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Sample records for kinetic energy induced

  1. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-03-01

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early time T cell signaling. I show using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and, ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in interpreting single cell kinetics from cell population level results.

  2. Kinetic Energy Oscillations during Disorder Induced Heating in an Ultracold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas; McQuillen, Patrick; Strickler, Trevor; Pohl, Thomas; Killian, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas of strontium are generated by photoionizing laser-cooled atoms at temperature TMOT ~ 10 mK and density n ~1016 m-3 in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). After photoionization, the ions heat to ~ 1 K by a mechanism known as Disorder Induced Heating (DIH). During DIH kinetic energy oscillations (KEO) occur at a frequency ~ 2ωpi , where ωpi is the plasma frequency, indicating coupling to collective modes of the plasma. Electron screening also comes into play by changing the interaction from a Coulomb to a Yukawa interaction. Although DIH has been previously studied, improved measurements combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations allow us to probe new aspects. We demonstrate a measurement of the damping of the KEO due to electron screening which agrees with the MD simulations. We show that the MD simulations can be used to fit experimental DIH curves for plasma density n, resulting in very accurate density measurements. Finally, we discuss how ion temperature measurements are affected by the non-thermal distribution of the ions during the early stages of DIH. This work was supported by the United States National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy (PHY-0714603), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550- 12-1-0267), the Shell Foundation, and the Department of Defense (NDSEG Fellowship)

  3. Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239{sup Pu} induced by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2010-08-04

    The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons ({nu}(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation {sigma}{sub E}*(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass ({sigma}{sub E}(A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence {sigma}{sub E}*(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

  4. Investigation of the maximum accessible kinetic energy of fragments in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 238}U nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Khryachkov, V. A. Bondarenko, I. P.; Ivanova, T. A.; Kuzminov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2013-03-15

    The masses, total kinetic energies (TKE), and emission angles of fragments originating from the fission of {sup 238}U nuclei that was induced by 5- and 6.5-MeV neutrons were measured by using digital methods for processing signals. A detailed analysis of the shape of digital signals made it possible to reduce substantially the contribution of fragments whose TKE values were distorted because of a superimposition of signals from recoil protons and from alpha particles produced in the spontaneous decay of uranium. The total statistics exceeded two million events for either neutron energy, and this permitted performing a detailed analysis of fission-fragment yields in the region of the highest attainable TKE values. An analysis of fragment yields made it possible to draw specific conclusions on the structure of the potential surface of fissile nuclei.

  5. Effects of Neutron Emission on Fragment Mass and Kinetic Energy Distribution from Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of {sup 235}U

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Saetone, E.

    2007-10-26

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening in the standard deviation of the kinetic energy at the final fragment mass number around m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. and other results on yield of mass. We conclude that the obtained results are a consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the sharp variation in the primary fragment kinetic energy and mass yield curves. We show that because neutron emission is hazardous to make any conclusion on primary quantities distribution of fragments from experimental results on final quantities distributions.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Clustered DNA Damages Induced by Silicon Beams of Different Kinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman D. J.; Keszenman, D.J.; Bennett, P.V.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14

    Humans may b exposed to highly energetic charged particle radiation as a result of medical treatments, occupational activitie or accidental events. In recent years, our increasing presence and burgeoning interest in space exploration beyond low Earth orbit has led to a large increase in the research of the biological effects ofcharged particle radiation typical of that encountered in the space radiation environment. The study of the effects of these types of radiation qualities in terms ofDNA damage induction and repair is fundamental to understand mechanisms both underlying their greater biological effectiveness as we)) as the short and long term risks of health effects such as carcinogenesis, degen rative diseases and premature aging. Charged particle radiation induces a variety of DNA alterations, notably bistranded clustered damages, defined as two or more closely-opposed strand break , oxidized bases or abasic sites within a few helical turns. The induction of such highly complex DNA damage enhances the probability of incorrect or incomplete repair and thus constitutes greater potential for genomic instability, cell death and transformation.

  7. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  8. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  9. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  10. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Peptide Ions: Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.; Shukla, Anil K.

    2003-12-01

    Kinetics and dynamics studies have been carried out for the surface-induced dissociation (SID) of a set of model peptides utilizing a specially designed electrospray ionization Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer in which mass-selected and vibrationally relaxed ions are collided on a orthogonally-mounted fluorinated self-assembled monolayer on Au{l_brace}111{r_brace} crystal. The sampling time in this apparatus can be varied from hundreds of microseconds to tens of seconds, enabling the investigation of kinetics of ion decomposition over an extended range of decomposition rates. RRKM-based modeling of these reactions for a set of polyalanines demonstrates that SID kinetics of these simple peptides is very similar to slow, multiple-collision activation and that the distribution of internal energies following collisional activation is indistinguishable from a thermal distribution. For more complex peptides comprised of several amino acids and with internal degrees of freedom ( DOF) of the order of 350 there is a dramatic change in kinetics in which RRKM kinetics is no longer capable of describing the decomposition of these complex ions. A combination of RRKM kinetics and the sudden death approximation, according to which decomposition occurs instantaneously, is a satisfactory description. This implies that a population of ions-which is dependant on the nature of the peptide, kinetic energy and sampling time-decomposes on or very near the surface. The shattering transition is described quantitatively for the limited set of molecules examined to date

  11. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Peptide Ions: Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2003-12-01

    Kinetics and dynamics studies have been carried out for the surface-induced dissociation (SID) of a set of model peptides utilizing a specially designed electro spray ionization Fourier Transform Ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer in which mass-selected and vibrationally relaxed ions are collided on an orthogonally-mounted fluorinated self-assembled monolayer on Au {111} crystal. The sampling time in this apparatus can be varied from hundreds of microseconds to tens of seconds, enabling the investigation of kinetics of ion decomposition over an extended range of decomposition rates. RRKM-based modeling of these reactions for a set of polyalanines demonstrates that kinetics of these simple peptides is very similar to slow, multiple-collision activation and that the distribution of internal energies following collisional activation is indistinguishable from a thermal distribution. For more complex peptides comprised of several amino acids and with internal degrees of freedom (DOF) of the order of 350 there is a dramatic change in kinetics in which RRKM kinetics is no longer capable of describing the decomposition of these complex ions. A combination of RRKM kinetics and the “sudden death” approximation, according to which decomposition occurs instantaneously, is a satisfactory description. This implies that a population of ions – which is dependant on the nature of the peptide, kinetic energy and sampling time – decomposes on or very near the surface. The shattering transition is described quantitatively for the limited set of molecules examined to date.

  12. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Dana Lynn

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  13. Kinetic Approach for Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Banaz; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2008-10-22

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electron gas and phonon gas excited with ultrashort intense laser pulses are calculated for laser-induced plasmas occurring in solids. The excitation during femtosecond irradiation and the subsequent thermalization of the free electrons, as well as the dynamics of phonons are described by kinetic equations. The microscopic collision processes, such as absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung, electron-electron collisions, and electron-phonon interactions are considered by complete Boltzmann collision integrals. We apply our kinetic approach for gold by taking s-band electron into account and compare it with the case of excitation of d-band electrons.

  14. Kinetic energy and quasi-biennial oscillation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. J.

    1971-01-01

    The modulation of the vertical flux of kinetic energy to the stratosphere by the pressure-work effect at 100 mb is compared with variations in the hemispheric kinetic energy, the horizontal momentum and heat transports at 'low' latitudes, and the tropical zonal wind and temperature for the lower stratosphere. It is deduced that the variation of the vertical flux of geopotential is in phase with the kinetic energy in the lower stratosphere and is statistically related to the time rate of change of the horizontal transports of heat and momentum at 30 N. The association of these results to the general circulation of the lower stratosphere is considered.

  15. Kinetic energy budgets in areas of convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Synoptic scale budgets of kinetic energy are computed using 3 and 6 h data from three of NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE's). Numerous areas of intense convection occurred during the three experiments. Large kinetic energy variability, with periods as short as 6 h, is observed in budgets computed over each entire experiment area and over limited volumes that barely enclose the convection and move with it. Kinetic energy generation and transport processes in the smaller volumes are often a maximum when the enclosed storms are near peak intensity, but the nature of the various energy processes differs between storm cases and seems closely related to the synoptic conditions. A commonly observed energy budget for peak storm intensity indicates that generation of kinetic energy by cross-contour flow is the major energy source while dissipation to subgrid scales is the major sink. Synoptic scale vertical motion transports kinetic energy from lower to upper levels of the atmosphere while low-level horizontal flux convergence and upper-level horizontal divergence also occur. Spatial fields of the energy budget terms show that the storm environment is a major center of energy activity for the entire area.

  16. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    PubMed

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed.

  17. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    PubMed

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed. PMID:20586467

  18. Kinetic Relaxation Models for Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kazuo; Markowich, Peter; Takata, Shigeru

    2007-04-01

    Kinetic equations with relaxation collision kernels are considered under the basic assumption of two collision invariants, namely mass and energy. The collision kernels are of BGK-type with a general local Gibbs state, which may be quite different from the Gaussian. By the use of the diffusive length/time scales, energy transport systems consisting of two parabolic equations with the position density and the energy density as unknowns are derived on a formal level. The H theorem for the kinetic model is presented, and the entropy for the energy transport systems, which is inherited from the kinetic model, is derived. The energy transport systems for specific examples of the global Gibbs state, such as a power law with negative exponent, a cut-off power law with positive exponent, the Maxwellian, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions, arepresented.

  19. Turbulence kinetic energy equation for dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Arab, T. W.; Roco, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    A multiphase turbulence closure model is presented which employs one transport equation, namely the turbulence kinetic energy equation. The proposed form of this equation is different from the earlier formulations in some aspects. The power spectrum of the carrier fluid is divided into two regions, which interact in different ways and at different rates with the suspended particles as a function of the particle-eddy size ratio and density ratio. The length scale is described algebraically. A mass/time averaging procedure for the momentum and kinetic energy equations is adopted. The resulting turbulence correlations are modeled under less retrictive assumptions comparative to previous work. The closures for the momentum and kinetic energy equations are given. Comparisons of the predictions with experimental results on liquid-solid jet and gas-solid pipe flow show satisfactory agreement.

  20. Kinetic-energy-momentum tensor in electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Cheyenne J.; Kemp, Brandon A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the Einstein-Laub formulation of electrodynamics is invalid since it yields a stress-energy-momentum (SEM) tensor that is not frame invariant. Two leading hypotheses for the kinetic formulation of electrodynamics (Chu and Einstein-Laub) are studied by use of the relativistic principle of virtual power, mathematical modeling, Lagrangian methods, and SEM transformations. The relativistic principle of virtual power is used to demonstrate the field dynamics associated with energy relations within a relativistic framework. Lorentz transformations of the respective SEM tensors demonstrate the relativistic frameworks for each studied formulation. Mathematical modeling of stationary and moving media is used to illustrate the differences and discrepancies of specific proposed kinetic formulations, where energy relations and conservation theorems are employed. Lagrangian methods are utilized to derive the field kinetic Maxwell's equations, which are studied with respect to SEM tensor transforms. Within each analysis, the Einstein-Laub formulation violates special relativity, which invalidates the Einstein-Laub SEM tensor.

  1. Filamentary and hierarchical pictures - Kinetic energy criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klypin, Anatoly A.; Melott, Adrian L.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new criterion for formation of second-generation filaments. The criterion called the kinetic energy ratio, KR, is based on comparison of peculiar velocities at different scales. We suggest that the clumpiness of the distribution in some cases might be less important than the 'coldness' or 'hotness' of the flow for formation of coherent structures. The kinetic energy ratio is analogous to the Mach number except for one essential difference. If at some scale KR is greater than 1, as estimated at the linear stage, then when fluctuations of this scale reach nonlinearity, the objects they produce must be anisotropic ('filamentary'). In the case of power-law initial spectra the kinetic ratio criterion suggests that the border line is the power-spectrum with the slope n = -1.

  2. Nonlocal kinetic-energy-density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E. |

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present nonlocal kinetic-energy functionals {ital T}[{ital n}] within the average density approximation (ADA) framework, which do not require any extra input when applied to any electron system and recover the exact kinetic energy and the linear response function of a homogeneous system. In contrast with previous ADA functionals, these present good behavior of the long-range tail of the exact weight function. The averaging procedure for the kinetic functional (averaging the Fermi momentum of the electron gas, instead of averaging the electron density) leads to a functional without numerical difficulties in the calculation of extended systems, and it gives excellent results when applied to atoms and jellium surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Electric Vehicles Mileage Extender Kinetic Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivkov, Venelin; Draganov, Vutko; Stoyanova, Yana

    2015-03-01

    The proposed paper considers small urban vehicles with electric hybrid propulsion systems. Energy demands are examined on the basis of European drive cycle (NEUDC) and on an energy recuperation coefficient and are formulated for description of cycle energy transfers. Numerical simulation results show real possibilities for increasing in achievable vehicle mileage at the same energy levels of a main energy source - the electric battery. Kinetic energy storage (KES), as proposed to be used as an energy buffer and different structural schemes of the hybrid propulsion system are commented. Minimum energy levels for primary (the electric battery) and secondary (KES) sources are evaluated. A strategy for reduced power flows control is examined, and its impact on achievable vehicle mileage is investigated. Results show an additional increase in simulated mileage at the same initial energy levels.

  4. Imperfect dark energy from kinetic gravity braiding

    SciTech Connect

    Deffayet, Cédric; Pujolàs, Oriol; Sawicki, Ignacy; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: oriol.pujolas@cern.ch E-mail: alexander.vikman@nyu.edu

    2010-10-01

    We introduce a large class of scalar-tensor models with interactions containing the second derivatives of the scalar field but not leading to additional degrees of freedom. These models exhibit peculiar features, such as an essential mixing of scalar and tensor kinetic terms, which we have named kinetic braiding. This braiding causes the scalar stress tensor to deviate from the perfect-fluid form. Cosmology in these models possesses a rich phenomenology, even in the limit where the scalar is an exact Goldstone boson. Generically, there are attractor solutions where the scalar monitors the behaviour of external matter. Because of the kinetic braiding, the position of the attractor depends both on the form of the Lagrangian and on the external energy density. The late-time asymptotic of these cosmologies is a de Sitter state. The scalar can exhibit phantom behaviour and is able to cross the phantom divide with neither ghosts nor gradient instabilities. These features provide a new class of models for Dark Energy. As an example, we study in detail a simple one-parameter model. The possible observational signatures of this model include a sizeable Early Dark Energy and a specific equation of state evolving into the final de-Sitter state from a healthy phantom regime.

  5. A note on the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1982-01-01

    The winter simulations of the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy. It is found that the kinetic energy is generated in the lower latitudes south of the maximum westerlies, transported northward and then, destroyed in the midlatitudes north of the maximum westerlies. Therefore, the atmospheric kinetic energy is maintained by the counterbalance between the divergence (convergence) of kinetic energy flux and generation (destruction) of kinetic energy in lower (middle) latitudes.

  6. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for the gas phase absorption of laser radiation for ultimate conversion to gas kinetic energy are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on absorption by the vibration rotation bands of diatomic molecules at high pressures. This high pressure absorption appears to offer efficient conversion of laser energy to gas translational energy. Bleaching and chemical effects are minimized and the variation of the total absorption coefficient with temperature is minimal.

  7. Kinetic energy recovery systems in motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwiński, C.

    2016-09-01

    The article draws attention to the increasing environmental pollution caused by the development of vehicle transport and motorization. Different types of design solutions used in vehicles for the reduction of fuel consumption, and thereby emission of toxic gasses into the atmosphere, were specified. Historical design solutions concerning energy recovery devices in mechanical vehicles which used flywheels to accumulate kinetic energy were shown. Developmental tendencies in the area of vehicle manufacturing in the form of hybrid electric and electric devices were discussed. Furthermore, designs of energy recovery devices with electrical energy storage from the vehicle braking and shock absorbing systems were presented. A mechanical energy storing device using a flywheel operating under vacuum was presented, as were advantages and disadvantages of both systems, the limitations they impose on individual constructions and safety issues. The paper also discusses a design concept of an energy recovery device in mechanical vehicles which uses torsion springs as the main components of energy accumulation during braking. The desirability of a cooperation of both the mechanical- and electrical energy recovery devices was indicated.

  8. Single crystal tungsten kinetic energy penetrators

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, C.F.; Gogolewski, R.P.

    1992-05-01

    We have explored the terminal ballistic performance of single crystal tungsten as a kinetic energy penetrator. Scientific speculation as to the anticipated penetration performance and nature of the interaction between such a kinetic energy penetrator and semi-infinite and spaced metallic targets has led us to perform laboratory scale experiments and metallographic examinations of post-impact penetrator materials. The single tungsten crystals were ground into kinetic energy penetrators with the [l angle]111[r angle] and [l angle]100[r angle] crystal direction being coincident with the axis of symmetry of the penetrators. The crystals were electro-polished to their final diameter. We, compared the terminal performance at current ordnance speeds of [l angle]111[r angle] single crystal tungsten to 90W-10 (NiFe) cemented tungsten and textured pure tungsten in laboratory scale ballistic experiments against a spaced steel (triple) target at sixty-five degrees obliquity. We also compared the terminal performance of [l angle]100[r angle] and [l angle]111[r angle] single crystal tungsten with 90W-10 and 98W02 (NiFe) cemented tungsten and textured pure tungsten in laboratory scale ballistic experiments against monolithic 4340 alloy steel (HRC = 36) at normal impact. We radiographed the penetrators during the interactions with the targets, we recovered portions of the penetrators after the ballistic experiments, and we conducted metallographic examinations of penetrator remnants. From the radiographic records and the metallographic examinations, we drew conclusions pertaining to insights into the terminal interactions of the penetrators with the targets and suggestions as to improved compositions of the cemented tungsten penetrators.

  9. Kinetic energy decomposition scheme based on information theory.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-12-15

    We proposed a novel kinetic energy decomposition analysis based on information theory. Since the Hirshfeld partitioning for electron densities can be formulated in terms of Kullback-Leibler information deficiency in information theory, a similar partitioning for kinetic energy densities was newly proposed. The numerical assessments confirm that the current kinetic energy decomposition scheme provides reasonable chemical pictures for ionic and covalent molecules, and can also estimate atomic energies using a correction with viral ratios.

  10. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  11. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  12. Spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Xu, M.; Fedorczak, N.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2012-01-15

    The turbulent spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy and its exchange is investigated in the framework of an K-{epsilon} model in a magnetized plasma column. The kinetic energy is transferred from the turbulence into the zonal flow around the shear layer. The Reynolds stress profile adjusts to the shear layer, which results in a transport of mean kinetic energy from the region around the shear layer into the shear layer.

  13. Kinetic energy factors in evaluation of athletes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jason N; Priest, Joe W; Marble, Daniel K

    2008-11-01

    It is established that speed and agility are critical attributes of sports performance. Performance timing of runs during agility course testing can be used to estimate acceleration, speed, or quickness. The authors of this research effort also report the energy of motion, or kinetic energy of the athlete, which considers not only the speed but also the mass of the athlete. An electronic timer was used to determine total run times as well as split performance times during a new 60-yd "run-shuttle" test. This newly designed agility test takes advantage of the technological capabilities of a laser timing device. Separate times for each of four run segments were recorded and converted to average speeds (m x s(-1)) as well as a quantitative factor of merit defined as the "K-factor." The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of training and to compare athletes and teams using measures of time, speed, and kinetic energy. Results of the analysis of total time on the 60-yd run-shuttle provided evidence of the effectiveness of the training programs. Split times of segments within the 60-yd run-shuttle provided information not available from conventional agility tests. Average speeds and K-factors identified discriminating characteristics of otherwise similar athletes. Our findings support the conclusion that training programs and athletic performance may be evaluated using the 60-yd run-shuttle with laser timer system. Coaches and trainers may find practical application of this technology for American football, soccer, basketball, baseball/softball, track and field, and field hockey.

  14. Kinetic energy factors in evaluation of athletes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jason N; Priest, Joe W; Marble, Daniel K

    2008-11-01

    It is established that speed and agility are critical attributes of sports performance. Performance timing of runs during agility course testing can be used to estimate acceleration, speed, or quickness. The authors of this research effort also report the energy of motion, or kinetic energy of the athlete, which considers not only the speed but also the mass of the athlete. An electronic timer was used to determine total run times as well as split performance times during a new 60-yd "run-shuttle" test. This newly designed agility test takes advantage of the technological capabilities of a laser timing device. Separate times for each of four run segments were recorded and converted to average speeds (m x s(-1)) as well as a quantitative factor of merit defined as the "K-factor." The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of training and to compare athletes and teams using measures of time, speed, and kinetic energy. Results of the analysis of total time on the 60-yd run-shuttle provided evidence of the effectiveness of the training programs. Split times of segments within the 60-yd run-shuttle provided information not available from conventional agility tests. Average speeds and K-factors identified discriminating characteristics of otherwise similar athletes. Our findings support the conclusion that training programs and athletic performance may be evaluated using the 60-yd run-shuttle with laser timer system. Coaches and trainers may find practical application of this technology for American football, soccer, basketball, baseball/softball, track and field, and field hockey. PMID:18824932

  15. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the gas phase absorption of laser radiation for conversion to gas kinetic energy are discussed. Absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung, in which laser energy is converted at a gas kinetic rate in a spectrally continuous process, is briefly described, and absorption by molecular vibrational rotation bands is discussed at length. High pressure absorption is proposed as a means of minimizing gas bleaching and dissociation, the major disadvantages of the molecular absorption process. A band model is presented for predicting the molecular absorption spectra in the high pressure absorption region and is applied to the CO molecule. Use of a rare gas seeded with Fe(CO)5 for converting vibrational modes to translation modes is described.

  16. Cascade of kinetic energy in three-dimensional compressible turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao; Shi, Yipeng; Xiao, Zuoli; He, X T; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-05-24

    The conservative cascade of kinetic energy is established using both Fourier analysis and a new exact physical-space flux relation in a simulated compressible turbulence. The subgrid scale (SGS) kinetic energy flux of the compressive mode is found to be significantly larger than that of the solenoidal mode in the inertial range, which is the main physical origin for the occurrence of Kolmogorov's -5/3 scaling of the energy spectrum in compressible turbulence. The perfect antiparallel alignment between the large-scale strain and the SGS stress leads to highly efficient kinetic energy transfer in shock regions, which is a distinctive feature of shock structures in comparison with vortex structures. The rescaled probability distribution functions of SGS kinetic energy flux collapse in the inertial range, indicating a statistical self-similarity of kinetic energy cascades.

  17. Determination of kinetic energy applied by center pivot sprinklers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetic energy of discrete drops impacting a bare soil surface is generally observed to lead to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to soil surface seal formation. Under center pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy development can...

  18. Droplet Kinetic Energy from Center-Pivot Sprinklers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetic energy of discrete water drops impacting a bare soil surface is generally observed to lead to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to soil surface seal formation. Under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy developmen...

  19. The Kinetic Energy of a Rotating Figure Skater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wei R.; Troelstra, Arne A.

    1998-01-01

    When a rotating figure skater's fully extended arms are pulled back toward the torso, the angular velocity is noticeably increased and the kinetic energy of the skater can also be shown to increase. Discusses the change of the kinetic energy during such a process, and the work necessary for such an increase is derived using a dynamic equilibrium…

  20. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques for the gas-phase absorption of laser energy with ultimate conversion to heat or directed kinetic energy are reviewed. It is shown that the efficiency of resonance absorption by the vibration/rotation bands of the working gas can be enhanced by operating at sufficiently high pressures so that the linewidths of the absorbing transition exceed the line spacing. Within this limit, the gas can absorb continuously over the full spectral region of the band, and bleaching can be minimized since the manifold of molecular vibrational levels can simultaneously absorb the laser radiation.

  1. Kinetic energy transport in Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petschel, K.; Stellmach, S.; Wilczek, M.; Lülff, J.; Hansen, U.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetic energy balance in Rayleigh--B\\'{e}nard convection is investigated for the Prandtl number range $0.01\\le Pr \\le 150$ and for fixed Rayleigh number $Ra=5\\cdot10^{6}$. The kinetic energy balance is divided into a dissipation, a production and a flux term. We discuss profiles of all terms and find that the different contributions to the energy balance can be spatially separated into regions where kinetic energy is produced and where kinetic energy is dissipated. Analysing the Prandtl number dependence of the kinetic energy balance, we show that the height-dependence of the mean viscous dissipation is closely related to the flux of kinetic energy. We show that the flux of kinetic energy can be divided into four additive contributions, each representing a different elementary physical process (advection, buoyancy, normal viscous stresses and viscous shear stresses). The behaviour of these individual flux contributions is found to be surprisingly rich and exhibits a pronounced Prandtl number dependence. Different flux contributions dominate the kinetic energy transport at different depth, such that a comprehensive discussion requires a decomposition of the domain into a considerable number of sub-layers. On a less detailed level, our results reveal that advective kinetic energy fluxes play a key role in balancing the near-wall dissipation at low Prandtl number, whereas normal viscous stresses are particularly important at high Prandtl number. Finally, our work reveals that classical velocity boundary layers are deeply connected to the kinetic energy transport, but fail to correctly represent regions of enhanced viscous dissipation.

  2. Kinetic energy budget studies of areas of convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Synoptic-scale kinetic energy budgets are being computed for three cases when large areas of intense convection occurred over the Central United States. Major energy activity occurs in the storm areas.

  3. Relativistic momentum and kinetic energy, and E = mc2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Kuang Hu, Ben

    2009-03-01

    Based on relativistic velocity addition and the conservation of momentum and energy, I present simple derivations of the expressions for the relativistic momentum and kinetic energy of a particle, and for the formula E = mc2.

  4. Kinetic energy budgets in areas of intense convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Berecek, E. M.; Ebel, D. M.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A kinetic energy budget analysis of the AVE-SESAME 1 period which coincided with the deadly Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented. Horizontal flux convergence was found to be the major kinetic energy source to the region, while cross contour destruction was the major sink. Kinetic energy transformations were dominated by processes related to strong jet intrusion into the severe storm area. A kinetic energy budget of the AVE 6 period also is presented. The effects of inherent rawinsonde data errors on widely used basic kinematic parameters, including velocity divergence, vorticity advection, and kinematic vertical motion are described. In addition, an error analysis was performed in terms of the kinetic energy budget equation. Results obtained from downward integration of the continuity equation to obtain kinematic values of vertical motion are described. This alternate procedure shows promising results in severe storm situations.

  5. [Kinetics of catalase inactivation induced by ultrasonic cavitation].

    PubMed

    Potapovich, M V; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic patterns of sonication-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase (CAT) were studied in buffer solutions (pH 4-11) within the temperature range from 36 to 55 degrees C. Solutions of CAT were exposed to low-frequency (20.8 kHz) ultrasound (specific power, 48-62 W/cm2). The kinetics of CAT inactivation was characterized by effective first-order rate constants (s-1) of total inactivation (kin), thermal inactivation (*kin), and ultrasonic inactivation (kin(us)). In all cases, the following inequality was valid: kin > *kin. The value of kin(us) increased with the ultrasound power (range, 48-62 W/cm2) and exhibited a strong dependence on pH of the medium. On increasing the initial concentration of CAT (0.4-4.0 nM), kin(us) decreased. The three rate constants were minimum within the range of pH 6.5-8; their values increased considerably at pH < 6 and pH > 9. At 36-55 degrees C, temperature dependence of kin(us) was characterized by an activation energy (Eact) of 19.7 kcal/mol, whereas the value of Eact for CAT thermoinactivation was equal to 44.2 kcal/mol. Bovine serum and human serum albumins (BSA and HSA, respectively) inhibited sonication-induced CAT inactivation; complete prevention was observed at concentrations above 2.5 micrograms/ml. Dimethyl formamide (DMFA), a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (HO.), prevented sonication-induced CAT inactivation at 10% (kin and *kin increased with the content of DMFA at concentrations in excess of 3%). The results obtained indicate that free radicals generated in the field of ultrasonic cavitation play a decisive role in the inactivation of CAT, which takes place when its solutions are exposed to low-frequency ultrasound. However, the efficiency of CAT inactivation by the radicals is determined by (1) the degree of association between the enzyme molecules in the reaction medium and (2) the composition thereof. PMID:12722648

  6. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  7. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte kinetics in experimentally induced keratitis.

    PubMed

    Chusid, M J; Davis, S D

    1985-02-01

    The movement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) into inflamed corneas was studied using a quantitative technique to measure PMNL chemotaxis in vivo. Our studies suggested that, in this model, most PMNLs enter the cornea through limbal vessels. A variety of bacterial agents, including viable bacteria, killed bacteria, culture filtrates, and endotoxin, were found to induce a significant corneal inflammatory response. Of the agents tested, viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced greatest inflammation. Host factors (serum, PMNLs) also induced movement of PMNLs into corneas, but only after preincubation with activating agents. Normal serum, resting PMNLs, and PMNL lysates derived from resting cells did not promote PMNL corneal ingress. These studies provide further insight into the movement of PMNLs into the inflamed cornea and information that may be of use in developing techniques to inhibit the corneal inflammatory response. PMID:3977698

  8. Turbulence generation through intense kinetic energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqui, Agustin F.; Donzis, Diego A.

    2016-06-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to systematically study the development and establishment of turbulence when the flow is initialized with concentrated regions of intense kinetic energy. This resembles both active and passive grids which have been extensively used to generate and study turbulence in laboratories at different Reynolds numbers and with different characteristics, such as the degree of isotropy and homogeneity. A large DNS database was generated covering a wide range of initial conditions with a focus on perturbations with some directional preference, a condition found in active jet grids and passive grids passed through a contraction as well as a new type of active grid inspired by the experimental use of lasers to photo-excite the molecules that comprise the fluid. The DNS database is used to assert under what conditions the flow becomes turbulent and if so, the time required for this to occur. We identify a natural time scale of the problem which indicates the onset of turbulence and a single Reynolds number based exclusively on initial conditions which controls the evolution of the flow. It is found that a minimum Reynolds number is needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, velocity as well as spectral dynamics and anisotropy measures is presented to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence.

  9. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of triphenylene

    SciTech Connect

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2014-06-28

    We report vibrational information of both the first electronically excited state and the ground cationic state of jet-cooled triphenylene via the techniques of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. The first excited electronic state S{sub 1} of the neutral molecule is of A{sub 1}′ symmetry and is therefore electric dipole forbidden in the D{sub 3h} group. Consequently, there are no observable Franck-Condon allowed totally symmetric a{sub 1}′ vibrational bands in the REMPI spectrum. All observed vibrational transitions are due to Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling to the E′ third electronically excited state S{sub 3}. The assignment of all vibrational bands as e′ symmetry is based on comparisons with calculations using the time dependent density functional theory and spectroscopic simulations. When an electron is eliminated, the molecular frame undergoes Jahn-Teller distortion, lowering the point group to C{sub 2v} and resulting in two nearly degenerate electronic states of A{sub 2} and B{sub 1} symmetry. Here we follow a crude treatment by assuming that all e′ vibrational modes resolve into b{sub 2} and a{sub 1} modes in the C{sub 2v} molecular frame. Some observed ZEKE transitions are tentatively assigned, and the adiabatic ionization threshold is determined to be 63 365 ± 7 cm{sup −1}. The observed ZEKE spectra contain a consistent pattern, with a cluster of transitions centered near the same vibrational level of the cation as that of the intermediate state, roughly consistent with the propensity rule. However, complete assignment of the detailed vibrational structure due to Jahn-Teller coupling requires much more extensive calculations, which will be performed in the future.

  10. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    PubMed

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  11. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towery, C. A. Z.; Poludnenko, A. Y.; Urzay, J.; O'Brien, J.; Ihme, M.; Hamlington, P. E.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  12. Laser pulse induced multiple exciton kinetics in molecular ring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiao; Wang, Luxia

    2016-11-01

    Multiple excitons can be formed upon strong optical excitation of molecular aggregates and complexes. Based on a theoretical approach on exciton-exciton annihilation dynamics in supramolecular systems (May et al., 2014), exciton interaction kinetics in ring aggregates of two-level molecules are investigated. Excited by the sub-picosecond laser pulse, multiple excitons keep stable in the molecular ring shaped as a regular polygon. If the symmetry is destroyed by changing the dipole of a single molecule, the excitation of different molecules becomes not identical, and the changed dipole-dipole interaction initiates subsequent energy redistribution. Depending on the molecular distance and the dipole configuration, the kinetics undergo different types of processes, but all get stable within some hundreds of femtoseconds. The study of exciton kinetics will be helpful for further investigations of the efficiency of optical devices based on molecular aggregates.

  13. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  14. Mutation-induced protein interaction kinetics changes affect apoptotic network dynamic properties and facilitate oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linjie; Sun, Tanlin; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    It has been a consensus in cancer research that cancer is a disease caused primarily by genomic alterations, especially somatic mutations. However, the mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we used the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a case study and performed a systematic analysis of integrating pathway dynamics with protein interaction kinetics to quantitatively investigate the causal molecular mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis. A mathematical model of the regulatory network was constructed to establish the functional role of dynamic bifurcation in the apoptotic process. The oncogenic mutation enrichment of each of the protein functional domains involved was found strongly correlated with the parameter sensitivity of the bifurcation point. We further dissected the causal mechanism underlying this correlation by evaluating the mutational influence on protein interaction kinetics using molecular dynamics simulation. We analyzed 29 matched mutant–wild-type and 16 matched SNP—wild-type protein systems. We found that the binding kinetics changes reflected by the changes of free energy changes induced by protein interaction mutations, which induce variations in the sensitive parameters of the bifurcation point, were a major cause of apoptosis pathway dysfunction, and mutations involved in sensitive interaction domains show high oncogenic potential. Our analysis provided a molecular basis for connecting protein mutations, protein interaction kinetics, network dynamics properties, and physiological function of a regulatory network. These insights provide a framework for coupling mutation genotype to tumorigenesis phenotype and help elucidate the logic of cancer initiation. PMID:26170328

  15. Mutation-induced protein interaction kinetics changes affect apoptotic network dynamic properties and facilitate oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linjie; Sun, Tanlin; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi

    2015-07-28

    It has been a consensus in cancer research that cancer is a disease caused primarily by genomic alterations, especially somatic mutations. However, the mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we used the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a case study and performed a systematic analysis of integrating pathway dynamics with protein interaction kinetics to quantitatively investigate the causal molecular mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis. A mathematical model of the regulatory network was constructed to establish the functional role of dynamic bifurcation in the apoptotic process. The oncogenic mutation enrichment of each of the protein functional domains involved was found strongly correlated with the parameter sensitivity of the bifurcation point. We further dissected the causal mechanism underlying this correlation by evaluating the mutational influence on protein interaction kinetics using molecular dynamics simulation. We analyzed 29 matched mutant-wild-type and 16 matched SNP--wild-type protein systems. We found that the binding kinetics changes reflected by the changes of free energy changes induced by protein interaction mutations, which induce variations in the sensitive parameters of the bifurcation point, were a major cause of apoptosis pathway dysfunction, and mutations involved in sensitive interaction domains show high oncogenic potential. Our analysis provided a molecular basis for connecting protein mutations, protein interaction kinetics, network dynamics properties, and physiological function of a regulatory network. These insights provide a framework for coupling mutation genotype to tumorigenesis phenotype and help elucidate the logic of cancer initiation.

  16. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  17. Kinetic model for photoinduced and thermally induced creation and annihilation of metastable defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhalim, I.

    1995-03-01

    A microscopic many-body model is proposed for the kinetics of metastable defects (MSDs) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). It is based on the existence of short-lived large energy fluctuations which induce transient traps for carriers that release their energy and enhance the creation or annihilation of MSDs. The expressions found for the photoinduced and thermally induced creation and annihilation rates' coefficients explain the dependence on the variety of parameters.

  18. Roles of divergent and rotational winds in the kinetic energy balance during intense convective activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Browning, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Contributions of divergent and rotational wind components to the synoptic-scale kinetic energy balance are described using rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals from NASA's fourth Atmospheric Variability experiment. Two intense thunderstorm complexes occurred during the period. Energy budgets are described for the entire computational region and for limited volumes that enclosed storm-induced, upper level wind maxima located poleward of convection. Although small in magnitude, the divergent wind component played an important role in the cross-contour generation and horizontal flux divergence of kinetic energy. The importance of V(D) appears directly related to the presence and intensity of convection. Although K(D) usually comprised less than 10 percent of the total kinetic energy content, generation of kinetic energy by V(D) was a major factor in the creation of upper-level wind maxima to the north of the storm complexes. Omission of the divergent wind apparently would lead to serious misrepresentations of the energy balance. A random error analysis is presented to assess confidence limits in the various energy parameters.

  19. A Note on Kinetic Energy, Dissipation and Enstrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Zhou, Ye; Fan, Meng

    1998-01-01

    The dissipation rate of a Newtonian fluid with constant shear viscosity can be shown to include three constituents: dilatation, vorticity, and surface strain. The last one is found to make no contributions to the change of kinetic energy. These dissipation constituents arc used to identify typical compact turbulent flow structures at high Reynolds numbers. The incompressible version of the simplified kinetic-energy equation is then cast to a novel form, which is free from the work rate done by surface stresses but in which the full dissipation re-enters.

  20. Fragmentation of water by ion impact: Kinetic energy release spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput, Jyoti; Safvan, C. P.

    2011-11-15

    The fragmentation of isolated water molecules on collision with 450-keV Ar{sup 9+} has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry employing multihit detection. The kinetic energy release spectrum for the dissociation of [H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+ White-Star} into (H{sup White-Star },H{sup +},O{sup +}) fragments has been measured where H{sup White-Star} is a neutral Rydberg hydrogen atom. Ab initio calculations are carried out for the lowest states of [H{sub 2}O]{sup q+} with q=2 and 3 to help interpret the kinetic energy release spectra.

  1. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms, and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J

    2014-12-31

    RNA hairpins play a pivotal role in a diverse range of cellular functions, and are integral components of ribozymes, mRNA, and riboswitches. However, the mechanistic and kinetic details of RNA hairpin folding, which are key determinants of most of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic detail. Our results show that the potential energy landscapes have a distinct funnel-like bias toward the folded hairpin state, consistent with efficient structure-seeking properties. Mechanistic and kinetic information is analyzed in terms of kinetic transition networks. We find microsecond folding times, consistent with temperature jump experiments, for hairpin folding initiated from relatively compact unfolded states. This process is essentially driven by an initial collapse, followed by rapid zippering of the helix stem in the final phase. Much lower folding rates are predicted when the folding is initiated from extended chains, which undergo longer excursions on the energy landscape before nucleation events can occur. Our work therefore explains recent experiments and coarse-grained simulations, where the folding kinetics exhibit precisely this dependency on the initial conditions.

  2. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  3. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  4. Low barrier kinetics: dependence on observables and free energy surface.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hairong; Gruebele, Martin

    2006-01-30

    Dynamics on free energy surfaces with high activation barriers are usually treated by few-state kinetics models, yielding characteristic rate coefficients and amplitudes depending on the connectivity of the states. When the barriers are low (< 3 kT), the assumption of instantaneous equilibration of the transition state, and hence, the few-state kinetics treatment, break down. Langevin dynamics is used here to explore the characteristic trends that occur in such cases, as a function of barrier height, number of barriers, dimensionality of the free energy surface, and switching functions that describe how spectroscopic probes vary from reactant to product. The result is a systematic phenomenological description of low barrier kinetics and dynamics.

  5. Evaluating rainfall kinetic energy - intensity relationships with observed disdrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Martinez, Marta; Begueria, Santiago; Latorre, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy is required for determining erosivity, the ability of rainfall to detach soil particles and initiate erosion. Its determination relay on the use of disdrometers, i.e. devices capable of measuring the drop size distribution and velocity of falling raindrops. In the absence of such devices, rainfall kinetic energy is usually estimated with empirical expressions relating rainfall energy and intensity. We evaluated the performance of 14 rainfall energy equations in estimating one-minute rainfall energy and event total energy, in comparison with observed data from 821 rainfall episodes (more than 100 thousand one-minute observations) by means of an optical disdrometer. In addition, two sources of bias when using such relationships were evaluated: i) the influence of using theoretical terminal raindrop fall velocities instead of measured values; and ii) the influence of time aggregation (rainfall intensity data every 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-minutes). Empirical relationships did a relatively good job when complete events were considered (R2 > 0.82), but offered poorer results for within-event (one-minute resolution) variation. Also, systematic biases where large for many equations. When raindrop size distribution was known, estimating the terminal fall velocities by empirical laws produced good results even at fine time resolution. The influence of time aggregation was very high in the estimated kinetic energy, although linear scaling may allow empirical correction. This results stress the importance of considering all these effects when rainfall energy needs to be estimated from more standard precipitation records. , and recommends the use of disdrometer data to locally determine rainfall kinetic energy.

  6. Momentum and Kinetic Energy: Confusable Concepts in Secondary School Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, T. G. K.; MacMillan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike express concerns about the conceptual difficulties associated with the concepts of momentum and kinetic energy currently taught in school physics. This article presents an in-depth analysis of the treatment given to them in 44 published textbooks written for UK secondary school certificate courses. This is set…

  7. Kinetic-energy absorber employs frictional force between mating cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E. W.

    1964-01-01

    A kinetic energy absorbing device uses a series of coaxial, mating cylindrical surfaces. These surfaces have high frictional resistance to relative motion when axial impact forces are applied. The device is designed for safe deceleration of vehicles impacting on landing surfaces.

  8. Mass, Momentum and Kinetic Energy of a Relativistic Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanchini, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous definition of mass in special relativity, proposed in a recent paper, is recalled and employed to obtain simple and rigorous deductions of the expressions of momentum and kinetic energy for a relativistic particle. The whole logical framework appears as the natural extension of the classical one. Only the first, second and third laws of…

  9. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: Potential and Kinetic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on potential and kinetic energy is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each…

  10. Heuristic control of kinetic energy in dynamic reaction coordinate calculations.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Arnim

    2013-08-01

    For the understanding and prediction of chemical reactions, detailed knowledge of the minimum energy path between reactants and transition state is of utmost importance. Stewart et al. (J. Comput. Chem. 1987, 8, 1117) proposed the usage of molecular trajectories calculated from Newton's equations of motion for an efficient reaction path following. Two operational modes are possible thereby: intrinsic (IRC) and dynamic reaction coordinate calculations (DRC). The technical difference between these modes is that in an IRC calculation the kinetic energy of the nuclei is quenched while the total energy is conserved in DRC calculations. In this work, a heuristic control methodology of atomic kinetic energies in DRC calculations using fuzzy logic is proposed. A diversified test set of 10 reactions has been collected to examine the performance of this approach. Fuzzy rule-based models are found to be a convenient way to make the determination of accessible paths of chemical reactions computationally efficient.

  11. A hybrid model describing ion induced kinetic electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, S.; Duvenbeck, A.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present a model to describe the kinetic internal and external electron emission from an ion bombarded metal target. The model is based upon a molecular dynamics treatment of the nuclear degree of freedom, the electronic system is assumed as a quasi-free electron gas characterized by its Fermi energy, electron temperature and a characteristic attenuation length. In a series of previous works we have employed this model, which includes the local kinetic excitation as well as the rapid spread of the generated excitation energy, in order to calculate internal and external electron emission yields within the framework of a Richardson-Dushman-like thermionic emission model. However, this kind of treatment turned out to fail in the realistic prediction of experimentally measured internal electron yields mainly due to the restriction of the treatment of electronic transport to a diffusive manner. Here, we propose a slightly modified approach additionally incorporating the contribution of hot electrons which are generated in the bulk material and undergo ballistic transport towards the emitting interface.

  12. Plasma transport induced by kinetic Alfven wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Izutsu, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Fujimoto, M.; Nakamura, T. K. M.

    2012-10-15

    At the Earth's magnetopause that separates the hot-tenuous magnetospheric plasma from the cold dense solar wind plasma, often seen is a boundary layer where plasmas of both origins coexist. Plasma diffusions of various forms have been considered as the cause of this plasma mixing. Here, we investigate the plasma transport induced by wave-particle interaction in kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence, which is one of the candidate processes. We clarify that the physical origin of the KAW-induced cross-field diffusion is the drift motions of those particles that are in Cerenkov resonance with the wave: E Multiplication-Sign B-like drift that emerges in the presence of non-zero parallel electric field component and grad-B drift due to compressional magnetic fluctuations. We find that KAW turbulence, which has a spectral breakpoint at which an MHD inertial range transits to a dissipation range, causes selective transport for particles whose parallel velocities are specified by the local Alfven velocity and the parallel phase velocity at the spectral breakpoint. This finding leads us to propose a new data analysis method for identifying whether or not a mixed plasma in the boundary layer is a consequence of KAW-induced transport across the magnetopause. The method refers to the velocity space distribution function data obtained by a spacecraft that performs in situ observations and, in principle, is applicable to currently available dataset such as that provided by the NASA's THEMIS mission.

  13. Kinetics of Hydrothermally Induced Reorganization of J-Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshino, Hiroko; Hasegawa, Soukaku; Mouri, Syuji; Miura, Yasuhiro F.; Sugi, Michio

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of the J-band reorganization process in merocyanine (MS)-Cd arachidate mixed Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films induced by heat treatments at 100% humidity (HTTs). The as-deposited J-band is reorganized by HTT to form a new phase associated with a narrowing and a slight redshift of the peak. The change in the UV-visible absorption spectrum A is found to involve two different stages: an increase in the absorbance A at wavelengths shorter than ˜540 nm at the expense of the as-deposited J-component and a decrease in A for the shorter wavelengths compensated by the growth of the new phase of the J-band. By introducing a three-component model, each spectrum is deconvoluted into three bands, Bands I, II, and III, which are presumably assigned as the blueshifted dimer, monomer and redshifted J-bands, respectively. The Band II fraction remains almost unchanged throughout the HTT process, indicating that the first and second stages of the spectral change can be interpreted as the dissociation of the as-deposited J-band into the dimers and as the reorganization of the J-band out of the dimers, respectively. The second-stage kinetics is found to obey a simple first-order law. The HTT-induced superstructures have been quantitatively examined referring to the average size of the domains observed in the microscopic images. It has been suggested that the domain growth is a phenomenon occurring subsequent to the J-band reorganization process rather than being an aspect of the process, since a superlinear increase in with heating time is observed with a long delay after the saturation of J-band growth.

  14. Programmable energy landscapes for kinetic control of DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Machinek, Robert R F; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Haley, Natalie E C; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2014-11-10

    DNA is used to construct synthetic systems that sense, actuate, move and compute. The operation of many dynamic DNA devices depends on toehold-mediated strand displacement, by which one DNA strand displaces another from a duplex. Kinetic control of strand displacement is particularly important in autonomous molecular machinery and molecular computation, in which non-equilibrium systems are controlled through rates of competing processes. Here, we introduce a new method based on the creation of mismatched base pairs as kinetic barriers to strand displacement. Reaction rate constants can be tuned across three orders of magnitude by altering the position of such a defect without significantly changing the stabilities of reactants or products. By modelling reaction free-energy landscapes, we explore the mechanistic basis of this control mechanism. We also demonstrate that oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of DNA, is capable of accurately predicting and explaining the impact of mismatches on displacement kinetics.

  15. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  16. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E. |

    1996-09-01

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Split kinetic energy method for quantum systems with competing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, H.; Chao, Sheng D.

    2012-09-15

    For quantum systems with competing potentials, the conventional perturbation theory often yields an asymptotic series and the subsequent numerical outcome becomes uncertain. To tackle such a kind of problems, we develop a general solution scheme based on a new energy dissection idea. Instead of dividing the potential energy into 'unperturbed' and 'perturbed' terms, a partition of the kinetic energy is performed. By distributing the kinetic energy term in part into each individual potential, the Hamiltonian can be expressed as the sum of the subsystem Hamiltonians with respective competing potentials. The total wavefunction is expanded by using a linear combination of the basis sets of respective subsystem Hamiltonians. We first illustrate the solution procedure using a simple system consisting of a particle under the action of double {delta}-function potentials. Next, this method is applied to the prototype systems of a charged harmonic oscillator in strong magnetic field and the hydrogen molecule ion. Compared with the usual perturbation approach, this new scheme converges much faster to the exact solutions for both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. When properly extended, this new solution scheme can be very useful for dealing with strongly coupling quantum systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new basis set expansion method is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Split kinetic energy method is proposed to solve quantum eigenvalue problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant improvement has been obtained in converging to exact results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of such methods is promising and discussed.

  18. Covalent bonding: the fundamental role of the kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Bacskay, George B; Nordholm, Sture

    2013-08-22

    This work addresses the continuing disagreement between two prevalent schools of thought concerning the mechanism of covalent bonding. According to Hellmann, Ruedenberg, and Kutzelnigg, a lowering of the kinetic energy associated with electron delocalization is the key stabilization mechanism. The opposing view of Slater, Feynman, and Bader has maintained that the source of stabilization is electrostatic potential energy lowering due to electron density redistribution to binding regions between nuclei. Despite the large body of accurate quantum chemical work on a range of molecules, the debate concerning the origin of bonding continues unabated, even for H2(+), the simplest of covalently bound molecules. We therefore present here a detailed study of H2(+), including its formation, that uses a sequence of computational methods designed to reveal the relevant contributing mechanisms as well as the spatial density distributions of the kinetic and potential energy contributions. We find that the electrostatic mechanism fails to provide real insight or explanation of bonding, while the kinetic energy mechanism is sound and accurate but complex or even paradoxical to those preferring the apparent simplicity of the electrostatic model. We further argue that the underlying mechanism of bonding is in fact of dynamical character, and analyses that focus on energy do not reveal the origin of covalent bonding in full clarity. PMID:23859401

  19. Mesoscale and macroscale kinetic energy fluxes from granular fabric evolution.

    PubMed

    Walker, David M; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Froyland, Gary

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution measurements means it is now possible to identify and track the local "fabric" or contact topology of individual grains in a deforming sand throughout loading history. These provide compelling impetus to the development of methods for inferring changes in the contact forces and energies at multiple spatiotemporal scales, using information on grain contacts alone. Here we develop a surrogate measure of the fluctuating kinetic energy based on changes in the local contact topology of individual grains. We demonstrate the method for dense granular materials under quasistatic biaxial shear. In these systems, the initially stable and solidlike response eventually gives way to liquidlike behavior and global failure. This crossover in mechanical behavior, akin to a phase transition, is marked by bursts of kinetic energy and frictional dissipation. Mechanisms underlying this release of energy include the buckling of major load-bearing structures known as force chains. These columns of grains represent major repositories for stored strain energy. Stored energy initially accumulates at all of the contacts along the force chain, but is released collectively when the chain overloads and buckles. The exact quantification of the buildup and release of energy in force chains, and the manner in which force chain buckling propagates in the sample (i.e., diffuse and systemwide versus localized into shear bands), requires detailed knowledge of contact forces. To date, however, the forces at grain contacts continue to elude measurement in natural granular materials like sand. Here, using data from computer simulations, we show that a proxy for the fluctuating kinetic energy in dense granular materials can be suitably constructed solely from the evolving properties of the grain's local contact topology. Our approach directly relates the evolution of fabric to energy flux and makes possible research into the propagation of failure from measurements of

  20. Mesoscale and macroscale kinetic energy fluxes from granular fabric evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Froyland, Gary

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution measurements means it is now possible to identify and track the local "fabric" or contact topology of individual grains in a deforming sand throughout loading history. These provide compelling impetus to the development of methods for inferring changes in the contact forces and energies at multiple spatiotemporal scales, using information on grain contacts alone. Here we develop a surrogate measure of the fluctuating kinetic energy based on changes in the local contact topology of individual grains. We demonstrate the method for dense granular materials under quasistatic biaxial shear. In these systems, the initially stable and solidlike response eventually gives way to liquidlike behavior and global failure. This crossover in mechanical behavior, akin to a phase transition, is marked by bursts of kinetic energy and frictional dissipation. Mechanisms underlying this release of energy include the buckling of major load-bearing structures known as force chains. These columns of grains represent major repositories for stored strain energy. Stored energy initially accumulates at all of the contacts along the force chain, but is released collectively when the chain overloads and buckles. The exact quantification of the buildup and release of energy in force chains, and the manner in which force chain buckling propagates in the sample (i.e., diffuse and systemwide versus localized into shear bands), requires detailed knowledge of contact forces. To date, however, the forces at grain contacts continue to elude measurement in natural granular materials like sand. Here, using data from computer simulations, we show that a proxy for the fluctuating kinetic energy in dense granular materials can be suitably constructed solely from the evolving properties of the grain's local contact topology. Our approach directly relates the evolution of fabric to energy flux and makes possible research into the propagation of failure from measurements of

  1. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.; Lam, S.H.

    1982-02-01

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. To combine the analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. It is capable of solving for both unsteady and steady thermionic converter behavior including possible laser ionization enhancement or atomic recombination lasing. A proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed. (WHK)

  2. A study of the kinetic energy generation with general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1983-01-01

    The history data of winter simulation by the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the generation of atmospheric kinetic energy. The contrast between the geographic distributions of the generation of kinetic energy and divergence of kinetic energy flux shows that kinetic energy is generated in the upstream side of jets, transported to the downstream side and destroyed there. The contributions from the time-mean and transient modes to the counterbalance between generation of kinetic energy and divergence of kinetic energy flux are also investigated. It is observed that the kinetic energy generated by the time-mean mode is essentially redistributed by the time-mean flow, while that generated by the transient flow is mainly responsible for the maintenance of the kinetic energy of the entire atmospheric flow.

  3. Kinetic energy budgets during the life cycle of intense convective activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Synoptic-scale data at three- and six-hour intervals are employed to study the relationship between changing kinetic energy variables and the life cycles of two severe squall lines. The kinetic energy budgets indicate a high degree of kinetic energy generation, especially pronounced near the jet-stream level. Energy losses in the storm environment are due to the transfer of kinetic energy from grid to subgrid scales of motion; large-scale upward vertical motion carries aloft the kinetic energy generated by storm activity at lower levels. In general, the time of maximum storm intensity is also the time of maximum energy conversion and transport.

  4. Effects of directed and kinetic energy weapons on spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, A P

    1986-12-01

    The characteristics of the various directed energy beams are reviewed, and their damaging effects on typical materials are examined for a wide range of energy pulse intensities and durations. Representative cases are surveyed, and charts are presented to indicate regions in which damage to spacecraft structures, particularly radiators for power plants, would be likely. The effects of kinetic energy weapons, such as bird-shot, are similarly examined. The charts are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of various measures designed to reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft components, particularly nuclear electric power plants.

  5. Platelet-activating factor-induced increases in glucose kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Hargrove, D.M.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a postulated mediator of many of the early hemodynamic effects of endotoxin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether in vivo administration of PAF could produce alterations in whole-body glucose metabolism that would mimic those seen during endotoxemia. Glucose kinetics were assessed in chronically catheterized conscious rats by the constant infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose before and for 4 h after either a bolus injection or a constant infusion of PAF. The bolus injection of PAF elevated the rate of glucose appearance (R{sub a}; 44%) for 1.5 h. The lower PAF infusion rate decreased blood pressure 11% to 104 mmHg, whereas the higher infusion rate decreased pressure 34% to 77 mmHg. Both PAF infusion rates produced elevations in plasma glucose and glucose R{sub a} throughout the 4-h infusion period in a dose-related manner. The PAF infusions also induced dose-related increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamine levels throughout the infusion period. Because the constant infusion of PAF did stimulate many of the hemodynamic and metabolic alterations produced by endotoxin, this study provides additional support for the potential importance of PAF as a mediator of the early hemodynamic and metabolic sequela of endotoxin shock. Furthermore, the PAF-induced changes in glucose metabolism appear to be mediated by the resultant elevation in plasma catecholamines.

  6. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  7. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  8. Mechanisms affecting kinetic energies of laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R. |; Leboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Laser materials processing techniques are expected to have a dramatic impact on materials science and engineering in the near future and beyond. One of the main laser materials processing techniques is Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for thin film growth. While experimentalists search for optimal approaches for thin film growth with pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a systematic effort in theory and modeling of various processes during PLD is needed. The quality of film deposited depends critically on the range and profile of the kinetic energy and density of the ablated plume. While it is to the advantage of pulsed laser deposition to have high kinetic energy, plumes that are too energetic causes film damage. A dynamic source effect was found to accelerate the plume expansion velocity much higher than that from a conventional free expansion model. A self-similar theory and a hydrodynamic model are developed to study this effect, which may help to explain experimentally observed high front expansion velocity. Background gas can also affect the kinetic energies. High background gas may cause the ablated materials to go backward. Experimentally observed plume splitting is also discussed.

  9. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics and the Activation Energy Relate Soil Peroxidase Kinetics to the Lignin Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebwasser-Freese, D.; Tharayil, N.; Preston, C. M.; Gerard, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that lignin exhibit a turnover rate of less than 6 years, suggesting that the enzymatic mechanisms mediating the decay of lignin are less understood. One factor that could be affecting the mean residence time of lignin in the soil is the catalytic efficiency of soil oxidoreductase enzymes. We characterized the spatial and seasonal transitions in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and activation energy of the soil oxidoreductase enzyme, peroxidase, across three ecosystems of differing litter chemistries- pine, deciduous forest, and a cultivated field- and associate it to the soil lignin chemistries. To interpret the combined effect of Vmax and Km, the two parameters were integrated into one term which we defined as the catalytic efficiency. Generally, the peroxidases in pine soils exhibited the highest Vmax and Km, resulting in the lowest catalytic efficiency, followed by that in the deciduous soils. Meanwhile, the agricultural soils which exhibited the lowest Vmax and Km contained the highest catalytic efficiency of peroxidase. Through linear regression analysis of the kinetic parameters to the soil lignin chemistry, we discerned that the catalytic efficiency term best associated to the lignin monomer ratios (C/V, P/V, and SCV/V). The Activation Energy of peroxidase varied by depth, and seasons across the ecosystems. However, the Activation Energy of peroxidase did not relate to the lignin chemistry or quantity. Collectively, our results show that although the peroxidase Vmax and Km in the phenolic-poor soils are low, the degradation efficiency of peroxidases in this soils can be equivalent or exceed that of phenolic-rich soils. This study, through the characterization of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, provides a new insight into the mechanisms that could moderate the decomposition of lignin in soils.

  10. High-energy interactions in kinetic inductance detectors arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addabbo, A.; Calvo, M.; Goupy, J.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Catalano, A.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Monfardini, A.

    2014-07-01

    The impacts of Cosmic Rays on the detectors are a key problem for space-based missions. We are studying the effects of such interactions on arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), in order to adapt this technology for use on board of satellites. Before proposing a new technology such as the Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a space-based mission, the problem of the Cosmic Rays that hit the detectors during in-flight operation has to be studied in detail. We present here several tests carried out with KID exposed to radioactive sources, which we use to reproduce the physical interactions induced by primary Cosmic Rays, and we report the results obtained adopting different solutions in terms of substrate materials and array geometries. We conclude by outlining the main guidelines to follow for fabricating KID for spacebased applications.

  11. Maximum kinetic energy considerations in proton stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, Evan R; Mackie, Thomas R

    2011-04-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum proton kinetic energy required to treat a given percentage of patients eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with coplanar arc-based proton therapy, contingent upon the number and location of gantry angles used. Treatment plans from 100 consecutive patients treated with SRS at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center between June of 2007 and March of 2010 were analyzed. For each target volume within each patient, in-house software was used to place proton pencil beam spots over the distal surface of the target volume from 51 equally-spaced gantry angles of up to 360°. For each beam spot, the radiological path length from the surface of the patient to the distal boundary of the target was then calculated along a ray from the gantry location to the location of the beam spot. This data was used to generate a maximum proton energy requirement for each patient as a function of the arc length that would be spanned by the gantry angles used in a given treatment. If only a single treatment angle is required, 100% of the patients included in the study could be treated by a proton beam with a maximum kinetic energy of 118 MeV. As the length of the treatment arc is increased to 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360°, the maximum energy requirement increases to 127, 145, 156, and 179 MeV, respectively. A very high percentage of SRS patients could be treated at relatively low proton energies if the gantry angles used in the treatment plan do not span a large treatment arc. Maximum proton kinetic energy requirements increase linearly with size of the treatment arc.

  12. Maximum kinetic energy considerations in proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, Evan R.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum proton kinetic energy required to treat a given percentage of patients eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with coplanar arc-based proton therapy, contingent upon the number and location of gantry angles used. Treatment plans from 100 consecutive patients treated with SRS at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center between June of 2007 and March of 2010 were analyzed. For each target volume within each patient, in-house software was used to place proton pencil beam spots over the distal surface of the target volume from 51 equally-spaced gantry angles of up to 360°. For each beam spot, the radiological path length from the surface of the patient to the distal boundary of the target was then calculated along a ray from the gantry location to the location of the beam spot. This data was used to generate a maximum proton energy requirement for each patient as a function of the arc length that would be spanned by the gantry angles used in a given treatment. If only a single treatment angle is required, 100% of the patients included in the study could be treated by a proton beam with a maximum kinetic energy of 118 MeV. As the length of the treatment arc is increased to 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360°, the maximum energy requirement increases to 127, 145, 156, and 179 MeV, respectively. A very high percentage of SRS patients could be treated at relatively low proton energies if the gantry angles used in the treatment plan do not span a large treatment arc. Maximum proton kinetic energy requirements increase linearly with size of the treatment arc. PMID:21844866

  13. Enhanced propagation of rainfall kinetic energy in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodato, Nazzareno; Bellocchi, Gianni

    2016-07-01

    A gridded 0.25° reconstruction of rainfall kinetic energy (RKE) over the UK, on the basis of pluviometric observations and reanalysis back to 1765, shows that autumn RKE doubled in 1991-2013 (˜2 MJ m-2) compared to 1948-1990 (˜1 MJ m-2). A shift eastward is underway, which includes southern and northern portions of the country. Analyzing the long-running England and Wales precipitation series, we conclude that it is likely that increased precipitation amounts associated with more frequent convective storms created conditions for higher energy events.

  14. Budgets of divergent and rotational kinetic energy during two periods of intense convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, D. E.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    The derivations of the energy budget equations for divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy are provided. The intense convection periods studied are: (1) synoptic scale data of 3 or 6 hour intervals and (2) mesoalphascale data every 3 hours. Composite energies and averaged budgets for the periods are presented; the effects of random data errors on derived energy parameters is investigated. The divergent kinetic energy and rotational kinetic energy budgets are compared; good correlation of the data is observed. The kinetic energies and budget terms increase with convective development; however, the conversion of the divergent and rotational energies are opposite.

  15. Decay and Spatial Diffusion of Turbulent Kinetic Energy In The Presence of a Linear Kinetic Energy Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A topic that elicited the interest of John Lumley is pressure transport in turbulence. In 1978 (JL, in Advances in Applied Mechanics, pages 123-176) he showed that pressure transport likely acts in the opposite direction to the spatial flux of kinetic energy due to triple velocity correlations. Here we examine a flow in which the interplay of turbulent decay and spatial transport is particularly relevant. Specifically, using a specially designed active grid and screens placed in the Corrsin wind tunnel, such a flow is realized. Data are acquired using X-wire thermal anemometry at different spanwise and downstream locations. In order to resolve the dissipation rate accurately, measurements are also acquired using the NSTAP probe developed and manufactured by Princeton researchers and kindly provided to us (M. Hultmark, Y. Fan, L. Smits). The results show power-law decay with downstream distance, with a decay exponent that becomes larger in the high kinetic energy side of the flow. Measurements of the dissipation enable us to obtain the spanwise gradient of the spatial flux. One possible explanation for the observations is upgrading transport of kinetic energy due to pressure-velocity correlations, although its magnitude required to close the budget appears very large. Absence of simultaneous pressure velocity measurement preclude us to fully elucidate the observed trends. In collaboration with Adrien Thormann, Johns Hopkins University. Financial support: National Science Foundation.

  16. COMPARATIVE KINETICS OF HEMOLYSIS INDUCED BY BACTERIAL AND OTHER HEMOLYSINS

    PubMed Central

    Bernheimer, Alan W.

    1947-01-01

    A study has been made of the kinetics of lysis induced by various hemolytic agents. The course of bemolysis was followed by mixing lysin with washed human erythrocytes, removing samples from the mixture, and estimating colorimetrically the hemoglobin in the supernatant fluid of the centrifuged samples. Most of the curves (but not all of them, e.g. tyrocidine) obtained by plotting degree of hemolysis against time, were S-shaped. The initiation of lysis by streptolysin S' was delayed, and in this property, streptolysin S' was similar to Cl. septicum hemolysin. None of the other lysins studied exhibited a long latent period preceding lysis. The maximum rate of hemoglobin liberation was found, in the range of lysin concentrations studied, to be a linear function of concentration when theta toxin of Cl. welchii, pneumolysin, tetanolysin, or streptolysin S' was the lytic agent. With comparable concentrations of saponin, sodium taurocholate, cetyl pyridinium chloride, tyrocidine, duponol C, lecithin-atrox venom mixture, or streptolysin O, the relation between rate and concentration was non-linear. The critical thermal increment associated with hemolysis was determined for systems containing pneumolysin, theta toxin, streptolysin S', streptolysin O, tetanolysin, and saponin. The findings concerning the effect of concentration and temperature on the rate of hemolysis provide a basis for classifying hemolytic agents (Tables I and II). Hemolysis induced by Cl. septicum hemolysin was found to be preceded by two phases: a phase of alteration of the erythrocytes and a phase involving swelling. Antihemolytic serum inhibited the first but not the second phase while sucrose inhibited the second but not the first phase. PMID:19873499

  17. New Approach for Studying Slow Fragmentation Kinetics in FT-ICR: Surface-Induced Dissociation Combined with Resonant Ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a new approach for studying the kinetics of large ion fragmentation in the gas phase by coupling surface-induced dissociation (SID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with resonant ejection of selected fragment ions using a relatively short (5 ms) ejection pulse. The approach is demonstrated for singly protonated angiotensin III ions excited by collisions with a self-assembled monolayer of alkylthiol on gold (HSAM). The overall decomposition rate and rate constants of individual reaction channels are controlled by varying the kinetic energy of the precursor ion in a range of 65–95 eV. The kinetics of peptide fragmentation are probed by varying the delay time between resonant ejection and fragment ion detection at a constant total reaction time. RRKM modeling indicates that the shape of the kinetics plots is strongly affected by the shape and position of the energy deposition function (EDF) describing the internal energy distribution of the ion following ion-surface collision. Modeling of the kinetics data provides detailed information on the shape of the EDF and energy and entropy effects of individual reaction channels.

  18. Momentum and kinetic energy before the tackle in rugby union.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Sharief; Karpul, David; Lambert, Mike

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior) and position (forwards vs. backs), and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact). Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60). Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg(.)m(.)s(-1) n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg(.)m(.)s(-1), d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29). Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards) are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact. Key PointsFirst study to quantify momentum, kinetic energy, and magnitude of impact in rugby tackles across different levels in matches without a device attached to a player.Physical components alone, of either ball

  19. Momentum and Kinetic Energy Before the Tackle in Rugby Union

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Sharief; Karpul, David; Lambert, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior) and position (forwards vs. backs), and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact). Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60). Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg.m.s-1 n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg.m.s-1, d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29). Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards) are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact. Key Points First study to quantify momentum, kinetic energy, and magnitude of impact in rugby tackles across different levels in matches without a device attached to a player. Physical components alone, of either ball-carrier or

  20. Kinetics Of Isomerisation Reaction Of Oriented Polyacetylene Induced By Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mammeri, S.; Belloum, M.; Tabacik, V.

    2008-09-23

    The impact of a laser's photons ({lambda} = 514.5 nm) on the surface of polyacetylene films (PA), composed of macromolecules PAcis and PAtrans produces simultaneously thermal and Raman diffusion [1]. The thermal effect initializes the isomerization of macromolecules PAcis to PAtrans [2]; this reaction is exothermic. Samples are polyacetylene oriented films synthesized horizontally or vertically in cis configuration and are subject to different laser powers during intervals of time which vary between 20 s and 250 s. The power (P ({lambda}), mW) of the laser is equivalent to the temperature T, of isomerization [3]. Isotherms are constructed and are characterized by the laser power applied. We have established theoretical models calculations with the aim of determining the kinetic parameters of the reaction of isomerization: the activation energy (Ea), the frequency factor of Arrhenius (A), and the rate constant (k). We concluded that even in the field of seconds, the isomerization is a complex process different from a reaction of order: 1, 7/10, 2/3, 3/5, 1/2, 2/5 and 1/4. The order 2/3 being the most suitable. The study determined, among others, the rate constants k 2/3 (T)(of the order 2/3 of the isomerization reaction)= 0.003337244, 0.0052149, 0.0209636, 0.043727 s-1 respectively for Laser powers 30, 120, 200 and 300 mW; activation energy 17.7844 kcal/mol and a factor of collision 19.066816 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. These results are found to be close to the experimental results studied.

  1. An energy basin finding algorithm for kinetic Monte Carlo acceleration.

    PubMed

    Puchala, Brian; Falk, Michael L; Garikipati, Krishna

    2010-04-01

    We present an energy basin finding algorithm for identifying the states in absorbing Markov chains used for accelerating kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations out of trapping energy basins. The algorithm saves groups of states corresponding to basic energy basins in which there is (i) a minimum energy saddle point and (ii) in moving away from the minimum the saddle point energies do not decrease between successive moves. When necessary, these groups are merged to help the system escape basins of basins. Energy basins are identified either as the system visits states, or by exploring surrounding states before the system visits them. We review exact and approximate methods for accelerating KMC simulations out of trapping energy basins and implement them within our algorithm. Its flexibility to store varying numbers of states, and ability to merge sets of saved states as the program runs, allows it to efficiently escape complicated trapping energy basins. Through simulations of vacancy-As cluster dissolution in Si, we demonstrate our algorithm can be several orders of magnitude faster than standard KMC simulations.

  2. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  3. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  4. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work. PMID:27627286

  5. Spectral Energy Transfer and Dissipation of Magnetic Energy from Fluid to Kinetic Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, K.; Li, H.

    2007-01-19

    We investigate the magnetic energy transfer from the fluid to kinetic scales and dissipation processes using three-dimensional fully kinetic particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The nonlinear evolution of a sheet pinch is studied where we show that it exhibits both fluid scale global relaxation and kinetic scale collisionless reconnection at multiple resonant surfaces. The interactions among collisionless tearing modes destroy the original flux surfaces and produce stochastic fields, along with generating sheets and filaments of intensified currents. In addition, the magnetic energy is transferred from the original shear length scale both to the large scales due to the global relaxation and to the smaller, kinetic scales for dissipation. The dissipation is dominated by the thermal or pressure effect in the generalized Ohm's law, and electrons are preferentially accelerated.

  6. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Bigdeli, Maryam; Saadat, Soheil; Mohammadi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy). The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy) prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety.

  7. When and how does a prominence-like jet gain kinetic energy?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, S.; Wang, Yuming

    2014-02-20

    A jet is a considerable amount of plasma being ejected from the chromosphere or lower corona into the higher corona and is a common phenomenon. Usually, a jet is triggered by a brightening or a flare, which provides the first driving force to push plasma upward. In this process, magnetic reconnection is thought to be the mechanism to convert magnetic energy into thermal, nonthermal, and kinetic energies. However, most jets could reach an unusual high altitude and end much later than the end of its associated flare. This fact implies that there is another way to continuously transfer magnetic energy into kinetic energy even after the reconnection. The picture described above is well known in the community, but how and how much magnetic energy is released through a way other than reconnection is still unclear. By studying a prominence-like jet observed by SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI, we find that the continuous relaxation of the post-reconnection magnetic field structure is an important process for a jet to climb up higher than it could through only reconnection. The kinetic energy of the jet gained through the relaxation is 1.6 times that gained from the reconnection. The resultant energy flux is hundreds of times larger than the flux required for the local coronal heating, suggesting that such jets are a possible source to keep the corona hot. Furthermore, rotational motions appear all the time during the jet. Our analysis suggests that torsional Alfvén waves induced during reconnection could not be the only mechanism to release magnetic energy and drive jets.

  8. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitsma, G.; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, L.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on 30 keV He2 + collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged collision products in coincidence in a recoil ion momentum spectrometer type of detection scheme. The determination of fragment kinetic energies is found to be considerably more accurate than for the case of mere coincidence time-of-flight spectrometers. In fission reactions involving two cationic fragments, typically kinetic energy releases of 2-3 eV are observed. The results are interpreted by means of density functional theory calculations of the reverse barriers. It is concluded that naphthalene fragmentation by collisions with keV ions clearly is much more violent than the corresponding photofragmentation with energetic photons. The ion-induced naphthalene fragmentation provides a feedstock of various small hydrocarbonic species of different charge states and kinetic energy, which could influence several molecule formation processes in the cold interstellar medium and facilitates growth of small hydrocarbon species on pre-existing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  9. Radiation of inertial kinetic energy as near-inertial waves forced by tropical Pacific Easterly waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, S. M.; Richards, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Easterly waves (EW) are low level tropical atmospheric disturbances able to resonantly force strong mixed layer inertial currents. Using data from two Tropical Atmosphere Ocean/Eastern Pacific Investigation of Climate Processes (TAO/EPIC) buoys located along 95°W and a multiparameterization one-dimensional turbulence model, we examine how the EW-forced surface inertial kinetic energy (IKE) loss is partitioned between turbulent dissipation and near-inertial wave (NIW) radiation. Several EW-forcing events are individually simulated with a version of the General Ocean Turbulence Model modified to include a linear damping coefficient to account for the NIW radiation energy sink. The kinetic energy budget of these simulations shows that NIW radiation accounted for typically 50-60% of the IKE loss and in some cases up to 80%. These empirically derived estimates of the contribution of the radiated NIWs to the loss of wind-induced surface IKE are substantially higher than recently published numerical estimates. Furthermore, the results indicate that the vertical NIW energy flux increases linearly with the wind input of IKE, an easily obtained quantity. The NIW vertical energy flux estimated for a single near-resonant event is comparable to extreme north Pacific wintertime-averaged fluxes, indicating the existence of important episodic sources of near-inertial energy available for mixing within and below the thermocline in the tropical region.

  10. Kinetic energy for the nuclear Yang-Mills collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, George; Sparks, Nick

    2015-10-01

    The Bohr-Mottelson-Frankfurt model of nuclear rotations and quadrupole vibrations is a foundational model in nuclear structure physics. The model, also called the geometrical collective model or simply GCM, has two hidden mathematical structures, one Lie group theoretic and the other differential geometric. Although the group structure has been understood for some time, the geometric structure is a new unexplored feature that shares the same mathematical origin as Yang-Mills, viz., a vector bundle with a non-abelian structure group and a connection. Using the de Rham Laplacian ▵ = * d * d from differential geometry for the kinetic energy extends significantly the physical scope of the GCM model. This Laplacian contains a ``magnetic'' term due to the coupling between base manifold rotational and fiber vorticity degrees of freedom. When the connection specializes to irrotational flow, the Laplacian reduces to the Bohr-Mottelson kinetic energy operator. More generally, the connection yields a moment of inertia that is intermediate between the extremes of irrotational flow and rigid body motion.

  11. The kinetic energy interceptor: Shooting a bullet with a bullet

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, the threat of proliferation with chemical, biological, and nuclear warheads continues. Two factors further increase the threat from these weapons of mass destruction: knowledge of missile technology has spread extensively, and, in recent years, many countries - some of them unfriendly to the US and its allies - have obtained short- and intermediate-range missiles. The threat posed by such missiles was amply demonstrated during the Gulf War. Thus, the need to protect US and allied forces from these weapons has never been greater. When nuclear-tipped defensive missiles, such as Sprint and Spartan, were phased out years ago, the US turned for its defense to kinetic-energy {open_quotes}kill{close_quotes} interceptors - missiles that destroy an enemy missile by striking it with lethal force and accuracy at some point in its trajectory. The Patriot missile is probably the best-known kinetic-energy (KE) interceptor in the US defensive arsenal. To counter the spreading threat of proliferation, LLNL and other laboratories have been participating in a joint program funded by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), within the Department of Defense, to develop defensive missile systems. Participants are designing, testing, and certifying KE interceptors to defend against current and future missile threats. These research efforts are described.

  12. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  13. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Tyler; Elsner, James B

    2015-01-01

    Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE) as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007-2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity.

  14. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Tyler; Elsner, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE) as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007–2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity. PMID:26132830

  15. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Tyler; Elsner, James B

    2015-01-01

    Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE) as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007-2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity. PMID:26132830

  16. Pressure induced manifold enhancement of Li-kinetics in FCC fullerene.

    PubMed

    Das, Deya; Han, Sang Soo; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Singh, Abhishek K

    2014-10-21

    The reduction of the diffusion energy barrier for Li in electrodes is one of the required criteria to achieve better performances in Li ion batteries. Using density functional theory based calculations, we report a pressure induced manifold enhancement of Li-kinetics in bulk FCC fullerene. Scanning of the potential energy surface reveals a diffusion path with a low energy barrier of 0.62 eV, which reduces further under the application of hydrostatic pressure. The pressure induced reduction in the diffusion barrier continues till a uniform volume strain of 17.7% is reached. Further enhancement of strain increases the barrier due to the repulsion caused by C-C bond formation between two neighbouring fullerenes. The decrease in the barrier is attributed to the combined effect of charge transfer triggered by the enhanced interaction of Li with the fullerene as well as the change in profile of the local potential, which becomes more attractive for Li. The lowering of the barrier leads to an enhancement of two orders of magnitude in Li diffusivity at room temperature making pressurized bulk fullerene a promising artificial solid electrolyte interface (SEI) for a faster rechargeable battery.

  17. A comparison of observed and numerically predicted eddy kinetic energy budgets for a developing extratropical cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dare, P. M.; Smith, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The eddy kinetic energy budget is calculated for a 48-hour forecast of an intense occluding winter cyclone associated with a strong well-developed jet stream. The model output consists of the initialized (1200 GMT January 9, 1975) and the 12, 24, 36, and 48 hour forecast fields from the Drexel/NCAR Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System (LAMPS) model. The LAMPS forecast compares well with observations for the first 24 hours, but then overdevelops the low-level cyclone while inadequately developing the upper-air wave and jet. Eddy kinetic energy was found to be concentrated in the upper-troposphere with maxima flanking the primary trough. The increases in kinetic energy were found to be due to an excess of the primary source term of kinetic energy content, which is the horizontal flux of eddy kinetic energy over the primary sinks, and the generation and dissipation of eddy kinetic energy.

  18. Einstein-Maxwell Dirichlet walls, negative kinetic energies, and the adiabatic approximation for extreme black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Kelly, William R.; Marolf, Donald

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational Dirichlet problem—in which the induced metric is fixed on boundaries at finite distance from the bulk—is related to simple notions of UV cutoffs in gauge/gravity duality and appears in discussions relating the low-energy behavior of gravity to fluid dynamics. We study the Einstein-Maxwell version of this problem, in which the induced Maxwell potential on the wall is also fixed. For flat walls in otherwise asymptotically flat spacetimes, we identify a moduli space of Majumdar-Papapetrou-like static solutions parametrized by the location of an extreme black hole relative to the wall. Such solutions may be described as balancing gravitational repulsion from a negative-mass image source against electrostatic attraction to an oppositely signed image charge. Standard techniques for handling divergences yield a moduli space metric with an eigenvalue that becomes negative near the wall, indicating a region of negative kinetic energy and suggesting that the Hamiltonian may be unbounded below. One may also surround the black hole with an additional (roughly spherical) Dirichlet wall to impose a regulator whose physics is more clear. Negative kinetic energies remain, though new terms do appear in the moduli space metric. The regulator dependence indicates that the adiabatic approximation may be ill-defined for classical extreme black holes with Dirichlet walls.

  19. Conversion of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1972-01-01

    The outflow of the solar magnetic field energy (the radial component of the Poynting vector) per steradian is inversely proportional to the solar wind velocity. It is a decreasing function of the heliocentric distance. When the magnetic field effect is included in the one-fluid model of the solar wind, the transformation of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy during the expansion process increases the solar wind velocity at 1 AU by 17 percent.

  20. Functional derivative of the kinetic energy functional for spherically symmetric systems.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Á

    2011-07-28

    Ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional is constructed for spherically symmetric systems. The differential virial theorem is derived for the ensemble. A first-order differential equation for the functional derivative of the ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional and the ensemble Pauli potential is presented. This equation can be solved and a special case of the solution provides the original non-interacting kinetic energy of the density functional theory.

  1. Kinetic energy budget of Typhoon Yagi (2006) during its extratropical transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuan; Zhong, Zhong; Wang, Yuan

    2012-10-01

    A diagnostic energetic analysis is conducted to study the kinetic energy budget during the extratropical transition (ET) of tropical cyclone (TC) Yagi (2006), using high-resolution numerical model output. The results show that the upper-level jet stream makes great contribution to the redevelopment of Yagi. When the Yagi approached to the upper-level jet stream, the horizontal flux of kinetic energy associated with the jet was the major cause of the ET. During the transition of Yagi, the horizontal flux of kinetic energy caused by the change of environmental field related to the TC movement only accounted for about 25 % of the total flux, while the horizontal convergence to Yagi under the action of the jet was the major portion of the total horizontal flux. Moreover, the work of pressure gradient force changed from a source of kinetic energy to a sink in the upper troposphere before and after the ET, however, it acted as a source of kinetic energy in the lower and middle troposphere all the time, and both the vertical and horizontal fluxes of kinetic energy caused by the upper-level jet increased the kinetic energy in the upper troposphere. The sub-grid scale friction and dissipation, which shows their maximum effects in the lower troposphere especially in the atmospheric boundary layer, played major consumption roles against the pressure gradient force. Furthermore, the consumption was almost entirely out-of-phase for the convective transport of kinetic energy in vertical, and inhibited the vertical flux of kinetic energy. In addition, there were significant high-frequency disturbances before and after the ET characterized by out-of-phase kinetic energy changes between upper and lower levels, thus, the vertically integrated kinetic energy budget in the air column could not give a reasonable physical image for TC kinetic energy variation.

  2. Functional derivative of the kinetic energy functional for spherically symmetric systems.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Á

    2011-07-28

    Ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional is constructed for spherically symmetric systems. The differential virial theorem is derived for the ensemble. A first-order differential equation for the functional derivative of the ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional and the ensemble Pauli potential is presented. This equation can be solved and a special case of the solution provides the original non-interacting kinetic energy of the density functional theory. PMID:21806089

  3. Förster resonance energy transfer structural kinetic studies of cardiac thin filament deactivation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Jayasundar, Jayant J; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2009-06-12

    Cardiac thin filament deactivation is initiated by Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C (cTnC), followed by multiple structural changes of thin filament proteins. These structural transitions are the molecular basis underlying the thin filament regulation of cardiac relaxation, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. In this study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the Ca2+-induced conformational changes of the cardiac thin filaments, specifically the closing of the cTnC N-domain, the cTnC-cTnI (troponin I) interaction, and the cTnI-actin interaction. The cTnC N-domain conformational change was examined by monitoring FRET between a donor (AEDANS) attached to one cysteine residue and an acceptor (DDPM) attached the other cysteine of the mutant cTnC(L13C/N51C). The cTnC-cTnI interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residue 89 of cTnC to residues 151 and 167 of cTnI, respectively. The cTnI-actin interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residues 151 and 167 of cTnI to residue 374 of actin. FRET Ca2+ titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements show that different thin filament structural transitions have different Ca2+ sensitivities and Ca2+ dissociation-induced kinetics. The observed structural transitions involving the regulatory region and the mobile domain of cTnI occurred at fast kinetic rates, whereas the kinetics of the structural transitions involving the cTnI inhibitory region was slow. Our results suggest that the thin filament deactivation upon Ca2+ dissociation is a two-step process. One step involves rapid binding of the mobile domain of cTnI to actin, which is kinetically coupled with the conformational change of the N-domain of cTnC and the dissociation of the regulatory region of cTnI from cTnC. The other step involves switching the inhibitory region of cTnI from interacting with cTnC to interacting with actin. The latter processes

  4. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Structural Kinetic Studies of Cardiac Thin Filament Deactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jun; Jayasundar, Jayant J.; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac thin filament deactivation is initiated by Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C (cTnC), followed by multiple structural changes of thin filament proteins. These structural transitions are the molecular basis underlying the thin filament regulation of cardiac relaxation, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. In this study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the Ca2+-induced conformational changes of the cardiac thin filaments, specifically the closing of the cTnC N-domain, the cTnC-cTnI (troponin I) interaction, and the cTnI-actin interaction. The cTnC N-domain conformational change was examined by monitoring FRET between a donor (AEDANS) attached to one cysteine residue and an acceptor (DDPM) attached the other cysteine of the mutant cTnC(L13C/N51C). The cTnC-cTnI interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residue 89 of cTnC to residues 151 and 167 of cTnI, respectively. The cTnI-actin interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residues 151 and 167 of cTnI to residue 374 of actin. FRET Ca2+ titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements show that different thin filament structural transitions have different Ca2+ sensitivities and Ca2+ dissociation-induced kinetics. The observed structural transitions involving the regulatory region and the mobile domain of cTnI occurred at fast kinetic rates, whereas the kinetics of the structural transitions involving the cTnI inhibitory region was slow. Our results suggest that the thin filament deactivation upon Ca2+ dissociation is a two-step process. One step involves rapid binding of the mobile domain of cTnI to actin, which is kinetically coupled with the conformational change of the N-domain of cTnC and the dissociation of the regulatory region of cTnI from cTnC. The other step involves switching the inhibitory region of cTnI from interacting with cTnC to interacting with actin. The latter processes

  5. Experimental evidence of the decrease of kinetic energy of hadrons in passing through atomic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Hadrons with kinetic energies higher than the pion production threshold lose their kinetic energies monotonically in traversing atomic nuclei, due to the strong interactions in nuclear matter. This phenomenon is a crude analogy to the energy loss of charged particles in their passage through materials. Experimental evidence is presented.

  6. Neutron kinetics in moderators and SNM detection through epithermal-neutron-induced fissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; King, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Extension of the well-established Differential Die Away Analysis (DDAA) into a faster time domain, where more penetrating epithermal neutrons induce fissions, is proposed and demonstrated via simulations and experiments. In the proposed method the fissions stimulated by thermal, epithermal and even higher-energy neutrons are measured after injection of a narrow pulse of high-energy 14 MeV (d,T) or 2.5 MeV (d,D) source neutrons, appropriately moderated. The ability to measure these fissions stems from the inherent correlation of neutron energy and time ("E-T" correlation) during the process of slowing down of high-energy source neutrons in common moderating materials such as hydrogenous compounds (e.g., polyethylene), heavy water, beryllium and graphite. The kinetic behavior following injection of a delta-function-shaped pulse (in time) of 14 MeV neutrons into such moderators is studied employing MCNPX simulations and, when applicable, some simple "one-group" models. These calculations served as a guide for the design of a source moderator which was used in experiments. Qualitative relationships between slowing-down time after the pulse and the prevailing neutron energy are discussed. A laboratory system consisting of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a polyethylene-reflected Be moderator, a liquid scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and a two-parameter E-T data acquisition system was set up to measure prompt neutron and delayed gamma-ray fission signatures in a 19.5% enriched LEU sample. The measured time behavior of thermal and epithermal neutron fission signals agreed well with the detailed simulations. The laboratory system can readily be redesigned and deployed as a mobile inspection system for SNM in, e.g., cars and vans. A strong pulsed neutron generator with narrow pulse (<75 ns) at a reasonably high pulse frequency could make the high-energy neutron induced fission modality a realizable SNM detection technique.

  7. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  8. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  9. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  10. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  11. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2014-05-13

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  12. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  13. Kinetic, structural and molecular docking studies on the inhibition of tyrosinase induced by arabinose.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Jiang; Yan, Li; Park, Daeui; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Yang, Jun-Mo; Ye, Zhuo Ming; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Tyrosinase plays a central role in biological pigment formation, and hence knowledge of tyrosinase catalytic mechanisms and regulation may have medical, cosmetic, and agricultural applications. We found in this study that arabinose significantly inhibited tyrosinase, and this was accompanied by conformational changes in enzyme structure. Kinetic analysis showed that arabinose-mediated inactivation followed first-order kinetics, and single and multiple classes of rate constants were measured. Arabinose displayed a mixed-type inhibitory mechanism with K(i)=0.22±0.07 mM. Measurements of intrinsic and ANS-binding fluorescence showed that arabinose induced tyrosinase to unfold and expose inner hydrophobic regions. We simulated the docking between tyrosinase and arabinose (binding energies were -26.28 kcal/mol for Dock6.3 and -2.02 kcal/mol for AutoDock4.2) and results suggested that arabinose interacts mostly with His61, Asn260, and Met280. The present strategy of predicting tyrosinase inhibition by simulation of docking by hydroxyl groups may prove useful in screening for potential tyrosinase inhibitors, as shown here for arabinose.

  14. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  15. A Rolling Pendulum Bob: Conservation of Energy and Partitioning of Kinetic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helrich, Carl; Lehman, Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Describes a pendulum in which the spherical bob can roll on a track of the same arc as it swings when suspended by a cord. Comparison of the motion in the two mentioned cases shows the effect of rotational kinetic energy when the bob rolls. (GA)

  16. Comment on "Single-point kinetic energy density functionals: A pointwise kinetic energy density analysis and numerical convergence investigation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickey, S. B.; Karasiev, Valentin V.; Chakraborty, Debajit

    2015-09-01

    We suggest a more nuanced view of the merit and utility of generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) for the noninteracting kinetic energy (KE) than the critique of Xia and Carter (XC) [Phys. Rev. B 91, 045124 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.045124]. Specifically, the multiple valuedness of the Pauli term enhancement factor (denoted G [n ] by XC) with respect to the inhomogeneity variable s can be excluded by enforcement of a bound on the Kohn-Sham KE to achieve universality of the functional along with enforcement of proper large-s behavior. This is physically sensible in that the excluded G values occur for s values that correspond to low densities. The behavior is exacerbated by peculiarities of pseudodensities. The VT84F KE GGA, constructed with these constraints, does not have the numerical instability in our older PBE2 functional analyzed by XC.

  17. Characterizing droplet kinetic energy applied by moving spray-plate center pivot irrigation sprinklers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetic energy of discrete drops impacting a bare soil surface is generally observed to lead to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to soil surface seal formation. Under center pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy development can...

  18. Droplet kinetic energy of moving spray-plate center-pivot irrigation sprinklers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetic energy of discrete water drops impacting a bare soil surface generally leads to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to formation of a seal on the soil surface. Under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy development ...

  19. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  20. Fluctuating kinetic energy budget during homogeneous flow of a fluid solid mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, L.M.; Foslein, W.

    1996-01-01

    Ensemble-averaging theorems are applied to derive transport equations for the fluctuating kinetic energy of a particulate mixture consisting of a continuous fluid and solid particles. The evolution of fluctuating kinetic energy in a homogeneous flow is examined and discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Numerical investigation of kinetic energy dynamics during autoignition of n-heptane/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucena Kreppel Paes, Paulo; Brasseur, James; Xuan, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Many engineering applications involve complex turbulent reacting flows, where nonlinear, multi-scale turbulence-combustion couplings are important. Direct representation of turbulent reacting flow dynamics is associated with prohibitive computational costs, which makes it necessary to employ turbulent combustion models to account for the effects of unresolved scales on resolved scales. Classical turbulence models are extensively employed in reacting flow simulations. However, they rely on assumptions about the energy cascade, which are valid for incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence. A better understanding of the turbulence-combustion interactions is required for the development of more accurate, physics-based sub-grid-scale models for turbulent reacting flows. In order to investigate the effects of reaction-induced density, viscosity, and pressure variations on the turbulent kinetic energy, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of autoignition of partially-premixed, lean n-heptane/air mixture in three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been performed. This configuration represents standard operating conditions of Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines. The differences in the turbulent kinetic energy balance between the present turbulent reacting flow and incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence are highlighted at different stages during the autoignition process.

  2. The Rainfall and Rainfall Kinetic Energy Intensity-Duration of Landslides and Debris flow in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jui-Ming; Chen, Hongey

    2016-04-01

    This research used Joss-Waldvogel Disdrometers (JWD) which set in Shiment catchment, Northern Taiwan and Chishan catchment, Southern Taiwan to record rainfall kinetic energy data, to find the relationship between rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall intensity in these two areas. The distance between the two areas is less than 150 km. These data help the researchers and showed that the equations of relationship were ekN =28.7* (1-0.7027*exp(-0.0395*I)) and ekS=27.4*(1-0.5954*exp(-0.0345*I)). Generally, rainfall kinetic energy in Northern Taiwan is higher than in Southern Taiwan during rainfall period. Also, the occurring time and rainfall records of 143 landslide events from 2006 to 2012 were analyzed. The rainfall-intensity (I-D) relationship could be used to build rainfall threshold which were IN=15.13 D-0.28 and IS=47.58 D-0.35. In brief, the rainfall feature in landslide of Northern Taiwan had low rainfall intensity, long rainfall duration and low average accumulative rainfall. By combining rainfall kinetic energy and rainfall threshold, rainfall kinetic energy threshold could be established, which were ¯E N=13.83 D-0.04 and ¯E S =15.59 D-0.02. The results showed that not only for rainfall but also for rainfall kinetic energy threshold, the values of thresholds in North were lower than those in South. Due to impaction energy of rainfall to ground surface, rainfall kinetic energy would not forever increase. Therefore, rainfall kinetic energy threshold is also a useful tool for landslide warning. Key words: Rainfall kinetic energy, Rainfall threshold, Rainfall kinetic energy threshold, Landslide

  3. High resolution kinetic energy by long time-delayed core-sampling photofragment translational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guosheng; Hwang, Hyun Jin; Jung, Hyun Chai

    2005-02-01

    A pulsed core-sampling photofragment translational spectroscopy (PTS) method with a long time-delay, which allows an extremely high kinetic energy resolution, is presented in this article. More commonly applying a short time delay between laser and pulsed acceleration electric field leads to a low kinetic energy resolution for the pulsed core-sampling method. This low kinetic energy resolution problem was overcome by applying a longer time delay. An absolute recoil velocity resolution of {delta}v=8 m/s and a relative kinetic energy resolution of {delta}E/E=3.6% were obtained in this experiment, by applying a time-delay of 8 {mu}s between the laser and the acceleration electric field. The vibrational distributions of the CH{sub 3} radical for the I* and I channel of CH{sub 3}I photodissociation at 266 nm were directly resolved for first time to presented an improvement of the kinetic energy resolution.

  4. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-03-05

    Pentobarbital is a common anesthetic agent used in animal research that is known to alter sympathetic function and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. The in vivo effects of iv pentobarbital on glucose homeostasis were studied in chronically catheterized fasted rats. Whole body glucose kinetics, assessed by the constant iv infusion of (6-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose, were determined in all rats in the conscious state. Thereafter, glucose metabolism was followed over the next 4 hr in 3 subgroups of rats; conscious, anesthetized with body temperature maintained, and anesthetized with body temperature not maintained. Hypothermia (a 5/sup 0/C decrease) developed spontaneously in anesthetized rats kept at ambient temperature (22/sup 0/C). No differences were seen in MABP and heart rate between conscious and normothermic anesthetized rats; however, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a decrease in MABP (20%) and heart rate (35%). Likewise, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations, the rate of glucose appearance (Ra), recycling and metabolic clearance (MCR) did not differ between conscious and normothermic anesthetized animals. In contrast, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a 50% reduction in plasma lactate, a 40% drop in glucose Ra, and a 30-40% decrease in glucose recycling and MCR. Thus, pentobarbital does not appear to alter in vivo glucose kinetics, compared to unanesthetized controls, provided that body temperature is maintained.

  5. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Hargrove, D.M.; Hyde, P.M.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-12-01

    Because pentobarbital is often used in investigations related to carbohydrate metabolism, the in vivo effect of this drug on glucose homeostasis was studied. Glucose kinetics assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, were determined in three groups of catheterized fasted rats: conscious, anesthetized and body temperature maintained, and anesthetized but body temperature not maintained. After induction of anesthesia, marked hypothermia developed in rats not provided with external heat. Anesthetized rats that developed hypothermia showed a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (25%) and heart rate (40%). Likewise, the plasma lactate concentration and the rates of glucose appearance, recycling, and metabolic clearance were reduced by 30-50% in the hypothermic anesthetized rats. Changes in whole-body carbohydrate metabolism were prevented when body temperature was maintained. Because plasma pentobarbital levels were similar between the euthermic and hypothermic rats during the first 2 h of the experiment, the rapid reduction in glucose metabolism in this latter group appears related to the decrease in body temperature. The continuous infusion of epinephrine produced alterations in glucose kinetics that were not different between conscious animals and anesthetized rats with body temperature maintained. Thus pentobarbital-anesthetized rats became hypothermic when kept at room temperature and exhibited marked decreases in glucose metabolism. Such changes were absent when body temperature was maintained during anesthesia.

  6. A kinetic analysis of strand breaks on large DNA induced by cigarette smoke extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Takata, Tatsuya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We report a kinetic analysis of strand breakages on large DNA molecules induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE), an extract of soluble cigarette smoke components. Previously, this DNA damage was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, whereas we used fluorescence to kinetically analyze damage to individual DNA molecules. CSE caused a marked change in length of DNA molecules. The rate of CSE-induced double-strand breakage on large random-coiled DNA molecules was determined using a simple theoretical model, allowing the facile estimation of the rate of double-strand breaks on large DNA molecules.

  7. Relationship between the kinetic energy budget and intensity of convection. [in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Synoptic data collected over the eastern United States during the fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment, April 24 and 25, 1975, is used to study the relationship between the kinetic energy budget and the intensity of convective activity. It is found that areas of intense convective activity are also major centers of kinetic energy activity. Energy processes increase in magnitude with an increase in convection intensity. Large generation of kinetic energy is associated with intense convection, but large quantities of energy are transported out of the area of convection. The kinetic energy budget associated with grid points having no convection differs greatly from the budgets of the three categories of convection. Weak energy processes are not associated with convection.

  8. When and How Does A Prominence-like Jet Gain Kinetic Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, K.; Shen, C.

    2013-12-01

    Usually a jet is triggered by a brightening or flare, which provides the first driving force. In this process, magnetic reconnection is thought to be the mechanism to convert magnetic energy into jet's kinetic energy. However, most jets could reach an unusual height and end far after the end of its associated flare. This fact implies another way continuously transferring magnetic energy into kinetic energy after the reconnection. This picture is well known, but how and how much magnetic energy is released through the way other than the reconnection is still unclear. Here, through studying a prominence-like jet observed by AIA and EUVI, we reveal the continuously relaxation of post-reconnection magnetic field structure is an important process to support a jet. The kinetic energy of the jet gained through this way is 1.6 times of that from the reconnection. The resultant energy flux is hundreds of the required for local coronal heating, suggesting such jets are a possible source to keep corona hot. Rotational motion appearing all the time during the jet implies the torsional Alfven wave induced during reconnection is not the only mechanism to release magnetic energy and drive jets. Left column: Difference images taken by SDO/AIA at 304A passband. The FOV of the images is 430"x430". Right column: Difference images from STEREO-A/EUVI at the same passband. The FOV is 450"x450". Since STEREO-A was 120 degree apart away from SDO on 2012 July 8, the SDO limb event right happened ondisk in the view of STEREO-A. Black and red solid curve: integrated intensity over the cross-section of the jet at different height at 19:11 UT and 19:47 UT, respectively. The two horizontal dashed lines are their average values. Black and red dashed curve with asterisks: axial speed with errors of the eight sub-jets shown in Figure 3 at 19:11 UT and 19:47 UT , respectively. Blue dashed curve with diamonds: angular speed with errors of the jet at different height.

  9. Surface analysis of zeolites: An XPS, variable kinetic energy XPS, and low energy ion scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bare, Simon R.; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Teschner, Detre; Hävacker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Schlögl, Robert; Chan, Ally S. Y.; Blackwell, N.; Charochak, M. E.; ter Veen, Rik; Brongersma, Hidde H.

    2016-06-01

    The surface Si/Al ratio in a series of zeolite Y samples has been obtained using laboratory XPS, synchrotron (variable kinetic energy) XPS, and low energy ion scattering (LEIS) spectroscopy. The non-destructive depth profile obtained using variable kinetic energy XPS is compared to that from the destructive argon ion bombardment depth profile from the lab XPS instrument. All of the data indicate that the near surface region of both the ammonium form and steamed Y zeolites is strongly enriched in aluminum. It is shown that when the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons is taken into account the laboratory XPS of aluminosilicates zeolites does not provide a true measurement of the surface stoichiometry, while variable kinetic energy XPS results in a more surface sensitive measurement. A comprehensive Si/Al concentration profile as a function of depth is developed by combining the data from the three surface characterization techniques. The LEIS spectroscopy reveals that the topmost atomic layer is further enriched in Al compared to subsequent layers.

  10. Hindcasts of Integrated Kinetic Energy in North Atlantic Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozar, Michael; Misra, Vasubandhu

    2015-04-01

    Integrated kinetic energy (IKE) is a recently developed metric that evaluates the destructive potential of a tropical cyclone by assessing the size and strength of its wind field. Despite the potential usefulness of the IKE metric, there are few, if any, operational tools that are specifically designed to forecast IKE in real-time. Therefore, a system of artificial neural networks is created to produce deterministic and probabilistic projections of IKE in North Atlantic tropical cyclones out to 72 hours from a series of relevant environmental and storm specific normalized input parameters. In an effort to assess its real-time skill, this IKE forecasting system is run in a mock-operational mode for the 1990 to 2011 North Atlantic hurricane seasons. Hindcasts of IKE are produced in this manner by running the neural networks with hindcasted input parameters from NOAA's second generation Global Ensemble Forecasting System reforecast dataset. Ultimately, the results of the hindcast exercises indicate that the neural network system is capable of skillfully forecasting IKE in an operational setting at a level significantly higher than climatology and persistence. Ultimately, forecasts of IKE from these neural networks could potentially be an asset for operational meteorologists that would complement existing forecast tools in an effort to better assess the damage potential of landfalling tropical cyclones, particularly with regards to storm surge damage.

  11. Numeric kinetic energy operators for molecules in polyspherical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Sadri, Keyvan; Lauvergnat, David; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2012-06-21

    Generalized curvilinear coordinates, as, e.g., polyspherical coordinates, are in general better adapted to the resolution of the nuclear Schrödinger equation than rectilinear ones like the normal mode coordinates. However, analytical expressions of the kinetic energy operators (KEOs) for molecular systems in polyspherical coordinates may be prohibitively complicated for large systems. In this paper we propose a method to generate a KEO numerically and bring it to a form practicable for dynamical calculations. To examine the new method we calculated vibrational spectra and eigenenergies for nitrous acid (HONO) and compare it with results obtained with an exact analytical KEO derived previously [F. Richter, P. Rosmus, F. Gatti, and H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 6072 (2004)]. In a second example we calculated π → π* photoabsorption spectrum and eigenenergies of ethene (C(2)H(4)) and compared it with previous work [M. R. Brill, F. Gatti, D. Lauvergnat, and H.-D. Meyer, Chem. Phys. 338, 186 (2007)]. In this ethene study the dimensionality was reduced from 12 to 6 by freezing six internal coordinates. Results for both molecules show that the proposed method for obtaining an approximate KEO is reliable for dynamical calculations. The error in eigenenergies was found to be below 1 cm(-1) for most states calculated.

  12. TURBULENT CELLS IN STARS: FLUCTUATIONS IN KINETIC ENERGY AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, W. David; Meakin, Casey E-mail: casey.meakin@gmail.com

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulations of shell oxygen burning exhibit bursty, recurrent fluctuations in turbulent kinetic energy. These are shown to be due to a general instability of the convective cell, requiring only a localized source of heating or cooling. Such fluctuations are shown to be suppressed in simulations of stellar evolution which use the mixing-length theory. Quantitatively similar behavior occurs in the model of a convective roll (cell) of Lorenz, which is known to have a strange attractor that gives rise to chaotic fluctuations in time of velocity and, as we show, luminosity. Study of simulations suggests that the behavior of a Lorenz convective roll may resemble that of a cell in convective flow. We examine some implications of this simplest approximation and suggest paths for improvement. Using the Lorenz model as representative of a convective cell, a multiple-cell model of a convective layer gives total luminosity fluctuations which are suggestive of irregular variables (red giants and supergiants), and of the long secondary period feature in semiregular asymptotic giant branch variables. This '{tau}-mechanism' is a new source for stellar variability, which is inherently nonlinear (unseen in linear stability analysis), and one closely related to intermittency in turbulence. It was already implicit in the 3D global simulations of Woodward et al. This fluctuating behavior is seen in extended two-dimensional simulations of CNeOSi burning shells, and may cause instability which leads to eruptions in progenitors of core-collapse supernovae prior to collapse.

  13. Zero Kinetic Energy Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Benzo[h]quinoline.

    PubMed

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2015-12-17

    We report zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy of benzo[h]quinoline (BhQ) via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) through the first electronically excited state S1. From the simulated REMPI spectra with and without Herzberg-Teller coupling, we conclude that vibronic coupling plays a minor but observable role in the electronic excitation to the S1 state. We further compare the S1 state of BhQ with the first two electronically excited states of phenanthrene, noticing a similarity of the S1 state of BhQ with the second electronically excited state S2 of phenanthrene. In the ZEKE spectra of BhQ, the vibrational frequencies of the cationic state D0 are consistently higher than those of the intermediate neutral state, indicating enhanced bonding upon ionization. The sparse ZEKE spectra, compared with the spectrum of phenanthrene containing rich vibronic activities, further imply that the nitrogen atom has attenuated the structural change between S1 and D0 states. We speculate that the nitrogen atom can withdraw an electron in the S1 state and donate an electron in the D0 state, thereby minimizing the structural change during ionization. The origin of the first electronically excited state is determined to be 29,410 ± 5 cm(-1), and the adiabatic ionization potential is determined to be 65,064 ± 7 cm(-1). PMID:26039927

  14. Effect of Basic Residue on the Kinetics of Peptide Fragmentation Examined Using Surface-Induced Dissociation Combined with Resonant Ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia

    2015-11-30

    In this work, resonant ejection coupled with surface-induced dissociation (SID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer is used to examine fragmentation kinetics of two singly protonated hexapeptides, RYGGFL and KYGGFL, containing the basic arginine residue and less basic lysine residue at the N-terminus. The kinetics of individual reaction channels at different collision energies are probed by applying a short ejection pulse (1 ms) in resonance with the cyclotron frequency of a selected fragment ion and varying the delay time between ion-surface collision and resonant ejection while keeping total reaction delay time constant. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental data provides accurate threshold energies and activation entropies of individual reaction channels. Substitution of arginine with less basic lysine has a pronounced effect on the observed fragmentation kinetics of several pathways, including the b2 ion formation, but has little or no effect on formation of the b5+H2O fragment ion. The combination of resonant ejection SID, time- and collision energy-resolved SID, and RRKM modeling of both types of experimental data provides a detailed mechanistic understanding of the primary dissociation pathways of complex gaseous ions.

  15. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  16. Spectral study of wintertime kinetic energy of the Northern Hemisphere in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. N.; Zhao, Z.; Kao, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    Characteristics of the kinetic energy of wind fields at various pressure levels were analyzed, and significant wavenumbers in the wavenumber-frequency domain were identified. The nonlinear interaction terms of the kinetic energy equation were examined, and the distribution of the kinetic energy at the 850 mb, 500 mb, and 200 mb levels was calculated. A 5 deg latitude-longitude square grid was used, with NMC data for the 1975-1976 winter in the 20-60 deg N at 500 mb and 20-85 deg N for the 200 mb and 850 mb levels. The kinetic energy distribution was determined to be geography-dependent, with wavenumbers 6-9 westerly waves in the midfrequency range contributing significantly to kinetic energy maxima over the North Pacific and the east coast of North America. The contribution of the nonlinear interactions of these waves, which correspond to the longitudinal convergence of the kinetic energy flux, was found to be larger than the meridional convergence of the kinetic energy flux, and to occur mainly between 30-50 deg N. The nonlinear interactions were a negative contribution over the North Pacific at the 200 mb level.

  17. Kinetic investigation of the extrinsic spin Hall effect induced by skew scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. L.; Wu, M. W.

    2008-02-01

    A study of the kinetics of the extrinsic spin Hall conductivity induced by skew scattering is performed using the fully microscopic kinetic spin Bloch equation approach to the (001) GaAs symmetric quantum well. In the steady state, the extrinsic spin Hall current/conductivity vanishes for the linear k dependent spin-orbit coupling and is very small for the cubic k dependent spin-orbit coupling. The spin precession induced by the Dresselhaus/Rashba spin-orbit coupling plays a very important role in the vanishing of the extrinsic spin Hall conductivity in the steady state. An in-plane spin polarization is induced by the skew scattering, with the help of the spin-orbit coupling. This spin polarization is very different from the current-induced spin polarization.

  18. Effect of Self-generated Radial Electric Field on Internal Collapse induced by m=1 Kinetic Kink Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Taro; Tokuda, Shinji; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Takizuka, Tomonori; Naitou, Hiroshi

    1998-11-01

    Effect of Self-generated Radial Electric Field on Internal Collapse induced by m=1 Kinetic Kink Mode Matsumoto Taro, Tokuda Shinji, Kishimoto Yasuaki, Takizuka Tomonori Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Japan and Naitou Hiroshi Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Japan The density gradient effect is taken into account in the gyro-kinetic nonlinear simulation of the kinetic m=1 internal kink mode in a cylindrical plasma. Even when the density gradient is not so large enough to change the process of the full reconnection, the process of the post-reconnection phase is changed considerably due to the self-generated radial electric field, i.e. m/n = 0/0 mode induced by the nonlinear interaction. The radial electric field grows to the same level as the 1/1 mode, and drives a ExB plasma rotation in the ion diamagnetic direction. The density and current distribution, and therefore q-min value after the full reconnection, are found to be significantly affected by the rotation.

  19. Prediction of free turbulent mixing using a turbulent kinetic energy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harsha, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Free turbulent mixing of two-dimensional and axisymmetric one- and two-stream flows is analyzed by a relatively simple turbulent kinetic energy method. This method incorporates a linear relationship between the turbulent shear and the turbulent kinetic energy and an algebraic relationship for the length scale appearing in the turbulent kinetic energy equation. Good results are obtained for a wide variety of flows. The technique is shown to be especially applicable to flows with heat and mass transfer, for which nonunity Prandtl and Schmidt numbers may be assumed.

  20. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  1. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  2. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 1: First and second variations of total kinetic action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The case of a cold gas in the absence of external force fields is considered. Since the only energy involved is kinetic energy, the total kinetic action (i.e., the space-time integral of the kinetic energy density) should serve as the total free-energy functional in this case, and as such should be a local minimum for all possible fluctuations about stable flow. This conjecture is tested by calculating explicit, manifestly covariant expressions for the first and second variations of the total kinetic action in the context of Lagrangian kinematics. The general question of the correlation between physical stability and the convexity of any action integral that can be interpreted as the total free-energy functional of the flow is discussed and illustrated for the cases of rectillinear and rotating shearing flows.

  3. On the Equipartition of Kinetic Energy in an Ideal Gas Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peliti, L.

    2007-01-01

    A refinement of an argument due to Maxwell for the equipartition of translational kinetic energy in a mixture of ideal gases with different masses is proposed. The argument is elementary, yet it may work as an illustration of the role of symmetry and independence postulates in kinetic theory. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  5. Fully nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals: a proposal and a general assessment for atomic systems.

    PubMed

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J E

    2008-08-21

    Following some recent ideas on the construction of kinetic energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the homogeneous electron gas, a family of them with a nonlocal term based on the von Weizsacker functional and with a dependence on the logarithm of the density is presented. As localized systems are the most difficult to study with explicit kinetic functionals, in this paper we apply to atomic systems a number of families of fully nonlocal kinetic functionals. We have put our attention in both the total kinetic energy and the local behavior of the kinetic energy density, and the results clearly show the quality of these fully nonlocal functionals. They make a good description of the local behavior of the kinetic energy density and maintain good results for the total kinetic energies. We must remark that almost all the functionals discussed in the paper, when using an adequate reference density, can be evaluated as a single integral in momentum space, with a quasilinear scaling for the computational cost.

  6. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Makwana, K. D. Cattaneo, F.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.

    2015-04-15

    Simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are performed with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.3}. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.5} for smaller simulation domain, and k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.3} for larger domain. We estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. This work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.

  7. New Ro-Vibrational Kinetic Energy Operators using Polyspherical Coordinates for Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We illustrate how one can easily derive kinetic energy operators for polyatomic molecules using polyspherical coordinates with very general choices for z-axis embeddings arid angles used to specify relative orientations of internal vectors. Computer algebra is not required.

  8. Efficient first-principles calculation of the quantum kinetic energy and momentum distribution of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-09-01

    Light nuclei at room temperature and below exhibit a kinetic energy which significantly deviates from the predictions of classical statistical mechanics. This quantum kinetic energy is responsible for a wide variety of isotope effects of interest in fields ranging from chemistry to climatology. It also furnishes the second moment of the nuclear momentum distribution, which contains subtle information about the chemical environment and has recently become accessible to deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Here, we show how, by combining imaginary time path integral dynamics with a carefully designed generalized Langevin equation, it is possible to dramatically reduce the expense of computing the quantum kinetic energy. We also introduce a transient anisotropic Gaussian approximation to the nuclear momentum distribution which can be calculated with negligible additional effort. As an example, we evaluate the structural properties, the quantum kinetic energy, and the nuclear momentum distribution for a first-principles simulation of liquid water.

  9. Efficient first-principles calculation of the quantum kinetic energy and momentum distribution of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-09-01

    Light nuclei at room temperature and below exhibit a kinetic energy which significantly deviates from the predictions of classical statistical mechanics. This quantum kinetic energy is responsible for a wide variety of isotope effects of interest in fields ranging from chemistry to climatology. It also furnishes the second moment of the nuclear momentum distribution, which contains subtle information about the chemical environment and has recently become accessible to deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Here, we show how, by combining imaginary time path integral dynamics with a carefully designed generalized Langevin equation, it is possible to dramatically reduce the expense of computing the quantum kinetic energy. We also introduce a transient anisotropic Gaussian approximation to the nuclear momentum distribution which can be calculated with negligible additional effort. As an example, we evaluate the structural properties, the quantum kinetic energy, and the nuclear momentum distribution for a first-principles simulation of liquid water. PMID:23005275

  10. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin. PMID:27167473

  11. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  12. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching. It is shown that the contrast between these relativistic and classical quantities can be presented in a straightforward manner and with a minimal level of (undergraduate) mathematics.

  13. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    SciTech Connect

    De-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-03-15

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. D 79, 103517 (2009).] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. D 69, 123517 (2004). We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  14. Approach to kinetic energy density functionals: Nonlocal terms with the structure of the von Weizsaecker functional

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2008-02-15

    We propose a kinetic energy density functional scheme with nonlocal terms based on the von Weizsaecker functional, instead of the more traditional approach where the nonlocal terms have the structure of the Thomas-Fermi functional. The proposed functionals recover the exact kinetic energy and reproduce the linear response function of homogeneous electron systems. In order to assess their quality, we have tested the total kinetic energies as well as the kinetic energy density for atoms. The results show that these nonlocal functionals give as good results as the most sophisticated functionals in the literature. The proposed scheme for constructing the functionals means a step ahead in the field of fully nonlocal kinetic energy functionals, because they are capable of giving better local behavior than the semilocal functionals, yielding at the same time accurate results for total kinetic energies. Moreover, the functionals enjoy the possibility of being evaluated as a single integral in momentum space if an adequate reference density is defined, and then quasilinear scaling for the computational cost can be achieved.

  15. Kinetic Energy Corrections for Slip-Stick Behavior in Brittle Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macon, David J.; Anderson, Greg L.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is the study of the failure of a body that contains a flaw. In the energy balance approach to fracture mechanics, contributions from the external work and elastic strain energy are accounted for but rarely are corrections for the kinetic energy given. Under slip-stick conditions, part of the external work is expended as kinetic energy. The magnitude of this kinetic energy depends upon the shape of the crack. A specimen with a blunt crack will fail at a high load and the crack will catastrophically travel through the material until the kinetic energy is dissipated. Material with a sharp crack will fail at a lower load but will still be catastrophic in nature. A kinetic term is incorporated into the energy balance approach. This term accounts for the velocity of the crack after failure and how far the crack travels before arresting. This correction makes the shape of the initiation crack irrelevant. When applied to data generated by tapered double cantilever beam specimens under slip-stick conditions, the scatter in the measured critical strain energy release rate is significantly reduced.

  16. Kinetics of processes and energy distribution in an electric discharge upon pumping a XeCl laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, Yurii I; Yampol'skaya, S A; Yastremskii, Arkadii G

    2010-01-31

    Radiation energies and efficiencies of the XeCl laser are calculated for different pump regimes in a broad range of variations in the initial parameters [pump energy of 50 - 350 J L{sup -1}, pulse duration of 30 - 150 ns, initial concentration of HCl molecules of (0.7 - 2.5) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}]. The sequence of kinetic processes during which the pump energy is converted into induced radiation and heat is determined. It is shown that when 80% - 90% of the initial HCl concentration is used per pulse, the optimal ratio between the radiation energy and the laser efficiency is provided. In these regimes, about 50% of the pump energy is spent on production of excimer molecules in the entire range of the experimental parameters and for one HCl molecule 10 {+-} 1.5 eV is spent. (lasers)

  17. Hailfall: the relationship between radar-derived hail kinetic energy and hail damage to buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohl, Roman; Schiesser, Hans-Heinrich; Aller, Dörte

    Relationships between radar-derived hail kinetic energy and hail damage to residential and agricultural buildings are presented for nine hail cells that occurred over the Swiss Mittelland (1992-1999). Hail kinetic energy ( EKINPIX) was calculated from C-band Doppler radar Constant Altitude Plan Position Indicators (CAPPIs) at a height of 1.5 km and daily hail damage claim data were available per Swiss community through several cantonal building insurance companies. In order to derive point-to-point relationships, hailfall and damage variables were triangulated on a 2×2-km grid and cross-correlation coefficients were then calculated for entire hail cells. The results show that high season hail storms (15 June-15 August) produced higher mean damage than low season storms (before and after) and weighted logistic damage functions produced correlation coefficients of 0.83 (0.86) for high (low) season storms over residential buildings and 0.79 (0.88) over agricultural buildings. The relationship between EKINPIX and total loss ratios (damage in relation to total sums insured) reveals no seasonal difference in hailstorm intensities and nonweighted logistic functions yield correlation coefficients of 0.85 (0.84) for residential (agricultural) buildings. The comparison between actual and predicted losses showed that nonweighted functions overestimated actual damage and that altered damage functions (flatter slope gradients) predicted damages that are in the range of the actual losses. Damage functions are calibrated using EKINPIX, total loss ratios and actual losses from two independent hail cells. One hail cell showed that damage induced through rainfall that followed hailfall multiplied the final loss considerably. The valuable agreement between radar-measured hailfall intensity and total loss ratios suggests that the established damage functions could be used by insurance companies to derive possible maximal hail losses to a building portfolio of interest.

  18. Rise kinetics of light-induced modulation of absorption for a CdS crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.; Conway, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of the rise kinetics for changes in optical absorption in a single crystal of CdS which was bulk excited by pulsed laser light. The experimental data were compared to calculations from a simple model involving a bimolecular process. Experimental and calculated values agreed to within the experimental error and confirmed that light-induced modulation of absorption is a bimolecular process.

  19. Single-strand stacking free energy from DNA beacon kinetics.

    PubMed

    Aalberts, Daniel P; Parman, John M; Goddard, Noel L

    2003-05-01

    DNA beacons are short single-stranded chains which can form closed hairpin shapes through complementary base pairing at their ends. Contrary to the common polymer theory assumption that only their loop length matters, experiments show that their closing kinetics depend on the loop composition. We have modeled the closing kinetics and in so doing have obtained stacking enthalpies and entropies for single-stranded nucleic acids. The resulting change of persistence length with temperature effects the dynamics. With a Monte Carlo study, we answer another polymer question of how the closing time scales with chain length, finding tau approximately N(2.44+/-0.02). There is a significant crossover for shorter chains, bringing the effective exponent into good agreement with experiment.

  20. Kinetic properties of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Genazzani, A A; Mezna, M; Summerhill, R J; Galione, A; Michelangeli, F

    1997-03-21

    Three endogenous molecules have now been shown to release Ca2+ in the sea urchin egg: inositol trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), a derivative of NADP. While the mechanism through which the first two molecules are able to release Ca2+ is established and well characterized with InsP3 and cADPR-activating InsP3 and ryanodine receptors, respectively, the newly described NAADP has been shown to release Ca2+ via an entirely different mechanism. The most striking feature of this novel Ca2+ release mechanism is its inactivation, since subthreshold concentrations of NAADP are able to fully and irreversibly desensitize the channel. In the present study we have investigated the fast kinetics of activation and inactivation of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release. NAADP was found to release Ca2+ in a biphasic manner, and such release was preceded by a pronounced latent period, which was inversely dependent on concentration. Moreover, the kinetic features of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release were not altered by pretreatment with low concentrations of NAADP, although the extent of Ca2+ release was greatly affected. Our data suggest that the inactivation of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release is an all-or-none phenomenon, and while some receptors have been fully inactivated, those that remain sensitive to NAADP do so without any change in kinetic features. PMID:9065423

  1. Ultraviolet Photon-Induced Desorption and Decomposition Kinetics and Dynamics of Methyl Nitrite on SILVER(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressley, Laura Ann

    The wavelength-dependent cross section for decomposition and surface fragment reaction mechanisms for the photon -induced decomposition of CH_3ONO on Ag(111) are determined using the surface analytical techniques of temperature programmed desorption with mass spectroscopy (TPD), x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS, respectively), residual gas analysis with mass spectroscopy (RGA), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Methyl nitrite adsorbs reversibly on Ag(111) at 100 K with monolayer and multilayer desorption occurring at 131 and 118 K, respectively. The major photodecomposition fragments formed at 100 K include O(a), CH_2 (a), CH_3(a), CH _2O(a), and CH_3O(a). Upon heating to 350 K, these fragments recombine and desorb as H_2 and CH_2OHCH=O. The desorption channel at 350 K accounts for ~ 85% of the available fragments retained on the surface. The remaining fragments react and desorb as CH_3 OCH=O and CH_2OHCH=O at 200 K and 250 K, respectively. The photon-induced desorption dynamics of the nascent fragment, NO, is determined using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOF). At 254, 308, and 313 nm, the translational energy distributions of the desorbing NO is measured at 100 K. Two desorption channels are observed in the TOF spectra at all wavelengths investigated. Irrespective of the excitation wavelength, the flux-weighted mean translational energy, < E_{trans }>/2k, of the slower channel is around 115 +/- 10 K. We propose that this channel results from an extended interaction of the NO with the Ag(111) surface. The measured < E_{trans}>/2k of the faster desorption channel of the nascent NO photofragment at 254, 308, and 351 nm is 1980 +/- 100 K, 617 +/- 100 K, and 846 +/- 100 K, respectively. Comparison of the surface and gas phase photochemical kinetics and dynamics indicates that the dominant photodecomposition mechanism on the Ag(111) surface is the direct absorbance of the photon by the adsorbate.

  2. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  3. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra.

    PubMed

    Vos, M; Marmitt, G G; Finkelstein, Y; Moreh, R

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO3, Li2CO3, and SiO2) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5-40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO2, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E - Egap)(1.5). For CaCO3, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li2CO3 (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  4. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  5. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs(+) is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs(+)-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10(6) helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  6. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs+ is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs+-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 106 helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K. PMID:26233132

  7. Kinetic stabilization against the oxidation reaction induced by a silaalkane cage in a thiophene-bridged molecular gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Setaka, Wataru; Ohmizu, Soichiro; Kira, Mitsuo

    2014-02-01

    Macrocage molecules with a bridged rotor have been synthesized as molecular gyroscopes. The kinetics of the oxidation reaction of the thiophene-bridged molecular gyroscope, whose thiophene ring was bridged inside a silaalkane cage, was investigated. A remarkable kinetic stabilization against the oxidation of the thiophene moiety induced by the molecular cage framework was observed.

  8. Kinetic Modeling of the X-ray-induced Damage to a Metalloprotein

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine M.; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that biological samples undergo x-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring x-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of x-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC MnIII/IV ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of x-ray-induced damage at variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of x-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of damage deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and x-ray FEL sources. PMID:23815809

  9. A kinetic energy analysis of the meso beta-scale severe storm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Printy, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses are performed of the meso beta-scale (20-200 km wavelengths and several hours to one-day periods) severe storm kinetic energy balance on the fifth day of the AVE SESAME campaign of May 1979. A 24-hr interval covering the antecedent, active and post-convective outbreak activity over Oklahoma are considered. Use is made of the kinetic energy budget equation (KEBE) for a finite volume in an isobaric coordinate system. Rawindsonde data with 75 km resolution were treated. The KEBE model covered changes in kinetic energy due to the cross contour flows, horizontal and vertical components of flux divergence, and volumic mass changes on synoptic and subsynoptic scales. The greatest variability was concentrated above 400 mb height and over the most intense storm activity. Energy was generated at the highest rates in divergence and decreased the most in convection. The meso beta-scale lacked sufficient resolution for analyzing mesoscale activity.

  10. Method to compensate the dispersion of kinetic energy resolution in a velocity map imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lan, Pengfei; Feng, Zhengpeng; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2014-10-01

    Here we present a novel method to improve the kinetic energy resolution of a velocity map imaging(VMI) spectrometer. The main modifications, compared to the original design of Eppink and Parker (1997 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68 3477), are two additional grid electrodes. One of the electrodes is a grounded grid and the other is an arc-shaped grid with negative voltages (or positive voltages for an ions spectrometer). The arc-shaped electrode is axially symmetrical around the spectrometer axis. The field constructed by the two electrodes is to compensate the dispersion of the ‘v’-shaped energy resolution. Simulations by SIMION and reconstructions by the basis set expansion Abel transform method show that the kinetic energy resolution can be improved drastically by our new method. Furthermore, the accuracy in the determination of the kinetic energy of ion/electrons remains unchanged with respect to the original design.

  11. Measurement of the Kinetic Energy of a Body by Means of a Deformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Pedro J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a technique that measures the deformation produced in a plastic material by a falling ball in order to compute the ball's kinetic energy. Varying the parameters produces accurate results and gives students a good understanding of the measurement of energy. Combines various mechanical concepts that students have learned separately in…

  12. Relativistic Momentum and Kinetic Energy, and E = mc[superscript 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2009-01-01

    Based on relativistic velocity addition and the conservation of momentum and energy, I present simple derivations of the expressions for the relativistic momentum and kinetic energy of a particle, and for the formula E = mc[superscript 2]. (Contains 5 footnotes and 2 figures.)

  13. On the estimation of cooperativity in ion channel kinetics: activation free energy and kinetic mechanism of Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2013-04-28

    In this paper, we have explored generic criteria of cooperative behavior in ion channel kinetics treating it on the same footing with multistate receptor-ligand binding in a compact theoretical framework. We have shown that the characterization of cooperativity of ion channels in terms of the Hill coefficient violates the standard Hill criteria defined for allosteric cooperativity of ligand binding. To resolve the issue, an alternative measure of cooperativity is proposed here in terms of the cooperativity index that sets a unified criteria for both the systems. More importantly, for ion channel this index can be very useful to describe the cooperative kinetics as it can be readily determined from the experimentally measured ionic current combined with theoretical modelling. We have analyzed the correlation between the voltage value and slope of the voltage-activation curve at the half-activation point and consequently determined the standard free energy of activation of the ion channel using two well-established mechanisms of cooperativity, namely, Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) models. Comparison of the theoretical results for both the models with appropriate experimental data of mutational perturbation of Shaker K(+) channel supports the experimental fact that the KNF model is more suitable to describe the cooperative behavior of this class of ion channels, whereas the performance of the MWC model is unsatisfactory. We have also estimated the mechanistic performance through standard free energy of channel activation for both the models and proposed a possible functional disadvantage in the MWC scheme.

  14. Kinetic energy of rainfall an important driver of soil erosion - how reliable are our estimates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilken, Florian; Sommer, Michael; Fiener, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The most important process initiating interrill erosion is the detachment of soil particles via splash processes. Splash erosion intensity is depending on soil and rainfall characteristics. Rainfall characteristics are essentially determined by the drop size and fall velocity, leading to a specific kinetic energy of rainfall. In consequence, the kinetic energy of rain events is often directly or indirectly included in erosion models to calculate splash erosion. Therefore, rainfall kinetic energy is commonly derived by empirical functions (e.g. RUSLE; Renard et al. 1997) from available rainfall intensity measurements. The aim of this study is to analyze the event type-specific uncertainties inherent in these empirical functions purely based on rainfall intensity measurements. Therefore, we compare rainfall energies calculated from rainfall intensities measured with a standard tipping bucket rain gauge to rainfall energy measurements taken by laser distrometers. These allow to calculate rainfall kinetic energy from a spectrum of measured drop sizes and fall velocities. The study was carried out in NE-Germany in a test area with an average annual precipitation of approximately 500 mm dominated by intense convective precipitation. We compare one year of data from two laser distrometers and two tipping buckets installed at two locations about 1 km apart. Our results show distinct differences for high intensity events between the measuring techniques. We found notably higher rainfall kinetic energy for high intensity events measured by the laser distrometer compared to the tipping bucked derived kinetic energy. This points to a measurement bias of high erosive rainfall events which would be of particular relevance for erosion studies.

  15. Empirical estimates of kinetic energy from some recent U.S. tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, T.; Elsner, J. B.; Camp, P.; Jagger, T. H.

    2014-06-01

    Data from some recent tornado damage assessments are used to compute the percentage of damage path area by enhanced Fujita (EF) rating and to estimate kinetic energy. Only a small fraction of the damage area gets the highest damage rating, and this fraction is lower than a model used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, estimates of kinetic energy derived from a characteristic wind speed for each EF rating and the fraction of area with that rating match kinetic energy estimates using the model percentages. On average, the higher the EF rating, the larger the kinetic energy, but there is large variability in the relationship. The average total kinetic energy over the EF1 tornadoes examined in the study is 0.61 TJ, which compares with an average of 2.37 TJ, 40.1 TJ, 36.5 TJ, and 50.4 TJ for the EF2, EF3, EF4, and EF5 tornadoes, respectively. The most energetic tornado examined had a maximum damage rating of EF3.

  16. The role of mesoscale kinetic energy in natural occurring phytoplankton blooms and export in Drake Passage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. R.; Veron, F.; Oliver, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is an iron limited, high nitrate, low chlorophyll region that draws considerable attention as a potential site for carbon drawdown through iron fertilization. However, there are no prolonged in-situ observations of the mechanisms driving naturally occurring blooms in this region. Here we present results from an APEX biofloat that continuously profiled the Drake Passage from ~ 2,000 m to the surface every two days. The biofloat measured the development and export of a naturally occurring phytoplankton bloom in the Drake Passage. Our analysis indicates that low levels of mesoscale kinetic energy coincided with the observed phytoplankton bloom. We postulate that low KE level are a precondition for bloom onset in the Drake Passage, which is confirmed by satellite observations. High levels of mesoscale kinetic energy immediately followed the phytoplankton bloom and appear to have facilitated organic carbon export to the deep ocean by changing the neutral density depths of aggregated cells. Furthermore, satellite observations in Drake Passage suggest that high levels of mesoscale kinetic energy limit bloom formation. We suggest that low mesoscale kinetic energy is a precondition for bloom formation in the Drake Passage before other potentially limiting factors become significant (e.g. grazing relation, macronutrients, micronutrients). If mesoscale kinetic energy were to impose a limitation on phytoplankton concentrations across the entire Southern Ocean, there may be regions unsuitable for geoengineered draw down of atmospheric carbon dioxide through large scale iron additions.

  17. Effect of diet-induced obesity on kinetic parameters of amino acid uptake by rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Picó, C; Pons, A; Palou, A

    1992-11-01

    The effects of cafeteria diet-induced obesity upon in vitro uptake of L-Alanine, Glycine, L-Lysine, L-Glutamine, L-Glutamic acid, L-Phenylalanine and L-Leucine by isolated rat erythrocytes have been studied. The total Phe and Leu uptakes followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The Glu uptake was fitted to diffusion kinetics. The uptakes of Ala, Gly, Lys and Gln were best explained by a two-component transport: one saturable and one diffusion. Obesity increased the Km value for Ala, Gln and Leu, and the Vmax value for Ala, but decreased the Vmax for Lys. Kinetic parameters of Phe uptake were unaffected by obesity. In addition, the pseudo-first order rate constant (Vmax/Km) for Ala, Gly, Gln, Lys and Leu uptake decreased as a result of cafeteria diet-induced obesity. The Kd value for Ala, Gly, Gln and Glu decreased and that of Lys increased as result of obesity. These adaptations could, at least in part, explain alterations in amino acid distribution between blood cells and plasma related to overfeeding or obesity.

  18. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Makwana, K. D.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.; Cattaneo, F.

    2015-04-10

    We performed simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k-1.5⊥k⊥-1.5 for smallermore » simulation domain, and k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3 for larger domain. We then estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. Finally, this work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.« less

  19. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Makwana, K. D.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.; Cattaneo, F.

    2015-04-10

    We performed simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k-1.5⊥k⊥-1.5 for smaller simulation domain, and k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3 for larger domain. We then estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. Finally, this work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.

  20. Estimation of the kinetic energy dissipation in fall-arrest system and manikin during fall impact.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Powers, John R; Harris, James R; Pan, Christopher S

    2011-04-01

    Fall-arrest systems (FASs) have been widely applied to provide a safe stop during fall incidents for occupational activities. The mechanical interaction and kinetic energy exchange between the human body and the fall-arrest system during fall impact is one of the most important factors in FAS ergonomic design. In the current study, we developed a systematic approach to evaluate the energy dissipated in the energy absorbing lanyard (EAL) and in the harness/manikin during fall impact. The kinematics of the manikin and EAL during the impact were derived using the arrest-force time histories that were measured experimentally. We applied the proposed method to analyse the experimental data of drop tests at heights of 1.83 and 3.35 m. Our preliminary results indicate that approximately 84-92% of the kinetic energy is dissipated in the EAL system and the remainder is dissipated in the harness/manikin during fall impact. The proposed approach would be useful for the ergonomic design and performance evaluation of an FAS. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Mechanical interaction, especially kinetic energy exchange, between the human body and the fall-arrest system during fall impact is one of the most important factors in the ergonomic design of a fall-arrest system. In the current study, we propose an approach to quantify the kinetic energy dissipated in the energy absorbing lanyard and in the harness/body system during fall impact.

  1. Modeling bubble dynamics and radical kinetics in ultrasound induced microalgal cell disruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal cell disruption induced by acoustic cavitation was simulated through solving the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field and their radial kinetics (chemical kinetics of radical species) occurring in the bubble during its oscillation, as well as calculating the bubble wall pressure at the collapse point. Modeling results indicated that increasing ultrasonic intensity led to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed during acoustic cavitation, however, the pressure generated when the bubbles collapsed decreased. Therefore, cumulative collapse pressure (CCP) of bubbles was used to quantify acoustic disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, and a marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata and compare with experimental results. The strong correlations between CCP and the intracellular lipid fluorescence density, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density, and cell particle/debris concentration were found, which suggests that the developed models could accurately predict acoustic cell disruption, and can be utilized in the scale up and optimization of the process. PMID:26384877

  2. Charge-state dependence of kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-07-01

    A calculation is performed in order to analyze the charge-state dependence of the kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the excitation of the electrons, the neutralization of the projectile during its passage through the solid, and the transport of the excited electrons from where they are created to the surface. It is shown that the number of excited electrons depends strongly on the ion charge state. Nevertheless, due to the fast neutralization of the ions within the escape depth of the excited electrons, no significant initial charge-state dependence is expected in the kinetic electron yield. This result is consistent with available experimental data.

  3. Efficiency and Optimality of 2-period Gait from Kinetic Energy Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Fumihiko

    This paper investigates the efficiency of a 2-period limit-cycle gait from the kinetic energy viewpoint. First, we formulate a steady 2-period gait by using simple recurrence formulas for the kinetic energy of an asymmetric rimless wheel. Second, we theoretically show that, in the case that the mean value of the hip angle is constant, the generated 2-period steady gait is less efficient than a 1-period symmetric one in terms of kinetic energy. Furthermore, we show that the symmetric gait is not always optimal from another viewpoint. Finally, we investigate the validity of the derived theory through numerical simulations of virtual passive dynamic walking using a compass-like biped robot.

  4. Kinetic-energy structure of a laser-produced-plasma channel in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao-Fang; Yu, Cheng-Xin; Li, Wei; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to calculate the fine structure of kinetic energy of laser-produced plasma, which bridges the two parts of researches of plasma channel usually studied independently of each other, i.e., the extension of the length of plasma filament and the prolongation of the lifetime of plasma channel generated by the laser pulse. The kinetic energy structure of the plasma channel is calculated by solving the motion equation of ionized electrons and utilizing the ionization rate as the weighting factor. With the study on the laser intensity, we analyze the formation mechanisms of the kinetic energy structure. This work holds great promise for optimizing the initial conditions of the evolutions of plasma channel after the laser pulse.

  5. Pressure-strain energy redistribution in compressible turbulence: return-to-isotropy versus kinetic-potential energy equipartition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Venugopal, Vishnu; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2016-08-01

    Return-to-isotropy and kinetic-potential energy equipartition are two fundamental pressure-moderated energy redistributive processes in anisotropic compressible turbulence. Pressure-strain correlation tensor redistributes energy among various Reynolds stress components and pressure-dilatation is responsible for energy reallocation between dilatational kinetic and potential energies. The competition and interplay between these pressure-based processes are investigated in this study. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of low turbulent Mach number dilatational turbulence are performed employing the hybrid thermal Lattice Boltzman method (HTLBM). It is found that a tendency towards equipartition precedes proclivity for isotropization. An evolution towards equipartition has a collateral but critical effect on return-to-isotropy. The preferential transfer of energy from strong (rather than weak) Reynolds stress components to potential energy accelerates the isotropization of dilatational fluctuations. Understanding of these pressure-based redistributive processes is critical for developing insight into the character of compressible turbulence.

  6. Exact kinetic energy enables accurate evaluation of weak interactions by the FDE-vdW method

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Debalina; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-08-28

    The correlation energy of interaction is an elusive and sought-after interaction between molecular systems. By partitioning the response function of the system into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE)-vdW method provides a computationally amenable nonlocal correlation functional based on the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem applied to subsystem density functional theory. In reproducing potential energy surfaces of weakly interacting dimers, we show that FDE-vdW, either employing semilocal or exact nonadditive kinetic energy functionals, is in quantitative agreement with high-accuracy coupled cluster calculations (overall mean unsigned error of 0.5 kcal/mol). When employing the exact kinetic energy (which we term the Kohn-Sham (KS)-vdW method), the binding energies are generally closer to the benchmark, and the energy surfaces are also smoother.

  7. Properties of the kinetic energy budgets in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ang; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Available high-quality numerical simulation data are used to investigate and characterize the kinetic energy budgets for fully developed turbulent flow in pipes and channels, and in the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. The mean kinetic energy equation in these flows is empirically and analytically shown to respectively exhibit the same four-layer leading-order balance structure as the mean momentum equation. This property of the mean kinetic energy budget provides guidance on how to group terms in the more complicated turbulence and total kinetic energy budgets. Under the suggested grouping, the turbulence budget shows either a two- or three-layer structure (depending on channel or pipe versus boundary layer flow), while the total kinetic energy budget exhibits a clear four-layer structure. These layers, however, differ in position and size and exhibit variations with friction Reynolds number (δ+) that are distinct from the layer structure associated with the mean dynamics. The present analyses indicate that each of the four layers is characterized by a predominance of a reduced set of the grouped terms in the governing equation. The width of the third layer is mathematically reasoned to scale like δ+-√{δ+} at finite Reynolds numbers. In the boundary layer the upper bounds of both the second and third layers convincingly merge under this normalization, as does the width of the third layer. This normalization also seems to be valid for the width of the third layer in pipes and channels, but only for δ+>1000 . The leading-order balances in the total kinetic energy budget are shown to arise from a nontrivial interweaving of the mean and turbulence budget contributions with distance from the wall.

  8. Drop size distributions and kinetic energy rates in variable intensity rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Temporal variability in rainfall intensity reflects on the drop size distribution (DSD), and affects the rainfall kinetic energy during the event. Smith et al. (2009) reported on 1-min interval rainfall intensity and corresponding DSD variability during a storm on the 22/7/06 at Princeton, NJ. They reported also on DSDs characteristics of heavy convective rainfall events during the whole summer. Applying the DSD model of Assouline and Mualem (1997), it is shown that: (a) a similar relationship between the mean drop size and the rainfall intensity characterized the local rainfall at both the seasonal and the single storm scale; (b) using the mean drop size as a scaling factor of the DSD removes the rainfall intensity dependence at the intrastorm scale, providing a powerful tool to deal with temporal variability of rainfall rates during rainfall events. For a storm characterized by a given temporal variability of intensities, three different ways of evaluating kinetic energy per unit mass or time were applied. By comparison to estimates accounting for rainfall temporal variability and related full DSDs, representing the storm by mean intensity and drop diameter tends to overestimate kinetic energy for low intensities and underestimate it for the higher ones. The relative error for the kinetic energy per unit of mass is ±45% and shifts from negative to positive sign for I>25 mm/h. For the kinetic energy per unit of time, the relative error ranges from -100% to +210% and changes sign for I>45 mm/h. When temporal variation of intensity is accounted for but drops are characterized by their mean values instead of the full DSD, kinetic energy is underestimated by 20% on average. Consequently, accounting for temporal variability in rainfall intensity during a storm has a notable impact on the erosive power of the rainfall.

  9. Neutrophil kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced neutropenia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Yuji; Kawagishi, Mayumi; Kusaka, Masaru )

    1990-01-01

    Single injection of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) immediately induced a decrease in the number of circulating neutrophils in rats. This neutropenia occurred 10 minutes after the injection but disappeared 40 minutes after injection. This transient neutropenia was dose-dependently induced by rhG-CSF and also induced by repeated injections. We studied the kinetics of circulating neutrophils in transient neutropenia. rhG-CSF markedly decreased the number of {sup 3}H-diisopropylfluorophosphate ({sup 3}H-DFP) labeled neutrophils in the circulation 10 minutes after injection but the labeled neutrophils recovered to near the control level 40 minutes after the injection. These results indicate that the neutrophil margination accounts for the neutrophenia and the marginated neutrophils return to the circulation.

  10. Energetic particle drive for toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes and kinetic toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in a low-shear Tokamak. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, B.N. |; Sharapov, S.E.

    1994-10-01

    The structure of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and kinetic TAE (KTAE) with large mode numbers is analyzed and the linear power transfer from energetic particles to these modes is calculated in the low shear limit when each mode is localized near a single gap within an interval whose total width {Delta}{sup out} is much smaller than the radius r{sub m} of the mode location. Near its peak where most of the mode energy is concentrated, the mode has an inner scalelength {Delta}{sup in}, which is much smaller than {Delta}{sup out}. The scale {Delta}{sup in} is determined by toroidicity and kinetic effects, which eliminate the singularity of the potential at the resonant surface. This work examines the case when the drift orbit width of energetic particles {Delta}{sub b} is much larger than the inner scalelength {Delta}{sup in}, but arbitrary compared to the total width of the mode. It is shown that the particle-to-wave linear power transfer is comparable for the TAE and KTAE modes in this case. The ratio of the energetic particle contributions to the growth rates of the TAE and KTAE modes is then roughly equal to the inverse ratio of the mode energies. It is found that, in the low shear limit the growth rate of the KTAE modes can be larger than that for the TAE modes.

  11. Connecting the kinetics and energy landscape of tRNA translocation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Blanchard, Scott C; Cate, Jamie H D; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-01-01

    Functional rearrangements in biomolecular assemblies result from diffusion across an underlying energy landscape. While bulk kinetic measurements rely on discrete state-like approximations to the energy landscape, single-molecule methods can project the free energy onto specific coordinates. With measures of the diffusion, one may establish a quantitative bridge between state-like kinetic measurements and the continuous energy landscape. We used an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the 70S ribosome (2.1 million atoms; 1.3 microseconds) to provide this bridge for specific conformational events associated with the process of tRNA translocation. Starting from a pre-translocation configuration, we identified sets of residues that collectively undergo rotary rearrangements implicated in ribosome function. Estimates of the diffusion coefficients along these collective coordinates for translocation were then used to interconvert between experimental rates and measures of the energy landscape. This analysis, in conjunction with previously reported experimental rates of translocation, provides an upper-bound estimate of the free-energy barriers associated with translocation. While this analysis was performed for a particular kinetic scheme of translocation, the quantitative framework is general and may be applied to energetic and kinetic descriptions that include any number of intermediates and transition states.

  12. Contributions of divergent and nondivergent winds to the kinetic energy balance of a severe storm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, P. A.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Divergent and rotational components of the synoptic scale kinetic energy balance are presented using rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals from the Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 4). Two intense thunderstorm complexes occurred during the period. Energy budgets are described for the entire computational region and for limited volumes that enclose and move with the convection. Although small in magnitude, the divergent wind component played an important role in the cross contour generation and horizontal flux divergence of kinetic energy. The importance of V sub D appears directly to the presence and intensity of convection within the area. Although K sub D usually comprised less than 10 percent of the total kinetic energy content within the storm environment, as much as 87 percent of the total horizontal flux divergence and 68 percent of the total cross contour generation was due to the divergent component in the upper atmosphere. Generation of kinetic energy by the divergent component appears to be a major factor in the creation of an upper level wind maximum on the poleward side of one of the complexes. A random error analysis is presented to assess confidence limits in the various energy parameters.

  13. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  14. Kinetic Kaleidoscope: Exploring Movement and Energy in the Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Gail Neary; Hollingsworth, Patricia

    Works of visual art contain an inner dynamism and energy that an individual's perceptual apparatus can translate into kinesthetic impressions, movement, and sound. Through this translation, a child's natural energies can interact with the artwork through multiple sensory experiences, enriching art appreciation. After a brief examination of the…

  15. A multiscale numerical study into the cascade of kinetic energy leading to severe local storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, D. A.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    The cascade of kinetic energy from macro- through mesoscales is studied on the basis of a nested grid system used to solve a set of nonlinear differential equations. The kinetic energy cascade and the concentration of vorticity through the hydrodynamic spectrum provide a means for predicting the location and intensity of severe weather from large-scale data sets. A mechanism described by the surface pressure tendency equation proves to be important in explaining how initial middle-tropospheric mass-momentum imbalances alter the low-level pressure field.

  16. Theoretical study of lithium ionic conductors by electronic stress tensor density and electronic kinetic energy density.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Fujii, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, Li3PO4 and Li3PS4, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Responses of biological soil crust to and its relief effect on raindrop kinetic energy].

    PubMed

    Qin, Ning-qiang; Zhao, Yun-ge

    2011-09-01

    Based on the field investigation and by the method of simulated single-drop rain, this paper studied the responses of different types of biological soil crusts (biocrusts) in the wind-water erosion interleaving region of Loess Plateau to and their relief effect on the kinetic energy of raindrops. The responses of the biocrusts to raindrop kinetic energy had close relations with their biological composition. The cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts with a thickness of 1 cm and the moss-dominated biocrusts with the coverage of 80% could resist in 0.99 J and 75.56 J of cumulative rain drop kinetic energy, respectively, and the potential resistance of the biocrusts with the same biological compositions was relative to the biomass of the biological compositions, i.e., the larger the biomass, the higher the resistance. As the chlorophyll a content of cyanobacteria- dominated biocrusts (which characterizes the cyanobacterial biomass) increased from 3.32 to 3.73 microg x g(-1), the resistance of the biocrusts against the cumulative raindrop kinetic energy increased from 0.99 to 2.17 J; when the moss biomass in the moss- dominated biocrusts increased from 2.03 to 4.73 g x dm(-2), the resistance of the crusts increased from 6.08 to 75.56 J. During the succession of the biocrusts, their responses to the raindrop kinetic energy presented an "S" pattern. No significant differences in the resistance against raindrop cumulative kinetic energy were observed between the cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts with variable biomass, but the resistance of moss-dominated biocrusts increased significantly as their biomass per unit area increased. The resistance of moss-dominated biocrusts increased linearly when their biomass increased from 2.03 g x dm(-2) to 4.73 g x dm(-2). The moss-dominated biocrusts could resist in 62.03 J of raindrop kinetic energy when their biomass was up to 3.70 g x dm(-2). Biocrusts had obvious effects in relieving raindrop kinetic energy, and the relief effect

  18. Kinetic regime of dithiothreitol-induced aggregation of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Borzova, Vera A; Markossian, Kira A; Kara, Dmitriy A; Kurganov, Boris

    2015-09-01

    A search for agents, which are capable of effectively suppressing protein aggregation, and elaboration of the appropriate test systems, are among important problems of modern biochemistry and biotechnology. One such test system is based on dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Study of the kinetics of DTT-induced aggregation of BSA by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation showed that a decrease in the portion of the non-aggregated protein in time followed the exponential law, the rate constant of the first order remaining unchanged at varying protein concentration (0.1M Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.0; 45 °C). The obtained results indicate that the rate-limiting stage of the general aggregation process is that of unfolding of the protein molecule. When studying the kinetics of DTT-induced aggregation of BSA by dynamic light scattering, we proposed to use parameter K(LS) as a measure of the initial rate of aggregation. Parameter K(LS) corresponds to the initial slope of the dependence of (I-I0)(0.5) on time (I0 and I are the initial and current values of the light scattering intensity, respectively). The K(LS) value has been applied to estimate anti-aggregation activity of chemical chaperones (arginine, its derivatives and proline). PMID:26116389

  19. Self-powered water splitting using flowing kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Han, Yu; Han, Chang Bao; Gao, Cai Zhen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-14

    By utilizing a water-flow-driven triboelectric nanogenerator, a fully self-powered water-splitting process is demonstrated using the electricity converted from a water flow without additional energy costs. Considering the extremely low costs, the demonstrated approach is universally applicable and practically usable for future water electrolysis, which may initiate a research direction in the field of triboelectrolysis and possibly impacts energy science in general.

  20. Concept of variable activation energy and its validity in nonisothermal kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guanglei; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Hongxia; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Zhongsuo

    2011-06-01

    The concept of variable activation energy in solid-state kinetics under nonisothermal conditions has been suffering from doubt and controversy. Rate equations of nonisothermal kinetics of solid decomposition, which involve the factors of thermodynamics conditions, pressure of gaseous product, structure parameters of solid, and/or extent of conversion, are derived from the models of the interface reaction, the diffusion of gaseous product, and the nuclei growth of the solid product, respectively. The definition of the validity function in the rate equations represents the influence of the factors on the reaction rate. A function of variable activation energy depending on the validity function is also developed. The changing trend and degree of activation energy are extrapolated from the function of variable activation energy and based on the data of nonisothermal thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate. It is shown that the concept of variable activation energy is meaningfully applicable to solid-state reactions under nonisothermal conditions.

  1. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  2. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher R.

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  3. Magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfers at the top of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay; Alboussière, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    We develop the theory for the magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer between different spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. We show that non-zero secular variation of the total magnetic energy could be significant and may provide evidence for the existence of stretching secular variation, which suggests the existence of radial motions at the top of the Earth's core-whole core convection or MAC waves. However, the uncertainties of the small scales of the geomagnetic field prevent a definite conclusion. Combining core field and flow models we calculate the detailed magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer matrices. The magnetic to magnetic energy transfer shows a complex behaviour with local and non-local transfers. The spectra of magnetic to magnetic energy transfers show clear maxima and minima, suggesting an energy cascade. The kinetic to magnetic energy transfers, which are much weaker due to the weak poloidal flow, are either local or non-local between degree one and higher degrees. The patterns observed in the matrices resemble energy transfer patterns that are typically found in 3-D MHD numerical simulations.

  4. Simulations of thermodynamics and kinetics on rough energy landscapes with milestoning.

    PubMed

    Bello-Rivas, Juan M; Elber, Ron

    2016-03-01

    We investigated by computational means the kinetics and stationary behavior of stochastic dynamics on an ensemble of rough two-dimensional energy landscapes. There are no obvious separations of temporal scales in these systems, which constitute a simple model for the behavior of glasses and some biomaterials. Even though there are significant computational challenges present in these systems due to the large number of metastable states, the Milestoning method is able to compute their kinetic and thermodynamic properties exactly. We observe two clearly distinguished regimes in the overall kinetics: one in which diffusive behavior dominates and another that follows an Arrhenius law (despite the absence of a dominant barrier). We compare our results with those obtained with an exactly-solvable one-dimensional model, and with the results from the rough one-dimensional energy model introduced by Zwanzig. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-03-01

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 103517 (2009).10.1103/PhysRevD.79.103517] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 69, 123517 (2004).10.1103/PhysRevD.69.123517 We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  6. Kinetics of the Opening and Closing of Individual Excitability-Inducing Material Channels in a Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenstein, Gerald; Blumenthal, Robert; Latorre, Ramon; Lecar, Harold

    1974-01-01

    The kinetics of the opening and closing of individual ion-conducting channels in lipid bilayers doped with small amounts of excitability-inducing material (EIM) are determined from discrete fluctuations in ionic current. The kinetics for the approach to steady-state conductance during voltage clamp are determined for lipid bilayers containing many EIM channels. The two sets of measurements are found to be consistent, verifying that the voltage-dependent conductance of the many-channel EIM system arises from the opening and closing of individual EIM channels. The opening and closing of the channels are Poisson processes. Transition rates for these processes vary exponentially with applied potential, implying that the energy difference between the open and closed states of an EIM channel is linearly proportional to the transmembrane electric field. A model incorporating the above properties of the EIM channels predicts the observed voltage dependence of ionic conductance and conductance relaxation time, which are also characteristic of natural electrically excitable membranes. PMID:4829526

  7. Surface induced constant composition crystal growth kinetics studies. The brushite gypsum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hina, A.; Nancollas, G. H.; Grynpas, M.

    2001-02-01

    The possible oriented growth of one crystalline phase on the surface of another is especially important in systems containing both phosphate and sulfate salts of calcium. Whether the overgrowth results from a true epitaxial relationship is dependent on factors such as the thermodynamic driving forces and the free energies of the surfaces. Despite the fact that calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD, gypsum) and calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD, brushite) show many crystallographic and structural analogies, their surface reactions are quite different. The nucleation and growth of gypsum on brushite surfaces has been investigated in supersaturated solutions of calcium sulfate dihydrate at 25.0°C using the constant composition (CC) method. During the kinetics experiments, the harvested solid phases were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). Induction periods, τ, preceding the initial formation of gypsum crystals at the brushite surfaces, varied markedly with relative supersaturation, σ. A thin layer wicking method was used to investigate the interfacial free energies of the growing phases, and these data were also calculated from the kinetics results. The interfacial free energy, γ, estimated from initial growth rates was 8.4 mJ m -2, while that calculated from the induction times was 8.9 mJ m -2. These values were in agreement with those determined directly using thin layer wicking.

  8. Kinetic and thermal energy harvesters for implantable medical devices and biomedical autonomous sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadei, Andrea; Dionisi, Alessandro; Sardini, Emilio; Serpelloni, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Implantable medical devices usually require a battery to operate and this can represent a severe restriction. In most cases, the implantable medical devices must be surgically replaced because of the dead batteries; therefore, the longevity of the whole implantable medical device is determined by the battery lifespan. For this reason, researchers have been studying energy harvesting techniques from the human body in order to obtain batteryless implantable medical devices. The human body is a rich source of energy and this energy can be harvested from body heat, breathing, arm motion, leg motion or the motion of other body parts produced during walking or any other activity. In particular, the main human-body energy sources are kinetic energy and thermal energy. This paper reviews the state-of-art in kinetic and thermoelectric energy harvesters for powering implantable medical devices. Kinetic energy harvesters are based on electromagnetic, electrostatic and piezoelectric conversion. The different energy harvesters are analyzed highlighting their sizes, energy or power they produce and their relative applications. As they must be implanted, energy harvesting devices must be limited in size, typically about 1 cm3. The available energy depends on human-body positions; therefore, some positions are more advantageous than others. For example, favorable positions for piezoelectric harvesters are hip, knee and ankle where forces are significant. The energy harvesters here reported produce a power between 6 nW and 7.2 mW; these values are comparable with the supply requirements of the most common implantable medical devices; this demonstrates that energy harvesting techniques is a valid solution to design batteryless implantable medical devices.

  9. Kinetic studies of lipid oxidation induced by hemoglobin measured by consumption of dissolved oxygen in a liposome model system.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Ana Karina; Rustad, Turid; Mozuraityte, Revilija; Storrø, Ivar

    2009-09-01

    The effect of hemoglobin (Hb) and lipid concentration, pH, temperature, and different antioxidants on heme-mediated lipid oxidation of liposomes from marine phospholipids was studied. The rate of lipid oxidation was measured by consumption of dissolved oxygen. Heme-mediated lipid oxidation at different Hb and lipid concentrations was modeled by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The maximum rate (V(max)) for the reaction with cod and bovine Hb as a pro-oxidant was 66.2 +/- 3.4 and 56.6 +/- 3.4 microM/min, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) for the reaction with cod and bovine Hb was 0.67 +/- 0.09 and 1.2 +/- 0.2 microM, respectively. V(max) for the relationship between the oxygen uptake rate and lipid concentration was 43.2 +/- 1.5 microM/min, while the K(m) was 0.93 +/- 0.14 mg/mL. The effect of the temperature followed Arrhenius kinetics, and there was no significant difference in activation energy between cod and bovine Hb. The rate of lipid oxidation induced by bovine Hb was highest around pH 6. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) had no significant effect on heme-mediated lipid oxidation, but alpha-tocopherol and astaxanthin worked well as antioxidants. Kinetic differences were found between iron and Hb as pro-oxidants, and the efficacy of the antioxidants depended upon the pro-oxidant in the system. PMID:19691337

  10. Photodissociation of Arn + cluster ions: Kinetic energy distributions of neutral fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takashi; Kondow, Tamotsu

    1993-01-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of fragments produced in the photodissociation of Arn+ (3≤n≤24) were measured at 532 nm. Analysis of these TOF spectra provides quantitative information on the kinetic energy distributions of the neutral Ar fragments. For Arn+ with n≤14, two types of Ar fragments were distinguished according to the kinetic energy release. One having a sizable amount of kinetic energy is ascribed to the fragments directly produced via the dissociation of the chromophoric core in the cluster ions. The other carrying a smaller amount of kinetic energy can be described by ``evaporation'' of solvent atoms in Arn+. The average translational energies of the ``fast'' and the ``slow'' fragments were estimated to be 0.35-0.38 and 0.07-0.1 eV, respectively, for n=7-11. The angular distribution of the fast fragments exhibits a preferential anisotropy with 1.5≲β≲2 along the direction of the polarization vector of the excitation laser, while an almost isotropic distribution was observed for the slow fragments. A possible photodissociation mechanism was proposed based on the theoretically predicted geometries of Arn+. In the TOF spectra for the larger Arn+ with 14≤n≤24, no indication was obtained for the production of the fast fragments. The average kinetic energy of the ejected neutral atoms is ˜0.05 eV at n=24. This finding indicates that the direct core dissociation no longer takes place in the larger Arn+ clusters, suggesting that the photophysical properties of Arn+ (n≥14) differ from those of the smaller cluster ions.

  11. Bio-kinetic energy harvesting using electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, Jeremiah R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Kornbluh, Roy

    2012-06-01

    In hybrid vehicles, electric motors are used on each wheel to not only propel the car but also to decelerate the car by acting as generators. In the case of the human body, muscles spend about half of their time acting as a brake, absorbing energy, or doing what is known as negative work. Using dielectric elastomers it is possible to use the "braking" phases of walking to generate power without restricting or fatiguing the Warfighter. Infoscitex and SRI have developed and demonstrated methods for using electroactive polymers (EAPs) to tap into the negative work generated at the knee during the deceleration phase of the human gait cycle and convert it into electrical power that can be used to support wearable information systems, including display and communication technologies. The specific class of EAP that has been selected for these applications is termed dielectric elastomers. Because dielectric elastomers dissipate very little mechanical energy into heat, greater amounts of energy can be converted into electricity than by any other method. The long term vision of this concept is to have EAP energy harvesting cells located in components of the Warfighter ensemble, such as the boot uppers, knee pads and eventually even the clothing itself. By properly locating EAPs at these sites it will be possible to not only harvest power from the negative work phase but to actually reduce the amount of work done by the Warfighter's muscles during this phase, thereby reducing fatigue and minimizing the forces transmitted to the joints.

  12. Similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra in the near-wall region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonia, R. A.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    The similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra, previously confirmed using experimental data in various turbulent shear flows, is validated in the near-wall region using direct numerical simulation data in a fully developed turbulent channel flow. The dependence of this similarity on the molecular Prandtl number is also examined.

  13. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  14. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  15. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  16. Effect of fescue toxicosis on ruminal kinetics, nitrogen and energy balance in Holstein steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to examine alteration of ruminal kinetics, as well as N and energy balance during fescue toxicosis. Six ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (BW=217 ±7 kg) were weight-matched into pairs and pair-fed throughout a cross-over design experiment with a 2x2 factorial treatment str...

  17. Kinetics of microstructure formation of high-pressure induced gel from a whey protein isolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Song; Yang, Hongwei; Zhu, Wanpeng; Mu, Tai-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic process of pressure-induced gelation of whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied using in situ light scattering. The relationship of the logarithm of scattered light intensity (I) versus time (t) was linear after the induced time and could be described by the Cahn-Hilliard linear theory. With increasing time, the scattered intensity deviated from the exponential relationship, and the time evolution of the scattered light intensity maximum Im and the corresponding wavenumber qm could be described in terms of the power-law relationship as Im~fβ and qm~f-α, respectively. These results indicated that phase separation occurred during the gelation of WPI solutions under high pressure.

  18. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Chang, H. C.; Cho, I. C.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, C. S.; Chou, W. T.

    2014-08-01

    In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair.

  19. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  20. Low energy ion-molecule reaction dynamics and chemiionization kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, J. M.

    Low energy crossed ion beam neutral beam studies of a wide spectrum of elementary chemical reactions were performed. The reactive scattering work embodies crossed beam studies of simple chemical processes under single collision conditions which elucidate reaction dynamics by measuring product branching ratios, translational energy distributions and scattering angle distributions. The studies have emphasized the proton transfer reactions of the important flame cations HCO(+) and H3O(+) with a number of neutral molecules present in flames, including H2O, CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, and (CH3)2CO, and a wide variety of reactions of the ground state carbon cation, C(+)((2)P), with neutrals, illustrating the important reactions of insertion into C-H, O-H, N-H, and C-C bonds, as well as condensation reactions in which new C-C bonds are formed, yielding significant increases in the molecular weight of the charged product. These studies represent the first crossed beam studies in which information more detailed than rate constants and energy dependent total cross sections was inferred about the reaction dynamics.

  1. Cation-induced kinetic heterogeneity of the intron-exon recognition in single group II introns.

    PubMed

    Kowerko, Danny; König, Sebastian L B; Skilandat, Miriam; Kruschel, Daniela; Hadzic, Mélodie C A S; Cardo, Lucia; Sigel, Roland K O

    2015-03-17

    RNA is commonly believed to undergo a number of sequential folding steps before reaching its functional fold, i.e., the global minimum in the free energy landscape. However, there is accumulating evidence that several functional conformations are often in coexistence, corresponding to multiple (local) minima in the folding landscape. Here we use the 5'-exon-intron recognition duplex of a self-splicing ribozyme as a model system to study the influence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on RNA tertiary structure formation. Bulk and single-molecule spectroscopy reveal that near-physiological M(2+) concentrations strongly promote interstrand association. Moreover, the presence of M(2+) leads to pronounced kinetic heterogeneity, suggesting the coexistence of multiple docked and undocked RNA conformations. Heterogeneity is found to decrease at saturating M(2+) concentrations. Using NMR, we locate specific Mg(2+) binding pockets and quantify their affinity toward Mg(2+). Mg(2+) pulse experiments show that M(2+) exchange occurs on the timescale of seconds. This unprecedented combination of NMR and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer demonstrates for the first time to our knowledge that a rugged free energy landscape coincides with incomplete occupation of specific M(2+) binding sites at near-physiological M(2+) concentrations. Unconventional kinetics in nucleic acid folding frequently encountered in single-molecule experiments are therefore likely to originate from a spectrum of conformations that differ in the occupation of M(2+) binding sites.

  2. Kinetic energies of fragment ions produced by dissociative photoionization of NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Angel, G. C.; Rstgi, O. P.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic energies of ions produced by dissociative photoionization of NO have been measured at the discrete resonance lines of He (584A) and Ne (736A), and with undispersed synchrotron radiation. O sup + ions were identified with energies from 0 to approximately 0.5 eV and two groups of N sup + ions one with energy of 0.36 eV and another with energies between 0.9 and 1.5 eV, apparently produced by predissociation of the C sup 3 P 1 and B'1 sigma states respectively.

  3. Thermal ablation of plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak disruptions: Sensitivity to particle kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-02-01

    Ablation damage to solid targets with high heat flux impulses is generally greater high-energy electron beam heat sources compared to low-energy plasma guns. This sensitivity to incoming particle kinetic energy is explored with computer modelling; a fast-running routine (DESIRE) is developed for initial scoping analysis and is found to be in reasonable agreement with several experiments on graphite and tungsten targets. If tokamak disruptions are characterized by particle energies less than {approximately}1 keV, then we expect plasma guns are a better analogue than electron beams for simulating disruption behavior and testing candidate plasma-facing materials.

  4. Low formation energy and kinetic barrier of Stone-Wales defect in infinite and finite silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjanath, Aaditya; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2014-01-01

    Stone-Wales (SW) defects in materials having hexagonal lattice are the most common topological defects that affect the electronic and mechanical properties. Using first principles density functional theory based calculations, we study the formation energy and kinetic barrier of SW-defect in infinite and finite sheets of silicene. The formation energies as well as the barriers in both the cases are significantly lower than those of graphene. Furthermore, compared with the infinite sheets, the energy barriers and formation energies are lower for finite sheets. However, due to low barriers these defects are expected to heal out of the finite sheets.

  5. Measurements and kinetic modeling of energy coupling in volume and surface nanosecond pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Yin, Zhiyao; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulse discharge plasma imaging, coupled pulse energy measurements, and kinetic modeling are used to analyze the mechanism of energy coupling in high repetition rate, spatially uniform, nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane geometry. Under these conditions, coupled pulse energy scales nearly linearly with pressure (number density), with energy coupled per molecule being nearly constant, in good agreement with the kinetic model predictions. In spite of high-peak reduced electric field reached before breakdown, E/N ˜ 500-700 Td, the reduced electric field in the plasma after breakdown is much lower, E/N ˜ 50-100 Td, predicting that a significant fraction of energy coupled to the air plasma, up to 30-40%, is loaded into nitrogen vibrational mode. A self-similar, local ionization kinetic model predicting energy coupling to the plasma in a surface ionization wave discharge produced by a nanosecond voltage pulse has been developed. The model predicts key discharge parameters such as ionization wave speed and propagation distance, electric field, electron density, plasma layer thickness, and pulse energy coupled to the plasma, demonstrating good qualitative agreement with experimental data and two-dimensional kinetic modeling calculations. The model allows an analytic solution and lends itself to incorporation into existing compressible flow codes, at very little computational cost, for in-depth analysis of the nanosecond discharge plasma flow control mechanism. The use of the model would place the main emphasis on coupling of localized thermal perturbations produced by the discharge with the flow via compression waves and would provide quantitative insight into the flow control mechanism on a long time scale.

  6. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  7. Constrained Parmeterization of Reduced Density Approximation of Kinetic Energy Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debajit; Trickey, Samuel; Karasiev, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of forces in ab initio MD is greatly accelerated by orbital-free DFT, especially at finite temperature. The recent achievement of a fully non-empirical constraint-based generalized gradient (GGA) functional for the Kohn-Sham KE Ts [ n ] brings to light the inherent limitations of GGAs. This motivates inclusion of higher-order derivatives in the form of reduced derivative approximation (RDA) functionals. That, in turn, requires new functional forms and design criteria. RDA functionals are constrained further to produce a positive-definite, non-singular Pauli potential. We focus on designing a non-empirical constraint-based meta-GGA functional with certain combinations of higher-order derivatives which avoid nuclear-site singularities to a specified order of gradient expansion. Here we report progress on this agenda. Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, grant DE-SC0002139.

  8. Kinetic energy of throughfall in a highly diverse forest ecosystem in the humid subtropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geißler, Christian; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    After decades of research it is generally accepted that vegetation is a key factor in controlling soil erosion. Therefore, in ecosystems where erosion is a serious problem, afforestation is a common measure against erosion. Most of the studies in the last decades focused on agricultural systems and less attention was paid to natural systems. To understand the mechanisms preventing soil erosion in natural systems the processes have to be studied in detail and gradually. The first step and central research question is on how the canopies of the tree layer alter the properties of rainfall and generate throughfall. Kinetic energy is a widely used parameter to estimate the erosion potential of open field rainfall and throughfall. In the past, numerous studies have shown that vegetation of a certain height enhances the kinetic energy under the canopy (Chapman 1948, Mosley 1982, Vis 1986, Hall & Calder 1993, Nanko et al. 2006, Nanko et al. 2008) in relation to open field rainfall. This is mainly due to a shift in the drop size distribution to less but larger drops possessing a higher amount of kinetic energy. In vital forest ecosystems lower vegetation (shrubs, herbs) as well as a continuous litter layer protects the forest soil from the impact of large drops. The influence of biodiversity, specific forest stands or single species in this process system is still in discussion. In the present study calibrated splash cups (after Ellison 1947, Geißler et al. under review) have been used to detect differences in kinetic energy on the scale of specific species and on the scale of forest stands of contrasting age and biodiversity in a natural forest ecosystem. The splash cups have been calibrated experimentally using a laser disdrometer. The results show that the kinetic energy of throughfall produced by the tree layer increases with the age of the specific forest stand. The average throughfall kinetic energy (J m-2) is about 2.6 times higher in forests than under open field

  9. Effect of heating rate and kinetic model selection on activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization of amorphous felodipine.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Bhugra, Chandan; Li, Zheng Jane; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-12-01

    The nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of amorphous materials is routinely analyzed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to kinetic models. In this work, we systematically evaluate how the model-dependent crystallization kinetics is impacted by variations in the heating rate and the selection of the kinetic model, two key factors that can lead to significant differences in the crystallization activation energy (Ea ) of an amorphous material. Using amorphous felodipine, we show that the Ea decreases with increase in the heating rate, irrespective of the kinetic model evaluated in this work. The model that best describes the crystallization phenomenon cannot be identified readily through the statistical fitting approach because several kinetic models yield comparable R(2) . Here, we propose an alternate paired model-fitting model-free (PMFMF) approach for identifying the most suitable kinetic model, where Ea obtained from model-dependent kinetics is compared with those obtained from model-free kinetics. The most suitable kinetic model is identified as the one that yields Ea values comparable with the model-free kinetics. Through this PMFMF approach, nucleation and growth is identified as the main mechanism that controls the crystallization kinetics of felodipine. Using this PMFMF approach, we further demonstrate that crystallization mechanism from amorphous phase varies with heating rate.

  10. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  11. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  12. Kinetic energy spectra in thermionic emission from small tungsten cluster anions: evidence for nonclassical electron capture.

    PubMed

    Concina, Bruno; Baguenard, Bruno; Calvo, Florent; Bordas, Christian

    2010-03-14

    The delayed electron emission from small mass-selected anionic tungsten clusters W(n)(-) has been studied for sizes in the range 9 < or = n < or = 21. Kinetic energy spectra have been measured for delays of about 100 ns after laser excitation by a velocity-map imaging spectrometer. They are analyzed in the framework of microreversible statistical theories. The low-energy behavior shows some significant deviations with respect to the classical Langevin capture model, which we interpret as possibly due to the influence of quantum dynamical effects such as tunneling through the centrifugal barrier, rather than shape effects. The cluster temperature has been extracted from both the experimental kinetic energy spectrum and the absolute decay rate. Discrepancies between the two approaches suggest that the sticking probability can be as low as a few percent for the smallest clusters.

  13. Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kun; Parkhill, John

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from an input electron density. The output of the network is used as a nonlocal correction to conventional local and semilocal kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. The density which minimizes the total energy given by the functional is examined in detail. We identify several avenues to improve on this exploratory work, by reducing numerical noise and changing the structure of our functional. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  14. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  15. Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Oklahoma City Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J; Leach, M; Gouveia, F

    2004-06-24

    A major field experiment, Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003), was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect meteorological and tracer data sets for evaluating dispersion models in urban areas. The Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency were the primary sponsors of JU2003. Investigators from five Department of Energy national laboratories, several other government agencies, universities, private companies, and international agencies conducted the experiment. Observations to characterize the meteorology in and around the urban area complemented the observation of the dispersion of SF6, an inert tracer gas. Over one hundred threedimensional sonic anemometers were deployed in and around the urban area to monitor wind speed, direction, and turbulence fluxes during releases of SF6. Sonic deployment locations included a profile of eight sonic anemometers mounted on a crane less than 1 km north of the central business district (CBD). Using data from these and other sonic anemometers deployed in the urban area, we can quantify the effect of the urban area on atmospheric turbulence and compare results seen in OKC to those in other urban areas to assess the parameters typically used in parameterizations of urban turbulence.

  16. Measurement of inner radiation belt electrons with kinetic energy above 1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2015-10-01

    Data from the Proton-Electron Telescope on the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite, taken during 1992-2009, are analyzed for evidence of inner radiation belt electrons with kinetic energy E > 1 MeV. It is found that most of the data from a detector combination with a nominal energy threshold of 1 MeV were, in fact, caused by a chance coincidence response to lower energy electrons or high-energy protons. In particular, there was no detection of inner belt or slot region electrons above 1 MeV following the 2003 Halloween storm injection, though they may have been present. However, by restricting data to a less-stable, low-altitude trapping region, a persistent presence of inner belt electrons in the energy range 1 to 1.6 MeV is demonstrated. Their soft, exponential energy spectra are consistent with extrapolation of lower energy measurements.

  17. Energy analysis of convectively induced wind perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Buechler, Dennis E.

    1989-01-01

    Budgets of divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy (KD and KR) are examined for four upper level wind speed maxima that develop during the fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV) and the first AVE-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME I). A similar budget analysis is performed for a low-level jet stream during AVE-SESAME I. The energetics of the four upper level speed maxima is found to have several similarities. The dominant source of KD is cross-contour flow by the divergent wind, and KD provides a major source of KR via a conversion process. Conversion from available potential energy provides an additional source of KR in three of the cases. Horizontal maps reveal that the conversions involving KD are maximized in regions poleward of the convection. Low-level jet development during AVE-SESAME I appears to be assisted by convective activity to the west.

  18. Kinetic energy budget during strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic energy budgets are computed during a cold air outbreak in association with strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States. The period is characterized by large generation of kinetic energy due to cross-contour flow. Horizontal export and dissipation of energy to subgrid scales of motion constitute the important energy sinks. Rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals during a 36 h period are used in the analysis and reveal that energy fluctuations on a time scale of less than 12 h are generally small even though the overall energy balance does change considerably during the period in conjunction with an upper level trough which moves through the region. An error analysis of the energy budget terms suggests that this major change in the budget is not due to random errors in the input data but is caused by the changing synoptic situation. The study illustrates the need to consider the time and space scales of associated weather phenomena in interpreting energy budgets obtained through use of higher frequency data.

  19. pH-induced kinetic co-operativity of a thylakoid-bound polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Valero, E; García-Carmona, F

    1992-01-01

    A study of the catecholase activity of a latent plant polyphenol oxidase, extracted and purified from the chloroplast membranes of grapes (Vitis vinifera cv. Airen), revealed for the first time a lag phase above pH 5.0, whereas a steady-state rate was reached immediately when pH values were lower, thus suggesting the hysteretic nature of the enzyme. During steady state, the enzyme showed negative co-operativity concomitant with the presence of the lag period, and followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics under more acid pH conditions. Statistical analysis of these data showed a minimal value for the extreme Hill coefficient of 0.54 at pH 6.0. This kinetic behaviour of polyphenol oxidase has been interpreted in terms of the pH-induced 'slow' transition mechanism reported by Ricard, Noat & Nari [(1984) Eur. J. Biochem. 145, 311-317] in which the conformational change does not affect the active site of the enzyme. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1530593

  20. Quantification of Protein-Induced Membrane Remodeling Kinetics In Vitro with Lipid Multilayer Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Troy W.; Hariri, Hanaa; Prommapan, Plengchart; Kusi-Appiah, Aubrey; Vafai, Nicholas; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Van Winkle, David H.; Stagg, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at micro- and nanoscopic scales. Consequently, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of supramolecular remodeling such as vesicle formation from planar lipid bilayers or multilayers are needed to understand cellular self-organization. Here, a new nanotechnology-based method for quantitative measurements of lipid–protein interactions is presented and its suitability for quantifying the membrane binding, inflation, and budding activity of the membrane-remodeling protein Sar1 is demonstrated. Lipid multilayer gratings are printed onto surfaces using nanointaglio and exposed to Sar1, resulting in the inflation of lipid multilayers into unilamellar structures, which can be observed in a label-free manner by monitoring the diffracted light. Local variations in lipid multilayer volume on the surface is used to vary substrate availability in a microarray format. A quantitative model is developed that allows quantification of binding affinity (KD) and kinetics (kon and koff). Importantly, this assay is uniquely capable of quantifying membrane remodeling. Upon Sar1-induced inflation of single bilayers from surface supported multilayers, the semicylindrical grating lines are observed to remodel into semispherical buds when a critical radius of curvature is reached. PMID:26649649

  1. Novel Collimated Beam Setup to Study the Kinetics of VUV-Induced Reactions.

    PubMed

    Duca, Clara; Imoberdorf, Gustavo; Mohseni, Madjid

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum UV (VUV) process is an incipient advanced oxidation process, which can be used for water treatment. This process relies on the formation of hydroxyl radicals through the VUV-induced photolysis of water. In particular, the use of ozone-generating mercury vapor lamps, which emit 10% of the radiation at 185 nm and 90% at 254 nm, is showing very promising results for the degradation of micropollutants. The kinetics of VUV process has been studied in batch- and flow-through reactors, but the effect of 254 and 185 nm photons cannot be isolated, mass transfer resistances can take place and the interpretation of the results is complex. In this technical note, a new VUV collimated beam to conduct kinetic tests is presented, which offers several advantages: (1) it allows the irradiation of samples with 185, 254 nm photons, or both, (2) the concentration of reagents is uniform in the reaction volume and (3) it allows to change the fluence rate by changing the distance between the lamp and the photoreactor. Details of the geometry are presented, as well as an analysis of the collimation and uniformity of the radiation of the new VUV-collimated beam setup. PMID:23952050

  2. Interaction between a high-kinetic-energy plasma jet and a target surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.K.; Varghese, P.L.; Howell, J.R.

    1986-12-01

    A model is constructed to estimate the net energy deposited on a target wall bombarded by a plasma jet with gross kinetic energy much greater than its temperature and with density on the order of about 10/sup 19//cc (such as the plasma generated by a rail gun). Both one- and two-dimensional cases are examined to study the interactions between incident and reflected plasma ions. The results show that the reflected plasma plays an essential role in stopping the incident plasma energy over some small range of parameters.

  3. Induced Seismicity Potential of Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzman, Murray

    2013-03-01

    Earthquakes attributable to human activities-``induced seismic events''-have received heightened public attention in the United States over the past several years. Upon request from the U.S. Congress and the Department of Energy, the National Research Council was asked to assemble a committee of experts to examine the scale, scope, and consequences of seismicity induced during fluid injection and withdrawal associated with geothermal energy development, oil and gas development, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The committee's report, publicly released in June 2012, indicates that induced seismicity associated with fluid injection or withdrawal is caused in most cases by change in pore fluid pressure and/or change in stress in the subsurface in the presence of faults with specific properties and orientations and a critical state of stress in the rocks. The factor that appears to have the most direct consequence in regard to induced seismicity is the net fluid balance (total balance of fluid introduced into or removed from the subsurface). Energy technology projects that are designed to maintain a balance between the amount of fluid being injected and withdrawn, such as most oil and gas development projects, appear to produce fewer seismic events than projects that do not maintain fluid balance. Major findings from the study include: (1) as presently implemented, the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas recovery does not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events; (2) injection for disposal of waste water derived from energy technologies does pose some risk for induced seismicity, but very few events have been documented over the past several decades relative to the large number of disposal wells in operation; and (3) CCS, due to the large net volumes of injected fluids suggested for future large-scale carbon storage projects, may have potential for inducing larger seismic events.

  4. Scale-to-scale energy transfer in mixing flow induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) mixing flow induced by a planar shock wave of Mach 1.6 is investigated using direct numerical simulation method. Interfacial perturbations of different scales between air and sulfur hexafluoride are introduced to study the effect of the initial conditions. Focus is placed on the analysis of the scale-to-scale transfer of kinetic energy in both Fourier and physical spaces. The kinetic energy injected from the perturbation scales is transferred to both larger and smaller scales in an average sense within the inner mixing zone (IMZ) at early times and is mainly passed down into smaller scales at the late stage. The physical-space energy flux due to the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress is studied using a filtering approach in order to shed light on the physical origin of the scale-to-scale kinetic energy transfer. It is found that the pointwise SGS energy flux is highly correlated with the local spike and bubble structures in the IMZ. Moreover, it turns out that the mean SGS energy flux is mainly ascribed to the component in the direction of shock wave propagation. An analysis using the method of conditional averaging manifests that the generation of local SGS energy flux is associated with the property of the surrounding flow induced by quadrupolar or dipolar vortex structures.

  5. Scale-to-scale energy transfer in mixing flow induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) mixing flow induced by a planar shock wave of Mach 1.6 is investigated using direct numerical simulation method. Interfacial perturbations of different scales between air and sulfur hexafluoride are introduced to study the effect of the initial conditions. Focus is placed on the analysis of the scale-to-scale transfer of kinetic energy in both Fourier and physical spaces. The kinetic energy injected from the perturbation scales is transferred to both larger and smaller scales in an average sense within the inner mixing zone (IMZ) at early times and is mainly passed down into smaller scales at the late stage. The physical-space energy flux due to the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress is studied using a filtering approach in order to shed light on the physical origin of the scale-to-scale kinetic energy transfer. It is found that the pointwise SGS energy flux is highly correlated with the local spike and bubble structures in the IMZ. Moreover, it turns out that the mean SGS energy flux is mainly ascribed to the component in the direction of shock wave propagation. An analysis using the method of conditional averaging manifests that the generation of local SGS energy flux is associated with the property of the surrounding flow induced by quadrupolar or dipolar vortex structures. PMID:27300983

  6. Material perception of a kinetic illusory object with amplitude and frequency changes in oscillated inducer motion.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tomohiro; Matsubara, Kazuya; Utsumi, Ken; Wada, Yuji

    2015-04-01

    The magnitude of the phase difference between inducers' oscillation of a kinetic illusory surface influences visual material impressions (Masuda et al., 2013). For example, impressions of bending or waving motions on a surface tend to occur at a 30- or 90-deg. phase difference, respectively. Here, we elucidate whether amplitude and frequency changes in an inducer's oscillation influence the visual impressions of an illusory surface's hardness, elasticity, and viscosity. Nine participants were asked to use an analog scale to judge their visual impressions relative to a standard pattern with no damping and no frequency change for each phase difference. Results revealed that hardness ratings were greater when amplitude decayed with time only in the 30-deg. phase difference. Elasticity ratings were greater when the frequency of oscillation had a large increase in the 90-deg. phase difference. In the 30-deg. phase difference, similar tendencies were only observed with no damping and ample damping. Viscosity ratings were greater when the frequency of oscillation decreased in both phase differences and when the amplitude decayed with time in the 30-deg. phase difference. These findings suggest that amplitude and frequency changes in an inducer's oscillation are significant factors for material perception derived from motion. PMID:25542274

  7. Conformational selection or induced-fit? A critical appraisal of the kinetic mechanism†

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    For almost five decades, two competing mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced-fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules. When binding/dissociation events are fast compared to conformational transitions, the rate of approach to equilibrium, kobs, becomes diagnostic of conformational selection or induced-fit based on whether it decreases or increases with the ligand concentration, [L]. However, this simple conclusion based on the rapid-equilibrium approximation is not valid in general. Here we show that conformational selection is associated with a rich repertoire of kinetic properties, with kobs decreasing or increasing with [L] depending on the relative magnitude of the rate of ligand dissociation, koff, and the rate of conformational isomerization, kr. We prove that, even for the simplest two-step mechanism of ligand binding, a decrease of kobs with [L] is unequivocal evidence of conformational selection, but an increase of kobs with [L] is not unequivocal evidence of induced-fit. Ligand binding to glucokinase, thrombin and its precursor prethrombin-2 are used as relevant examples. We conclude that conformational selection as a mechanism for ligand binding to its target may be far more common than currently believed. PMID:22775458

  8. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyan; Ge, Zhishen; Jiang, Xiaoze; Hassan, P A; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-12-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt, p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC), were investigated by stopped-flow with light scattering detection. Spherical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles transform into short ellipsoidal shapes at low salt concentrations ([PTHC]/[SDS], chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.4). Upon stopped-flow mixing aqueous solutions of spherical SDS micelles with PTHC, the scattered light intensity gradually increases with time. Single exponential fitting of the dynamic traces leads to characteristic relaxation time, tau(g), for the growth process from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles, and it increases with increasing SDS concentrations. This suggests that ellipsoidal micelles might be produced by successive insertion of unimers into spherical micelles, similar to the case of formation of spherical micelles as suggested by Aniansson-Wall (A-W) theory. At chi(PTHC) > or = 0.5, rod-like micelles with much higher axial ratio form. The scattered light intensity exhibits an initially abrupt increase and then levels off. The dynamic curves can be well fitted with single exponential functions, and the obtained tau(g) decreases with increasing SDS concentration. Thus, the growth from spherical to rod-like micelles might proceed via fusion of spherical micelles, in agreement with mechanism proposed by Ikeda et al. At chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.6, the apparent activation energies obtained from temperature dependent kinetic studies for the micellar growth are 40.4 and 3.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The large differences between activation energies for the growth from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles at low chi(PTHC) and the sphere-to-rod transition at high chi(PTHC) further indicate that they should follow different mechanisms. Moreover, the sphere-to-rod transition kinetics of sodium alkyl sulfate with varying hydrophobic chain lengths (n=10, 12, 14, and 16) are also studied. The longer the carbon chain

  9. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyan; Ge, Zhishen; Jiang, Xiaoze; Hassan, P A; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-12-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt, p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC), were investigated by stopped-flow with light scattering detection. Spherical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles transform into short ellipsoidal shapes at low salt concentrations ([PTHC]/[SDS], chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.4). Upon stopped-flow mixing aqueous solutions of spherical SDS micelles with PTHC, the scattered light intensity gradually increases with time. Single exponential fitting of the dynamic traces leads to characteristic relaxation time, tau(g), for the growth process from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles, and it increases with increasing SDS concentrations. This suggests that ellipsoidal micelles might be produced by successive insertion of unimers into spherical micelles, similar to the case of formation of spherical micelles as suggested by Aniansson-Wall (A-W) theory. At chi(PTHC) > or = 0.5, rod-like micelles with much higher axial ratio form. The scattered light intensity exhibits an initially abrupt increase and then levels off. The dynamic curves can be well fitted with single exponential functions, and the obtained tau(g) decreases with increasing SDS concentration. Thus, the growth from spherical to rod-like micelles might proceed via fusion of spherical micelles, in agreement with mechanism proposed by Ikeda et al. At chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.6, the apparent activation energies obtained from temperature dependent kinetic studies for the micellar growth are 40.4 and 3.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The large differences between activation energies for the growth from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles at low chi(PTHC) and the sphere-to-rod transition at high chi(PTHC) further indicate that they should follow different mechanisms. Moreover, the sphere-to-rod transition kinetics of sodium alkyl sulfate with varying hydrophobic chain lengths (n=10, 12, 14, and 16) are also studied. The longer the carbon chain

  10. Kinetic model of atomic and molecular emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    A kinetic model previously developed to predict the relative intensities of atomic emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been extended to include processes related to CN and C(2) molecular emissions. Simulations with this model were performed to predict the relative excited-state populations. The results from the simulations are compared with experimentally determined excited-state populations from 1,064 nm laser irradiation of organic residues on aluminum foil. The model reasonably predicts the relative intensity of the molecular emissions. Significantly, the model reproduces the vastly different temporal profiles of the atomic and molecular emissions. The latter are found to extend to much longer times after the laser pulse, and this appears to be due to the increasing concentration of the molecules versus time. From the simulations, the important processes affecting the CN and C(2) concentrations are identified.

  11. Light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis: energetics, kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Renger, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    The essential steps of photosynthetic water splitting take place in Photosystem II (PSII) and comprise three different reaction sequences: (i) light induced formation of the radical pair P680(+)Q(A)(-), (ii) P680(+) driven oxidative water splitting into O(2) and four protons, and (iii) two step plastoquinone reduction to plastoquinol by Q(A)(-). This mini-review briefly summarizes our state of knowledge on energetics, kinetics and mechanism of oxidative water splitting. Essential features of the two types of reactions involved are described: (a) P680(+) reduction by the redox active tyrosine Y(z) and (b) sequence of oxidation steps induced by Y(z)(ox) in the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). The rate of the former reaction is limited by the non-adiabatic electron transfer (NET) step and the multi-phase kinetics shown to originate from a sequence of relaxation processes. In marked contrast, the rate of the stepwise oxidation by Y(z)(ox) of the WOC up to the redox level S(3) is not limited by NET but by trigger reactions which probably comprise proton shifts and/or conformational changes. The overall rate of the final reaction sequence leading to formation and release of O(2) is assumed to be limited by the electron transfer step from the S(3) state of WOC to Y(z)(ox) due to involvement of an endergonic redox equilibrium. Currently discussed controversial ideas on possible pathways are briefly outlined. Several crucial points of the mechanism of oxidative water splitting, like O-O bond formation, role of local proton shift(s), details of hydrogen bonding, are still not clarified and remain a challenging topic of future research.

  12. Energy dynamics in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced turbulent mixing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zuoli; Liu, Han

    2014-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) induced turbulent mixing flow in a shock tube is numerically investigated by using direct numerical simulation based on an effective in-house high-order turbulence solver (HOTS). The energy transfer and transport characteristics are studied both before and after re-shock. The celebrated Kolmogorov -5/3 spectrum can be observed in a long inertial subrange during the development of the turbulent mixing zone (TMZ). Insight is taken into the underlying mechanism by evaluating the energy-budget equations. A posteriori analysis of the influence of subgrid scales on resolved motions also gives a consistent picture of energy transfer in the RMI-induced turbulent mixing. Moreover, the kinetic energy cascade in the TMZ is discussed by using Favre filtering approach in physical space. A nonlinear vortex-stretching model for the subgrid-scale stress serves to explain the underlying mechanism of the energy cascade in the RMI-induced turbulence.

  13. Energy dependence of mass, charge, isotopic, and energy distributions in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kim, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The mass, charge, isotopic, and kinetic-energy distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reactions 235U+n and 239Pu+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The charge and mass distributions of the electromagnetic- and neutron-induced fission of 214,218Ra, 230,232,238U are also shown. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments.

  14. An experimental-finite element analysis on the kinetic energy absorption capacity of polyvinyl alcohol sponge.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is in widespread use for biomedical and tissue engineering applications owing to its biocompatibility, availability, relative cheapness, and excellent mechanical properties. This study reports a novel concept of design in energy absorbing materials which consist in the use of PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material to enhance the energy loss of impact loads. An experimental study is carried out to measure the mechanical properties of the PVA sponge under uniaxial loading. The kinetic energy absorption capacity of the PVA sponge is computed by a hexahedral finite element (FE) model of the steel ball and bullet through the LS-DYNA code under impact load at three different thicknesses (5, 10, 15mm). The results show that a higher sponge thickness invokes a higher energy loss of the steel ball and bullet. The highest energy loss of the steel ball and bullet is observed for the thickest sponge with 160 and 35J, respectively. The most common type of traumatic brain injury in which the head subject to impact load causes the brain to move within the skull and consequently brain hemorrhaging. These results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as a great kinetic energy absorber material compared to commonly used expanded polystyrene foams (EPS) to absorb most of the impact energy and reduces the transmitted load. The results might have implications not only for understanding of the mechanical properties of PVA sponge but also for use as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and packaging material design.

  15. An experimental-finite element analysis on the kinetic energy absorption capacity of polyvinyl alcohol sponge.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is in widespread use for biomedical and tissue engineering applications owing to its biocompatibility, availability, relative cheapness, and excellent mechanical properties. This study reports a novel concept of design in energy absorbing materials which consist in the use of PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material to enhance the energy loss of impact loads. An experimental study is carried out to measure the mechanical properties of the PVA sponge under uniaxial loading. The kinetic energy absorption capacity of the PVA sponge is computed by a hexahedral finite element (FE) model of the steel ball and bullet through the LS-DYNA code under impact load at three different thicknesses (5, 10, 15mm). The results show that a higher sponge thickness invokes a higher energy loss of the steel ball and bullet. The highest energy loss of the steel ball and bullet is observed for the thickest sponge with 160 and 35J, respectively. The most common type of traumatic brain injury in which the head subject to impact load causes the brain to move within the skull and consequently brain hemorrhaging. These results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as a great kinetic energy absorber material compared to commonly used expanded polystyrene foams (EPS) to absorb most of the impact energy and reduces the transmitted load. The results might have implications not only for understanding of the mechanical properties of PVA sponge but also for use as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and packaging material design. PMID:24863223

  16. The genetic code and its optimization for kinetic energy conservation in polypeptide chains.

    PubMed

    Guilloux, Antonin; Jestin, Jean-Luc

    2012-08-01

    Why is the genetic code the way it is? Concepts from fields as diverse as molecular evolution, classical chemistry, biochemistry and metabolism have been used to define selection pressures most likely to be involved in the shaping of the genetic code. Here minimization of kinetic energy disturbances during protein evolution by mutation allows an optimization of the genetic code to be highlighted. The quadratic forms corresponding to the kinetic energy term are considered over the field of rational numbers. Arguments are given to support the introduction of notions from basic number theory within this context. The observations found to be consistent with this minimization are statistically significant. The genetic code may well have been optimized according to energetic criteria so as to improve folding and dynamic properties of polypeptide chains.

  17. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Mean-flow results are compared with those given in a previous paper where the same problem was attacked using a Prandtl mixing-length hypothesis. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow. They highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient.

  18. Traumatic thrombosis of internal carotid artery sustained by transfer of kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Kalcioglu, Mahmut Tayyar; Celbis, Osman; Mizrak, Bulent; Firat, Yezdan; Selimoglu, Erol

    2012-06-01

    A 31-year-old male patient with a fatal thrombosis of the internal carotid artery caused by gun shot injury was presented in this case report. The patient was referred to the hospital with a diffuse edema on his left cheek. On otolaryngologic examination, there was a bullet entrance hole at the left mandibular corpus. No exit hole could be found. The finding from his axial computed tomography of neck and paranasal sinuses was normal. On neurological examination, a dense right hemiparesis was observed. In his cerebral angiogram, left common carotid artery was totally obliterated. Diffuse ischemia was observed in the left cerebral hemisphere. Despite intensive interventions, the patient died 4 days after the accident. In the autopsy, a large thrombosis was obtained in the left common carotid artery. This case emphasizes a fatal kinetic energy effect in vascular structures. It is stressed that a gun shot injury could be fatal with its indirect kinetic energy effects at subacute phase.

  19. Kinetic energy and scalar spectra in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic energy and scalar spectra from the measurements in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulent flow are presented. Kinetic energy and concentration (scalar) spectra are obtained from the experiments wherein density difference is created using brine and fresh water and temperature spectra are obtained from the experiments in which heat is used. Scaling of the frequency spectra of lateral and longitudinal velocity near the tube axis is closer to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov scaling, while the scalar spectra show some evidence of dual scaling, Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling followed by Obukhov-Corrsin scaling. These scalings are also observed in the corresponding second order spatial structure functions of velocity and concentration fluctuations.

  20. Energy level formula for the Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-yi; Chen, Bo-zhan; Fan, Yue

    1996-02-01

    Based on the <η| representation which is the common eigenstate of the relative position x1 - x2 and the total momentum P1 + P2 of two particles we derive the energy level formula for a Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential. The <η| representation seems to provide a direct and convenient approach for solving certain dynamical problems for two-body systems.

  1. Eigenvalue spectrum of the independent-fermion kinetic-energy kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, D.

    1996-09-01

    The constrained minimization independent-fermion kinetic-energy kernel, {delta}{sup 2}{ital T}{sub {ital s}}[{rho}]/{delta}{rho}({bold r}){delta}{rho}({bold r}{sup {prime}}), has a zero mode for all {rho}({bold r}), while it is non-negative for {rho}({bold r}) noninteracting {ital v} representable. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. A nonlinear kinetic energy principle for two-dimensional collision-free plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, K.; Goldstein, H.

    1983-08-01

    The existence of a nonlinear kinetic-energy principle for the 2D collisionless plasmas described by the Vlasov theory is demonstrated analytically, accounting for the relevant dynamical constraints. A method similar to that of Gardner (1963) is applied to spatially inhomogeneous plasmas, restricting the theory to cases with translational invariance. Despite this limitation, the principle is considered applicable in analyses such as that of the stability of the geomagnetic tail.

  3. Evidence for cluster shape effects on the kinetic energy spectrum in thermionic emission.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Lépine, F; Baguenard, B; Pagliarulo, F; Concina, B; Bordas, C; Parneix, P

    2007-11-28

    Experimental kinetic energy release distributions obtained for the thermionic emission from C(n) (-) clusters, 10< or =n< or =20, exhibit significant non-Boltzmann variations. Using phase space theory, these different features are analyzed and interpreted as the consequence of contrasting shapes in the daughter clusters; linear and nonlinear isomers have clearly distinct signatures. These results provide a novel indirect structural probe for atomic clusters associated with their thermionic emission spectra.

  4. Electrostatic and kinetic energies in the wake wave of a short laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Teychenne, D.; Bonnaud, G. ); Bobin, J. )

    1994-06-01

    The electrostatic and kinetic energies available in the longitudinal electron plasma wave created in the wake of an ultraintense laser pulse are obtained analytically. The analysis is one dimensional and assumes a square-shaped pulse that propagates in a highly underdense plasma with the velocity of light in vacuum. The length scale for laser depletion is given as a function of the laser irradiance and the electron density.

  5. Mass Yields and Average Total Kinetic Energy Release in Fission for 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dana

    2015-10-01

    Mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) in neutron induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu targets were measured with a gridded ionization chamber. Despite decades of fission research, our understanding of how fragment mass yields and TKE depend on incident neutron energy is limited, especially at higher energies (above 5-10 MeV). Improved accuracy in these quantities is important for nuclear technology as it enhances our simulation capabilities and increases the confidence in diagnostic tools. The data can also guide and validate theoretical fission models where the correlation between the fragment mass and TKE is of particular value for constraining models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam with energies from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on target nuclei 235U, 238U, and 239Pu will be presented with a focus on exploring data trends as a function of neutron energy from thermal through 30 MeV. Results indicate clear evidence of structure due to multi-chance fission in the TKE . LA-UR-15-24761.

  6. Bidirectional energy cascades and the origin of kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Che, H; Goldstein, M L; Viñas, A F

    2014-02-14

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  7. Quasiperiodic energy dependence of exciton relaxation kinetics in the sexithiophene crystal.

    PubMed

    Petelenz, Piotr; Zak, Emil

    2014-10-16

    Femtosecond kinetics of fluorescence rise in the sexithiophene crystal is studied on a microscopic model of intraband relaxation, where exciton energy is assumed to be dissipated by phonon-accompanied scattering, with the rates calculated earlier. The temporal evolution of the exciton population is described by a set of kinetic equations, solved numerically to yield the population buildup at the band bottom. Not only the time scale but also the shape of the rise curves is found to be unusually sensitive to excitation energy, exhibiting unique quasiperiodic dependence thereon, which is rationalized in terms of the underlying model. Further simulations demonstrate that the main conclusions are robust with respect to experimental factors such as finite temperature and inherent spectral broadening of the exciting pulse, while the calculated fluorescence rise times are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data available to date. As the rise profiles are composed of a number of exponential contributions, which varies with excitation energy, the common practice of characterizing the population buildup in the emitting state by a single value of relaxation time turns out to be an oversimplification. New experiments giving further insight into the kinetics and mechanism of intraband exciton relaxation are suggested.

  8. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Roldán, É.; Martínez, I. A.; Rica, R. A.; Dinis, L.

    2014-06-09

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  9. Nucleation of diindenoperylene and pentacene at thermal and hyperthermal incident kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Edward R.; Desai, Tushar V.; Greer, Douglas R.; Engstrom, James R.; Woll, Arthur R.

    2015-05-15

    The authors have examined the nucleation of diindenoperylene (DIP) on SiO{sub 2} employing primarily atomic force microscopy and focusing on the effect of incident kinetic energy employing both thermal and supersonic sources. For all incident kinetic energies examined (E{sub i} = 0.09–11.3 eV), the nucleation of DIP is homogeneous and the dependence of the maximum island density on the growth rate is described by a power law. A critical nucleus of approximately two molecules is implicated by our data. A re-examination of the nucleation of pentacene on SiO{sub 2} gives the same major result that the maximum island density is determined by the growth rate, and it is independent of the incident kinetic energy. These observations are readily understood by factoring in the size of the critical nucleus in each case, and the island density, which indicates that diffusive transport of molecules to the growing islands dominate the dynamics of growth in the submonolayer regime.

  10. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, É.; Martínez, I. A.; Dinis, L.; Rica, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  11. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  12. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-01-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface. PMID:25034006

  13. Bond energies in polyunsaturated acids and kinetics of co-oxidation of protiated and deuterated acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, Z. S.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Pliss, E. M.; Buchachenko, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational program specially designed to analyze co-oxidation of substances in mixtures is suggested. The rigorous kinetic scheme of 32 reactions describing co-oxidation of isotope differing polyunsaturated fatty acids was computed to enlighten experimentally detected enormously large H/D isotope effects. The latter were shown to depend on the kinetic chain length and exhibit two extreme regimes of short and long chains which characterize isotope effects on the initiation and propagation chain reactions of hydrogen (deuterium) atom abstraction. No protective effect of deuterated polyunsaturated acids on the oxidation of protiated acids was detected. Protective effect of the deuterated compounds on the biologically important processes seems to be induced by the low yield of products formed in the chain termination reactions due to the low rate of initiation by deuterated compounds.

  14. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer analysis for kinetic determinations of SUMO-specific protease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Song, Yang; Madahar, Vipul; Liao, Jiayu

    2012-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research, and it is a very powerful tool for elucidating protein interactions in either dynamic or steady state. SUMOylation (the process of SUMO [small ubiquitin-like modifier] conjugation to substrates) is an important posttranslational protein modification with critical roles in multiple biological processes. Conjugating SUMO to substrates requires an enzymatic cascade. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as an endopeptidase to process the pre-SUMO or as an isopeptidase to deconjugate SUMO from its substrate. To fully understand the roles of SENPs in the SUMOylation cycle, it is critical to understand their kinetics. Here, we report a novel development of a quantitative FRET-based protease assay for SENP1 kinetic parameter determination. The assay is based on the quantitative analysis of the FRET signal from the total fluorescent signal at acceptor emission wavelength, which consists of three components: donor (CyPet-SUMO1) emission, acceptor (YPet) emission, and FRET signal during the digestion process. Subsequently, we developed novel theoretical and experimental procedures to determine the kinetic parameters, k(cat), K(M), and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) of catalytic domain SENP1 toward pre-SUMO1. Importantly, the general principles of this quantitative FRET-based protease kinetic determination can be applied to other proteases.

  15. On the determination of activation energy and the order of kinetics in thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Mahua; Bhattacharyya, S.; Mazumdar, P. S.; Singh, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The study of thermoluminescence (TL) glow-peaks forms the background of important and useful methods for estimating the kinetic parameters such as activation energy ? and the order of kinetics ?. These parameters are, in general, determined by using glow curve deconvolution or peak shape methods. In the present paper, we have investigated the suitability of the modified peak shape method and Kirsh method in order to perform simultaneous evaluation of these kinetic parameters ? and ? in TL. For this purpose, we have considered numerically computed TL peaks resulting from (i) General Order Kinetics model, (ii) Non-interactive MultiTrap System model (or Modified One Trap One Recombination centre (M-OTOR) model), and (iii) Interactive MultiTrap System model. We have also considered the application of these methods to experimental TL glow peaks of γ-irradiated colourless calcite that exhibits two intense TL glow peaks at 516 and 613 K, respectively. Theoretical results obtained by using different methods corresponding to different models show good agreement with experiments and, hence, point towards the model independence of methods under consideration, except the cases of strong retrapping.

  16. Kinetic Energy Distribution of H(2p) Atoms from Dissociative Excitation of H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Ahmed, Syed M.; Kanik, Isik; Multari, Rosalie

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic energy distribution of H(2p) atoms resulting from electron impact dissociation of H2 has been measured for the first time with uv spectroscopy. A high resolution uv spectrometer was used for the measurement of the H Lyman-alpha emission line profiles at 20 and 100 eV electron impact energies. Analysis of the deconvolved 100 eV line profile reveals the existence of a narrow line peak and a broad pedestal base. Slow H(2p) atoms with peak energy near 80 meV produce the peak profile, which is nearly independent of impact energy. The wings of H Lyman-alpha arise from dissociative excitation of a series of doubly excited Q(sub 1) and Q(sub 2) states, which define the core orbitals. The fast atom energy distribution peaks at 4 eV.

  17. State-to-State Internal Energy Relaxation Following the Quantum-Kinetic Model in DSMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    A new model for chemical reactions, the Quantum-Kinetic (Q-K) model of Bird, has recently been introduced that does not depend on macroscopic rate equations or values of local flow field data. Subsequently, the Q-K model has been extended to include reactions involving charged species and electronic energy level transitions. Although this is a phenomenological model, it has been shown to accurately reproduce both equilibrium and non-equilibrium reaction rates. The usefulness of this model becomes clear as local flow conditions either exceed the conditions used to build previous models or when they depart from an equilibrium distribution. Presently, the applicability of the relaxation technique is investigated for the vibrational internal energy mode. The Forced Harmonic Oscillator (FHO) theory for vibrational energy level transitions is combined with the Q-K energy level transition model to accurately reproduce energy level transitions at a reduced computational cost compared to the older FHO models.

  18. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu; Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha; Gupta, Govind

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature <500 °C, growth of In follows Stranski-Krastanov growth mode while for temperature >500 °C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250-340 °C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520 °C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560 °C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580 °C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  19. Erythropoietic kinetics in sheep studied by means of induced changes in hemoglobin phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gabuzda, Thomas G.; Schuman, Marc A.; Silver, Ruth K.; Lewis, Hugh B.

    1968-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with the kinetics of the reciprocal relationship between sheep hemoglobin (Hb) A and Hb C formation in response to anemia. The relative synthesis of the hemoglobin types was assessed at various times in bone marrow erythroid cells incubated in vitro with 59Fe. The changeover from Hb A to Hb C formation lagged by about 3 days behind the development of anemia and was complete within about 11 days. After recovery from anemia the reciprocal change back to preanemic conditions proceeded at a much slower rate, Hb C formation gradually declining to unmeasurable levels over about 25 days. Infusions of plasma with high erythropoietin titre induced the formation of relatively large quantities of Hb C in erythroid cells of nonanemic sheep, demonstrating the central importance of a humoral mechanism in the change of expression of the hemoglobin genes. The following conclusions were drawn: hemoglobin phenotype is determined at a stem cell level. Erythroid stem cells appear to undergo gradual renewal. The identity of the plasma factor which induces Hb C formation is not yet known; it is not present in plasma from nonanemic sheep, and its production is not dependent upon hemoglobin genotype. If the plasma factor turns out to be erythropoietin, then this hormone must have an important influence on the pool of erythroid stem cells. Images PMID:5672611

  20. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  1. Enhancement of binding kinetics on affinity substrates by laser point heating induced transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing the time response and detection limit of affinity-binding based biosensors is an area of active research. For diffusion limited reactions, introducing active mass transport is an effective strategy to reduce the equilibration time and improve surface binding. Here, a laser is focused on the ceiling of a microchamber to generate point heating, which introduces natural advection and thermophoresis to promote mass transport to the reactive floor. We first used the COMSOL simulation to study how the kinetics of ligand binding is influenced by the optothermal effect. Afterwards, binding of biotinylated nanoparticles to NeutrAvidin-treated substrates is quantitatively measured with and without laser heating. It is discovered that laser induced point heating reduces the reaction half-life locally, and the reduction improves with the natural advection velocity. In addition, non-uniform ligand binding on the substrate is induced by the laser with predictable binding patterns. This optothermal strategy holds promise to improve the time-response and sensitivity of biosensors and microarrays. PMID:26898559

  2. Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm for thermally induced breakdown of fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Naoki; Kun, Ferenc; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2015-03-01

    Fiber bundle models are one of the most fundamental modeling approaches for the investigation of the fracture of heterogeneous materials being able to capture a broad spectrum of damage mechanisms, loading conditions, and types of load sharing. In the framework of the fiber bundle model we introduce a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to investigate the thermally induced creep rupture of materials occurring under a constant external load. We demonstrate that the method overcomes several limitations of previous techniques and provides an efficient numerical framework at any load and temperature values. We show for both equal and localized load sharing that the computational time does not depend on the temperature; it is solely determined by the external load and the system size. In the limit of low load where the lifetime of the system diverges, the computational time saturates to a constant value. The method takes into account the secondary failures induced by subsequent load redistributions after breaking events, with the additional advantage that breaking avalanches always start from a single broken fiber. PMID:25871244

  3. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-15

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N/sub 2/ and F/sub 2/, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules.

  4. Convective kinetic energy equation under the mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2015-03-01

    The present paper originally derives the convective kinetic energy equation under mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization in a formal manner based on the segmentally-constant approximation (SCA). Though this equation is long since presented by Arakawa and Schubert (1974), a formal derivation is not known in the literature. The derivation of this formulation is of increasing interests in recent years due to the fact that it can explain basic aspects of the convective dynamics such as discharge-recharge and transition from shallow to deep convection. The derivation is presented in two manners: (i) for the case that only the vertical component of the velocity is considered and (ii) the case that both the horizontal and vertical components are considered. The equation reduces to the same form as originally presented by Arakwa and Schubert in both cases, but with the energy dissipation term defined differently. In both cases, nevertheless, the energy "dissipation" (loss) term consists of the three principal contributions: (i) entrainment-detrainment, (ii) outflow from top of convection, and (iii) pressure effects. Additionally, inflow from the bottom of convection contributing to a growth of convection is also formally counted as a part of the dissipation term. The eddy dissipation is also included for a completeness. The order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the convective kinetic energy "dissipation" is dominated by the pressure effects, and it may be approximately described by Rayleigh damping with a constant time scale of the order of 102-103 s. The conclusion is also supported by a supplementary analysis of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation. The Appendix discusses how the loss term ("dissipation") of the convective kinetic energy is qualitatively different from the conventional eddy-dissipation process found in turbulent flows.

  5. Quantifying the Nucleation and Growth Kinetics of Microwave Nanochemistry Enabled by in Situ High-Energy X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Gao, Min-Rui; Liu, Yuzi; Okasinski, John S; Ren, Yang; Sun, Yugang

    2016-01-13

    The fast reaction kinetics presented in the microwave synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles was quantitatively studied, for the first time, by integrating a microwave reactor with in situ X-ray diffraction at a high-energy synchrotron beamline. Comprehensive data analysis reveals two different types of reaction kinetics corresponding to the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles. The formation of seeds (nucleation) follows typical first-order reaction kinetics with activation energy of 20.34 kJ/mol, while the growth of seeds (growth) follows typical self-catalytic reaction kinetics. Varying the synthesis conditions indicates that the microwave colloidal chemistry is independent of concentration of surfactant. These discoveries reveal that the microwave synthesis of Ag nanoparticles proceeds with reaction kinetics significantly different from the synthesis present in conventional oil bath heating. The in situ X-ray diffraction technique reported in this work is promising to enable further understanding of crystalline nanomaterials formed through microwave synthesis.

  6. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects.

  7. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects. PMID:27498645

  8. Classical trajectory studies of gas phase reaction dynamics and kinetics using ab initio potential energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Pattengill, Merle D.; Schwenke, David W.

    1989-01-01

    Strategies for constructing global potential energy surfaces from a limited number of accurate ab initio electronic energy calculations are discussed. Generally, these data are concentrated in small regions of configuration space (e.g., in the vicinity of saddle points and energy minima) and difficulties arise in generating a potential function that is globally well-behaved. Efficient computer codes for carrying out classical trajectory calculations on vector and parallel processors are also described. Illustrations are given from recent work on the following chemical systems: Ca + HF yields CaF + H, H + H + H2 yields H2 + H2, N + O2 yields NO + O and O + N2 yields NO + N. The dynamics and kinetics of metathesis, dissociation, recombination, energy transfer and complex formation processes will be discussed.

  9. Induced innovation, energy prices, and the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, David Clifford

    The process of developing new technologies is a central question for economic theory as well as for public policy in many areas. For example, the development of cleaner, more efficient energy technologies will play an important role in reducing the threat of global warming. To study how technology evolves over time, this dissertation uses patent data on energy innovations from 1970 to 1991 to examine the impact of energy prices on energy-efficient innovations. Before this can be done, however, information on supply-side factors which influence innovation is also needed. In the case of innovation, supply-side factors are the usefulness of the existing base of scientific knowledge. Patent citations are used for this purpose. Subsequent citations to patents granted each year since 1970 are used to show that the returns to research and development (R&D) fall over time for most of the technologies studied. These estimates are then combined with data on demand-side factors, such as energy prices, to estimate a model of induced innovation in energy technologies. Both energy prices and the supply of knowledge are found to have strongly significant positive effects on innovation. Next, the Yale Technology Concordance (YTC), which maps patents to the industries in which they are used, is employed to construct a stock of energy-related knowledge for 14 energy intensive industries. The effect of changes in this stock on energy consumption in these industries is estimated. On average, the present value of energy savings resulting from a new patent is eight million dollars, with the maximum savings coming about five years after the initial patent application. Finally, the results of each regression are combined to simulate the impact of a ten percent energy tax. Initially, simple factor substitution due to the price change has the largest effect. However, because of the cumulative nature of R&D, induced innovation has a much larger effect than factor substitution in the long run

  10. Theoretical-computational modeling of photo-induced charge separation spectra and charge recombination kinetics in solution.

    PubMed

    Piacente, Giovanni; Amadei, Andrea; D'Abramo, Marco; Daidone, Isabella; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2014-10-14

    In this study we propose a theoretical-computational method, essentially based on molecular dynamics simulations and quantum-chemical calculations, for modelling the photo-induced charge separation (CS) and the subsequent charge recombination (CR) processes in solution. In particular we have reproduced the low-energy UV-Vis spectra of systems composed by an aromatic species (Ar = benzene or indene) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) in chloroform solution, dominated by the formation of the Ar(+)-TCNE(-) ion pair (IP) complex. The kinetics of the charge recombination process leading to the regeneration of Ar and TCNE has also been modelled. In both the cases the agreement with the experimental data is satisfactory. Although the presence of systematic deficiencies makes our approach unable to address some key aspects of the above processes (e.g. the ultrafast internal vibrational redistribution), it appears to be a rather promising tool for modelling the CS-CR process for atomic-molecular systems of very high complexity. The involvement of the triplet IP complex has also been discussed. PMID:25157909

  11. Dipyridamole-induced stress - variability in {sup 82}Rb PET kinetic studies in the anesthetized canine

    SciTech Connect

    Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Taylor, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    Reproducibility and variability of dipyridamole-induced stress in the myocardium as measured with {sup 82}Rb PET kinetics was tested in a series of replicated studies on six dogs using the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph (4.5mm FWHM with {sup 82}Rb). A single lateral slice through the myocardium was imaged in a baseline resting state, and again immediately after an infusion of dipyridamole (0.6 mg/kg over 4 min). Blood samples taken at 1 minute intervals were assayed with HPLC. A two compartment model with parameters k{sub 1} (uptake rate), k{sub 2} (wash-out rate), and f{sub v} (vascular fraction) was fit to the data. Stress-state k{sub 1} estimates were compared with rest-state k{sub 1} estimates and dipyridamole levels in the blood to ascertain any dependencies between them. In a multiple regression of the stress-k{sub 1} on both the rest-k{sub 1} and the mean dipyridamole concentration (0-4 min), the rest-k{sub 1} is significant (p=0.032) as a predictor and the dipyridamole concentration is borderline significant (p=0.060). Together they explain about 35% of the variability in the stress-k{sub 1}. Analysis of variance shows no significant between-animal effects for either the rest-k{sub 1} or the stress-k{sub 1} estimates but a significant (p=0.032) between-animal effect for the dipyridamole concentration. Dipyridamole is routinely used to induce stress for kinetic PET cardiac studies, but its contribution to variability in the rest-stress test has not been examined. These studies show that dipyridamole pharmacokinetic variability within and between animals has an effect on the stress-k{sub 1} estimate, but the effect is small. The statistically significant correlation of the rest- and stress-k{sub 1} values suggests that the ratio of K{sub 1} (stress/rest) is a more stable indicator of the stress response than the stress-k{sub 1} values alone.

  12. Hydroxyl radical induced oxidation of theophylline in water: a kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Sunil Paul, M M; Aravind, U K; Pramod, G; Saha, A; Aravindakumar, C T

    2014-08-14

    Oxidative destruction and mineralization of emerging organic pollutants by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH) is a well established area of research. The possibility of generating hazardous by-products in the case of ˙OH reaction demands extensive investigations on the degradation mechanism. A combination of pulse radiolysis and steady state photolysis (H2O2/UV photolysis) followed by high resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) analysis have been employed to explicate the kinetic and mechanistic features of the destruction of theophylline, a model pharmaceutical compound and an identified pollutant, by ˙OH in the present study. The oxidative destruction of this molecule, for intermediate product studies, was initially achieved by H2O2/UV photolysis. The transient absorption spectrum corresponding to the reaction of ˙OH with theophylline at pH 6, primarily caused by the generation of (T8-OH)˙, was characterised by an absorption band at 330 nm (k2 = (8.22 ± 0.03) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)). A significantly different spectrum (λmax: 340 nm) was observed at highly alkaline pH (10.2) due to the deprotonation of this radical (pKa∼ 10.0). Specific one electron oxidants such as sulphate radical anions (SO4˙(-)) and azide radicals (N3˙) produce the deprotonated form (T(-H)˙) of the radical cation (T˙(+)) of theophylline (pKa 3.1) with k2 values of (7.51 ± 0.04) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and (7.61 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) respectively. Conversely, oxide radicals (O˙(-)) react with theophylline via a hydrogen abstraction protocol with a rather slow k2 value of (1.95 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The transient spectral studies were complemented by the end product profile acquired by HRMS analysis. Various transformation products of theophylline induced by ˙OH were identified by this technique which include derivatives of uric acids (i, iv & v) and xanthines (ii, iii & vi). Further breakdown of the early formed product due to ˙OH attack leads to

  13. Kinetic-energy density functionals with nonlocal terms with the structure of the Thomas-Fermi functional

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2007-11-15

    We study two families of approximate nonlocal kinetic-energy functionals that include a full von Weizsaecker functional, and that have nonlocal terms with the mathematical structure of the Thomas-Fermi functional. The functionals recover the exact kinetic energy and the linear response function of a homogeneous electron system. The first family is a generalization of a successful previous nonlocal functional. The second family is proposed in the paper, and is designed to obtain functionals suitable for use in both localized and extended systems. Furthermore, this family has been designed to be evaluated by a single integration in momentum space when a constant reference density is used. The atomic total kinetic energies are in good agreement with the exact calculations. The kinetic-energy density corresponding to each functional has been assessed to control its quality. The results show that, in general, these functionals behave better than both the Thomas-Fermi and all semilocal generalized gradient approximation functionals when describing the kinetic-energy density of atoms, providing a better description of the nonlocal effects of the kinetic energy of electron systems.

  14. Kinetic study of solid waste pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model.

    PubMed

    Bhavanam, Anjireddy; Sastry, R C

    2015-02-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of municipal solid waste, agricultural residues such as ground nut shell, cotton husk and their blends are investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with in a temperature range of 30-900 °C at different heating rates of 10 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C/min in inert atmosphere. From the thermograms obtained from TGA, it is observed that the maximum rate of degradation occurred in the second stage of the pyrolysis process for all the solid wastes. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) is used to study the pyrolysis kinetics of the solid wastes. The kinetic parameters E (activation energy), k0 (frequency factor) are calculated from this model. It is found that the range of activation energies for agricultural residues are lower than the municipal solid waste. The activation energies for the municipal solid waste pyrolysis process drastically decreased with addition of agricultural residues. The proposed DAEM is successfully validated with TGA experimental data.

  15. Comparison of CME masses and kinetic energies near the Sun and in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Howard, R. A.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    Masses have now been determined for many of the CMEs observed in the inner heliosphere by the HELIOS 1 and 2 zodiacal light photometers. The speed of the brightest material of each CME has also been measured so that, for events having both mass and speed determinations, the kinetic energies of the CMEs are estimated. We compare the masses and kinetic energies of the individual CMEs measured in the inner heliosphere by HELIOS and near the Sun from observations by the SOLWIND (1979-1983) and SMM coronagraphs (1980). Where feasible we also compare the speeds of the same CMEs. We find that the HELIOS masses and energies tend to be somewhat larger by factors of 2-5 than those derived from the coronagraph data. We also compare the distribution of the masses and energies of the HELIOS and coronagraph CMEs over the solar cycle. These results provide an important baseline for observations of CMEs from coronagraphs, from the ISEE-3/ICE, WIND and Ulysses spacecraft and in the future from SOHO.

  16. A simplified model for average kinetic energy flux within large wind turbine arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey; Zhang, Wei; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy distribution within an array of wind turbines using a 1-D model for the interactions between large-scale wind farms and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Obstructed shear flow scaling is used to predict the development length of the wind farm flow as well as vertical momentum flux. Within the region of flow development, momentum and energy is advected into the wind farm and wake turbulence draws excess momentum in from between turbines. This is characterized by large dispersive fluxes. Once the flow within the farm is developed, the area - averaged velocity profile exhibits an inflection point, characteristic of obstructed shear flows. The inflected velocity profile is responsible for a characteristic turbulence eddy scale, which may be responsible for a significant amount of the vertical momentum and energy flux. Prediction of this scale is useful for determining the amount of available power for harvesting. The model result for kinetic energy flux is compared to wind tunnel measurements. The model is useful for optimizing wind turbine spacing and layout, and for assessing the impacts of wind farms on nearby wind resources and the environment.

  17. Enhanced von Weizsäcker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Ilgyou; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizsäcker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

  18. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate observations in the cold wake of Typhoon Fanapi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Laurent, L.; Jayne, S. R.; Lambert, S.; Douglass, E.; Rainville, L.; Lee, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Typhoon Fanapi formed in the western North Pacific Ocean, and became a named storm on September 14, 2010 in the vicinity of 129.1 E, 19.6 N. It subsequently traveled westward across the Philippine Sea and came ashore near Hualien, Tawain as a category 3 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale (winds of 120 miles per hour) on September 19, 2010. The storm created a strong cold wake in the ocean along its path. Following the landfall of the typhoon, a research cruise abroad the R/V Revelle was undertaken to study the structure, evolution, and decay of the cold wake as part of the Impact of Typhoons on the Pacific (ITOP) study. Here we present observations of the cold wake revealing the residual turbulent kinetic energy after the storm. Hydrographic and velocity observations were made with coincident turbulence observations, made with a tethered free-falling profiler measuring shear microstructure. This data record allows us document the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate over a period spanning 3 to 18 days after the passage of the storm. In the near-surface layer (z<50-m depth), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rates were suppressed in the cold wake, relative to levels outside the wake, as a result of the increased stratification. It would appear that any enhancement of turbulence occurring in the near-surface layer had dissipated by the 3rd day after the storm's passage. However, below the cold wake, TKE dissipation rate levels decayed in the 2-week period after the storm, consistent with the decay on near-inertial energy. The results suggest that cold wakes may be an effective way to boost mixing through the mixed-layer/thermocline transition zone that links surface forcing to ocean interior processes.

  19. Kinetic Modeling of Slow Energy Release in Non-Ideal Carbon Rich Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Fried, L; Glaesemann, K; Souers, C

    2006-06-20

    We present here the first self-consistent kinetic based model for long time-scale energy release in detonation waves in the non-ideal explosive LX-17. Non-ideal, insensitive carbon rich explosives, such as those based on TATB, are believed to have significant late-time slow release in energy. One proposed source of this energy is diffusion-limited growth of carbon clusters. In this paper we consider the late-time energy release problem in detonation waves using the thermochemical code CHEETAH linked to a multidimensional ALE hydrodynamics model. The linked CHEETAH-ALE model dimensional treats slowly reacting chemical species using kinetic rate laws, with chemical equilibrium assumed for species coupled via fast time-scale reactions. In the model presented here we include separate rate equations for the transformation of the un-reacted explosive to product gases and for the growth of a small particulate form of condensed graphite to a large particulate form. The small particulate graphite is assumed to be in chemical equilibrium with the gaseous species allowing for coupling between the instantaneous thermodynamic state and the production of graphite clusters. For the explosive burn rate a pressure dependent rate law was used. Low pressure freezing of the gas species mass fractions was also included to account for regions where the kinetic coupling rates become longer than the hydrodynamic time-scales. The model rate parameters were calibrated using cylinder and rate-stick experimental data. Excellent long time agreement and size effect results were achieved.

  20. Calibration and evaluation of an electronic sensor for rainfall kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Madden, L V; Wilson, L L; Ntahimpera, N

    1998-09-01

    ABSTRACT A novel sensor for measuring the kinetic energy of impacting raindrops, developed based on a soil-mass erosion sensor, was tested in the laboratory, with a rain simulator, and in the field. Drop impactions on the sensor-consisting of a piezoelectric crystal and associated electronics-produce an electrical charge that equals a fixed amount of energy. Calibration of the sensor was done in the laboratory using water drops of known diameter impacting with known velocity, and thus, with known kinetic energy. The relationship between pulse-count output of the sensor minus the background pulse counts when no drops were impacting (O; per min) and kinetic energy flux density (i.e., power [P; mJ cm(-2) min(-1)]) was found to be described by the formula P; = (0.204 + 0.065 . O)(0.67). The measurement threshold was 0.34 mJ cm(-2) min(-1). Using the sensor, generated rains with intensities of 23 to 48 mm/h were found to have powers of 0.4 to 2.2 mJ cm(-2) min(-1). In 2 years of field testing, 85 individual rain episodes were monitored, with mean intensities ranging from 0.1 to 42 mm/h. These rains had mean powers ranging from 0 to 5 mJ cm(-2) min(-1), and the highest power for a 5-min sampling period was 10 mJ cm(-2) min(-1). Both power and intensity varied greatly over time within rain episodes, and there was considerable variation in power at any given rain intensity, emphasizing the importance of measuring rather than simply predicting power. Although there was no known true power measurements for the generated or natural rains, estimates were realistic based on theoretical calculations, assuming that the gamma distribution represents raindrop sizes. The sensor is important in assessing the risk of rain splash dispersal of plant pathogens.

  1. Kinetic energy distribution of multiply charged ions in Coulomb explosion of Xe clusters.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua

    2011-02-21

    We report on the calculations of kinetic energy distribution (KED) functions of multiply charged, high-energy ions in Coulomb explosion (CE) of an assembly of elemental Xe(n) clusters (average size (n) = 200-2171) driven by ultra-intense, near-infrared, Gaussian laser fields (peak intensities 10(15) - 4 × 10(16) W cm(-2), pulse lengths 65-230 fs). In this cluster size and pulse parameter domain, outer ionization is incomplete∕vertical, incomplete∕nonvertical, or complete∕nonvertical, with CE occurring in the presence of nanoplasma electrons. The KEDs were obtained from double averaging of single-trajectory molecular dynamics simulation ion kinetic energies. The KEDs were doubly averaged over a log-normal cluster size distribution and over the laser intensity distribution of a spatial Gaussian beam, which constitutes either a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) profile, with the 3D profile (when the cluster beam radius is larger than the Rayleigh length) usually being experimentally realized. The general features of the doubly averaged KEDs manifest the smearing out of the structure corresponding to the distribution of ion charges, a marked increase of the KEDs at very low energies due to the contribution from the persistent nanoplasma, a distortion of the KEDs and of the average energies toward lower energy values, and the appearance of long low-intensity high-energy tails caused by the admixture of contributions from large clusters by size averaging. The doubly averaged simulation results account reasonably well (within 30%) for the experimental data for the cluster-size dependence of the CE energetics and for its dependence on the laser pulse parameters, as well as for the anisotropy in the angular distribution of the energies of the Xe(q+) ions. Possible applications of this computational study include a control of the ion kinetic energies by the choice of the laser intensity profile (2D∕3D) in the laser-cluster interaction volume.

  2. Internal energy distribution of peptides in electrospray ionization : ESI and collision-induced dissociation spectra calculation.

    PubMed

    Pak, Alireza; Lesage, Denis; Gimbert, Yves; Vékey, Károly; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2008-04-01

    The internal energy of ions and the timescale play fundamental roles in mass spectrometry. The main objective of this study is to estimate and compare the internal energy distributions of different ions (different nature, degree of freedom 'DOF' and fragmentations) produced in an electrospray source (ESI) of a triple-quadrupole instrument (Quattro I Micromass). These measurements were performed using both the Survival Yield method (as proposed by De Pauw) and the MassKinetics software (kinetic model introduced by Vékey). The internal energy calibration is the preliminary step for ESI and collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra calculation. meta-Methyl-benzylpyridinium ion and four protonated peptides (YGGFL, LDIFSDF, LDIFSDFR and RLDIFSDF) were produced using an electrospray source. These ions were used as thermometer probe compounds. Cone voltages (V(c)) were linearly correlated with the mean internal energy values () carried by desolvated ions. These mean internal energy values seem to be slightly dependent on the size of the studied ion. ESI mass spectra and CID spectra were then simulated using the MassKinetics software to propose an empirical equation for the mean internal energy () versus cone voltage (V(c)) for different source temperatures (T): < E(int) > = [405 x 10(-6) - 480 x 10(-9) (DOF)] V(c)T + E(therm)(T). In this equation, the E(therm)(T) parameter is the mean internal energy due to the source temperature at 0 V(c).

  3. Ultra-low kinetic energy photoelectron angular distribution measurements in He and Ne using a Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, A. M.; Redt, E.; Hoenert, M.; Hoyos-Campo, L. M.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Aguilar, A.

    2009-11-01

    We present photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in Helium and Neon for electrons with excess energies between 5 and 100 meV. These ultra-low kinetic energy PAD measurements were obtained with a modified Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer (VMI) and VUV light from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron radiation source. The efficiency and reliability of the spectrometer at this ultra-low kinetic energy range has been tested by determining the variation with energy of the asymmetry, β, parameter of photoelectrons from the s-shell direct ionization in Helium. For Neon, we determined the energy dependent asymmetry parameters across the "s" and "d" autoionizing resonances between the P3/2 and P1/2 ionic states. Furthermore, we measured the asymmetry parameter for photoelectrons produced from the n = 2 to n = 6 satellite states of He. These measurements were performed at values of excess kinetic energy previously unexplored.

  4. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high modal overlap, and this analysis has never been published. Moreover, until fairly recently, measurement of the total sound energy density required an elaborate experimental arrangement based on finite-difference approximations using at least four amplitude and phase matched pressure microphones. With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically, experimentally, and numerically.

  5. Control of Electron Beam-Induced Au Nanocrystal Growth Kinetics through Solution Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeung Hun; Schneider, Nicholas M; Grogan, Joseph M; Reuter, Mark C; Bau, Haim H; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances M

    2015-08-12

    Measurements of solution-phase crystal growth provide mechanistic information that is helpful in designing and synthesizing nanostructures. Here, we examine the model system of individual Au nanocrystal formation within a defined liquid geometry during electron beam irradiation of gold chloride solution, where radiolytically formed hydrated electrons reduce Au ions to solid Au. By selecting conditions that favor the growth of well-faceted Au nanoprisms, we measure growth rates of individual crystals. The volume of each crystal increases linearly with irradiation time at a rate unaffected by its shape or proximity to neighboring crystals, implying a growth process that is controlled by the arrival of atoms from solution. Furthermore, growth requires a threshold dose rate, suggesting competition between reduction and oxidation processes in the solution. Above this threshold, the growth rate follows a power law with dose rate. To explain the observed dose rate dependence, we demonstrate that a reaction-diffusion model is required that explicitly accounts for the species H(+) and Cl(-). The model highlights the necessity of considering all species present when interpreting kinetic data obtained from beam-induced processes, and suggest conditions under which growth rates can be controlled with higher precision.

  6. Control of Electron Beam-Induced Au Nanocrystal Growth Kinetics through Solution Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeung Hun; Schneider, Nicholas M; Grogan, Joseph M; Reuter, Mark C; Bau, Haim H; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances M

    2015-08-12

    Measurements of solution-phase crystal growth provide mechanistic information that is helpful in designing and synthesizing nanostructures. Here, we examine the model system of individual Au nanocrystal formation within a defined liquid geometry during electron beam irradiation of gold chloride solution, where radiolytically formed hydrated electrons reduce Au ions to solid Au. By selecting conditions that favor the growth of well-faceted Au nanoprisms, we measure growth rates of individual crystals. The volume of each crystal increases linearly with irradiation time at a rate unaffected by its shape or proximity to neighboring crystals, implying a growth process that is controlled by the arrival of atoms from solution. Furthermore, growth requires a threshold dose rate, suggesting competition between reduction and oxidation processes in the solution. Above this threshold, the growth rate follows a power law with dose rate. To explain the observed dose rate dependence, we demonstrate that a reaction-diffusion model is required that explicitly accounts for the species H(+) and Cl(-). The model highlights the necessity of considering all species present when interpreting kinetic data obtained from beam-induced processes, and suggest conditions under which growth rates can be controlled with higher precision. PMID:26207841

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the light-induced processes in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Igor; Zorn, Björn; Manstein, Dietmar J; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    The light-induced processes of the biological photoreceptor phytochrome (recombinant phyA of oat and recombinant CphA from the cyanobacterium Tolypothrix PCC7601) have been investigated in a time-resolved manner in the temperature range from 0 to 30°C. Both proteins were heterologously expressed and assembled in vitro with phycocyanobilin. The Pr state of plant phytochrome phyA is converted to the Pfr state after formation of four intermediates with an overall quantum yield of ~18%. The reversal reaction (Pfr-to-Pr) shows several intermediates, all of which, even the first detectable one, exhibit already all spectral features of the Pr state. The canonical phytochrome CphA from Tolypothrix showed a similar intermediate sequence as its plant ortholog. Whereas the kinetics for the forward reaction (Pr-to-Pfr) was nearly identical for both proteins, the reverse process (Pr formation) in the cyanobacterial phytochrome was slower by a factor of three. As found for the Pfr-to-Pr intermediates in the plant protein, also in CphA all detectable intermediates showed the spectral features of the Pr form. For both phytochromes, activation parameters for both the forward and the backward reaction pathways were determined. PMID:24209867

  8. On flow induced kinetic diffusion and rotary kiln bed burden heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boateng, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    The cross-section of a partially-filled cylindrical kiln rotating on its horizontal axis and processing granular solids produces a shear zone (active layer) at the free surface which grows with the kiln's rotational rate. The active layer, although relatively thin, compared with the rest of the bed burden, drives all physical/chemical reactions. This is because of the high rate of surface renewal which, in turn, promotes heat exchange between the exposed surface and the higher temperature freeboard gas. Unlike packed beds, particulate diffusion induced by the flow of granules, adds a significant component to the overall heat transfer in the bed. Problem formulation and modeling of heat conduction using flow fields derived from experiments suggest that at slow kiln speeds the diffusion effect may not be recognized due to long term duration of particle contacts and hence packed-bed heat conduction models may provide adequate characterization. However, at moderate and high kiln speeds particle collisions are short-termed and kinetic diffusion contributes to the effective thermal conductivity by as much as tenfold thereby resulting in a well-mixed conditions and a homogeneous bed temperature. Industrial processing ramifications such as kiln speed control and product quality are discussed hereafter.

  9. IGF-I augments resection-induced mucosal hyperplasia by altering enterocyte kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dahly, Elizabeth M; Guo, Ziwen; Ney, Denise M

    2003-10-01

    Our objective was to determine if exogenous insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) augments the adaptive growth response to mid small bowel resection in association with changes in enterocyte kinetics. We determined structural adaptation and concomitant changes in enterocyte proliferation, apoptosis, and migration of the jejunum in growing, parenterally fed rats after mid small bowel resection or small bowel transection, and treatment with IGF-I or vehicle. IGF-I treatment in resected rats significantly increased jejunal mucosal mass by 20% and mucosal concentrations of protein and DNA by 36 and 33%, respectively, above the response to resection alone. The enhancement of resection-induced adaptive growth and cellularity by IGF-I reflected an increase in enterocyte proliferation, an expansion of the proliferative compartment in the crypt, and no further decrease in enterocyte apoptosis or increase in enterocyte migration beyond the effects of resection. The ability of IGF-I to augment the mucosal hyperplasia stimulated by the endogenous response to resection substantiates the role of IGF-I as an intestinal mitogen that promotes tissue regeneration.

  10. Nitrate-induced photodegradation of atenolol in aqueous solution: kinetics, toxicity and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuefei; Zeng, Chao; Ferronato, Corinne; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Yang, Xi

    2012-07-01

    The extensive utilization of β-blockers worldwide led to frequent detection in natural water. In this study the photolysis behavior of atenolol (ATL) and toxicity of its photodegradation products were investigated in the presence of nitrate ions. The results showed that ATL photodegradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics upon simulated solar irradiation. The photodegradation was found to be dependent on nitrate concentration and increasing the nitrate from 0.5 mML(-1) to 10 mML(-1) led to the enhancement of rate constant from 0.00101 min(-1) to 0.00716 min(-1). Hydroxyl radical was determined to play a key role in the photolysis process by using isopropanol as molecular probe. Increasing the solution pH from 4.8 to 10.4, the photodegradation rate slightly decreased from 0.00246 min(-1) to 0.00195 min(-1), probably due to pH-dependent effect of nitrate-induced .OH formation. Bicarbonate decreased the photodegradation of ATL in the presence of nitrate ions mainly through pH effect, while humic substance inhibited the photodegradation via both attenuating light and competing radicals. Upon irradiation for 240 min, only 10% reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) can be achieved in spite of 72% transformation rate of ATL, implying a majority of ATL transformed into intermediate products rather than complete mineralization. The main photoproducts of ATL were identified by using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) techniques and possible nitrate-induced photodegradation pathways were proposed. The toxicity of the phototransformation products was evaluated using aquatic species Daphnia magna, and the results revealed that photodegradation was an effective mechanism for ATL toxicity reduction in natural waters. PMID:22497785

  11. Graph-based analysis of kinetics on multidimensional potential-energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okushima, T.; Niiyama, T.; Ikeda, K. S.; Shimizu, Y.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: one is to give a detailed description of an alternative graph-based analysis method, which we call saddle connectivity graph, for analyzing the global topography and the dynamical properties of many-dimensional potential-energy landscapes and the other is to give examples of applications of this method in the analysis of the kinetics of realistic systems. A Dijkstra-type shortest path algorithm is proposed to extract dynamically dominant transition pathways by kinetically defining transition costs. The applicability of this approach is first confirmed by an illustrative example of a low-dimensional random potential. We then show that a coarse-graining procedure tailored for saddle connectivity graphs can be used to obtain the kinetic properties of 13- and 38-atom Lennard-Jones clusters. The coarse-graining method not only reduces the complexity of the graphs, but also, with iterative use, reveals a self-similar hierarchical structure in these clusters. We also propose that the self-similarity is common to many-atom Lennard-Jones clusters.

  12. Graph-based analysis of kinetics on multidimensional potential-energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Okushima, T; Niiyama, T; Ikeda, K S; Shimizu, Y

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: one is to give a detailed description of an alternative graph-based analysis method, which we call saddle connectivity graph, for analyzing the global topography and the dynamical properties of many-dimensional potential-energy landscapes and the other is to give examples of applications of this method in the analysis of the kinetics of realistic systems. A Dijkstra-type shortest path algorithm is proposed to extract dynamically dominant transition pathways by kinetically defining transition costs. The applicability of this approach is first confirmed by an illustrative example of a low-dimensional random potential. We then show that a coarse-graining procedure tailored for saddle connectivity graphs can be used to obtain the kinetic properties of 13- and 38-atom Lennard-Jones clusters. The coarse-graining method not only reduces the complexity of the graphs, but also, with iterative use, reveals a self-similar hierarchical structure in these clusters. We also propose that the self-similarity is common to many-atom Lennard-Jones clusters. PMID:19905185

  13. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2016-04-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  14. The analysis and kinetic energy balance of an upper-level wind maximum during intense convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formation and maintenance of the upper-level wind maximum which formed between 1800 and 2100 GMT, April 10, 1979, during the AVE-SESAME I period, when intense storms and tornadoes were experienced (the Red River Valley tornado outbreak). Radiosonde stations participating in AVE-SESAME I are plotted (centered on Oklahoma). National Meteorological Center radar summaries near the times of maximum convective activity are mapped, and height and isotach plots are given, where the formation of an upper-level wind maximum over Oklahoma is the most significant feature at 300 mb. The energy balance of the storm region is seen to change dramatically as the wind maximum forms. During much of its lifetime, the upper-level wind maximum is maintained by ageostrophic flow that produces cross-contour generation of kinetic energy and by the upward transport of midtropospheric energy. Two possible mechanisms for the ageostrophic flow are considered.

  15. Potential to kinetic energy conversion in wave number domain for the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.-J.; Vincent, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results of a wave number study conducted for the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) using FGGE data for the period January 10-27, 1979 are reported. In particular, three variables (geomagnetic height, z, vertical p-velocity, omega, and temperature, T) and one energy conversion quantity, omega-alpha (where alpha is the specific volume), are shown. It is demonstrated that wave number 4 plays an important role in the conversion from available potential energy to kinetic energy in the Southern Hemisphere tropics, particularly in the vicinity of the SPCZ. It is therefore suggested that the development and movement of wave number 4 waves be carefully monitored in making forecasts for the South Pacific region.

  16. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2016-04-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths. PMID:27035587

  17. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2016-01-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths. PMID:27035587

  18. Asymptotic domination of cold relativistic MHD winds by kinetic energy flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    1994-01-01

    We study the conditions which lead to the conversion of most Poynting flux into kinetic energy flux in cold, relativistic hydromagnetic winds. It is shown that plasma acceleration along a precisely radial flow is extremely inefficient due to the near cancellation of the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension forces. However, if the flux tubes in a flow diverge even slightly faster than radially, the fast magnetosonic point moves inward from infinity to a few times the light cylinder radius. Once the flow becomes supermagnetosonic, further divergence of the flux tubes beyond the fast point can accelerate the flow via the 'magnetic nozzle' effect, thereby further converting Poynting flux to kinetic energy flux. We show that the Grad-Shafranov equation admits a generic family of kinetic energy-dominated asymptotic wind solutions with finite total magnetic flux. The Poynting flux in these solutions vanishes logarithmically with distance. The way in which the flux surfaces are nested within the flow depends only on the ratio of angular velocity to poliodal 4-velocity as a function of magnetic flux. Radial variations in flow structure can be expressed in terms of a pressure boundary condition on the outermost flux surface, provided that no external toriodal field surrounds the flow. For a special case, we show explicitly how the flux surfaces merge gradually to their asymptotes. For flows confined by an external medium of pressure decreasing to zero at infinity we show that, depending on how fast the ambient pressure declines, the final flow state could be either a collimated jet or a wind that fills the entire space. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for jets from active galactic nuclei and for free pulsar winds such as that believed to power the Crab Nebula.

  19. Momentum or kinetic energy - How do substrate properties influence the calculation of rainfall erosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Geißler, Christian; Lassu, Tamás; Peters, Piet; Seeger, Manuel; Nadrowski, Karin; Scholten, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a key component in soil erosion by water. While kinetic energy and momentum are used to describe the erosivity of rainfall, and both are derived from mass and velocity of raindrops, it is not clear how different substrates transform this energy. In our study we conducted rainfall simulation experiments to determine splash detachment amounts of five substrates (coarse sand, medium sand, fine sand, PE balls, silt) for seven different rainfall intensities (52-116 mm h-1). We used linear mixed-effect modeling (LME) to calculate erosivity predictors for each substrate. Additionally, we separated drop-size-velocity relationship into lower left and upper right quarter to investigate the effect of small and slow just as big and fast raindrops on splash detachment amounts. We suggest using momentum divided by drop diameter as a substrate-independent erosivity predictor. To consider different substrates specific erosivity parameters are needed. Heavier substrates like sand are best described by kinetic energy multiplied by diameter whereas lighter substrates like silt point to momentum divided by diameter to the power of 1.5. Furthermore, our results show that substrates are differently affected by the size and velocity of drops. While splash detachment of light substances can be reliably predicted by drop size and velocity for small and slow drops, drop size and velocity loses its predictive power in heavier substrates like sand.

  20. Effect of mean velocity shear on the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1992-01-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy in incompressible turbulence is investigated using a two-scale DIA. The dissipation rate is shown to consist of two parts; one corresponds to the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models of eddy-viscosity type, and another comes from the viscous effect that is closely connected with mean velocity shear. This result can elucidate the physical meaning of the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models and explain part of the discrepancy in the near-wall dissipation rates between the current turbulence models and direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation.

  1. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  2. Method and turbine for extracting kinetic energy from a stream of two-phase fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An axial flow separator turbine is described which includes a number of nozzles for delivering streams of a two-phase fluid along linear paths. A phase separator which responsively separates the vapor and liquid is characterized by concentrically related annuli supported for rotation within the paths. The separator has endless channels for confining the liquid under the influence of centrifugal forces. A vapor turbine fan extracts kinetic energy from the liquid. Angular momentum of both the liquid phase and the vapor phase of the fluid is converted to torque.

  3. Estimates of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate for a stratified flow in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Demarco, Giuliano; Martins, Luis Gustavo Nogueira; Acevedo, Otávio Costa; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Welter, Guilherme Sausen; Costa, Felipe Denardin; Fisch, Gilberto Fernando; Avelar, Ana Cristina

    2015-08-01

    In this work a method to estimate turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate (TKEDR) was presented. The technique uses the second-order structure function and Kolmogorov's law for inertial subrange. This methodology was applied on both neutral and stable stratification wind tunnel data, where the frozen turbulence hypothesis was assumed. The experiments were made with Reynolds Number ranging from 103 up to 104. The results show difference between the neutral and stable cases, but this gap decreases with the mean wind speed. Furthermore, TKEDR evaluated was used to describe the inertial subrange in the longitudinal velocity spectrum with a good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Calculated half-lives and kinetic energies for spontaneous emission of heavy ions from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W.; Depta, K.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A.

    1986-05-01

    The most probable decays by spontaneous emission of heavy ions are listed for nuclides with Z = 47--106 and total half-lives>1 ..mu..sec. Partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to ..cap alpha.. decay, kinetic energies, and Q values are estimated by using the analytical superasymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for those ..cap alpha..-decay lifetimes which have not been measured, and the new Wapstra--Audi mass tables. Numerous ''stable'' nuclides with Z>40 are found to be metastable with respect to the new decay modes. The current experimental status is briefly reviewed.

  5. Kinetic energy and spatial variability of throughfall in forest ecosystems as a function of biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion by water is an important process regarding ecosystem stability and ecosystem functions; this is especially true for subtropical regions with high intensity rainfall. Rainfall erosivity is one important factor in estimating soil erosion as an ecosystem function under forest. The power of raindrops to detach sediment at the soil surface is influenced by drop size and velocity. When passing through vegetation, rain drop size as well as rain drop velocity are changed depending on several vegetation parameters e.g. leaf area index (LAI). The role of biodiversity as one of these vegetation parameters on soil erosion processes is not yet clear and more information on the spatial distribution of throughfall under vegetation canopies is needed. In this study throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) as a unit of rainfall erosivity was measured and the effect of biodiversity on TKE and their spatial distribution was investigated. The experiment was carried out within the DFG research unit "Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (BEF)-China" in subtropical China. To measure biodiversity effects, splash cups have been used as a high-precision device with a high number of replications possible. 1800 Splash Cups were installed in the field during five different rainfall events on 40 plots with different tree diversity levels with a total of 24 tree species. For investigating spatial distribution of TKE, these splash cups have been set up in distinct distances from tree individuals (15cm, 30cm and 45cm away from stem, in the middle of two and four individuals, under the first branch, at the intersection of a 45cm and 105cm circle around two stems and one free from vegetation to determine freefall kinetic energy). Additional vegetation parameters have been measured: LAI and ground coverage under each splash cup, height, stem diameter, crown expansion in north-south and west-east direction, number of branches and crown height of each tree individual. First results show a higher

  6. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 degrees continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 degrees split arc proton therapy (two 90 degrees arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  7. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sengbusch, E.; Perez-Andujar, A.; DeLuca, P. M. Jr.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-02-15

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 deg. continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 deg. split arc proton therapy (two 90 degree sign arcs) using CT profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  8. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, E.; Pérez-Andújar, A.; DeLuca, P. M.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180° continuous arc proton therapy and for 180° split arc proton therapy (two 90° arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the proton kinetic

  9. Minimal Model of Quantum Kinetic Clusters for the Energy-Transfer Network of a Light-Harvesting Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianlan; Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Cao, Jianshu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-04-01

    The energy absorbed in a light-harvesting protein complex is often transferred collectively through aggregated chromophore clusters. For population evolution of chromophores, the time-integrated effective rate matrix allows us to construct quantum kinetic clusters quantitatively and determine the reduced cluster-cluster transfer rates systematically, thus defining a minimal model of energy-transfer kinetics. For Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) and light-havrvesting complex II (LCHII) monomers, quantum Markovian kinetics of clusters can accurately reproduce the overall energy-transfer process in the long-time scale. The dominant energy-transfer pathways are identified in the picture of aggregated clusters. The chromophores distributed extensively in various clusters can assist a fast and long-range energy transfer.

  10. Inversion Vibrational Energy Levels of AsH3 + Studied by Zero-Kinetic Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-06-01

    The rotational-resolved vibrational spectra of AsH3 + have been measured for the first time with vibrational energies up to 6000 wn above the ground state using zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopic method. The inversion vibrational energy levels (νb{2}) and the corresponding rotational constants for the νb{2} =0-16 have been determined. The tunneling splittings of the inversion vibration energy levels have been observed for the ground and the first excited vibrational states. The geometric parameters of AsH3 + as a function of inversion vibrational quantum states have been determined, indicating that the geometric structure of the cation changes from near planar structure to a pyramidal structure with more vibrational excitations. In addition to the experimental measurement, a two-dimensional theoretical calculation including the two symmetric vibrational modes was performed to determine the energy levels of the symmetric inversion and As-H stretching vibrations. The calculated vibrational energy levels are in good agreement with the experimental results. The first adiabatic ionization energy (IE) for AsH3 was also accurately determined. The result of this work will be compared with our published result on the PH3+.

  11. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano; Divin, Andrey

    2014-05-15

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S≈10{sup −3}W/m{sup 2}.

  12. Mercury-induced autoimmune glomerulonephritis in inbred rats. I. Kinetics and species specificity of autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, J H; McCoy, J P; Hirszel, P; Bigazzi, P E

    1985-01-01

    The nephropathy observed in rats after administration of mercuric chloride can be used to clarify the mechanisms underlying renal autoimmunity induced by chemicals. As a necessary preliminary step in the study of this animal model, we have investigated the kinetics and species-specificity of autoimmune responses to renal antigens. By a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), circulating autoantibodies to the glomerular basement membrane of the kidney (anti-GBM) have been detected within 8 days after the initiation of mercuric chloride treatment. Anti-GBM antibodies reach a peak by 15 days and then decrease rapidly in the following 2 weeks. Extensive cross-reactions between rat and human GBM antigens have been detected by ELISA, indicating a high degree of conservation of some renal autoantigens and suggesting certain similarities between the autoimmune response induced in rats by mercuric chloride and that observed in human glomerulonephritis caused by anti-GBM. Dose-response studies have been performed to ascertain whether anti-GBM responses are correlated with massive kidney damage and release of renal antigens. We have noted that a wide range of levels of mercuric chloride are capable of stimulating the production of anti-GBM and that animals receiving this chemical in as low a concentration as 0.02 mg/100 g body weight (i.e. a dose ten times lower than those causing massive nephrotoxic effects) still have anti-GBM specifically bound to their kidneys. Thus, it is possible that the administration of mercury compounds to BN rats results in kidney autoimmunity not only because of the release of renal autoantigens, but also through the activation of specific lymphocytes and/or disruption of regulatory networks. Finally, we have observed that both BN and MAXX rats produce anti-GBM after mercuric chloride treatment, while M520 rats do not. Since the MAXX strain was initially obtained from a cross of BN and Lewis rats and shares antigens of the

  13. Inverse Kinetics

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  14. Notepad-like triboelectric generator for efficiently harvesting low-velocity motion energy by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanlin; Leng, Qiang; Lian, Jiawei; Guo, Hengyu; Yi, Xi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-01-21

    Great attention has been paid to nanogenerators that harvest energy from ambient environments lately. In order to give considerable output current, most nanogenerators require high-velocity motion that in most cases can hardly be provided in our daily life. Here we report a notepad-like triboelectric generator (NTEG), which uses simple notepad-like structure to generate elastic deformation so as to turn a low-velocity kinetic energy into high-velocity kinetic energy through the conversion of elastic potential energy. Therefore, the NTEG can achieve high current output under low-velocity motion, which completely distinguishes it from tribogenerators previously reported. The factors that may affect the output performance are explored, including the number of slices, active length of slice, press speed, and vertical displacement. In addition, the working mechanism is systematically studied, indicating that the efficiency of the generator can be greatly enhanced by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy. The short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage, and power density are 205 μA and 470 V and 9.86 W/m(2), respectively, which is powerful enough to light up hundreds of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and charge a commercial capacitor. Besides, NTEGs have been successfully applied to a self-powered door monitor.

  15. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    PubMed

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks.

  16. Kinetic modeling and energy efficiency of UV/H₂O₂ treatment of iodinated trihalomethanes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongjun; Zhang, Lifeng; Yue, Junqi; Webster, Richard D; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2015-05-15

    Photodegradation of I-THMs including CHCl2I and CHI3 by the UV/H2O2 system was investigated in this study. CHCl2I and CHI3 react rapidly with hydroxyl radical (OH) produced by the UV/H2O2 system, with second-order rate constants of 8.0 × 10(9) and 8.9 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. A fraction of CHCl2I could be completely mineralized within 15 min and the remaining fraction was mainly converted to formic acid (HCO2H). Cl(-) and I(-) were identified as the predominant end-products. No ClO3(-) was observed during the photodegradation process, while IO3(-) was detected but at less than 2% of the total liberated iodine species at the end of the reaction. The effects of pH, H2O2 dose, and matrix species such as humic acid (HA), HCO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), NO3(-) on the photodegradation kinetics were evaluated. The steady-state kinetic model has been proven to successfully predict the destruction of CHCl2I and CHI3 by UV/H2O2 in different water matrices. On this basis, the kinetic model combined with electrical energy per order (EE/O) concept was applied to evaluate the efficiency of the photodegradation process and to optimize the H2O2 dose for different scenarios. The optimal H2O2 doses in deionized (DI) water, model natural water, and surface water are estimated at 5, 12, and 16 mg L(-1), respectively, which correspond to the lowest total energy consumption (EE/Ototal) of 0.2, 0.31, and 0.45 kWhm(-3)order(-1).

  17. Hydroxyapatite kinetic deposition on solid substrates induced by laser-liquid-solid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramatarova, Liliana; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Todor; Presker, Radina; Stutzmann, Martin

    2005-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is present in the human body as a mineral constituent of the bones and teeth, as well as a major or minor component of kidney stones. HA deposited on different solid substrates can find applications including biomaterials and biosensors. This work deals with the kinetics of the HA growth by applying a novel method of laser-liquid-solid-interaction (LLSI) process on three types of materials (stainless stell, silicon and silica glass). The method allows interaction between a pulsed laser and a substrate immersed in a solution (simulated body fluid, SBF). By a scanning system, a design of seven squares at a distance of 200 μm was created at the end of each sample. In this way the center of the substrate (about 6x6 mm) was no irradiated. Following the LLSI process, the samples were left in the irradiated SBF for various intervals of time. Light microscopy (LM) showed surfaces seede with randomly distributed transparent and white particles. The surface seeding increased with the immersion time and was dependent on the substrate type. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrsocopy showed that in the first stage of soaking (up to 6 h) the observed white particles were calcium phosphate containing. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrsocopy revealed that the transparent particles were NaCl. In the next stage (after 12 h) vibrational modes typical for HA were clearly observed. Detailed observation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after 12 h showed morphology of sphere-like aggregates, grouped in a porous network. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDX confirmed that after 12 h the grown layer was HA. It was found that in comparison to the traditionally empoyed prolonged soaking in SBF, the applied LLSI process yielded a synergistic effect due to the simultaneous use of the solid substrate, the aqueous solution and the laser energy.

  18. On energy balance and the structure of radiated waves in kinetics of crystalline defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Basant Lal

    2016-11-01

    Traveling waves, with well-known closed form expressions, in the context of the defects kinetics in crystals are excavated further with respect to their inherent structure of oscillatory components. These are associated with, so called, Frenkel-Kontorova model with a piecewise quadratic substrate potential, corresponding to the symmetric as well as asymmetric energy wells of the substrate, displacive phase transitions in bistable chains, and brittle fracture in triangular lattice strips under mode III conditions. The paper demonstrates that the power expended theorem holds so that the sum of rate of working and the rate of total energy flux into a control strip moving steadily with the defect equals the rate of energy sinking into the defect, in the sense of N.F. Mott. In the conservative case of the Frenkel-Kontorova model with asymmetric energy wells, this leads to an alternative expression for the mobility in terms of the energy flux through radiated lattice waves. An application of the same to the case of martensitic phase boundary and a crack, propagating uniformly in bistable chains and triangular lattice strips, respectively, is also provided and the energy release is expressed in terms of the radiated energy flux directly. The equivalence between the well-known expressions and their alternative is established via an elementary identity, which is stated and proved in the paper as the zero lemma. An intimate connection between the three distinct types of defects is, thus, revealed in the framework of energy balance, via a structural similarity between the corresponding variants of the 'zero' lemma containing the information about radiated energy flux. An extension to the dissipative models, in the presence of linear viscous damping, is detailed and analog of the zero lemma is proved. The analysis is relevant to the dynamics of dislocations, brittle cracks, and martensitic phase boundaries, besides possible applications to analogous physical contexts which are

  19. Kinetic energy of shakeoff atomic electrons from 37K β+ decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; Gorelov, A.; Farfan, C.; Smale, S.; Olchanski, K.; Kurchananov, L.; Anholm, M.; Behling, R. S.; Fenker, B.; Shidling, P. D.; Mehlman, M.; Melconian, D.; Ashery, D.; Gwinner, G.; Trinat Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the kinetic energies from 0 to 30 eV of atomic shakeoff electrons from the β+ decay of 37K. Despite much experimental and theoretical work on the distribution of final ion charge states, shakeoff electrons from β- decay have only been measured with energies above 150 eV [Mitrokhovich, Nucl. Phys. Atom. Energy, 11, 125 (2010)]. We use our magneto-optical trap's time-varying magnetic quadrupole field combined with a uniform electric field as a spectrometer. Our result has more 15 eV electrons than a model using the sudden approximation and hydrogenic wavefunctions [Levinger, Phys. Rev. 90, 11 (1958)]. The total energy carried away by electrons is, as expected, a negligible correction to superallowed Ft values. Understanding the energy of these low-energy electrons is important for their use in precision β decay to select events coming from trapped atoms and start time-of-flight for the recoil ions. Our results could provide a benchmark for shakeoff electron calculations used for biological radiation damage [Lee, Comp. Math. Meth in Medicine doi:10.1155/2012/651475]. Support: NSERC, NRC through TRIUMF, DOE ER41747 ER40773, State of Texas, Israel Science Foundation.

  20. On the evaluation of the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Peach, Michael J G; Griffiths, David G J; Tozer, David J

    2012-04-14

    The utility of both an orbital-free and a single-orbital expression for computing the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory is investigated for simple atomic systems. The accuracy of both expressions is governed by the extent to which the Kohn-Sham equation is solved for the given exchange-correlation functional and so special attention is paid to the influence of finite Gaussian basis sets. The orbital-free expression is a statement of the virial theorem and its accuracy is quantified. The accuracy of the single-orbital expression is sensitive to the choice of Kohn-Sham orbital. The use of particularly compact orbitals is problematic because the failure to solve the Kohn-Sham equation exactly in regions where the orbital has decayed to near-zero leads to unphysical behaviour in regions that contribute to the kinetic energy, rendering it inaccurate. This problem is particularly severe for core orbitals, which would otherwise appear attractive due to their formally nodeless nature. The most accurate results from the single-orbital expression are obtained using the relatively diffuse, highest occupied orbitals, although special care is required at orbital nodes.

  1. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1987-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  2. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated.

  3. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-01

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study. PMID:19452076

  4. Measurement of kinetic energy dissipation with gelatine fissure formation with special reference to gelatine validation.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Jorma

    2005-05-28

    Various methods for calculating the amount of kinetic energy dissipated by a bullet into ballistic gelatine have been suggested in literature. These methods were compared using the results of thirteen 9 mmx19 mm pistol and five 7.62 mmx 39 mm rifle bullets shot into 10% ballistic gelatine. The Wound Profile Method gave the highest correlation, 0.89, with the measured amounts of dissipated kinetic energy. The Fissure surface area and total crack length method gained 0.51 and 0.52, respectively. The experimental results were also compared with those from pig tests with the same bullet types. Using the z-test at 95% level of confidence no difference between impact velocity normalized bullet decelerations could be determined for the 9 mm bullet used. The same test showed significant difference for 7.62 mm bullets. That, however, can be considered to be the result of the bullet's tendency to tumble in non-homogenous living tissue causing significant dispersion of observed deceleration values. The results add further evidence supporting the validity of 10% gelatine at +4 degrees C as wound ballistic tissue simulant. The study also introduces the use of an elastic "shroud" to hold the gelatine in place, to some extent reduce the effects of asymmetric expansion of the gelatine and to simulate the expansion suppression effect of surrounding tissues. PMID:15837008

  5. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  6. On the evaluation of the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Peach, Michael J G; Griffiths, David G J; Tozer, David J

    2012-04-14

    The utility of both an orbital-free and a single-orbital expression for computing the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory is investigated for simple atomic systems. The accuracy of both expressions is governed by the extent to which the Kohn-Sham equation is solved for the given exchange-correlation functional and so special attention is paid to the influence of finite Gaussian basis sets. The orbital-free expression is a statement of the virial theorem and its accuracy is quantified. The accuracy of the single-orbital expression is sensitive to the choice of Kohn-Sham orbital. The use of particularly compact orbitals is problematic because the failure to solve the Kohn-Sham equation exactly in regions where the orbital has decayed to near-zero leads to unphysical behaviour in regions that contribute to the kinetic energy, rendering it inaccurate. This problem is particularly severe for core orbitals, which would otherwise appear attractive due to their formally nodeless nature. The most accurate results from the single-orbital expression are obtained using the relatively diffuse, highest occupied orbitals, although special care is required at orbital nodes. PMID:22502495

  7. Distinct dissociation kinetics between ion pairs: Solvent-coordinate free-energy landscape analysis.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru

    2015-07-28

    Different ion pairs exhibit different dissociation kinetics; however, while the nature of this process is vital for understanding various molecular systems, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to examine the origin of different kinetic rate constants for this process, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl in water. The results showed substantial differences in dissociation rate constant, following the trend kLiCl < kNaCl < kKCl < kCsCl. Analysis of the free-energy landscape with a solvent reaction coordinate and subsequent rate component analysis showed that the differences in these rate constants arose predominantly from the variation in solvent-state distribution between the ion pairs. The formation of a water-bridging configuration, in which the water molecule binds to an anion and a cation simultaneously, was identified as a key step in this process: water-bridge formation lowers the related dissociation free-energy barrier, thereby increasing the probability of ion-pair dissociation. Consequently, a higher probability of water-bridge formation leads to a higher ion-pair dissociation rate.

  8. Distinct dissociation kinetics between ion pairs: Solvent-coordinate free-energy landscape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru

    2015-07-01

    Different ion pairs exhibit different dissociation kinetics; however, while the nature of this process is vital for understanding various molecular systems, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to examine the origin of different kinetic rate constants for this process, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl in water. The results showed substantial differences in dissociation rate constant, following the trend kLiCl < kNaCl < kKCl < kCsCl. Analysis of the free-energy landscape with a solvent reaction coordinate and subsequent rate component analysis showed that the differences in these rate constants arose predominantly from the variation in solvent-state distribution between the ion pairs. The formation of a water-bridging configuration, in which the water molecule binds to an anion and a cation simultaneously, was identified as a key step in this process: water-bridge formation lowers the related dissociation free-energy barrier, thereby increasing the probability of ion-pair dissociation. Consequently, a higher probability of water-bridge formation leads to a higher ion-pair dissociation rate.

  9. Kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients in straight compound channels with vegetated floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidifar, H.; Omid, M. H.; Keshavarzi, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the effect of flow relative depth (ratio of the floodplain to the main channel flow depths) and vegetation density on the kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients (termed as α and β, respectively) was described based on an experimental study. A series of experiments was run using rigid dowels with seven flow relative depths and four vegetation densities in an asymmetric compound channel. The local flow velocities were measured using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Using regression analysis, velocity data were considered and equations were developed for calculating the kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients as a function of the flow relative depth and vegetation density. The results show that the values of α and β decrease as the relative depth increases. Also, as the vegetation density increases, the effects of the vegetation on α and β increase too. Finally, by comparing with the findings of the previous researchers, it was found that the average values of the α for asymmetric compound channels with vegetation are 26.5% and 43.3% greater than those for asymmetric and symmetric compound channels without vegetation respectively while these values for β are 12.7% and 18.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the floodplain vegetation can increase the average values of coefficients α and β by 52.8% and 21.6%, respectively, in comparison with single channels.

  10. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2016-02-01

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a "dust" fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R - α R^2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding "Einstein-frame" effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed.

  11. Momentum or kinetic energy - how do substrate properties influence the calculation of rainfall erosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Geißler, Christian; Lassu, Tamás; Peters, Piet; Seeger, Manuel; Nadrowski, Karin; Scholten, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a key component in soil erosion by water. In principle, two ways exist to describe erosivity, namely kinetic energy and momentum. However, the role of mass and velocity of raindrops in relation to properties of the substrates to be eroded is not yet clear. In our study we conducted rainfall simulation experiments to determine splash detachment amounts of five substrates (coarse sand, medium sand, fine sand, PE balls, silt) for seven different rainfall intensities (52-116 mm/h). We used linear mixed-effect modeling (LME) to calculate erosivity predictors for each substrate. Additionally, we separated drop size distribution into 1st and 3rd quartile to investigate the effect of small and slow respectively big and fast raindrops on splash detachment amounts. We suggest using momentum divided by drop diameter as a substrate-independent erosivity predictor. To consider different substrates specific erosivity parameters are needed. Heavier substrates like sand are best described by kinetic energy multiplied by diameter whereas lighter substrates like silt point to momentum divided by diameter to the power of 1.5. Further, our results show that the first quartile of the drop size distribution is best in describing splash detachment rates of light substrates whereas for heavier substrates like sand the influence of drop size distribution is indifferent.

  12. The Effects of Kinetic Energy on Concentric and Eccentric Isokinetic Work

    PubMed Central

    Boggess, Brian; Moffit, Jeff; Morales, Jacobo; Anderson, Tim

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examined inertial effects on work output during isokinetic concentric knee extension and eccentric knee flexion. Total work (Wtotal) included work due to kinetic energy (Wkin), with respect to gravity (Wgrav), and against the dynamometer (Wdyn). Eighteen resistance-trained participants (9 males, 9 females) performed maximal voluntary concentric (90, 150, 210, 270 deg/s) and eccentric (-150, -90, -30 deg/s) actions with the dominant leg. Differences between work measurement type (WMT), i.e., gravity-corrected work and Wtotal, were assessed. ANOVA (2 WMT x 2 mode x 2 gender x 4 speed) revealed significant main effects (p < 0. 05) for both factors concentrically but only for WMT eccentrically. It was concluded that the effect of kinetic energy during isokinetic leg extension may elicit differences in measurement where the associated error (Kerr) significantly increases with increasing velocity concentrically and decreases eccentrically. Key pointsTotal isokinetic work is underestimated by standard gravity corrected techniques.Standard gravity corrected work measurements overestimate isometric eccentric total work.The overestimation of isometric eccentric total work increases with greater angular velocity. PMID:24150138

  13. Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budgets and Dissipation Rates in Disturbed Stable Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Piper, M; Kosovic, B

    2004-06-18

    An important parameter in the numerical simulation of atmospheric boundary layers is the dissipation length scale, l{sub {var_epsilon}}. It is especially important in weakly to moderately stable conditions, in which a tenuous balance between shear production of turbulence, buoyant destruction of turbulence, and turbulent dissipation is maintained. In large-scale models, the dissipation rate is often parameterized using a diagnostic equation based on the production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and an estimate of the dissipation length scale. Proper parameterization of the dissipation length scale from experimental data requires accurate estimation of the rate of dissipation of TKE from experimental data. Using data from the MICROFRONTS and CASES-99 field programs, we evaluate turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), TKE dissipation rate {var_epsilon}, and dissipation length l{sub {var_epsilon}} over a range of stability regimes represented by a stable boundary layer (SBL), a destabilizing intrusion (by first a cold front and second a density current) and recovery. These data may be utilized to test recent parameterizations of dissipation rate {var_epsilon} and l{sub {var_epsilon}} in order to determine the suitability of these models for inclusion in mesoscale models for numerical weather prediction or pollution dispersion prediction.

  14. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good.

  15. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-01

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study.

  16. Quantification of raindrop kinetic energy for improved prediction of splash-dispersed pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lovell, D J; Parker, S R; Van Peteghem, P; Webb, D A; Welham, S J

    2002-05-01

    ABSTRACT An electronic sensor, based on a piezoelectric transducer, was tested in the laboratory using simulated raindrops, and in natural rainfall. Data were also collected for splash dispersal using tracer dyes in laboratory experiments and the Long Ashton splashmeter in field experiments. Droplets impacting on sensor produce sound waves that are detected by an omnidirectional microphone sealed within an acoustic chamber. An electrical charge, proportional to the sound wave, is produced by the microphone and is converted to a categorical scale and then stored to provide an accumulation of impacts over a specified period of time. Calibration of the sensor was done using single-droplet impacts of known mass and impacting velocity. A linear relationship was shown between the categorical scale and the kinetic energy of impacting droplets (adjusted r(2) = 0.99). The best relationship fitted between splash dispersal from dye cup, and kinetic energy was a second-order polynomial (adjusted r(2) > 0.99). Splash height, recorded by the Long Ashton splashmeter during 41 natural rainfall events, was correlated closely with sensor output (adjusted r(2) = 0.87). Our studies indicate that the sensor provides quantitative data which could be incorporated into disease management systems to provide estimates of inoculum dispersal gradients within crop canopies.

  17. Kinetic description of charmonium production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Polleri, Alberto; Weise, Wolfram; Renk, Thorsten; Schneider, Roland

    2004-10-01

    We study the evolution of charmonia as they collide with the constituents of the fireball produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The latter evolves in a manner controlled by the equation of state as given by lattice QCD, and is constructed in such a way that the observed hadronic spectra are correctly reproduced. A kinetic description of charmonium interactions with both quark-gluon and hadronic degrees of freedom allows us to study in detail the evolution in different regimes, controlled by collision energy, kinematics, and geometry. The data collected at the CERN-SPS accelerator are well described and new estimates for J/{psi} production at BNL-RHIC are presented.

  18. Current redistribution and generation of kinetic energy in the stagnated Z pinch.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Papp, D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Talbot, B R; Chittenden, J P; Niasse, N

    2013-07-01

    The structure of magnetic fields was investigated in stagnated wire-array Z pinches using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The distribution of current in the pinch and trailing material was reconstructed. A significant part of current can switch from the main pinch to the trailing plasma preheated by x-ray radiation of the pinch. Secondary implosions of trailing plasma generate kinetic energy and provide enhanced heating and radiation of plasma at stagnation. Hot spots in wire-array Z pinches also provide enhanced radiation of the Z pinch. A collapse of a single hot spot radiates 1%-3% of x-ray energy of the Z pinch with a total contribution of hot spots of 10%-30%.

  19. Kinetic and geometric isotope effects originating from different adsorption potential energy surfaces: cyclohexane on Rh(111).

    PubMed

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shimizu, Sumera; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) by the use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C(6)D(12)) is lower than that of C(6)H(12). In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C(6)D(12) is smaller than that by adsorbed C(6)H(12). These results indicate that C(6)D(12) has a shallower adsorption potential than C(6)H(12) (vertical geometric isotope effect). The lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed in the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the different repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles. The observed isotope effects should be ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H···metal interaction.

  20. Cars and Kinetic Energy -- Some Simple Physics with Real-World Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Understanding energy usage is crucial to understanding modern civilization, as well as many of the challenges it faces. Energy-related issues also offer real-world examples of important physical concepts, and as such have been the focus of several articles in The Physics Teacher in the past few decades (e.g., Refs. 1-5, noted further below). Here, I illustrate how a basic understanding of kinetic energy—a topic encountered early in any introductory physics course—enables significant insights into the nature of automobile transportation. Specifically, we can accurately predict how much power the average driver in the United States uses, and explain what determines this, without needing to consider any aspects of mechanical engineering or engine design.

  1. The effects of divergent and nondivergent winds on the kinetic energy budget of a mid-latitude cyclone - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T.-C.; Alpert, J. C.; Schlatter, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    The magnitude of the divergent component of the wind is relatively small compared to that of the nondivergent component in large-scale atmospheric flows; nevertheless, it plays an important role in the case of explosive cyclogenesis examined here. The kinetic energy budget for the life cycle of an intense, developing cyclone over North America is calculated. The principal kinetic energy source is the net horizontal transport across the boundaries of the region enclosing the cyclone. By investigating the relative importance of the divergent and nondivergent wind components in the kinetic energy budget, it was found, as expected, that neglecting the divergent wind component in calculating the magnitude of the kinetic energy is of little consequence, but that the horizontal flux convergence and generation of kinetic energy depend crucially upon the divergent component. Modification of the divergent wind component can result in significant changes in the kinetic energy budget of the synoptic system.

  2. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  3. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2+, H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation. PMID:24880263

  4. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Ruedenberg, Klaus; Ivanic, Joseph

    2014-05-28

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}, B{sub 2}, C{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, F{sub 2}, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  5. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael W; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-05-28

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2 (+), H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  6. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael W; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-05-28

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2 +, H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  7. Kinetic energy release in thermal ion--molecule reactions: The Nb sup 2+ --(benzene) single charge--transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gord, J.R.; Freiser, B.S. ); Buckner, S.W. )

    1991-03-15

    We have adapted the techniques originally developed to measure ion kinetic energies in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometry to study the single charge--transfer reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene under thermal conditions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICRMS). The partitioning of reaction exothermicity among the internal and translational modes available is consistent with a long-distance electron-transfer mechanism, in which the reactants approach on an ion-induced dipole attractive potential and cross to a repulsive potential at a critical separation of {similar to}7.5 A when electron transfer occurs. The reaction exothermicity, 5.08 eV, is partitioned to translation of Nb{sup +} , 0.81{plus minus}0.25 eV, translation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +}, 1.22{plus minus}0.25 eV, and internal excitation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +} to produce the la{sub 2{ital u}} electronic state, which is {similar to}3 eV above the ground state of the ion. We have also studied the kinetics of the reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene and determined the rate constant, {ital k} = 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, and the efficiency, 0.60, of the process. These also support the proposed charge--transfer mechanism. In addition to the charge--transfer pathway, which accounts for 95% of the reaction products, Nb{sup 2+} is observed to dehydrogenate benzene to form Nb{sup 2+} (benzyne). This process implies {ital D}(Nb{sup 2+} --benzyne){ge}79 kcal/mol.

  8. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments.

  9. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments. PMID:26185444

  10. Kinetic selection vs. free energy of DNA base pairing in control of polymerase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Oertell, Keriann; Harcourt, Emily M; Mohsen, Michael G; Petruska, John; Kool, Eric T; Goodman, Myron F

    2016-04-19

    What is the free energy source enabling high-fidelity DNA polymerases (pols) to favor incorporation of correct over incorrect base pairs by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold, corresponding to free energy differences of ΔΔGinc∼ 5.5-7 kcal/mol? Standard ΔΔG° values (∼0.3 kcal/mol) calculated from melting temperature measurements comparing matched vs. mismatched base pairs at duplex DNA termini are far too low to explain pol accuracy. Earlier analyses suggested that pol active-site steric constraints can amplify DNA free energy differences at the transition state (kinetic selection). A recent paper [Olson et al. (2013)J Am Chem Soc135:1205-1208] used Vent pol to catalyze incorporations in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate intended to equilibrate forward (polymerization) and backward (pyrophosphorolysis) reactions. A steady-state leveling off of incorporation profiles at long reaction times was interpreted as reaching equilibrium between polymerization and pyrophosphorolysis, yielding apparent ΔG° = -RTlnKeq, indicating ΔΔG° of 3.5-7 kcal/mol, sufficient to account for pol accuracy without need of kinetic selection. Here we perform experiments to measure and account for pyrophosphorolysis explicitly. We show that forward and reverse reactions attain steady states far from equilibrium for wrong incorporations such as G opposite T. Therefore,[Formula: see text]values obtained from such steady-state evaluations ofKeqare not dependent on DNA properties alone, but depend largely on constraints imposed on right and wrong substrates in the polymerase active site.

  11. Kinetic selection vs. free energy of DNA base pairing in control of polymerase fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Oertell, Keriann; Harcourt, Emily M.; Mohsen, Michael G.; Petruska, John; Kool, Eric T.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2016-01-01

    What is the free energy source enabling high-fidelity DNA polymerases (pols) to favor incorporation of correct over incorrect base pairs by 103- to 104-fold, corresponding to free energy differences of ΔΔGinc ∼ 5.5–7 kcal/mol? Standard ΔΔG° values (∼0.3 kcal/mol) calculated from melting temperature measurements comparing matched vs. mismatched base pairs at duplex DNA termini are far too low to explain pol accuracy. Earlier analyses suggested that pol active-site steric constraints can amplify DNA free energy differences at the transition state (kinetic selection). A recent paper [Olson et al. (2013) J Am Chem Soc 135:1205–1208] used Vent pol to catalyze incorporations in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate intended to equilibrate forward (polymerization) and backward (pyrophosphorolysis) reactions. A steady-state leveling off of incorporation profiles at long reaction times was interpreted as reaching equilibrium between polymerization and pyrophosphorolysis, yielding apparent ΔG° = −RT ln Keq, indicating ΔΔG° of 3.5–7 kcal/mol, sufficient to account for pol accuracy without need of kinetic selection. Here we perform experiments to measure and account for pyrophosphorolysis explicitly. We show that forward and reverse reactions attain steady states far from equilibrium for wrong incorporations such as G opposite T. Therefore, ΔΔGinc° values obtained from such steady-state evaluations of Keq are not dependent on DNA properties alone, but depend largely on constraints imposed on right and wrong substrates in the polymerase active site. PMID:27044101

  12. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding–diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments. PMID:26185444

  13. Kinetic selection vs. free energy of DNA base pairing in control of polymerase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Oertell, Keriann; Harcourt, Emily M; Mohsen, Michael G; Petruska, John; Kool, Eric T; Goodman, Myron F

    2016-04-19

    What is the free energy source enabling high-fidelity DNA polymerases (pols) to favor incorporation of correct over incorrect base pairs by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold, corresponding to free energy differences of ΔΔGinc∼ 5.5-7 kcal/mol? Standard ΔΔG° values (∼0.3 kcal/mol) calculated from melting temperature measurements comparing matched vs. mismatched base pairs at duplex DNA termini are far too low to explain pol accuracy. Earlier analyses suggested that pol active-site steric constraints can amplify DNA free energy differences at the transition state (kinetic selection). A recent paper [Olson et al. (2013)J Am Chem Soc135:1205-1208] used Vent pol to catalyze incorporations in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate intended to equilibrate forward (polymerization) and backward (pyrophosphorolysis) reactions. A steady-state leveling off of incorporation profiles at long reaction times was interpreted as reaching equilibrium between polymerization and pyrophosphorolysis, yielding apparent ΔG° = -RTlnKeq, indicating ΔΔG° of 3.5-7 kcal/mol, sufficient to account for pol accuracy without need of kinetic selection. Here we perform experiments to measure and account for pyrophosphorolysis explicitly. We show that forward and reverse reactions attain steady states far from equilibrium for wrong incorporations such as G opposite T. Therefore,[Formula: see text]values obtained from such steady-state evaluations ofKeqare not dependent on DNA properties alone, but depend largely on constraints imposed on right and wrong substrates in the polymerase active site. PMID:27044101

  14. Note: Proton microbeam formation with continuously variable kinetic energy using a compact system for three-dimensional proton beam writing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, T. Ishii, Y.

    2015-03-15

    A compact focused gaseous ion beam system has been developed to form proton microbeams of a few hundreds of keV with a penetration depth of micrometer range in 3-dimensional proton beam writing. Proton microbeams with kinetic energies of 100-140 keV were experimentally formed on the same point at a constant ratio of the kinetic energy of the object side to that of the image side. The experimental results indicate that the beam diameters were measured to be almost constant at approximately 6 μm at the same point with the kinetic energy range. These characteristics of the system were experimentally and numerically demonstrated to be maintained as long as the ratio was constant.

  15. Proton transfer pathways, energy landscape, and kinetics in creatine-water systems.

    PubMed

    Ivchenko, Olga; Whittleston, Chris S; Carr, Joanne M; Imhof, Petra; Goerke, Steffen; Bachert, Peter; Wales, David J

    2014-02-27

    We study the exchange processes of the metabolite creatine, which is present in both tumorous and normal tissues and has NH2 and NH groups that can transfer protons to water. Creatine produces chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proton transfer pathway from zwitterionic creatine to water is examined using a kinetic transition network constructed from the discrete path sampling approach and an approximate quantum-chemical energy function, employing the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. The resulting potential energy surface is visualized by constructing disconnectivity graphs. The energy landscape consists of two distinct regions corresponding to the zwitterionic creatine structures and deprotonated creatine. The activation energy that characterizes the proton transfer from the creatine NH2 group to water was determined from an Arrhenius fit of rate constants as a function of temperature, obtained from harmonic transition state theory. The result is in reasonable agreement with values obtained in water exchange spectroscopy (WEX) experiments.

  16. Kinetic model for the vibrational energy exchange in flowing molecular gas mixtures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offenhaeuser, F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a computational model for the description of the vibrational energy exchange in flowing gas mixtures, taking into account a given number of energy levels for each vibrational degree of freedom. It is possible to select an arbitrary number of energy levels. The presented model uses values in the range from 10 to approximately 40. The distribution of energy with respect to these levels can differ from the equilibrium distribution. The kinetic model developed can be employed for arbitrary gaseous mixtures with an arbitrary number of vibrational degrees of freedom for each type of gas. The application of the model to CO2-H2ON2-O2-He mixtures is discussed. The obtained relations can be utilized in a study of the suitability of radiation-related transitional processes, involving the CO2 molecule, for laser applications. It is found that the computational results provided by the model agree very well with experimental data obtained for a CO2 laser. Possibilities for the activation of a 16-micron and 14-micron laser are considered.

  17. Metastable anions of dinitrobenzene: Resonances for electron attachment and kinetic energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Mauracher, A.; Denifl, S.; Edtbauer, A.; Hager, M.; Probst, M.; Scheier, P.; Echt, O.; Maerk, T. D.; Field, T. A.; Graupner, K.

    2010-12-28

    Attachment of free, low-energy electrons to dinitrobenzene (DNB) in the gas phase leads to DNB{sup -} as well as several fragment anions. DNB{sup -}, (DNB-H){sup -}, (DNB-NO){sup -}, (DNB-2NO){sup -}, and (DNB-NO{sub 2}){sup -} are found to undergo metastable (unimolecular) dissociation. A rich pattern of resonances in the yield of these metastable reactions versus electron energy is observed; some resonances are highly isomer-specific. Most metastable reactions are accompanied by large average kinetic energy releases (KER) that range from 0.5 to 1.32 eV, typical of complex rearrangement reactions, but (1,3-DNB-H){sup -} features a resonance with a KER of only 0.06 eV for loss of NO. (1,3-DNB-NO){sup -} offers a rare example of a sequential metastable reaction, namely, loss of NO followed by loss of CO to yield C{sub 5}H{sub 4}O{sup -} with a large KER of 1.32 eV. The G4(MP2) method is applied to compute adiabatic electron affinities and reaction energies for several of the observed metastable channels.

  18. Isospin quartic term in the kinetic energy of neutron-rich nucleonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Bao-Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2015-07-01

    The energy of a free gas of neutrons and protons is well known to be approximately isospin parabolic with a negligibly small quartic term of only 0.45 MeV at the saturation density of nuclear matter ρ0=0.16 fm-3 . Using an isospin-dependent single-nucleon momentum distribution including a high (low) momentum tail (depletion) with its shape parameters constrained by recent high-energy electron scattering and medium-energy nuclear photodisintegration experiments as well as the state-of-the-art calculations of the deuteron wave function and the equation of state of pure neutron matter near the unitary limit within several modern microscopic many-body theories, we show for the first time that the kinetic energy of interacting nucleons in neutron-rich nucleonic matter has a significant quartic term of 7.18 ±2.52 MeV. Such a large quartic term has broad ramifications in determining the equation of state of neutron-rich nucleonic matter using observables of nuclear reactions and neutron stars.

  19. Kinetic-Energy Distributions of Positive and Negative Ions in DC Townsend Discharges of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; van Brunt, R. J.; Olthoff, J. K.

    1997-10-01

    Ion kinetic-energy distributions (IEDs), mean energies, and relative abundances are measured for CO_2^+, CO^+, O_2^+, O^+, C^+, and O^- ions produced in dc Townsend discharges in pure carbon dioxide. The discharges are generated at electric field-to-gas density ratios (E/N) ranging from 3.5 x 10-18 Vm^2 to 20 x 10-18 Vm^2 (3.5 to 20 kTd). Ions sampled from the discharge through a small orifice in the center of the grounded electrode were energy and mass analyzed by an electrostatic energy analyzer attached to a quadrupole mass spectrometer.(M. V. V. S. Rao, R. J. Van Brunt, and J. K. Olthoff, Phys. Rev. E 54), 5641 (1996) In the present experiments, CO_2^+ was determined to be the dominant positive ion (greater than 85%) at all E/N. The IEDs of CO_2^+, O_2^+, and O^+ are Maxwellian at all E/N, with CO^+ exhibiting non-Maxwellian behavior above 10 kTd, and C^+ exhibiting non-Maxwellian behavior at all E/N. Negative ion fluxes were substantially lower than positive ion fluxes, with O^- being the only detectable negative ion. The IEDs for O^- are Maxwellian at 6 kTd and below. The fact that O^- is the only negative ion indicates that no asymmetric charge transfer exists for O^- in CO_2.

  20. Unfolding Kinetics of β-Lactoglobulin Induced by Surfactant and Denaturant: A Stopped-Flow/Fluorescence Study

    PubMed Central

    Viseu, Maria Isabel; Melo, Eduardo P.; Carvalho, Teresa Isabel; Correia, Raquel F.; Costa, Sílvia M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The β→α transition of β-lactoglobulin, a globular protein abundant in the milk of several mammals, is investigated in this work. This transition, induced by the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC), is accompanied by partial unfolding of the protein. In this work, unfolding of bovine β-lactoglobulin in DTAC is compared with its unfolding induced by the chemical denaturant guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl). The final protein states attained in the two media have quite different secondary structure: in DTAC the α-helical content increases, leading to the so-called α-state; in GnHCl the amount of ordered secondary-structure decreases, resulting in a random coil-rich final state (denatured, or D, state). To obtain information on both mechanistic routes, in DTAC and GnHCl, and to characterize intermediates, the kinetics of unfolding were investigated in the two media. Equilibrium and kinetic data show the partial accumulation of an on-pathway intermediate in each unfolding route: in DTAC, an intermediate (I1) with mostly native secondary structure but loose tertiary structure appears between the native (β) and α-states; in GnHCl, another intermediate (I2) appears between states β and D. Kinetic rate constants follow a linear Chevron-plot representation in GnHCl, but show a more complex mechanism in DTAC, which acts like a stronger binding species. PMID:17693475

  1. A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

  2. Light-induced degradation and metastable-state recovery with reaction kinetics modeling in boron-doped Czochralski silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Min; Chun, Seungju; Bae, Suhyun; Park, Seungeun; Lee, Hae-seok Kim, Donghwan; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-eun; Kang, Yoonmook

    2014-08-25

    Solar cells fabricated from boron-doped p-type Czochralski silicon suffer from light-induced degradation that can lower the conversion efficiency by up to 10% relative. When solar cells are exposed to temperatures between 100 °C and 200 °C under illumination, regeneration, in which the minority carrier lifetime is gradually recovered, occurs after the initial light-induced degradation. We studied the light-induced degradation and regeneration process using carrier injection within a design chamber and observed open-circuit voltage trends at various sample temperatures. We proposed a cyclic reaction kinetics model to more precisely analyze the degradation and recovery phenomenon. Our model incorporated the reaction paths that were not counted in the original model between the three states (annealed, degradation, and regeneration). We calculated a rate constant for each reaction path based on the proposed model, extracted an activation energy for each reaction using these rate constants at various temperatures, and calculated activation energies of redegradation and the stabilization reaction.

  3. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation.

    PubMed

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-21

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  4. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  5. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Mel E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu; Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  6. Geographical distribution and anisotropy of the inverse kinetic energy cascade, and its role in the eddy equilibrium processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihong; Liu, Zhiliang; Pang, Chongguang

    2015-07-01

    The geographic character of the inverse cascade is analyzed based on the spectral kinetic energy flux calculated in the global ocean, using sea surface height (SSH) data from satellites, reanalysis data, and model outputs. It is shown that the strongest inverse cascade occurs mostly in high-energy eastward-flowing currents, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the Kuroshio Extension, and the Gulf Stream, which matches the global distribution pattern of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE). Hence, the eddy scales predicted by the local linear baroclinic instability Lbci and from the altimeter observation Leddy are mapped out and compared with the energy injection scale Linj and the arrest-start scale Larrest-start of the inverse cascade, respectively. Generally, Lbci agrees well with Linj in the midlatitude and high-latitude oceans, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Leddy falls within the arrest ranges of the inverse cascade and is quite close to Larrest-start. Finally, the depth dependence and the anisotropy of the inverse kinetic energy cascade are also diagnosed in the global ocean. We have found that the strength of the inverse cascades decreases with increasing depth, but the global pattern of the strength is nearly invariable. Meanwhile, the variations in depth hardly affect the Linj and Larrest-start. After considering the anisotropy in the spectral flux calculation, a possible inertial range for the zonal spectral kinetic energy flux is expected, where the cascade magnitude will keep a nearly constant negative value associated with the oceanic zonal jets.

  7. Single-particle kinetic energy in density-functional theory: Harmonic confinement in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    March, N. H.

    2006-04-15

    Using the known perturbation series for the idempotent Dirac density matrix in powers of a given one-body potential V(r), Stoddart and March (SM) generated a corresponding series for the kinetic energy density. While the general term of the SM series is known, a summation has not been achieved to date. A contribution to solve this problem is made here by exhibiting an explicit form of the above kinetic energy density for Fermions filling an arbitrary number of closed shells, when the confinement is harmonic. This example is of considerable current interest because of ongoing experiments on ultracold atomic gases of Fermions.

  8. Identification and Kinetics of Accumulation of Proteins Induced by Ethylene in Bean Abscission Zones 1

    PubMed Central

    del Campillo, Elena; Lewis, Lowell N.

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis system that combines a cationic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH near neutrality with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the spectrum of basic polypeptides that accumulate in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) abscission zones after treatment with ethylene. Results showed that, as abscission progressed, at least seven basic proteins accumulated in the abscission zone prior to the accumulation of 9.5 cellulase. Six of the seven proteins correspond to pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Among them, two isoforms of β-1,3-glucanase and multiple isoforms of chitinase were identified. A 22 kilodalton polypeptide that accumulated to high levels was identified as a thaumatin-like protein by analysis of its N-terminal sequence (up to 20 amino acids) and its serological relationship with heterologous thaumatin antibodies. A 15 kilodalton polypeptide serologically related to PR P1 (p14) from tomato was identified as bean PR P1 (p14)-like protein. The kinetics of accumulation of glucanases, chitinases, thaumatin-like and PR P1 (p14)-like proteins during ethylene treatment were similar and they showed that PR proteins accumulated in abscission zones prior to the increase in 9.5 cellulase. Addition of indoleacetic acid, a potent inhibitor of abscission, reduced the accumulation of these proteins to a similar extent (60%). The synchronized accumulation of this set of PR proteins, early in the abscission process, may play a role in induced resistance to possible fungal attack after a plant part is shed. The seventh protein does not correspond to any previously characterized PR protein. This new 45 kilodalton polypeptide accumulated in abscission zones on exposure to ethylene concomitantly with the increase in 9.5 cellulase. Its N-terminal sequence (up to 15 amino acids) showed some homology with the amino terminal sequence of chitinase. Polyclonal antibodies against chitinase recognized the 45

  9. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of self-organized pattern formation induced by ion beam sputtering using crater functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhangcan; Lively, Michael A.; Allain, Jean Paul

    2015-02-01

    The production of self-organized nanostructures by ion beam sputtering has been of keen interest to researchers for many decades. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical efforts to understand ion-induced nanostructures, there are still many basic questions open to discussion, such as the role of erosion or curvature-dependent sputtering. In this work, a hybrid MD/kMC (molecular dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo) multiscale atomistic model is developed to investigate these knowledge gaps, and its predictive ability is validated across the experimental parameter space. This model uses crater functions, which were obtained from MD simulations, to model the prompt mass redistribution due to single-ion impacts. Defect migration, which is missing from previous models that use crater functions, is treated by a kMC Arrhenius method. Using this model, a systematic study was performed for silicon bombarded by Ar+ ions of various energies (100 eV, 250 eV, 500 eV, 700 eV, and 1000 eV) at incidence angles of 0∘ to 80∘. The simulation results were compared with experimental findings, showing good agreement in many aspects of surface evolution, such as the phase diagram. The underestimation of the ripple wavelength by the simulations suggests that surface diffusion is not the main smoothening mechanism for ion-induced pattern formation. Furthermore, the simulated results were compared with moment-description continuum theory and found to give better results, as the simulation did not suffer from the same mathematical inconsistencies as the continuum model. The key finding was that redistributive effects are dominant in the formation of flat surfaces and parallel-mode ripples, but erosive effects are dominant at high angles when perpendicular-mode ripples are formed. Ion irradiation with simultaneous sample rotation was also simulated, resulting in arrays of square-ordered dots. The patterns obtained from sample rotation were strongly correlated to the rotation speed and to

  10. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  11. Stationary points of the rigid body kinetic energy and the principal axes of inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinac, Velimir; Jusup, Marko; Legović, Tarzan

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate how searching for the extrema of the rotational kinetic energy can be exploited to introduce the idea of the principal axes of inertia in a general and intuitive way. To that end, we propose a motivational starting point for a discussion with students, followed by a physical problem that, in its simplest form, can be handled using only basic calculus. Principal axes and moments of inertia arise seamlessly as solutions to the proposed problem. A numerical example is provided to emphasize key ideas. To encourage alternative ways of thinking, we also show how similar conclusions can be derived from the square of the angular momentum. A generalized procedure, appropriate for a classical mechanics course, is outlined in the Appendix.

  12. Stringent test for non-additive, non-interacting, kinetic energy functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kaili; Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) provides an ideal framework for testing and developing new approximations to the non-additive and non-interacting kinetic energy functional (Tsnadd [ {nα } ]), understood as a functional of the set of fragment ground-state densities. We present our progress on both of these fronts: (1) Systematic comparison of the performance of various existing approximations to Tsnadd [ {nα } ] ; and (2) Development of new approximations. We find that a re-parametrization of the GGA enhancement factor employed for the construction of Tsnadd [ {nα } ] through the conjointness conjecture captures essential features of the functional derivatives of Tsnadd [ {nα } ] . A physically-motivated two-orbital approximation for Tsnadd [ {nα } ] is shown to outperform most other approximations for the case of He2, and an intriguing one-parameter formula makes this approximation accurate for all noble-gas diatomics.

  13. Anomalous dissipation and kinetic-energy distribution in pipes at very high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wei, Bo-Bo; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-01-01

    A symmetry-based theory is developed for the description of (streamwise) kinetic energy K in turbulent pipes at extremely high Reynolds numbers (Re's). The theory assumes a mesolayer with continual deformation of wall-attached eddies which introduce an anomalous dissipation, breaking the exact balance between production and dissipation. An outer peak of K is predicted above a critical Re of 10^{4}, in good agreement with experimental data. The theory offers an alternative explanation for the recently discovered logarithmic distribution of K. The concept of anomalous dissipation is further supported by a significant modification of the k-ω equation, yielding an accurate prediction of the entire K profile. PMID:26871016

  14. The interannual variability of the surface eddy kinetic energy in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Bracco, Annalisa; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2011-11-01

    The variability of the surface eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Labrador Sea is investigated with a suite of numerical integrations using a regional ocean model. Simulations are performed over the period 1980-2001 and are compared to satellite observations over the last 9 years. The surface EKE pattern in the basin is dominated by a region along the West coast of Greenland where eddies, mainly anticyclonic, are formed by instability of the main currents flowing over the continental slope, consistent with previous idealized results. Here the interannual changes are linked to the shear of the incoming boundary current system imposed as boundary condition to the model domain. The highly variable strength of the East Greenland current at the northeast boundary, derived from the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis, strongly influences the vortex formation. In the center of the Labrador Sea, where deep convection occurs, a statistically significant portion of the modeled interannual surface EKE variability is correlated with the local atmospheric forcing, and both heat and wind fluxes play an important role and can be adopted as predictors at a lag of 2-3 months. The Arctic Oscillation index can also be used as a remote indicator of the atmospheric fluxes, but with lower skill than local measurements. In contrast the North Atlantic Oscillation index does not correlate significantly with the surface EKE at intraseasonal and interannual scales. The analysis of altimeter data over the 1993-2001 supports the existence of this asymmetry between the regime locally forced by the atmosphere in the central basin, and the regime remotely forced by the incoming boundary current along the west Greenland coast. Those results have important implications for monitoring and predicting the surface eddy kinetic energy variability in the Labrador Sea.

  15. New mechanism of kinetic exchange interaction induced by strong magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the kinetic exchange interaction between single-occupied magnetic orbitals (s-s) is always antiferromagnetic, while between single- and double-occupied orbitals (s-d) is always ferromagnetic and much weaker. Here we show that the exchange interaction between strongly anisotropic doublets of lanthanides, actinides and transition metal ions with unquenched orbital momentum contains a new s-d kinetic contribution equal in strength with the s-s one. In non-collinear magnetic systems, this s-d kinetic mechanism can cause an overall ferromagnetic exchange interaction which can become very strong for transition metal ions. These findings are fully confirmed by DFT based analysis of exchange interaction in several Ln3+ complexes. PMID:27098292

  16. Sensitivity Analysis for Reactor Period Induced by Positive Reactivity Using One-point Adjoint Kinetic Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, G.; Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2014-04-01

    In order to better predict a kinetic behavior of a nuclear fission reactor, an improvement of the delayed neutron parameters is essential. The present paper specifies important nuclear data for a reactor kinetics: Fission yield and decay constant data of 86Ge, some bromine isotopes, 94Rb, 98mY and some iodine isotopes. Their importance is quantified as sensitivities with a help of the adjoint kinetic equation, and it is found that they are dependent on an inserted reactivity (or a reactor period). Moreover, dependence of sensitivities on nuclear data files is also quantified using the latest files. Even though the currently evaluated data are used, there are large differences among different data files from a view point of the delayed neutrons.

  17. The kinetic and available potential energy budget of a winter extratropical cyclone system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Dare, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The energy budget of an extratropical cyclone system which traversed North America and intensified through the period January 9-11, 1975 is presented. The objectives of the study are: (1) to document the complete energy budget of a significant winter cyclone event, and (2) to comment on the significance of latent heat release (LHR) in the cyclone's evolution. Results reveal an overall increase in both kinetic (K) and available potential energy (A). K increases are accounted for by boundary flux convergence of K, while A increases are due to generation by LHR and K to A conversion. In addition, the general A increase is accompanied by a 24 h oscillation that is explained largely by the flux quantity in the A budget equation and is correlated with a similar fluctuation in the K to A conversion. LHR does not appear to be critical in the development of this cyclone system. Rather, LHR acts to increase the intensity of the event. It is hypothesized that the direct influence that LHR had on the deepening cyclone's reduced mass was augmented by an indirect influence, in which pre-existing dry dynamical forcing was enhanced by diabatic heating, thus leading to accelerated cyclone development at a later time.

  18. Kinetic Energy Release dependence in the Photo Double Ionization of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Th.; Miyabe, S.; Belkacem, A.; McCurdy, C. W.; Lenz, U.; Jahnke, T.; Doerner, R.; Williams, J.; Landers, A.

    2012-06-01

    In the Photo Double Ionization (PDI) of hydrogen molecules with photon energies of 150eV we were able to probe the electronic two particle density as a function of the bond length, i.e. the Kinetic Energy Release (KER) of the ions, and the orientation of the molecular axis with respect to the polarization vector of the incoming ligh. We applied the COLTRIMS technique and measured two electrons and two protons in coincidence. We found a shift in the KER for σ and π transitions. While the KER is lower when the molecular axis is aligned parallel to the linear polarization vector (σ-σ), the KER for a perpendicular orientation (σ-π) is clearly higher by a little more than 1eV. Quantum mechanical ab initio calculations are able to quantify the shift in KER and the ratio for the two different transitions (β-parameter) for a broad range of photon energies (75 to 240eV). These results reflect the dependence of the σ and π amplitudes to the bond length. This shows that a simple KER measurement for horizontal and vertical polarization can be used to extract this information; it makes measuring the β-parameter as a function of KER obsolete.

  19. Turbulent kinetic energy generation in the convective boundary layer derived from thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slameršak, Aljoša; Renner, Maik; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hartogensis, Oscar; Kolle, Olaf; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent heat fluxes facilitate the bulk of heat transfer between the surface and lower atmosphere, which results in the diurnal growth of convective boundary layer (CBL) and turbulent kinetic energy generation (TKE). Here we postulate the hypothesis that TKE generation in the CBL occurs as a result of heat transfer in a "Carnot-like" heat engine with temporal changes in the internal energy of the boundary layer. We used the Tennekes energy-balance model of CBL and extended it with the analysis of the entropy balance to derive the estimates of TKE generation in the CBL. These TKE generation estimates were compared to the turbulent dissipation from a simple dissipation model from Moeng and Sullivan, to test the validity of our heat engine hypothesis. In addition, to evaluate the performance of the dissipation model, this was independently validated by a comparison of its estimates with the turbulent dissipation calculations based on spectral analysis of eddy covariance wind measurements at a German field station. Our analysis demonstrates how a consistent application of thermodynamics can be used to obtain an independent physical constraint on the diurnal boundary layer evolution. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the CBL operates at the thermodynamic limit, thus imposing a thermodynamic constraint on surface-atmosphere exchange.

  20. Polysaccharide chemistry regulates kinetics of calcite nucleation through competition of interfacial energies

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Laura M.; Han, Nizhou; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Here we quantify the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto a suite of high-purity polysaccharide (PS) substrates under controlled conditions. The energy barriers to nucleation are PS-specific by a systematic relationship to PS charge density and substrate structure that is rooted in minimization of the competing substrate–crystal and substrate–liquid interfacial energies. Chitosan presents a low-energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate–crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate–crystal interfaces. The findings support a directing role for PS in biomineral formation and demonstrate that substrate–crystal interactions are one end-member in a larger continuum of competing forces that regulate heterogeneous crystal nucleation. PMID:23690577

  1. Comminution of solids caused by kinetic energy of high shear strain rate, with implications for impact, shock, and shale fracturing.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Zdenek P; Caner, Ferhun C

    2013-11-26

    Although there exists a vast literature on the dynamic comminution or fragmentation of rocks, concrete, metals, and ceramics, none of the known models suffices for macroscopic dynamic finite element analysis. This paper outlines the basic idea of the macroscopic model. Unlike static fracture, in which the driving force is the release of strain energy, here the essential idea is that the driving force of comminution under high-rate compression is the release of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate. The density of this energy at strain rates >1,000/s is found to exceed the maximum possible strain energy density by orders of magnitude, making the strain energy irrelevant. It is shown that particle size is proportional to the -2/3 power of the shear strain rate and the 2/3 power of the interface fracture energy or interface shear stress, and that the comminution process is macroscopically equivalent to an apparent shear viscosity that is proportional (at constant interface stress) to the -1/3 power of this rate. A dimensionless indicator of the comminution intensity is formulated. The theory was inspired by noting that the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate plays a role analogous to the local kinetic energy of eddies in turbulent flow.

  2. Comminution of solids caused by kinetic energy of high shear strain rate, with implications for impact, shock, and shale fracturing

    PubMed Central

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Caner, Ferhun C.

    2013-01-01

    Although there exists a vast literature on the dynamic comminution or fragmentation of rocks, concrete, metals, and ceramics, none of the known models suffices for macroscopic dynamic finite element analysis. This paper outlines the basic idea of the macroscopic model. Unlike static fracture, in which the driving force is the release of strain energy, here the essential idea is that the driving force of comminution under high-rate compression is the release of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate. The density of this energy at strain rates >1,000/s is found to exceed the maximum possible strain energy density by orders of magnitude, making the strain energy irrelevant. It is shown that particle size is proportional to the −2/3 power of the shear strain rate and the 2/3 power of the interface fracture energy or interface shear stress, and that the comminution process is macroscopically equivalent to an apparent shear viscosity that is proportional (at constant interface stress) to the −1/3 power of this rate. A dimensionless indicator of the comminution intensity is formulated. The theory was inspired by noting that the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate plays a role analogous to the local kinetic energy of eddies in turbulent flow. PMID:24218624

  3. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  4. Application of the distributed activation energy model to the kinetic study of pyrolysis of the fresh water algae Chlorococcum humicola.

    PubMed

    Kirtania, Kawnish; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2012-03-01

    Apart from capturing carbon dioxide, fresh water algae can be used to produce biofuel. To assess the energy potential of Chlorococcum humicola, the alga's pyrolytic behavior was studied at heating rates of 5-20K/min in a thermobalance. To model the weight loss characteristics, an algorithm was developed based on the distributed activation energy model and applied to experimental data to extract the kinetics of the decomposition process. When the kinetic parameters estimated by this method were applied to another set of experimental data which were not used to estimate the parameters, the model was capable of predicting the pyrolysis behavior, in the new set of data with a R(2) value of 0.999479. The slow weight loss, that took place at the end of the pyrolysis process, was also accounted for by the proposed algorithm which is capable of predicting the pyrolysis kinetics of C. humicola at different heating rates.

  5. AGN JET KINETIC POWER AND THE ENERGY BUDGET OF RADIO GALAXY LOBES

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Shabala, S. S.

    2013-04-10

    Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FR I radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FR II radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FR II radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation to that obtained for FR I radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relations determined separately for FR I and FR II radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FR I and FR II radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral aging and strong shocks driven by powerful FR II radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FR Is and counteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation determined for low power FR I radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.

  6. Seasonal eddy kinetic energy modulations along the North Equatorial Countercurrent in the western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Qiu, Bo; Chen, Shuiming; Qi, Yiquan; Du, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Seasonal eddy kinetic energy (EKE) variability and its associated eddy energy conversion processes in the western tropical Pacific are investigated using satellite altimeter observations and a global, eddy-resolving, ocean general circulation model (OGCM). Both the altimeter-observed sea surface height anomalies and the OGCM simulation show an area with enhanced EKE east of the Mindanao Island centered around 133°E and 5°N. This enhanced EKE area corresponds to the location of the quasi-stationary meander of the North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC) and is bordered to the south by the Halmahera Eddy. The mesoscale EKE in this area exhibits a clear seasonality, strong in summer (July-August) and weak in winter (November-January), and much of this seasonality is confined to the upper 200 m layer. An investigation into the upper ocean eddy energetics based on the OGCM simulation reveals that the areal barotropic eddy energy conversion rate has an annual cycle similar to the EKE variations, while the areal baroclinic eddy energy conversion is found to be much smaller that the barotropic conversion rate and exhibits no clear seasonal changes. This indicates that the EKE variations are largely controlled by barotropic conversion of the seasonally varying regional circulation. By examining the seasonal background circulation changes, we find that the amplification of the barotropic eddy energy conversion rate in July-August is related to the seasonal evolution of the Mindanao Current and the New Guinea Coastal Current that amplifies the curvature and amplitude of the quasi-stationary meander of the NECC and results in an elevated EKE level through increased regional barotropic conversion.

  7. Estimation of capacity of suspended load considering effects of preservation of turbulent kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, H.; Sugawara, D.; Goto, K.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative estimation of capacity of suspended sediment load is critical for reconstruction of flows such as tsunamis or turbidity currents. Capacity of suspended load is a layer-averaged concentration at which suspended sediments are saturated in flows, and it works as a threshold between erosion and deposition from suspended sediments. Capacity of suspended load varies depending on sediment grain-size, flow velocity and flow height, and therefore it is useful for reconstructing paleohydraulic conditions of suspension-rich flows.Generally, suspension capacity has been calculated from a simple equilibrium conditions of rates of sediment entrainment and suspension fallout. Various empirical functions of sediment entrainment are available, and suspension fallout rates can be estimated from theoretical distribution. However, Goto et al. (2014) recently revealed that sediment concentration of actual run-up flows of large-scale tsunamis is far below the estimated value based on the field observations of 2011 Tohoku-Oki Tsunami. Thus, it is necessary to reconsider existing models of suspension capacity. Here we propose a new method to estimate capacity of suspended load considering preservation of kinetic energy of turbulence. Density stratification caused by suspended sediments expends energy of turbulence in flows, but most of previous methods did not consider this effect. We employed a model to calculate preservation of turbulent kinetic energy proposed by Parker et al. (1986). As a result, it was revealed that capacity of high-velocity flows (e.g. 10 m/s) is quite low (e.g. 2 %) although previous models predict very high-concentration (e.g. ~20 %). Our estimation is quite conformable to the result of the observation of 2011 Tohoku-Oki Tsunami. Also, our model predict that friction of flows remarkably decrease due to expended turbulence energy. Decrease of Reynolds stress causes apparently low friction coefficient of flows.Our new method is especially important for

  8. The kinetic energy spectrum of protons produced by the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic energy spectra of protons resulting from the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact have been measured for electron impact energies from threshold (approximately 17 eV) to 160 eV at 90 deg and 30 deg detection angles, using a crossed-beam experimental arrangement. To check reliability, two separate proton energy analysis methods have been employed, i.e., a time-of-flight proton energy analysis and an electrostatic hemispherical energy analyzer. The present results are compared with previous measurements.

  9. Pressure and kinetic energy transport across the cavity mouth in resonating cavities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter Roger; Abbá, Antonella; Tordella, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Basic properties of the incompressible fluid motion in a rectangular cavity located along one wall of a plane channel are considered. For Mach numbers of the order of 1×10(-3) and using the incompressible formulation, we look for observable properties that can be associated with acoustic emission, which is normally observed in this kind of flow beyond a critical value of Reynolds number. The focus is put on the energy dynamics, in particular on the accumulation of energy in the cavity which takes place in the form of pressure and kinetic energy. By increasing the external forcing, we observe that the pressure flow into the cavity increases very rapidly, then peaks. However, the flow of kinetic energy, which is many orders of magnitude lower than that of the pressure, slowly but continuously grows. This leads to the pressure-kinetic energy flows ratio reaching an asymptotic state around the value 1000 for the channel bulk speed Reynolds number. It is interesting to note that beyond this threshold when the channel flow is highly unsteady-a sort of coarse turbulent flow-a sequence of high and low pressure spots is seen to depart from the downward cavity step in the statistically averaged field. The set of spots forms a steady spatial structure, a sort of damped standing wave stretching along the spanwise direction. The line joining the centers of the spots has an inclination similar to the normal to the fronts of density or pressure waves, which are observed to propagate from the downstream cavity edge in compressible cavity flows (at Mach numbers of 1×10(2) to 1×10(3), larger than those considered here). The wavelength of the standing wave is of the order of 1/8 the cavity depth and observed at the channel bulk Reynolds number, Re~2900. In this condition, the measure of the maximum pressure differences in the cavity field shows values of the order of 1×10(-1) Pa. We interpret the presence of this sort of wave as the fingerprint of the noise emission spots which

  10. Pressure and kinetic energy transport across the cavity mouth in resonating cavities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter Roger; Abbá, Antonella; Tordella, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Basic properties of the incompressible fluid motion in a rectangular cavity located along one wall of a plane channel are considered. For Mach numbers of the order of 1×10(-3) and using the incompressible formulation, we look for observable properties that can be associated with acoustic emission, which is normally observed in this kind of flow beyond a critical value of Reynolds number. The focus is put on the energy dynamics, in particular on the accumulation of energy in the cavity which takes place in the form of pressure and kinetic energy. By increasing the external forcing, we observe that the pressure flow into the cavity increases very rapidly, then peaks. However, the flow of kinetic energy, which is many orders of magnitude lower than that of the pressure, slowly but continuously grows. This leads to the pressure-kinetic energy flows ratio reaching an asymptotic state around the value 1000 for the channel bulk speed Reynolds number. It is interesting to note that beyond this threshold when the channel flow is highly unsteady-a sort of coarse turbulent flow-a sequence of high and low pressure spots is seen to depart from the downward cavity step in the statistically averaged field. The set of spots forms a steady spatial structure, a sort of damped standing wave stretching along the spanwise direction. The line joining the centers of the spots has an inclination similar to the normal to the fronts of density or pressure waves, which are observed to propagate from the downstream cavity edge in compressible cavity flows (at Mach numbers of 1×10(2) to 1×10(3), larger than those considered here). The wavelength of the standing wave is of the order of 1/8 the cavity depth and observed at the channel bulk Reynolds number, Re~2900. In this condition, the measure of the maximum pressure differences in the cavity field shows values of the order of 1×10(-1) Pa. We interpret the presence of this sort of wave as the fingerprint of the noise emission spots which

  11. A parallel adaptive method for simulating shock-induced combustion with detailed chemical kinetics in complex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive finite volume approach is presented to accurately simulate shock-induced combustion phenomena in gases, particular detonation waves. The method uses a Cartesian mesh that is dynamically adapted to embedded geometries and flow features by using regular refinement patches. The discretisation is a reliable linearised Riemann solver for thermally perfect gas mixtures; detailed kinetics are considered in an operator splitting approach. Besides easily reproducible ignition problems, the capabilities of the method and its parallel implementation are quantified and demonstrated for fully resolved triple point structure investigations of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures in two and three space dimensions.

  12. Pressure-induced kinetics of the α to ω transition in zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, M. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Sinogeikin, S. V.

    2015-07-14

    Diamond anvil cells (DAC) coupled with x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements are one of the primary techniques for investigating structural stability of materials at high pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions. DAC-XRD has been predominantly used to resolve structural information at set P-T conditions and, consequently, provides P-T phase diagram information on a broad range of materials. With advances in large scale synchrotron x-ray facilities and corresponding x-ray diagnostic capabilities, it is now becoming possible to perform sub-second time resolved measurements on micron sized DAC samples. As a result, there is an opportunity to gain valuable information about the kinetics of structural phase transformations and extend our understanding of material behavior at high P-T conditions. Using DAC-XRD time resolved measurements, we have investigated the kinetics of the α to ω transformation in zirconium. We observe a clear time and pressure dependence in the martensitic α-ω transition as a function of pressure-jump, i.e., drive pressure. The resulting data are fit using available kinetics models, which can provide further insight into transformation mechanism that influence transformation kinetics. Our results help shed light on the discrepancies observed in previous measurements of the α-ω transition pressure in zirconium.

  13. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: Tetrahedral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2015-03-07

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB{sub 4} molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q){sup −2} type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH{sub 4} molecule is demonstrated.

  14. Photoemission from activated gallium arsenide. II. Spin polarization versus kinetic energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouhin, H.-J.; Hermann, C.; Lampel, G.

    1985-03-01

    The spin polarization of the electrons emitted by a GaAs photocathode under circularly polarized light excitation is investigated as a function of the electron kinetic energy. The photocathode is activated by cesium and oxygen coadsorption under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions to achieve a negative electron affinity. The spin polarization is measured by Mott scattering. The study is performed with a very-high-energy resolution (20 meV), at 300 and 120 K, under well-focused Kr+-laser light excitation (photon energy ranging from 1.55 to 2.60 eV). The polarization-versus-energy distribution curves show typical features related to those observed in the energy distribution curves, which are analyzed in detail in the preceding paper [H.-J. Drouhin, C. Hermann, and G. Lampel, Phys. Rev. B 31, 3859 (1985)]. A model is developed to account for the largest measured polarization, which arises from electrons excited from the heavy-hole band and emitted without suffering any collision: A (2/3) maximum value is expected, which is reduced by spin precession in the internal D'yakonov and Perel' (DP) field, due to the absence of space-inversion symmetry in GaAs. An estimation of the hot-electron mean free path (~0.1 μm for photon energy above 1.96 eV) is deduced. The photoemission polarizations of the electrons excited from each of the two other valence bands are also calculated using a nonparabolic Kane band model. The L and X subsidiary minima give rise to polarization plateaus originating from energy relaxation in the band-bending region. The main contribution to the photocurrent is due to electrons which were thermalized in the central minimum of the bulk crystal and have relaxed their energy in the band-bending region prior to emission into vacuum. Their polarization is studied in relation with the luminescence polarization, measured on the same samples, in the framework of a one-dimensional diffusion model. An additional depolarization, occurring during the escape process, is

  15. Shear-induced enhancements of crystallization kinetics and morphological transformation for long chain branched polylactides with different branching degrees

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junyang; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Yaqiong; Fang, Huagao; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of long chain branching (LCB) degree on the shear-induced isothermal crystallization kinetics of a series of LCB polylactides (LCB PLAs) have been investigated by using rotational rheometer, polarized optical microscopy (POM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dynamic viscoelastic properties obtained by small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) tests indicate that LCB PLAs show more broadened relaxation time spectra with increasing LCB degree. Upon a pre-shear at the shear rate of 1 s−1 LCB PLAs show much faster crystallization kinetics than linear PLA and the crystallization kinetics is enhanced with increasing LCB degree. By modeling the system as a suspension the quantitative evaluation of nucleation density can be derived from rheological experiments. The nucleation density is greatly enhanced with increasing LCB degree and a saturation in shear time is observed. Crystalline morphologies for LCB PLAs observed by POM and SEM demonstrate the enhancement of nucleation density with increasing LCB degree and a transformation from spherulitic to orientated crystalline morphologies. The observation can be ascribed to longer relaxation time of the longest macromolecular chains and broadened, complex relaxation behaviors due to the introduction of LCB into PLA, which is essential in stabilizing the orientated crystal nuclei after pre-shear. PMID:27246803

  16. Shear-induced enhancements of crystallization kinetics and morphological transformation for long chain branched polylactides with different branching degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junyang; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Yaqiong; Fang, Huagao; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The effects of long chain branching (LCB) degree on the shear-induced isothermal crystallization kinetics of a series of LCB polylactides (LCB PLAs) have been investigated by using rotational rheometer, polarized optical microscopy (POM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dynamic viscoelastic properties obtained by small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) tests indicate that LCB PLAs show more broadened relaxation time spectra with increasing LCB degree. Upon a pre-shear at the shear rate of 1 s‑1 LCB PLAs show much faster crystallization kinetics than linear PLA and the crystallization kinetics is enhanced with increasing LCB degree. By modeling the system as a suspension the quantitative evaluation of nucleation density can be derived from rheological experiments. The nucleation density is greatly enhanced with increasing LCB degree and a saturation in shear time is observed. Crystalline morphologies for LCB PLAs observed by POM and SEM demonstrate the enhancement of nucleation density with increasing LCB degree and a transformation from spherulitic to orientated crystalline morphologies. The observation can be ascribed to longer relaxation time of the longest macromolecular chains and broadened, complex relaxation behaviors due to the introduction of LCB into PLA, which is essential in stabilizing the orientated crystal nuclei after pre-shear.

  17. Estimating free-energy barrier heights for an ultrafast folding protein from calorimetric and kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Henry, Eric R; Kubelka, Jan; Hofrichter, James; Muñoz, Victor; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Eaton, William A

    2008-05-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the temperature dependence of the absolute heat capacity of the 35-residue subdomain of the villin headpiece, a protein that folds in 5 mus and is therefore assumed to have a small free-energy barrier separating folded and unfolded states. To obtain an estimate of the barrier height from the calorimetric data, two models, a variable-barrier model and an Ising-like model, were used to fit the heat capacity in excess of the folded state over the temperature range 15-125 degrees C. The variable-barrier model is based on an empirical mathematical form for the density of states, with four adjustable parameters and the enthalpy (H) as a reaction coordinate. The Ising-like model is based on the inter-residue contact map of the X-ray structure with exact enumeration of approximately 10(5) possible conformations, with two adjustable parameters in the partition function, and either the fraction of native contacts (Q) or the number of ordered residues (P) as reaction coordinates. The variable-barrier model provides an excellent fit to the data and yields a barrier height at the folding temperature ranging from 0.4 to 1.1 kcal mol(-1), while the Ising-like model provides a less good fit and yields barrier heights of 2.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) and 2.1 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) for the Q and P reaction coordinates, respectively. In both models, the barrier to folding increases with increasing temperature. Assuming a sufficiently large activation energy for diffusion on the free-energy surfaces, both models are consistent with the observation of a temperature-independent folding rate in previously published laser temperature-jump experiments. Analysis of this kinetic data, using an approximate form for the pre-exponential factor of Kramers theory and the 70 ns relaxation time for the fast phase that precedes the unfolding/refolding relaxation to determine the diffusion coefficient, results in a barrier height of 1.6 +/- 0.3 kcal mol

  18. Spider orb webs rely on radial threads to absorb prey kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Sensenig, Andrew T; Lorentz, Kimberly A; Kelly, Sean P; Blackledge, Todd A

    2012-08-01

    The kinetic energy of flying insect prey is a formidable challenge for orb-weaving spiders. These spiders construct two-dimensional, round webs from a combination of stiff, strong radial silk and highly elastic, glue-coated capture spirals. Orb webs must first stop the flight of insect prey and then retain those insects long enough to be subdued by the spiders. Consequently, spider silks rank among the toughest known biomaterials. The large number of silk threads composing a web suggests that aerodynamic dissipation may also play an important role in stopping prey. Here, we quantify energy dissipation in orb webs spun by diverse species of spiders using data derived from high-speed videos of web deformation under prey impact. By integrating video data with material testing of silks, we compare the relative contributions of radial silk, the capture spiral and aerodynamic dissipation. Radial silk dominated energy absorption in all webs, with the potential to account for approximately 100 per cent of the work of stopping prey in larger webs. The most generous estimates for the roles of capture spirals and aerodynamic dissipation show that they rarely contribute more than 30 per cent and 10 per cent of the total work of stopping prey, respectively, and then only for smaller orb webs. The reliance of spider orb webs upon internal energy absorption by radial threads for prey capture suggests that the material properties of the capture spirals are largely unconstrained by the selective pressures of stopping prey and can instead evolve freely in response to alternative functional constraints such as adhering to prey.

  19. Multifractal scaling of the kinetic energy flux in solar wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsch, E.; Rosenbauer, H.; Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The geometrical and scaling properties of the energy flux of the turbulent kinetic energy in the solar wind have been studied. By present experimental technology in solar wind measurements, we cannot directly measure the real volumetric dissipation rate, epsilon(t), but are constrained to represent it by surrogating the energy flux near the dissipation range at the proton gyro scales. There is evidence for the multifractal nature of the so defined dissipation field epsilon(t), a result derived from the scaling exponents of its statistical q-th order moments. The related generalized dimension D(q) has been determined and reveals that the dissipation field has a multifractal structure. which is not compatible with a scale-invariant cascade. The associated multifractal spectrum f(alpha) has been estimated for the first time for MHD turbulence in the solar wind. Its features resemble those obtained for turbulent fluids and other nonlinear multifractal systems. The generalized dimension D(q) can, for turbulence in high-speed streams, be fitted well by the functional dependence of the p-model with a comparatively large parameter, p = 0.87. indicating a strongly intermittent multifractal energy cascade. The experimental value for D(p)/3, if used in the scaling exponent s(p) of the velocity structure function, gives an exponent that can describe some of the observations. The scaling exponent mu of the auto correlation function of epsilon(t) has also been directly evaluated. It has the value of 0.37. Finally. the mean dissipation rate was determined, which could be used in solar wind heating models.

  20. Spider orb webs rely on radial threads to absorb prey kinetic energy

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Andrew T.; Lorentz, Kimberly A.; Kelly, Sean P.; Blackledge, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetic energy of flying insect prey is a formidable challenge for orb-weaving spiders. These spiders construct two-dimensional, round webs from a combination of stiff, strong radial silk and highly elastic, glue-coated capture spirals. Orb webs must first stop the flight of insect prey and then retain those insects long enough to be subdued by the spiders. Consequently, spider silks rank among the toughest known biomaterials. The large number of silk threads composing a web suggests that aerodynamic dissipation may also play an important role in stopping prey. Here, we quantify energy dissipation in orb webs spun by diverse species of spiders using data derived from high-speed videos of web deformation under prey impact. By integrating video data with material testing of silks, we compare the relative contributions of radial silk, the capture spiral and aerodynamic dissipation. Radial silk dominated energy absorption in all webs, with the potential to account for approximately 100 per cent of the work of stopping prey in larger webs. The most generous estimates for the roles of capture spirals and aerodynamic dissipation show that they rarely contribute more than 30 per cent and 10 per cent of the total work of stopping prey, respectively, and then only for smaller orb webs. The reliance of spider orb webs upon internal energy absorption by radial threads for prey capture suggests that the material properties of the capture spirals are largely unconstrained by the selective pressures of stopping prey and can instead evolve freely in response to alternative functional constraints such as adhering to prey. PMID:22431738

  1. Impact comminution of solids due to local kinetic energy of high shear strain rate: I. Continuum theory and turbulence analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Caner, Ferhun C.

    2014-03-01

    The modeling of high velocity impact into brittle or quasibrittle solids is hampered by the unavailability of a constitutive model capturing the effects of material comminution into very fine particles. The present objective is to develop such a model, usable in finite element programs. The comminution at very high strain rates can dissipate a large portion of the kinetic energy of an impacting missile. The spatial derivative of the energy dissipated by comminution gives a force resisting the penetration, which is superposed on the nodal forces obtained from the static constitutive model in a finite element program. The present theory is inspired partly by Grady's model for expansive comminution due to explosion inside a hollow sphere, and partly by analogy with turbulence. In high velocity turbulent flow, the energy dissipation rate gets enhanced by the formation of micro-vortices (eddies) which dissipate energy by viscous shear stress. Similarly, here it is assumed that the energy dissipation at fast deformation of a confined solid gets enhanced by the release of kinetic energy of the motion associated with a high-rate shear strain of forming particles. For simplicity, the shape of these particles in the plane of maximum shear rate is considered to be regular hexagons. The particle sizes are assumed to be distributed according to the Schuhmann power law. The condition that the rate of release of the local kinetic energy must be equal to the interface fracture energy yields a relation between the particle size, the shear strain rate, the fracture energy and the mass density. As one experimental justification, the present theory agrees with Grady's empirical observation that, in impact events, the average particle size is proportional to the (-2/3) power of the shear strain rate. The main characteristic of the comminution process is a dimensionless number Ba (Eq. (37)) representing the ratio of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate to the maximum possible

  2. Skin penetration surrogate for the evaluation of less lethal kinetic energy munitions.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia A; Resslar, Marianne; Stewart, Shelby

    2012-07-10

    Although the benefits of the use of less lethal kinetic energy munitions are numerous, there is a need to evaluate the munitions prior to deployment to ensure their intended effect. The objective of the current research was to validate a surrogate that could be used to predict the risk of penetration of these devices. Existing data from biomechanical testing with post-mortem human specimens (PMHS) served as the foundation for this research. Development of the surrogate involved simulating the various layers of the skin and underlying soft tissues using a combination of materials. A standardized 12-gauge impactor was used to assess each combination. The energy density that resulted in a 50% risk of penetration for the anterior thorax region (23.99 J/cm(2)) from the previous research was matched using a specific combination of layers. Twelve various combinations of materials were tested with the 50% risk of penetration determined. The final validated surrogate consisted of a Laceration Assessment Layer (LAL) of natural chamois and .6 cm of closed-cell foam over a Penetration Assessment Layer (PAL) of 20% ordnance gelatin. This surrogate predicted a 50% risk of penetration at 23.88 J/cm(2). Injury risk curves for the PMHS and surrogate development work are presented.

  3. Molecular kinetic theory of strongly nonequilibrium processes of mass, momentum, and energy transfer: Local equilibrium criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2015-09-01

    Consequences of the complete system of transfer equations of the properties (momentum, energy, and mass) of particles and their pairs are considered under local equilibrium conditions with regard to the Bogoliubov hierarchy of relaxation times between the first and second distribution functions (DFs) and distinctions in the characteristic relaxation times of particle momentum, energy, and mass. It is found that even under the local equilibrium condition in the Bogoliubov hierarchy of relaxation times between the first and second DFs, pair correlations are maintained between all dynamic variables (velocity, temperature, and density) whose values are proportional to the gradients of transferable properties. A criterion is introduced requiring there be no local equilibrium condition upon reaching the critical value at which the description of the transfer process becomes incorrect in classical nonequilibrium thermodynamics. External forces are considered in the equations for strongly nonequilibrium processes. Along with allowing for intermolecular potentials, it becomes possible to discuss the concept of passive forces (introduced in thermodynamics by Gibbs) from the standpoint of the kinetic theory. It is shown that use of this concept does not reflect modern representations of real processes.

  4. Maximizing kinetic energy transfer in one-dimensional many-body collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricardo, Bernard; Lee, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The main problem discussed in this paper involves a simple one-dimensional two-body collision, in which the problem can be extended into a chain of one-dimensional many-body collisions. The result is quite interesting, as it provides us with a thorough mathematical understanding that will help in designing a chain system for maximum energy transfer for a range of collision types. In this paper, we will show that there is a way to improve the kinetic energy transfer between two masses, and the idea can be applied recursively. However, this method only works for a certain range of collision types, which is indicated by a range of coefficients of restitution. Although the concept of momentum, elastic and inelastic collision, as well as Newton’s laws, are taught in junior college physics, especially in Singapore schools, students in this level are not expected to be able to do this problem quantitatively, as it requires rigorous mathematics, including calculus. Nevertheless, this paper provides nice analytical steps that address some common misconceptions in students’ way of thinking about one-dimensional collisions.

  5. The horizontal planar structure of kinetic energy in a model vertical-axis wind turbine array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Zeller, Robert; Zarama, Francisco; Weitzman, Joel; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have indicated that arrays of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) could potentially harvest significantly more power per unit land area than arrays composed of conventional horizontal axis wind turbines. However, to design VAWT arrays for optimal power conversion, a more comprehensive understanding of inter-turbine energy transfer is needed. In the presented study, a geometrically scaled array of rotating circular cylinders is used to model a VAWT array. The horizontal inter-cylinder mean fluid velocities and Reynolds stresses are measured on several cross-sections using 2D particle image velocimetry in a flume. Two orientations of the array relative to the incoming flow are tested. The results indicate that cylinder rotation drives asymmetric mean flow patterns within and above the array, resulting in non-uniform distributions of turbulent kinetic energy. The variability is observed to be directly related to the ratio of the cylinder rotation speed to the streamwise water velocity. Emphasis is placed on the implications of the asymmetries for power production. Work supported by a Stanford Graduate Fellowship to A.E.C, by funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF2645, and by funding from the Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Stanford University.

  6. Observed and simulated power spectra of kinetic and magnetic energy retrieved with 2D inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovic, S.; Rempel, M.; van Noort, M.; Cameron, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Information on the origin of internetwork magnetic field is hidden at the smallest spatial scales. Aims: We try to retrieve the power spectra with certainty to the highest spatial frequencies allowed by current instrumentation. Methods: To accomplish this, we use a 2D inversion code that is able to recover information up to the instrumental diffraction limit. Results: The retrieved power spectra have shallow slopes that extend further down to much smaller scales than has been found before. They do not seem to show any power law. The observed slopes at subgranular scales agree with those obtained from recent local dynamo simulations. Small differences are found for the vertical component of kinetic energy that suggest that observations suffer from an instrumental effect that is not taken into account. Conclusions: Local dynamo simulations quantitatively reproduce the observed magnetic energy power spectra on the scales of granulation down to the resolution limit of Hinode/SP, within the error bars inflicted by the method used and the instrumental effects replicated.

  7. Application of a four-step HMX kinetic model to an impact-induced fraction ignition problems

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, William L; Gunderson, Jake A; Dickson, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    kinetics and thermodynamics of the phase transition, providing Dickson, et al. with the information necessary to develop a four-step model that included a two-step nucleation and growth mechanism for the {beta}-{delta} phase transition. Initially, an irreversible scheme was proposed. That model accurately predicted the spatial and temporal cook off behavior of the small-scale radial experiment under slow heating conditions, but did not accurately capture the endothermic phase transition at a faster heating rate. The current version of the four-step model includes reversibility and accurately describes the small-scale radial experiment over a wide range of heating rates. We have observed impact-induced friction ignition of PBX 9501 with grit embedded between the explosive and the lower anvil surface. Observation was done using an infrared camera looking through the sapphire bottom anvil. Time to ignition and temperature-time behavior were recorded. The time to ignition was approximately 500 microseconds and the temperature was approximately 1000 K. The four step reversible kinetic scheme was previously validated for slow cook off scenarios. Our intention was to test the validity for significantly faster hot-spot processes, such as the impact-induced grit friction process studied here. We found the model predicted the ignition time within experimental error. There are caveats to consider when evaluating the agreement. The primary input to the model was friction work over an area computed by a stress analysis. The work rate itself, and the relative velocity of the grit and substrate both have a strong dependence on the initial position of the grit. Any errors in the analysis or the initial grit position would affect the model results. At this time, we do not know the sensitivity to these issues. However, the good agreement does suggest the four step kinetic scheme may have universal applicability for HMX systems.

  8. Kinetics of Au induced faceting of vicinal Si( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, R.; Seifert, C.; Kammler, M.; Meyer zu Heringdorf, F.-J.; Horn-von-Hoegen, M.; Zhachuk, R. A.; Olshanetsky, B. Z.

    2002-06-01

    Au induced faceting of vicinal Si(1 1 1) has been studied during adsorption at elevated temperature by spot profile analyzing of low energy electron diffraction and after quenching to room temperature by scanning tunneling microscopy. On the surfaces inclined towards [1 1 2¯] five different types of facets form with increasing Au coverage at adsorption temperatures Tads below 800 °C. They are (4 4 3), (7 7 5), (5 5 3), a stepped (2 2 1), and the (3 3 1) facets. Atomic models for the (5 5 3) and (7 7 5) facet planes are proposed on the basis of high resolution STM images. At T ads=800 ° C we found the formation of an ordered step train which covers the entire surface. With further increasing Au coverage the stepped surface decomposes again into (1 1 1) terraces and step bunches. Driving force is the formation of the Si(1 1 1)-(5×2)-Au reconstruction.

  9. Some Kinetic and Metabolic Characteristics of Calcium-Induced Potassium Transport in Human Red Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kregenow, Floyd M.; Hoffman, Joseph F.

    1972-01-01

    When fresh human erythrocytes or their ghosts are incubated with Ca + IAA (iodoacetic acid) + adenosine, K permeability increases; K permeability also increases when energy-depleted cells or their ghosts are incubated with Ca alone. Na transport decreases or remains unaltered in both situations. The Ca-induced increase in K permeability in the depleted cell system is qualitatively similar to that seen in the fresh cell system and furnishes a means for studying the metabolic dependence of calcium's action. Studies with the depleted system suggest that the normal refractiveness of the cell to calcium is provided by a metabolically dependent substrate. Removal of this substrate allows Ca to enter the cell and exert its effect. By using 47Ca, a maximum value was obtained (3–7 x 10-6 moles/liter of red blood cells) for the quantity of calcium that is taken up by the cell and responsible for the change in K permeability. Measurements of the unidirectional fluxes of K, obtained during the time Ca increases K permeability, appear to satisfy the flux ratio equation for passive diffusion through a membrane. PMID:5074809

  10. [Comparison of the kinetics of ionophore-induced ion transport in conventional and solventless membranes].

    PubMed

    Laprade, R; Lapointe, J Y

    1982-03-01

    In contrast to conventional membranes prepared from a mixture of glyceryl-monooleate (GMO) and decane (GMO-D) which still contain decane in the final state, the membranes formed from a mixture of GMO and squalene (GMO-S) or triolein (GMO-T) contain finally only GMO and are said to be "solventless". The use of the electric current relaxation technique following a voltage jump has allowed us to characterize the effect of the absence of solvent on the various steps of ion transport induced by nonactin. We have measured the rates of formation (kri) of dissociation (kDi) and of translocation (kis) of the ion-ionophore complex as well as the rate of translocation of the ionophore (ks). With the GMO-S and GMO-T membranes, kis is about ten times higher, ks, twice as high, and kDi twice as small than with the GMO-D membranes. The observed effects are always more prominent with the GMO-T membranes. These results can be interpreted in terms of modifications of the energy barriers in the membrane due to the absence of solvent.

  11. Activation energy distributions predicted by dispersive kinetic models for nucleation and denucleation: anomalous diffusion resulting from quantization.

    PubMed

    Skrdla, Peter J

    2011-06-23

    The activation energy distributions underpinning the two complementary dispersive kinetic models described by the author in a recent work (Skrdla, P. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 9329) are derived and investigated. In the case of nucleation rate-limited conversions, which exhibit "acceleratory" sigmoidal transients (a kind of S-shaped stretched exponential conversion profile), an activation energy distribution visually similar to the Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) distribution is recovered, consistent with the original derivation of that model. In the case of predominantly "deceleratory" conversions, the activation energy distribution is skewed from normal in the opposite direction. While the "M-B-like" activation energy distribution supports the empirical observation of a rate enhancement as a function of the conversion time in nucleation rate-limited processes, the complementary distribution, with its pronounced low-energy tail, reflects a slow-down in the specific rate as the conversion progresses, consistent with experimentally observed denucleation rate-limited conversions. Activation energy distributions were also plotted for real-world data (Qu, H.; Louhi-Kultanen, M.; Kallas, J. Cryst. Growth Des. 2007, 7, 724), depicting the impact of various additives on the nucleation rate-limited kinetics of the solvent-mediated phase transformation of the crystalline drug carbamazepine. Last, by coupling the author's dispersive kinetic description of the time-dependent activation energy for nucleation to the classical description of the critical nucleus energy provided by the Kelvin equation, an accelerated hopping mechanism for the diffusion of monomers to the growing embryo surface was observed. That hopping mechanism was rationalized by modifying the Einstein-Smoluchowski (E-S) equation to allow it to describe the "supra-brownian" molecular motion thought to lie at the heart of nucleation kinetics.

  12. Mechanisms and kinetics of short pulse laser-induced destruction of silver-containing nanoparticles in multicomponent silicate photo-thermo-refractive glass.

    PubMed

    Lumeau, Julien; Glebov, Leonid B

    2014-11-01

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is a photosensitive multi-component silicate glass that is commercially used for the recording of volume holographic elements and finds many applications in advanced laser systems. Refractive index decrement in this glass is observed after UV exposure followed by thermal development. This procedure also causes the appearance of Ag-containing particles that can then be optically bleached by using the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Despite the broad usage of this method, its mechanisms are still unclear. In this paper, a systematic study of the short pulse laser-induced destruction of Ag-containing particles' kinetics versus incident energy per pulse and dosage is presented. We show that no bleaching of Ag-containing particles occurs for an energy density in laser pulses below 0.1  J/cm2 while above 1  J/cm2, the efficiency of bleaching saturates. Efficiency of bleaching depends on the type of particles to be bleached (Ag, AgBr…). Using a simple model of short pulse laser interaction with nanoparticles embedded in glass, the temperature of the Ag-containing particles reached during the laser interaction is shown to be large enough to produce complete dissipation of these particles which is expected to be the main mechanism of short pulse laser-induced destruction of Ag-containing particles.

  13. A kinetic approach to cosmic ray induced streaming instability at supernova shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, Elena; Blasi, Pasquale; /Arcetri Observ. /Fermilab /Gran Sasso

    2008-06-01

    We show here that a purely kinetic approach to the excitation of waves by cosmic rays in the vicinity of a shock front leads to predict the appearance of a non-alfvenic fastly growing mode which has the same dispersion relation as that previously found by Bell (2004) by treating the plasma in the MHD approximation. The kinetic approach allows us to investigate the dependence of the dispersion relation of these waves on the microphysics of the current which compensates the cosmic ray flow. We also show that a resonant and a non-resonant mode may appear at the same time and one of the two may become dominant on the other depending on the conditions in the acceleration region. We discuss the role of the unstable modes for magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in supernova remnants at different stages of the remnant evolution.

  14. Crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars in cooling and decompression-induced crystallization experiments in trachytic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspar, the effect of the degree of undercooling ( ΔT = T liquidus - T experimental) and time on nucleation and crystal growth process. This experimental work gives us new data about crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts, and it that will be useful to better understand the natural system of Campi Flegrei volcanoes. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus, at pressure between 30 and 200 MPa, temperature between 750 and 855 °C, time between 7,200 and 57,600 s and redox condition close to the NNO +0.8 buffer. These conditions are ideal to reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes, where the "conditions" pertain to the complete range of pressures, temperatures and time at which the experiments were performed. Alkali feldspar is the main phase present in this trachyte, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. The obtained results show that crystallization kinetics are strictly related to ΔT, time, final pressure, superheating (- ΔT) and water content in the melt. ΔT is the driving force of the crystallization, and it has a strong influence on nucleation and growth processes. In fact, the growth process dominates crystallization at small ΔT, whereas the nucleation dominates crystallization at large ΔT. Time also is an important variable during crystallization process, because long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations. This is an important aspect to understand magma evolution in the magma chamber and in the conduit, which in turn has strong effects on magma rheology.

  15. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  16. Quantitative analysis of the experimental O-J-I-P chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics. Apparent activation energy and origin of each kinetic step.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Steve; Joly, David; Carpentier, Robert

    2006-10-01

    Fluorescence induction has been studied for a long time, but there are still questions concerning what the O-J-I-P kinetic steps represent. Most studies agree that the O-J rise is related to photosystem II primary acceptor (Q(A)) reduction, but several contradictory theories exist for the J-I and I-P rises. One problem with fluorescence induction analysis is that most work done to date has used only qualitative or semiquantitative data analysis by visually comparing traces to observe the effects of different chemicals or treatments. Although this method is useful to observe major changes, a quantitative method must be used to detect more subtle, yet important, differences in the fluorescence induction trace. To achieve this, we used a relatively simple mathematical approach to extract the amplitudes and half-times of the three major fluorescence induction phases obtained from traces measured in thylakoid membranes kept at various temperatures. Apparent activation energies (E(A)) were also obtained for each kinetic step. Our results show that each phase has a different E(A), with E(A O-J) kinetic phase.

  17. Free energy in plasmas under wave-induced diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Rax, J.M. )

    1993-05-01

    When waves propagate through a bounded plasma, the wave may be amplified or damped at the expense of the plasma kinetic energy. In many cases of interest, the primary effect of the wave is to cause plasma diffusion in velocity and configuration space. In the absence of collisions, the rearrangement of the plasma conserves entropy, as large-grain structures are mixed and fine-grain structures emerge. The maximum extractable energy by waves so diffusing the plasma is a quantity of fundamental interest; it can be defined, but it is difficult to calculate. Through the consideration of specific examples, certain strategies for maximizing energy extraction are identified.

  18. von Kármán Energy Decay and Heating of Protons and Electrons in a Kinetic Turbulent Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P.; Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Shay, M. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2013-09-01

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von Kármán hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics. Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitudes the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in the large amplitude turbulence regime.

  19. Von Kármán energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic turbulent plasma.

    PubMed

    Wu, P; Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-09-20

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von Kármán hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics. Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitudes the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in the large amplitude turbulence regime.

  20. A homogeneous quenching resonance energy transfer assay for the kinetic analysis of the GTPase nucleotide exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Ligabue, Alessio; Wang, Qi; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Veltel, Stefan; van Adrichem, Arjan J; Hänninen, Pekka; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET) assay for small GTPase nucleotide exchange kinetic monitoring is demonstrated using nanomolar protein concentrations. Small GTPases are central signaling proteins in all eukaryotic cells acting as a "molecular switches" that are active in the GTP-state and inactive in the GDP-state. GTP-loading is highly regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In several diseases, most prominently cancer, this process in misregulated. The kinetics of the nucleotide exchange reaction reports on the enzymatic activity of the GEF reaction system and is, therefore, of special interest. We determined the nucleotide exchange kinetics using europium-labeled GTP (Eu-GTP) in the QRET assay for small GTPases. After GEF catalyzed GTP-loading of a GTPase, a high time-resolved luminescence signal was found to be associated with GTPase bound Eu-GTP, whereas the non-bound Eu-GTP fraction was quenched by soluble quencher. The association kinetics of the Eu-GTP was measured after GEF addition, whereas the dissociation kinetics could be determined after addition of unlabeled GTP. The resulting association and dissociation rates were in agreement with previously published values for H-Ras(Wt), H-Ras(Q61G), and K-Ras(Wt), respectively. The broader applicability of the QRET assay for small GTPases was demonstrated by determining the kinetics of the Ect2 catalyzed RhoA(Wt) GTP-loading. The QRET assay allows the use of nanomolar protein concentrations, as more than 3-fold signal-to-background ratio was achieved with 50 nM GTPase and GEF proteins. Thus, small GTPase exchange kinetics can be efficiently determined in a HTS compatible 384-well plate format.

  1. Kinetic energy discrimination in collision/reaction cell ICP-MS: Theoretical review of principles and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Noriyuki

    2015-08-01

    Kinetic energy discrimination (KED) is one of the means to control cell-formed interferences in collision/reaction cell ICP-MS, and also a technique to reduce polyatomic ion interferences derived from the plasma or vacuum interface in collision cell ICP-MS. The operation of KED is accurately described to explain how spectral interferences from polyatomic ions are reduced by this technique. The cell is operated under non-thermal conditions to implement KED, where the hard sphere collision model is aptly employed to portray the transmission of ions colliding with the cell gas that they don't chemically react with. It is theoretically explained that the analyte atomic ions surmount the energy barrier placed downstream of the cell and the interfering polyatomic ions do not due to their lower kinetic energy than the atomic ions, resulting in polyatomic interference reduction. The intrinsic limitations of this technique are shown to lie in the statistical nature of collision processes, which causes the broadening of ion kinetic energy distribution that hinders efficient KED. The reaction cell operation with KED, where plasma-derived interferences are reduced by the reactive cell gas while cell-formed interferences are suppressed by the energy barrier, is also described in a quantitative manner. This review paper provides an in-depth understanding of KED in cell-based ICP-MS for analysts to make better use of it.

  2. Characteristics of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate and turbidity near the coast of East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Xu, Huiping; Qin, Rufu; Xu, Changwei; Fan, Daidu

    2016-09-01

    The East China Sea (ECS) has a high suspended-sediment concentration because of the influence of the Changjiang River, indicated by high turbidity in the water. Considering the islands offthe coast and the complex topography, and the strong influence of tides and wind, the coast offthe ECS is a typical region with strong oceanic mixing processes. The changes in the dynamic processes near the bottom play an important role in the control of water turbidity. The turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate ( ɛ ) is a parameter that shows the strength of ocean mixing. This is estimated based on a structure method using current velocity that is measured by a high-frequency Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) from a seafloor observatory in the ECS. The results indicate strong ocean mixing processes with a mean ɛ value of 5.7×10-5 W/kg and distinct tidal variations in the dissipation rate. Conversely, the variation of the water turbidity leads to changes in the water dynamical structure near the bottom. Comparing the dissipation rate with the turbidity near the bottom boundary layer, we find that the high turbidity mimics strong ocean mixing.

  3. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of chrysene: a comparison with tetracene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Harthcock, Colin; Kong, Wei

    2012-07-01

    We report the electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of chrysene using resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. As an isomer of tetracene, chrysene contains a kink in the middle of the four fused hexagonal rings, which complicates not just the symmetry but, more importantly, the molecular orbitals and hence vibronic transitions. Incidentally, the two nearby electronically excited states of chrysene have the same symmetry, and vibronic coupling introduces no out-of-plane vibrational modes. As a result, the REMPI spectrum of chrysene contains essentially only in-plane ring deformation modes, similar to that of tetracene. However, density functional calculations using gaussian even after the inclusion of vibronic coupling can only duplicate the observed REMPI spectrum in a qualitative sense, and the agreement is considerably worse than our recent work on a few pericondensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and on tetracene. The ZEKE spectrum of chrysene via the origin band of the intermediate electronic state S(1), however, can be qualitatively reproduced by a straightforward Franck-Condon calculation. The ZEKE spectra from vibrationally excited states of the S(1), on the other hand, demonstrate some degree of mode selectivity: the overall intensity of the ZEKE spectrum can vary by an order of magnitude depending on the vibrational mode of the intermediate state. A scaling factor in the theoretical vibrational frequency for the cation is also needed to compare with the experimental result, unlike tetracene and pentacene.

  4. Large-scale kinetic energy spectra from Eulerian analysis of EOLE wind data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desbois, M.

    1975-01-01

    A data set of 56,000 winds determined from the horizontal displacements of EOLE balloons at the 200 mb level in the Southern Hemisphere during the period October 1971-February 1972 is utilized for the computation of planetary- and synoptic-scale kinetic energy space spectra. However, the random distribution of measurements in space and time presents some problems for the spectral analysis. Two different approaches are used, i.e., a harmonic analysis of daily wind values at equi-distant points obtained by space-time interpolation of the data, and a correlation method using the direct measurements. Both methods give similar results for small wavenumbers, but the second is more accurate for higher wavenumbers (k above or equal to 10). The spectra show a maximum at wavenumbers 5 and 6 due to baroclinic instability and then decrease for high wavenumbers up to wavenumber 35 (which is the limit of the analysis), according to the inverse power law k to the negative p, with p close to 3.

  5. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Marty, F.; Basset, P.; Galayko, D.

    2015-12-21

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 g{sub rms}, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm{sup 3}. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  6. Smoothing Control of Wind Farm Output by Using Kinetic Energy of Variable Speed Wind Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Daiki; Saitoh, Hiroumi

    This paper proposes a new control method for reducing fluctuation of power system frequency through smoothing active power output of wind farm. The proposal is based on the modulation of rotaional kinetic energy of variable speed wind power generators through power converters between permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSG) and transmission lines. In this paper, the proposed control is called Fluctuation Absorption by Flywheel Characteristics control (FAFC). The FAFC can be easily implemented by adding wind farm output signal to Maximum Power Point Tracking control signal through a feedback control loop. In order to verify the effectiveness of the FAFC control, a simulation study was carried out. In the study, it was assumed that the wind farm consisting of PMSG type wind power generator and induction machine type wind power generaotors is connected with a power sysem. The results of the study show that the FAFC control is a useful method for reducing the impacts of wind farm output fluctuation on system frequency without additional devices such as secondary battery.

  7. Connectivity of Marine Protected Areas and Its Relation with Total Kinetic Energy.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, Andressa; Gherardi, Douglas Francisco Marcolino; Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi

    2015-01-01

    The East Continental Shelf (ECS) of Brazil is a hotspot of endemism and biodiversity of reef biota in the South Atlantic, hosting a number of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Connectivity of MPAs through larval dispersal influences recruitment, population dynamics, genetic structure and biogeography in coral reef ecosystems. Connectivity of protected reef ecosystem in the ECS was investigated with a hydrodynamic model (ROMS) forcing an Individual Based Model (IBM-Ichthyop), and used groupers (genus Mycteroperca) as functional group. The hydrodynamic output from ROMS was compared with satellite data and showed good agreement with observed surface fields. Eggs were released, in IBM experiments, from April to September along six years (2002-2007) in five MPAs along the ECS. Intrannual variability in recruitment and self-recruitment of grouper larvae was observed, as well as a negative correlation of these population parameters with total Kinetic Energy (KE) used as a metric of the physical environment. Higher KE leads to increased offshore advection of larvae, reduced total recruitment and connectivity of MPAs. Our results indicate high and uni-directional connectivity between MPAs from north to south influenced by the Brazil Current flowing in the same direction. Results also showed that some MPAs act predominantly as "sink" while others are mainly "source" areas. PMID:26448650

  8. Dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy in the free atmosphere: MST radar and radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantha, L.; Hocking, W.

    2011-06-01

    Our knowledge of the spatio-temporal variability of the dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) in the free atmosphere is severely limited because of the difficulty and expense of making these measurements globally. A few MST/ST radar facilities that are still in operation around the globe have provided us with valuable data on temporal variability of the dissipation rate in the atmospheric column above the radars but the data covers an extremely tiny fraction of the global free atmosphere. Moreover, there are limitations to these data also, since restrictive hypotheses are necessary for making these measurements. It appears that simple radiosondes launched from the existing global sonde network might be able to provide a much wider coverage, provided the technique for deducing the dissipation rates from overturns detected by the sondes can be calibrated and validated against existing techniques. An intensive field campaign conducted over the Harrow ST radar site located in western Ontario, Canada, during the summer of 2007 provided precisely such an opportunity. In this paper, we report on the comparison of the TKE dissipation rates derived from the PTU measurements made by ozonesondes launched during the campaign with those obtained from direct ST radar measurements. We find encouraging agreement between the two, which suggests that routine measurements of TKE dissipation rates by radiosondes in the global free atmosphere might indeed be feasible.

  9. Connectivity of Marine Protected Areas and Its Relation with Total Kinetic Energy

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostini, Andressa; Gherardi, Douglas Francisco Marcolino; Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi

    2015-01-01

    The East Continental Shelf (ECS) of Brazil is a hotspot of endemism and biodiversity of reef biota in the South Atlantic, hosting a number of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Connectivity of MPAs through larval dispersal influences recruitment, population dynamics, genetic structure and biogeography in coral reef ecosystems. Connectivity of protected reef ecosystem in the ECS was investigated with a hydrodynamic model (ROMS) forcing an Individual Based Model (IBM—Ichthyop), and used groupers (genus Mycteroperca) as functional group. The hydrodynamic output from ROMS was compared with satellite data and showed good agreement with observed surface fields. Eggs were released, in IBM experiments, from April to September along six years (2002–2007) in five MPAs along the ECS. Intrannual variability in recruitment and self-recruitment of grouper larvae was observed, as well as a negative correlation of these population parameters with total Kinetic Energy (KE) used as a metric of the physical environment. Higher KE leads to increased offshore advection of larvae, reduced total recruitment and connectivity of MPAs. Our results indicate high and uni-directional connectivity between MPAs from north to south influenced by the Brazil Current flowing in the same direction. Results also showed that some MPAs act predominantly as “sink” while others are mainly “source” areas. PMID:26448650

  10. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Y; Moreh, R; Shang, S L; Shchur, Ya; Wang, Y; Liu, Z K

    2016-02-01

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X3H(SO4)2 superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M3H(SO4)2 compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance ROO, being a measure of the HB strength. PMID:26851916

  11. Production and destruction of eddy kinetic energy in forced submesoscale eddy-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sonaljit; Ramachandran, Sanjiv; Tandon, Amit; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-09-01

    We study the production and dissipation of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in a submesoscale eddy field forced with downfront winds using the Process Study Ocean Model (PSOM) with a horizontal grid resolution of 0.5 km. We simulate an idealized 100 m deep mixed-layer front initially in geostrophic balance with a jet in a domain that permits eddies within a range of O(1 km-100 km). The vertical eddy viscosities and the dissipation are parameterized using four different subgrid vertical mixing parameterizations: the k - ɛ , the KPP, and two different constant eddy viscosity and diffusivity profiles with a magnitude of O(10-2m2s-1) in the mixed layer. Our study shows that strong vertical eddy viscosities near the surface reduce the parameterized dissipation, whereas strong vertical eddy diffusivities reduce the lateral buoyancy gradients and consequently the rate of restratification by mixed-layer instabilities (MLI). Our simulations show that near the surface, the spatial variability of the dissipation along the periphery of the eddies depends on the relative alignment of the ageostrophic and geostrophic shear. Analysis of the resolved EKE budgets in the frontal region from the simulations show important similarities between the vertical structure of the EKE budget produced by the k - ɛ and KPP parameterizations, and earlier LES studies. Such an agreement is absent in the simulations using constant eddy-viscosity parameterizations.

  12. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Boisseau, S.; Marty, F.; Galayko, D.; Basset, P.

    2015-12-01

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 grms, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm3. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  13. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Di Domizio, S.; Castellano, M. G.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  14. Dynamical interpretation of average fission-fragment kinetic energy systematics and nuclear scission

    SciTech Connect

    Nadtochy, P.N.; Adeev, G.D.

    2005-11-01

    A dynamical interpretation of the well-known systematics for average total kinetic energy of fission fragments over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter (600 on the Coulomb parameter. The results of dynamical calculations of within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics show that the mean distance between the centers of mass of nascent fragments at the scission configuration increases linearly with the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}. This distance changes approximately from 2.35R{sub 0} for {sup 119}Xe to 2.6R{sub 0} for {sup 256}Fm. In spite of this increase in mean distance between future fragments at scission, the linear dependence of on the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} remains approximately valid over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}.

  15. Turbulent kinetic energy production and flow structures in compressible homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-09-01

    The production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow structures in compressible homogeneous turbulent shear flow (HTSF) are investigated by using direct numerical simulation. A theoretical analysis suggests that the vertical turbulent transport process should be responsible for the production of TKE in HTSF. It is manifested based on a conditional average method that the pure TKE production becomes increasingly larger in strain regions than in vortex regions of the flow. The velocity-derivative correlation in the shear plane is employed to identify the streaky structures in HTSF, which also tend to occur predominantly in strain regions of turbulence. Localized analyses of conditional averages reveal that the streaky structures in compressible HTSF are closely related to the negative productions of TKE. A comparative study implies that flow compressibility has a considerable effect on the spatial distributions and patterns of the strain- and vortex-dominated fields, which in turn cause the discrepancies in distribution of the TKE production and streaky structures between incompressible and compressible HTSFs.

  16. Kinetics and localization of wound-induced DNA biosynthesis in potato tuber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuber wounding induces a cascade of biological responses that are involved in processes required to heal and protect surviving plant tissues. Little is known about the coordination of these processes, including essential wound-induced DNA synthesis, yet they play critical roles in maintaining marke...

  17. Coalescence-induced jumping motion on non-wetting surfaces: The mechanism of low energy conversion efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangjie; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Feng, James J.; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2014-11-01

    When two drops coalesce on a non-wetting substrate such as a superhydrophobic surface, the merged drop spontaneously jumps away from the surface. The self-propelled jumping is powered by the surface energy released upon drop coalescence. However, the translational kinetic energy associated with the jumping is much smaller than the released surface energy. The mechanism of this low energy conversion efficiency is elucidated with 3D phase field simulations which have been experimentally validated. The coalescing drops can be viewed as a two-lobed perturbation to the merged drop with a larger equilibrium radius. The large-amplitude perturbation induces the capillary-inertial oscillation of the merged drop, and the symmetry of the oscillation is broken by the non-wetting substrate. Since the substrate intercepts only a small fraction of the merged drop, a small translational momentum is imparted by the symmetry-breaking substrate, giving rise to the low jumping velocity of 0.2 when nondimensionalized by the capillary-inertial velocity and consequently a low energy conversion efficiency of less than 4%. Other than this small fraction of translational kinetic energy, the majority of the kinetic energy is oscillatory and eventually dissipated.

  18. Kinetic studies on photolysis-induced gelation of sickle cell hemoglobin suggest a new mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrone, F.A.; Hofrichter, J.; Sunshine, H.R.; Eaton, W.A.

    1980-10-01

    The kinetics of deoxyhemoglobin S gelation have been investigated using photolytic dissociation of the carbon monoxide complex to initiate the process. Measurements over a wide range of times, 10/sup -3/ -10/sup 4/s, show that both the concentration dependence of the tenth-time (i.e., the time required to complete one-tenth the reaction) and the time dependence of the process decrease as gelation speeds up. In slowly gelling samples, where single domains of polymers are formed in the small sample volumes employed with this technique (1 to 2 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 3/), there is a marked increase in the variability of the tenth-times. These results are explained by a mechanism in which gelation is initiated by homogeneous nucleation of polymers in the bulk solution phase, followed by heterogeneous nucleation on the surface of existing polymers. At the lowest concentrations, homogeneous nucleation is so improbable that stochastic behavior is observed in the small sample volumes, and heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant pathway for polymer formation, thereby accounting for the high time dependence. At the highest concentrations homogeneous nucleation becomes much more probable, and the time dependence decreases. The decrease in concentration dependence of the tenth-time with increasing concentration results from a decrease in size of both the homogeneous and heterogeneous critical nuclei. The model rationalizes the major observations on the kinetics of gelation of deoxyhemoglobin S, and is readily testable by further experiments.

  19. A mechanistic description of radiation-induced damage to normal tissue and its healing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a novel mechanistic model of the yield of tissue damage at the end of radiation treatment and of the subsequent healing kinetics. We find explicit expressions for the total number of functional proliferating cells as well as doomed (functional but non-proliferating) cells as a function of time post treatment. This leads to the possibility of estimating—for any given cohort of patients undergoing radiation therapy—the probability distribution of those kinetic parameters (e.g. proliferation rates) that determine times to injury onset and ensuing resolution. The model is suitable for tissues with simple duplication organization, meaning that functionally competent cells are also responsible for tissue renewal or regeneration following injury. An extension of the model to arbitrary temporal patterns of dose rate is presented. To illustrate the practical utility of the model, as well as its limitations, we apply it to data on the time course of urethral toxicity following fractionated radiation treatment and brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  20. Species-Specific Effects on Throughfall Kinetic Energy in Subtropical Forest Plantations Are Related to Leaf Traits and Tree Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Kröber, Wenzel; Li, Ying; von Oheimb, Goddert

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion is a key threat to many ecosystems, especially in subtropical China where high erosion rates occur. While the mechanisms that induce soil erosion on agricultural land are well understood, soil erosion processes in forests have rarely been studied. Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) is influenced in manifold ways and often determined by the tree’s leaf and architectural traits. We investigated the role of species identity in mono-specific stands on TKE by asking to what extent TKE is species-specific and which leaf and architectural traits account for variation in TKE. We measured TKE of 11 different tree species planted in monocultures in a biodiversity-ecosystem-functioning experiment in subtropical China, using sand-filled splash cups during five natural rainfall events in summer 2013. In addition, 14 leaf and tree architectural traits were measured and linked to TKE. Our results showed that TKE was highly species-specific. Highest TKE was found below Choerospondias axillaris and Sapindus saponaria, while Schima superba showed lowest TKE. These species-specific effects were mediated by leaf habit, leaf area (LA), leaf pinnation, leaf margin, stem diameter at ground level (GD), crown base height (CBH), tree height, number of branches and leaf area index (LAI) as biotic factors and throughfall as abiotic factor. Among these, leaf habit, tree height and LA showed the highest effect sizes on TKE and can be considered as major drivers of TKE. TKE was positively influenced by LA, GD, CBH, tree height, LAI, and throughfall amount while it was negatively influenced by the number of branches. TKE was lower in evergreen, simple leaved and dentate leaved than in deciduous, pinnated or entire leaved species. Our results clearly showed that soil erosion in forest plantations can be mitigated by the appropriate choice of tree species. PMID:26079260

  1. Species-Specific Effects on Throughfall Kinetic Energy in Subtropical Forest Plantations Are Related to Leaf Traits and Tree Architecture.

    PubMed

    Goebes, Philipp; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Kröber, Wenzel; Kühn, Peter; Li, Ying; Seitz, Steffen; von Oheimb, Goddert; Scholten, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion is a key threat to many ecosystems, especially in subtropical China where high erosion rates occur. While the mechanisms that induce soil erosion on agricultural land are well understood, soil erosion processes in forests have rarely been studied. Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) is influenced in manifold ways and often determined by the tree's leaf and architectural traits. We investigated the role of species identity in mono-specific stands on TKE by asking to what extent TKE is species-specific and which leaf and architectural traits account for variation in TKE. We measured TKE of 11 different tree species planted in monocultures in a biodiversity-ecosystem-functioning experiment in subtropical China, using sand-filled splash cups during five natural rainfall events in summer 2013. In addition, 14 leaf and tree architectural traits were measured and linked to TKE. Our results showed that TKE was highly species-specific. Highest TKE was found below Choerospondias axillaris and Sapindus saponaria, while Schima superba showed lowest TKE. These species-specific effects were mediated by leaf habit, leaf area (LA), leaf pinnation, leaf margin, stem diameter at ground level (GD), crown base height (CBH), tree height, number of branches and leaf area index (LAI) as biotic factors and throughfall as abiotic factor. Among these, leaf habit, tree height and LA showed the highest effect sizes on TKE and can be considered as major drivers of TKE. TKE was positively influenced by LA, GD, CBH, tree height, LAI, and throughfall amount while it was negatively influenced by the number of branches. TKE was lower in evergreen, simple leaved and dentate leaved than in deciduous, pinnated or entire leaved species. Our results clearly showed that soil erosion in forest plantations can be mitigated by the appropriate choice of tree species. PMID:26079260

  2. Species-Specific Effects on Throughfall Kinetic Energy in Subtropical Forest Plantations Are Related to Leaf Traits and Tree Architecture.

    PubMed

    Goebes, Philipp; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Kröber, Wenzel; Kühn, Peter; Li, Ying; Seitz, Steffen; von Oheimb, Goddert; Scholten, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion is a key threat to many ecosystems, especially in subtropical China where high erosion rates occur. While the mechanisms that induce soil erosion on agricultural land are well understood, soil erosion processes in forests have rarely been studied. Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) is influenced in manifold ways and often determined by the tree's leaf and architectural traits. We investigated the role of species identity in mono-specific stands on TKE by asking to what extent TKE is species-specific and which leaf and architectural traits account for variation in TKE. We measured TKE of 11 different tree species planted in monocultures in a biodiversity-ecosystem-functioning experiment in subtropical China, using sand-filled splash cups during five natural rainfall events in summer 2013. In addition, 14 leaf and tree architectural traits were measured and linked to TKE. Our results showed that TKE was highly species-specific. Highest TKE was found below Choerospondias axillaris and Sapindus saponaria, while Schima superba showed lowest TKE. These species-specific effects were mediated by leaf habit, leaf area (LA), leaf pinnation, leaf margin, stem diameter at ground level (GD), crown base height (CBH), tree height, number of branches and leaf area index (LAI) as biotic factors and throughfall as abiotic factor. Among these, leaf habit, tree height and LA showed the highest effect sizes on TKE and can be considered as major drivers of TKE. TKE was positively influenced by LA, GD, CBH, tree height, LAI, and throughfall amount while it was negatively influenced by the number of branches. TKE was lower in evergreen, simple leaved and dentate leaved than in deciduous, pinnated or entire leaved species. Our results clearly showed that soil erosion in forest plantations can be mitigated by the appropriate choice of tree species.

  3. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P.; Howe, Emily A.; Loik, Nikita D.; Kramer, Holger B.; McCullagh, James S. O.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Flashman, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1–3 or EGLN1–3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Kmapp(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Kmapp(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. PMID:26112411

  4. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor.

    PubMed

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P; Howe, Emily A; Loik, Nikita D; Kramer, Holger B; McCullagh, James S O; Schofield, Christopher J; Flashman, Emily

    2015-08-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3 or EGLN1-3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Km(app)(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Km(app)(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. PMID:26112411

  5. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  6. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  7. Radiation-induced formation of Co3O4 nanoparticles from Co(2+)(aq): probing the kinetics using radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Alrehaily, L M; Joseph, J M; Wren, J C

    2015-10-01

    The effects of the Co(2+) content and different radical scavengers on the kinetics of γ-radiation-induced Co3O4 nanoparticle formation and growth were investigated. There are four distinct stages of particle formation with different oxidation rates. Scavengers and [Co(2+)]0 affect the oxidation kinetics in the different stages and consequently the final size of the particles formed. Radiolysis model calculations were performed to obtain the time-evolution of the concentrations of key oxidants and reductants, and the effect of scavengers on those concentrations. Based on the model results and experimental data a reaction mechanism for Co3O4 particle formation by γ-irradiation of solutions containing Co(2+)(aq) is proposed. The main cobalt oxidation reaction changes with time. Oxidation of Co(2+)(aq) to Co(3+)(aq) by radiolytically produced ˙OH occurs first in the solution phase. This is followed by spontaneous co-precipitation of mixed Co(II)/Co(III) hydroxide nucleate particles. Adsorption of Co(II)(ad) followed by surface oxidation of Co(II)(ad) to CoOOH(ad) by H2O2 grows particles with a solid CoOOH(s) phase. In parallel, the solid-state transformation of CoOOH(s) and Co(II)(ad) to form Co3O4(s) occurs.

  8. Resorption kinetics of four hydroxyapatite-based ceramics by particle induced X-ray emission and neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallot, E.; Irigaray, J. L.; Oudadesse, H.; Brun, V.; Weber, G.; Frayssinet, P.

    1999-05-01

    From the viewpoint of hard tissue response to implant materials, calcium phosphates are probably the most compatible materials presently known. During the last few years, much attention has been paid to hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate as potential biomaterials for bone substitute. A good implantation of biomaterials in the skeleton is to reach full integration of non-living implant with living bone. The aim of this study is to compare the resorption kinetics of four kinds of calcium phosphate ceramics: hydroxyapatite (Ca{10}(PO4)6(OH)2), hydroxyapatite doped with manganese or zinc and a composite material of 75% hydroxyapatite and 25% β-tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2). Cylinders (5 6 mm in diameter) of these ceramics were packed into holes made in the femur diaphysis of mature ovine. At 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 28, 36 and 48 weeks after the operation, bone/implant interface was embedded in polymethylmethacrylate. We used the PIXE method (particle induced X-ray emission) to measure the distribution of mineral elements (Ca, P, Sr, Zn, Mn and Fe) at the bone/implant interface. At 4, 8, 16, 28 and 48 weeks after implantation we studied a biopsy of the ceramics by neutron activation method. Then, we have a global measurement of mineral elements in the biomaterial. The results showed that the resorption kinetics of hydroxyapatite doped with zinc was faster than that of the three other bioceramics.

  9. Stereodynamical Origin of Anti-Arrhenius Kinetics: Negative Activation Energy and Roaming for a Four-Atom Reaction.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Silva, Valter H C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    The OH + HBr → H2O + Br reaction, prototypical of halogen-atom liberating processes relevant to mechanisms for atmospheric ozone destruction, attracted frequent attention of experimental chemical kinetics: the nature of the unusual reactivity drop from low to high temperatures eluded a variety of theoretical efforts, ranking this one among the most studied four-atom reactions. Here, inspired by oriented molecular-beams experiments, we develop a first-principles stereodynamical approach. Thermalized sets of trajectories, evolving on a multidimensional potential energy surface quantum mechanically generated on-the-fly, provide a map of most visited regions at each temperature. Visualizations of rearrangements of bonds along trajectories and of the role of specific angles of reactants' mutual approach elucidate the mechanistic change from the low kinetic energy regime (where incident reactants reorient to find the propitious alignment leading to reaction) to high temperature (where speed hinders adjustment of directionality and roaming delays reactivity).

  10. Experimental effect of shots caused by projectiles fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J.

    PubMed

    Smędra-Kaźmirska, Anna; Barzdo, Maciej; Kędzierski, Maciej; Antoszczyk, Łukasz; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Pursuant to the Polish Weapons and Ammunitions Law (Legal Gazette No 53/1999 item 549 with subsequent amendments), air guns with kinetic energy of the fired projectiles below 17 J are not regarded as weapons. The aim of the study was to assess the potential effect of shots caused by projectiles of various mass and structure fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J on human soft tissues. As a model of soft tissue, we used 20% gelatin blocks. After shooting, we measured the depth of gelatin block penetration by pellets fired from various distances and compared these results with autopsy findings. The results demonstrated that examined pneumatic guns may cause serious injuries, including damage to the pleura, pericardium, liver, spleen, kidneys, femoral artery, and thoracic and abdominal aorta. Experiment shown that gelatin blocks do not reflect fully the properties of the human body.

  11. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  12. Kinetic control over pathway complexity in supramolecular polymerization through modulating the energy landscape by rational molecular design.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Soichiro; Fukui, Tomoya; Jue, Melinda L; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Sugiyasu, Kazunori

    2014-12-22

    Far-from-equilibrium thermodynamic systems that are established as a consequence of coupled equilibria are the origin of the complex behavior of biological systems. Therefore, research in supramolecular chemistry has recently been shifting emphasis from a thermodynamic standpoint to a kinetic one; however, control over the complex kinetic processes is still in its infancy. Herein, we report our attempt to control the time evolution of supramolecular assembly in a process in which the supramolecular assembly transforms from a J-aggregate to an H-aggregate over time. The transformation proceeds through a delicate interplay of these two aggregation pathways. We have succeeded in modulating the energy landscape of the respective aggregates by a rational molecular design. On the basis of this understanding of the energy landscape, programming of the time evolution was achieved through adjusting the balance between the coupled equilibria.

  13. High temperature materials synthesis without heat: Oxide layer growth on electronic materials using high-kinetic-energy atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffbauer, M.A.; Cross, J.B.; Archuleta, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors examined thin-film materials-synthesis processes in which chemical reactions are initiated using high-kinetic-energy neutral atomic species instead of high temperatures. The research is aimed at producing device-quality insulating oxide layers on semiconductor materials. Thick, uniform, and fully oxidized insulating layers of unprecedented quality are formed on gallium arsenide by exposure of wafer substrates to a high kinetic-energy ({approximately}3eV) neutral atomic-oxygen beam. The nonthermal oxidation process does not disrupt the crystalline order of the substrate and no detectable elemental arsenic is produced at the oxide/gallium arsenide interface.

  14. Experimental effect of shots caused by projectiles fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J.

    PubMed

    Smędra-Kaźmirska, Anna; Barzdo, Maciej; Kędzierski, Maciej; Antoszczyk, Łukasz; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Pursuant to the Polish Weapons and Ammunitions Law (Legal Gazette No 53/1999 item 549 with subsequent amendments), air guns with kinetic energy of the fired projectiles below 17 J are not regarded as weapons. The aim of the study was to assess the potential effect of shots caused by projectiles of various mass and structure fired from air guns with kinetic energy below 17 J on human soft tissues. As a model of soft tissue, we used 20% gelatin blocks. After shooting, we measured the depth of gelatin block penetration by pellets fired from various distances and compared these results with autopsy findings. The results demonstrated that examined pneumatic guns may cause serious injuries, including damage to the pleura, pericardium, liver, spleen, kidneys, femoral artery, and thoracic and abdominal aorta. Experiment shown that gelatin blocks do not reflect fully the properties of the human body. PMID:23919403

  15. Attenuation of 10 MeV electron beam energy to achieve low doses does not affect Salmonella spp. inactivation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV electron beam on Salmonella inactivation kinetics was investigated. No statistically significant differences were observed between the D10 values of either Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- or a Salmonella cocktail (S. 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Newport, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella) when irradiated with either a non-attenuated 10 MeV eBeam or an attenuated 10 MeV eBeam (~2.9±0.22 MeV). The results show that attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV eBeam to achieve low doses does not affect the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. when compared to direct 10 MeV eBeam irradiation.

  16. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOEpatents

    Cross, Jon B.; Cremers, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  17. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOEpatents

    Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

    1986-01-10

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  18. Kinetic-arrest-induced phase coexistence and metastability in (Mn,Fe ) 2(P ,Si )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X. F.; Mitsui, Y.; Dugulan, A. Iulian; Caron, L.; Thang, N. V.; Manuel, P.; Koyama, K.; Takahashi, K.; van Dijk, N. H.; Brück, E.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetometry, and in-field x-ray diffraction are employed to investigate the magnetoelastic phase transition in hexagonal (Mn,Fe ) 2(P ,Si ) compounds. (Mn,Fe ) 2(P ,Si ) compounds undergo for certain compositions a second-order paramagnetic (PM) to a spin-density-wave (SDW) phase transition before further transforming into a ferromagnetic (FM) phase via a first-order phase transition. The SDW-FM transition can be kinetically arrested, causing the coexistence of FM and untransformed SDW phases at low temperatures. Our in-field x-ray diffraction and magnetic relaxation measurements clearly reveal the metastability of the untransformed SDW phase. This unusual magnetic configuration originates from the strong magnetoelastic coupling and the mixed magnetism in hexagonal (Mn,Fe ) 2(P ,Si ) compounds.

  19. Kinetically induced irreversibility in electro-oxidation and reduction of Pt surface.

    PubMed

    Jinnouchi, Ryosuke; Kodama, Kensaku; Suzuki, Takahisa; Morimoto, Yu

    2015-05-14

    A mean field kinetic model was developed for electrochemical oxidations and reductions of Pt(111) on the basis of density functional theory calculations, and the reaction mechanisms were analyzed. The model reasonably describes asymmetric shapes of cyclic voltammograms and small Tafel slopes of relevant redox reactions observed in experiments without assuming any unphysical forms of rate equations. Simulations using the model indicate that the oxidation of Pt(111) proceeds via an electrochemical oxidation from Pt to PtOH and a disproportionation reaction from PtOH to PtO and Pt, while its reduction proceeds via two electrochemical reductions from PtO to PtOH and from PtOH to Pt.

  20. Kinetic model of C/H/N/O emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Dagdigian, Paul J.; Khachatrian, Ani; Babushok, Valeri I.

    2010-05-01

    A kinetic model to predict the relative intensities of the atomic C/H/N/O emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been developed for organic compounds. The model includes a comprehensive set of chemical processes involving both neutral and ionic chemistry and physical excitation and de-excitation of atomic levels affecting the neutral, ionic, and excited-state species concentrations. The relative excited-state atom concentrations predicted by this modeling are compared with those derived from the observed LIBS intensities for 355 nm ns laser irradiation of residues of two organic compounds on aluminum substrate. The model reasonably predicts the relative excited-state concentrations, as well as their time profiles. Comparison of measured and computed concentrations has also allowed an estimation of the degree of air entrainment.