2016-09-01

    The increasing availability of complete genome data is facilitating the acquisition of phylogenomic data sets, but the process of obtaining orthologous sequences from other genomes and assembling multiple sequence alignments remains piecemeal and arduous. We designed software that performs these tasks and outputs anonymous loci (AL) or anchored enrichment/ultraconserved element loci (AE/UCE) data sets in ready-to-analyze formats. We demonstrate our program by applying it to the hominoids. Starting with human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan genomes, our software generated an exhaustive data set of 292 ALs (∼1 kb each) in ∼3 h. Not only did analyses of our AL data set validate the program by yielding a portrait of hominoid evolution in agreement with previous studies, but the accuracy and precision of our estimated ancestral effective population sizes and speciation times represent improvements. We also used our program with a published set of 512 vertebrate-wide AE "probe" sequences to generate data sets consisting of 171 and 242 independent loci (∼1 kb each) in 11 and 13 min, respectively. The former data set consisted of flanking sequences 500 bp from adjacent AEs, while the latter contained sequences bordering AEs. Although our AE data sets produced the expected hominoid species tree, coalescent-based estimates of ancestral population sizes and speciation times based on these data were considerably lower than estimates from our AL data set and previous studies. Accordingly, we suggest that loci subjected to direct or indirect selection may not be appropriate for coalescent-based methods. Complete in silico approaches, combined with the burgeoning genome databases, will accelerate the pace of phylogenomics. PMID:27435933

  9. In silico phylogenomics using complete genomes: a case study on the evolution of hominoids.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor Rodrigues; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Jennings, W Bryan

    2016-09-01

    The increasing availability of complete genome data is facilitating the acquisition of phylogenomic data sets, but the process of obtaining orthologous sequences from other genomes and assembling multiple sequence alignments remains piecemeal and arduous. We designed software that performs these tasks and outputs anonymous loci (AL) or anchored enrichment/ultraconserved element loci (AE/UCE) data sets in ready-to-analyze formats. We demonstrate our program by applying it to the hominoids. Starting with human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan genomes, our software generated an exhaustive data set of 292 ALs (∼1 kb each) in ∼3 h. Not only did analyses of our AL data set validate the program by yielding a portrait of hominoid evolution in agreement with previous studies, but the accuracy and precision of our estimated ancestral effective population sizes and speciation times represent improvements. We also used our program with a published set of 512 vertebrate-wide AE "probe" sequences to generate data sets consisting of 171 and 242 independent loci (∼1 kb each) in 11 and 13 min, respectively. The former data set consisted of flanking sequences 500 bp from adjacent AEs, while the latter contained sequences bordering AEs. Although our AE data sets produced the expected hominoid species tree, coalescent-based estimates of ancestral population sizes and speciation times based on these data were considerably lower than estimates from our AL data set and previous studies. Accordingly, we suggest that loci subjected to direct or indirect selection may not be appropriate for coalescent-based methods. Complete in silico approaches, combined with the burgeoning genome databases, will accelerate the pace of phylogenomics.

  10. The impact of tibial torsion measurements on gait analysis kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Santos, Nadia Maria; Godoy, Wagner De; Bernal, Milena Moreira Barreto; Paes, Ângela Tavares; Ramalho, Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure and compare tibial torsion values as assessed by goniometry and three-dimensional kinematics. In addition, the impact of each one of these measurements on kinematic and kinetic results for normal gait was determined. Methods: Twenty-three healthy and fully ambulatory patients were assessed, 11 women and 12 men, from 20 to 40 years old. Data were collected at a laboratory for the three-dimensional analysis of movement with 10 cameras and two force plates. Tibial torsion measurements were obtained using goniometry and three-dimensional kinematics based on the Plug-in Gait model. Afterwards, both procedures were compared, and the impact of each result was assessed on the kinematic and kinetic modeling of the knee and ankle. Results: Pearson's linear correlation coefficient (r=0,504) showed a moderate correlation between the three-dimensional kinematics and goniometry, and between the changes in the measurements. Regarding the processed kinematic and kinetic results for every torsion position, no significant differences were noticed among any of the studied variables (p>0.05). Conclusion: Although statistical correlation among tibial torsion angles by goniometry and three-dimensional kinematic were moderate, kinematic and kinetic analysis of the joints did not reveal any significant changes. Level of Evidence I, Diagnostic Studies - Investigating a Diagnostic Test. PMID:25328438

  11. Complete solubilization of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue may improve proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Taylor, Clive R; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2013-04-01

    Tissue-based proteomic approaches (tissue proteomics) are essential for discovering and evaluating biomarkers for personalized medicine. In any proteomics study, the most critical issue is sample extraction and preparation. This problem is especially difficult when recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, improving and standardizing protein extraction from FFPE tissue is a critical need because of the millions of archival FFPE tissues available in tissue banks worldwide. Recent progress in the application of heat-induced antigen retrieval principles for protein extraction from FFPE tissue has resulted in a number of published FFPE tissue proteomics studies. However, there is currently no consensus on the optimal protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue or accepted standards for quantitative evaluation of the extracts. Standardization is critical to ensure the accurate evaluation of FFPE protein extracts by proteomic methods such as reverse phase protein arrays, which is now in clinical use. In our view, complete solubilization of FFPE tissue samples is the best way to achieve the goal of standardizing the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. However, further studies are recommended to develop standardized protein extraction methods to ensure quantitative and qualitative reproducibility in the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues.

  12. Speech-Associated Labiomandibular Movement in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Kinematic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Yang, Fan-pei Gloria; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wong, Alice May-kuen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the speech-associated labiomandibular movement during articulation production in Mandarin-speaking children with spastic quadriplegic (SQ) cerebral palsy (CP). Twelve children with SQ CP (aged 7-11 years) and 12 age-matched healthy children as controls were enrolled for the study. All children underwent…

  13. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  14. Analytical and semi-analytical inverse kinematics of SSRMS-type manipulators with single joint locked failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenfu; She, Yu; Xu, Yangsheng

    2014-12-01

    Redundant space manipulators, including Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and European Robotic Arm (ERA), have been playing important roles in the construction and maintenance of International Space Station (ISS). They all have 7 revolute joints arranged in similar configurations, and are referred to as SSRMS-type manipulators. When a joint is locked in an arbitrary position due to some failures, a 7R manipulator degrades to a 6R manipulator. Without a spherical wrist or three consecutive parallel joints, the inverse kinematics of the 6R manipulator is very complex. In this paper, we propose effective methods to resolve the inverse kinematics for different cases of any joint locked in an arbitrary position. Firstly, configuration characteristics of the SSRMS-type redundant manipulators are analyzed. Then, an existing of closed-form inverse kinematics is discussed for locking different joints. Secondly, D-H frames and corresponding D-H parameters of the new 6-DOF manipulator formed by locking a joint in an arbitrary position are re-constructed. A unified table is then created to describe the kinematics for all possible cases of single joint locking failure. Thirdly, completely analytical and semi-analytical methods are presented to solve the inverse kinematics equations, and the former is used for locking joint 1, 2, 6 or 7 while the latter for locking joint 3, 4 or 5. Finally, typical cases for single joint locking are studied. The results verify the proposed methods.

  15. Hyoid and laryngeal excursion kinematics - magnitude, duration and velocity - changes following successful exercise-based dysphagia rehabilitation: MDTP.

    PubMed

    Sia, I; Carvajal, P; Lacy, A A; Carnaby, G D; Crary, M A

    2015-05-01

    Variability in magnitude of deglutitional hyolaryngeal excursion in patients with dysphagia suggests that it does not adequately represent the kinematics of swallowing difficulties or recovery following rehabilitation. On the other hand, reduced hyolaryngeal excursion velocity has been reported in patients with dysphagia. While increased movement velocity often accompanies clinical and functional recovery in many diseases, velocity changes in swallowing-related movement following dysphagia therapy have not been well studied. This study evaluated changes in hyoid and laryngeal excursion (magnitude, duration and velocity) before and following successful dysphagia therapy to provide a more comprehensive representation of improvement to swallowing kinematics in patients who have experienced successful rehabilitation. A secondary analysis of case series data was completed. Eight patients with severe, chronic dysphagia completed a standard course of an exercise-based dysphagia treatment programme (McNeill dysphagia therapy program, MDTP). Pre- and post-treatment, kinematic aspects of swallowing were evaluated for thin liquid, thick liquid and pudding swallows. Maximum hyoid and laryngeal excursion magnitude and excursion duration were measured. Excursion velocities were calculated from excursion magnitude and duration measures. Successful treatment for dysphagia facilitated increased hyolaryngeal excursion magnitude, duration and velocity. These changes were most prominent for the hyoid and most often observed with thin liquids. By examining hyoid and laryngeal excursion velocity in patients who have experienced successful dysphagia rehabilitation, this study demonstrated the value of evaluating spatial and temporal aspects of swallowing kinematics in a single measure for a more comprehensive representation of positive changes underlying functional recovery.

  16. KINEMATICS OF STELLAR POPULATIONS IN POSTSTARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hiner, Kyle D.; Canalizo, Gabriela E-mail: khiner@astro-udec.cl

    2015-01-20

    Poststarburst galaxies host a population of early-type stars (A or F) but simultaneously lack indicators of ongoing star formation such as [O II] emission. Two distinct stellar populations have been identified in these systems: a young poststarburst population superimposed on an older host population. We present a study of nine poststarburst galaxies with the following objectives: (1) to investigate whether and how kinematical differences between the young and old populations of stars can be measured, and (2) to gain insight into the formation mechanism of the young population in these systems. We fit high signal-to-noise spectra with two independent populations in distinct spectral regions: the Balmer region, the Mg IB region, and the Ca triplet when available. We show that the kinematics of the two populations largely track one another if measured in the Balmer region with high signal-to-noise data. Results from examining the Faber-Jackson relation and the fundamental plane indicate that these objects are not kinematically disturbed relative to more evolved spheroids. A case study of the internal kinematics of one object in our sample shows it to be pressure supported and not rotationally dominated. Overall our results are consistent with merger-induced starburst scenarios where the young population is observed during the later stages of the merger.

  17. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Non-Completers in Online Doctor of Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Bernadette Marie

    2012-01-01

    The chance of an individual completing a traditional doctorate program is 50% (Bowen & Rudenstine, 1992; Council of Graduate Schools Ph.D. Completion Project, 2008; Ivankova & Stick, 2007). Student attrition in online programs is 10% to 20% greater than that of traditional, residential programs (Allen & Seaman, 2010; Carr, 2000; Diaz,…

  18. Kinematics and evolution of poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koranyi, Daniel Mark

    2000-11-01

    The AWM and MKW poor clusters form a complete nearby sample of poor clusters that span a range of velocity dispersions and populations; they were selected on the basis of a cD-like galaxy at their centers. I describe a photometric and kinematic study of AWM 7, the richest cluster in the sample, and extend the galaxy sample to perform a detailed analysis of the mass profile of this cluster. I assess the performance of the virial mass estimator under a variety of assumptions about the orbital anisotropy profile. I then describe an extensive kinematic analysis of 17 AWM and MKW clusters, investigating velocity distributions, spectral segregation, velocity dispersion profiles, and X-ray properties. This section establishes a robust observational baseline for comparison to simulations. The AWM and MKW clusters are as varied in their properties as their richer counterparts, and are globally no different from poor clusters without cD galaxies. This similarity suggests that the formation of the cD in such clusters is governed by local physics, independent of the global cluster properties. Finally, I describe and analyze high-resolution N-body simulations of poor clusters that are a good match to the AWM and MKW clusters in mass, galaxy population, and velocity dispersion. The simulations consist of ~10 million particles, of which typically 2 million constitute the final virialized region. The simulations track galaxies and dark matter separately, permitting an analysis of the morphological evolution of the galaxy population. I summarize the kinematic properties of the simulated clusters and their evolution with redshift, I compare them to the observed sample of AWM and MKW clusters, and test the accuracy with which the standard virial mass estimator recovers the true underlying mass profile. The virial estimator recovers the total mass accurately on average, but systematically overestimates the mass profile interior to the virial radius.

  19. Salt kinematics and regional tectonics across a Permian gas field: a case study from East Frisia, NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackiner, Anna Alexandra; Antrett, Philipp; Strozyk, Frank; Back, Stefan; Kukla, Peter; Stollhofen, Harald

    2013-09-01

    This study presents a reconstruction of the tectonic history of an Upper Rotliegend tight gas field in Northern Germany. Tectonism of the greater study area was influenced by multiple phases of salt movement, which produced a variety of salt-related structural features such as salt walls, salt diapirs as well as salt glaciers (namakiers). A sequential 2D retro-deformation and stratal backstripping methodology was used to differentiate mechanisms inducing salt movement and to discuss their relation to regional tectonics. The quantitative geometric restoration included sedimentary balancing, decompaction, fault-related deformation, salt movement, thermal subsidence, and isostasy to unravel the post-depositional tectonic overprint of the Rotliegend reservoir rock. The results of this study indicate that reactive salt diapirism started during an Early Triassic interval of thin-skinned extensional tectonics, followed by an active diapirism stage with an overburden salt piercement in the Late Triassic, and finally a period of intensive salt surface extrusion and the formation of salt glaciers (namakiers) in Late Triassic and Jurassic times. Since the Early Cretaceous, salt in the study area has been rising by passive diapirism.

  20. The Photometric and Kinematic Structure of Face-on Disk Galaxies. III. Kinematic Inclinations from Hα Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained Hα velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i kin = 23° for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20° and 6% at 30°. Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical "face-on" Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15° and 5% at 30°. This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  1. Effects of Violating Screen Design Principles of Balance, Unity, and Focus on Recall Learning, Study Time, and Completion Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Michael; Kanuka, Heather

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated whether achievement, completion rate, and lesson time vary with computer-screen layouts using good design principles compared with poorly designed screens. Results with adult learners using computer-based instruction showed no difference in achievement scores but good design did lead to higher completion rates and less time…

  2. A Quantitative Study of a Software Tool that Supports a Part-Complete Solution Method on Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a quantitative research study into the use of a software tool that was built to support a part-complete solution method (PCSM) for the learning of computer programming. The use of part-complete solutions to programming problems is one of the methods that can be used to reduce the cognitive load that students…

  3. Effects of diagonal shoulder training in a closed kinematic chain for secondary impingement syndrome: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Han; Park, Du-Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of diagonal shoulder training on an individual with secondary impingement due to scapular dyskinesis. [Subject] A 54 year-old female with secondary impingement participated in this study. [Methods] The patient performed diagonal shoulder training in 4-point kneeling, 3 times per day for 20 minutes over a period of 6 weeks. Evaluations of shoulder pain, range of motion, upper trapezius/lower serratus anterior ratio, and impingement were performed before training and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. [Results] The patient’s parameters improved gradually. All parameters returned to normal ranges at 4 weeks. [Conclusion] Diagonal shoulder training is effective for improving dysfunction in individuals with secondary impingement. In addition, this training should be applied for more than 4 weeks. PMID:26180371

  4. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  5. Action Experience Changes Attention to Kinematic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Courtney A.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    The current study used remote corneal reflection eye-tracking to examine the relationship between motor experience and action anticipation in 13-months-old infants. To measure online anticipation of actions infants watched videos where the actor’s hand provided kinematic information (in its orientation) about the type of object that the actor was going to reach for. The actor’s hand orientation either matched the orientation of a rod (congruent cue) or did not match the orientation of the rod (incongruent cue). To examine relations between motor experience and action anticipation, we used a 2 (reach first vs. observe first) × 2 (congruent kinematic cue vs. incongruent kinematic cue) between-subjects design. We show that 13-months-old infants in the observe first condition spontaneously generate rapid online visual predictions to congruent hand orientation cues and do not visually anticipate when presented incongruent cues. We further demonstrate that the speed that these infants generate predictions to congruent motor cues is correlated with their own ability to pre-shape their hands. Finally, we demonstrate that following reaching experience, infants generate rapid predictions to both congruent and incongruent hand shape cues—suggesting that short-term experience changes attention to kinematics. PMID:26913012

  6. Kinematic comparisons of 1996 Olympic baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, R F; Fleisig, G S; Zheng, N; Barrentine, S W; Andrews, J R

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the kinematics of baseball pitchers who participated in the 1996 XXVI Centennial Olympic Games. Two synchronized video cameras operating at 120 Hz were used to video 48 pitchers from Australia, Japan, the Netherlands, Cuba, Italy, Korea, Nicaragua and the USA. All pitchers were analysed while throwing the fastball pitch. Twenty-one kinematic parameters were measured at lead foot contact, during the arm cocking and arm acceleration phases, and at the instant of ball release. These parameters included stride length, foot angle and foot placement; shoulder abduction, shoulder horizontal adduction and shoulder external rotation; knee and elbow flexion; upper torso, shoulder internal rotation and elbow extension angular velocities; forward and lateral trunk tilt; and ball speed. A one-way analysis of variance (P < 0.01) was used to assess kinematic differences. Shoulder horizontal adduction and shoulder external rotation at lead foot contact and ball speed at the instant of ball release were significantly different among countries. The greater shoulder horizontal abduction observed in Cuban pitchers at lead foot contact is thought to be an important factor in the generation of force throughout the arm cocking and arm acceleration phases, and may in part explain why Cuban pitchers generated the greatest ball release speed. We conclude that pitching kinematics are similar among baseball pitchers from different countries.

  7. Complete effect-profile assessment in association studies with multiple genetic and multiple environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Maity, Arnab; Luo, Yiwen; Neely, Megan L; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Studying complex diseases in the post genome-wide association studies (GWAS) era has led to developing methods that consider factor-sets rather than individual genetic/environmental factors (i.e., Multi-G-Multi-E studies), and mining for potential gene-environment (G×E) interactions has proven to be an invaluable aid in both discovery and deciphering underlying biological mechanisms. Current approaches for examining effect profiles in Multi-G-Multi-E analyses are either underpowered due to large degrees of freedom, ill-suited for detecting G×E interactions due to imprecise modeling of the G and E effects, or lack of capacity for modeling interactions between two factor-sets (e.g., existing methods focus primarily on a single E factor). In this work, we illustrate the issues encountered in constructing kernels for investigating interactions between two factor-sets, and propose a simple yet intuitive solution to construct the G×E kernel that retains the ease-of-interpretation of classic regression. We also construct a series of kernel machine (KM) score tests to evaluate the complete effect profile (i.e., the G, E, and G×E effects individually or in combination). We show, via simulations and a data application, that the proposed KM methods outperform the classic and PC regressions across a range of scenarios, including varying effect size, effect structure, and interaction complexity. The largest power gain was observed when the underlying effect structure involved complex G×E interactions; however, the proposed methods have consistent, powerful performance when the effect profile is simple or complex, suggesting that the proposed method could be a useful tool for exploratory or confirmatory G×E analysis.

  8. Scaling and kinematics of a floating wind turbine under ocean waves and variable thrust: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Chris; Ruehl, Kelley; Guala, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Scale model wave channel experiments were performed to study the motion of an offshore floating wind turbine in operational sea states. The model tests were conducted on a 1:100 Froude scaled Sandia National Labs 13.2 MW prototype offshore wind turbine with a barge style floating platform. The platform is modeled after the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge designed for the 5MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine. The wave environment used in the model tests is representative of the deep-water sea states off the coast of Maine as well as the Pacific Northwest. The purpose of the tests is to validate a computational model of the turbine-wave interaction where the effects of airflow are not considered. To simplify the tests and validation, the platform motion is restricted to two degrees of freedom, pitch and heave, by attaching two roller support types at the center of gravity along the pitch axis. The major aerodynamic force acting on the turbine, i.e. the rotor thrust, is provided by spinning a scaled rotor at a controlled rotational speed. A subset of experiments were performed to study the effect of a mean or fluctuating rotor thrust on the platform dynamics, exploring strategies to control the thrust as a function of platform pitch angle and minimize platform oscillations.

  9. A Comparative Study on the Kinematic Biomechanical Effects of Tibia Vara in the Healthy and Diseased Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmohammadi, Mehrdad; Karami, Hossein; Bani, Milad Salimi; Zadeh, Hossein Bahreini; Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Malalignment about the knee leads to a pathological-mechanical load that may cause early osteoarthritis of the knee joint and high degree of deformity which may need surgical treatment. Analysis of the leg movements in the experimental cases and comparing acquired results to the normal ones during the gait is used as a practical method to evaluate the effects of the disease. METHOD: In this study, gait differences between the patients with tibia vara and normal people were studied according to the data obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) motion analyzer. Various parameters, including positions, linear and angular velocities, linear and angular accelerations, total velocity, total acceleration, and path length at different angels were extracted and processed via a 3D motion analyzer. Then the results of the patient and control groups were compared to identify the differences. RESULTS: The maximum and average values as well as sample entropy were also calculated for all the mentioned parameters. Among all, only nine remarkable differences between these two groups were observed. The results revealed that the great difference between the patients with tibia vara compared to the normal ones in gait cycle lies on the abnormal movement of fibula bone and less irregularities along the z-axis. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may have implications not only for understanding the differences between the tibia vara in the healthy and diseased individuals, but also for providing a practical understanding for the medical and orthopedic experts to propose a better treatment method.

  10. Fan-shaped complete block on helical tomotherapy for esophageal cancer: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiu-Han; Mok, Greta S P; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Pei; Shiau, An-Cheng; Tien, Hui-Ju; Lin, Chi-Ta; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is a common complication for radiotherapy of esophageal cancer and is associated with the low dose irradiated lung volume. This study aims to reduce the mean lung dose (MLD) and the relative lung volume at 20 Gy (V 20) and at low dose region using various designs of the fan-shaped complete block (FSCB) in helical tomotherapy. Hypothetical esophageal tumor was delineated on an anthropomorphic phantom. The FSCB was defined as the fan-shaped radiation restricted area located in both lungs. Seven treatment plans were performed with nonblock design and FSCB with different fan angles, that is, from 90° to 140°, with increment of 10°. The homogeneous index, conformation number, MLD, and the relative lung volume receiving more than 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy (V 5, V 10, V 15, and V 20) were determined for each treatment scheme. There was a substantial reduction in the MLD, V 5, V 10, V 15, and V 20 when using different types of FSCB as compared to the nonblock design. The reduction of V 20, V 15, V 10, and V 5 was 6.3%-8.6%, 16%-23%, 42%-57%, and 42%-66% for FSCB 90°-140°, respectively. The use of FSCB in helical tomotherapy is a promising method to reduce the MLD, V 20, and relative lung volume in low dose region, especially in V 5 and V 10 for esophageal cancer.

  11. Studying survivors of near-lethal suicide attempts as a proxy for completed suicide in prisons.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, Adrienne; Fazel, Seena; Marzano, Lisa; Hawton, Keith

    2012-07-10

    Suicides in prisons are common. There is a pressing need to understand more about the causes and prevention of prisoner suicides. A particularly informative approach is through studying survivors of near-lethal suicide attempts. However, the extent to which this approach is a good proxy for completed suicide requires verification. In this article we aimed to assess (1) the extent to which male and female prisoners who made near-lethal suicide attempts in prison are similar to prisoners who die by suicide; (2) the suicidal intent of those making near-lethal suicide attempts; and (3) the applicability of the Suicide Intent Scale in prisons. Survivors of near-lethal suicide attempts and prisoners who died by suicide were compared on sociodemographic and criminological characteristics. The suicidal intent of prisoners engaging in near-lethal self-harm was assessed using Beck's Suicide Intent Scale. There were no significant differences when the sociodemographic and criminological profiles of prisoners who made near-lethal suicide attempts and those who died by suicide were compared, except that male prisoners who made near-lethal suicide attempts were somewhat younger. Most prisoners carrying out near-lethal acts had high suicidal intent. However, some questions in the Suicide Intent Scale were inappropriate for assessing intent in prisoners. Prisoners who survive near-lethal self-harm would appear to be a valid proxy for those who die by suicide in prison. The Suicide Intent Scale requires some modifications for use in prisons.

  12. The Maiden Voyage of a Kinematics Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwolfe, Matthew L.

    2015-04-01

    In a Montessori preschool classroom, students work independently on tasks that absorb their attention in part because the apparatus are carefully designed to make mistakes directly observable and limit exploration to one aspect or dimension. Control of error inheres in the apparatus itself, so that teacher intervention can be minimal.1 Inspired by this example, I created a robotic kinematics apparatus that also shapes the inquiry experience. Students program the robot by drawing kinematic graphs on a computer and then observe its motion. Exploration is at once limited to constant velocity and constant acceleration motion, yet open to complex multi-segment examples difficult to achieve in the lab in other ways. The robot precisely and reliably produces the motion described by the students' graphs, so that the apparatus itself provides immediate visual feedback about whether their understanding is correct as they are free to explore within the hard-coded limits. In particular, the kinematic robot enables hands-on study of multi-segment constant velocity situations, which lays a far stronger foundation for the study of accelerated motion. When correction is anonymous—just between one group of lab partners and their robot—students using the kinematic robot tend to flow right back to work because they view the correction as an integral part of the inquiry learning process. By contrast, when correction occurs by the teacher and/or in public (e.g., returning a graded assignment or pointing out student misconceptions during class), students all too often treat the event as the endpoint to inquiry. Furthermore, quantitative evidence shows a large gain from pre-test to post-test scores using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K).

  13. Kinematic study at the junction of the East Anatolian fault and the Dead Sea fault from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Yasser; Masson, Frederic; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Cakir, Ziyadin; Alchalbi, Abdulmutaleb; Yavasoglu, Hakan; Yönlü, Onder; Daoud, Mohamed; Ergintav, Semih; Inan, Sedat

    2013-07-01

    The Hatay Triple Junction (HTJ) is a tectonically complex area located at the intersection between the left-lateral East Anatolian fault (EAF), the Cyprus subduction arc and the left-lateral Dead Sea fault (DSF) which is a transform boundary between the Arabian and Sinai plates as they converge toward Eurasia. Previous GPS studies indicate a left-lateral strike-slip rate across the DSF varying from 5 mm/yr (along the southern part) to 2 mm/yr (along the northern part) (Alchalbi et al., 2010; Gomez et al., 2007; Le Béon et al., 2008; Mahmoud et al., 2005; Al-Tarazi et al., 2011). In contrast, the EAF has a roughly constant velocity along strike estimated at 9.7 + 0.9 mm/yr (Reilinger et al., 2006). The HTJ contains several well-identified active fault segments (DSF, EAF, Osmaniye fault, Karasu fault, Latakia fault, Jisr-al-shuggur fault, Idleb fault and Afrin fault) (Meghraoui et al., 2011), the fault-slip rates for which are poorly constrained. In order to constrain better the slip rate on faults, we established a network of 57 GPS sites in NW Syria and in SE Turkey. The first campaign was carried out in September 2009; a second took place in September and November 2010 and a third (only in Turkey) in September 2011. Although the velocity field vectors computed from the 2009, 2010 and 2011 measurements appear consistent with other local studies, the results are hampered by large uncertainties due to the short observation period. However, preliminary interpretations are consistent with decreasing velocity along the DSF from south to north reported previously.

  14. Pelvis and torso kinematics and their relationship to shoulder kinematics in high-school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Keeley, David W

    2010-12-01

    It was the purpose of our study to examine the kinematics of the pelvis and torso and determine their relationship to the kinematics of the shoulder in high-school baseball pitchers. A single group, repeated-measures design was used to collect pelvis, torso, and shoulder kinematics throughout the pitching motion. Subjects threw a series of maximal effort fastballs to a catcher located the regulation distance (18.44m) from the pitching mound, and those data from the fastest pitch passing through the strike zone were analyzed. After test trials, kinematic data were analyzed using a series of descriptive statistics to identify outliers and determine the nature of the distribution before testing for the presence of relationships between the various parameters. Results indicated that for several parameters, the actions at and about the shoulder are strongly related to the actions of the pelvis and torso throughout the pitching motion. However, although pelvis and torso kinematics throughout the pitching motion were inversely related to both shoulder elevation and the plane of shoulder elevation, only the rate of axial torso rotation was significantly related to these shoulder parameters. More importantly, the rate of axial torso rotation is significantly related to these shoulder parameters in a way that may help explain the high rate of shoulder injury in high-school pitchers. Therefore, strength training should focus on developing a strong stable core including the gluteal musculature in an attempt to control the rate of torso rotation during the pitch. PMID:20703168

  15. Pelvis and torso kinematics and their relationship to shoulder kinematics in high-school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Keeley, David W

    2010-12-01

    It was the purpose of our study to examine the kinematics of the pelvis and torso and determine their relationship to the kinematics of the shoulder in high-school baseball pitchers. A single group, repeated-measures design was used to collect pelvis, torso, and shoulder kinematics throughout the pitching motion. Subjects threw a series of maximal effort fastballs to a catcher located the regulation distance (18.44m) from the pitching mound, and those data from the fastest pitch passing through the strike zone were analyzed. After test trials, kinematic data were analyzed using a series of descriptive statistics to identify outliers and determine the nature of the distribution before testing for the presence of relationships between the various parameters. Results indicated that for several parameters, the actions at and about the shoulder are strongly related to the actions of the pelvis and torso throughout the pitching motion. However, although pelvis and torso kinematics throughout the pitching motion were inversely related to both shoulder elevation and the plane of shoulder elevation, only the rate of axial torso rotation was significantly related to these shoulder parameters. More importantly, the rate of axial torso rotation is significantly related to these shoulder parameters in a way that may help explain the high rate of shoulder injury in high-school pitchers. Therefore, strength training should focus on developing a strong stable core including the gluteal musculature in an attempt to control the rate of torso rotation during the pitch.

  16. Peak-ring structure and kinematics from a multi-disciplinary study of the Schrödinger impact basin

    PubMed Central

    Kring, David A.; Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Collins, Gareth S.; Potter, Ross W. K.; Chandnani, Mitali

    2016-01-01

    The Schrödinger basin on the lunar farside is ∼320 km in diameter and the best-preserved peak-ring basin of its size in the Earth–Moon system. Here we present spectral and photogeologic analyses of data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument on the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on the LRO spacecraft, which indicates the peak ring is composed of anorthositic, noritic and troctolitic lithologies that were juxtaposed by several cross-cutting faults during peak-ring formation. Hydrocode simulations indicate the lithologies were uplifted from depths up to 30 km, representing the crust of the lunar farside. Through combining geological and remote-sensing observations with numerical modelling, we show that a Displaced Structural Uplift model is best for peak rings, including that in the K–T Chicxulub impact crater on Earth. These results may help guide sample selection in lunar sample return missions that are being studied for the multi-agency International Space Exploration Coordination Group. PMID:27762265

  17. Relationship between jump landing kinematics and peak ACL force during a jump in downhill skiing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, D; van den Bogert, A J; Nachbauer, W

    2014-06-01

    Recent data highlight that competitive skiers face a high risk of injuries especially during off-balance jump landing maneuvers in downhill skiing. The purpose of the present study was to develop a musculo-skeletal modeling and simulation approach to investigate the cause-and-effect relationship between a perturbed landing position, i.e., joint angles and trunk orientation, and the peak force in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) during jump landing. A two-dimensional musculo-skeletal model was developed and a baseline simulation was obtained reproducing measurement data of a reference landing movement. Based on the baseline simulation, a series of perturbed landing simulations (n = 1000) was generated. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between peak ACL force and the perturbed landing posture. Increased backward lean, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion as well as an asymmetric position were related to higher peak ACL forces during jump landing. The orientation of the trunk of the skier was identified as the most important predictor accounting for 60% of the variance of the peak ACL force in the simulations. Teaching of tactical decisions and the inclusion of exercise regimens in ACL injury prevention programs to improve trunk control during landing motions in downhill skiing was concluded.

  18. Complete Effect-Profile Assessment in Association Studies with Multiple Genetic and Multiple Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Maity, Arnab; Luo, Yiwen; Neely, Megan L.; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Studying complex diseases in the post GWAS era has led to developing methods that consider factor-sets rather than individual genetic/environmental factors (i.e., Multi-G-Multi-E studies), and mining for potential gene-environment (GxE) interactions has proven to be an invaluable aid in both discovery and deciphering underlying biological mechanisms. Current approaches for examining effect profiles in Multi-G-Multi-E analyses are either underpowered due to large degrees of freedom, ill-suited for detecting GxE interactions due to imprecise modeling of the G and E effects, or lack of capacity for modeling interactions between two factor sets (e.g., existing methods focus primarily on a single E factor). In this work, we illustrate the issues encountered in constructing kernels for investigating interactions between two factor-sets, and propose a simple yet intuitive solution to construct the GxE kernel that retains the ease-of-interpretation of classic regression. We also construct a series of KM score tests to evaluate the complete effect profile (i.e., the G, E, and GxE effects individually or in combination). We show, via simulations and a data application, that the proposed KM methods outperform the classic and PC regressions across a range of scenarios, including varying effect size, effect structure, and interaction complexity. The largest power gain was observed when the underlying effect structure involved complex GxE interactions; however, the proposed methods have consistent, powerful performance when the effect profile is simple or complex, suggesting that the proposed method could be a useful tool for exploratory or confirmatory GxE analysis. PMID:25538034

  19. Kinematic Downsizing at z ∼ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Raymond C.; Kassin, Susan A.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Guo, Yicheng; Pacifici, Camilla; Koekemoer, Anton; Stephens, Andrew W.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a survey of the internal kinematics of 49 star-forming galaxies at z∼ 2 in the CANDELS fields with the Keck/MOSFIRE spectrograph, Survey in the near-Infrared of Galaxies with Multiple position Angles (SIGMA). Kinematics (rotation velocity V rot and gas velocity dispersion {σ }g) are measured from nebular emission lines which trace the hot ionized gas surrounding star-forming regions. We find that by z∼ 2, massive star-forming galaxies ({log} {M}* /{M}ȯ ≳ 10.2) have assembled primitive disks: their kinematics are dominated by rotation, they are consistent with a marginally stable disk model, and they form a Tully–Fisher relation. These massive galaxies have values of {V}{rot}/{σ }g that are factors of 2–5 lower than local well-ordered galaxies at similar masses. Such results are consistent with findings by other studies. We find that low-mass galaxies ({log} {M}* /{M}ȯ ≲ 10.2) at this epoch are still in the early stages of disk assembly: their kinematics are often dominated by gas velocity dispersion and they fall from the Tully–Fisher relation to significantly low values of V rot. This “kinematic downsizing” implies that the process(es) responsible for disrupting disks at z∼ 2 have a stronger effect and/or are more active in low-mass systems. In conclusion, we find that the period of rapid stellar mass growth at z∼ 2 is coincident with the nascent assembly of low-mass disks and the assembly and settling of high-mass disks.

  20. Multidisciplinary approach to constrain kinematics of fault zones at shallow depths: a case study from the Cameros-Demanda thrust (North Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas-Sainz, A. M.; Román-Berdiel, T.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; García-Lasanta, C.; Villalaín, J. J.; Aldega, L.; Corrado, S.; Caricchi, C.; Invernizzi, C.; Osácar, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Thrusting at shallow depths often precludes analysis by means of structural indicators effective in other geological contexts (e.g., mylonites, sheath folds, shear bands). In this paper, a combination of techniques (including structural analysis, magnetic methods, as anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and paleomagnetism, and paleothermometry) is used to define thrusting conditions, deformation, and transport directions in the Cameros-Demanda thrust (North Spain). Three outcrops were analyzed along this intraplate, large-scale major structure having 150 km of outcropping length, 30 km of maximum horizontal displacement, and 5 km of vertical throw. Results obtained by means of the different techniques are compared with data derived from cross sections and stratigraphic analysis. Mixed-layer illite-smectite and vitrinite reflectance indicating deep diagenetic conditions and mature stage of hydrocarbon generation suggests shallow depths during deformation, thus confirming that the protolith for most of the fault rocks is the footwall of the main thrust. Kinematic indicators (foliation, S/C structures, and slickenside striations) indicate altogether a dominant NNW movement of the hanging wall in the western zone and NE in the eastern zone of the thrust, thus implying strain partitioning between different branches of the main thrust. The study of AMS in fault rocks (nearly 400 samples of fault gouge, breccia, and microbreccia) indicates that the strike of magnetic foliation is oblique to the transport direction and that the magnetic lineation parallelizes the projection of the transport direction onto the k max/k int plane in sites with strong shear deformation. Paleomagnetism applied to fault rocks indicates the existence of remagnetizations linked to thrusting, in spite of the shallow depth for deformation, and a strong deformation or scattering of the magnetic remanence vectors in the fault zone. The application of the described techniques and consistency of

  1. Kinematic orbits and the structure of the internal space for systems of five or more bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Kevin A.; Littlejohn, Robert G.

    1999-10-01

    The internal space for a molecule, atom, or other n-body system can be conveniently parameterized by 3n - 9 kinematic angles and three hematic invariants. For a fixed set of kinematic invariants, the kinematic angles parameterize a subspace, called a kinematic orbit, of the n-body internal space. Building on an earlier analysis of the three- and four-body problems, we derive the form of these kinematic orbits (that is, their topology) for the general n-body problem. The case n = 5 is studied in detail, along with the previously studied cases n = 3,4.

  2. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  3. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component.

  4. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  5. IDENTIFYING THE YOUNG LOW-MASS STARS WITHIN 25 pc. II. DISTANCES, KINEMATICS, AND GROUP MEMBERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-10

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of {approx}<300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of {approx}<25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young ({approx}<3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and {beta} Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages {approx}<150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event.

  6. A statistical kinematic source inversion approach based on the QUESO library for uncertainty quantification and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Olaf; McDougall, Damon; Mai, Martin; Babuska, Ivo

    2014-05-01

    Seismic, often augmented with geodetic data, are frequently used to invert for the spatio-temporal evolution of slip along a rupture plane. The resulting images of the slip evolution for a single event, inferred by different research teams, often vary distinctly, depending on the adopted inversion approach and rupture model parameterization. This observation raises the question, which of the provided kinematic source inversion solutions is most reliable and most robust, and — more generally — how accurate are fault parameterization and solution predictions? These issues are not included in "standard" source inversion approaches. Here, we present a statistical inversion approach to constrain kinematic rupture parameters from teleseismic body waves. The approach is based a) on a forward-modeling scheme that computes synthetic (body-)waves for a given kinematic rupture model, and b) on the QUESO (Quantification of Uncertainty for Estimation, Simulation, and Optimization) library that uses MCMC algorithms and Bayes theorem for sample selection. We present Bayesian inversions for rupture parameters in synthetic earthquakes (i.e. for which the exact rupture history is known) in an attempt to identify the cross-over at which further model discretization (spatial and temporal resolution of the parameter space) is no longer attributed to a decreasing misfit. Identification of this cross-over is of importance as it reveals the resolution power of the studied data set (i.e. teleseismic body waves), enabling one to constrain kinematic earthquake rupture histories of real earthquakes at a resolution that is supported by data. In addition, the Bayesian approach allows for mapping complete posterior probability density functions of the desired kinematic source parameters, thus enabling us to rigorously assess the uncertainties in earthquake source inversions.

  7. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32733

  8. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory.

  9. Uncertainties of Completeness Measures in Openstreetmap - a Case Study for Buildings in a Medium-Sized German City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnros, T.; Dorn, H.; Hahmann, S.; Zipf, A.

    2015-08-01

    The completeness of buildings in OpenStreetMap (OSM) is estimated for a medium-sized German city and its surroundings by comparing the OSM data with data from an official building cadastre. As completeness measures we apply two unit-based methods that are frequently applied in similar studies. It is found that the estimation of OSM building completeness strongly differ between the methods. A count ratio (number of OSM buildings / number of reference buildings) tends to underestimate the actual building completeness and an area ratio (total OSM building area / total reference building area) instead tends to overestimate the completeness within the study area. It is argued that a simple pre-processing of the building footprint polygons leads to a more accurate completeness estimation when applying the count ratio. It is also suggested to more carefully examine the areas that have been mapped in OSM but not in the reference data set (false positives). In the present study region, these values are mainly due to simplified OSM polygons and they contribute to an overestimation of the OSM building completeness when applying the area ratio.

  10. Enhancing Doctoral Completion in Women: Evidence from a Qualitative Study of a Unique Federally Funded Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Drake-Clark, Donna; Grasso, Maureen; Banta, Trudy

    2014-01-01

    In an era where campus environments were often unwelcoming to women, and there were few women role models, an innovative program funded by the National Institute of Education produced 100% completion by female and minority doctoral students. At a 25-year reunion, the graduates reflected on their program experiences and careers. Reflections were…

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697, a Paradigm for Genome Plasticity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thibessard, Annabelle

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697 was completely determined. The genome consists of an 8.1-Mbp linear chromosome with terminal inverted repeats of 210 kb. Genomic islands were identified, one of which corresponds to a new putative integrative and conjugative element (ICE) called pSAM3. PMID:27257195

  12. Reasons for Non-Completion and Dissatisfaction among Apprentices and Trainees: A Regional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Alison; Snell, Darryn

    2008-01-01

    Skills shortages have reinvigorated ongoing debate and concern about high attrition rates among Australian apprentices and trainees. Low apprentice and trainee wages have often been cited to explain this ongoing problem. This paper discusses the factors contributing to non-completion among apprentices and trainees in regional Victoria, and how the…

  13. Timely Doctoral Completion Rates in Five Fields: A Two-Part Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Angela Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Roughly half of all doctoral students who begin a program do not continue through graduation, and many of them face significant financial losses and emotional burdens as a result. Although this completion rate has stayed fairly constant for the past few decades, it has recently gained attention on a national level. In 2011, the National Research…

  14. A Long-Term Follow-Up Study of 1994-95 Career Program Completers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This report presents the 1999 major findings about long-term career program completers who left Kansas' Johnson County Community College in 1994-95. The report summarizes data on utilization of community college preparation, experiences with their full-time related job, hourly wage and satisfaction with their full-time related job, community…

  15. Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS): A Quantitative Study of Latino Students' Goal Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraza, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    A problem exists with consistency in measuring and tracking students' academic goals in California Community Colleges [CCC]. Effective measurements in CCC that embody academic goals below the associate degree and four-year college articulation agreements, call for attention to determine student academic interests and completion rates.…

  16. Carpal kinematics of lunotriquetral dissociations.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Rowen, B; Tokunaga, D; Ryu, J; Kato, H; Kihira, M

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the carpal kinematics after serial arthroscopic sectioning of the ligaments at the lunotriquetral joint, without damaging the capsule and other soft tissues of the wrist. Six cadaver wrists were studied and a custom designed three-dimensional mechanical digitizer was utilized. Three sets of digitization were performed for a normal state, after arthroscopic sectioning of lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (stage A), and after further sectioning of volar radiolunotriquetral ligament (stage B). Motion of the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, capitate and hamate was studied. The results indicated that the motion of the triquetrum was significantly increased at stage A, particularly after 15 degrees of ulnar deviation. An increased motion at the lunotriquetral joint was observed at stage B, which was mainly due to the significantly decreased lunate extension motion and the increased triquetrum extension motion during wrist extension. This study suggested that the lunotriquetral interosseous ligament plays the most important role for the stabilization of the lunotriquetral joint during wrist ulnar deviation, while the volar radiolunotriquetral ligament may function as a stabilizer for the lunotriquetral joint during wrist extension. PMID:2065165

  17. A complete radio study of SNR G15.4+0.1 from new GMRT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supan, L.; Castelletti, G.; Joshi, B. C.; Surnis, M. P.; Supanitsky, D.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: The supernova remnant (SNR) G15.4+0.1 is considered to be the possible counterpart of the γ-ray source HESS J1818-154. With the goal of getting a complete view of this remnant and understanding the nature of the γ-ray flux, we conducted a detailed radio study that includes the search for pulsations and a model of the broadband emission for the SNR G15.4+0.1/HESS J1818-154 system. Methods: Low-frequency imaging at 624 MHz and pulsar observations at 624 and 1404 MHz towards G15.4+0.1 were carried out with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We correlated the new radio data with observations of the source at X-ray and infrared wavelengths from XMM-Newton and Herschel observatories, respectively. To characterize the neutral hydrogen (HI) medium towards G15.4+0.1, we used data from the Southern Galactic Plane Survey. We modelled the spectral energy distribution (SED) using both hadronic and leptonic scenarios. Results: From the combination of the new GMRT observations with existing data, we derived a continuum spectral index α = -0.62 ± 0.03 for the whole remnant. The local synchrotron spectra of G15.4+0.1, calculated from the combination of the GMRT data with 330 MHz observations from the Very Large Array, tends to be flatter in the central part of the remnant, accompanying the region where the blast wave is impinging molecular gas. No spectral index trace was found indicating the radio counterpart to the pulsar wind nebula proposed from X-ray observations. In addition, the search for radio pulsations yielded negative results. Emission at far-infrared wavelengths is observed in the region where the SNR shock is interacting with dense molecular clumps. We also identified HI features forming a shell that wraps most of the outer border of G15.4+0.1. Characteristic parameters were estimated for the shocked HI gas. We found that either a purely hadronic or leptonic model is compatible with the broadband emission known so far.

  18. Kinematics of Earth Impacting Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaninno, R. C.; Vourlidas, A.

    2012-12-01

    With the data from the STEREO mission, we are able to continuously monitor Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) as they progress from the Sun to Earth. However, even with continuous monitoring with remote sensing observations, we are still unable to accurately predict the arrival or terrestrial impact of a CME. In this study, we analyze nine CMEs from the Sun to Earth as observed in both the remote sensing and in situ data sets. In this study, we track nine CMEs from the Sun to 70% - 98% of the distance to Earth with the remote sensing data. We use the Graduate Cyclical Shell (GCS) model to estimate the position of each CME as it is observed in the inner heliosphere. From the derived kinematics, we compare the predicted arrival times and impact velocities with the in situ data. We consider different method for fitting the kinematics and the modeled geometry of the CME to improve the predicted arrival time.

  19. A feasibility study on laser rapid forming of a complete titanium denture base plate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Gao, Bo; Tan, Hua; Chen, Jing; Tang, Chak-Yin; Tsui, Chi-Pong

    2010-05-01

    This work attempted to integrate the technologies of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) and laser rapid forming (LRF) for the fabrication of the titanium plate of a complete denture. By the combination of laser scan and reverse engineering software, the standard triangulation language (STL)-formatted denture base plate was finally designed and sliced into a sequence of numerical controlled codes. The titanium (Ti) complete denture plate was finally built, layer-by-layer, on the LRF system. To evaluate the quality of fit, a virtual adaptation test that measured and compared the profiles of the laser free formed denture plate and those of the edentulous plaster cast had been conducted, and the mean deviation was found to be 0.34 mm. After traditional dental finishing techniques, a complete denture with a Ti base plate was then made and judged to be acceptable. The CAD/CAM/LRF system is a potential candidate and a new platform for the design and manufacture of custom-made Ti denture plates and restorations. PMID:18716825

  20. Constraining Basin Geometry and Fault Kinematics on the Santo Tomas Segment of the Agua Blanca Fault Through a Combined Geophysical and Structural Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, A.; Wetmore, P.; Fletcher, J.; Connor, C. B.; Callihan, S.; Beeson, J.; Wilson, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Santo Tomas basin, located in northern Baja California, formed at a right step in the dextral Agua Blanca fault (ABF). The ABF extends for more than 120km east from Punta Banda, with an east-west strike, and represents the southernmost fault in the San Andreas system of faulting. The basin is located roughly 40km south of Ensenada where the Agua Blanca fault intersects the Maximos fault. A detailed geophysical analysis defines the basin geometry, and helps to constrain the distribution and offset of mapped and concealed faults. Geophysical and structural data sets are combined to constrain the kinematic evolution of the Santo Tomas basin, including determining the relative amount of dip-slip and strike-slip motion on basin-bounding faults. Gravity data was collected over seven transects across and along the axis of the basin at 500 meter intervals, with 200 meter intervals at locations of known or inferred faults. Magnetic data were taken over the same lines, and are used in conjunction with gravity data to constrain the locations, geometries and displacements of intrabasinal faults. The combined gravity and magnetic data are modeled using Geosoft Oasis montaj software to create 2 3/4D models along profiles across the study area. Modeling of the geophysical data combined with structural mapping indicates that the Santo Tomas basin is bound by two major strike-slip faults, the ABF on the northeastern side and the Maximos fault on south, Based on offset markers, most of the strike-slip motion appears to be concentrated on the ABF on the north side of the basin. The ABF fault is characterized by multiple subparallel fault strands that appear to coalesce into single strands to the northwest and southeast of the basin. The Maximos is characterized by a single strand throughout the basin and it exhibits a minor dip-slip component. Basin sediments thicken slightly against the Maximos fault to as much as 1km. A third fault, cutting across the basin southeast of the

  1. Kalman smoothing improves the estimation of joint kinematics and kinetics in marker-based human gait analysis.

    PubMed

    De Groote, F; De Laet, T; Jonkers, I; De Schutter, J

    2008-12-01

    We developed a Kalman smoothing algorithm to improve estimates of joint kinematics from measured marker trajectories during motion analysis. Kalman smoothing estimates are based on complete marker trajectories. This is an improvement over other techniques, such as the global optimisation method (GOM), Kalman filtering, and local marker estimation (LME), where the estimate at each time instant is only based on part of the marker trajectories. We applied GOM, Kalman filtering, LME, and Kalman smoothing to marker trajectories from both simulated and experimental gait motion, to estimate the joint kinematics of a ten segment biomechanical model, with 21 degrees of freedom. Three simulated marker trajectories were studied: without errors, with instrumental errors, and with soft tissue artefacts (STA). Two modelling errors were studied: increased thigh length and hip centre dislocation. We calculated estimation errors from the known joint kinematics in the simulation study. Compared with other techniques, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint positions, by more than 50% for the simulated marker trajectories without errors and with instrumental errors. Compared with GOM, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint moments by more than 35%. Compared with Kalman filtering and LME, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint accelerations by at least 50%. Our simulation results show that the use of Kalman smoothing substantially improves the estimates of joint kinematics and kinetics compared with previously proposed techniques (GOM, Kalman filtering, and LME) for both simulated, with and without modelling errors, and experimentally measured gait motion.

  2. Patient satisfaction with complete dentures fabricated using two neutral zone techniques: a within-subject cross-over pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Komal; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra; Verma, Mahesh

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have compared complete dentures fabricated using conventional and neutral zone (NZ) techniques. However, studies comparing patient satisfaction with complete dentures fabricated using swallowing and phonetic NZ techniques are lacking in literature. To compare patient satisfaction with the complete dentures fabricated using the two NZ techniques. To compare the bucco-lingual dimensions of the NZ records obtained with these techniques. Ten completely edentulous subjects dissatisfied with their existing mandibular complete dentures participated in the study. Five subjects first received the swallowing neutral zone (SNZ) dentures and five the phonetic neutral zone (PNZ) dentures. Tissue conditioner was used as the recording material in both the techniques. After having worn the prosthesis for a minimum of 2 months, subjects responded to a questionnaire that measured their perceptions of various factors associated with the prosthesis. The prostheses were then changed and the procedures repeated. Student t test and non-parametric Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. Level of statistical significance was set p < 0.05. There was no statistical significant difference in patient satisfaction with the SNZ and PNZ complete dentures for all the variables assessed. Statistical significant difference was observed for majority of the variables when the two NZ dentures were compared with patients' old dentures. The difference in the mean dimensions of the two NZ records was also found to be statistically insignificant except in the maxillary left premolar region. The study indicated that patient satisfaction with the complete dentures fabricated using SNZ technique did not significantly differ from that of the PNZ technique. Data gathered at the final appointment showed that SNZ dentures were preferred by the patients with regards to esthetics, stability, comfort and ability to chew. For ability to speak, mixed preferences were found.

  3. Complete correlation studies of two-proton decays: 6Be and 45Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Grigorenko, L.; Wiser, T. D.; Miernik, K.; Charity, R. J.; Pfutzner, M.; Banu, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dominik, W.; Elson, J. M.; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, R.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Liddick, Sean; Mercurio, K.; Rajabali, Mustafa; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Stolz, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2009-06-01

    The complete three-body correlation pictures are experimentally reconstructed for the two-proton decays of the 6Be and 45Fe ground states. We are able to see qualitative similarities and differences between these decays. They demonstrate very good agreement with the predictions of a theoretical three-body cluster model. Validity of the theoretical methods for treatment of the three-body Coulombic decays of this class is thus established by the broad range of lifetimes and nuclear masses spanned by these cases. Implementations for decay dynamics and nuclear structure of 2p emitters are discussed.

  4. Ionized gas kinematics of galaxies in the CALIFA survey. I. Velocity fields, kinematic parameters of the dominant component, and presence of kinematically distinct gaseous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, B.; Márquez, I.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Masegosa, J.; Husemann, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, J.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; van de Ven, G.; Spekkens, K.; Holmes, L.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; del Olmo, A.; Ziegler, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Bekeraitė, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Bomans, D.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Ionized gas kinematics provide important clues to the dynamical structure of galaxies and hold constraints to the processes driving their evolution. Aims: The motivation of this work is to provide an overall characterization of the kinematic behavior of the ionized gas of the galaxies included in the Calar Alto Legacy Integral field Area (CALIFA), offering kinematic clues to potential users of the CALIFA survey for including kinematical criteria in their selection of targets for specific studies. From the first 200 galaxies observed by CALIFA survey in its two configurations, we present the two-dimensional kinematic view of the 177 galaxies satisfaying a gas content/detection threshold. Methods: After removing the stellar contribution, we used the cross-correlation technique to obtain the radial velocity of the dominant gaseous component for each spectrum in the CALIFA data cubes for different emission lines (namely, [O ii] λλ3726,3729, [O iii] λλ4959,5007, Hα+[N ii] λλ6548,6584, and [SII]λλ6716,6730). The main kinematic parameters measured on the plane of the sky were directly derived from the radial velocities with no assumptions on the internal prevailing motions. Evidence of the presence of several gaseous components with different kinematics were detected by using [O iii] λλ4959,5007 emission line profiles. Results: At the velocity resolution of CALIFA, most objects in the sample show regular velocity fields, although the ionized-gas kinematics are rarely consistent with simple coplanar circular motions. Thirty-five percent of the objects present evidence of a displacement between the photometric and kinematic centers larger than the original spaxel radii. Only 17% of the objects in the sample exhibit kinematic lopsidedness when comparing receding and approaching sides of the velocity fields, but most of them are interacting galaxies exhibiting nuclear activity (AGN or LINER). Early-type (E+S0) galaxies in the sample present clear

  5. Review: Assessment of completeness of reporting in intervention studies using livestock: an example from pain mitigation interventions in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate and complete reporting of study methods, results, and interpretation are essential components of the scientific process, allowing end-users to evaluate the internal and external validity of a study. Several reporting guidelines are now publicly available for animal researchers including the...

  6. Factors That Contribute to the Completion of Programs of Study at Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education for African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Barrett Wade McCoy

    2015-01-01

    The study examined factors that predicted the completion of programs of study at Arkansas institutions of higher education for African American males. Astin's (1993a) Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) Model was used as the theoretical foundation. Descriptive analyses and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were performed on the data. The…

  7. Are Dropout and Degree Completion in Doctoral Study Significantly Dependent on Type of Financial Support and Field of Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Haert, Margaux; Arias Ortiz, Elena; Emplit, Philippe; Halloin, Véronique; Dehon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the determinants of "time to dropout" from doctoral studies and "time to PhD completion" are studied using a discrete-time competing risks survival analysis for a sample of 3092 doctoral candidates from the Université libre de Bruxelles. Not surprisingly, results show that students supported with research…

  8. Inverse kinematics problem in robotics using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Lawrence, Charles

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, Multilayer Feedforward Networks are applied to the robot inverse kinematic problem. The networks are trained with endeffector position and joint angles. After training, performance is measured by having the network generate joint angles for arbitrary endeffector trajectories. A 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) spatial manipulator is used for the study. It is found that neural networks provide a simple and effective way to both model the manipulator inverse kinematics and circumvent the problems associated with algorithmic solution methods.

  9. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-01-01

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly. PMID:26839605

  10. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-12-22

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly.

  11. New Kinematical Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steve W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger; /-KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-05-25

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t)=j, we measure q{sub 0}=-0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j=2.16 +0.81 -0.75, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible.

  12. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-12-22

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly. PMID:26839605

  13. Stereoscopic study of the kinematic evolution of a coronal mass ejection and its driven shock from the sun to the earth and the prediction of their arrival times

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the complete evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We have tracked the evolution of both the ejecta and its shock, and further fit the evolution of the fronts to a simple but physics-based analytical model. This study focuses on the CME initiated on the Sun on 2012 July 12 and arriving at the Earth on 2012 July 14. Shock and ejecta fronts were observed by white light images, as well as in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite. We find that the propagation of the two fronts is not completely dependent upon one another, but can each be modeled in the heliosphere with a drag model that assumes the dominant force of affecting CME evolution to be the aerodynamic drag force of the ambient solar wind. Results indicate that the CME ejecta front undergoes a more rapid deceleration than the shock front within 50 R {sub ☉} and therefore the propagation of the two fronts is not completely coupled in the heliosphere. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, as well as data from time-elongation stack plots and in situ signatures, we show that the drag model can accurately describe the behavior of each front, but is more effective with the ejecta. We also show that without the in situ data, based on measurements out to 80 R {sub ☉} combined with the general values for drag model parameters, the arrival of both the shock and ejecta can be predicted within four hours of arrival.

  14. Stereoscopic Study of the Kinematic Evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection and Its Driven Shock from the Sun to the Earth and the Prediction of Their Arrival Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the complete evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We have tracked the evolution of both the ejecta and its shock, and further fit the evolution of the fronts to a simple but physics-based analytical model. This study focuses on the CME initiated on the Sun on 2012 July 12 and arriving at the Earth on 2012 July 14. Shock and ejecta fronts were observed by white light images, as well as in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite. We find that the propagation of the two fronts is not completely dependent upon one another, but can each be modeled in the heliosphere with a drag model that assumes the dominant force of affecting CME evolution to be the aerodynamic drag force of the ambient solar wind. Results indicate that the CME ejecta front undergoes a more rapid deceleration than the shock front within 50 R ☉ and therefore the propagation of the two fronts is not completely coupled in the heliosphere. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, as well as data from time-elongation stack plots and in situ signatures, we show that the drag model can accurately describe the behavior of each front, but is more effective with the ejecta. We also show that without the in situ data, based on measurements out to 80 R ☉ combined with the general values for drag model parameters, the arrival of both the shock and ejecta can be predicted within four hours of arrival.

  15. Stereoscopic Study of the Kinematic Evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection and Its Driven Shock from the Sun to the Earth and the Prediction of Their Arrival Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the complete evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We have tracked the evolution of both the ejecta and its shock, and further fit the evolution of the fronts to a simple but physics-based analytical model. This study focuses on the CME initiated on the Sun on 2012 July 12 and arriving at the Earth on 2012 July 14. Shock and ejecta fronts were observed by white light images, as well as in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite. We find that the propagation of the two fronts is not completely dependent upon one another, but can each be modeled in the heliosphere with a drag model that assumes the dominant force of affecting CME evolution to be the aerodynamic drag force of the ambient solar wind. Results indicate that the CME ejecta front undergoes a more rapid deceleration than the shock front within 50 R ⊙ and therefore the propagation of the two fronts is not completely coupled in the heliosphere. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, as well as data from time-elongation stack plots and in situ signatures, we show that the drag model can accurately describe the behavior of each front, but is more effective with the ejecta. We also show that without the in situ data, based on measurements out to 80 R ⊙ combined with the general values for drag model parameters, the arrival of both the shock and ejecta can be predicted within four hours of arrival.

  16. Effectiveness of denture cleanser associated with microwave disinfection and brushing of complete dentures: in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Newton; Rocha, Alessandra Lima; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Costa, Bruno; Morimoto, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Complete dentures acts as a reservoir for microbial colonization, which may lead to systemic infections. Microwave irradiation has been used as an efficient method of denture disinfection. Even though current methods eliminate denture-base microorganisms, a recurrence rate of denture stomatitis (DS) is still observed among denture-wearing patients. It was hypothesized that microwave disinfection kills microorganisms but do not remove dead bacteria from the denture surface. To test this hypothesis, the biofilm found in the dentures of 10 patients with DS was evaluated. In addition, the effects of microwave irradiation plus brushing (MW+B) on the denture biofilm and the combination of denture cleanser with microwave irradiation and brushing (MW+DC+B) for the removal of denture-accumulating microorganisms were investigated. Microbiological data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric analysis (Friedman/Wilcoxon, α=0.05). MW+B and MW+DC+B were effective in reducing the rate of microorganisms (99.2% and 99.5% respectively), but without significant difference between them (p=0.553). However, it was observed that the complete removal of microorganisms from denture surface was only possible when all regimens were combined (MW+DC+B). Microwave irradiation in combination with soaking in denture cleanser and brushing effectively disinfected the dentures and removed denture biofilm.

  17. Relationship between Student Progress in College and Successful Completion of English and LERN Classes. Focus Study. AB 1725 Accountability Model Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronvig, Jill; And Others

    In 1990, a study was conducted at Mt. San Antonio College to examine the relationship between students' successful completion of English and Learning Resources Network (LERN) courses and the completion of other college courses during the same semester. The study population included all students who were enrolled in either English 1A, 68, 67, or…

  18. Enhancement of Kinematic Accelerations by Wavenumber Correlation Filtering.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2016-01-01

    To obtain kinematic accelerations with high accuracy and reliability, multiple Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers with a single antenna can be used for airborne gravimetry. The data collected from each receiver can be processed for kinematic accelerations that may be combined using simple averaging. Here, however, uncorrelated errors from instrument errors in each receiver also will be included that degrade the final solutions. Therefore, in this study, the wavenumber correlation filter (WCF) is applied to extract only the higher positively correlated wavenumber components of the kinematic accelerations for the enhancement of the final solution. The in situ airborne GPS data from two receivers were wavenumber-correlation-filtered to show about 0.07835 Gal improvement in accuracy relative to the solution from the raw kinematic accelerations. PMID:27608026

  19. Enhancement of Kinematic Accelerations by Wavenumber Correlation Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2016-01-01

    To obtain kinematic accelerations with high accuracy and reliability, multiple Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers with a single antenna can be used for airborne gravimetry. The data collected from each receiver can be processed for kinematic accelerations that may be combined using simple averaging. Here, however, uncorrelated errors from instrument errors in each receiver also will be included that degrade the final solutions. Therefore, in this study, the wavenumber correlation filter (WCF) is applied to extract only the higher positively correlated wavenumber components of the kinematic accelerations for the enhancement of the final solution. The in situ airborne GPS data from two receivers were wavenumber-correlation-filtered to show about 0.07835 Gal improvement in accuracy relative to the solution from the raw kinematic accelerations. PMID:27608026

  20. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Lianne; Groen, Brenda E; Speyer, Renée; van Limbeek, Jacques; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the masticatory muscles were obtained over two sessions with four conditions: two food textures (biscuit and bread) of two sizes (small and large). Twelve healthy adults (mean age 29.1 years) completed the study. The second to the fifth chewing cycle of 5 bites were used for analyses. The reproducibility per outcome variable was calculated with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman analysis was applied to determine the standard error of measurement relative error of measurement and smallest detectable differences of all variables. ICCs ranged from 0.71 to 0.98 for all outcome variables. The outcome variables consisted of four bite and fourteen chewing cycle variables. The relative standard error of measurement of the bite variables was up to 17.3% for 'time-to-swallow', 'time-to-transport' and 'number of chewing cycles', but ranged from 31.5% to 57.0% for 'change of chewing side'. The relative standard error of measurement ranged from 4.1% to 24.7% for chewing cycle variables and was smaller for kinematic variables than sEMG variables. In general, measurements obtained with 3D kinematics and sEMG are reproducible techniques to assess the mastication process. The duration of the chewing cycle and frequency of chewing were the best reproducible measurements. Change of chewing side could not be reproduced. The published measurement error and smallest detectable differences will aid the interpretation of the results of future clinical studies using the same study variables. PMID:26617403

  1. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Lianne; Groen, Brenda E; Speyer, Renée; van Limbeek, Jacques; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the masticatory muscles were obtained over two sessions with four conditions: two food textures (biscuit and bread) of two sizes (small and large). Twelve healthy adults (mean age 29.1 years) completed the study. The second to the fifth chewing cycle of 5 bites were used for analyses. The reproducibility per outcome variable was calculated with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman analysis was applied to determine the standard error of measurement relative error of measurement and smallest detectable differences of all variables. ICCs ranged from 0.71 to 0.98 for all outcome variables. The outcome variables consisted of four bite and fourteen chewing cycle variables. The relative standard error of measurement of the bite variables was up to 17.3% for 'time-to-swallow', 'time-to-transport' and 'number of chewing cycles', but ranged from 31.5% to 57.0% for 'change of chewing side'. The relative standard error of measurement ranged from 4.1% to 24.7% for chewing cycle variables and was smaller for kinematic variables than sEMG variables. In general, measurements obtained with 3D kinematics and sEMG are reproducible techniques to assess the mastication process. The duration of the chewing cycle and frequency of chewing were the best reproducible measurements. Change of chewing side could not be reproduced. The published measurement error and smallest detectable differences will aid the interpretation of the results of future clinical studies using the same study variables.

  2. Functional kinematics of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Rainbow, M J; Wolff, A L; Crisco, J J; Wolfe, S W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review past and present concepts concerning functional kinematics of the healthy and injured wrist. To provide a context for students of the wrist, we describe the progression of techniques for measuring carpal kinematics over the past century and discuss how this has influenced today's understanding of functional kinematics. Next, we provide an overview of recent developments and highlight the clinical relevance of these findings. We use these findings and recent evidence that supports the importance of coupled motion in early rehabilitation of radiocarpal injuries to develop the argument that coupled motion during functional activities is a clinically relevant outcome; therefore, clinicians should develop a framework for its dynamic assessment. This should enable a tailored and individualized approach to the treatment of carpal injuries.

  3. Large-Scale Population Study of Human Cell Lines Indicates that Dosage Compensation Is Virtually Complete

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Colette M; Lovell, Frances L; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Stranger, Barbara E; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Ross, Mark T

    2008-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation in female mammals results in dosage compensation of X-linked gene products between the sexes. In humans there is evidence that a substantial proportion of genes escape from silencing. We have carried out a large-scale analysis of gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from four human populations to determine the extent to which escape from X chromosome inactivation disrupts dosage compensation. We conclude that dosage compensation is virtually complete. Overall expression from the X chromosome is only slightly higher in females and can largely be accounted for by elevated female expression of approximately 5% of X-linked genes. We suggest that the potential contribution of escape from X chromosome inactivation to phenotypic differences between the sexes is more limited than previously believed. PMID:18208332

  4. The complete VS ribozyme in solution studied by small-angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, Jan; Ouellet, Jonathan; Norman, David G.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lilley, David M.J.

    2008-10-06

    We have used small-angle X-ray solution scattering to obtain ab initio shape reconstructions of the complete VS ribozyme. The ribozyme occupies an electron density envelope with an irregular shape, into which helical sections have been fitted. The ribozyme is built around a core comprising a near-coaxial stack of three helices, organized by two three-way helical junctions. An additional three-way junction formed by an auxiliary helix directs the substrate stem-loop, juxtaposing the cleavage site with an internal loop to create the active complex. This is consistent with the current view of the probable mechanism of trans-esterification in which adenine and guanine nucleobases contributed by the interacting loops combine in general acid-base catalysis.

  5. The complete VS ribozyme in solution studied by small-angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Ouellet, Jonathan; Norman, David G.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lilley, David M.J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We have used small-angle X-ray solution scattering to obtain ab initio shape reconstructions of the complete VS ribozyme. The ribozyme occupies an electron density envelope with an irregular shape, into which helical sections have been fitted. The ribozyme is built around a core comprising a near-coaxial stack of three helices, organized by two three-way helical junctions. An additional three-way junction formed by an auxiliary helix directs the substrate stem-loop, juxtaposing the cleavage site with an internal loop to create the active complex. This is consistent with the current view of the probable mechanism of transesterification in which adenine and guanine nucleobases contributed by the interacting loops combine together in general acid-base catalysis. PMID:18786398

  6. Design, implementation, and completion of a horizontal tight gas wellbore - case study: Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, R.L.; Evans, L.W.; Anderson, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    In September, 1993 Amoco Production Company began drilling the Champlin 254B No. 2H, a horizontal well test located near the Wamsutter Arch, southwestem Wyoming. The Champlin 254B No. 2H was designed to confirm a fractured reservoir concept and to test the economic viability of a horizontal wellbore in the Almond fm.. The wellbore was designed to determine real-time, the fracture direction and the optimum horizontal leg direction within the confines of the drilling permit. A deviated pilot hole was drilled to optimize our ability to cross vertical natural fractures. MWD gamma-ray, oriented core, a vertical seismic profile, Formation Microimager, and a robust suite of electric logs were obtained to gain information on the presence and orientation of fractures before kickoff for the horizontal leg. Electromagnetic goniometry was used onsite to orient fractures in core. Log and core data were consistent and a wellbore trajectory of due South was chosen. A two thousand foot horizontal wellbore was drilled, 1700 feet of which is in the upper Almond formation productive zone. MWD gamma-ray, three 30` cores, Formation Microscanner logs, and a density-neutron log were obtained in the horizontal hole. This wellbore was completed open-hole with a stabilized gas rate of 1 mmcfd. In May, 1994 a portion of the original wellbore collapsed and a replacement horizontal leg was drilled. Oil-based mud and rotary BOP`s were utilized to minimize damage and invasion to the reservoir. Reservoir pressures encountered in the redrill indicate that depletion along the original wellbore had begun. The redrill was completed open-hole with a pre-perforated (every third joint) 5 1/2 inches liner and also stabilized at a rate of 1 mmcfd.

  7. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Häussler, Andreas; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10 Dutch subjects) or in Berlin (9 German subjects). Both groups wrote every 3h a test sentence of similar structure in their native language. Kinematic handwriting performance was assessed with a digitizing tablet and evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency, and script size. Writing speed (frequency of strokes and average velocity) revealed a clear circadian rhythm, with a parallel decline during night and a minimum around 3:00 h in the morning for both groups. Script size and movement fluency did not vary with time of day in neither group. Legibility of handwriting was evaluated by intra-individually ranking handwriting specimens of the 13 sessions by 10 German and 10 Dutch raters. Whereas legibility ratings of the German handwriting specimens deteriorated during night in parallel with slower writing speed, legibility of the Dutch handwriting deteriorated not until the next morning. In conclusion, the circadian rhythm of handwriting kinematics seems to be independent of script language at least among the two tested western countries. Moreover, handwriting legibility is also subject to a circadian rhythm which, however, seems to be influenced by variations in the assessment protocol.

  8. Kinematics of KPG 390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.

    2010-06-01

    In this work we present scanning Fabry-Perot Hα observations of the isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5278/9 obtained with the PUMA Fabry-Perot interferometer. We derived velocity fields, various kinematic parameters and rotation curves for both galaxies. Our kinematical results together with the fact that dust lanes have been detected in both galaxies, as well as the analysis of surface brightness profiles along the minor axis, allowed us to determine that both components of the interacting pair are trailing spirals.

  9. The Kinematics and Dynamics of SA Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jore, Katherine Patricia

    1997-12-01

    A study of the kinematics of the stellar and gaseous components of Sa galaxies was undertaken in order to understand the origins of the heterogeneity of the Sa galaxies as a class and to investigate previous observations suggesting that the fraction of the mass of Sa galaxies in the form of dark matter is smaller than that found in later type spirals. A sample of 23 nearby non-interacting morphologically normal galaxies was studied. The small-bulged Sa, NGC 4138, was found to contain two extended counter-rotating stellar disks. The primary stellar disk contains ~80% of the stars; the presence of Hα absorption suggests that star formation in this component ceased ~108 years ago. The remaining stars, along with the H I and emission line gas, are rotating counter to the primary disk with comparable observed velocity. The counter-rotating disk may either be the result of a merger of a spiral with a gas-rich dwarf, or the continual infall of material of opposite spin vector onto the galaxy. For the entire sample, comparison of the stellar and optical rotation curves reveals that only 4 of the 23 galaxies in the sample are free of kinematic peculiarities. Eighteen galaxies in the sample have non-circular motions along the minor axis. Along the major axis, 11 galaxies have kinematic peculiarities including extended counter-rotating stars and∨ gas, counter-rotating stellar or gas cores, or multiple stellar or gas components. The presence of kinematically decoupled components suggests that minor mergers may have been common events even among morphologically normal Sa's. Dynamical masses were obtained from the velocity fields mapped by optical and H I observations by adopting the maximum disk hypothesis. As in previous studies, the kinematics of most Sa galaxies can be modeled within the optical disk without invoking a significant dark matter halo component. However, in order to model the velocity fields as traced by the H I sizable dark matter halo components are

  10. Crafting Appealing Text Messages to Encourage Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Completion: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D; Denizard-Thompson, Nancy; Kronner, Donna; Miller, David P

    2015-01-01

    Background mHealth interventions that incorporate text messages have great potential to increase receipt of preventive health services such as colorectal cancer screening. However, little is known about older adult perspectives regarding the receipt of text messages from their health care providers. Objective To assess whether older adults would value and access text messages from their physician’s practice regarding colorectal cancer screening. Methods We conducted four focus groups with 26 adults, aged 50 to 75 years, who had either recently completed or were overdue for colorectal cancer screening. A trained moderator followed a semistructured interview guide covering participant knowledge and attitudes regarding colorectal cancer screening, potential barriers to colorectal cancer screening, attitudes about receiving electronic communications from a doctor’s office, and reactions to sample text messages. Results Participant responses to three primary research questions were examined: (1) facilitators and barriers to colorectal cancer screening, (2) attitudes toward receiving text messages from providers, and (3) characteristics of appealing text messages. Two themes related to facilitators of colorectal cancer screening were perceived benefits/need and family experiences and encouragement. Themes related to barriers included unpleasantness, discomfort, knowledge gaps, fear of complications, and system factors. Four themes emerged regarding receipt of text messages from health care providers: (1) comfort and familiarity with technology, (2) privacy concerns/potential for errors, (3) impact on patient-provider relationship, and (4) perceived helpfulness. Many participants expressed initial reluctance to receiving text messages but responded favorably when shown sample messages. Participants preferred messages that contained content that was important to them and were positive and reassuring, personalized, and friendly to novice texters (eg, avoided the use of

  11. Examination Phase of the Master's Thesis: A Plausible Cause of Delayed Completion of Graduate Studies at Makerere University, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oonyu, Joseph C.; Wamala, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the examination stage of student theses on the completion time of graduate studies at Makerere University, Uganda. The assessment is based on the administrative data of 504 Master's degree students in the 2000 to 2008 enrollment cohorts at the School of Education, Makerere University. The total elapsed time…

  12. Demographic and Predeparture Factors Associated with Drinking and Alcohol-Related Consequences for College Students Completing Study Abroad Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Skidmore, Jessica R.; Aresi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Study abroad students are at risk for increased and problematic drinking behavior. As few efforts have been made to examine this at-risk population, the authors predicted drinking and alcohol-related consequences abroad from predeparture and site-specific factors. Participants: The sample consisted of 339 students completing study…

  13. Characteristics of suicide completers with a psychiatric diagnosis before death: a postmortem study of 98 cases.

    PubMed

    Bakst, Shelly; Braun, Tali; Hirshberg, Rachel; Zucker, Inbar; Shohat, Tamar

    2014-12-15

    The objective of this research was to classify the deaths of 98 victims of suicide in Tel Aviv, Israel between the years 2007 and 2010. This was done by examining background features and clinical characteristics among suicide completers with histories of a prior psychiatric hospitalization using logistic regression modeling. 34% of the sample (33/98) was given at least one psychiatric diagnosis upon discharge from a prior psychiatric hospitalization. Throughout their lifetime, those with psychiatric diagnoses were significantly more likely to have histories of mental health treatment (psychotherapy and psychotropic medication), psychopathology and suicidality among family members, prior suicide attempts and familial or emotional crisis as compared with those without a psychiatric diagnosis. During their last life phase, those with prior psychiatric diagnoses were also significantly more likely to have received psychotherapeutic treatment, expressed a lack of desire to live and presented with affective symptoms (e.g. depression, anxiety, adaptation difficulty and nervousness) as compared with those without such histories. Thus, focusing on high risk populations, such as those with psychiatric illnesses and deciphering the role of mental health treatment, familial predisposition, prior suicide attempt and sub-clinical symptoms in relation to suicide can inform future prevention practices.

  14. Kinematic analysis of platform-type robotic manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolun

    New methods are developed for the kinematic analysis of serial and platform-type parallel robotic manipulators, including forward and inverse kinematic solutions, singularity identifications and workspace evaluation. Differences between serial and platform-type parallel manipulators, which can provide substantially improved end-point rigidity compared with the conventional serial robotic arms, are addressed. The problem of determining the screw parameters of rigid body motion from initial and final position data is discussed, as a basis to search for a general and efficient procedure to solve the complex forward kinematics problem of platform-type manipulators. Several Screw-Theory based approaches for solving the inverse instantaneous problem of 6 DOF serial manipulators are studied and compared in terms of their computational efficiency, accuracy, sensitivity to data error and capability of dealing with singularities. A modified Vector Decomposition method is then proposed for solving the IIK problem and for singularity analysis of serial kinematic chains, the method is especially effective when applied to the wrist partitioned serial manipulators, which are essential components to any platform-type parallel manipulators. By using the data of three point positions, velocities, and accelerations of the end effector a general method is developed for solving the forward kinematics problem, including position, velocity and acceleration kinematics, of platform-type manipulators. The solution procedure can be applied to a wide variety of platform-type manipulators such as the 6 DOF Steward Platform manipulator and other models. It is found that while the solution for the forward position kinematics of a platform-type manipulator can be obtained by solving a non-linear system of equations, the closed-form solutions for forward rate and acceleration kinematics can be found by solving a system of linear equations. Based on the proposed kinematic formulations, an algorithm

  15. Friction Stir Welding at MSFC: Kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 The Welding Institute of the United Kingdom patented the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process. In FSW a rotating pin-tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the faying surfaces together as it moves up the seam. By April 2000 the American Welding Society International Welding and Fabricating Exposition featured several exhibits of commercial FSW processes and the 81st Annual Convention devoted a technical session to the process. The FSW process is of interest to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as a means of avoiding hot-cracking problems presented by the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy, which is the primary constituent of the Lightweight Space Shuttle External Tank. The process has been under development at MSFC for External Tank applications since the early 1990's. Early development of the FSW process proceeded by cut-and-try empirical methods. A substantial and complex body of data resulted. A theoretical model was wanted to deal with the complexity and reduce the data to concepts serviceable for process diagnostics, optimization, parameter selection, etc. A first step in understanding the FSW process is to determine the kinematics, i.e., the flow field in the metal in the vicinity of the pin-tool. Given the kinematics, the dynamics, i.e., the forces, can be targeted. Given a completed model of the FSW process, attempts at rational design of tools and selection of process parameters can be made.

  16. University Study in Australia: Persistence, Completion and beyond. LSAY Briefing Number 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This Briefing charts the progress of young people through university: (1) What difficulties do they encounter in the transition from school to university study?; (2) How many persist in their studies and graduate?; and (3) What are the benefits of university study? It also examines the issue of demand for university places: How many young people…

  17. Dark Matter Profiles in Late-type Dwarf Galaxies from Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Joshua J.; Fabricius, M. H.; Simon, J. D.; Gebhardt, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present new stellar and gaseous velocity fields for thirteen late-type dwarf galaxies, primarily to study the density distributions of their baryons and dark matter. A subset of our targets reach high enough signal-to-noise that the central dark matter density profile slope can be reliably estimated from the stellar kinematics alone. Most previous observations have been based on kinematics from atomic or ionized gas and have derived best-fit profiles much shallower than those predicted by pure N-body simulations in ΛCDM. In contrast to those results, we find from the stellar kinematics that galaxies contain a wide variety of density profiles ranging from completely cored halos up to cuspy r^-1 profiles comparable to the predicted NFW form. We present our measurements, demonstrate cases where the gas gives a biased inference on the dark matter properties, and fit Jeans models to the data with baryonic and dark components. For the cases that deviate from an NFW profile, we search our data for unusual orbital structure (anisotropies) and chemical abundance gradients in order to constrain the proposed mechanisms that may alter the initial configuration of the dark matter halo.

  18. Kinematic Chains in Ski Jumping In-run Posture

    PubMed Central

    Janurová, Eva; Janura, Miroslav; Cabell, Lee; Svoboda, Zdeněk; Vařeka, Ivan; Elfmark, Milan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of kinematic chains has been systematically applied to biological systems since the 1950s. The course of a ski jump can be characterized as a change between closed and open kinematic chains. The purpose of this study was to determine a relationship between adjacent segments within the ski jumper’s body’s kinematic chain during the in-run phase of the ski jump. The in-run positions of 267 elite male ski jumpers who participated in the FIS World Cup events in Innsbruck, Austria, between 1992 and 2001 were analyzed (656 jumps). Two-dimensional (2-D) kinematic data were collected from the bodies of the subjects. Relationships between adjacent segments of the kinematic chain in the ski jumper’s body at the in-run position are greater nearer the chain’s ground contact. The coefficient of determination between the ankle and knee joint angles is 0.67. Changes in the segments’ positions in the kinematic chain of the ski jumper’s body are stable during longitudinal assessment. Changes in shank and thigh positions, in the sense of increase or decrease, are the same. PMID:24511342

  19. Kinematic Chains in Ski Jumping In-run Posture.

    PubMed

    Janurová, Eva; Janura, Miroslav; Cabell, Lee; Svoboda, Zdeněk; Vařeka, Ivan; Elfmark, Milan

    2013-12-18

    The concept of kinematic chains has been systematically applied to biological systems since the 1950s. The course of a ski jump can be characterized as a change between closed and open kinematic chains. The purpose of this study was to determine a relationship between adjacent segments within the ski jumper's body's kinematic chain during the in-run phase of the ski jump. The in-run positions of 267 elite male ski jumpers who participated in the FIS World Cup events in Innsbruck, Austria, between 1992 and 2001 were analyzed (656 jumps). Two-dimensional (2-D) kinematic data were collected from the bodies of the subjects. Relationships between adjacent segments of the kinematic chain in the ski jumper's body at the in-run position are greater nearer the chain's ground contact. The coefficient of determination between the ankle and knee joint angles is 0.67. Changes in the segments' positions in the kinematic chain of the ski jumper's body are stable during longitudinal assessment. Changes in shank and thigh positions, in the sense of increase or decrease, are the same.

  20. Obtaining High Retention and Completion Rates in a New Zealand ODL Environment: A Case Study of Strategies Employed by Information and Library Studies Faculty at the Open Polytechnic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maathuis-Smith, Sandra; Wellington, Shannon; Cossham, Amanda; Fields, Alison; Irvine, Jan; Welland, Sarah; Innes, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Open and distance learning (ODL) provides unique challenges for student retention and course completion. In an increasingly competitive educational environment, measures such as retention and completion form the basis for the evaluation of institutional and student performance. Information and Library Studies (ILS) faculty at the Open Polytechnic…

  1. Kinematic Parameters of Signed Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production…

  2. The Impact of "Virtualization" on Independent Study Course Completion Rates: The British Columbia Open University Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Louis

    2009-01-01

    In 1997 the British Columbia Open University (BCOU) adopted a virtualization strategy based primarily on twinning off-line independent study distance education courses (textbook-based with study guide and telephone and e-mail tutor support) with alternate online versions (textbook-based with integrated conferencing and communications provided…

  3. THE PHOTOMETRIC AND KINEMATIC STRUCTURE OF FACE-ON DISK GALAXIES. III. KINEMATIC INCLINATIONS FROM H{alpha} VELOCITY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained H{alpha} velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i{sub kin} = 23 Degree-Sign for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20 Degree-Sign and 6% at 30 Degree-Sign . Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical ''face-on'' Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15 Degree-Sign and 5% at 30 Degree-Sign . This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  4. Kinematics of Haro 11: The miniature Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, G.; Marquart, T.; Cumming, R. J.; Fathi, K.; Bergvall, N.; Adamo, A.; Amram, P.; Hayes, M.

    2015-11-01

    Luminous blue compact galaxies are among the most active galaxies in the local Universe in terms of their star formation rate per unit mass. They are rare at the current cosmic epoch, but were more abundant in the past and may be seen as the local analogues of higher red shift Lyman break galaxies. Studies of their kinematics is key to understanding what triggers their unusually active star formation. In this work, we investigate the kinematics of stars and ionised gas in Haro 11, one of the most luminous blue compact galaxies in the local Universe. Previous works have indicated that many of these galaxies may be triggered by galaxy mergers. We have employed Fabry-Perot interferometry, long-slit spectroscopy, and integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy to explore the kinematics of Haro 11. We target the near-infrared calcium triplet, and use cross-correlation and penalised pixel fitting techniques to derive the stellar velocity field and velocity dispersion. We analyse ionised gas through emission lines from hydrogen, [O iii], and [S iii]. When spectral resolution and signal to noise allows, we investigate the line profile in detail and identify multiple velocity components when present. The spectra reveal a complex velocity field whose components, both stellar and gaseous, we attempt to disentangle. We find that to first order, the velocity field and velocity dispersions derived from stars and ionised gas agree. Hence the complexities reveal real dynamical disturbances providing further evidence for a merger in Haro 11. Through decomposition of emission lines, we find evidence for kinematically distinct components, for instance, a tidal arm. The ionised gas velocity field can be traced to large galactocentric radii, and shows significant velocity dispersion even far out in the halo. If interpreted as virial motions, this indicates that Haro 11 may have a mass of ~1011 M⊙. Haro 11 shows many resemblances with the famous Antennae galaxies both morphologically and

  5. Individual Responses to Completion of Short-Term and Chronic Interval Training: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Schubert, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), heart rate (HR), and fat oxidation occur in response to chronic endurance training. However, many studies report frequent incidence of “non-responders” who do not adapt to continuous moderate exercise. Whether this is the case in response to high intensity interval training (HIT), which elicits similar adaptations as endurance training, is unknown. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine individual responses to two paradigms of interval training. In the first study (study 1), twenty active men and women (age and baseline VO2max = 24.0±4.6 yr and 42.8±4.8 mL/kg/min) performed 6 d of sprint interval training (SIT) consisting of 4–6 Wingate tests per day, while in a separate study (study 2), 20 sedentary women (age and baseline VO2max = 23.7±6.2 yr and 30.0±4.9 mL/kg/min) performed 12 wk of high-volume HIT at workloads ranging from 60–90% maximal workload. Individual changes in VO2max, HR, and fat oxidation were examined in each study, and multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors of training adaptations to SIT and HIT. Data showed high frequency of increased VO2max (95%) and attenuated exercise HR (85%) in response to HIT, and low frequency of response for VO2max (65%) and exercise HR (55%) via SIT. Frequency of improved fat oxidation was similar (60–65%) across regimens. Only one participant across both interventions showed non-response for all variables. Baseline values of VO2max, exercise HR, respiratory exchange ratio, and body fat were significant predictors of adaptations to interval training. Frequency of positive responses to interval training seems to be greater in response to prolonged, higher volume interval training compared to similar durations of endurance training. PMID:24847797

  6. SPACEBAR: Kinematic design by computer graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interactive graphics computer program SPACEBAR, conceived to reduce the time and complexity associated with the development of kinematic mechanisms on the design board, was described. This program allows the direct design and analysis of mechanisms right at the terminal screen. All input variables, including linkage geometry, stiffness, and applied loading conditions, can be fed into or changed at the terminal and may be displayed in three dimensions. All mechanism configurations can be cycled through their range of travel and viewed in their various geometric positions. Output data includes geometric positioning in orthogonal coordinates of each node point in the mechanism, velocity and acceleration of the node points, and internal loads and displacements of the node points and linkages. All analysis calculations take at most a few seconds to complete. Output data can be viewed at the scope and also printed at the discretion of the user.

  7. Kinematic Plasticity during Flight in Fruit Bats: Individual Variability in Response to Loading

    PubMed Central

    Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Riskin, Daniel K.; Breuer, Kenneth S.; Swartz, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    All bats experience daily and seasonal fluctuation in body mass. An increase in mass requires changes in flight kinematics to produce the extra lift necessary to compensate for increased weight. How bats modify their kinematics to increase lift, however, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of a 20% increase in mass on flight kinematics for Cynopterus brachyotis, the lesser dog-faced fruit bat. We reconstructed the 3D wing kinematics and how they changed with the additional mass. Bats showed a marked change in wing kinematics in response to loading, but changes varied among individuals. Each bat adjusted a different combination of kinematic parameters to increase lift, indicating that aerodynamic force generation can be modulated in multiple ways. Two main kinematic strategies were distinguished: bats either changed the motion of the wings by primarily increasing wingbeat frequency, or changed the configuration of the wings by increasing wing area and camber. The complex, individual-dependent response to increased loading in our bats points to an underappreciated aspect of locomotor control, in which the inherent complexity of the biomechanical system allows for kinematic plasticity. The kinematic plasticity and functional redundancy observed in bat flight can have evolutionary consequences, such as an increase potential for morphological and kinematic diversification due to weakened locomotor trade-offs. PMID:22615790

  8. Do dynamic-based MR knee kinematics methods produce the same results as static methods?

    PubMed

    d'Entremont, Agnes G; Nordmeyer-Massner, Jurek A; Bos, Clemens; Wilson, David R; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2013-06-01

    MR-based methods provide low risk, noninvasive assessment of joint kinematics; however, these methods often use static positions or require many identical cycles of movement. The study objective was to compare the 3D kinematic results approximated from a series of sequential static poses of the knee with the 3D kinematic results obtained from continuous dynamic movement of the knee. To accomplish this objective, we compared kinematic data from a validated static MR method to a fast static MR method, and compared kinematic data from both static methods to a newly developed dynamic MR method. Ten normal volunteers were imaged using the three kinematic methods (dynamic, static standard, and static fast). Results showed that the two sets of static results were in agreement, indicating that the sequences (standard and fast) may be used interchangeably. Dynamic kinematic results were significantly different from both static results in eight of 11 kinematic parameters: patellar flexion, patellar tilt, patellar proximal translation, patellar lateral translation, patellar anterior translation, tibial abduction, tibial internal rotation, and tibial anterior translation. Three-dimensional MR kinematics measured from dynamic knee motion are often different from those measured in a static knee at several positions, indicating that dynamic-based kinematics provides information that is not obtainable from static scans.

  9. Kinematic plasticity during flight in fruit bats: individual variability in response to loading.

    PubMed

    Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Riskin, Daniel K; Breuer, Kenneth S; Swartz, Sharon M

    2012-01-01

    All bats experience daily and seasonal fluctuation in body mass. An increase in mass requires changes in flight kinematics to produce the extra lift necessary to compensate for increased weight. How bats modify their kinematics to increase lift, however, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of a 20% increase in mass on flight kinematics for Cynopterus brachyotis, the lesser dog-faced fruit bat. We reconstructed the 3D wing kinematics and how they changed with the additional mass. Bats showed a marked change in wing kinematics in response to loading, but changes varied among individuals. Each bat adjusted a different combination of kinematic parameters to increase lift, indicating that aerodynamic force generation can be modulated in multiple ways. Two main kinematic strategies were distinguished: bats either changed the motion of the wings by primarily increasing wingbeat frequency, or changed the configuration of the wings by increasing wing area and camber. The complex, individual-dependent response to increased loading in our bats points to an underappreciated aspect of locomotor control, in which the inherent complexity of the biomechanical system allows for kinematic plasticity. The kinematic plasticity and functional redundancy observed in bat flight can have evolutionary consequences, such as an increase potential for morphological and kinematic diversification due to weakened locomotor trade-offs. PMID:22615790

  10. A Charge Separation Study to Enable the Design of a Complete Muon Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, C.; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Johnson, Rolland P.; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Neuffer, David; Yonehara, K.

    2013-12-01

    The most promising designs for 6D muon cooling channels operate on a specific sign of electric charge. In particular, the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) and Rectilinear RFOFO designs are the leading candidates to become the baseline 6D cooling channel in the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). Time constraints prevented the design of a realistic charge separator, so a simplified study was performed to emulate the effects of charge separation on muons exiting the front end of a muon collider. The output of the study provides particle distributions that the competing designs will use as input into their cooling channels. We report here on the study of the charge separator that created the simulated particles.

  11. Kinematical evidence for secular evolution in Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Font, Joan; Beckman, John E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of the kinematics of a sample of isolated spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We use Hα Fabry-Perot data from the GHαFaS instrument at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, complemented with images at 3.6 microns, in the R band and in the Hα filter. The resulting data cubes and velocity field maps allow a complete study of the kinematics of a galaxy, including in-depth investigations of the rotation curve, velocity moment maps, velocity residual maps, gradient maps and position-velocity (PV) diagrams. We find clear evidence of the secular evolution processes going on in these galaxies, such as asymmetries in the velocity field in the bar zone, and non-circular motions, probably in response to the potential of the structural components of the galaxies, or to past or present interactions.

  12. Completing PhDs: The Perils and Enduring Promise of Deep Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Jon

    2009-01-01

    What is a PhD? People answer this question too often by succumbing to the bureaucratic lure. They describe formal processes, "outcomes", time to degree, funding, training in teaching--indeed, almost everything except central intellectual attraction and personal focus of the PhD enterprise: deep study. Certainly in United States PhD programs, the…

  13. Career Program Completers, 1993-94: A Long-Term Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This long-term follow-up study, conducted in the summer of 1998 by Johnson County Community College (JCCC, Kansas) focused on graduates, certificate recipients, and students identified by career program administrators as leaving with marketable skills in 1993-94. Since first administering this type of survey in 1989, JCCC has gained a broader…

  14. Delorme's Procedure for Complete Rectal Prolapse: A Study of Recurrence Patterns in the Long Term

    PubMed Central

    Placer, Carlos; Enriquez-Navascués, Jose M.; Timoteo, Ander; Elorza, Garazi; Borda, Nerea; Gallego, Lander; Saralegui, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The objective of this study was to determine the recurrence rate and associated risk factors of full-thickness rectal prolapse in the long term after Delorme's procedure. Patients and Methods. The study involved adult patients with rectal prolapse treated with Delorme's surgery between 2000 and 2012 and followed up prospectively in an outpatient unit. We assessed epidemiological data, Wexner constipation and incontinence score, recurrence patterns, and risk factors. Data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate studies and follow-up was performed according to Kaplan-Meier technique. The primary outcome was recurrence. Results. A total of 42 patients, where 71.4% (n = 30) were women, with a median age of 76 years (IQR 66 to 86), underwent Delorme's surgery. The median follow-up was 85 months (IQR 28 to 132). There was no mortality, and morbidity was 9.5%. Recurrence occurred in five patients (12%) within 14 months after surgery. Actuarial recurrence at five years was 9.9%. According to the univariate analysis, constipation and concomitant pelvic floor repair were the only factors found to be associated with recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed no statistically significant differences among variables studied. Kaplan-Meier estimate revealed that constipation was associated with a higher risk of recurrence (log-rank test, p = 0.006). Conclusions. Delorme's procedure is a safe technique with an actuarial recurrence at five years of 9.9%. The outcomes obtained in this study support the performance of concomitant postanal repair and levatorplasty to reduce recurrences. Also, severe constipation is associated with a higher recurrence rate. PMID:26783557

  15. Review: Assessment of completeness of reporting in intervention studies using livestock: an example from pain mitigation interventions in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A; Anthony, R; Bergamasco, L; Coetzee, J F; Dzikamunhenga, R S; Johnson, A K; Karriker, L A; Marchant-Forde, J N; Martineau, G P; Millman, S T; Pajor, E A; Rutherford, K; Sprague, M; Sutherland, M A; von Borell, E; Webb, S R

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and complete reporting of study methods, results and interpretation are essential components for any scientific process, allowing end-users to evaluate the internal and external validity of a study. When animals are used in research, excellence in reporting is expected as a matter of continued ethical acceptability of animal use in the sciences. Our primary objective was to assess completeness of reporting for a series of studies relevant to mitigation of pain in neonatal piglets undergoing routine management procedures. Our second objective was to illustrate how authors can report the items in the Reporting guidElines For randomized controLled trials for livEstoCk and food safety (REFLECT) statement using examples from the animal welfare science literature. A total of 52 studies from 40 articles were evaluated using a modified REFLECT statement. No single study reported all REFLECT checklist items. Seven studies reported specific objectives with testable hypotheses. Six studies identified primary or secondary outcomes. Randomization and blinding were considered to be partially reported in 21 and 18 studies, respectively. No studies reported the rationale for sample sizes. Several studies failed to report key design features such as units for measurement, means, standard deviations, standard errors for continuous outcomes or comparative characteristics for categorical outcomes expressed as either rates or proportions. In the discipline of animal welfare science, authors, reviewers and editors are encouraged to use available reporting guidelines to ensure that scientific methods and results are adequately described and free of misrepresentations and inaccuracies. Complete and accurate reporting increases the ability to apply the results of studies to the decision-making process and prevent wastage of financial and animal resources.

  16. XMM-Subaru:Complete High Precision Study of Galaxy Clusters for Modern Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2010-10-01

    Our XMM-Subaru study of 12 clusters confirms that Mgas is a low scatter mass proxy, but the slopes of the mass-observable relations deviate from self-similar predictions, dependent on cluster dynamics. We propose to calibrate biases in the mass proxies based on 3 independent probes (Xray/lensing/velocity dispersion) for a volume-limited sample of 52 luminous clusters, and to investigate the origin of the biases by adding a sample of 15 lower-Lx clusters. We will deliver definitive constraints on systematics for upcoming cluster cosmology surveys. The dataset will be a major asset for programs aiming to measure dark energy as well as programs adding a multi-wavelength focus to studies of cluster physics. High-quality X-ray data exist for 47 clusters, we request 650ks for the remaining 20.

  17. Introducing medical educators to qualitative study design: Twelve tips from inception to completion.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Subha; Mann, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Many research questions posed by medical educators could be answered more effectively by the application of carefully selected qualitative research design than traditional quantitative research methods. Indeed, in many cases using mixed methods research would expand the scope of a study and yield meaningful qualitative data in addition to quantitative data. Qualitative research seeks to understand people's experiences, the meanings they assign to those experiences, the psychosocial aspects of and language used in interpersonal interactions, and the factors that influence perspectives and interactions. This understanding is vital in exploring learning and teaching styles, learners' experiences and perceptions, implementing and studying the impact of educational interventions and faculty development. This article aims to advance medical educators' understanding and application of qualitative research principles in educational scholarship by summarising and consolidating the fundamental principles of research in medical education described in recent AMEE guides. The 12 tips below offer a systematic, yet practical approach to designing a qualitative research study, particularly targeting educators new to this arena.

  18. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Regulatory Applications: Examination of Four Case Studies With Different Degrees of Completeness and Scientific Confidence.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Antczak, Philipp; Burgoon, Lyle; Falciani, Francesco; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gutsell, Steve; Hodges, Geoff; Kienzler, Aude; Knapen, Dries; McBride, Mary; Willett, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) offer a pathway-based toxicological framework to support hazard assessment and regulatory decision-making. However, little has been discussed about the scientific confidence needed, or how complete a pathway should be, before use in a specific regulatory application. Here we review four case studies to explore the degree of scientific confidence and extent of completeness (in terms of causal events) that is required for an AOP to be useful for a specific purpose in a regulatory application: (i) Membrane disruption (Narcosis) leading to respiratory failure (low confidence), (ii) Hepatocellular proliferation leading to cancer (partial pathway, moderate confidence), (iii) Covalent binding to proteins leading to skin sensitization (high confidence), and (iv) Aromatase inhibition leading to reproductive dysfunction in fish (high confidence). Partially complete AOPs with unknown molecular initiating events, such as 'Hepatocellular proliferation leading to cancer', were found to be valuable. We demonstrate that scientific confidence in these pathways can be increased though the use of unconventional information (eg, computational identification of potential initiators). AOPs at all levels of confidence can contribute to specific uses. A significant statistical or quantitative relationship between events and/or the adverse outcome relationships is a common characteristic of AOPs, both incomplete and complete, that have specific regulatory uses. For AOPs to be useful in a regulatory context they must be at least as useful as the tools that regulators currently possess, or the techniques currently employed by regulators. PMID:26500288

  19. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Regulatory Applications: Examination of Four Case Studies With Different Degrees of Completeness and Scientific Confidence.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Antczak, Philipp; Burgoon, Lyle; Falciani, Francesco; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gutsell, Steve; Hodges, Geoff; Kienzler, Aude; Knapen, Dries; McBride, Mary; Willett, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) offer a pathway-based toxicological framework to support hazard assessment and regulatory decision-making. However, little has been discussed about the scientific confidence needed, or how complete a pathway should be, before use in a specific regulatory application. Here we review four case studies to explore the degree of scientific confidence and extent of completeness (in terms of causal events) that is required for an AOP to be useful for a specific purpose in a regulatory application: (i) Membrane disruption (Narcosis) leading to respiratory failure (low confidence), (ii) Hepatocellular proliferation leading to cancer (partial pathway, moderate confidence), (iii) Covalent binding to proteins leading to skin sensitization (high confidence), and (iv) Aromatase inhibition leading to reproductive dysfunction in fish (high confidence). Partially complete AOPs with unknown molecular initiating events, such as 'Hepatocellular proliferation leading to cancer', were found to be valuable. We demonstrate that scientific confidence in these pathways can be increased though the use of unconventional information (eg, computational identification of potential initiators). AOPs at all levels of confidence can contribute to specific uses. A significant statistical or quantitative relationship between events and/or the adverse outcome relationships is a common characteristic of AOPs, both incomplete and complete, that have specific regulatory uses. For AOPs to be useful in a regulatory context they must be at least as useful as the tools that regulators currently possess, or the techniques currently employed by regulators.

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Muscle Effect on the Kinematics of the Head-Neck Complex in a Frontal Car Collision: A Parameter Study.

    PubMed

    Wittek; Kajzer

    1998-01-01

    A 2-dimensional multibody model of the head-neck complex with muscle elements was developed to estimate the influence of muscles on the kinematics of the head-neck complex in a frontal car collision. With this model the authors evaluated how strongly the calculated influence of muscles depends on 3 important factors: (a) impact severity, (b) reflex time, and (c) parameters that determine characteristics of different components of the muscle model. When muscles were triggered at the beginning of impact, the maximum angle of the head flexion was decreased by the muscles by 40% in a frontal collision with an acceleration of 15 g. The influence of muscles was significant for reflex times lower than 60 (80) ms. The calculated influence of muscles was not sensitive to most parameters of the muscle model.

  1. Real-time measurement of pelvis and trunk kinematics during treadmill locomotion using a low-cost depth-sensing camera: A concurrent validity study.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Tom W; Taylor, Jonathan; McBain, Thomas; Weston, Matthew; Spears, Iain R

    2016-02-01

    There is currently no suitable kinematic system for a large-scale prospective trial assessing risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders. A practical kinematic system is described which involves the use of a single low-cost depth-sensing camera for the real-time measurement of 3-dimensional linear and angular pelvic and trunk range-of-movement (ROM). The method is based on the creation and processing of dynamic point clouds taken from the posterior surface of the pelvis and trunk. Nine healthy participants performed 3 trials of treadmill locomotion when walking at self-selected speed (3.6-5.6 km/h), running at 70% (10.9-14.0 km/h) and 90% of maximal speed (14.0-18.0 km/h). Stride-by-stride linear and angular ROM data were captured concurrently using the single depth-sensing camera running at 30 Hz (Kinect(TM) for Windows, Microsoft, USA) and a six-camera motion capture system at 100 Hz (Vicon MX13, Vicon Motion Systems, United Kingdom). Within subject correlation coefficients between the practical and criterion method ranged from very large to nearly perfect (r=0.87-1.00) for the linear ROM. Correlation coefficients for the angular ROM ranged from moderate to very large (r=0.41-0.80). The limits of agreement between the two systems for linear movements were ≤ 9.9 mm at all velocities of gait and ≤ 4.6° at all velocities of gait. The single camera system using depth-sensing technology is capable of capturing linear pelvic and trunk ROM during treadmill locomotion with reasonable precision when compared to the criterion method. Further improvements to the measurement of angles and validation across a wider population are recommended.

  2. A SLUGGS and Gemini/GMOS combined study of the elliptical galaxy M60: wide-field photometry and kinematics of the globular cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pota, Vincenzo; Brodie, Jean P.; Bridges, Terry; Strader, Jay; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Villaume, Alexa; Jennings, Zach; Faifer, Favio R.; Pastorello, Nicola; Forbes, Duncan A.; Campbell, Ainsley; Usher, Christopher; Foster, Caroline; Spitler, Lee R.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forte, Juan C.; Norris, Mark A.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Beasley, Michael A.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hanes, David A.; Sharples, Ray M.; Arnold, Jacob A.

    2015-06-01

    We present new wide-field photometry and spectroscopy of the globular clusters (GCs) around NGC 4649 (M60), the third brightest galaxy in the Virgo cluster. Imaging of NGC 4649 was assembled from a recently obtained Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys mosaic, and new Subaru/Suprime-Cam and archival Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam data. About 1200 sources were followed up spectroscopically using combined observations from three multi-object spectrographs: Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph, Gemini/Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph and Multiple Mirror Telescope/Hectospec. We confirm 431 unique GCs belonging to NGC 4649, a factor of 3.5 larger than previous data sets and with a factor of 3 improvement in velocity precision. We confirm significant GC colour bimodality and find that the red GCs are more centrally concentrated, while the blue GCs are more spatially extended. We infer negative GC colour gradients in the innermost 20 kpc and flat gradients out to large radii. Rotation is detected along the galaxy major axis for all tracers: blue GCs, red GCs, galaxy stars and planetary nebulae. We compare the observed properties of NGC 4649 with galaxy formation models. We find that formation via a major merger between two gas-poor galaxies, followed by satellite accretion, can consistently reproduce the observations of NGC 4649 at different radii. We find no strong evidence to support an interaction between NGC 4649 and the neighbouring spiral galaxy NGC 4647. We identify interesting GC kinematic features in our data, such as counter-rotating subgroups and bumpy kinematic profiles, which encode more clues about the formation history of NGC 4649.

  3. The Risk of Paradoxical Embolism (RoPE) Study: Initial description of the completed database

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, David E.; Angelantonio, Emanuele Di; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Donovan, Jennifer S.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Griffith, John; Homma, Shunichi; Jaigobin, Cheryl; Mas, Jean-Louis; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Michel, Patrik; Mono, Marie-Luise; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Papetti, Federica; Ruthazer, Robin; Serena, Joaquín; Weimar, Christian; Kent, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Detecting a benefit from closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in patients with cryptogenic stroke (CS) is hampered by low rates of stroke recurrence and uncertainty about the causal role of PFO in the index event. A method to predict PFO-attributable recurrence risk is needed. However, individual databases generally have too few stroke recurrences to support risk modeling. Prior studies of this population have been limited by low statistical power for examining factors related to recurrence. Aims To develop a database to support modeling of PFO-attributable recurrence risk by combining extant data sets. Methods We identified investigators with extant databases including subjects with CS investigated for PFO; determined the availability and characteristics of data in each database; collaboratively specified the variables to be included in the Risk of Paradoxical Embolism (RoPE) database; harmonized the variables across databases, and collected new primary data when necessary and feasible. Results The RoPE database has individual clinical, radiologic, and echocardiographic data from 12 component databases including subjects with CS both with (n=1925) and without (n=1749) PFO. In the PFO subjects, a total of 381 outcomes (stroke, TIA, death) occurred (median follow-up = 2.2yrs). While there were substantial variations in data collection between studies, there was sufficient overlap to define a common set of variables suitable for risk modeling. Conclusion While individual studies are inadequate for modeling PFO-attributable recurrence risk, collaboration between investigators has yielded a database with sufficient power to identify those patients at highest risk for a PFO-related stroke recurrence who may have the greatest potential benefit from PFO closure. PMID:22883936

  4. The Stellar Kinematics of Several Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, D. A.; Rubin, V. C.; Swaters, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present long-slit spectra of three irregular galaxies from which we determine the stellar kinematics in two of the galaxies (NGC 1156 and NGC 4449) and ionized-gas kinematics in all three (including NGC 2366). We compare the stellar and ionized gas kinematics to the morphology of the galaxies and their HI kinematics. We find surprising differences between the kinematics of the stars, ionized gas, and neutral gas in these systems. Support for this work was provided to DAH by the Lowell Research Fund and by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-9616940.

  5. HLA antigen familial study in complete Behçet's syndrome affecting three sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, J L; Gonzalez-Dominguez, J; Gonzalez-Fernandez, R; Prada, J L; Peña, J; Solana, R

    1993-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a multisystemic disease affecting most organs. Although a tendency towards an association with a certain genetic type and with HLA-B51 is suspected, the incidence of several siblings with Behçet's disease in a single family is rare. A family, in which three sisters were affected with Behçet's disease, uveitis being the most severe manifestation, was studied. In this family all siblings were B51 positive. Only the female siblings, however, with a positive identical HLA phenotype: A2, A11, B51, B44, Cw6, Cw5, DR4, DRw13, DRw53, DRw52, DQw7, DQw6, developed the disease symptoms, whereas none of the male siblings was affected. PMID:8447696

  6. [Comparative studies of sera from cattle with complete leukemia virus and glycoprotein antigens].

    PubMed

    Mateva, V; Vasileva, L

    1980-01-01

    One hundred cattle serums were investigated by the AGTD-test with two antigens: an antigen produced by the whole virus and an antigen containing glycoproteins. Of all serums studied 44 showed a specific precipitation in case the glycoprotein antigen was used. In case the antigen from the whole virus was used 41 serums showed a specific precipitation line, while in 3 of the serums two precipitation lines were observed. Fifty six serums proved negative, containing no antibodies against bovine leucosis virus, after antigens were used. In 2 of the serums non specific precipitation lines were obtained when the antigen from whole virus was used. the precipitation lines produced by both antigenes did not differ in intensity and time of manifestation. PMID:6251597

  7. Power spectrum density analysis for the influence of complete denture on the brain function of edentulous patients - pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Praveen; Anitha, Kuttae Viswanathan; Reddy, Jetti Ramesh; Muthukumar, Balasubramanium

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This pilot study was to find the influence of complete denture on the brain activity and cognitive function of edentulous patients measured through Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study recruited 20 patients aged from 50 to 60 years requiring complete dentures with inclusion and exclusion criteria. The brain function and cognitive function were analyzed with a mental state questionnaire and a 15-minute analysis of power spectral density of EEG alpha waves. The analysis included edentulous phase and post denture insertion adaptive phase, each done before and after chewing. The results obtained were statistically evaluated. RESULTS Power Spectral Density (PSD) values increased from edentulous phase to post denture insertion adaption phase. The data were grouped as edentulous phase before chewing (EEG p1-0.0064), edentulous phase after chewing (EEG p2-0.0073), post denture insertion adaptive phase before chewing (EEG p3-0.0077), and post denture insertion adaptive phase after chewing (EEG p4-0.0096). The acquired values were statistically analyzed using paired t-test, which showed statistically significant results (P<.05). CONCLUSION This pilot study showed functional improvement in brain function of edentulous patients with complete dentures rehabilitation. PMID:27350852

  8. Classifying Cytogenetics in Patients with AML in Complete Remission Undergoing Allogeneic Transplantation: A CIBMTR Study

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Philippe; Kim, Haesook T.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Perez, Waleska S.; Dal Cin, Paola S.; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Waller, Edmund K.; Litzow, Mark R.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Artz, Andrew S.; Gupta, Vikas; Savani, Bipin N.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Schouten, Harry C.; Finke, Jürgen; Ball, Edward D.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Cutler, Corey S.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Antin, Joseph H.; Isola, Luis M.; Di Bartolomeo, Paolo; Camitta, Bruce M.; Miller, Alan M.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Sierra, Jorge; Savoie, M. Lynn; Halter, Joerg; Stiff, Patrick J.; Nabhan, Chadi; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Bunjes, Donald W.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Devine, Steven M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bornhauser, Martin; Lewis, Victor A.; Marks, David I.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Cytogenetics play a major role in determining the prognosis of patients with AML. However, the existing cytogenetics classifications were developed on chemotherapy-treated patients and may not be optimal for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We studied 821 adult patients reported to the CIBMTR who underwent HCT for AML in first or second CR between 1999 and 2004. We compared the ability of the 6 existing classifications to stratify patients by overall survival (OS). We then defined a new schema specifically applicable to HCT patients using this patient cohort. Under this CIBMTR schema, inv(16) is favorable, complex karyotype (4+ abnormalities) is adverse, and all other classified abnormalities are intermediate in predicting survival after HCT (5y OS 64%, 18%, and 50%, respectively, p=0.0001). This schema stratified patients into 3 groups with similar non-relapse mortality, but significantly different incidences of relapse, overall and leukemia-free survival. It applied to patients regardless of their disease status (CR1 or CR2), donor type (MRD or URD), or conditioning intensity (myeloablative or reduced intensity). This transplantation-specific classification could be adopted for prognostication purposes and to stratify patients with AML and karyotypic abnormalities entering HCT clinical trials. PMID:21810400

  9. A theoretical study on the complete dehydrogenation of methanol on Pd (100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao; Wang, Bin; Fang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) method was employed to investigate the adsorption and decomposition mechanisms of CH3OH on Pd (100) surface. Different kinds of possible adsorption modes of relevant intermediates on the surface were identified. It was found that CH3OH and CH2OH prefers to adsorb on the top site, CH3O, CHOH and CO occupy preferentially on the bridge site, while CH2O, CHO, COH and H species adsorb on the hollow site. The adsorption energies of all species exhibit the following trend: CH3OH < CH2O < CH3O < CO < CH2OH < H < CHO < CHOH < COH. Subsequently, four possible dissociation pathways of CH3OH via initial Osbnd H and Csbnd H bond scissions were proposed and studied systematically. The transition states, energy barriers and reaction energies were calculated to explore the dehydrogenation mechanisms of CH3OH on Pd (100) surface. It was indicated that the scission of Csbnd H bond is more favorable for CH3OH and CH2OH and the Hsbnd O bond cleavage is easier for CHOH. The path 2 (CH3OHsbnd CH2OHsbnd CHOHsbnd CHOsbnd CO) is the most possible dehydrogenation pathway, where the highest energy barrier of CH3OH dissociation makes it to be the rate-determining step of the whole dehydrogenation reaction.

  10. Quantum simulation of noncausal kinematic transformations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Casanova, J; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-08-30

    We propose the implementation of Galileo group symmetry operations or, in general, linear coordinate transformations in a quantum simulator. With an appropriate encoding, unitary gates applied to our quantum system give rise to Galilean boosts or spatial and time parity operations in the simulated dynamics. This framework provides us with a flexible toolbox that enhances the versatility of quantum simulation theory, allowing the direct access to dynamical quantities that would otherwise require full tomography. Furthermore, this method enables the study of noncausal kinematics and phenomena beyond special relativity in a quantum controllable system. PMID:24033011

  11. Quantum simulation of noncausal kinematic transformations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Casanova, J; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-08-30

    We propose the implementation of Galileo group symmetry operations or, in general, linear coordinate transformations in a quantum simulator. With an appropriate encoding, unitary gates applied to our quantum system give rise to Galilean boosts or spatial and time parity operations in the simulated dynamics. This framework provides us with a flexible toolbox that enhances the versatility of quantum simulation theory, allowing the direct access to dynamical quantities that would otherwise require full tomography. Furthermore, this method enables the study of noncausal kinematics and phenomena beyond special relativity in a quantum controllable system.

  12. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase: Complete human gene sequence and molecular study of three families with hepatoerythropoietic porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Moran-Jimenez, M.J.; Ged, C.; Verneuil, H. de

    1996-04-01

    A deficiency in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) enzyme activity, the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is found in patients with sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda (s-PCT), familial porphyria cutanea tarda (f-PCT), and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP). Subnormal UROD activity is due to mutations of the UROD gene in both f-PCT and HEP, but no mutations have been found in s-PCT. Genetic analysis has determined that f-PCT is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In contrast, HEP, a severe form of cutaneous porphyria, is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. HEP is characterized by a profound deficiency of UROD activity, and the disease is usually manifest in childhood. In this study, a strategy was designed to identify alleles responsible for the HEP phenotype in three unrelated families. Mutations of UROD were identified by direct sequencing of four amplified fragments that contained the entire coding sequence of the UROD gene. Two new missense mutations were observed at the homoallelic state: P62L (proline-to-leucine substitution at codon 62) in a Portuguese family and Y311C (tyrosine-to-cysteine substitution at codon 311) in an Italian family. A third mutation, G281E, was observed in a Spanish family. This mutation has been previously described in three families from Spain and one from Tunisia. In the Spanish family described in this report, a paternal uncle of the proband developed clinically overt PCT as an adult and proved to be heterozygous for the G281E mutation. Mutant cDNAs corresponding to the P62L and Y311C changes detected in these families were created by site-directed mutagenesis. Recombinant proteins proved to have subnormal enzyme activity, and the Y311C mutant was thermolabile. 24 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Pythagoras Theorem and Relativistic Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulaj, Zenun; Dhoqina, Polikron

    2010-01-01

    In two inertial frames that move in a particular direction, may be registered a light signal that propagates in an angle with this direction. Applying Pythagoras theorem and principles of STR in both systems, we can derive all relativistic kinematics relations like the relativity of simultaneity of events, of the time interval, of the length of objects, of the velocity of the material point, Lorentz transformations, Doppler effect and stellar aberration.

  14. Methodology issues concerning the accuracy of kinematic data collection and analysis using the ariel performance analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmington, R. P.; Klute, Glenn K. (Editor); Carroll, Amy E. (Editor); Stuart, Mark A. (Editor); Poliner, Jeff (Editor); Rajulu, Sudhakar (Editor); Stanush, Julie (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Kinematics, the study of motion exclusive of the influences of mass and force, is one of the primary methods used for the analysis of human biomechanical systems as well as other types of mechanical systems. The Anthropometry and Biomechanics Laboratory (ABL) in the Crew Interface Analysis section of the Man-Systems Division performs both human body kinematics as well as mechanical system kinematics using the Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS). The APAS supports both analysis of analog signals (e.g. force plate data collection) as well as digitization and analysis of video data. The current evaluations address several methodology issues concerning the accuracy of the kinematic data collection and analysis used in the ABL. This document describes a series of evaluations performed to gain quantitative data pertaining to position and constant angular velocity movements under several operating conditions. Two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional data collection and analyses were completed in a controlled laboratory environment using typical hardware setups. In addition, an evaluation was performed to evaluate the accuracy impact due to a single axis camera offset. Segment length and positional data exhibited errors within 3 percent when using three-dimensional analysis and yielded errors within 8 percent through two-dimensional analysis (Direct Linear Software). Peak angular velocities displayed errors within 6 percent through three-dimensional analyses and exhibited errors of 12 percent when using two-dimensional analysis (Direct Linear Software). The specific results from this series of evaluations and their impacts on the methodology issues of kinematic data collection and analyses are presented in detail. The accuracy levels observed in these evaluations are also presented.

  15. Kinematics and Ground Reaction Force Determination: A Demonstration Quantifying Locomotor Abilities of Young Adult, Middle-aged, and Geriatric Rats

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Aubrey A.; Kerr, Brendan; Neville, Tanya; Ngan, Sybil; Assem, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    Behavior, in its broadest definition, can be defined as the motor manifestation of physiologic processes. As such, all behaviors manifest through the motor system. In the fields of neuroscience and orthopedics, locomotion is a commonly evaluated behavior for a variety of disease models. For example, locomotor recovery after traumatic injury to the nervous system is one of the most commonly evaluated behaviors 1-3. Though locomotion can be evaluated using a variety of endpoint measurements (e.g. time taken to complete a locomotor task, etc), semiquantitative kinematic measures (e.g. ordinal rating scales (e.g. Basso Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor (BBB) rating scale, etc)) and surrogate measures of behaviour (e.g. muscle force, nerve conduction velocity, etc), only kinetics (force measurements) and kinematics (measurements of body segments in space) provide a detailed description of the strategy by which an animal is able to locomote 1. Though not new, kinematic and kinetic measurements of locomoting rodents is now more readily accessible due to the availability of commercially available equipment designed for this purpose. Importantly, however, experimenters need to be very familiar with theory of biomechanical analyses and understand the benefits and limitations of these forms of analyses prior to embarking on what will become a relatively labor-intensive study. The present paper aims to describe a method for collecting kinematic and ground reaction force data using commercially available equipment. Details of equipment and apparatus set-up, pre-training of animals, inclusion and exclusion criteria of acceptable runs, and methods for collecting the data are described. We illustrate the utility of this behavioral analysis technique by describing the kinematics and kinetics of strain-matched young adult, middle-aged, and geriatric rats. PMID:21403621

  16. Of cilium and flagellum kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hansen, Joshua C.

    2009-11-01

    The kinematics of propulsion of small animals such as paramecium and spermatozoa is considered. Larger scale models of the cilium and flagellum have been built and a four-motor apparatus has been constructed to reproduce their known periodic motions. The cilium model has transverse deformational ability in one plane only, while the flagellum model has such ability in two planes. When the flagellum model is given a push-pull in one diametral plane, instead of transverse deflection in one plane, it forms a coil. Berg & Anderson's postulation (Nature 245 1973) that a flagellum rotates, is recalled. The kinematics of cilia of paramecium, of the whipping motion of the spermatozoa flagella, and of the flapping motion (rolling and pitching) of the pectoral fins of much larger animals such penguins, have been reproduced in the same basic paramecium apparatus. The results suggest that each of the tiny individual paramecium propulsors have the intrinsic dormant kinematic and structural building blocks to optimize into higher Reynolds number propulsors. A synthetic hypothesis on how small might have become large is animated.

  17. Are static and dynamic kinematics comparable after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Saevarsson, Stefan K; Romeo, Carolina I; Anglin, Carolyn

    2013-04-01

    Knee kinematics provide information about how the femoral, tibial and patellar bones or prosthetic components move relative to each other. Accurate knowledge of kinematics is valuable for implant design, comparisons between designs or surgical techniques, and to identify differences between patients with good and poor outcomes. Both static and dynamic imaging techniques have been used to evaluate kinematics. In general, static imaging is used to capture better quality images or to capture views that cannot be acquired by dynamic imaging, whereas dynamic imaging is used to capture real-life movements. How well static kinematics represent dynamic kinematics is subject to frequent debate and has not been adequately addressed, especially after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the static and dynamic weightbearing kinematics of 10 female subjects after TKA. Using the same clinical scanner for both methods, static images were taken using our standard protocol, sequential-biplane radiographs at multiple flexion angles, as well as with dynamic video fluoroscopy during a step up activity. The static method can reliably measure all 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) after TKA, however only seven were compared due to the poorer out-of-plane reliability in the single-plane dynamic imaging. No differences were found between the static and dynamic kinematics for nine out of ten subjects. For one subject, however, a difference of 5-8° in internal/external tibial rotation was found. The research question, study purpose and the advantages and disadvantages of each method need to be considered when determining which imaging method to use.

  18. Color-kinematics duality in multi-Regge kinematics and dimensional reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Henrik; Vera, Agustín Sabio; Campillo, Eduardo Serna; Vázquez-Mozo, Miguel Á.

    2013-10-01

    In this note we study the applicability of the color-kinematics duality to the scattering of two distinguishable scalar matter particles with gluon emission in QCD, or graviton emission in Einstein gravity. Previous analysis suggested that direct use of the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson double-copy prescription to matter amplitudes does not reproduce the gravitational amplitude in multi-Regge kinematics. This situation, however, can be avoided by extensions to the gauge theory, while maintaning the same Regge limit. Here we present two examples of these extensions: the introduction of a scalar contact interaction and the relaxation of the distinguishability of the scalars. In both cases new diagrams allow for a full reconstruction of the correct Regge limit on the gravitational side. Both modifications correspond to theories obtained by dimensional reduction from higher-dimensional gauge theories.

  19. SMACK - SMOOTHING FOR AIRCRAFT KINEMATICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program SMACK (SMoothing for AirCraft Kinematics) is designed to provide flightpath reconstruction of aircraft forces and motions from measurements that are noisy or incomplete. Additionally, SMACK provides a check on instrument accuracy and data consistency. The program can be used to analyze data from flight-test experiments prior to their use in performance, stability and control, or aerodynamic modeling calculations. It can also be used in the analysis of aircraft accidents, where the actual forces and motions may have to be determined from a very limited data set. Application of a state-estimation method for flightpath reconstruction is possible because aircraft forces and motions are related by well-known equations of motion. The task of postflight state estimation is known as a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem. SMACK utilizes a backward-filter, forward-smoother algorithm to solve the problem. The equations of motion are used to produce estimates that are compared with their corresponding measurement time histories. The procedure is iterative, providing improved state estimates until a minimum squared-error measure is achieved. In the SMACK program, the state and measurement models together represent a finite-difference approximation for the six-degree-of-freedom dynamics of a rigid body. The models are used to generate time histories which are likely to be found in a flight-test measurement set. These include onboard variables such as Euler angles, angular rates, and linear accelerations as well as tracking variables such as slant range, bearing, and elevation. Any bias or scale-factor errors associated with the state or measurement models are appended to the state vector and treated as constant but unknown parameters. The SMACK documentation covers the derivation of the solution algorithm, describes the state and measurement models, and presents several application examples that should help the analyst recognize the potential

  20. Immediate loading of maxillary and mandibular implant-supported fixed complete dentures: a 1- to 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting-Jen; Kan, Joseph Y K; Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Roe, Phillip; Lozada, Jaime L

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the success rates of 50 full-arch maxillary and/or mandibular implant-supported fixed complete dentures. After a mean follow-up time of 42.1 months, 269 implants remained in function, which corresponded to cumulative implant success rates of 85.2% and an absolute success rate of 90.6% (269/297 implants). This study suggested that higher implant failure rates might be associated with a dental history of bruxism (29.3%) vs no history of bruxism (4.6%) and surgeons with limited experience (≤5 years; 12.2%) vs surgeons with experience (2.4%). PMID:21942324

  1. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  2. The Kinematics of Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Kathryn A.; Margon, Bruce H.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of molecular carbon absorption bands in the spectra of main sequence dwarfs is remarkable, as these stars have not yet evolved through the helium-burning and dredge-up phases that deposit carbon in a stellar photosphere. Dwarf carbon stars are thus generally considered members of post-mass transfer binaries, with the main sequence star polluted by an evolved, often now invisible, companion. For decades only a handful were known. Now it is recognized that carbon dwarfs likely outnumber the better-understood giant carbon stars. Green (2013) has identified more than 700 carbon dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This large sample- distributed nearly evenly throughout the SDSS footprint- makes a study of stellar kinematics possible for dwarf carbon stars as a class.We examine the proper motions and radial velocities of ~700 carbon dwarfs and compare to a sample of 2×104 non-carbon main sequence stars from the SDSS archive. The spectra of carbon dwarfs and giants can appear indistinguishable, and so the relatively faint carbon dwarfs are recognized only if they have a sufficiently large proper motion to exclude the possibility of their being distant giants. We build our non-carbon control sample by the same proper motion criteria and additionally require that the control stars match the carbon dwarf selection with respect to properties such as photometric colors. In order to examine the kinematics of a sample spread across a large portion of sky, we compare each carbon dwarf with a group of control stars separated from it by less than three degrees. Preliminary results suggest that carbon dwarfs' kinematics are similar to the distributions of their neighboring control stars. We will present the results of detailed tests, including an investigation of several carbon dwarfs with atypical radial velocities.

  3. Kinematics of transition during human accelerated sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Nagahara, Ryu; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Matsuo, Akifumi; Zushi, Koji

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated kinematics of human accelerated sprinting through 50 m and examined whether there is transition and changes in acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. Twelve male sprinters performed a 60-m sprint, during which step-to-step kinematics were captured using 60 infrared cameras. To detect the transition during the acceleration phase, the mean height of the whole-body centre of gravity (CG) during the support phase was adopted as a measure. Detection methods found two transitions during the entire acceleration phase of maximal sprinting, and the acceleration phase could thus be divided into initial, middle, and final sections. Discriminable kinematic changes were found when the sprinters crossed the detected first transition—the foot contacting the ground in front of the CG, the knee-joint starting to flex during the support phase, terminating an increase in step frequency—and second transition—the termination of changes in body postures and the start of a slight decrease in the intensity of hip-joint movements, thus validating the employed methods. In each acceleration section, different contributions of lower-extremity segments to increase in the CG forward velocity—thigh and shank for the initial section, thigh, shank, and foot for the middle section, shank and foot for the final section—were verified, establishing different acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. In conclusion, there are presumably two transitions during human maximal accelerated sprinting that divide the entire acceleration phase into three sections, and different acceleration strategies represented by the contributions of the segments for running speed are employed. PMID:24996923

  4. Kinematics of the stationary helical vortex mode in Taylor Couette Poiseuille Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raguin, L. Guy; Georgiadis, John G.

    2004-10-01

    We reconstruct a kinematically admissible (volume-preserving) three-dimensional velocity field corresponding to the stationary helical vortex (SHV) mode which is observed in the Taylor Couette Poiseuille (TCP) system with a ratio of inner to outer cylinder radii of 0.5 and a length to annulus gap ratio of 16, starting from experimental data obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for Rey {=} 11.14 and Ta(1/2) {=} 170 in water. The goal of the present work is to provide a complete kinematic representation of a strongly nonlinear duct flow that is of importance in the fields of mixing and segregation, as well as in the study of the kinematic structure of three-dimensional flows. By a judicious choice of a set of global basis functions that exploit the helical symmetry of SHV, an analytical approximation of the streamfunction is obtained despite the coarse MRI data and the non-uniform distribution of measurement error. This approximation is given in terms of a truncated series of smooth functions that converges weakly in L_2, and the reconstruction method is directly applicable to three-dimensional incompressible flows that possess a continuous volume-preserving symmetry. The SHV flow structure consists of a pair of asymmetric counter-rotating helical cells in a double helix structure, foliated with invariant helically symmetric surfaces containing fibre-like fluid particle orbits wrapped around the inner cylinder. Imposing general topological constraints, juxtaposing SHV with neighbouring hydrodynamic modes such as the propagating Taylor vortex flow and direct numerical simulation help corroborate the validity of the reconstruction of the SHV flow field. The kinematically admissible flow field obeys the Navier Stokes equations with 10% accuracy, which is consistent with experimental error, and has the same flow portrait as the numerically computed flow. Global analysis of the SHV mode indicates that it corresponds to a minimum in dissipation and mixing in

  5. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  6. Mapping Dark Matter Halos with Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremy; Gebhardt, K.; Greene, J. E.; Graves, G.

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies of all sizes form and evolve in the centers of dark matter halos. As these halos constitute the large majority of the total mass of a galaxy, dark matter certainly plays a central role in the galaxy's formation and evolution. Yet despite our understanding of the importance of dark matter, observations of the extent and shape of dark matter halos have been slow in coming. The paucity of data is particularly acute in elliptical galaxies. Happily, concerted effort over the past several years by a number of groups has been shedding light on the dark matter halos around galaxies over a wide range in mass. The development of new instrumentation and large surveys, coupled with the tantalizing evidence for a direct detection of dark matter from the AMS experiment, has brought on a golden age in the study of galactic scale dark matter halos. I report on results using extended stellar kinematics from integrated light to dynamically model massive elliptical galaxies in the local universe. I use the integral field power of the Mitchell Spectrograph to explore the kinematics of stars to large radii (R > 2.5 r_e). Once the line-of-sight stellar kinematics are measured, I employ orbit-based, axisymmetric dynamical modeling to explore a range of dark matter halo parameterizations. Globular cluster kinematics at even larger radii are used to further constrain the dynamical models. The dynamical models also return information on the anisotropy of the stars which help to further illuminate the primary formation mechanisms of the galaxy. Specifically, I will show dynamical modeling results for the first and second rank galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, M49 and M87. Although similar in total luminosity and ellipticity, these two galaxies show evidence for different dark matter halo shapes, baryon to dark matter fractions, and stellar anisotropy profiles. Moreover, the stellar velocity dispersion at large radii in M87 is significantly higher than the globular clusters at the same

  7. A Comparison of Masticatory Performance and Efficiency of Complete Dentures Made with High Impact and Flexible Resins: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyar, Anjali; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Yadav, Naveen S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with extensive tooth loss, restoration of masticatory function and aesthetics is main concern for a prosthodontist. Aim of Study This study aimed to evaluate and compare differences in masticatory efficiency of patients treated with complete dentures made with either high impact or flexible resins. Setting and Design The sample size consisted of 10 study subjects. Two sets of dentures first conventional followed by flexible dentures were fabricated for each subject and both the sets of dentures were accessed for masticatory performance and efficiency. Materials and Methods This study compared the masticatory performance and efficiency of dentures by means of standardized mesh sieves. Masticatory efficiency was calculated by recording the total number of chewing cycles and time required to completely swallow a standardized food item. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was given and evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used The statistical analyses were performed using Z-test of Proportion and Paired t-test. Results The masticatory performance ratio was found to be more for hard food in conventional dentures. The values of masticatory performance ratios for soft food, time and number of masticatory strokes were indicating better masticatory efficiency of conventional dentures. Conclusion Though masticatory efficiency and performance were found to be better for patient’s dentures made with Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), a statistically significant number of patients reported that the flexible dentures were more satisfying than the conventional dentures. PMID:26266213

  8. A KINEMATIC DISTANCE STUDY OF THE PLANETARY NEBULAE-SUPERNOVA REMNANT-H II REGION COMPLEX AT G35.6–0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Su, H. Q.; Torres, D. F.; Pedaletti, G. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2013-10-01

    Two possible planetary nebulae (PN G035.5–00.4 and IRAS 18551+0159), one newly re-identified supernova remnant (SNR G35.6–0.4), and one H II region (G35.6–0.5) form a line-of-sight-overlapping complex known as G35.6–0.5. We analyze 21 cm H I absorption spectra toward the complex to constrain the kinematic distances of these objects. PN G035.5–00.4 has a distance from 3.8 ± 0.4 kpc to 5.4 ± 0.7 kpc. IRAS 18551+0159 is at 4.3 ± 0.5 kpc. We discuss the distance for SNR 35.6–0.4, for which the previous estimate was 10.5 kpc, and find a plausible distance of 3.6 ± 0.4 kpc. The new distance of SNR G35.6–0.4 and the derived mass for the ∼55 km s{sup –1} CO molecular cloud can accommodate an association with HESS J1858+020. We also conclude that SNR G35.6–0.4 is unlikely to be associated with PSR J1857+0210 or PSR J1857+0212, which are projected onto the SNR area.

  9. A study of tectonic activity in the Basin-Range Province and on the San Andreas Fault. No. 1: Kinematics of Basin-Range intraplate extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddington, P. K.; Smith, R. B.; Renggli, C.

    1986-01-01

    Strain rates assessed from brittle fracture and total brittle-ductile deformation measured from geodetic data were compared to estimates of paleo-strain from Quaternary geology for the intraplate Great Basin part of the Basin-Range, western United States. These data provide an assessment of the kinematics and mode of lithospheric extension that the western U.S. Cordillera has experienced from the past few million years to the present. Strain and deformation rates were determined by the seismic moment tensor method using historic seismicity and fault plane solutions for sub-regions of homogeneous strain. Contemporary deformation in the Great Basin occurs principally along the active seismic zones. The integrated opening rate across the entire Great Basin is accommodated by E-E extension at 8 to 10 mm/a in the north that diminishes to NW-SE extension of 3.5 mm/a in the south. Zones of maximum lithospheric extension correspond to belts of thin crust, high heat flow, and Quaternary basaltic volcanism, suggesting that these parameters are related through mechanism of extension such as a stress relaxation, allowing bouyant uplift and ascension of magmas.

  10. Mechanical and kinematic alignment in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bonzanini, Giancarlo; Chirillo, Danilo; de Tullio, Vito

    2016-01-01

    In the last 10 years many studies have questioned if the strive to mechanical align any knee may pose some problems related to ligament misbalancing that could explain the high rate of disappointed patients, almost 20% in some reports. Proper indication and difference between patient’s and surgeon’s expectations are among the most important one’s but it must be underlined that, there is indeed a sharp difference between normal knee kinematics, prosthetic knee kinematics and arthritic knee kinematics being the last one extremely variable. A so called kinematic alignment has recently been developed in order to improve patient’s knee function and pain control minimizing any surgical gesture focused on ligaments balance. The amount of bone resections may not affect limb alignment but has an important consequence in ligament tension and balance, clinical result and function therefore a measured bone resection technique is essential in order to perform a proper kinematic alignment. Purpose of this paper is to briefly review the different alignment procedures used for TKA and to discuss their definitions, concepts and evidence on outcome. PMID:27162780

  11. Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ∼8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of 'disk settling'. For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art 'zoom in' hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (σ{sub g}) and increase in ordered rotation (V{sub rot}) with time. The slopes of the relations between both σ{sub g} and V{sub rot} with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling'.

  12. Kinematic Evolution of Simulated Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ~8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of "disk settling." For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art "zoom in" hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (σ g ) and increase in ordered rotation (V rot) with time. The slopes of the relations between both σ g and V rot with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling.

  13. Modeling Host Disk Kinematics of Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuca, Camilo; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by our group has shown that, although the kinematics of many active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be modeled by biconal outflow, most AGN have kinematics that are too convolved with other forms of motion to be modeled so simply, such as the rotation of the host disk. To disentangle these rotational components from the outflowing ionized gas due to AGN "feedback" in the narrow-line region (NLR) and understand the AGN's relationship with the host galaxy at extended distances, we present this study on two Seyfert 2 galaxies, Markarian 3 and Markarian 573, based on two-dimensional long-slit spectra taken with the ARC 3.5m telescope at Apache-Point Observatory. The two targets were observed multiple times at varying position angles (in order to trace the kinematics of the host disk at multiple points) and their total kinematics were analyzed and modeled using DiskFit, a publicly available code that fits given velocity fields. We compare the results of DiskFit to observed velocities and consider the applications of this technique to the kinematic fitting of other nearby AGN with convolved motions.

  14. Comparisons of Kinematics and Dynamics Simulation Software Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, Yeu-Sheng Paul

    2002-01-01

    Kinematic and dynamic analyses for moving bodies are essential to system engineers and designers in the process of design and validations. 3D visualization and motion simulation plus finite element analysis (FEA) give engineers a better way to present ideas and results. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) system engineering researchers are currently using IGRIP from DELMIA Inc. as a kinematic simulation tool for discrete bodies motion simulations. Although IGRIP is an excellent tool for kinematic simulation with some dynamic analysis capabilities in robotic control, explorations of other alternatives with more powerful dynamic analysis and FEA capabilities are necessary. Kinematics analysis will only examine the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of the mechanism without considering effects from masses of components. With dynamic analysis and FEA, effects such as the forces or torques at the joint due to mass and inertia of components can be identified. With keen market competition, ALGOR Mechanical Event Simulation (MES), MSC visualNastran 4D, Unigraphics Motion+, and Pro/MECHANICA were chosen for explorations. In this study, comparisons between software tools were presented in terms of following categories: graphical user interface (GUI), import capability, tutorial availability, ease of use, kinematic simulation capability, dynamic simulation capability, FEA capability, graphical output, technical support, and cost. Propulsion Test Article (PTA) with Fastrac engine model exported from IGRIP and an office chair mechanism were used as examples for simulations.

  15. Kinematic Evolution of Simulated Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last approximately 8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of "disk settling." For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art "zoom in" hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking as the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (sigma(sub g)) and increase in ordered rotation (V(sub rot)) with time. The slopes of the relations between both sigma(sub g) and V(sub rot) with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling.

  16. The use of detailed reservoir description and simulation studies in investigating completion strategies, cormorant, UK North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, J.H.; Valenti, N.P.

    1987-01-01

    A portion of the Cormorant field in the U.K. North Sea is being developed using a subsea production system. All layers in the stratified reservoir section are being waterflooded concurrently by perforating the entire interval in both producers and injectors. The permeability contrast among the layers is such that there is potential for severe imbalance in the movement of the waterflood fronts, resulting in large volumes of early water production from high permeability layers and incomplete displacement of oil from less permeable layers. With the high cost of expanding platform facilities or performing workovers on subsea wells to re-distribute production and/or injection, there is considerable incentive to optimise the completions in new wells. This paper describes studies undertaken by Esso Exploration and Production U.K. to evaluate various completion strategies for newe subsea wells. These studies were done to complement work done by the operator, Shell U.K. Explorations and Production. The studies included detailed reservoir description work to define the oil-in-pace and permeability distribution, followed by simulation of the waterflood for a representative reservoir cross-section. Wellbore, flowline and pipeline hydraulics for the complex productions and injection system were included to more accurately model well rates. The results provide general insight into the nature of the displacement when waterflooding a stratified section with a limited nuber of wells. They also provide specific guidance on: (1) dual vs. single completions, (2) perforating, testing and stimulation sequence and (3) the benefits of partially perforating high permeability sands.

  17. Kinematic GPS Profiles to monitor surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charara, R.; Vigny, C.; Briole, P.

    2008-12-01

    GPS kinematic measurement consists in placing a GPS rover receiver that registers its position on a moving vehicule with a high frequency. The frequency of the data acquisition is chosen according to the number of points and the precision needed to characterize the rover trajectory. The position of the rover receiver can be determined with respect to another GPS reference station with a precision of a few centimeters. Consequently different kinematic profiles on trajectories can be realized in different contexts (volcano slopes, active faults,...). We first studied the correlation between different profiles on the same trajectory in the absense of any particular event. Then different individual profiles are interpolated and a single profiles is generated which we refer to as "tube". We also studied and analyzed the impact of different parameters such as the baseline length, the atmospheric errors and the number of individual profiles on the precision of the obtained tube. We present results of experimentations that were performed in Chili, Reunion Island and Greece and we show how the results can be influenced by the baselines lengths and topographies. In case of event (Earthquakes, volcanoes eruptions, landslides,...) this technique can be used to assess the amplitude of ground deformation. We estimate the thresholds (in term of amplitude and spatial extension) of detectable signals.

  18. Flapping flight: effect of asymmetric kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Nakul; Krithivasan, Siddharth; K. R., Sreenivas

    2014-11-01

    Flapping flight has received considerable attention in the past with its relevance in the design of micro-air vehicles. In this regard, asymmetric flapping of wings offers simple kinematics. Nevertheless, it leads to symmetry-breaking in the flow field and generation of sustained lift. It has been observed previously with flow visualization experiments and Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) simulations that if the down-stroke time period is lesser than the up-stroke time, there is a net downward momentum imparted to the fluid. This is seen as a switching the flow field from a four-jet (symmetric) to a two-jet (asymmetric) configuration when the stroke-time ratio is progressively varied. This symmetry breaking has been studied experimentally using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) across a range of Reynolds Numbers and asymmetry ratios. Results are also corroborated with results from 3-D numerical simulations. Study helps in shedding light on the effectiveness of asymmetric kinematics as a lift generation mechanism.

  19. SEM-EDS-Based Elemental Identification on the Enamel Surface after the Completion of Orthodontic Treatment: In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Julia; Lipski, Mariusz; Wójcicka, Anna; Gedrange, Tomasz; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Braces as foreign bodies in the mouth carry a risk of side effects and toxicity to the human body. This article presents the results indicating the possible toxic effects of tools used for cleaning the enamel after the completion of orthodontic treatment. The studies were carried out in vitro. The procedure of enamel etching, bonding orthodontic metal brackets, and enamel cleaning after their removal was performed under laboratory conditions. The enamel microstructure and elements present on its surface were evaluated using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Silicon and aluminium were found in addition to the tooth building elements. PMID:27766265

  20. An Evaluation of the Effects of an Oven Timer Study Behavior and Concurrent Completion and Accuracy of Assignments for a First Grade Repeater: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegelman, Elizabeth D.; And Others

    The effects of an oven timer as an antecedent stimulus on study behavior and concurrent completion and accuracy of reading and writing assignments were investigated for an 8-year-old first grade repeater who lacked motivation. Following baseline observations during which the teacher recorded study behavior and collected assignments with no…

  1. Tracing kinematic (mis)alignments in CALIFA merging galaxies. Stellar and ionized gas kinematic orientations at every merger stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Wild, V.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Marquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Ziegler, B.; del Olmo, A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Mast, D.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Marino, R. A.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Walcher, C. J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Bomans, D. J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bekeraitė, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved stellar and/or ionized gas kinematic properties for a sample of 103 interacting galaxies, tracing all merger stages: close companions, pairs with morphological signatures of interaction, and coalesced merger remnants. In order to distinguish kinematic properties caused by a merger event from those driven by internal processes, we compare our galaxies with a control sample of 80 non-interacting galaxies. We measure for both the stellar and the ionized gas components the major (projected) kinematic position angles (PAkin, approaching and receding) directly from the velocity distributions with no assumptions on the internal motions. This method also allow us to derive the deviations of the kinematic PAs from a straight line (δPAkin). We find that around half of the interacting objects show morpho-kinematic PA misalignments that cannot be found in the control sample. In particular, we observe those misalignments in galaxies with morphological signatures of interaction. On the other hand, thelevel of alignment between the approaching and receding sides for both samples is similar, with most of the galaxies displaying small misalignments. Radial deviations of the kinematic PA orientation from a straight line in the stellar component measured by δPAkin are large for both samples. However, for a large fraction of interacting galaxies the ionized gas δPAkin is larger than the typical values derived from isolated galaxies (48%), indicating that this parameter is a good indicator to trace the impact of interaction and mergers in the internal motions of galaxies. By comparing the stellar and ionized gas kinematic PA, we find that 42% (28/66) of the interacting galaxies have misalignments larger than 16°, compared to 10% from the control sample. Our results show the impact of interactions in the motion of stellar and ionized gas as well as the wide the variety of their spatially resolved kinematic distributions. This study also provides a local

  2. Test-retest reliability of three-dimensional kinematics using an electromagnetic tracking system during single-leg squat and stepping maneuver.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Theresa H; Moriya, Érika Tiemi Uehara; Maciel, Carlos D; Serrão, Fábio V

    2014-01-01

    The electromagnetic tracking system (ETS) has been used to analyze three-dimensional (3D) lower limb kinematics. The single-leg squat and stepping maneuver are useful tasks to evaluate lower extremity alignment in a clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee 3D kinematics using an ETS during single-leg squat and stepping maneuver and compare 3D kinematics between tasks. Twenty healthy volunteers (10 males and 10 females) completed two test sessions 3-5 days apart. Three-dimensional kinematics using an ETS was assessed during single-leg squat and stepping maneuver. Overall, intrarater-intrasession reliability (ICCs=0.83-1.00) and intersession reliabilities (ICCs=0.82-0.97) were high during single-leg squat and stepping maneuver. The intrasession minimal detectable change (MDC) ranged from 1.3° for the knee frontal plane range of motion for single-leg squat to 6.2° for the pelvic transverse range of motion for the stepping maneuver. Intersession MDC values ranged from 1.2° for the ipsilateral trunk lean for the single-leg squat to 8.3° for hip flexion for the stepping maneuver. Healthy participants exhibited greater anterior pelvic tilt, more hip flexion, and less contralateral pelvis forward excursion (p<0.05) during single-leg squat compared with the stepping maneuver. These findings suggest that the 3D kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee using an ETS is reliable during single-leg squat and the stepping maneuver. Minimal detectable change values were low during the evaluated activities. Intertask comparisons revealed differences in hip and pelvis kinematics.

  3. Epidemiology of Spinal Cord Injuries and Risk Factors for Complete Injuries in Guangdong, China: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Huang, Lin; Tang, Yong; Wang, Wenhao; Chen, Keng; Ye, Jichao; Lu, Ciyong; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injuries are highly disabling and deadly injuries. Currently, few studies focus on non-traumatic spinal cord injuries, and there is little information regarding the risk factors for complete injuries. This study aims to describe the demographics and the injury characteristics for both traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injuries and to explore the risk factors for complete spinal cord injuries. Methods A retrospective study was performed by reviewing the medical records of 3,832 patients with spinal cord injuries who were first admitted to the sampled hospitals in Guangdong, China. The demographics and injury characteristics of the patients were described and compared between the different groups using the chi-square test. Logistic regression was conducted to analyze the risk factors for complete spinal cord injuries. Results The proportion of patients increased from 7.0% to 14.0% from 2003 to 2011. The male-to-female ratio was 3.0∶1. The major cause of spinal cord injuries was traffic accidents (21.7%). Many of the injured were workers (36.2%), peasants (22.8%), and unemployed people (13.9%); these occupations accounted for 72.9% of the total sample. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the OR (95% CI) for male gender compared to female gender was 1.25 (1.07–1.89), the OR (95%CI) for having a spinal fracture was 1.56 (1.35–2.60), the OR (95%CI) for having a thoracic injury was 1.23 (1.10–2.00), and the OR (95%CI) for having complications was 2.47 (1.96–3.13). Conclusion The proportion of males was higher than the proportion of females. Workers, peasants and the unemployed comprised the high-risk occupational categories. Male gender, having a spinal fracture, having a thoracic injury, and having complications were the major risk factors for a complete injury. We recommend that preventive measures should focus on high-risk populations, such as young males. PMID:24489652

  4. Prion domain of yeast Ure2 protein adopts a completely disordered structure: a solid-support EPR study.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Sam; Chiang, Vicky; Ho, Elaine; Le, Linh; Guo, Zhefeng

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is associated with a range of neurodegenerative diseases in humans, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and prion diseases. In yeast, amyloid underlies several non-Mendelian phenotypes referred to as yeast prions. Mechanism of amyloid formation is critical for a complete understanding of the yeast prion phenomenon and human amyloid-related diseases. Ure2 protein is the basis of yeast prion [URE3]. The Ure2p prion domain is largely disordered. Residual structures, if any, in the disordered region may play an important role in the aggregation process. Studies of Ure2p prion domain are complicated by its high aggregation propensity, which results in a mixture of monomer and aggregates in solution. Previously we have developed a solid-support electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) approach to address this problem and have identified a structured state for the Alzheimer's amyloid-β monomer. Here we use solid-support EPR to study the structure of Ure2p prion domain. EPR spectra of Ure2p prion domain with spin labels at every fifth residue from position 10 to position 75 show similar residue mobility profile for denaturing and native buffers after accounting for the effect of solution viscosity. These results suggest that Ure2p prion domain adopts a completely disordered structure in the native buffer. A completely disordered Ure2p prion domain implies that the amyloid formation of Ure2p, and likely other Q/N-rich yeast prion proteins, is primarily driven by inter-molecular interactions. PMID:23077577

  5. A KBE tool for solving the mechanisms kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, C.; Tiuca, T. L.; Noveanu, S.; Mândru, D.

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge-Based-Engineering (KBE) is a research field in which the methodologies and technologies for capturing and re-using the engineering knowledge are studied. Nowadays, the mechanisms design is accomplished by using various CAD software. Since, every CAD system includes KBE tools, those can be used to reduce time and simplify the mechanism's design process.One step in the design of the mechanisms with more than one degree of freedom is the direct and inverse kinematic analysis. This step can be difficult, because many calculations are involved and usually more than one solution exists. The geometrical constraints defined in the CAD system for the mechanism linkage's assembling, offer a simple solution for the kinematics analysis.This paper presents a KBE tool useful for kinematics analysis.The automation of repetitive tasks is implemented in an external application written in C# that it is also presented.

  6. Kinematic correction for roller skewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is developed for high-speed cylindrical roller bearings. This stabilization requires race and roller crowning to product changes in the rolling geometry as the roller shifts axially. These changes put a reverse skew in the rolling elements by changing the rolling taper. Twelve basic possible bearing modifications are identified in this paper. Four have single transverse convex curvature in the rollers while eight have rollers with compound transverse curvature composed of a central cylindrical band of constant radius surrounded by symmetric bands with both slope and transverse curvature.

  7. Relativistic kinematics and stationary motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Jorge G.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2009-11-01

    The relativistic jerk, snap and all higher-order kinematical D-vectors are defined for the motion of a massive particle in a D-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. We illustrate the formalism with stationary motions, for which we provide a new, Lorentz covariant, classification. We generalize some cases to branes, explaining the relevance to uniform motion in a heat bath. We also consider some non-stationary motions, including motion with constant proper jerk, and free fall into a black hole as viewed from a GEMS perspective.

  8. THE KINEMATICS OF PRIMATE MIDFOOT FLEXIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Thomas M.; Ball, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a unique assessment of primate intrinsic foot joint kinematics based upon bone pin rigid cluster tracking. It challenges the assumption that human evolution resulted in a reduction of midfoot flexibility, which has been identified in other primates as the “midtarsal break.” Rigid cluster pins were inserted into the foot bones of human, chimpanzee, baboon and macaque cadavers. The positions of these bone pins were monitored during a plantarflexion-dorsiflexion movement cycle. Analysis resolved flexion-extension movement patterns and the associated orientation of rotational axes for the talonavicular, calcaneocuboid and lateral cubometatarsal joints. Results show that midfoot flexibility occurs primarily at the talonavicular and cubometatarsal joints. The rotational magnitudes are roughly similar between humans and chimps. There is also a similarity among evaluated primates in the observed rotations of the lateral cubometatarsal joint, but there was much greater rotation observed for the talonavicular joint, which may serve to differentiate monkeys from the hominines. It appears that the capability for a midtarsal break is present within the human foot. A consideration of the joint axes shows that the medial and lateral joints have opposing orientations, which has been associated with a rigid locking mechanism in the human foot. However, the potential for this same mechanism also appears in the chimpanzee foot. These findings demonstrate a functional similarity within the midfoot of the hominines. Therefore, the kinematic capabilities and restrictions for the skeletal linkages of the human foot may not be as unique as has been previously suggested. PMID:25234343

  9. The Kinematics of Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  10. Identifying the Young Low-mass Stars within 25 pc. II. Distances, Kinematics, and Group Membership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-01

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of lsim300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of lsim25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young (lsim3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and β Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages lsim150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, the du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Subaru Telescope. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial

  11. An observational study of the accuracy and completeness of an anesthesia information management system: recommendations for documentation system changes.

    PubMed

    Wilbanks, Bryan A; Moss, Jacqueline A; Berner, Eta S

    2013-08-01

    Anesthesia information management systems must often be tailored to fit the environment in which they are implemented. Extensive customization necessitates that systems be analyzed for both accuracy and completeness of documentation design to ensure that the final record is a true representation of practice. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of a recently installed system in the capture of key perianesthesia data. This study used an observational design and was conducted using a convenience sample of nurse anesthetists. Observational data of the nurse anesthetists'delivery of anesthesia care were collected using a touch-screen tablet computer utilizing an Access database customized observational data collection tool. A questionnaire was also administered to these nurse anesthetists to assess perceived accuracy, completeness, and satisfaction with the electronic documentation system. The major sources of data not documented in the system were anesthesiologist presence (20%) and placement of intravenous lines (20%). The major sources of inaccuracies in documentation were gas flow rates (45%), medication administration times (30%), and documentation of neuromuscular function testing (20%)-all of the sources of inaccuracies were related to the use of charting templates that were not altered to reflect the actual interventions performed. PMID:23851709

  12. An observational study of the accuracy and completeness of an anesthesia information management system: recommendations for documentation system changes.

    PubMed

    Wilbanks, Bryan A; Moss, Jacqueline A; Berner, Eta S

    2013-08-01

    Anesthesia information management systems must often be tailored to fit the environment in which they are implemented. Extensive customization necessitates that systems be analyzed for both accuracy and completeness of documentation design to ensure that the final record is a true representation of practice. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of a recently installed system in the capture of key perianesthesia data. This study used an observational design and was conducted using a convenience sample of nurse anesthetists. Observational data of the nurse anesthetists'delivery of anesthesia care were collected using a touch-screen tablet computer utilizing an Access database customized observational data collection tool. A questionnaire was also administered to these nurse anesthetists to assess perceived accuracy, completeness, and satisfaction with the electronic documentation system. The major sources of data not documented in the system were anesthesiologist presence (20%) and placement of intravenous lines (20%). The major sources of inaccuracies in documentation were gas flow rates (45%), medication administration times (30%), and documentation of neuromuscular function testing (20%)-all of the sources of inaccuracies were related to the use of charting templates that were not altered to reflect the actual interventions performed.

  13. Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: arthroscopic needling versus complete calcium removal and rotator cuff repair. A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO; DE GIORGI, SILVANA; GAROFALO, RAFFAELE; CONTI, MARCO; TAFURI, SILVIO; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to verify the differences in the clinical outcomes of two arthroscopic techniques used to treat calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: needling versus complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair. Methods from September 2010 to September 2012, 40 patients with calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were arthroscopically treated by the same surgeon using one of the two following techniques: needling (Group 1) and complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair with suture anchors (Group 2). Both groups followed the same rehabilitation program. The two groups were compared at 6 and 12 months of follow-up for the presence of residual calcifications and for the following clinical outcomes: Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation Form (ASES) shoulder score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale, Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results all the clinical scores (Constant, ASES, UCLA, SST and VAS scores) improved significantly between baseline and postoperative follow-up, both at 6 and at 12 months. No differences at final follow-up were found between the two groups. Conclusions both the techniques were effective in solving the symptoms of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder. Clinical scores improved in both groups. Residual calcifications were found in only a few cases and were always less than 10 mm. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26904521

  14. Completed Suicide with Violent and Non-Violent Methods in Rural Shandong, China: A Psychological Autopsy Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shi-Hua; Jia, Cun-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to describe the specific characteristics of completed suicides by violent methods and non-violent methods in rural Chinese population, and to explore the related factors for corresponding methods. Methods Data of this study came from investigation of 199 completed suicide cases and their paired controls of rural areas in three different counties in Shandong, China, by interviewing one informant of each subject using the method of Psychological Autopsy (PA). Results There were 78 (39.2%) suicides with violent methods and 121 (60.8%) suicides with non-violent methods. Ingesting pesticides, as a non-violent method, appeared to be the most common suicide method (103, 51.8%). Hanging (73 cases, 36.7%) and drowning (5 cases, 2.5%) were the only violent methods observed. Storage of pesticides at home and higher suicide intent score were significantly associated with choice of violent methods while committing suicide. Risk factors related to suicide death included negative life events and hopelessness. Conclusions Suicide with violent methods has different factors from suicide with non-violent methods. Suicide methods should be considered in suicide prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:25111835

  15. Index finger and thumb kinematics and performance measurements for common touchscreen gestures.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Deanna S; Dennerlein, Jack T; Jindrich, Devin L

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify differences in 7 touchscreen gestures. Eighteen participants performed index finger tapping, sliding in 4 orthogonal directions, and index finger and thumb pinch and stretch gestures on a touchscreen tablet computer. We hypothesized that two finger gestures would require longer task completion time and greater finger joint excursions than sliding gestures using only the index finger. We measured task completion times and finger joint kinematics. Tapping showed the fastest average (±SD) task completion time, 567(190) ms, of all gestures (p < 0.001). Pinch had faster task completion time, 765(277) ms, than all single-finger sliding gestures (p < 0.001). Stretch was faster to complete at 843(317) ms (p < 0.001) than all sliding gestures except slide right. Stretch demonstrated greater mean index finger metacarpophalangeal flexion/extension joint excursions, 63(16)°, compared to sliding gestures, 34(10)°, and tapping, 27(13)° (p < 0.01). Overall, two-finger gestures were faster to complete and showed greater joint excursions than single-finger sliding gestures. PMID:27633211

  16. Comparative effects of unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on gait kinematics in Parkinson's disease: a randomized, blinded study.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Jagid, Jonathan R; Luca, Corneliu C

    2016-08-01

    Gait dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) does not always respond to bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). Since right hemisphere motor networks may be dominant for gait control, identical stimulation of asymmetric circuits could account for gait dysfunction. We compared the effects of bilateral and unilateral STN-DBS on gait kinematics in PD patients who developed gait impairment after STN-DBS. Twenty-two PD patients with >50 % improvement in motor scores, but dopamine-resistant gait dysfunction 6-12 months after bilateral STN-DBS were blindly tested off dopaminergic effects in four randomly assigned DBS conditions: bilateral, right-sided, left-sided and off stimulation. Motor scores (MDS-UPDRS III), gait scores (MDS-UPRDS 2.11-2.13 + 3.9-3.13), turning time (seconds), stride length (meters) and velocity (meters/second) were measured 1 h after DBS changes. Motor and gait scores significantly improved with bilateral versus unilateral STN-DBS. Stride length and velocity (0.95 ± 0.06, 0.84 ± 0.07) significantly improved with bilateral (1.09 ± 0.04, 0.95 ± 0.05), right-sided (1.06 ± 0.04, 0.92 ± 0.05) and left-sided stimulation (1.01 ± 0.05, 0.90 ± 0.05) (p < 0.05). Stride length significantly improved with right-sided versus left-sided (0.05 ± 0.02) and bilateral versus left-sided stimulation (0.07 ± 0.02) (p < 0.05). Turning time (4.89 ± 0.6) tended to improve with bilateral (4.13 ± 0.5) (p = 0.15) and right-sided (4.27 ± 0.6) (p = 0.2) more than with left STN-DBS (4.69 ± 0.5) (p = 0.5). Bilateral STN-DBS yields greater improvement in motor and gait scores in PD patients. Yet, unilateral stimulation has similar effects on gait kinematics. Particularly, right-sided stimulation might produce slightly greater improvements. Although the clinical relevance of differential programming of right versus left-sided STN-DBS is unclear, this approach could be considered in the management of

  17. On the Motion of a Free Particle in Kinematic Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Ioan Antoniu

    From the viewpoint that Milne's Kinematic Relativity is a fundamental theory of matter in all domain, from elementary particle physics tocosmology, we study the problem of a free particle in the presence of the Universe at large, in the classical and quantum pictures. We formulate the Hamilton-Jacobi, Dirac, and Kelin-Gordon equations for a free particle in the presence of the Universe at large. The form of these equations suggests that Kinematic Relativity is more suitable to serve as a basis for a description of the Early Universe than the ordinary relativistic and quantum theories of contemporary physics.

  18. The morphology and kinematics of neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of z = 0 galaxies with Milky Way masses - a study with the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Nelson, Dylan

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the properties of the circumgalactic gas (circumgalactic medium, CGM) around 120 galaxies with stellar and dark matter halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way. We focus on the morphology and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen and how this depends on fg, the ratio of gas-to-stellar mass within the optical radius. In gas-rich galaxies with fg > 0.1, gas temperatures rise slowly from centre of the halo out to the virial radius and average neutral gas column densities remain above 1019 atoms cm-2 out to radii of 50-70 kpc. In gas-poor galaxies with fg < 0.1, gas temperatures rise quickly outside the edge of the disc to ˜106 K, and then remain fixed out to radii of 100 kpc. The column density of neutral gas quickly drops below 1019 atoms cm-2 at radii of 10 kpc. Neutral gas distributions are also more asymmetric in gas-poor galaxies. Most of the differences between gas-poor and gas-rich galaxies in the Illustris simulation can be attributed to the effects of `radio-mode' AGN feedback. In the Illustris simulation, the circumgalactic gas is found to rotate coherently about the centre of the galaxy with a maximum rotational velocity of around 200 km s-1. In gas-rich galaxies, the average coherence length of the rotating gas is 40 kpc, compared to 10 kpc in gas-poor galaxies. In the very most gas-rich systems, the CGM can rotate coherently over scales of 70-100 kpc. We discuss our results in the context of recent observations of the CGM in low-mass galaxies via UV absorption-line spectroscopy and deep 21 cm observations of edge-on spiral galaxies.

  19. The morphology and kinematics of neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of z=0 galaxies with Milky Way masses - a study with the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Nelson, Dylan

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the properties of the circumgalactic gas (CGM) around 120 galaxies with stellar and dark matter halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way. We focus on the morphology and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen and how this depends on fg, the ratio of gas-to-stellar mass within the optical radius. In gas-rich galaxies with fg > 0.1, gas temperatures rise slowly from center of the halo out to the virial radius and average neutral gas column densities remain above 1019 atoms cm-2 out to radii of 50-70 kpc. In gas-poor galaxies with fg < 0.1, gas temperatures rise quickly outside the edge of the disk to ˜106 K, and then remain fixed out to radii of 100 kpc. The column density of neutral gas quickly drops below 1019 atoms cm-2 at radii of 10 kpc. Neutral gas distributions are also more asymmetric in gas-poor galaxies. Most of the differences between gas-poor and gas-rich galaxies in the Illustris simulation can be attributed to the effects of "radio-mode" AGN feedback. In the Illustris simulation, the circumgalactic gas is found to rotate coherently about the center of the galaxy with a maximum rotational velocity of around 200 km/s. In gas-rich galaxies, the average coherence length of the rotating gas is 40 kpc, compared to 10 kpc in gas-poor galaxies. In the very most gas-rich systems, the CGM can rotate coherently over scales of 70-100 kpc. We discuss our results in the context of recent observations of the CGM in low mass galaxies via UV absorption-line spectroscopy and deep 21cm observations of edge-on spiral galaxies,

  20. Basic concepts of kinematic-wave models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The kinematic-wave model is one of a number of approximations of the dynamic-wave model. The dynamic-wave model describes one-dimensional shallow-water waves (unsteady, gradually varied, open-channel flow). The report provides a basic reference on the theory and application of kinematic-wave models and describes the limitations of the model in relation to the other approximations of the dynamic-wave model. In the kinematic-wave approximation, a number of the terms in the equation of motion are assumed to be insignificant. The equation of motion is replaced by an equation describing uniform flow. Thus, the kinematic-wave model is described by the continuity equation and a uniform flow equation such as the well-known Chezy or Manning formulas. Kinematic-wave models are applicable to overland flow where lateral inflow is continuously added and is a large part of the total flow. For channel-routing applications, the kinematic-wave model always predicts a steeper wave with less dispersion and attenuation than actually occurs. The effect of the accumulation of errors in the kinematic-wave model shows that the approximations made in the development of the kinematic-wave equations are not generally justified for most channel-routing applications. Modified flow-routing models can be used which help to stop the accumulation of error that occurs when the kinematic-wave model is applied. (USGS)

  1. Kinematic Constraints Associated with the Acquisition of Overarm Throwing Part I: Step and Trunk Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stodden, David F.; Langendorfer, Stephen J.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Andrews, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine differences within specific kinematic variables and ball velocity associated with developmental component levels of step and trunk action (Roberton & Halverson, 1984), and (b) if the differences in kinematic variables were significantly associated with the differences in component levels, determine…

  2. Kinematic Constraints Associated with the Acquisition of Overarm Throwing Part II: Upper Extremity Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stodden, David F.; Langendorfer, Stephen J.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Andrews, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the differences within 11 specific kinematic variables and an outcome measure (ball velocity) associated with component developmental levels of humerus and forearm action (Roberton & Halverson, 1984), and (b) if the differences in kinematic variables were significantly associated with the differences…

  3. Chromosomal Study is Must for Prepubertal Girl with Inguinal Hernia: Opportunity to Diagnose Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Debdeep; Patra, Dipak Kumar; De, Angshuman; Mallick, Barindranath

    2015-01-01

    The sufferers of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) are phenotypic females despite of having functional testes and normal male karyotype. They usually present late with primary amenorrhea but delayed diagnosis increases chance of gonadal malignancy. Alertness for this entity is crucial as with early diagnosis such disorder can be managed more appropriately for a better future. We hereby describe a case of CAIS in an 8-year-old girl presented with bilateral inguinal swellings. Endocrinological analysis, radiological investigations and cytogenetic studies were done. Investigations revealed absence of female internal genitalia. Karyotyping and molecular study confirmed the presence of Y chromosome. Parents were counseled regarding timely gonadectomy, fertility and other long term social issues. PMID:26023570

  4. The effect of aerobic exercise during the interset rest periods on kinematics, kinetics, and lactate clearance of two resistance loading schemes.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Nur I; Cronin, John B; Nosaka, Ken K

    2012-01-01

    It may be possible to enhance set and session kinematics and kinetics by engaging in low-intensity aerobic exercise during the interset rest period. The purpose of this study therefore was to quantify the change in session kinematics and kinetics of 35% 1RM and 70% 1RM loading schemes equated by volume, when aerobic exercise or passive rest was undertaken between sets. Twelve male student athletes were recruited for this study. Squat average force, peak force, average power, peak power, total work, and total impulse were quantified using a force plate and linear transducer. Blood lactate samples were taken before set 1, after set 1, after set 2, and after the last set performed. No significant (p < 0.05) differences (0.37-9.24%) were found in any of the kinematic and kinetic variables of interset after active or passive interset rest periods. Significant increases (64-76%) in blood lactate occurred from the inception of exercise to completion, for both the heavy and light loading schemes. However, no significant differences in lactate accumulation were noted, whether active or passive recovery was undertaken in the interest rest period. It was concluded that active recovery in the form of low-intensity cycling offered no additional benefits in terms of lactate clearance and enhancement of set and session kinematics and kinetics.

  5. Ballistic representation for kinematic access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    This work uses simple two-body orbital dynamics to initially determine the kinematic access for a ballistic vehicle. Primarily this analysis was developed to assess when a rocket body might conjunct with an orbiting satellite platform. A family of access opportunities can be represented as a volume for a specific rocket relative to its launch platform. Alternately, the opportunities can be represented as a geographical footprint relative to aircraft or satellite position that encompasses all possible launcher locations for a specific rocket. A thrusting rocket is treated as a ballistic vehicle that receives all its energy at launch and follows a coasting trajectory. To do so, the rocket's burnout energy is used to find its equivalent initial velocity for a given launcher's altitude. Three kinematic access solutions are then found that account for spherical Earth rotation. One solution finds the maximum range for an ascent-only trajectory while another solution accommodates a descending trajectory. In addition, the ascent engagement for the descending trajectory is used to depict a rapid access scenario. These preliminary solutions are formulated to address ground-, sea-, or air-launched vehicles.

  6. A Universal Kinematic Scaling Relation and Galaxy Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis

    We retrace the development of a kinematic scaling relation, referred to as the Fundamental Manifold (FM), that addresses shortcomings of the commonly used fundamental plane in certain contexts. We then examine whether bulges separately satisfy the FM relation and discuss what the success or failure of such a match implies for the nature of classical- and pseudo-bulges. On the basis of this preliminary analysis we suggest that while classical bulges appear to be independent, dynamically complete subsystems within their host galaxies that satisfy the scaling relation, pseudobulges do not satisfy the scaling relation and so probably consist of an unrepresentative subset of disc stars. This is currently not a unique explanation of the results, but the use of kinematic scaling relations with larger samples, done in a more systematic manner, could lead to a more definitive resolution on the nature of bulges.

  7. Demographic and Predeparture Factors Associated With Drinking and Alcohol-Related Consequences for College Students Completing Study Abroad Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Skidmore, Jessica R.; Aresi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Study abroad students are at-risk for increased and problematic drinking behavior. As few efforts have been made to examine this at-risk population, we predicted drinking and alcohol-related consequences abroad from predeparture and site-specific factors. Participants: The sample consisted of 339 students completing study abroad programs. Method: Participants filled out online measures at predeparture, abroad, and at post-return. Results: We found drinking and consequences abroad were predicted by a number of factors including demographics (e.g., younger age, male sex, Greek affiliation, White ethnicity), student factors (e.g. low GPA, major area of study), study abroad site factors (e.g., apartment living abroad, study in Europe), predeparture levels of drinking and consequences, sensation seeking, and goals related to social gathering. Conclusions: Findings can be used to inform campus policies for admission to study abroad programs as well as assist in the development of interventions targeted toward preventing risk for students during abroad experiences. PMID:24499190

  8. The experiences of women engineers who have completed one to five years of professional engineering employment: A phenomenological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan M.

    Women engineers remain underrepresented in employment in engineering fields in the United States. Feminist theory views this gender disparity beyond equity in numbers for women engineers and looks at structural issues of women's access, opportunities, and quality of experience in the workplace. Research on women's success and persistence in engineering education is diverse; however, there are few studies that focus on the early years of women's careers in engineering and less using a phenomenological research design. Experiences of women engineers who have completed one to five years of professional engineering employment are presented using a phenomenological research design. Research questions explored the individual and composite experiences for the co-researchers of the study as well as challenges and advantages of the phenomenon of having completed one to five years of professional engineering employment. Themes that emanated from the data were a feeling that engineering is a positive profession, liking math and science from an early age, having experiences of attending math and science camps or learning and practicing engineering interests with their fathers for some co-researchers. Other themes included a feeling of being different as a woman in the engineering workplace, taking advantage of opportunities for training, education, and advancement to further their careers, and the role of informal and formal mentoring in developing workplace networks and engineering expertise. Co-researchers negotiated issues of management quality and support, experiences of gender discrimination in the workplace, and having to make decisions balancing their careers and family responsibilities. Finally, the women engineers for this research study expressed intentions to persist in their careers while pursuing expertise and experience in their individual engineering fields.

  9. Kinematic analysis of males with transtibial amputation carrying military loads.

    PubMed

    Schnall, Barri L; Hendershot, Brad D; Bell, Johanna C; Wolf, Erik J

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical responses to load carriage, a common task for dismounted troops, have been well studied in nondisabled individuals. However, with recent shifts in the rehabilitation and retention process of injured servicemembers, there remains a substantial need for understanding these responses in persons with lower-limb amputations. Temporal-spatial and kinematic gait parameters were analyzed among 10 male servicemembers with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA) and 10 uninjured male controls. Participants completed six treadmill walking trials in all combinations of two speeds (1.34 and 1.52 m/s) and three loads (none, 21.8, and 32.7 kg). Persons with TTA exhibited biomechanical compensations to carried loads that are comparable to those observed in uninjured individuals. However, several distinct gait changes appear to be unique to those with TTA, notably, increased dorsiflexion (deformation) of the prosthetic foot/ankle, less stance knee flexion on the prosthetic limb, and altered trunk forward lean/excursion. Such evidence supports the need for future work to assess the risk for overuse injuries with carried loads in this population in addition to guiding the development of adaptive prosthetic feet/components to meet the needs of redeployed servicemembers or veterans/civilians in physically demanding occupations. PMID:25815769

  10. Kinematics of a Massive Star Cluster in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    We propose to measure the proper motion stellar kinematics of a massive (~10^4Msun), forming proto-star-cluster to test basic theoretical models of formation. This will be the first time such a measurement has been performed. It requires HST-WFC3/IR and is beyond the practical capabilities of ground-based adaptive optics (AO) observations. In contrast to previously-studied massive, young (<10 Myr-old), already-formed clusters, such as NGC3603, Westerlund 1 or the Arches, our target protocluster, G286.21+0.17 (hereafter G286), is still gas-dominated and undergoing active star formation. It has been carefully selected from a complete survey of ~300 dense molecular gas clumps in a 120 sq. deg. region of the Galactic plane. The cluster is also relatively nearby (~2.5 kpc), but not too close that it would span a prohibitively large angular area or suffer from significant saturation problems. Such massive systems are rare and indeed we are unaware of any equivalent, early-stage (i.e., gas dominated) cluster that is closer. Given the depth of its gravitational potential based on its mass and size, the expected proper motions of many independent sub-clusters of stars are detectable at the ~5 sigma level over a 2-year baseline and global contraction of the cluster can be seen if it is happening even at just ~10% of the free-fall rate.

  11. Differences in Soccer Kick Kinematics between Blind Players and Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Katis, Athanasios; Kellis, Eleftherios; Natsikas, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the kinematic differences during instep soccer kicks between players who were blind and sighted controls. Eleven male soccer players who were blind and nine male sighted performed instep kicks under static and dynamic conditions. The results indicated significantly higher (p less than 0.05) ball…

  12. Kinematical superalgebras and Lie algebras of order 3

    SciTech Connect

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.; Rausch de Traubenberg, M.

    2008-06-15

    We study and classify kinematical algebras which appear in the framework of Lie superalgebras or Lie algebras of order 3. All these algebras are related through generalized Inonue-Wigner contractions from either the orthosymplectic superalgebra or the de Sitter Lie algebra of order 3.

  13. The Change in Eating Behaviors in a Web-Based Weight Loss Program: A Longitudinal Analysis of Study Completers

    PubMed Central

    Hult, Mari; van der Mark, Marianne; Grotta, Alessandra; Jonasson, Josefine; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne; Rössner, Stephan; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    Background Eating behaviors are essential components in weight loss programs, but limited research has explored eating behaviors in Web-based weight loss programs. Objectives The aim was to evaluate an interactive Web-based weight loss program on eating behaviors using the 18-item Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire Revised (TFEQ-R18) which measures uncontrolled eating, emotional eating, and cognitive restrained eating. Our Web-based weight loss program is comprised of information about healthy lifestyle choices, weekly chats with experts, social networking features, databases for recipe searches, and features allowing members to self-report and track their weight, physical activity, and dietary intake on the website. Methods On registering for the weight loss program, 23,333 members agreed to take part in the research study. The participants were then asked to complete the TFEQ-R18 questionnaire at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of participation. All data collection was conducted online, with no face-to-face contact. To study changes in TFEQ-R18 eating behaviors we restricted our study to those members who completed all 3 TFEQ-R18 questionnaires. These participants were defined as “completers” and the remaining as “noncompleters.” The relationships between sex, change in eating behaviors, and total weight loss were studied using repeated measures ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results In total, 22,800 individuals participated (females: 19,065/22,800, 83.62%; mean age 39.6, SD 11.4 years; BMI 29.0 kg/m2; males: 3735/22,800, 16.38%; mean age 43.2, SD 11.7 years; BMI 30.8 kg/m2). Noncompleters (n=22,180) were younger and reported a lower score of uncontrolled eating and a higher score of cognitive restrained eating. Over time, completers (n=620) decreased their uncontrolled eating score (from 56.3 to 32.0; P<.001) and increased their cognitive restrained eating (from 50.6 to 62.9; P<.001). Males decreased their emotional eating (from 57.2 to 35

  14. Imaging spectrophotometry of ionized gas in NGC 1068. I - Kinematics of the narrow-line region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Gerald; Bland, Jonathan; Tully, R. Brent

    1990-01-01

    The kinematics of collisionally excited forbidden N II 6548, 6583 across the inner 1 arcmin diameter of the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 is mapped using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer and low-noise CCD. The stack of monochromatic images, which spatially resolved the high-velocity gas, was analyzed for kinematic and photometric content. Profiles agree well with previous long-slit work, and their complete spatial coverage makes it possible to constrain the gas volume distribution. It is found that the narrow-line region is distributed in a thick center-darkened, line-emitting cylinder that envelopes the collimated radio jet. Three distinct kinematic subsystems, of which the cylinder is composed, are discussed in detail. Detailed behavior of the emission-line profiles, at the few points in the NE quadrant with simple kinematics, argues that the ionized gas develops a significant component of motion perpendicular to the jet axis.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genomes of Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus (Xiphosura, Arthropoda) and implications for chelicerate phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Baek, Su Youn; Choi, Eun Hwa; Jang, Kuem Hee; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Park, Sang Myeon; Suk, Ho Young; Chang, Cheon Young; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2014-01-01

    Horseshoe crabs (order Xiphosura) are often referred to as an ancient order of marine chelicerates and have been considered as keystone taxa for the understanding of chelicerate evolution. However, the mitochondrial genome of this order is only available from a single species, Limulus polyphemus. In the present study, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from two Asian horseshoe crabs, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus to offer novel data for the evolutionary relationship within Xiphosura and their position in the chelicerate phylogeny. The mitochondrial genomes of C. rotundicauda (15,033 bp) and T. tridentatus (15,006 bp) encode 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes. Overall sequences and genome structure of two Asian species were highly similar to that of Limulus polyphemus, though clear differences among three were found in the stem-loop structure of the putative control region. In the phylogenetic analysis with complete mitochondrial genomes of 43 chelicerate species, C. rotundicauda and T. tridentatus were recovered as a monophyly, while L. polyphemus solely formed an independent clade. Xiphosuran species were placed at the basal root of the tree, and major other chelicerate taxa were clustered in a single monophyly, clearly confirming that horseshoe crabs composed an ancestral taxon among chelicerates. By contrast, the phylogenetic tree without the information of Asian horseshoe crabs did not support monophyletic clustering of other chelicerates. In conclusion, our analyses may provide more robust and reliable perspective on the study of evolutionary history for chelicerates than earlier analyses with a single Atlantic species. PMID:24795529

  16. Complete mitochondrial genomes of Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus (Xiphosura, Arthropoda) and implications for chelicerate phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Baek, Su Youn; Choi, Eun Hwa; Jang, Kuem Hee; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Park, Sang Myeon; Suk, Ho Young; Chang, Cheon Young; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2014-01-01

    Horseshoe crabs (order Xiphosura) are often referred to as an ancient order of marine chelicerates and have been considered as keystone taxa for the understanding of chelicerate evolution. However, the mitochondrial genome of this order is only available from a single species, Limulus polyphemus. In the present study, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from two Asian horseshoe crabs, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus to offer novel data for the evolutionary relationship within Xiphosura and their position in the chelicerate phylogeny. The mitochondrial genomes of C. rotundicauda (15,033 bp) and T. tridentatus (15,006 bp) encode 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes. Overall sequences and genome structure of two Asian species were highly similar to that of Limulus polyphemus, though clear differences among three were found in the stem-loop structure of the putative control region. In the phylogenetic analysis with complete mitochondrial genomes of 43 chelicerate species, C. rotundicauda and T. tridentatus were recovered as a monophyly, while L. polyphemus solely formed an independent clade. Xiphosuran species were placed at the basal root of the tree, and major other chelicerate taxa were clustered in a single monophyly, clearly confirming that horseshoe crabs composed an ancestral taxon among chelicerates. By contrast, the phylogenetic tree without the information of Asian horseshoe crabs did not support monophyletic clustering of other chelicerates. In conclusion, our analyses may provide more robust and reliable perspective on the study of evolutionary history for chelicerates than earlier analyses with a single Atlantic species.

  17. Complete Mitochondrial Genomes of Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus (Xiphosura, Arthropoda) and Implications for Chelicerate Phylogenetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Su Youn; Choi, Eun Hwa; Jang, Kuem Hee; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Park, Sang Myeon; Suk, Ho Young; Chang, Cheon Young; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2014-01-01

    Horseshoe crabs (order Xiphosura) are often referred to as an ancient order of marine chelicerates and have been considered as keystone taxa for the understanding of chelicerate evolution. However, the mitochondrial genome of this order is only available from a single species, Limulus polyphemus. In the present study, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from two Asian horseshoe crabs, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus to offer novel data for the evolutionary relationship within Xiphosura and their position in the chelicerate phylogeny. The mitochondrial genomes of C. rotundicauda (15,033 bp) and T. tridentatus (15,006 bp) encode 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes. Overall sequences and genome structure of two Asian species were highly similar to that of Limulus polyphemus, though clear differences among three were found in the stem-loop structure of the putative control region. In the phylogenetic analysis with complete mitochondrial genomes of 43 chelicerate species, C. rotundicauda and T. tridentatus were recovered as a monophyly, while L. polyphemus solely formed an independent clade. Xiphosuran species were placed at the basal root of the tree, and major other chelicerate taxa were clustered in a single monophyly, clearly confirming that horseshoe crabs composed an ancestral taxon among chelicerates. By contrast, the phylogenetic tree without the information of Asian horseshoe crabs did not support monophyletic clustering of other chelicerates. In conclusion, our analyses may provide more robust and reliable perspective on the study of evolutionary history for chelicerates than earlier analyses with a single Atlantic species. PMID:24795529

  18. EMG and Kinematic Responses to Unexpected Slips After Slip Training in Virtual Reality

    PubMed Central

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to design a virtual reality (VR) training to induce perturbation in older adults similar to a slip and examine the effect of the training on kinematic and muscular responses in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were involved in a laboratory study and randomly assigned to two groups (virtual reality training and control). Both groups went through three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on slippery surface. The training group experienced twelve simulated slips using a visual perturbation induced by tilting a virtual reality scene while walking on the treadmill and the control group completed normal walking during the training session. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results demonstrated the proactive adjustments such as increased trunk flexion at heel contact after training. Reactive adjustments included reduced time to peak activations of knee flexors, reduced knee coactivation, reduced time to trunk flexion, and reduced trunk angular velocity after training. In conclusion, the study findings indicate that the VR training was able to generate a perturbation in older adults that evoked recovery reactions and such motor skill can be transferred to the actual slip trials. PMID:25296401

  19. The influence of a foot orthotic on lower extremity transverse plane kinematics in collegiate female athletes with pes planus.

    PubMed

    Christopher, R Carcia; Drouin, Joshua M; Houglum, Peggy A

    2006-01-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in female athletes remain prevalent. Athletes with excessive foot pronation have been identified to be at greater risk for non-contact ACL injury. Excessive foot pronation has been linked to increased medial tibial rotation. Increased medial tibial rotation heightens ACL strain and has been observed at or near the time of ACL injury. Foot orthotics have been shown to decrease medial tibial rotation during walking and running tasks. The effect of a foot orthotic on activities that simulate a non-contact ACL injury mechanism (i.e. landing) however is unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether a foot orthotic was capable of altering transverse plane lower extremity kinematics in female athletes during landing. Twenty uninjured collegiate female athletes participating in the sports of basketball, soccer or volleyball with pes planus volunteered. Utilizing a repeated measures counterbalanced design, subjects completed two landing tasks with and without a foot orthotic using standardized footwear. The prefabricated orthotic had a rigid shell and a 6 extrinsic rear-foot varus post. Dependent measures included initial contact angle, peak angle, excursion and time to peak angle for both the tibia and femur. Statistical analysis suggested that the selected foot orthosis had little influence over lower extremity transverse plane kinematics. Several factors including: the limitation of a static measure to predict dynamic movement, inter-subject variability and the physical characteristics of the orthotic device likely account for the results. Future research should examine the influence of different types of foot orthotics not only on lower extremity kinematics but also tibiofemoral kinetics. Key PointsLower extremity transverse plane kinematics in female athletes during a landing task exhibit substantial variability.A rigid prefabricated foot orthotic does not significantly alter transverse

  20. Kinematics of the free throw in basketball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, A.; Miller, G.

    1981-06-01

    The kinematics of the two basic styles of free throw in basketball are discussed. It is shown that from a purely kinematic and trajectory point of view, the overhand push shot is preferable to the underhand loop shot. The advantages of the underhand shot lie in the actual execution of the shot.

  1. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes.

  2. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report.

    PubMed

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes. PMID:27630445

  3. Low speed maneuvering flight of the rose-breasted cockatoo (Eolophus roseicapillus). I. Kinematic and neuromuscular control of turning.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, T L; Biewener, A A

    2007-06-01

    Maneuvering flight has long been recognized as an important component of the natural behavior of many bird species, but has been the subject of little experimental work. Here we examine the kinematics and neuromuscular control of turning flight in the rose-breasted cockatoo Eolophus roseicapillus (N=6), testing predictions of maneuvering flight and control based on aerodynamic theory and prior kinematic and neuromuscular studies. Six cockatoos were trained to navigate between two perches placed in an L-shaped flight corridor, making a 90 degrees turn midway through each flight. Flights were recorded with three synchronized high-speed video cameras placed outside the corridor, allowing a three-dimensional reconstruction of wing and body kinematics through the turn. We simultaneously collected electromyography recordings from bilateral implants in the pectoralis, supracoracoideus, biceps brachii and extensor metacarpi radialis muscles. The cockatoos maneuvered using flapping, banked turns with an average turn radius of 0.92 m. The mean rate of change in heading during a complete wingbeat varied through the turn and was significantly correlated to roll angle at mid-downstroke. Changes in roll angle were found to include both within-wingbeat and among-wingbeat components that bear no direct relationship to one another. Within-wingbeat changes in roll were dominated by the inertial effects while among-wingbeat changes in roll were likely the result of both inertial and aerodynamic effects.

  4. Kinematic determinants of weapon velocity during the fencing lunge in experienced épée fencers.

    PubMed

    Bottoms, Lindsay; Greenhalgh, Andrew; Sinclair, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The lunge is the most common attack in fencing, however there is currently a paucity of published research investigating the kinematics of this movement. The aim of this study was to investigate if kinematics measured during the épée fencing lunge had a significant effect on sword velocity at touch and whether there were any key movement tactics that produced the maximum velocity. Lower extremity kinematic data were obtained from fourteen right handed club épée fencers using a 3D motion capture system as they completed simulated lunges. A forward stepwise multiple linear regression was performed on the data. The overall regression model yielded an Adj R2 of 0.74, p ≤ 0.01. The results show that the rear lower extremity's knee range of motion, peak hip flexion and the fore lower extremity's peak hip flexion all in the sagittal plane were significant predictors of sword velocity. The results indicate that flexion of the rear extremity's knee is an important predictor, suggesting that the fencer sits low in their stance to produce power during the lunge. Furthermore it would appear that the magnitude of peak flexion of the fore extremity's hip was a significant indicator of sword velocity suggesting movement of fore limbs should also be considered in lunge performance.

  5. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes. PMID:27630445

  6. In situ studies of surface of NiFe2O4 catalyst during complete oxidation of methane

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Shiran; Shan, Junjun; Nie, Longhui; Nguyen, Luan; Wu, Zili; Tao, Franklin

    2015-12-21

    Here, NiFe2O4 with an inverse spinel structure exhibits high activity for a complete oxidation of methane at 400 °C–425 °C and a higher temperature. The surface of the catalyst and its adsorbates were well characterized with ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and in situ infrared spectroscopy (IR). In situ studies of the surface of NiFe2O4 using AP-XPS suggest the formation of methoxy-like and formate-like intermediates at a temperature lower than 200 °C, supported by the observed vibrational signatures in in situ IR studies. Evolutions of C1s photoemission features and the nominal atomic ratios of C/(Ni + Fe) of themore » catalyst surface suggest that the formate-like intermediate is transformed to product molecules CO2 and H2O in the temperature range of 250–300 °C. In situ studies suggest the formation of a spectator, – Olattice – CH2 – Olattice –. It strongly bonds to surface through C–O bonds and cannot be activated even at 400 °C.« less

  7. In situ studies of surface of NiFe2O4 catalyst during complete oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiran; Shan, Junjun; Nie, Longhui; Nguyen, Luan; Wu, Zili; Tao, Franklin (Feng)

    2016-06-01

    NiFe2O4 with an inverse spinel structure exhibits high activity for a complete oxidation of methane at 400 °C-425 °C and a higher temperature. The surface of the catalyst and its adsorbates were well characterized with ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and in situ infrared spectroscopy (IR). In situ studies of the surface of NiFe2O4 using AP-XPS suggest the formation of methoxy-like and formate-like intermediates at a temperature lower than 200 °C, supported by the observed vibrational signatures in in situ IR studies. Evolutions of C1s photoemission features and the nominal atomic ratios of C/(Ni + Fe) of the catalyst surface suggest that the formate-like intermediate is transformed to product molecules CO2 and H2O in the temperature range of 250-300 °C. In situ studies suggest the formation of a spectator, - Olatticesbnd CH2sbnd Olattice -. It strongly bonds to surface through Csbnd O bonds and cannot be activated even at 400 °C.

  8. Achieving complete nitrogen removal by coupling nitritation-anammox and methane-dependent denitrification: A model-based study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueming; Guo, Jianhua; Xie, Guo-Jun; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) processes enables the complete nitrogen removal from wastewater by utilizing the methane produced on site from anaerobic digesters. This model-based study investigated the mechanisms and operational window for efficient nitrogen removal by coupling nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) and methane-dependent denitrification in membrane biofilm reactors (MBfRs). A mathematical model was applied to describe the microbial interactions among Anammox bacteria, DAMO archaea, and DAMO bacteria. The model sufficiently described the batch experimental data from an MBfR containing an Anammox-DAMO biofilm with different feeding nitrogen compositions, which confirmed the validity of the model. The effects of process parameters on the system performance and microbial community structure could therefore be reliably evaluated. The impacts of nitritation produced NO2(-)/NH4(+) ratio, methane supply, biofilm thickness and total nitrogen (TN) surface loading were comprehensively investigated with the model. Results showed that the optimum NO2(-)/NH4(+) ratio produced from nitritation for the Anammox-DAMO biofilm system was around 1.0 in order to achieve the maximum TN removal (over 99.0%), independent on TN surface loading. The corresponding optimal methane supply increased while the associated methane utilization efficiency decreased with the increase of TN surface loading. The cooperation between DAMO organisms and Anammox bacteria played the key role in the TN removal. Based on these results, the proof-of-concept feasibility of a single-stage MBfR coupling nitritation-Anammox-DAMO for complete nitrogen removal was also tested through integrating the model with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) processes whilst controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the simulated system. The maximum TN removal was found to be achieved at the bulk DO concentration of

  9. Effect of palatal form on movement of teeth during processing of complete denture prosthesis: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Sumanth; Manjunath, Shaurya; Vajawat, Mayuri

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the influence of shallow and deep palatal forms on the movement of teeth during the processing of complete denture prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Maxillary casts with shallow and deep palatal forms were selected and duplicated to make 10 casts of each palatal form. Base plates were constructed and teeth were arranged in their anatomic positions. Metal pins with true apex were placed on the central groove of the right and left first molars and one on the incisive papilla area as a reference point. Casts were scanned using i-CAT Vision Q 1.9 (i-CAT cone beam 3D dental imaging system by Imaging Sciences International, PA, USA), which has 360° rotational tomography. The distances between the apices of metallic pin inserts on the teeth and fitted point of reference were recorded in buccopalatal axes at waxed up stage, after deflasking, and after finishing and polishing. Results: Results showed a statistically significant movement of teeth in shallow and deep palatal forms during all stages of complete denture processing. In shallow palatal form dentures, there was a significant tooth movement in palatal direction between Stages 1 and 2 (P ≤ 0.05) and buccal movement between Stages 2 and 3. In deep palatal form dentures, teeth showed a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) movement in buccal direction during all stages of denture processing. Conclusion: Teeth showed significant movement during processing of acrylic resin dentures. Overall, the movement of teeth in shallow palatal form dentures was in palatal direction, whereas in deep palatal form dentures, the movement of teeth was in buccal direction. PMID:27041898

  10. Bayesian kinematic earthquake source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, S. E.; Simons, M.; Beck, J. L.; Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J. E.; Chowdhury, F.; Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.; Comte, D.; Glass, B.; Leiva, C.; Ortega, F. H.

    2009-12-01

    Most coseismic, postseismic, and interseismic slip models are based on highly regularized optimizations which yield one solution which satisfies the data given a particular set of regularizing constraints. This regularization hampers our ability to answer basic questions such as whether seismic and aseismic slip overlap or instead rupture separate portions of the fault zone. We present a Bayesian methodology for generating kinematic earthquake source models with a focus on large subduction zone earthquakes. Unlike classical optimization approaches, Bayesian techniques sample the ensemble of all acceptable models presented as an a posteriori probability density function (PDF), and thus we can explore the entire solution space to determine, for example, which model parameters are well determined and which are not, or what is the likelihood that two slip distributions overlap in space. Bayesian sampling also has the advantage that all a priori knowledge of the source process can be used to mold the a posteriori ensemble of models. Although very powerful, Bayesian methods have up to now been of limited use in geophysical modeling because they are only computationally feasible for problems with a small number of free parameters due to what is called the "curse of dimensionality." However, our methodology can successfully sample solution spaces of many hundreds of parameters, which is sufficient to produce finite fault kinematic earthquake models. Our algorithm is a modification of the tempered Markov chain Monte Carlo (tempered MCMC or TMCMC) method. In our algorithm, we sample a "tempered" a posteriori PDF using many MCMC simulations running in parallel and evolutionary computation in which models which fit the data poorly are preferentially eliminated in favor of models which better predict the data. We present results for both synthetic test problems as well as for the 2007 Mw 7.8 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake, the latter of which is constrained by InSAR, local high

  11. Kinematics of chiropteran shoulder girdle in flight.

    PubMed

    Panyutina, A A; Kuznetsov, A N; Korzun, L P

    2013-03-01

    New data on the mechanisms of movements of the shoulder girdle and humerus of bats are described; potential mobility is compared to the movements actually used in flight. The study was performed on the basis of morphological and functional analysis of anatomical specimens of 15 species, high speed and high definition filming of two species and X-ray survey of Rousettus aegyptiacus flight. Our observations indicate that any excursions of the shoulder girdle in bats have relatively small input in the wing amplitude. Shoulder girdle movements resemble kinematics of a crank mechanism: clavicle plays the role of crank, and scapula-the role of connecting rod. Previously described osseous "locking mechanisms" in shoulder joint of advanced bats do not affect the movements, actually used in flight. The wing beats in bats are performed predominantly by movements of humerus relative to shoulder girdle, although these movements occupy the caudal-most sector of available shoulder mobility. PMID:23381941

  12. Magnitude of multiplanar breast kinematics differs depending upon run distance.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Alexandra; Mills, Chris; Corbett, Jo; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Recommendations for breast support, dynamic breast pain assessment, and implications for sports performance have been made within breast biomechanics research; however, these studies have been based upon short exercise protocols (2-5 min). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of breast support on multiplanar breast kinematics over a 5-kilometre run. Ten female participants (34D or 32DD) conducted two 5-kilometre runs, in a low and high breast support. Relative multiplanar breast kinematics were averaged over five gait cycles at six intervals of a 5-kilometre run. Increases in multiplanar breast kinematics were reported from the start to the end of the run, with the greatest rate of increase in breast kinematics reported within the first two kilometres of running. The greatest relative increases in breast range of motion (34%), velocity (33%), and acceleration (41%) were reported in the superioinferior direction at the fifth kilometre (33 min of running) in the high breast support. Key findings suggest that the run distance, and therefore run duration, employed for both fundamental research and product validation protocols should be carefully considered and it is suggested that running protocols for assessing breast biomechanics should exceed 7 min.

  13. Structure and Kinematics of Early-Type Galaxies from Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Observations of galaxy isophotes, long-slit kinematics, and high-resolution photometry suggested a possible dichotomy between two distinct classes of elliptical galaxies. But these methods are expensive for large galaxy samples. Instead, integral field spectroscopy can efficiently recognize the shape, dynamics, and stellar population of complete samples of early-type galaxies (ETGs). These studies showed that the two main classes, the fast and slow rotators, can be separated using stellar kinematics. I show that there is a dichotomy in the dynamics of the two classes. The slow rotators are weakly triaxial and dominate above [Formula: see text]. Below Mcrit, the structure of fast rotators parallels that of spiral galaxies. There is a smooth sequence along which the age, the metal content, the enhancement in α-elements, and the weight of the stellar initial mass function all increase with the central mass density slope, or bulge mass fraction, while the molecular gas fraction correspondingly decreases. The properties of ETGs on galaxy scaling relations, in particular the [Formula: see text] diagram, and their dependence on environment, indicate two main independent channels for galaxy evolution. Fast-rotator ETGs start as star-forming disks and evolve through a channel dominated by gas accretion, bulge growth, and quenching, whereas slow rotators assemble near the centers of massive halos via intense star formation at high redshift and remain as such for the rest of their evolution via a channel dominated by gas poor mergers. This is consistent with independent studies of the galaxies redshift evolution.

  14. Immediate effects of unilateral restricted ankle motion on gait kinematics in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Romkes, Jacqueline; Schweizer, Katrin

    2015-03-01

    Correcting a pathological toe walking gait pattern can be achieved by restricting excessive plantarflexion during the swing phase of gait. A common conservative treatment measure is providing the patient with an ankle-foot-orthosis on the affected lower leg. This study examined the lower body gait kinematics and temporal-spatial parameters of fifteen healthy adults when walking freely and with unilateral restricted ankle motion. The latter was achieved by fitting an ankle-foot-orthosis. Specific hip and knee kinematic parameters and temporal-spatial parameters were investigated. Differences between the two conditions were calculated by paired Student's t-tests and 95% confidence intervals. Unilateral restricted ankle motion influenced kinematics mainly in the swing phase. Hip and knee peak flexion in the swing phase were increased on the restricted side (hip: 49.2° (SD 4.2°), knee: 75.9° (SD 6.1°)) compared to walking freely (hip: 43.3° (SD 4.5°), knee: 66.7° (SD 5.3°)). Peak hip flexion occurred earlier in the swing phase in the restricted condition (85% (SD 2%)) compared to the free-walking condition (96% (SD 5%)). For these parameters, the confidence intervals were different, indicating clinical relevance. Walking with unilateral restricted ankle motion had a negative effect on walking velocity, cadence, step time, and step length. The confidence intervals, however, overlapped. These results might be a reaction to unusual sensory feedback from the feet with the ankle-foot-orthosis or due to increased hip flexor activity compensating for the reduced function of the plantarflexors. The evaluation of the immediate changes in unilateral restricted ankle motion in individuals with healthy gaits can contribute to a more complete understanding on this topic. PMID:25800648

  15. Moving the Completion Needle at Community Colleges: CUNY's Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linderman, Donna; Kolenovic, Zineta

    2013-01-01

    Despite enrolling almost half of all undergraduate students in the United States, community colleges have struggled for decades with low degree-completion rates. CUNY community colleges struggle with the challenge of low completion rates even when the degree timetable is expanded. According to the CUNY Office of Institutional Research and…

  16. Association of the Single-Limb Hop Test With Isokinetic, Kinematic, and Kinetic Asymmetries in Patients After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Xergia, Sofia A.; Pappas, Evangelos; Georgoulis, Anastasios D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asymmetries persist after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Physical performance tests such as the single-limb hop test have been used extensively to assess return-to-sport criteria, as they reproduce dynamic athletic maneuvers. Hypothesis: The single-limb hop is associated with muscle strength and kinematic and kinetic asymmetries in ACLR patients 6 to 9 months after surgery. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two men with ACLR (mean age, 28.8 ± 11.2 years) at 6 to 9 months (mean, 7.01 ± 0.93 months) after surgery completed isokinetic testing in 3 velocities (120, 180, and 300 deg/s) and a kinetic, kinematic, and functional evaluation of the single-limb hop test. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship between the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI) of the single-limb hop distance and each of the outcome variables. Results: There were significant positive correlations between the LSI of the single-limb hop distance and the LSI of the peak extension torque at 120 deg/s (P = 0.044, r = 0.37) and the peak extension torque at 180 deg/s (P = 0.042, r = 0.38) as well as a negative correlation with the peak flexion torque at 180 deg/s (P = 0.043, r = −0.38). The LSI of the single-limb hop test was not correlated with any kinetic or kinematic variable (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present study demonstrate that distance LSI of the single-limb hop test correlates with isokinetic extension peak torque LSI but not kinetic and kinematic asymmetry. Clinical Relevance: The single-limb hop test can be used as an additional tool for the recognition of muscle strength asymmetries but not for kinetic or kinematic asymmetries 6 to 9 months after ACLR. PMID:26131298

  17. Galaxy simulations: Kinematics and mock observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.

    2013-08-01

    spiral galaxies. We recreate minor and major binary mergers, binary merger trees with multiple progenitors, and multiple sequential mergers. Within each of these categories of formation history, we correlate progenitor gas fraction, mass ratio, orbital pericenter, orbital ellipticity, spin, and kinematically decoupled cores with remnant kinematic properties. We find that binary mergers nearly always form fast rotators, but slow rotators can be formed from zero initial angular momentum configurations and gas-poor mergers. Remnants of binary merger trees are triaxial slow rotators. Sequential mergers form round slow rotators that most resemble the ATLAS3D rotators. We investigate the failure of ART and Sunrise simulation to reproduce the observed distribution of galaxies in the UVJ color-color diagram. No simulated galaxies achieve a color with V-J >1.0 while still being in the blue sequence. I systematically study the underlying sub grid models present in Sunrise to diagnose the source of the discrepancy. The experiments were largely unsuccessful in directly isolating the root of the J-band excess attenuation; however, they are instructive and can guide the intuition in terms of understanding the interplay of stellar emission and dust. These experiments were aimed at understanding the role of the underlying sub grid dust and radiation models, varying the dust geometry, and performing numerical studies of the radiation transfer calculation. Finally, I detail the data pipeline responsible for the creation of galaxy mock observations. The pipeline can be broken into the ART simulation raw data, the dark matter merger tree backbone, the format translation using yt, simulation the radiation transfer in Sunrise, and post-processed image treatments resulting. At every step, I detail the execution of the algorithms, the format of the data, and useful scripts for straightforward analysis.

  18. KINEMATICAL AND CHEMICAL VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK. I. THICK DISK KINEMATICS ,

    SciTech Connect

    Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Mendez, R. A.

    2012-03-10

    The variation of the kinematical properties of the Galactic thick disk with Galactic height Z is studied by means of 412 red giants observed in the direction of the south Galactic pole up to 4.5 kpc from the plane. We confirm the non-null mean radial motion toward the Galactic anticenter found by other authors, but we find that it changes sign at |Z| = 3 kpc, and the proposed inward motion of the local standard of rest alone cannot explain these observations. The rotational velocity decreases with |Z| by -30 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}, but the data are better represented by a power law with index 1.25, similar to that proposed from the analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. All the velocity dispersions increase with |Z|, but the vertical gradients are small. The dispersions grow proportionally, with no significant variation of the anisotropy. The ratio {sigma}{sub U}/{sigma}{sub W} = 2 suggests that the thick disk could have formed from a low-latitude merging event. The vertex deviation increases with Galactic height, reaching {approx}20 Degree-Sign at |Z| = 3.5 kpc. The tilt angle also increases, and the orientation of the ellipsoid in the radial-vertical plane is constantly intermediate between the alignment with the cylindrical and the spherical coordinate systems. The tilt angle at |Z| = 2 kpc coincides with the expectations of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics, but an extension of the calculations to higher |Z| is required to perform a conclusive test. Finally, between 2.5 and 3.5 kpc we detect deviations from the linear trend of many kinematical quantities, suggesting that some kinematical substructure could be present.

  19. Kinematical and Chemical Vertical Structure of the Galactic Thick Disk. I. Thick Disk Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Méndez, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The variation of the kinematical properties of the Galactic thick disk with Galactic height Z is studied by means of 412 red giants observed in the direction of the south Galactic pole up to 4.5 kpc from the plane. We confirm the non-null mean radial motion toward the Galactic anticenter found by other authors, but we find that it changes sign at |Z| = 3 kpc, and the proposed inward motion of the local standard of rest alone cannot explain these observations. The rotational velocity decreases with |Z| by -30 km s-1 kpc-1, but the data are better represented by a power law with index 1.25, similar to that proposed from the analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. All the velocity dispersions increase with |Z|, but the vertical gradients are small. The dispersions grow proportionally, with no significant variation of the anisotropy. The ratio σU/σW = 2 suggests that the thick disk could have formed from a low-latitude merging event. The vertex deviation increases with Galactic height, reaching ~20° at |Z| = 3.5 kpc. The tilt angle also increases, and the orientation of the ellipsoid in the radial-vertical plane is constantly intermediate between the alignment with the cylindrical and the spherical coordinate systems. The tilt angle at |Z| = 2 kpc coincides with the expectations of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics, but an extension of the calculations to higher |Z| is required to perform a conclusive test. Finally, between 2.5 and 3.5 kpc we detect deviations from the linear trend of many kinematical quantities, suggesting that some kinematical substructure could be present. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (proposal IDs 075.B-0459(A), 077.B-0348(A)). This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan and the duPont Telescopes, located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  20. Kinematic path planning for space-based robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seereeram, Sanjeev; Wen, John T.

    1998-01-01

    Future space robotics tasks require manipulators of significant dexterity, achievable through kinematic redundancy and modular reconfigurability, but with a corresponding complexity of motion planning. Existing research aims for full autonomy and completeness, at the expense of efficiency, generality or even user friendliness. Commercial simulators require user-taught joint paths-a significant burden for assembly tasks subject to collision avoidance, kinematic and dynamic constraints. Our research has developed a Kinematic Path Planning (KPP) algorithm which bridges the gap between research and industry to produce a powerful and useful product. KPP consists of three key components: path-space iterative search, probabilistic refinement, and an operator guidance interface. The KPP algorithm has been successfully applied to the SSRMS for PMA relocation and dual-arm truss assembly tasks. Other KPP capabilities include Cartesian path following, hybrid Cartesian endpoint/intermediate via-point planning, redundancy resolution and path optimization. KPP incorporates supervisory (operator) input at any detail to influence the solution, yielding desirable/predictable paths for multi-jointed arms, avoiding obstacles and obeying manipulator limits. This software will eventually form a marketable robotic planner suitable for commercialization in conjunction with existing robotic CAD/CAM packages.

  1. Are starbursts really mergers at high redshift? A kinematic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Weiner, Ben; Kassin, Susan; Bournaud, Frederic; Eisenhardt, Peter; Inami, Hanae; Pforr, Janine

    2014-02-01

    Star-forming galaxies obey a remarkable ``main sequence'' correlation between their star formation rates (SFR) and stellar masses (M^ast), whose normalization (the specific star formation rate, SSFR) evolves with redshift. A minority of starbursts, with much higher SSFR, are found at all redshifts, and may be an important evolutionary stage, fueling AGN activity and building bulges and spheroids. Locally, starbursting ultraluminous infrared galaxies are the product of galaxy mergers, but this is not so clear at z > 1, where ULIRGs are hundreds of times more common, but where HST images reveal only loose correlations between irregular/disturbed morphology and starburst activity. We propose to use MOSFIRE spectroscopy to measure kinematics for 80 Herschel far-IR-selected galaxies at z 1.5, distributed over the SFR-M^ast plane. We will look for kinematic differences (larger σ_V or σ/V_rot at fixed M^ast; increased line asymmetry, and a new kinematic irregularity index optimized from numerical simulations) between main sequence and starburst galaxies that would indicate a prevalence of merger activity at higher SSFR. This program was allocated 1 night in 2013B, but was scheduled so that it will be impossible to observe our fields in 3 position angles as required. We request additional time in 2014A to complete the observations as planned.

  2. Primate Anatomy, Kinematics, and Principles for Humanoid Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.; Ambrose, Catherine G.

    2004-01-01

    The primate order of animals is investigated for clues in the design of Humanoid Robots. The pursuit is directed with a theory that kinematics, musculature, perception, and cognition can be optimized for specific tasks by varying the proportions of limbs, and in particular, the points of branching in kinematic trees such as the primate skeleton. Called the Bifurcated Chain Hypothesis, the theory is that the branching proportions found in humans may be superior to other animals and primates for the tasks of dexterous manipulation and other human specialties. The primate taxa are defined, contemporary primate evolution hypotheses are critiqued, and variations within the order are noted. The kinematic branching points of the torso, limbs and fingers are studied for differences in proportions across the order, and associated with family and genus capabilities and behaviors. The human configuration of a long waist, long neck, and short arms is graded using a kinematic workspace analysis and a set of design axioms for mobile manipulation robots. It scores well. The re emergence of the human waist, seen in early Prosimians and Monkeys for arboreal balance, but lost in the terrestrial Pongidae, is postulated as benefiting human dexterity. The human combination of an articulated waist and neck will be shown to enable the use of smaller arms, achieving greater regions of workspace dexterity than the larger limbs of Gorillas and other Hominoidea.

  3. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew David; Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises. PMID:25653899

  4. Stellar kinematic groups. I - The Ursa Major group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; Mayor, Michel

    1993-01-01

    The Ursa Major Group (UMaG) is studied as a test case for the authenticity of Stellar Kinematic Groups, using Coravel radial velocities, recent compilations of astrometric data, and new spectroscopic observations. Spectroscopic age indicators, particularly indices of the strength of chromospheric emission, are applied to solar-type candidate members of UMaG, and it is shown that stars that meet the spectroscopic criteria also have kinematics that agree better with the space motions of the nucleus of UMaG than does the starting sample as a whole. The primary limitation on the precision of kinematics is now parallaxes instead of radial velocities. These more restrictive kinematic criteria are then applied to other UMaG candidates and a list summarizing membership is presented. UMaG is also examined as a cluster, confirming its traditional age of 0.3 Gyr, and a mean Fe/H of -0.08 +/- 0.09 for those stars most likely to be bona fide members.

  5. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew David; Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises.

  6. Kinematic Determinants of Early Acceleration in Field Sport Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Aron J.; Lockie, Robert G.; Coutts, Aaron J.

    2003-01-01

    Acceleration performance is important for field sport athletes that require a high level of repeat sprint ability. Although acceleration is widely trained for, there is little evidence outlining which kinematic factors delineate between good and poor acceleration. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinematic differences between individuals with fast and slow acceleration. Twenty field sport athletes were tested for sprint ability over the first three steps of a 15m sprint. Subjects were filmed at high speed to determine a range of lower body kinematic measures. For data analysis, subjects were then divided into relatively fast (n = 10) and slow (n = 10) groups based on their horizontal velocity. Groups were then compared across kinematic measures, including stride length and frequency, to determine whether they accounted for observed differences in sprint velocity. The results showed the fast group had significantly lower (~11-13%) left and right foot contact times (p < .05), and an increased stride frequency (~9%), as compared to the slow group. Knee extension was also significantly different between groups (p < .05). There was no difference found in stride length. It was concluded that those subjects who are relatively fast in early acceleration achieve this through reduced ground contact times resulting in an improved stride frequency. Training for improved acceleration should be directed towards using coaching instructions and drills that specifically train such movement adaptations. PMID:24688275

  7. Changes in bull sperm kinematics after single layer centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Yulnawati, Y; Abraham, M C; Laskowski, D; Johannisson, A; Morrell, J M

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate bull sperm kinematics after centrifugation through a single layer of a colloid [Single Layer Centrifugation (SLC)]. Ejaculates from 20 bulls were extended and stored at 4-6°C for 24 h during transport to the laboratory for SLC through Androcoll-B, followed by measurement of sperm kinematics in all samples. Total motility (86% and 88% for uncentrifuged and SLC samples, respectively) and progressive motility (84% for both the groups) were similar (p > 0.05). In contrast, straightness (STR) (0.65 vs 0.69), linearity (LIN) (0.32 vs 0.35) and beat cross frequency (BCF) (22.3 vs 23.6 Hz) were significantly higher in the SLC-selected samples than in the uncentrifuged samples, whereas velocity of the average path (VAP) (95 vs 90 μm/s), curvilinear velocity (VCL) (192 vs 180 μm/s), amplitude of lateral head deviation (ALH) (7 μm vs 6.5 μm) and hypermotility (49% vs 38%) were significantly decreased. The kinematics of the samples with the poorest motility was improved most by SLC. In conclusion, even though SLC had no direct effect on total and progressive motility, it appeared to have a positive influence on several other kinematic parameters that may be important for fertilization after artificial insemination.

  8. Kinematic analysis of a flexible six-DOF parallel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jing, Feng-Shui; Tan, Min; Hou, Zeng-Guang; Liang, Zi-Ze; Wang, Yun-Kuan; Gupta, Madan M; Nikiforuk, Peter N

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a new type of six-degrees of freedom (DOF) flexible parallel mechanism (FPM) is presented. This type of parallel mechanism possesses several favorable properties: (1) its number of DOFs is independent of the number of serial chains which make up the mechanism; (2) it has no kinematical singularities; (3) it is designed to move on rails, and therefore its workspace is much larger than that of a conventional parallel manipulator; and (4) without changing the number of DOFs and the kinematics of the mechanisms, the number of the serial chains can be reconfigured according to the needs of the tasks. These properties make the mechanism very preferable in practice, especially for such tasks as joining huge ship blocks, in which the manipulated objects vary dramatically both in weights and dimensions. Furthermore, the mechanism can be used as either a fully actuated system or an underactuated system. In the fully actuated case, the mechanism has six DOF motion capabilities and manipulation capabilities. However, in the underactuated case, the mechanism still has six DOF motion capabilities, but it has only five DOF manipulation capabilities. In this paper, both the inverse and forward kinematics are studied and expressed in a closed form. The workspace and singularity analysis of the mechanism are also presented. An example is presented to illustrate how to calculate the kinematics of the mechanism in both fully-actuated and underactuated cases. Finally, an application of such a mechanism to manufacturing industry is introduced.

  9. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises. PMID:25653899

  10. Reliability and Minimum Detectable Change of Temporal-Spatial, Kinematic, and Dynamic Stability Measures during Perturbed Gait.

    PubMed

    Rábago, Christopher A; Dingwell, Jonathan B; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Temporal-spatial, kinematic variability, and dynamic stability measures collected during perturbation-based assessment paradigms are often used to identify dysfunction associated with gait instability. However, it remains unclear which measures are most reliable for detecting and tracking responses to perturbations. This study systematically determined the between-session reliability and minimum detectable change values of temporal-spatial, kinematic variability, and dynamic stability measures during three types of perturbed gait. Twenty young healthy adults completed two identical testing sessions two weeks apart, comprised of an unperturbed and three perturbed (cognitive, physical, and visual) walking conditions in a virtual reality environment. Within each session, perturbation responses were compared to unperturbed walking using paired t-tests. Between-session reliability and minimum detectable change values were also calculated for each measure and condition. All temporal-spatial, kinematic variability and dynamic stability measures demonstrated fair to excellent between-session reliability. Minimal detectable change values, normalized to mean values ranged from 1-50%. Step width mean and variability measures demonstrated the greatest response to perturbations with excellent between-session reliability and low minimum detectable change values. Orbital stability measures demonstrated specificity to perturbation direction and sensitivity with excellent between-session reliability and low minimum detectable change values. We observed substantially greater between-session reliability and lower minimum detectable change values for local stability measures than previously described which may be the result of averaging across trials within a session and using velocity versus acceleration data for reconstruction of state spaces. Across all perturbation types, temporal-spatial, orbital and local measures were the most reliable measures with the lowest minimum

  11. Cervical kinematics during drinking in developing chickens.

    PubMed

    Heidweiller, J; Van der Leeuw, A H; Zweers, G A

    1992-05-01

    Development of head neck motion patterns is studied in drinking chickens to examine (1) general motion principles, (2) ontogenetic changes in these patterns, and (3) whether pattern changes are due to scaling effects during growth. Behavioral patterns are analyzed by high speed filming, radiography, and calculation of rotation patterns for each joint during all movement patterns. Flexibility and variability are great, but representative kinematic patterns are selected for immersion, upstroke, and tip-up phases. Five principles were found that control cervical motion. Two principles maximize rotation efficiency: the geometric and lever arm principles. Two trajectory compensating principles occur; one controls compensation for overflexion, and the other corrects curved into straight trajectories of head motion. One principle occurs that minimizes rotation force if large forces tend to develop in one joint. This principle results in a characteristic cervical motion pattern ("bike chain" pattern). There are three developmental periods: (1) hatchlings (2) chickens 1 to 4 weeks old (1-4W), and (3) older than 4 weeks. Each period is characterized by different kinematic patterns. In 1-4W chicks, the rotation force is minimized. In older stages, the cervical joints rotate according to geometric and lever arm principles. The totally different motion pattern in hatchlings results from a different behavioral reaction to water and the influence of large centrifugal forces. Transitions in cervical motion patterns are connected to effects of scaling, primarily changes in head and body weights. Changes in motion patterns are not related to changes in anatomical characters such as flexion extremes and relative length of each vertebra since these are similar in all stages.

  12. Kinematic synthesis of bevel-gear-type robotic wrist mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen-Chou

    Bevel-gear-type robotic wrist mechanisms are commonly used in industry. The reasons for their popularity are that they are compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. However, there are singularities in their workspace, which substantially degrade their manipulative performance. The objective of this research is to develop an atlas of three-degree-of-freedom bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms, and through dimensional synthesis to improve their kinematic performance. The dissertation contains two major parts: the first is structural analysis and synthesis, the other is kinematic analysis and dimensional synthesis. To synthesize the kinematic structures of bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms, the kinematic structures are separated from their functional considerations. All kinematic structures which satisfy the mobility condition are enumerated in an unbiased, systematic manner. Then the bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms are identified by applying the functional requirements. Structural analysis shows that a three-degree-of-freedom wrist mechanism usually consists of non-fractionated, two degree-of-freedom epicyclic gear train jointed with the base link. Therefore, the structural synthesis can be simplified into a problem of examining the atlas of non-fractionated, two-degree-of-freedom epicyclic gear trains. The resulting bevel-gear-type wrist mechanism has been categorized and evaluated. It is shown that three-degree-of-freedom, four-jointed wrist mechanisms are promising for further improving the kinematic performance. It is found that a spherical planetary gear train is necessarily imbedded in a three-degree-of-freedom, four-jointed wrist mechanism. Therefore, to study the workspace and singularity problems of three-degree-of-freedom four-jointed spherical wrist mechanisms, we have to study the trajectories of spherical planetary gear trains. The parametric equations of the trajectories and some useful geometric properties for the analysis and synthesis of

  13. Alterations in Cortical Sensorimotor Connectivity following Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective Resting-State fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Oni-Orisan, Akinwunmi; Kaushal, Mayank; Li, Wenjun; Leschke, Jack; Ward, B Douglas; Vedantam, Aditya; Kalinosky, Benjamin; Budde, Matthew D; Schmit, Brian D; Li, Shi-Jiang; Muqeet, Vaishnavi; Kurpad, Shekar N

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated alterations during task-induced brain activation in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The interruption to structural integrity of the spinal cord and the resultant disrupted flow of bidirectional communication between the brain and the spinal cord might contribute to the observed dynamic reorganization (neural plasticity). However, the effect of SCI on brain resting-state connectivity patterns remains unclear. We undertook a prospective resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) study to explore changes to cortical activation patterns following SCI. With institutional review board approval, rs-fMRI data was obtained in eleven patients with complete cervical SCI (>2 years post injury) and nine age-matched controls. The data was processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimages software. Region of interest (ROI) based analysis was performed to study changes in the sensorimotor network using pre- and post-central gyri as seed regions. Two-sampled t-test was carried out to check for significant differences between the two groups. SCI patients showed decreased functional connectivity in motor and sensory cortical regions when compared to controls. The decrease was noted in ipsilateral, contralateral, and interhemispheric regions for left and right precentral ROIs. Additionally, the left postcentral ROI demonstrated increased connectivity with the thalamus bilaterally in SCI patients. Our results suggest that cortical activation patterns in the sensorimotor network undergo dynamic reorganization following SCI. The presence of these changes in chronic spinal cord injury patients is suggestive of the inherent neural plasticity within the central nervous system. PMID:26954693

  14. Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy for complete rectal prolapse: A retrospective study evaluating outcomes in North Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhijit; Kumar, Saket; Maurya, Ajeet Pratap; Gupta, Vishal; Gupta, Vivek; Rahul

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcomes of laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy in the management of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in North Indian patients with inherent bulky and redundant colon. METHODS: The study was conducted at a tertiary health care center of North India. Between January 2010 and October 2014, 15 patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral mesh repair for CRP, were evaluated in the present study. Perioperative outcomes, improvement in bowel dysfunction or appearance of new complications were documented from the hospital records maintained prospectively. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (9 female) with a median age of 50 years (range, 15-68) were included in the study. The median operative time was 200 min (range, 180-350 min) and the median post-operative stay was 4 d (range, 3-21 d). No operative mortality occurred. One patient with inadvertent small bowel injury required laparotomy on post-operative day 2. At a median follow-up of 22 mo (range, 4-54 mo), no prolapse recurrence was reported. No mesh-related complication was encountered. Wexner constipation score improved significantly from the preoperative value of 17 (range, 5-24) to 6 (range, 0-23) (P < 0.001) and the fecal incontinence severity index score from 24 (range, 0-53) to 2 (range, 0-53) (P = 0.007). No de novo constipation or fecal incontinence was recorded during the follow-up. On personal conversation, all patients expressed satisfaction with the outcome of their treatment. CONCLUSION: Our experience indicates that laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy is an effective surgical option for CRP in North Indian patients having a bulky redundant colon. PMID:27152139

  15. Alterations in Cortical Sensorimotor Connectivity following Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Leschke, Jack; Ward, B. Douglas; Vedantam, Aditya; Kalinosky, Benjamin; Budde, Matthew D.; Schmit, Brian D.; Li, Shi-Jiang; Muqeet, Vaishnavi; Kurpad, Shekar N.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated alterations during task-induced brain activation in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The interruption to structural integrity of the spinal cord and the resultant disrupted flow of bidirectional communication between the brain and the spinal cord might contribute to the observed dynamic reorganization (neural plasticity). However, the effect of SCI on brain resting-state connectivity patterns remains unclear. We undertook a prospective resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) study to explore changes to cortical activation patterns following SCI. With institutional review board approval, rs-fMRI data was obtained in eleven patients with complete cervical SCI (>2 years post injury) and nine age-matched controls. The data was processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimages software. Region of interest (ROI) based analysis was performed to study changes in the sensorimotor network using pre- and post-central gyri as seed regions. Two-sampled t-test was carried out to check for significant differences between the two groups. SCI patients showed decreased functional connectivity in motor and sensory cortical regions when compared to controls. The decrease was noted in ipsilateral, contralateral, and interhemispheric regions for left and right precentral ROIs. Additionally, the left postcentral ROI demonstrated increased connectivity with the thalamus bilaterally in SCI patients. Our results suggest that cortical activation patterns in the sensorimotor network undergo dynamic reorganization following SCI. The presence of these changes in chronic spinal cord injury patients is suggestive of the inherent neural plasticity within the central nervous system. PMID:26954693

  16. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing.

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics.

  17. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing.

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics. PMID:24851830

  18. Study of Complete Thermoelectric Generator Behavior Including Water-to-Ambient Heat Dissipation on the Cold Side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranguren, P.; Astrain, D.; Martínez, A.

    2014-06-01

    Reduction of the thermal resistances of the heat exchangers of a thermoelectric generation (TEG) system leads to a significant increase in TEG efficiency. For the cold side of a thermoelectric module (TEM), a wide range of heat exchangers have been studied, from simple finned dissipators to more complex water (water-glycol) heat exchangers. As the Nusselt number is much higher in water heat exchangers than in conventional air finned dissipators, the convective thermal resistances are better. However, to conclude which heat exchanger leads to higher efficiencies, it is necessary to include the whole system involved in the heat dissipation, i.e., the TEM-to-water heat exchanger, the water-to-ambient heat exchanger, as well as the required pumps and fans. This paper presents a dynamic computational model able to simulate the complete behavior of a TEG, including both heat exchangers. The model uses the heat transfer and hydraulic equations to compute the TEM-to-water and water-to-ambient thermal resistances, along with the resistance of the hot-side heat exchanger at different operating conditions. Likewise, the model includes all the thermoelectric effects with temperature-dependent properties. The model calculates the net power generation for different configurations, providing a methodology to design and optimize the heat exchange in order to maximize the net power generation for a wide variety of TEGs.

  19. Kinematical analysis of the ejecta created after a catastrophic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Oro, A.; Cellino, A.; Paolicchi, P.; Tanga, P.

    2014-07-01

    The creation of an asteroid dynamical family as the outcome of a high-energy collision is essentially a two-step process: (1) the hydrodynamical phase, when the colliding system (projectile+target) is partially or completely shattered and the fragments are ejected (with several side effects, such as the creation of a plasma cloud, usually not relevant for the final observable properties); (2) the ballistic phase, when the ejecta collide or are reaccumulated due to the mutual gravity. At the end of this phase, the asteroid family is established, and its observable properties, also after a long time interval of dynamical evolution (including Yarkovsky-driven acceleration of the small members), have significant footprints of this original structure. In turn, this structure depends on the overall properties (mass and velocity distributions) in the beginning of the ballistic phase (D'Abramo et al. 1999, Michel et al. 2004). According to the results of hydrodynamical simulations, most of the ejecta entering the ballistic phase are small (their size is essentially limited by the resolution of the code). A kinematical analysis of their properties may be helpful to clarify several points: 1) How can these small fragments reaccumulate into larger bodies, to create an observable family? If one starts from an expanding field and a set of small fragments, it is not easy to obtain a significant reaccumulation into many bodies; simple kinematical models, such as spherical expansion, but also the less symmetrical geometries defined from the semiempirical models of the 90's, allow essentially a more or less massive reaccumulation into very few bodies (sometimes only the largest remnant). What are the general properties of an ejection field causing a process of reaccumulation able to produce the observational evidence? 2) May some significant results be resolution-dependent? 3) Is it possible to define a general qualitative pattern of the ejecta field, allowing, in principle, to

  20. The Influence of Different Hand Paddle Size on 100-m Front Crawl Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    López-Plaza, Daniel; Alacid, Fernando; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.; Muyor, José M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different sizes of hand paddles on kinematic parameters during a 100 m freestyle swimming performance in elite swimmers. Nine elite swimmers (19.1 ± 1.9 years) completed three tests of 100 m without paddles, with small paddles (271.27 cm2) and with large paddles (332.67 cm2), respectively. One video camera was used to record the performance during the three trials. The mean swimming velocity, stroke rate and stroke length were measured in the central 10 meters of each 50 m length. The results showed that stroke length tended to increase significantly when wearing hand paddles (p < 0.05) during both the first and second 50 m sections whereas the increase in swimming velocity occurred only in the second 50 m (p < 0.05). Conversely, the stroke rate showed a slight decreasing trend with increasing paddle size. During the 100 m freestyle trial the stroke kinematics were changed significantly as a result of the increase in propelling surface size when hand paddles were worn. PMID:23486988

  1. A novel running mechanic's class changes kinematics but not running economy.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Daniel H; Lehecka, Nick; King, Deborah L

    2014-11-01

    A novel method of running technique instruction, Midstance to Midstance Running (MMR), was studied to determine how MMR affected kinematics and running economy (RE) of recreational runners. An experimental pre-post randomized groups design was used. Participants (n = 18) were recreational runners who ran at least 3 days a week and 5 km per run. All testing was performed on a treadmill at 2.8 m·s. The intervention group (n = 9) completed 8 weeks of instruction in MMR; the control group (n = 9) continued running without instruction. The MMR group showed significant decreases in stride length (SL) (p = 0.02) and maximum knee flexion velocity in stance (p = 0.01), and a significant increase in stride rate (SR) (p = 0.02) after 8 weeks. No significant changes were found in heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, or RE. Midstance to Midstance Running was effective in changing SR and SL, but was not effective in changing other kinematic variables such as foot contact position and maximum knee flexion during swing. Midstance to Midstance Running did not affect RE. Evidence suggests that MMR may be an appropriate instructional method for recreational runners trying to decrease SL and increase SR.

  2. Problem list completeness in electronic health records: a multi-site study and assessment of success factors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; McCoy, Allison B.; Hickman, Thu-Trang T.; St Hilaire, Daniel; Borbolla, Damian; Bowes, Len; Dixon, William G.; Dorr, David A.; Krall, Michael; Malholtra, Sameer; Bates, David W.; Sittig, Dean F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess problem list completeness using an objective measure across a range of sites, and to identify success factors for problem list completeness. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of electronic health record data and interviews at ten healthcare organizations within the United States, United Kingdom, and Argentina who use a variety of electronic health record systems: four self-developed and six commercial. At each site, we assessed the proportion of patients who have diabetes recorded on their problem list out of all patients with a hemoglobin A1c elevation >= 7.0%, which is diagnostic of diabetes. We then conducted interviews with informatics leaders at the four highest performing sites to determine factors associated with success. Finally, we surveyed all the sites about common practices implemented at the top performing sites to determine whether there was an association between problem list management practices and problem list completeness. Results Problem list completeness across the ten sites ranged from 60.2% to 99.4%, with a mean of 78.2%. Financial incentives, problem-oriented charting, gap reporting, shared responsibility, links to billing codes, and organizational culture were identified as success factors at the four hospitals with problem list completeness at or near 90.0%. Discussion Incomplete problem lists represent a global data integrity problem that could compromise quality of care and put patients at risk. There was a wide range of problem list completeness across the healthcare facilities. Nevertheless, some facilities have achieved high levels of problem list completeness, and it is important to better understand the factors that contribute to success to improve patient safety. Conclusion Problem list completeness varies substantially across healthcare facilities. In our review of EHR systems at ten healthcare facilities, we identified six success factors which may be useful for healthcare organizations seeking to

  3. Kinematic hardening in creep of Zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Radan; Deuble, Dietmar

    2016-10-01

    Results of biaxial creep tests with stress changes on Zircaloy-2 tube samples are presented. A Hollomon-type viscoplastic strain hardening model is extended by the Armstrong-Frederic nonlinear kinematic hardening law, resulting in a mixed (i.e. isotropic and kinematic) strain hardening model. The creep tests with stress changes and similar tests published in the literature are simulated by the models. It is shown that introduction of the kinematic strain hardening in the viscoplastic strain hardening model is sufficient to describe the creep transients following stress drops, stress reversals and stress removals.

  4. Learning inverse kinematics: reduced sampling through decomposition into virtual robots.

    PubMed

    de Angulo, Vicente Ruiz; Torras, Carme

    2008-12-01

    We propose a technique to speedup the learning of the inverse kinematics of a robot manipulator by decomposing it into two or more virtual robot arms. Unlike previous decomposition approaches, this one does not place any requirement on the robot architecture, and thus, it is completely general. Parametrized self-organizing maps are particularly adequate for this type of learning, and permit comparing results directly obtained and through the decomposition. Experimentation shows that time reductions of up to two orders of magnitude are easily attained.

  5. Robotic hand-held surgical device: evaluation of end-effector's kinematics and development of proof-of-concept prototypes.

    PubMed

    Zahraee, Ali Hassan; Szewczyk, Jérome; Paik, Jamie Kyujin; Morel, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    We are working towards the development of a robotic hand-held surgical device for laparoscopic interventions that enhances the surgeons' dexterity. In this paper, the kinematics of the end effector is studied. Different choices of kinematics are compared during an evaluation campaign using a virtual reality simulator to find the optimal one: the Yaw-Roll (YR) kinematics. A proof of concept prototype is made based on the results. PMID:20879429

  6. Kinematic adaptations to ischemic pain in claudicants during continuous walking.

    PubMed

    Mockford, Katherine A; Vanicek, Natalie; Jordan, Alastair; Chetter, Ian C; Coughlin, Patrick A

    2010-07-01

    Intermittent claudication has been associated with impaired gait and balance. The study aim was to compare gait adaptations over time between claudicants classified with good versus poor balance. Kinematic data were collected from 24 claudicants during continuous walking. Balance was assessed using; Timed Up and Go test (TUG), and Sensory Organisation (SOT) and Motor Control (MCT) Tests using NeuroCom Equitest®. 'Good balance' (GB) was operationally defined as those claudicants achieving normal scores on at least 2 of 3 tests whereas 'poor balance' (PB) claudicants achieved normal scores on 0 or 1 test. Temporal-spatial and sagittal plane joint kinematics were analysed at three time intervals; 'no pain' (prior to onset), 'initial pain' and 'maximal pain' (unable to continue walking). A two-way mixed design ANOVA was performed. Claudicants demonstrated a significant decrease in walking speed, step frequency and increased time in double support (p<0.05). Inter-group analysis showed no differences between GB and PB on any temporal-spatial or kinematic parameters (p>0.05). There was no significant time and group interaction for any temporal-spatial or kinematic variable except hip flexion. GB claudicants demonstrated increased hip flexion as pain progressed but this adaptive strategy was not seen in PB claudicants. Claudicants make adaptations to walking by slowing (down) when in pain. Differences between GB and PB were not seen in temporal-spatial or ankle, knee and pelvic kinematic gait parameters. However adaptation to pain in GB claudicants involved a hip strategy, not seen in PB claudicants. PMID:20678939

  7. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  8. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Billy C.; Lum, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  9. An explicit kinematic scenario for the Iapetus and Rheic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeier, Mat; Torsvik, Trond

    2015-04-01

    The opening of the Rheic Ocean by the rifting of Avalonia, and the subsequent closure of the Iapetus Ocean by means of the three-way continental collision between Laurentia, Baltica and Avalonia, together constitute the most dramatic, defining and well-studied tectonic events of the early Paleozoic. Despite this, modern kinematic models of those interrelated events are still schematic and/or spatiotemporally disjointed. This is in large part due to the fact that: 1.) many of the available models were originally built to explain a specific region (i.e. Northern Appalachians, Northern Ireland and Scotland, Norwegian Caledonides, etc.) and have only been expanded to neighboring regions as a speculative note, and 2.) the models were not constructed upon a rigorous plate tectonic framework, wherein plate boundaries are specified and the kinematics of the entire lithosphere within the domain are explicitly defined through time. Although the lithosphere of the Iapetus and Rheic Oceans was long ago destroyed, the kinematics of those basins can still be surmised through the careful consideration of paleomagnetic data from the continents and terranes formerly flanking those oceans, and from geological observables along their margins. It is thus possible to explore the tectonic evolution of those basins with kinematic models that strictly conform to plate tectonic rules, both in space and time. Such an approach can plainly identify existing kinematic concepts that are tectonically untenable and those that work only in isolation. Here we briefly elaborate on this approach and present the results of a developing full-plate model of the Iapetus and Rheic Oceans for Late Cambrian to end-Silurian time, with a particular focus on the development of the Caledonide margins.

  10. Milky Way halo gas kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of high resolution, short wavelength absorption data taken by IUE toward high latitude O and B stars are presented in a discussion of the large scale kinematic properties of Milky Way Halo gas. An analysis of these data demonstrates that: (1) the obsrved absorption widths (FWHM) of Si II are very large, ranging up to 150 Km/s for the most distant halo star; this is much larger than is generally appreciated from optical data; (2) the absorption is observed to be systematically negative in radial velocity, indicating that cool material is, on the whole, flowing toward the disk of the galaxy; (3) there is some evidence for asymmetry between the northern and southern galactic hemispheres, in accordance with the HI 21 cm data toward the galactic poles; (4) low column density gas with highly negative radial LSR velocity (V less than -70 km/s) can be found toward stars beyond 1-3 kpc in the northern galactic hemisphere in all four quadrants of galactic longitude; and (5) only the profiles toward stars in the direction of known high velocity HI features show a clear two component structure.

  11. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  12. Kinematics of sport wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Coutts, K D

    1990-01-01

    Eight international caliber wheelchair male athletes (3 basketball, 5 distance track) performed an all-out propulsion effort from a standing start for 10 seconds on a wheelchair ergometer. Comparisons between the basketball and track athletes on linear wheelchair and push rim velocity during the first 3 pushes and the peak value indicated that the basketball players had a significantly (p less than .05) higher push rim velocity throughout the effort and a higher wheelchair velocity only at the end of the first push. The track athletes attained a significantly higher peak wheelchair velocity. Graphical comparison of the best individual basketball and track athletes' performances indicated that the track athletes caught up to the basketball players after about 3.7 seconds or 12 meters and travelled 49 meters in the 10 seconds, compared to 37 meters for the basketball players. Differences in push rim and wheel diameter are considered the major factor in the noted differences in propulsion kinematics of basketball and track wheelchairs.

  13. Effect of Leg Dominance on The Center-of-Mass Kinematics During an Inside-of-the-Foot Kick in Amateur Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Zago, Matteo; Motta, Andrea Francesco; Mapelli, Andrea; Annoni, Isabella; Galvani, Christel; Sforza, Chiarella

    2014-09-29

    Soccer kicking kinematics has received wide interest in literature. However, while the instep-kick has been broadly studied, only few researchers investigated the inside-of-the-foot kick, which is one of the most frequently performed techniques during games. In particular, little knowledge is available about differences in kinematics when kicking with the preferred and non-preferred leg. A motion analysis system recorded the three-dimensional coordinates of reflective markers placed upon the body of nine amateur soccer players (23.0 ± 2.1 years, BMI 22.2 ± 2.6 kg/m2), who performed 30 pass-kicks each, 15 with the preferred and 15 with the non-preferred leg. We investigated skill kinematics while maintaining a perspective on the complete picture of movement, looking for laterality related differences. The main focus was laid on: anatomical angles, contribution of upper limbs in kick biomechanics, kinematics of the body Center of Mass (CoM), which describes the whole body movement and is related to balance and stability. When kicking with the preferred leg, CoM displacement during the ground-support phase was 13% higher (p<0.001), normalized CoM height was 1.3% lower (p<0.001) and CoM velocity 10% higher (p<0.01); foot and shank velocities were about 5% higher (p<0.01); arms were more abducted (p<0.01); shoulders were rotated more towards the target (p<0.01, 6° mean orientation difference). We concluded that differences in motor control between preferred and non-preferred leg kicks exist, particularly in the movement velocity and upper body kinematics. Coaches can use these results to provide effective instructions to players in the learning process, moving their focus on kicking speed and upper body behavior.

  14. Effect of Leg Dominance on The Center-of-Mass Kinematics During an Inside-of-the-Foot Kick in Amateur Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Zago, Matteo; Motta, Andrea Francesco; Mapelli, Andrea; Annoni, Isabella; Galvani, Christel; Sforza, Chiarella

    2014-09-29

    Soccer kicking kinematics has received wide interest in literature. However, while the instep-kick has been broadly studied, only few researchers investigated the inside-of-the-foot kick, which is one of the most frequently performed techniques during games. In particular, little knowledge is available about differences in kinematics when kicking with the preferred and non-preferred leg. A motion analysis system recorded the three-dimensional coordinates of reflective markers placed upon the body of nine amateur soccer players (23.0 ± 2.1 years, BMI 22.2 ± 2.6 kg/m2), who performed 30 pass-kicks each, 15 with the preferred and 15 with the non-preferred leg. We investigated skill kinematics while maintaining a perspective on the complete picture of movement, looking for laterality related differences. The main focus was laid on: anatomical angles, contribution of upper limbs in kick biomechanics, kinematics of the body Center of Mass (CoM), which describes the whole body movement and is related to balance and stability. When kicking with the preferred leg, CoM displacement during the ground-support phase was 13% higher (p<0.001), normalized CoM height was 1.3% lower (p<0.001) and CoM velocity 10% higher (p<0.01); foot and shank velocities were about 5% higher (p<0.01); arms were more abducted (p<0.01); shoulders were rotated more towards the target (p<0.01, 6° mean orientation difference). We concluded that differences in motor control between preferred and non-preferred leg kicks exist, particularly in the movement velocity and upper body kinematics. Coaches can use these results to provide effective instructions to players in the learning process, moving their focus on kicking speed and upper body behavior. PMID:25414739

  15. Abundances and Kinematics of Field Stars. II. Kinematics and Abundance Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulbright, Jon P.

    2002-01-01

    As an investigation of the origin of ``α-poor'' halo stars, we analyze kinematic and abundance data for 73 intermediate-metallicity stars (-1>[Fe/H]>=-2) selected from Paper I of this series. We find evidence for a connection between the kinematics and the enhancement of certain element-to-iron ([X/Fe]) ratios in these stars. Statistically significant correlations were found between [X/Fe] and galactic rest-frame velocities (vRF) for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, and Ni, with marginally significant correlations existing for Ti and Y as well. We also find that the [X/Fe] ratios for these elements all correlate with a similar level of significance with [Na/Fe]. Finally, we compare the abundances of these halo stars against those of stars in nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We find significant differences between the abundance ratios in the dSph stars and halo stars of similar metallicity. From this result, it is unlikely that the halo stars in the solar neighborhood, including even the ``α-poor'' stars, were once members of disrupted dSph galaxies similar to those studied to date.

  16. Influence of joint constraints on lower limb kinematics estimation from skin markers using global optimization.

    PubMed

    Duprey, Sonia; Cheze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2010-10-19

    In order to obtain the lower limb kinematics from skin-based markers, the soft tissue artefact (STA) has to be compensated. Global optimization (GO) methods rely on a predefined kinematic model and attempt to limit STA by minimizing the differences between model predicted and skin-based marker positions. Thus, the reliability of GO methods depends directly on the chosen model, whose influence is not well known yet. This study develops a GO method that allows to easily implement different sets of joint constraints in order to assess their influence on the lower limb kinematics during gait. The segment definition was based on generalized coordinates giving only linear or quadratic joint constraints. Seven sets of joint constraints were assessed, corresponding to different kinematic models at the ankle, knee and hip: SSS, USS, PSS, SHS, SPS, UHS and PPS (where S, U and H stand for spherical, universal and hinge joints and P for parallel mechanism). GO was applied to gait data from five healthy males. Results showed that the lower limb kinematics, except hip kinematics, knee and ankle flexion-extension, significantly depend on the chosen ankle and knee constraints. The knee parallel mechanism generated some typical knee rotation patterns previously observed in lower limb kinematic studies. Furthermore, only the parallel mechanisms produced joint displacements. Thus, GO using parallel mechanism seems promising. It also offers some perspectives of subject-specific joint constraints.

  17. Longitudinal evaluation of jaw muscle activity and mandibular kinematics in young patients with Class II malocclusion treated with the Teuscher activator

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Maria J.; Cacho, Alberto; Alarcón, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A longitudinal study was performed to evaluate the jaw muscle activity and mandibular kinematics after Teuscher activator treatment and at 2 years after orthodontic treatment completion. Material and Methods: Twenty-seven children with Class II division 1 malocclusion were evaluated before treatment (T0; mean: 11.6 years), after functional treatment (T1; mean: 12.8 years), and 2 years after orthodontic treatment (T2; mean: 18 years). Bilateral surface electromyographic activities of the anterior temporalis, posterior temporalis, masseter, and suprahyoid muscle areas were analyzed at rest and during clenching, swallowing, and mastication. Kinematic recordings of the mandibular maximum opening, lateral shift, right and left lateral excursions, and protrusion were evaluated. Results: Compared to T0, the left masseter activity during clenching was decreased at T1 but increased at T2, similar to the other evaluated muscles. The suprahyoid activity during swallowing was increased at T1 but decreased at T2. The masseter activity during mastication was increased at T1 and further increased at T2. The left and right lateral excursions and protrusion did not show significant changes throughout the experiment. Conclusions: Teuscher activator and subsequent fixed orthodontic treatment improved jaw muscle function; however, a long period was needed to attain complete neuromuscular adaptation. Key words:Class II malocclusion, jaw muscles, mandibular kinematics, sEMG, Teuscher activator. PMID:23385506

  18. Cellular Phones Helping to Get a Clearer Picture of