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Sample records for kinetic phosphorescence analysis

  1. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis to quantify europium and terbium

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Chelsie; Seiner, Brienne; Smith, Steven; Bowen, James; Finch, Zach; Friese, Judah

    2015-09-04

    The ability to measure europium and terbium may be confounded by the presence of other lanthanides when using spectroscopic techniques such as optical emission spectroscopy, especially at trace levels. Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) offers a method to avoid these interferences during trace level measurements. This study examined analysis parameters for Eu and Tb by testing the effects of different acids, molarities, and the use of a complexing agent to determine the ideal conditions and limits of detection for each analyte in samples containing various mixtures of lanthanides.

  2. Evaluation of kinetic phosphorescence analysis for the determination of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Croatto, P.V.; Frank, I.W.; Johnson, K.D.; Mason, P.B.; Smith, M.M.

    1997-12-01

    In the past, New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has used a fluorometric method for the determination of sub-microgram quantities of uranium. In its continuing effort to upgrade and improve measurement technology, NBL has evaluated the commercially-available KPA-11 kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (Chemchek, Richland, WA). The Chemchek KPA-11 is a bench-top instrument which performs single-measurement, quench-corrected analyses for trace uranium. It incorporates patented kinetic phosphorimetry techniques to measure and analyze sample phosphorescence as a function of time. With laser excitation and time-corrected photon counting, the KPA-11 has a lower detection limit than conventional fluorometric methods. Operated with a personal computer, the state-of-the-art KPA-11 offers extensive time resolution and phosphorescence lifetime capabilities for additional specificity. Interferences are thereby avoided while obtaining precise measurements. Routine analyses can be easily and effectively accomplished, with the accuracy and precision equivalent to the pulsed-laser fluorometric method presently performed at NBL, without the need for internal standards. Applications of kinetic phosphorimetry at NBL include the measurement of trace level uranium in retention tank, waste samples, and low-level samples. It has also been used to support other experimental activities at NBL by the measuring of nanogram amounts of uranium contamination (in blanks) in isotopic sample preparations, and the determining of elution curves of different ion exchange resins used for uranium purification. In many cases, no pretreatment of samples was necessary except to fume them with nitric acid, and then to redissolve and dilute them to an appropriate concentration with 1 M HNO{sub 3} before measurement. Concentrations were determined on a mass basis ({micro}g U/g of solution), but no density corrections were needed since all the samples (including the samples used for calibration) were in the same

  3. Investigating Uranium Concentrations in Groundwaters in the State of Idaho Using Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tkavadze, Levan; Dunker, Roy E; Brey, Richard R; Dudgeon, John

    2016-11-01

    The determination of uranium concentrations in natural water samples is of great interest due to the environmental consequences of this radionuclide. In this study, 380 groundwater samples from various locations within the state of Idaho were analyzed using two different techniques. The first method was Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA), which gives the total uranium concentrations in water samples. The second analysis method was inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP- MS). This method determines the total uranium concentration as well as the separate isotope concentrations of uranium. The U/U isotopic ratio was also measured for each sample to confirm that there was no depleted or enriched uranium present. The results were compared and mapped separately from each other. The study also found that in some areas of the state, natural uranium concentrations are relatively high.

  4. Spectral and kinetic parameters of phosphorescence of triplet chlorophyll a in the photosynthetic apparatus of plants.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A; Kovalev, Yu V

    2014-04-01

    Spectral and kinetic parameters and quantum yield of IR phosphorescence accompanying radiative deactivation of the chlorophyll a (Chl a) triplet state were compared in pigment solutions, greening and mature plant leaves, isolated chloroplasts, and thalluses of macrophytic marine algae. On the early stages of greening just after the Shibata shift, phosphorescence is determined by the bulk Chl a molecules. According to phosphorescence measurement, the quantum yield of triplet state formation is not less than 25%. Further greening leads to a strong decrease in the phosphorescence yield. In mature leaves developing under normal irradiation conditions, the phosphorescence yield declined 1000-fold. This parameter is stable in leaves of different plant species. Three spectral forms of phosphorescence-emitting chlorophyll were revealed in the mature photosynthetic apparatus with the main emission maxima at 955, 975, and 995 nm and lifetimes ~1.9, ~1.5, and 1.1-1.3 ms. In the excitation spectra of chlorophyll phosphorescence measured in thalluses of macrophytic green and red algae, the absorption bands of Chl a and accessory pigments - carotenoids, Chl b, and phycobilins - were observed. These data suggest that phosphorescence is emitted by triplet chlorophyll molecules that are not quenched by carotenoids and correspond to short wavelength forms of Chl a coupled to the normal light harvesting pigment complex. The concentration of the phosphorescence-emitting chlorophyll molecules in chloroplasts and the contribution of these molecules to chlorophyll fluorescence were estimated. Spectral and kinetic parameters of the phosphorescence corresponding to the long wavelength fluorescence band at 737 nm were evaluated. The data indicate that phosphorescence provides unique information on the photophysics of pigment molecules, molecular organization of the photosynthetic apparatus, and mechanisms and efficiency of photodynamic stress in plants.

  5. Effect of Proton Radiation on the Kinetics of Phosphorescence Decay in the Ceramic Material ZnS-Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchakova, T.A.; Vesna, G.V.; Makara, V.A.

    2004-11-01

    The results of studying the dose dependences of the decay kinetics of phosphorescence excited by X-ray radiation in luminescent ZnS-Cu ceramic material before and after irradiation with 50-MeV protons are considered. An anomalous variation in the exponent of the hyperbolic phosphorescence curves was observed experimentally as the accumulated light sum increased. It is found from an analysis of the data obtained that two processes are involved in the decay: one of these is monomolecular and corresponds to the first-order kinetics; the other is bimolecular and corresponds to the second-order kinetics. Transitions of charge carriers delocalized from traps occur at the nonradiative-recombination centers induced by proton radiation. Recombination of these charge carriers at the emission centers in the course of decay is described by the second-order kinetics.

  6. Experiments with Glow-in-the-Dark Toys: Kinetics of Doped ZnS Phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisensky, George C.; Patel, Manish N.; Reich, Megan L.

    1996-11-01

    Many semiconductors exhibit the property of phosphorescence, the phenomenon whereby a material excited by visible or ultraviolet radiation glows (i.e., emits visible light) for a substantial time after the excitation source has been removed. One phosphorescent semiconductor commonly used in glow-in-the dark toys and emergency signs is copper-doped zinc sulfide (ZnS:Cu), a material that produces a yellow-green glow. The study of this light emission is a suitable introduction to kinetics and to semiconductors. Intensity data were recorded for a Glow-Yo yo-yo, an Amazing Glow Ball, Hanovia P-1000 pigment, and Glo-Vinyl Tape by spectrofluorophotometer and also by using a CdS photocell and ohmmeter. The emission of the ZnS semiconductor is not across the band gap, but involves interband traps associated with the Cu doping material. The phosphorescence decay of ZnS:Cu fits a second order equation, consistent with recombination of relatively equal populations of holes and electrons (n ~ p). Arrhenius data show the delocalized electrons in the conduction band must overcome a small but measurable activation energy of about 15 kJ/mol to fall back to the localized copper-site holes for the recombination that produces phosphorescence.

  7. Study on the kinetic properties of phosphor in deoxycholate aggregates by phosphorescent quenching methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Yu; Jin, Wei-Jun

    2007-07-27

    Owing to the unique molecular structure and aggregate behaviors in aqueous solution, dihydroxy bile salts can provide phosphorescent probe with a special microenvironment in which the room temperature phosphorescence of probe can be detected in the presence of dissolved oxygen. It, however, is not very clear how the bile salts work in inducing this kind of oxygen-independent phosphorescence. The present work tries to offer with possible more insights by investigating the particular kinetic behaviors of 3-bromoquinoline (3-BrQ) as probe in sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) aggregate based on phosphorescent quenching methodology. The critical aggregate concentration of NaDC is estimated as about 0.5mM based on the enhancement of probe phosphorescence. As the functions of quencher Cu(2+) and NO(2)(-), the rate constants of various photophysical processes for 3-BrQ are obtained in NaDC solution and full aqueous solution, respectively. In NaDC solution, the quenching rate constant k(cu2+) equals to 1.77x10(7)M(-1)s(-1) k(no-2)(mq) 1.62x10(6)M(-1)s(-1). The exit rate k(-) and entrance rate k(+) are determined to be 16-46s(-1) and 10(6)M(-1)s(-1) levels, respectively. The quenching rate constant k(o2)(q) of dissolved oxygen is estimated as 4.15x10(4)M(-1)s(-1) in air-saturated NaDC solution at 1atm.

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo study of triplet-triplet annihilation in organic phosphorescent emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eersel, H.; Bobbert, P. A.; Coehoorn, R.

    2015-03-01

    The triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) rate in organic phosphorescent materials such as used in organic light-emitting diodes is determined predominantly either by the rate of single-step Förster-type triplet-triplet interactions, or by multi-step triplet diffusion. We show how kinetic Monte Carlo simulations may be used to analyze the role of both processes. Under steady state conditions, the effective triplet-triplet interaction rate coefficient, kTT, which is often regarded as a constant, is found to depend actually on the number of excitons lost upon a triplet-triplet interaction process and to show a significant higher-order dependence on the triplet volume density. Under the conditions encountered in transient photoluminescence (PL) studies, kTT is found to be effectively constant in the case of diffusion-dominated TTA. However, for the case of single-step TTA, a strongly different decay of the emission intensity is found, which also deviates from an analytic expression proposed in the literature. We discuss how the transient PL response may be used to make a distinction between both mechanisms. The simulations are applied to recently published work on the dye concentration dependence of the TTA rate in materials based on the archetypal green emitter tris[2-phenylpyridine]iridium (Ir(ppy)3).

  9. Analysis of the phosphorescent dye concentration dependence of triplet-triplet annihilation in organic host-guest systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; van Eersel, H.; Bobbert, P. A.; Coehoorn, R.

    2016-10-01

    Using a novel method for analyzing transient photoluminescence (PL) experiments, a microscopic description is obtained for the dye concentration dependence of triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) in phosphorescent host-guest systems. It is demonstrated that the TTA-mechanism, which could be a single-step dominated process or a diffusion-mediated multi-step process, can be deduced for any given dye concentration from a recently proposed PL intensity analysis. A comparison with the results of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations provides the TTA-Förster radius and shows that the TTA enhancement due to triplet diffusion can be well described in a microscopic manner assuming Förster- or Dexter-type energy transfer.

  10. Phosphorescence lifetime analysis with a quadratic programming algorithm for determining quencher distributions in heterogeneous systems.

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, S A; Wilson, D F

    1994-01-01

    A new method for analysis of phosphorescence lifetime distributions in heterogeneous systems has been developed. This method is based on decomposition of the data vector to a linearly independent set of exponentials and uses quadratic programming principles for x2 minimization. Solution of the resulting algorithm requires a finite number of calculations (it is not iterative) and is computationally fast and robust. The algorithm has been tested on various simulated decays and for analysis of phosphorescence measurements of experimental systems with descrete distributions of lifetimes. Critical analysis of the effect of signal-to-noise on the resolving capability of the algorithm is presented. This technique is recommended for resolution of the distributions of quencher concentration in heterogeneous samples, of which oxygen distributions in tissue is an important example. Phosphors of practical importance for biological oxygen measurements: Pd-meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (PdTCPP) and Pd-meso-porphyrin (PdMP) have been used to provide experimental test of the algorithm. PMID:7858142

  11. Oxygen measurements via phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Sami; Marzouqi, Farida; Al Mansouri, Aysha; Penefsky, Harvey S; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurements of dissolved O(2) as a function of time have numerous chemical and biological applications. The Pd (II) complex of meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-tetrabenzoporphyrin (Pd phosphor) was used for this purpose. Detection is based on the principle that the phosphorescence of this oxygen probe is inversely related to dissolved O(2) (O(2) quenches the phosphorescence). Biologic samples containing the Pd phosphor were flashed (10/s) with a peak output of 625nm; emitted light was detected at 800nm. Amplified pulses of phosphorescence were digitized at 1-2MHz using an analog/digital converter (PCI-DAS 4020/12 I/O Board) with outputs ranging from 1 to 20MHz. Assessment revealed a customized program was necessary. Pulses were captured using a developed software at 0.1-4MHz, depending on the speed of the computer. O(2) concentration was calculated by fitting to an exponential the decay of the phosphorescence. Twelve tasks were identified, which allowed full control and customization of the data acquisition, storage and analysis. The program used Microsoft Visual Basic 6 (VB6), Microsoft Access Database 2007, and a Universal Library component that allowed direct reading from the PCI-DAS 4020/12 I/O Board. It involved a relational database design to store experiments, pulses and pulse metadata, including phosphorescence decay rates. The method permitted reliable measurements of cellular O(2) consumption over several hours. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Franck-Condon analysis of the S0 --> T1 absorption and phosphorescence spectra of biphenyl and bridged derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Fabrizia; Zgierski, Marek Z.

    1992-11-01

    The equilibrium geometry and the vibrational force field of the ground and the lowest triplet electronic states of biphenyl and three bridged derivatives-biphenylene, fluorene and phenanthrene-are computed by using an updated version of the QCFF/PI (Quantum Chemical Force Field/π electron) Hamiltonian. The displacement parameters between T1 and S0 are obtained and used to model the S0→T1 absorption and the phosphorescence spectra. The calculated Franck-Condon envelopes are found to be in excellent agreement with the vibrational structure of the observed spectra. The common features of the phosphorescence spectra of biphenyl and fluorene are related to the same orbital nature of the lowest triplet state. The observed asymmetry between the phosphorescence and singlet-triplet absorption spectra of biphenyl is reproduced when the twisted equilibrium geometry of S0 is considered. It is shown that evidence of the nonplanarity of the ground state of biphenyl is manifested by the lower intensity of the band observed in the phosphorescence at 747 cm-1 with respect to the intensity of the same band in fluorene. The increased vibrational activity calculated in the lower frequency region for biphenylene and phenanthrene agrees with the observed spectra and reflects the different orbital nature of the lowest triplet state of the two strongly perturbed bridged derivatives with respect to biphenyl and fluorene. From the analysis of the computed vibrational frequencies, it is suggested that the false origin of the symmetry forbidden phosphorescence of biphenylene is due to the lowest out-of-plane mode of au symmetry.

  13. The energies and kinetics of triplet carotenoids in the LH2 antenna complexes as determined by phosphorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Taguchi, Tokio; Fujii, Ritsuko; Yokoyama, Kyosuke; Koyama, Yasushi; Watanabe, Yasutaka

    2004-01-01

    The triplet (T 1) states of carotenoids (Cars) and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl) in the LH2 antenna complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C, Rba. sphaeroides 2.4.1 and Rhodospirillum molischianum, containing neurosporene, spheroidene and lycopene, respectively, were examined by stationary-state and time-resolved phosphorescence spectroscopy. The T 1 energies of Cars were determined, irrespective of the Car or BChl excitation, to be 7030 cm -1 (neurosporene), 6920 cm -1 (spheroidene) and 6870 cm -1 (lycopene), respectively, whereas that of BChl to be 7590 cm -1. In the Rba. sphaeroides G1C, the Car and BChl triplet states decayed in similar time constant as the BChl Q y state, a fact which indicates that the pair of triplet states decays through the triplet-triplet annihilation mechanism.

  14. Modular kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Krab, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    Modularization is an important strategy to tackle the study of complex biological systems. Modular kinetic analysis (MKA) is a quantitative method to extract kinetic information from such a modularized system that can be used to determine the control and regulatory structure of the system, and to pinpoint and quantify the interaction of effectors with the system. The principles of the method are described, and the relation with metabolic control analysis is discussed. Examples of application of MKA are given. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Theory and Calculation of the Phosphorescence Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Baryshnikov, Gleb; Minaev, Boris; Ågren, Hans

    2017-05-10

    Phosphorescence is a phenomenon of delayed luminescence that corresponds to the radiative decay of the molecular triplet state. As a general property of molecules, phosphorescence represents a cornerstone problem of chemical physics due to the spin prohibition of the underlying triplet-singlet emission and because its analysis embraces a deep knowledge of electronic molecular structure. Phosphorescence is the simplest physical process which provides an example of spin-forbidden transformation with a characteristic spin selectivity and magnetic field dependence, being the model also for more complicated chemical reactions and for spin catalysis applications. The bridging of the spin prohibition in phosphorescence is commonly analyzed by perturbation theory, which considers the intensity borrowing from spin-allowed electronic transitions. In this review, we highlight the basic theoretical principles and computational aspects for the estimation of various phosphorescence parameters, like intensity, radiative rate constant, lifetime, polarization, zero-field splitting, and spin sublevel population. Qualitative aspects of the phosphorescence phenomenon are discussed in terms of concepts like structure-activity relationships, donor-acceptor interactions, vibronic activity, and the role of spin-orbit coupling under charge-transfer perturbations. We illustrate the theory and principles of computational phosphorescence by highlighting studies of classical examples like molecular nitrogen and oxygen, benzene, naphthalene and their azaderivatives, porphyrins, as well as by reviewing current research on systems like electrophosphorescent transition metal complexes, nucleobases, and amino acids. We furthermore discuss modern studies of phosphorescence that cover topics of applied relevance, like the design of novel photofunctional materials for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, chemical sensors, and bioimaging.

  16. Flow injection analysis with on-line nylon powder extraction for room-temperature phosphorescence determination of thiabendazole.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, G N; Escandar, G M

    2009-07-30

    A fast and very selective flow-through phosphorescence optosensor was designed and characterized for the determination of the fungicide thiabendazole in water samples. For the first time, thiabendazole was determined using a flow-through optosensor based on the phosphorescence signals obtained when it is retained in a solid support. While thiabendazole does not phosphoresce in packing materials commonly used to fill the flow-cell, significant emission signals are observed when it is retained on nylon powder in the presence of iodide and sulfite. The experimental set-up was based on a flow-injection manifold coupled to an on-line phosphorescence detector containing nylon powder packed in a conventional flow-cell. Potassium iodide and sodium sulfite were added to sample aliquots to improve the thiabendazole phosphorescence and injected in the flow manifold using water as carrier. After the phosphorescence emission was registered, the analyte was eluted from the packed nylon with a 65% (v/v) methanol-water mixture. Optimal instrumentation, experimental and flow conditions were evaluated. Using a sample volume of 2000 microL, the analytical signal showed a very good linearity in the range 12.9-110 ng mL(-1), with a detection limit of 4.5 ng mL(-1), and a sample throughput of about 14 samples per hour. The effects of the presence of concomitant species in the thiabendazole phosphorescence signal were studied, and a comparison with the fluorescence nylon-powder optosensor was carried out and discussed. Finally, the applicability of the proposed optosensor was tested in water samples, and satisfactory recoveries ranging between 97% and 105% were obtained.

  17. Analysis of Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model for polymorphic crystallization (i.e., initial and final phases with identical compositions), which includes time-dependent nucleation and cluster-size-dependent growth rates, is developed and tested by fits to experimental data. Model calculations are used to assess the validity of two of the more common approaches for the analysis of crystallization data. The effects of particle size on transformation kinetics, important for the crystallization of many systems of limited dimension including thin films, fine powders, and nanoparticles, are examined.

  18. Using phosphorescence as a fingerprint for the Hope and other blue diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton-Magaña, Sally; Post, Jeffrey E.; Heaney, Peter J.; Freitas, Jaime; Klein, Paul; Walters, Roy; Butler, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Sixty-seven natural blue diamonds, including the two largestsuch gemstones known (the Hope and the Blue Heart), were probedby ultraviolet radiation, and their luminescence was analyzedusing a novel spectrometer system. Prior to this study, thefiery red phosphorescence of the Hope Diamond was regarded asquite rare compared to greenish-blue phosphorescence. However,our results demonstrated that virtually all blue diamonds phosphoresceat 660 nm (orange-red) but that this emission often is obscuredby a concomitant luminescence at 500 nm (green-blue). Althoughboth bands were nearly always present, the relative intensitiesof these emissions and their decay kinetics varied dramatically.Consequently, phosphorescence analysis provides a method todiscriminate among individual blue diamonds. Treated and syntheticblue diamonds showed behavior distinct from natural stones.Temperature-dependent phosphorescence revealed that the 660nm emission has an activation energy of 0.4 eV, close to the0.37 eV acceptor energy for boron, suggesting that the phosphorescenceis caused by donor-acceptor pair recombination.

  19. Surface Plasmon Coupled Phosphorescence (SPCP)

    PubMed Central

    Previte, Michael J. R.; Aslan, Kadir; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observation of surface plasmon coupled phosphorescence (SPCP) for PtOEP (2,3,7,8,12,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphyrin platinum II) immobilized in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) films on continuous gold films of 47 nm thickness. We confirm the observation of SPCP by comparing the spectra and lifetimes for plasmon coupled phosphorescence with the free space isotropic phosphorescence emission. Due to the directional emission inherent to plasmon coupled phosphorescence, we believe that SPCP can facilitate the study of phosphorescence in biological applications, such as protein dynamics and alkaline phosphatase studies, whose signal intensities are inherently weak and nearly always isotropic. PMID:19562099

  20. Surface plasmon coupled phosphorescence (SPCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previte, Michael J. R.; Aslan, Kadir; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D.

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of surface plasmon coupled phosphorescence (SPCP) for PtOEP (2,3,7,8,12,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphyrin platinum II) immobilized in polyvinyl chloride films on continuous gold films of 47 nm thickness. We confirm the observation of SPCP by comparing the spectra and lifetimes for plasmon coupled phosphorescence with the free space isotropic phosphorescence emission. Due to the directional emission inherent to plasmon coupled phosphorescence, we believe that SPCP can facilitate the study of phosphorescence in biological applications, such as protein dynamics and alkaline phosphatase studies, whose signal intensities are inherently weak and nearly always isotropic.

  1. Surface Plasmon Coupled Phosphorescence (SPCP).

    PubMed

    Previte, Michael J R; Aslan, Kadir; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D

    2006-12-11

    We report the first observation of surface plasmon coupled phosphorescence (SPCP) for PtOEP (2,3,7,8,12,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphyrin platinum II) immobilized in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) films on continuous gold films of 47 nm thickness. We confirm the observation of SPCP by comparing the spectra and lifetimes for plasmon coupled phosphorescence with the free space isotropic phosphorescence emission. Due to the directional emission inherent to plasmon coupled phosphorescence, we believe that SPCP can facilitate the study of phosphorescence in biological applications, such as protein dynamics and alkaline phosphatase studies, whose signal intensities are inherently weak and nearly always isotropic.

  2. Quenching platinum octaethylporphine phosphorescence in solution by poly(ferrocenylsilane).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Cyr, Paul W; Wang, Yishan; Soong, Ronald; Macdonald, Peter M; Chen, Liusheng; Manners, Ian; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2006-01-01

    We describe experiments that determine the quenching kinetics by poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) for platinum octaethylporphine (PtOEP) phosphorescence in toluene solution. The phosphorescence quenching process was interpreted in terms of diffusion-controlled kinetics. Pulsed-gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (PGSE NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to characterize the diffusion behavior of PFS and PtOEP in toluene solution. We found that the ferrocene group present in the repeat unit of polymer backbone is a good quencher for PtOEP phosphorescence. Quenching by the polymer involves the entire PFS polymer chain instead of individual ferrocene groups. The intrinsic quenching ability of PFS was found to be higher than that of a model compound, Bu-FS, that contains a single ferrocene group.

  3. How the Molecular Packing Affects the Room Temperature Phosphorescence in Pure Organic Compounds: Ingenious Molecular Design, Detailed Crystal Analysis, and Rational Theoretical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yujun; Ge, Yuwei; Peng, Qian; Li, Conggang; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2017-02-21

    Long-lived phosphorescence at room temperature (RTP) from pure organic molecules is rare. Recent research reveals various crystalline organic molecules can realize RTP with lifetimes extending to the magnitude of second. There is little research on how molecular packing affecting RTP. Three compounds are designed with similar optical properties in solution, but tremendously different solid emission characteristics. By investigating the molecular packing arrangement in single crystals, it is found that the packing style of the compact face to face favors of long phosphorescence lifetime and high photoluminescence efficiency, with the lifetime up to 748 ms observed in the crystal of CPM ((9H-carbazol-9-yl)(phenyl)methanone). Theoretical calculation analysis also reveals this kind of packing style can remarkably reduce the singlet excited energy level and prompt electron communication between dimers. Surprisingly, CPM has two very similar single crystals, labeled as CPM and CPM-A, with almost identical crystal data, and the only difference is that molecules in CPM-A crystal take a little looser packing arrangement. X-ray diffraction and cross-polarization under magic spinning (13) C NMR spectra double confirm that they are different crystals. Interestingly, CPM-A crystal shows negligible RTP compared to the CPM crystal, once again proving that the packing style is critical to the RTP property.

  4. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  5. Effect of matrices on phosphorescence of aromatic compounds in porous sol-gel glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnich, S.A.; Mel`nichenko, I.M.; Nevzorov, V.V.

    1995-12-01

    Phosphorescence of aromatic compounds is studied in porous sol-gel matrices at liquid nitrogen temperature. Spectral and kinetic parameters of phosphorescence are found to depend on a matrix and the nature of the activator molecules. In the case of carbonyl compounds, this dependence is determined, in our opinion, by the interaction between the carbonyl group of a molecule and the hydroxyl groups of a matrix, which are bonded to surface silicon atoms. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Time-resolved phosphorescence of proteins and polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousslang, Kenneth W.; Buratto, Steve K.; Haynes, D.; Heath, P.; Holloway, D.; Hulteen, John C.; Dick, Lisa; Stevenson, K.; Harding, C. O.; Ross, J. B. Alexander

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes the use of luminescent coenzymes and substrates in the study of two proteins, horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and sex steroid-binding protein (SBP). We report the phosphorescence emission and lifetimes of NAD and e-NAD in pyrazole ternary complexes with ADH. Whereas the decay of NAD is adequately described as monoexponential with a lifetime of 2.4 s, the decay of e-NAD obeys a double exponential decay law with time constants of 0.4 and 0.15 sec. Ternary complexes with NAD have the same decay kinetics as ADH by itself. However, in ternary complexes with f-NAD, it is possible to selectively excite and detect the coenzyme phosphorescence. We show that f-NAD is a more useful probe than NAD for protein structure in ADH. We also measured the triplet emission and decay lifetimes of dihydroequilenin, an equine steroid bound by SBP. We find that the phosphorescence spectra and lifetimes are pH dependent, with the protonated species dominating emission below pH 10.0, and the deprotonated form dominating at pH 10.0 and above. The acidic and basic species can be selectively excited, and the emission at pH near the pKa is characteristic of the equilibrium ground state populations. Since hydrogen bonding is implicated in SBP-steroid complexes, dihydroequilenin is a potential phosphorescent probe for the binding interaction.

  7. Beam tests of phosphorescent screens

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Luth, V.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, J.

    1985-03-05

    Twelve phosphorescent screens were beam tested for linearity, uniformity, low radiation damage and a suitable emitted wavelength for use with television cameras. One screen was chosen for the construction of several intercepting profile monitors which were used during the SLC Ten Sector Tests to measure the emittance and wakefield effects of a damped electron beam.

  8. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.

    2016-02-29

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  9. Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

    2014-08-26

    Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

  10. Analysis of protein aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, F

    1999-01-01

    Given a set of kinetic data, then, the preceding discussions suggest the following approach to its analysis. 1. For purposes of establishing the reaction, ignore the final stages and concentrate on the initial 10-20% of the reaction at first. A globally optimized model may be based on a faulty assumption for the initial steps. Thus, although the whole data set may look reasonably well fit, the reaction could be misrepresented, and thus the fit unhelpful if accuracy at the later stages has come at the expense of the initial phase of the reaction. 2. What is the time course of the initial reaction? (A) Is the reaction exponential? Exponential growth gives dramatic lag times (see Fig. 3), whereas nonexponential "lag times" have a visible signal from time 0 (i.e., Fig. 2). If the data set shows the abrupt appearance of signals after a period of quiescence, the chances are excellent that the time course is exponential. High sensitivity measurement of the signal at times during the lag phase should be used to confirm the exponential nature quantitatively. Exponential reactions mean a secondary pathway is operative. (a) A cascade (tn) can look similar to an exponential, but may proceed from a multistep single-path reaction. Thus the exponential needs to be ascertained with some accuracy. (b) It is possible that some or all of the lag results from a stochastic process, i.e., formation of a single nucleus being observed. This, however, is likely to be accompanied by a secondary process, as few techniques are sensitive enough to detect a single polymer at a time, and having one nucleus form many polymers is a hallmark of a secondary process. Thus, the reproducibility of the kinetics must be established to rule out stochastics. If data show wide variation, stochastic methods as described earlier may be employed. (c) Given a secondary process, one must separate the primary nucleation process from the secondary process (by stochastic means or by use of the product B2A, as

  11. Phosphorescence lifetime based oxygen micro-sensing using a digital micromirror device.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shih-Hui; Holl, Mark R; McQuaide, Sarah C; Ren, Timothy T H; Gales, Steven A; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2007-08-20

    A digital light modulation microscope (DLMM) that utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) on an epifluorescence microscope has been developed to modulate excitation light in spatial and temporal domains for phosphorescence lifetime detection. Local O2 concentration can be inferred through the detected lifetime around an O2-quenching phosphorescent porphyrin microsensor. Combined with microsensor arrays, the DLMM can sequentially address light to each microsensor element to construct a discrete lifetime image or O2 distribution. In contrast to conventional phosphorescence lifetime imaging, the new method eliminates the need for a pulsed light source and a time-gated camera. To demonstrate O2 sensing with lab-on-a-chip devices, an array of 150-mum-diameter micro-wells coated with phosphorescent porphyrin were observed. The locations of the sensor elements were automatically identified though image analysis. The goal of this platform is to measure the O2 consumption of individual cells trapped in the microwells.

  12. A modified stopped-flow apparatus for time-resolved protein phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strambini, Giovanni B.; Puntoni, Alessandro; Gonnelli, Margherita

    1997-12-01

    A type of commercial apparatus was modified and integrated in order to implement the detection of time-resolved protein phosphorescence in the stopped-flow technique. Laser excitation, photomultiplier protection from the intense fluorescence pulse, fluorescence integration, and data acquisition are all synchronized by a trigger module that takes over standard computer control of the stopped-flow apparatus. A detailed protocol is given for effective deoxygenation of the sample and flow lines and for avoiding contamination of the solutions by quenching impurities. The performance of the apparatus was tested by comparing the phosphorescence decay kinetics of the protein horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the stopped-flow apparatus and in a standard phosphorimeter. The time resolution of phosphorescence detection in the stopped-flow apparatus is 10 ms and the sensitivity in terms of chromophores concentration is about 0.1 μM.

  13. Detailed kinetic study of the thermoluminescence glow curve of synthetic quartz.

    PubMed

    Kitis, G; Pagonis, V; Carty, H; Tatsis, E

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis has been performed of the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve of high purity synthetic quartz. The kinetic parameters of the glow peak at 110 degrees C were evaluated for doses ranging from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy using glow curve deconvolution (GCD), initial rise, variable heating ratc and phosphorescence decay methods. All the methods gave results that agree within the experimental errors.

  14. Time-resolved phosphorescence of proteins: structural studies using energy transfer in the rapid diffusion limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafni, Ari; Mersol, Joseph V.; Steel, Duncan G.

    1990-05-01

    Room temperature phosphorescence emitted by tryptophan residues in deoxygenated aqueous solutions of proteins is extremely sensitive to the environment of these residues and can be utilized for the detailed study of protein structure and dynamics. The long decay time of their triplet state makes the phosphorescent tryptophans suitable donors for resonance energy transfer in the rapid diffusion limit. As shown by Stryer et al. (Ann. Rev. Biophys. Bioeng. 11, 203 (1982)) proper data analysis can then yield the distance of closest approach between the donor-acceptor pair. This method can thus allow one to map the distances of phosphorescent tryptophans from the surface of the protein. In the present study a laser-based photon counting system was used to follow the room-temperature phosphorescence decays of alkaline phosphatase and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase and to study the quenching of their triplet states by several molecules whose absorption spectra overlap the long-lived emission of these proteins. The results demonstrate the potential applicability of these measurements for the mapping of phosphorescent tryptophan residues and confirm the phosphorescence of alkaline phosphatase to originate in Trp-109. Limitations to the applicability of the energy-transfer approach arise from quenching mechanisms which compete with resonance transfer. Two such processes - electron transfer and exchange interactions - are discussed.

  15. Phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes: toward high phosphorescence quantum efficiency through ligand control.

    PubMed

    You, Youngmin; Park, Soo Young

    2009-02-28

    Phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes attract enormous attention because they allow highly efficient electrophosphorescence. In pursuing the development of Ir(III) complexes during the last decade, significant progress has been made in terms of the colour-tunability, thermal- and photo-stability, phase homogeneity, and phosphorescence efficiency. By far, extensive synthetic efforts have been focused on the molecular design of ligands to achieve a wide range of phosphorescence colour that is compatible with organic light-emitting device (OLED) applications. In contrast, less has been known about a collective structure-property relationship for phosphorescence quantum efficiency. In fact, a few rule-of-thumbs for high phosphorescence quantum efficiency have been occasionally reported, but a collective rationale is yet to be investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of 8 different methods reported so far to achieve high phosphorescence quantum efficiency from Ir(III) complexes. The methods included herein are limited to the cases of intramolecular controls, and thus are discussed in terms of variations in ligand structures: (1) geometric isomer control, (2) rigid structure and restricted intramolecular motion, (3) larger mixing of 1MLCT and 3LC states, (4) de-stabilizing a thermally accessible non-emissive state, (5) introducing dendrimer structures, (6) control in substituents of ligands, (7) confining the phosphorescent region of a mixed ligand Ir(III) complex and (8) sensitized phosphorescence by using attached energy donors. Each method is closely related to intramolecular excited state interactions, which strongly affect radiative or non-radiative transitions. A comprehensive understanding of these methods leads us to conclude that the modulation in ligand structures has a profound effect on both the phosphorescence colour and phosphorescence quantum efficiency. Thus, the judicious selection of ligand structures and their chelate disposition

  16. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, Bruce A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  17. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-06-10

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  18. Vacuum Nanohole Array Embedded Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sohee; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Song, Young Seok; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Jang-Joo; Youn, Jae Ryoun

    2015-01-01

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes that utilize phosphorescent materials has an internal efficiency of 100% but is limited by an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 30%. In this study, extremely high-efficiency organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with an EQE of greater than 50% and low roll-off were produced by inserting a vacuum nanohole array (VNHA) into phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs). The resultant extraction enhancement was quantified in terms of EQE by comparing experimentally measured results with those produced from optical modeling analysis, which assumes the near-perfect electric characteristics of the device. A comparison of the experimental data and optical modeling results indicated that the VNHA extracts the entire waveguide loss into the air. The EQE obtained in this study is the highest value obtained to date for bottom-emitting OLEDs. PMID:25732061

  19. Host compounds for red phosphorescent OLEDs

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Chuanjun; Cheon, Kwang -Ohk

    2015-08-25

    Novel compounds containing a triphenylene moiety linked to an .alpha..beta. connected binaphthyl ring system are provided. These compounds have surprisingly good solubility in organic solvents and are useful as host compounds in red phosphorescent OLEDs.

  20. Phosphorescence of vitreous 2-bromobenzophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buravtseva, L. M.; Pyshkin, O. S.; Strzhemechny, M. A.; Avdeenko, A. A.

    2008-06-01

    Spectroscopic studies of vitreous 2-bromobenzophenone have been carried out over the respective domain of its stability. Glassy 2-bromobenzophenone samples were obtained by abrupt cooling of the melt by cold helium vapor. Quantum yield measurements allowed us to establish that the upper boundary of stable glass is slightly above 100K, while at about 220K the glass melts. Phosphorescence measurements at 4.2K showed that even at this low temperature the emission contains a strong excimer component. The energy position and shape (two bands) of the excimer emission are close to those observed in the crystal of 2-bromobenzophenone at higher temperatures. Contrary to findings in the crystal, the monomeric emission of the glass contains only one C =O stretch series, every band of which is substantially broader than in the crystal. As the temperature is raised, the monomeric emission intensity falls, disappearing completely above 70K.

  1. Evaluation of multi-exponential curve fitting analysis of oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces for recovering microvascular oxygen tension histograms.

    PubMed

    Bezemer, Rick; Faber, Dirk J; Almac, Emre; Kalkman, Jeroen; Legrand, Matthieu; Heger, Michal; Ince, Can

    2010-12-01

    Although it is generally accepted that oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces can be analyzed using the exponential series method (ESM), its application until now has been limited to a few (patho)physiological studies, probably because the reliability of the recovered oxygen tension (pO(2)) histograms has never been extensively evaluated and lacks documentation. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the use of the ESM to adequately determine pO(2) histograms from phosphorescence decay traces. For this purpose we simulated decay traces corresponding to uni- and bimodal pO(2) distributions and recovered the pO(2) histograms at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Ultimately, we recovered microvascular pO(2) histograms measured in the rat kidney in a model of endotoxemic shock and fluid resuscitation and showed that the mean microvascular oxygen tension, [Symbol: see text]pO(2)[Symbol: see text], decreased after induction of endotoxemia and that after 2 h of fluid resuscitation, [Symbol: see text]pO(2)[Symbol: see text] remained low, but the hypoxic peak that had arisen during endotoxemia was reduced. This finding illustrates the importance of recovering pO(2) histograms under (patho)physiological conditions. In conclusion, this study has characterized how noise affects the recovery of pO(2) histograms using the ESM and documented the reliability of the ESM for recovering both low- and high-pO(2) distributions for SNRs typically found in experiments. This study might therefore serve as a frame of reference for investigations focused on oxygen (re)distribution during health and disease and encourage researchers to (re-)analyze data obtained in (earlier) studies possibly revealing new insights into complex disease states and treatment strategies.

  2. Evaluation of multi-exponential curve fitting analysis of oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces for recovering microvascular oxygen tension histograms

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Dirk J.; Almac, Emre; Kalkman, Jeroen; Legrand, Matthieu; Heger, Michal; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces can be analyzed using the exponential series method (ESM), its application until now has been limited to a few (patho)physiological studies, probably because the reliability of the recovered oxygen tension (pO2) histograms has never been extensively evaluated and lacks documentation. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the use of the ESM to adequately determine pO2 histograms from phosphorescence decay traces. For this purpose we simulated decay traces corresponding to uni- and bimodal pO2 distributions and recovered the pO2 histograms at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Ultimately, we recovered microvascular pO2 histograms measured in the rat kidney in a model of endotoxemic shock and fluid resuscitation and showed that the mean microvascular oxygen tension, 〈pO2〉, decreased after induction of endotoxemia and that after 2 h of fluid resuscitation, 〈pO2〉 remained low, but the hypoxic peak that had arisen during endotoxemia was reduced. This finding illustrates the importance of recovering pO2 histograms under (patho)physiological conditions. In conclusion, this study has characterized how noise affects the recovery of pO2 histograms using the ESM and documented the reliability of the ESM for recovering both low- and high-pO2 distributions for SNRs typically found in experiments. This study might therefore serve as a frame of reference for investigations focused on oxygen (re)distribution during health and disease and encourage researchers to (re-)analyze data obtained in (earlier) studies possibly revealing new insights into complex disease states and treatment strategies. PMID:21046272

  3. Room temperature phosphorescence of Trp-314 as a monitor of subunit communications in alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver.

    PubMed

    Strambini, G B; Gonnelli, M; Galley, W C

    1990-01-09

    The phosphorescence properties of liver alcohol dehydrogenase from horse were characterized at limiting concentrations of coenzyme and coenzyme analogues. The emission decay kinetics of Trp-314 in strong, slowly exchanging, ternary complexes with NADH/isobutyramide, NAD/pyrazole, and NADH/dimethyl sulfoxide displays a markedly nonexponential character. The analysis of decay components over the saturation curve reveals that the phosphorescence from singly bound protein molecules has a lifetime from 1 to 1.3 s, which is 2-3 times larger than observed with fully bound and unliganded enzyme. The remarkably tighter configuration reported by the triplet probe for the coenzyme-binding domain in half-saturated macromolecules is not exclusive of strongly inhibited ternary complexes. Measurements on binary complexes with NADH, ADPR, and the inactive coenzyme analogue 1,4,5,6-tetrahydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide confirm that binding of the ligand to one subunit has qualitatively the same influence on protein structure. If the lifetime of Trp-314 provides clear evidence for an appreciable change in conformation at half-binding that is apparently triggered by the ADPR fragment of the coenzyme, such communication between subunits does not lead to allosteric phenomena in coenzyme binding.

  4. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  5. Luminescence quenching of a phosphorescent conjugated polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Haskins-Glusac, Ksenija; Pinto, Mauricio R; Tan, Chunyan; Schanze, Kirk S

    2004-11-17

    The photophysical and luminescence quenching properties of a platinum(II) acetylide-based conjugated polyelectrolyte, Pt-p, which features carboxylic acid solubilizing groups are reported. The Pt-acetylide polymer is water soluble, and it exhibits phosphorescence from a triplet pi,pi exciton based on the conjugated backbone. The phosphorescence from Pt-p is quenched by viologens with different charges (MV(+), MV(2+), and MV(4+)), and in each case the quenching is dominated by a dynamic (diffusional) mechanism. Comparison of the Stern-Volmer quenching properties of Pt-p with those of a structurally analogous fluorescent organic polyelectrolyte leads to the conclusion that the amplified quenching effect, which is commonly observed for fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolytes, is not important for the platinum acetylide phosphorescent conjugated polyelectrolyte.

  6. Principles of phosphorescent organic light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Minaev, Boris; Baryshnikov, Gleb; Agren, Hans

    2014-02-07

    Organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology has found numerous applications in the development of solid state lighting, flat panel displays and flexible screens. These applications are already commercialized in mobile phones and TV sets. White OLEDs are of especial importance for lighting; they now use multilayer combinations of organic and elementoorganic dyes which emit various colors in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum. At the same time the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is still a major challenge for OLED applications. In this review we highlight the basic principles and the main mechanisms behind phosphorescent light emission of various classes of photofunctional OLED materials, like organic polymers and oligomers, electron and hole transport molecules, elementoorganic complexes with heavy metal central ions, and clarify connections between the main features of electronic structure and the photo-physical properties of the phosphorescent OLED materials.

  7. Mathematics analysis of polymerase chain reaction kinetic curves.

    PubMed

    Sochivko, D G; Fedorov, A A; Varlamov, D A; Kurochkin, V E; Petrov, R V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews different approaches to the mathematical analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kinetic curves. The basic principles of PCR mathematical analysis are presented. Approximation of PCR kinetic curves and PCR efficiency curves by various functions is described. Several PCR models based on chemical kinetics equations are suggested. Decision criteria for an optimal function to describe PCR efficiency are proposed.

  8. Effect of concentration, temperature, and freezing rate on the phosphorescence parameters of acenaphthene in n-hexane matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, N. V.; Deryabin, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the concentration, temperature, and freezing rate on the spectra, kinetics, and intensity of phosphorescence of acenaphthene in polycrystalline n-hexane matrices has been studied. The specific features of the transformation of quasi-lines in the phosphorescence spectrum of molecules embedded in an n-hexane crystal lattice into broad molecular bands at high concentrations of the solution (~10‒1 mol/L) have been considered. It has been demonstrated that a distortion of the n-hexane crystal lattice at a high concentration of embedded acenaphthene molecules can be a cause of the observed transformation of the quasi-line spectrum.

  9. Reaction kinetic analysis of reactor surveillance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Kinomura, A.; Nagai, Y.

    2017-02-01

    In the reactor pressure vessel surveillance data of a European-type pressurized water reactor (low-Cu steel), it was found that the concentration of matrix defects was very high, and a large number of precipitates existed. In this study, defect structure evolution obtained from surveillance data was simulated by reaction kinetic analysis using 15 rate equations. The saturation of precipitation and the growth of loops were simulated, but it was not possible to explain the increase in DBTT on the basis of the defect structures. The sub-grain boundary segregation of solutes was discussed for the origin of the DBTT increase.

  10. Kinetic stability analysis on electromagnetic filamentary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    A coherent radial transport of filamentary structures in SOL region is important for its characteristics that can increase unwanted high fluxes to plasma facing components. In the course of propagation in radial direction, the coherency of the filaments is significantly limited by electrostatic resistive drift instability (Angus et al., 2012). Considering higher plasma pressure, which would have more large impact in heat fluxes, electromagnetic effects will reduce the growth rate of the drift wave instability and increase the instabilities from electron inertial effects. According to a linear stability analysis on equations with fluid approximation, the maximum growth rate of the instability from the electron inertia is higher than that of drift-Alfvén wave instability in high beta filaments such as ELMs. However, the analysis on the high beta filaments requires kinetic approach, since the decreased collisionality will make the fluid approximation broken. Therefore, the kinetic analysis will be presented for the electromagnetic effects on the dynamics of filamentary structures. This work was supported by the USDOE Grants DE-FG02-04ER54739 and DE-SC0010413 at UCSD and also by the Kwanjeong Educational Foundation.

  11. A century of enzyme kinetic analysis, 1913 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth A

    2013-09-02

    This review traces the history and logical progression of methods for quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics from the 1913 Michaelis and Menten paper to the application of modern computational methods today. Following a brief review of methods for fitting steady state kinetic data, modern methods are highlighted for fitting full progress curve kinetics based upon numerical integration of rate equations, including a re-analysis of the original Michaelis-Menten full time course kinetic data. Finally, several illustrations of modern transient state kinetic methods of analysis are shown which enable the elucidation of reactions occurring at the active sites of enzymes in order to relate structure and function.

  12. A Century of Enzyme Kinetic Analysis, 1913 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This review traces the history and logical progression of methods for quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics from the 1913 Michaelis and Menten paper to the application of modern computational methods today. Following a brief review of methods for fitting steady state kinetic data, modern methods are highlighted for fitting full progress curve kinetics based upon numerical integration of rate equations, including a re-analysis of the original Michaelis-Menten full time course kinetic data. Finally, several illustrations of modern transient state kinetic methods of analysis are shown which enable the elucidation of reactions occurring at the active sites of enzymes in order to relate structure and function. PMID:23850893

  13. Kinetic and thermal analysis of polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jeffery David

    2002-09-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques have been used to study the thermal degradation of polymeric materials. These polymers were subjected to a variety of heating programs as well as numerous types of atmospheric conditions. The results from these analyses were then used to determine activation energies as a function of an extent of reaction variable, alpha. This technique, known as the model-free isoconversional method, allows for changes in energies to occur as decomposition pathways change. This produces a more realistic means of observing complex kinetic schemes and is a better representation of kinetic analysis. Chapters 1 and 2 provide introductory backgrounds into both polymer chemistry and the isoconversional analysis technique, respectively. A brief description of the research goals and motivations is also discussed. Thermal analysis of pure polystyrene (PS), polyethylene (PE), and polypropylene (PP) samples are presented in Chapter 3. The obtained activation energy dependencies are interpreted in terms of degradation mechanisms. These mechanisms vary greatly according to the gaseous environment in which they were analyzed. The thermal degradation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in both pure nitrogen and in various oxygen-containing atmospheres is discussed in Chapter 4. It was observed that oxygen exhibits a stabilizing effect on PMMA decomposition. Activation energies for these processes, and their mechanistic interpretations, will also be presented. Chapter 5 builds off the understanding gained in Chapter 4 by investigating the char-forming effects of silica gel and potassium carbonate additives on PMMA. These additives are known for their fire-resistant properties when combined in a 3:1 silica gel to potassium carbonate ratio. The effects of these additives, and their respective ratio amounts, on PMMA char formation are reported. Chapters 6 and 7 conclude the dissertation by looking at the thermal

  14. Kinetic Analysis of tRNA Methylfransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ya-Ming; Masuda, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules contain many chemical modifications that are introduced after transcription. A major form of these modifications is methyl transfer to bases and backbone groups, using S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Each methylation confers a specific advantage to tRNA in structure or in function. A remarkable methylation is to the G37 base on the 3' side of the anticodon to generate m1G37-tRNA, which suppresses frameshift errors during protein synthesis and is therefore essential for cell growth in all three domains of life. This methylation is catalyzed by TrmD in bacteria and by Trm5 in eukaryotes and archaea. Although TrmD and Trm5 catalyze the same methylation reaction, kinetic analysis reveal that these two enzymes are unrelated to each other and are distinct in their reaction mechanism. This chapter summarizes the kinetic assays that are used to reveal the distinction between TrmD and Trm5. Three types of assays are described, the steady-state, the pre-steady-state, and the single turnover assays, which collectively provide the basis for mechanistic investigation of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer reactions. PMID:26253967

  15. Updated Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    2005-01-01

    An updated version of the General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis (LSENS) computer code has become available. A prior version of LSENS was described in "Program Helps to Determine Chemical-Reaction Mechanisms" (LEW-15758), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 19, No. 5 (May 1995), page 66. To recapitulate: LSENS solves complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical-kinetics problems (e.g., combustion of fuels) that are represented by sets of many coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations. LSENS has been designed for flexibility, convenience, and computational efficiency. The present version of LSENS incorporates mathematical models for (1) a static system; (2) steady, one-dimensional inviscid flow; (3) reaction behind an incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; (4) a perfectly stirred reactor; and (5) a perfectly stirred reactor followed by a plug-flow reactor. In addition, LSENS can compute equilibrium properties for the following assigned states: enthalpy and pressure, temperature and pressure, internal energy and volume, and temperature and volume. For static and one-dimensional-flow problems, including those behind an incident shock wave and following a perfectly stirred reactor calculation, LSENS can compute sensitivity coefficients of dependent variables and their derivatives, with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate-coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  16. Hybrid native phosphorescence and fluorescence spectroscopy for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimova, Alexandra; Katz, A.; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Budansky, Yuri; Bykov, Alexei A.; Zeylikovich, Roman; Alfano, R. R.

    2006-02-01

    Native fluorescence of tissues in the UV and visible spectral regions has been investigated for over two decades. Native fluorescence has been demonstrated to be an accurate tools for distinguish normal tissue from malignant and pre-malignant. Prior investigations have demonstrated that there are several ratio-based algorithms, which can distinguish malignant tissue from normal with high sensitivity and specificity.1 The wavelength combinations used in these ratios isolate the contributions from pairs of tissue fluorophors, one of which is frequently tryptophan (trp), the predominant tissue fluorophore with excitation in the UV (250-300 nm). In this work, algorithms using a combination of native fluorescence and trp phosphorescence were developed which show promise for providing enhanced detection accuracy. Using optical fibers to collect the emission from the specimen allowed interrogation of small regions of tissue, providing precise spatial information. Using a specially designed setup, specimens were excited in the UV and spectra were collected in the range of 300 to 700 nm. Three main emission bands were selected for analysis: 340 nm (trp fluorescence); 420 - 460 nm band (fluorescence from the extra cellular matrix); and 500 - 520 nm (trp phosphorescence). Normal specimens consistently exhibited a low ratio (<10) of 345 to 500 nm emission intensity while this same ratio was consistently high (>15) for cancer specimens. Creating intensities ratio maps from the tissue allows one to localize the malignant regions with high spatial precision. The study was performed on ex vivo human breast tissues. The ratio analysis correlated well with histopathology.

  17. Rigidification or interaction-induced phosphorescence of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Baroncini, Massimo; Bergamini, Giacomo; Ceroni, Paola

    2017-02-09

    Phosphorescent materials are mostly based on metal complexes. Metal-free organic molecules usually display phosphorescence only in a rigid matrix at 77 K. In the last few years, there has been increasing interest in the design of organic molecules displaying long-lived and highly intense room-temperature phosphorescence, an extremely difficult task since these two properties are generally conflicting. This review reports the most recent and tutorial examples of molecules that are weakly or non-phosphorescent in deaerated fluid solution and whose room temperature phosphorescence is switched on upon aggregation. The examples are divided into two classes according to the mechanism responsible for switching on phosphorescence: (i) rigidification by crystallization or by encapsulation in a polymeric matrix and (ii) interaction with other molecules of the same type (self-aggregation) or a different type by taking advantage of heavy-atom effects.

  18. Phosphorescent Differential Sensing of Physiological Phosphates with Lanthanide Ions-Modified Mn-Doped ZnCdS Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    He, Hengwei; Li, Chenghui; Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-06-07

    Phosphates, both inorganic and organic, play fundamental roles in numerous biological and chemical processes. The biological functions of phosphates connect with each other, analysis of single phosphate-containing biomolecule therefore cannot reveal the exact biological significance of phosphates. Sensor array is therefore the best choice for differentiation analysis of physiological phosphates. Lanthanide ions possess high affinity toward physiological phosphates, while lanthanide ions can also efficiently quench the luminescence of quantum dots (QDs). Taking lanthanide ions as cartridges, here we proposed a sensor array for sensing of physiological phosphates based on lanthanide ions-modified Mn-doped ZnCdS phosphorescent QDs in the manner of indicator-displacement assay. A series of lanthanide ions were selected as quencher for phosphorescent QDs. Physiological phosphates could subsequently displace the quencher and recover the phosphorescence. Depending on their varied phosphorescence restoration, a sensor array was thus developed. The photophysics of phosphorescence quenching and restoration were studied in detail for better understanding the mechanism of the sensor array. The exact contribution of each sensor element to the sensor array was evaluated. Those sensor elements with little contribution to the differentiation analysis were removed for narrowing the size of the array. The proposed sensor array was successfully explored for probing nucleotide phosphates-involved enzymatic processes and their metabolites, simulated energy charge changes, and analysis of physiological phosphates in biological samples.

  19. Laser phosphoroscope and applications to room-temperature phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sarah J; Zhang, Guoqing; Demas, James N; Fraser, Cassandra L; Degraff, Ben A

    2011-11-01

    A simple phosphoroscope with no moving parts is described. In one scan the total luminescence, the long-lived phosphorescence, and the short-lived fluorescence can be determined. A 50% duty cycle excitation from a diode laser is used to excite the sample, and from the digitized waveform the phosphorescence is extracted from the off period, the total emission from the full cycle, and the fluorescence from the on period corrected for the phosphorescence contribution. The performance of the system is demonstrated using room-temperature phosphorescence of organic dyes in boric acid glasses, a multi-emissive boron-polymer dye, and a europium chelate.

  20. Phosphorescence maxima and triplet state lifetimes of NAD+ and epsilon-NAD+ in ternary complexes with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rousslang, K; Allen, L; Ross, J B

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes the phosphorescence emission and decay times of NAD+ and its fluorescent etheno derivative, epsilon-NAD+, in the pyrazole ternary complex with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). We show that the epsilon-NAD+ triplet state, as well as the tryptophan triplet state, can be utilized to monitor the coenzyme-enzyme interaction. The decays of NAD+ and AMP are single exponential, and the lifetimes are the same within experimental error. The phosphorescence lifetimes, evaluated as single exponentials, are slightly shorter in epsilon-NAD+ than they are in epsilon-AMP. Whereas the decay of epsilon-AMP was adequately fit by a single exponential with a time constant of very close to 0.5 s, it was necessary to fit the decay of epsilon-NAD+ to a double exponential. Ternary complexes with NAD+ excited at 297 nm exhibit decay kinetics nearly identical to those of ADH by itself. On the other hand, when excitation of the epsilon-NAD+ ternary complex is provided at 313 nm, where there is very little absorption by either tryptophan residue, the decay law of the ternary complex is similar to that of epsilon-NAD+ in solution. Our results demonstrate that NAD+ and epsilon-NAD+ quench tryptophan phosphorescence in ADH. Normalizing the phosphorescence intensity to the 0-0 vibronic band assigned to Trp-15 (blue-edge), we calculate a 21% decrease in the phosphorescence associated with Trp-314 at stoichiometric saturation of the coenzyme binding sites with NAD+ in the ternary complex. When the active sites are saturated with epsilon-NAD+, the relative phosphorescence due to Trp-314 decreases by 63%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Phosphorescent cyclometalated complexes for efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Suzuri, Yoshiyuki; Oshiyama, Tomohiro; Ito, Hiroto; Hiyama, Kunihisa; Kita, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    Phosphorescent emitters are extremely important for efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which attract significant attention. Phosphorescent emitters, which have a high phosphorescence quantum yield at room temperature, typically contain a heavy metal such as iridium and have been reported to emit blue, green and red light. In particular, the blue cyclometalated complexes with high efficiency and high stability are being developed. In this review, we focus on blue cyclometalated complexes. Recent progress of computational analysis necessary to design a cyclometalated complex is introduced. The prediction of the radiative transition is indispensable to get an emissive cyclometalated complex. We summarize four methods to control phosphorescence peak of the cyclometalated complex: (i) substituent effect on ligands, (ii) effects of ancillary ligands on heteroleptic complexes, (iii) design of the ligand skeleton, and (iv) selection of the central metal. It is considered that novel ligand skeletons would be important to achieve both a high efficiency and long lifetime in the blue OLEDs. Moreover, the combination of an emitter and a host is important as well as the emitter itself. According to the dependences on the combination of an emitter and a host, the control of exciton density of the triplet is necessary to achieve both a high efficiency and a long lifetime, because the annihilations of the triplet state cause exciton quenching and material deterioration.

  2. Phosphorescent cyclometalated complexes for efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuri, Yoshiyuki; Oshiyama, Tomohiro; Ito, Hiroto; Hiyama, Kunihisa; Kita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorescent emitters are extremely important for efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which attract significant attention. Phosphorescent emitters, which have a high phosphorescence quantum yield at room temperature, typically contain a heavy metal such as iridium and have been reported to emit blue, green and red light. In particular, the blue cyclometalated complexes with high efficiency and high stability are being developed. In this review, we focus on blue cyclometalated complexes. Recent progress of computational analysis necessary to design a cyclometalated complex is introduced. The prediction of the radiative transition is indispensable to get an emissive cyclometalated complex. We summarize four methods to control phosphorescence peak of the cyclometalated complex: (i) substituent effect on ligands, (ii) effects of ancillary ligands on heteroleptic complexes, (iii) design of the ligand skeleton, and (iv) selection of the central metal. It is considered that novel ligand skeletons would be important to achieve both a high efficiency and long lifetime in the blue OLEDs. Moreover, the combination of an emitter and a host is important as well as the emitter itself. According to the dependences on the combination of an emitter and a host, the control of exciton density of the triplet is necessary to achieve both a high efficiency and a long lifetime, because the annihilations of the triplet state cause exciton quenching and material deterioration. PMID:27877712

  3. Phosphorescent cyclometalated complexes for efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuri, Yoshiyuki; Oshiyama, Tomohiro; Ito, Hiroto; Hiyama, Kunihisa; Kita, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    Phosphorescent emitters are extremely important for efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which attract significant attention. Phosphorescent emitters, which have a high phosphorescence quantum yield at room temperature, typically contain a heavy metal such as iridium and have been reported to emit blue, green and red light. In particular, the blue cyclometalated complexes with high efficiency and high stability are being developed. In this review, we focus on blue cyclometalated complexes. Recent progress of computational analysis necessary to design a cyclometalated complex is introduced. The prediction of the radiative transition is indispensable to get an emissive cyclometalated complex. We summarize four methods to control phosphorescence peak of the cyclometalated complex: (i) substituent effect on ligands, (ii) effects of ancillary ligands on heteroleptic complexes, (iii) design of the ligand skeleton, and (iv) selection of the central metal. It is considered that novel ligand skeletons would be important to achieve both a high efficiency and long lifetime in the blue OLEDs. Moreover, the combination of an emitter and a host is important as well as the emitter itself. According to the dependences on the combination of an emitter and a host, the control of exciton density of the triplet is necessary to achieve both a high efficiency and a long lifetime, because the annihilations of the triplet state cause exciton quenching and material deterioration.

  4. Tryptophan phosphorescence as a monitor of flexibility of membrane proteins in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhul, Vladimir M.; Scherbin, Dmitry G.

    1997-05-01

    Method of room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence (RTTP) has been used to study slow intramolecular equilibrium motions in membrane proteins. The conventional home-made instruments were employed for measurement of RTTP kinetic and spectral parameters. Objects of the investigation were suspensions of human erythrocyte membranes, different animal and plant cells. On rat gepathocytes it has been shown that membrane proteins in composition of subcellular structures and native cells are able to the RTTP with tens and hundreds milliseconds lifetimes. An overwhelming part of soluble proteins of cytoplasm, karyoplasm and mitochondrial matrix has not capability to RTTP with lifetimes above 1 ms. It is concluded that unlike membrane proteins soluble proteins as a rule are characterized by motions of protein structure with intensive low frequency and large amplitude, that leads to pronounced quenching of their RTTP. In the case of membrane proteins, which are capable of phosphorescence in a millisecond range, the flexibility of the chromophores environment decreases. These results indicate that RTTP method gives the unique possibility to investigate dynamical structure of membrane proteins without their preliminary isolation from cells. The data on membrane proteins intramolecular dynamics in composition of cells at the action of biological active substances in physiological concentrations--Concavalin A, nerve growth factor, epidermal growth factor, 24-epibrassinosteroid received by the phosphorescent method are presented.

  5. Kinetic Analysis of a Mammalian Phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Henage, Lee G.; Exton, John H.; Brown, H. Alex

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian cells, phospholipase D activity is tightly regulated by diverse cellular signals, including hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Multiple signaling pathways converge upon phospholipase D to modulate cellular actions, such as cell growth, shape, and secretion. We examined the kinetics of protein kinase C and G-protein regulation of mammalian phospholipase D1 (PLD1) in order to better understand interactions between PLD1 and its regulators. Activation by Arf-1, RhoA, Rac1, Cdc42, protein kinase Cα, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate displayed surface dilution kinetics, but these effectors modulated different kinetic parameters. PKCα activation of PLD1 involves N- and C-terminal PLD domains. Rho GTPases were binding activators, enhancing the catalytic efficiency of a purified PLD1 catalytic domain via effects on Km. Arf-1, a catalytic activator, stimulated PLD1 by enhancing the catalytic constant, kcat. A kinetic description of PLD1 activation by multiple modulators reveals a mechanism for apparent synergy between activators. Synergy was observed only when PLD1 was simultaneously stimulated by a binding activator and a catalytic activator. Surprisingly, synergistic activation was steeply dependent on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylcholine. Together, these findings suggest a role for PLD1 as a signaling node, in which integration of convergent signals occurs within discrete locales of the cellular membrane. PMID:16339153

  6. Molecular Fluorescence, Phosphorescence, and Chemiluminescence Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Powe, Aleeta; Das, Susmita; Lowry, Mark; El-Zahab, Bilal; Fakayode, Sayo; Geng, Maxwell; Baker, Gary A; Wang, Lin; McCarroll, Matthew; Patonay, Gabor; Li, Min; Aljarrah, Mohannad; Neal, Sharon; Warner, Isiah M

    2010-01-01

    This review covers the 2 year period since our last review (1) from January 2008 through December 2009. A computer search of Chemical Abstracts provided most of the references for this review. A search for documents written in English containing the terms fluorescence or phosphorescence or chemiluminescence published in 2008-2009 resulted in more than 100 000 hits. An initial screening reduced this number to approximately 23 000 publications that were considered for inclusion in this review. Key word searches of this subset provided subtopics of manageable size. Other citations were found through individual searches by the various authors who wrote a particular section of this review.

  7. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-07

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  8. Kinetic Analysis of δ Ribozyme Cleavage†

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, Stéphane; Lafontaine, Daniel; Ananvoranich, Sirinart; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The ability of δ ribozyme to catalyze the cleavage of an 11-mer RNA substrate was examined under both single- and multiple-turnover conditions. In both cases only small differences in the kinetic parameters were observed in the presence of either magnesium or calcium as cofactor. Under multiple-turnover conditions, the catalytic efficiency of the ribozyme (kcat/KM) was higher at 37 °C than at 56 °C. The cleavage reaction seems to be limited by the product release step at 37 °C and by the chemical cleavage step at 56 °C. We observed substrate inhibition at high concentrations of the 11-mer substrate. Cleavage rate constants were determined with a structural derivative characterized by an ultrastable L4 tetraloop. The kinetic parameters (kcat and KM) and dissociation constant (Kd) were almost identical for both ribozymes, suggesting that the stability of the L4 loop has a negligible impact on the catalytic activities of the examined ribozymes. Various cleavage inhibition and gel-shift assays with analogues, substrate, and both active and inactive ribozymes were performed. The 2′-hydroxyl group adjacent to the scissile phosphate was shown to be involved in binding with the ribozyme, while the essential cytosine residue of the J4/2 junction was shown to contribute to substrate association. We clearly show that substrate binding to the δ ribozyme is not restricted to the formation of a helix located downstream of the cleavage site. Using these results, we postulate a kinetic pathway involving a conformational transition step essential for the formation of the active ribozyme/substrate complex. PMID:9836591

  9. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    SciTech Connect

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph.

  10. Spectrum Analysis of Some Kinetic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tong; Yu, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the spectrum structure of some kinetic equations qualitatively by using semigroup theory and linear operator perturbation theory. The models include the classical Boltzmann equation for hard potentials with or without angular cutoff and the Landau equation with {γ≥q-2}. As an application, we show that the solutions to these two fundamental equations are asymptotically equivalent (mod time decay rate {t^{-5/4}}) as {tto∞} to that of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for initial data around an equilibrium state.

  11. Global kinetic analysis of seeded BSA aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ziya; Demir, Yusuf Kemal; Kayser, Veysel

    2016-04-30

    Accelerated aggregation studies were conducted around the melting temperature (Tm) to elucidate the kinetics of seeded BSA aggregation. Aggregation was tracked by SEC-HPLC and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. Time evolution of monomer, dimer and soluble aggregate concentrations were globally analysed to reliably deduce mechanistic details pertinent to the process. Results showed that BSA aggregated irreversibly through both sequential monomer addition and aggregate-aggregate interactions. Sequential monomer addition proceeded only via non-native monomers, starting to occur only by 1-2°C below the Tm. Aggregate-aggregate interactions were the dominant mechanism below the Tm due to an initial presence of small aggregates that acted as seeds. Aggregate-aggregate interactions were significant also above the Tm, particularly at later stages of aggregation when sequential monomer addition seemed to cease, leading in some cases to insoluble aggregate formation. The adherence (or non-thereof) of the mechanisms to Arrhenius kinetics were discussed alongside possible implications of seeding for biopharmaceutical shelf-life and spectroscopic data interpretation, the latter of which was found to often be overlooked in BSA aggregation studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Scenario of temperature-related variation of phosphorescence spectra of ortho-bromobenzophenone crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzhemechny, M. A.; Stepanian, S. G.; Zloba, D. I.; Buravtseva, L. M.; Pyshkin, O. S.; Piryatinski, Yu. P.; Melnik, V. I.; Klishevich, G. V.; Adamowicz, L.

    2015-12-01

    Luminescence and other properties of solid 2-bromobenzophenone demonstrate features, which require special attention. We present results, which include DFT calculations, integrated and time-resolved phosphorescence spectra, and excitation spectra. The energies of the title molecule were calculated for the S0 , S1 , and T1 states. Nanosecond time-resolved phosphorescence spectra were measured at three temperature points at which the spectra undergo substantial changes. Joint analysis of energy surfaces and experimental evidence allowed reconstruction of the emission scenario that determines temperature-related variations of spectra. Upon excitation to state S1 the molecule converges very fast to T1 , emission from which can occur from the minima at 60° or at 180°. At low temperatures the molecule emits from the former, whereas at higher temperatures the molecule can overcome the barrier to emit from the lower minimum. The probability of excimer formation increases with increasing temperature.

  13. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Engel, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to quantitate the dynamic parameters of carnitine metabolism in the dog. Six mongrel dogs were given intravenous injections of L-(methyl-3H)carnitine and the specific radioactivity of carnitine was followed in plasma and urine for 19-28 days. The data were analyzed by kinetic compartmental analysis. A three-compartment, open-system model ((a) extracellular fluid, (b) cardiac and skeletal muscle, (c) other tissues, particularly liver and kidney) was adopted and kinetic parameters (carnitine flux, pool sizes, kinetic constants) were derived. In four of six dogs the size of the muscle carnitine pool obtained by kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 5%) with estimates based on measurement of carnitine concentrations in different muscles. In three of six dogs carnitine excretion rates derived from kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 9%) with experimentally measured values, but in three dogs the rates by kinetic compartmental analysis were significantly higher than the corresponding rates measured directly. Appropriate chromatographic analyses revealed no radioactive metabolites in muscle or urine of any of the dogs. Turnover times for carnitine were (mean +/- SEM): 0.44 +/- 0.05 h for extracellular fluid, 232 +/- 22 h for muscle, and 7.9 +/- 1.1 h for other tissues. The estimated flux of carnitine in muscle was 210 pmol/min/g of tissue. Whole-body turnover time for carnitine was 62.9 +/- 5.6 days (mean +/- SEM). Estimated carnitine biosynthesis ranged from 2.9 to 28 mumol/kg body wt/day. Results of this study indicate that kinetic compartmental analysis may be applicable to study of human carnitine metabolism.

  14. Bright afterglow illuminator made of phosphorescent material and fluorescent fibers.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Yamamoto, K

    2000-08-20

    Phosphorescent oxides and fluorescent dyes were used together to create a fiber-type illuminator that glows in the dark without the need for electric power. Dye-doped polymer fibers, which were bundled at one end, were linearly arrayed in a polysiloxane resin that contained phosphorescent oxide particles. The phosphorescent resin continued to glow for a long time even after the excitation light was removed. Organic dyes in a polymer fiber were excited by the phosphorescence and emitted fluorescence toward the fiber end. Fluorescence from a number of dyes was combined in the long fiber, and, consequently a bright light beam emerged from the fiber end. Useful performance, i.e., high power density, narrow beam divergence, and long afterglow, is demonstrated by the prototype fiber illuminator.

  15. Smart responsive phosphorescent materials for data recording and security protection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huibin; Liu, Shujuan; Lin, Wenpeng; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Lv, Wen; Huang, Xiao; Huo, Fengwei; Yang, Huiran; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2014-04-07

    Smart luminescent materials that are responsive to external stimuli have received considerable interest. Here we report ionic iridium (III) complexes simultaneously exhibiting mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. These complexes share the same phosphorescent iridium (III) cation with a N-H moiety in the N^N ligand and contain different anions, including hexafluorophosphate, tetrafluoroborate, iodide, bromide and chloride. The anionic counterions cause a variation in the emission colours of the complexes from yellow to green by forming hydrogen bonds with the N-H proton. The electronic effect of the N-H moiety is sensitive towards mechanical grinding, solvent vapour and electric field, resulting in mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. On the basis of these findings, we construct a data-recording device and demonstrate data encryption and decryption via fluorescence lifetime imaging and time-gated luminescence imaging techniques. Our results suggest that rationally designed phosphorescent complexes may be promising candidates for advanced data recording and security protection.

  16. Phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with high efficiency and brightness

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-11-12

    An organic light emitting device including a) an anode; b) a cathode; and c) an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode, the emissive layer comprising an organic host compound and a phosphorescent compound exhibiting a Stokes Shift overlap greater than 0.3 eV. The organic light emitting device may further include a hole transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the anode; and an electron transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the cathode. In some embodiments, the phosphorescent compound exhibits a phosphorescent lifetime of less than 10 .mu.s. In some embodiments, the concentration of the phosphorescent compound ranges from 0.5 wt. % to 10 wt. %.

  17. Extended OLED operational lifetime through phosphorescent dopant profile management

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Zhang, Yifan

    2017-05-30

    This disclosure relates, at least in part, an organic light emitting device, which in some embodiments comprises an anode; a cathode; a first emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode, the first emissive layer comprising an electron transporting compound and a phosphorescent emissive dopant compound; and wherein the phosphorescent emissive dopant compound has a concentration gradient, in the emissive layer, which varies from the cathode side of the first emissive layer to the anode side of the emissive layer.

  18. Status and potential for phosphorescent OLED technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, M.; Weaver, M. S.; Adamovich, V.; Kwong, R. C.; Lu, M. H.; Brown, J. J.

    2005-07-01

    As organic light emitting device (OLED) technology is building up momentum in the commercial marketplace, phosphorescent OLEDs (PHOLEDsTM) are proving themselves to be an ideal display medium for a wide range of product applications: from small mobile displays to large area TVs. As part of this work we continue to advance PHOLED technology by new materials design and device architectures. For example a green PHOLED with 4.3 V, 70 cd/A, 50 lm/W and > 10,000 hours lifetime at 1,000 cd/m2 is reported. PHOLEDs enable very low power consumption displays with low display operating temperatures, and can be deposited by a range of different deposition techniques. Along with state-of-the-art device performance we report results on the ruggedness of PHOLED materials in high volume manufacturing environments.

  19. Pyrolysis kinetics of hazelnut husk using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Selim; Topçu, Yıldıray

    2014-03-01

    This study aims at investigating physicochemical properties and pyrolysis kinetics of hazelnut husk, an abundant agricultural waste in Turkey. The physicochemical properties were determined by bomb calorimeter, elemental analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. Physicochemical analysis results showed that hazelnut husk has a high calorimetric value and high volatile matter content. Pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer under inert conditions and operated at different heating rates (5, 10, 20°C/min). Three different kinetic models, the iso-conversional Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW) models and Coats-Redfern method were applied on TGA data of hazelnut husk to calculate the kinetic parameters including activation energy, pre-exponential factor and reaction order. Simulation of hazelnut husk pyrolysis using data obtained from TGA analysis showed good agreement with experimental data. Combining with physicochemical properties, it was concluded that this biomass can become useful source of energy or chemicals.

  20. Kinetics of enzyme action on surface-attached substrates: a practical guide to progress curve analysis in any kinetic situation.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Demaille, Christophe

    2012-10-16

    In the present work, exact kinetic equations describing the action of an enzyme in solution on a substrate attached to a surface have been derived in the framework of the Michaelis-Menten mechanism but without resorting to the often-used steady-state approximation. The here-derived kinetic equations are cast in a workable format, allowing us to introduce a simple and universal procedure for the quantitative analysis of enzyme surface kinetics that is valid for any kinetic situation. The results presented here should allow experimentalists studying the kinetics of enzyme action on immobilized substrates to analyze their data in a perfectly rigorous way.

  1. Stabilizing g-States in Centrosymmetric Tetrapyrroles: Two-Photon-Absorbing Porphyrins with Bright Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Esipova, Tatiana V; Rivera-Jacquez, Héctor J; Weber, Bruno; Masunov, Artëm E; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2017-08-24

    Using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and sum-overstates (SOS) formalism, we predicted significant stabilization of 2P-active g-states in a compact fully symmetric porphyrin, in which all four pyrrolic fragments are fused with phathalimide residues via the β-carbon positions. The synthesis of a soluble, nonaggregating meso-unsubstituted tetraarylphthalimidoporphyrin (TAPIP) was then developed, and the spectroscopic measurements confirmed that a strongly 2P-active state in this porphyrin is stabilized below the B (Soret) state level. Single-crystal X-ray analysis revealed near-ideally planar geometry of the TAPIP macrocycle, while its tetra-meso-arylated analogue (meso-Ar4TAPIP) was found to be highly saddled. Consistent with these structural features, Pt meso-Ar4TAPIP phosphoresces rather weakly (ϕphos = 0.05 in DMF at 22 °C), while both Pt and Pd complexes of TAPIP are highly phosphorescent (ϕphos = 0.45 and 0.23, respectively). In addition PdTAPIP exhibits non-negligible thermally activated (E-type) delayed fluorescence (ϕfl(d) ∼ 0.012). Taken together, these photophysical properties make metal complexes of meso-unsubstituted tetaarylphthalimidoporphyrins the brightest 2P-absorbing phosphorescent chromophores known to date.

  2. Quantitative full time course analysis of nonlinear enzyme cycling kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition due to the reversible binding of reaction products is common and underlies the origins of negative feedback inhibition in many metabolic and signaling pathways. Product inhibition generates non-linearity in steady-state time courses of enzyme activity, which limits the utility of well-established enzymology approaches developed under the assumption of irreversible product release. For more than a century, numerous attempts to find a mathematical solution for analysis of kinetic time courses with product inhibition have been put forth. However, no practical general method capable of extracting common enzymatic parameters from such non-linear time courses has been successfully developed. Here we present a simple and practical method of analysis capable of efficiently extracting steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters and product binding constants from non-linear kinetic time courses with product inhibition and/or substrate depletion. The method is general and applicable to all enzyme systems, independent of reaction schemes and pathways.

  3. Synthetic control over photoinduced electron transfer in phosphorescence zinc sensors.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hana; Cho, Somin; Han, Yejee; Chae, Weon-Sik; Ahn, Dae-Ro; You, Youngmin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2013-03-27

    Despite the promising photofunctionalities, phosphorescent probes have been examined only to a limited extent, and the molecular features that provide convenient handles for controlling the phosphorescence response have yet to be identified. We synthesized a series of phosphorescence zinc sensors based on a cyclometalated heteroleptic Ir(III) complex. The sensor construct includes two anionic cyclometalating ligands and a neutral diimine ligand that tethers a di(2-picolyl)amine (DPA) zinc receptor. A series of cyclometalating ligands with a range of electron densities and band gap energies were used to create phosphorescence sensors. The sensor series was characterized by variable-temperature steady-state and transient photoluminescence spectroscopy studies, electrochemical measurements, and quantum chemical calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory. The studies demonstrated that the suppression of nonradiative photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) from DPA to the photoexcited Ir(IV) species provided the underlying mechanism that governed the phosphorescent response to zinc ions. Importantly, the Coulombic barrier, which was located on either the cyclometalating ligand or the diimine ligand, negligibly influenced the PeT process. Phosphorescence modulation by PeT strictly obeyed the Rehm-Weller principle, and the process occurred in the Marcus-normal region. These findings provide important guidelines for improving sensing performance; an efficient phosphorescence sensor should include a cyclometalating ligand with a wide band gap energy and a deep oxidation potential. Finally, the actions of the sensor were demonstrated by visualizing the intracellular zinc ion distribution in HeLa cells using a confocal laser scanning microscope and a photoluminescence lifetime imaging microscope.

  4. Kinetic analysis of complex metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanopoulos, G.

    1996-12-31

    A new methodology is presented for the analysis of complex metabolic networks with the goal of metabolite overproduction. The objective is to locate a small number of reaction steps in a network that have maximum impact on network flux amplification and whose rate can also be increased without functional network derangement. This method extends the concepts of Metabolic Control Analysis to groups of reactions and offers the means for calculating group control coefficients as measures of the control exercised by groups of reactions on the overall network fluxes and intracellular metabolite pools. It is further demonstrated that the optimal strategy for the effective increase of network fluxes, while maintaining an uninterrupted supply of intermediate metabolites, is through the coordinated amplification of multiple (as opposed to a single) reaction steps. Satisfying this requirement invokes the concept of the concentration control to coefficient, which emerges as a critical parameter in the identification of feasible enzymatic modifications with maximal impact on the network flux. A case study of aromatic aminoacid production is provided to illustrate these concepts.

  5. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. I. Kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Masia-Perez, J; Garcia-Molina, F; García-Moreno, M; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinases zymogens involving a uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous activation route and a reversible inhibition step, the time course equation of the zymogen, inhibitor and activated enzyme concentrations have been derived. Likewise, expressions for the time required for any reaction progress and the corresponding mean activation rates as well as the half-life of the global zymogen activation have been derived. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed.

  6. A highly selective phosphorescence probe for histidine in living bodies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quankun; Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqiang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Ruoyang; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-11-14

    In this work, we designed and synthesized a heterobimetallic ruthenium(ii)-nickel(ii) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(phen-DPA)Ni](PF6)4 (Ru-Ni), as a highly selective phosphorescence probe for histidine. The probe exhibited weak emission at 603 nm because the phosphorescence of the Ru(ii) complex can be strongly quenched by the paramagnetic Ni(2+) ion. In the presence of histidine, reaction of Ru-Ni with histidine resulted in the release of nickel(ii) and an enhancement in the phosphorescence intensity at 603 nm. Ru-Ni showed high selectivity for histidine even in the presence of other amino acids and cellular abundant species. Cell imaging experimental results demonstrated that Ru-Ni is membrane permeable, and can be applied for visualizing histidine in live cells. More interestingly, Ru-Ni also can act as a novel reaction-based nuclear staining agent for visualizing exclusively the nuclei of living cells with a significant phosphorescence enhancement. In addition, the potential of the probe for biological applications was confirmed by employing it for phosphorescence imaging of histidine in larval zebrafish and Daphnia magna. These results demonstrated that Ru-Ni would be a useful tool for physiological and pathological studies involving histidine.

  7. Activating efficient phosphorescence from purely organic materials by crystal design.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Onas; Lee, Kangwon; Kim, Hyong-Jun; Lin, Kevin Y; Kim, Jinsang

    2011-03-01

    Phosphorescence is among the many functional features that, in practice, divide pure organic compounds from organometallics and inorganics. Considered to be practically non-phosphorescent, purely organic compounds (metal-free) are very rarely explored as emitters in phosphor applications, despite the emerging demand in this field. To defy this paradigm, we describe novel design principles to create purely organic materials demonstrating phosphorescence that can be turned on by incorporating halogen bonding into their crystals. By designing chromophores to contain triplet-producing aromatic aldehydes and triplet-promoting bromine, crystal-state halogen bonding can be made to direct the heavy atom effect to produce surprisingly efficient solid-state phosphorescence. When this chromophore is diluted into the crystal of a bi-halogenated, non-carbonyl analogue, ambient phosphorescent quantum yields reach 55%. Here, using this design, a series of pure organic phosphors are colour-tuned to emit blue, green, yellow and orange. From this initial discovery, a directed heavy atom design principle is demonstrated that will allow for the development of bright and practical purely organic phosphors.

  8. Biomedical application of metalloporphyrins room-temperature phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitsky, Alexander P.

    1993-05-01

    Biological specimens are characterized by high light-scattering and background fluorescence which cause decrease in sensitivity of immunoassays. These unfavorable effects can be minimized by selecting a label with high absolute sensitivity, appropriate excitation and emission wavelengths, and time-resolved mode of measurements. This can be achieved by the use of metalloporphyrin labels, microsecond logic for discrimination of scattered light and background fluorescence which arises in optical elements, cells, solvents, and samples. The intensity of metalloporphyrin phosphorescence depends to a great extent on pH. Nonionic and cationic micelles have a strong effect on the phosphorescence quantum yield of Pd- coproporphyrin. Under optimum conditions Pd-coproporphyrin can be detected at a concentration of 10-13M by using modified Arcus 1230 (Wallac, Finland). On the basis of these results a novel class of luminescent labels --phosphorescent metalloporphyrins -- was applied to immunoassays. Pd- and Pt-coproporphyrins were used for the covalent labeling of antibodies and antigens. Special derivatives of a porphyrin with activated side chain were synthesized. Techniques for covalent coupling of porphyrins and their metal derivatives with proteins were developed as well as methods for purification of conjugates. A solid-phase time-resolved porphyrin phosphorescence immunoassay test was developed. The well known `sandwich' and competition techniques are compatible with the proposed method. Two or more metalloporphyrins with distinguishable phosphorescent parameters may be used for the simultaneous determining of several antigens in one sample.

  9. Optical Characteristics of Phosphorescent Materials with Water-Based Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Akihiro; Kagami, Shinya; Jones, Mark I.

    A composite coating approach has been employed to produce phosphorescent materials for emergency exit signs. The coating consists of a reflecting undercoat, a middle coating comprising phosphorescent pigments in a water based ceramic, and a final transparent silica topcoat. The effects of size and amount of pigments in the ceramic based coating on the luminance of the materials was assessed and compared with the Japanese Industrial Standard for safety signboards (JIS Z9107). The luminance increased with the amount of pigment in the coating, and samples with more than 20% exceeded the standard. Luminance 10 times higher than the JIS standard was obtained with 50% phosphorescent pigments. The luminance increased initially with the number of applications of the ceramic based coating but there was no further increase for more than 4 applications. The water-based phosphorescent ceramics developed here are superior in optical characteristics and made entirely of inorganic materials. It is considered that these are excellent materials for phosphorescent emergency exit signs. In addition, the materials can be applied at room temperature for example to metal substrates or by silkscreen printing on tiles, and then calcined at low temperature. This type of processing makes them suitable for a whole range of applications.

  10. Studies on properties and application of non-protected room temperature phosphorescence of propranolol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Zhong-Xiao; Li, Long-Di

    2002-08-01

    A direct and simple non-protected room temperature phosphorimetry (NP-RTP) for determine propranolol, which using I - as a heavy atom perturber and sodium sulfite as a deoxygenator, has been developed. The phosphorescence peak wavelength maxima λex/ λem=288/494, 522 nm. The analytical curve of propranolol gives a linear dynamic range of 8.0×10 -8-2.0×10 -5 mol l -1 and a detection limit of 3×10 -8 mol l -1. The influence of I - concentration on RTP lifetime of propranolol was studied and the luminescence kinetic parameters were calculated. It is found that the relation between I - concentration ( x) and RTP lifetime ( τ) can be expressed as τ=1.25e -0.477 x and the rate constants of phosphorescence emission kp was 0.800 per ms. The method was applied directly to determination of propranolol in urine and drug tablets with a satisfactory result. The recoveries were 96.6-97.4% and the relative standard deviation was 2% for the 1.00×10 -6-4.00×10 -6 mol l -1 propranolol in spiked urine sample.

  11. Phosphorescence bioimaging using cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    You, Youngmin

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in the development of the phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes have made it possible to implement the phosphorescence modality in bioimaging applications. A variety of phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes have been synthesized and assessed in the context of in vitro and in vivo imaging, especially in subcellular organelle staining and the sensing of biologically important analytes. The examples presented here demonstrate that Ir(III) complexes provide attractive alternatives to fluorescent organic compounds in the construction of biolabels and biosensors. The complexes are particularly advantageous with respect to fluorescent compounds in their compatibility with time-gated bioimaging techniques that completely eliminate background signals due to autofluorescence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Highly efficient exciplex phosphorescence from organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgili, D.; Cocchi, M.; Fattori, V.; Sabatini, C.; Kalinowski, J.; Williams, J. A. G.

    2006-12-01

    The efficiency of organic exciplex light-emitting-devices (EXLEDs) can be greatly improved by introduction of a phosphorescent sensitizer with a high electronic affinity. In the electron-hole combination process at the electron donor/acceptor interface, solely singlet exciplexes are generated producing the exciplex fluorescence. A phosphor sensitizer allows the formation in the emitter bulk of triplet exciplexes, which yield highly efficient exciplex phosphorescence. As an example, we use a Pt-based phosphor (PtL 2Cl) doped into a star-burst amine hole transporting donor (m-MTDATA) and bathophenanthroline (BPT) electron-transporting acceptor system which in a bi-layer EXLED reveals an exciplex high electro-phosphorescence external quantum yield of 2.4% photon/carrier.

  13. Local kinetic analysis of the ballooning mode in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akira

    1990-07-01

    The problem of ballooning marginal stability in tokamaks, in both the incompressible and compressible limits, is examined in terms of a local kinetic dispersion relation by incorporating all possible kinetic resonances of both electrons and ions. In particular, the ion Landau resonance, which has been ignored in previous kinetic theories, is retained. A low-beta, collisionless tokamak discharge with shifted circular magnetic surfaces is assumed; for simplicity, particle trapping is ignored. The analysis indicates that the stability boundary of the ballooning mode in tokamaks is quite insensitive to whether a plasma is compressible or incompressible. The maximum growth rate of the kinetic ballooning mode is smaller than the magneto hydrodynamic counterpart typically by a factor of 5, and it does not exceed the ion transit frequency by a large margin. The findings may imply that the ballooning instability should not be as violent as conjectured to date, and explain the achievement in some tokamaks of stable discharge in the beta regime that should be magnetohydrodynamic ballooning unstable.

  14. Novel red phosphorescent polymers bearing both ambipolar and functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent moieties for highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Lian, Meng; Yu, Yue; Yan, Xiaogang; Xu, Xianbin; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel red phosphorescent polymers is successfully developed through Suzuki cross-coupling among ambipolar units, functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent blocks, and fluorene-based silane moieties. The photophysical and electrochemical investigations indicate not only highly efficient energy-transfer from the organic segments to the phosphorescent units in the polymer backbone but also the ambipolar character of the copolymers. Benefiting from all these merits, the phosphorescent polymers can furnish organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with exceptional high electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies with a current efficiency (η L ) of 8.31 cd A(-1) , external quantum efficiency (η ext ) of 16.07%, and power efficiency (η P ) of 2.95 lm W(-1) , representing the state-of-the-art electroluminescent performances ever achieved by red phosphorescent polymers. This work here might represent a new pathway to design and synthesize highly efficient phosphorescent polymers.

  15. Kinetic analysis of the multistep aggregation mechanism of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Arosio, Paolo; Sozo, Margaux; Yates, Andrew; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-09-11

    We investigate by kinetic analysis the aggregation mechanism of two monoclonal antibodies belonging to the IgG1 and IgG2 subclass under thermal stress. For each IgG, we apply a combination of size exclusion chromatography and light scattering techniques to resolve the time evolution of the monomer, dimer, and trimer concentrations, as well as the average molecular weight and the average hydrodynamic radius of the aggregate distribution. By combining the detailed experimental characterization with a theoretical kinetic model based on population balance equations, we extract relevant information on the contribution of the individual elementary steps on the global aggregation process. The analysis shows that the two molecules follow different aggregation pathways under the same operating conditions. In particular, while the monomer depletion of the IgG1 is found to be rate-limited by monomeric conformational changes, bimolecular collision is identified as the rate-limiting step in the IgG2 aggregation process. The measurement of the microscopic rate constants by kinetic analysis allows the quantification of the protein-protein interaction potentials expressed in terms of the Fuchs stability ratio (W). It is found that the antibody solutions exhibit large W values, which are several orders of magnitude larger than the values computed in the frame of the DLVO theory. This indicates that, besides net electrostatic repulsion, additional effects delay the aggregation kinetics of the antibody solutions with respect to diffusion-limited conditions. These effects likely include the limited efficiency of the collision events due to the presence of a limited number of specific aggregation-prone patches on the heterogeneous protein surface, and the contribution of additional repulsive non-DLVO forces to the protein-protein interaction potential, such as hydration forces.

  16. Visible room-temperature phosphorescence of pure organic crystals via a radical-ion-pair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Shinichi; Akeno, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Yuasa, Hideya

    2015-06-28

    The afterglow of phosphorescent compounds can be distinguished from background fluorescence and scattered light by a time-resolved observation, which is a beneficial property for bioimaging. Phosphorescence emission accompanies spin-forbidden transitions from an excited singlet state through an excited triplet state to a ground singlet state. Since these intersystem crossings are facilitated usually by the heavy-atom effect, metal-free organic solids are seldom phosphorescent, although these solids have recently been refurbished as low-cost, eco-friendly phosphorescent materials. Here, we show that crystalline isophthalic acid exhibits room-temperature phosphorescence with an afterglow that lasts several seconds through a nuclear spin magnetism-assisted spin exchange of a radical ion pair. The obvious afterglow that facilitates a time-resolved detection and the unusual phosphorescence mechanism that enables emission intensification by nuclear spin managements are promising for exploiting the phosphorescence materials in novel applications such as bioimaging.

  17. LSENS, The NASA Lewis Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    2000-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS (the NASA Lewis kinetics and sensitivity analysis code), are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include: static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; incident-shock initiated reaction in a shock tube; and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method (LSODE, the Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations), which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reactions, is used to solve the "stiff" ordinary differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, the code uses the decoupled direct method to calculate sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters. Solution methods for the equilibrium and post-shock conditions and for perfectly stirred reactor problems are either adapted from or based on the procedures built into the NASA code CEA (Chemical Equilibrium and Applications).

  18. Fluctuation Analysis: Dissecting Transcriptional Kinetics with Signal Theory.

    PubMed

    Coulon, A; Larson, D R

    2016-01-01

    Recent live-cell microscopy techniques now allow the visualization in multiple colors of RNAs as they are transcribed on genes of interest. Following the number of nascent RNAs over time at a single locus reveals complex fluctuations originating from the underlying transcriptional kinetics. We present here a technique based on concepts from signal theory-called fluctuation analysis-to analyze and interpret multicolor transcriptional time traces and extract the temporal signatures of the underlying mechanisms. The principle is to generate, from the time traces, a set of functions called correlation functions. We explain how to compute these functions practically from a set of experimental traces and how to interpret them through different theoretical and computational means. We also present the major difficulties and pitfalls one might encounter with this technique. This approach is capable of extracting mechanistic information hidden in transcriptional fluctuations at multiple timescales and has broad applications for understanding transcriptional kinetics.

  19. n,. pi. /sup */ state of jet-cooled benzophenone as studied by sensitized phosphorescence excitation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, S.; Sato, T.; Mikami, N.; Ito, M.

    1986-10-23

    The sensitized phosphorescence excitation spectrum of jet-cooled benzophenone due to the S/sub 1/(n,..pi../sup */) produced from S/sub 0/ transition has been measured. It was found that the spectrum consists exclusively of several long progressions of 60 cm/sup -1/ which is the in-phase torsional mode of the phenyl rings. The vibrational analysis and the potential calculation shows that the in the S/sub 1/(n,..pi../sup */) state great geometry changes occur in the dihedral angle between the phenyl rings, the C=O bond distance, and the C-C bonds adjacent to the C=O bond.

  20. Formulation, construction and analysis of kinetic models of metabolism: A review of modelling frameworks.

    PubMed

    Saa, Pedro A; Nielsen, Lars K

    2017-09-12

    Kinetic models are critical to predict the dynamic behaviour of metabolic networks. Mechanistic kinetic models for large networks remain uncommon due to the difficulty of fitting their parameters. Recent modelling frameworks promise new ways to overcome this obstacle while retaining predictive capabilities. In this review, we present an overview of the relevant mathematical frameworks for kinetic formulation, construction and analysis. Starting with kinetic formalisms, we next review statistical methods for parameter inference, as well as recent computational frameworks applied to the construction and analysis of kinetic models. Finally, we discuss opportunities and limitations hindering the development of larger kinetic reconstructions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Phosphorescence within benzotellurophenes and color tunable tellurophenes under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Gang; Wiltshire, Benjamin D; Choi, Paul; Savin, Aliaksandr; Sun, Shuai; Mohammadpour, Arash; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Farsinezhad, Samira; Brown, Alex; Shankar, Karthik; Rivard, Eric

    2015-03-28

    The zirconium-mediated syntheses of pinacolboronate (BPin) appended benzo[b]tellurophenes and two phenyl/BPin substituted tellurophene isomers with different colors of emission have been achieved. These species are new additions to an emerging class of inorganic heterocycles that display visible phosphorescence in the solid state under ambient conditions.

  2. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, D D; Maes, N C J; Lamberts, T; Sweep, A M; van de Water, W; Kunnen, R P J; Clercx, H J H; van Heijst, G J F; Dam, N J

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  3. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Voort, D. D. van der Water, W. van de; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Heijst, G. J. F. van; Maes, N. C. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Dam, N. J.; Lamberts, T.

    2016-03-15

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  4. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Maes, N. C. J.; Lamberts, T.; Sweep, A. M.; van de Water, W.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Dam, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (˜1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  5. Kinetic analysis of two dimensional metallic grating Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ding

    2011-08-15

    The dispersion relation of two dimensional metallic grating Cerenkov maser has been given by using kinetic analysis, in which the influence of electron movement is directly considered without using an equivalent dielectric medium assumption. The effects of structural parameters and beam state on the interaction gain and synchronous frequency have also been investigated in detail by numerical calculations. To an illustrative case, the quantitative relations produced from varying the gap distance between electron beam and metallic grating, beam current, electron transverse to axial velocity ratio, and electron axial velocity spread have been obtained. The developed method can be used to predict the real interaction system performances.

  6. A uranium (VI) complex: Synthesis, structural and thermal kinetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Nidhi

    2016-08-01

    A new complex [UO2(2,6-DNP)2phen] (1) (2,6-DNP = 2,6-dinitrophenol, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) was synthesized, and identified by elemental analysis, IR, Powder XRD and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure provides the abundant information's about the bonding and geometry around the U(VI) metal center. The thermal decomposition was studied by TG-DSC, and the kinetics of thermolysis was investigated by applying model fitting as well as isoconversional methods. Explosion delay measurement (De) was also evaluated to determine the response of this complex under the condition of rapid heating.

  7. Intracellular O2 sensing probe based on cell-penetrating phosphorescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fercher, Andreas; Borisov, Sergey M; Zhdanov, Alexander V; Klimant, Ingo; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2011-07-26

    A new intracellular O(2) (icO(2)) sensing probe is presented, which comprises a nanoparticle (NP) formulation of a cationic polymer Eudragit RL-100 and a hydrophobic phosphorescent dye Pt(II)-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (PtPFPP). Using the time-resolved fluorescence (TR-F) plate reader set-up, cell loading was investigated in detail, particularly the effects of probe concentration, loading time, serum content in the medium, cell type, density, etc. The use of a fluorescent analogue of the probe in conjunction with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, revealed that cellular uptake of the NPs is driven by nonspecific energy-dependent endocytosis and that the probe localizes inside the cell close to the nucleus. Probe calibration in biological environment was performed, which allowed conversion of measured phosphorescence lifetime signals into icO(2) concentration (μM). Its analytical performance in icO(2) sensing experiments was demonstrated by monitoring metabolic responses of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells under ambient and hypoxic macroenvironment. The NP probe was seen to generate stable and reproducible signals in different types of mammalian cells and robust responses to their metabolic stimulation, thus allowing accurate quantitative analysis. High brightness and photostability allow its use in screening experiments with cell populations on a commercial TR-F reader, and for single cell analysis on a fluorescent microscope.

  8. LSENS - GENERAL CHEMICAL KINETICS AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical kinetics problems. The motivation for the development of this program is the continuing interest in developing detailed chemical reaction mechanisms for complex reactions such as the combustion of fuels and pollutant formation and destruction. A reaction mechanism is the set of all elementary chemical reactions that are required to describe the process of interest. Mathematical descriptions of chemical kinetics problems constitute sets of coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The number of ODEs can be very large because of the numerous chemical species involved in the reaction mechanism. Further complicating the situation are the many simultaneous reactions needed to describe the chemical kinetics of practical fuels. For example, the mechanism describing the oxidation of the simplest hydrocarbon fuel, methane, involves over 25 species participating in nearly 100 elementary reaction steps. Validating a chemical reaction mechanism requires repetitive solutions of the governing ODEs for a variety of reaction conditions. Analytical solutions to the systems of ODEs describing chemistry are not possible, except for the simplest cases, which are of little or no practical value. Consequently, there is a need for fast and reliable numerical solution techniques for chemical kinetics problems. In addition to solving the ODEs describing chemical kinetics, it is often necessary to know what effects variations in either initial condition values or chemical reaction mechanism parameters have on the solution. Such a need arises in the development of reaction mechanisms from experimental data. The rate coefficients are often not known with great precision and in general, the experimental data are not sufficiently detailed to accurately estimate the rate coefficient parameters. The development of a reaction mechanism is facilitated by a systematic sensitivity analysis

  9. LSENS - GENERAL CHEMICAL KINETICS AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical kinetics problems. The motivation for the development of this program is the continuing interest in developing detailed chemical reaction mechanisms for complex reactions such as the combustion of fuels and pollutant formation and destruction. A reaction mechanism is the set of all elementary chemical reactions that are required to describe the process of interest. Mathematical descriptions of chemical kinetics problems constitute sets of coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The number of ODEs can be very large because of the numerous chemical species involved in the reaction mechanism. Further complicating the situation are the many simultaneous reactions needed to describe the chemical kinetics of practical fuels. For example, the mechanism describing the oxidation of the simplest hydrocarbon fuel, methane, involves over 25 species participating in nearly 100 elementary reaction steps. Validating a chemical reaction mechanism requires repetitive solutions of the governing ODEs for a variety of reaction conditions. Analytical solutions to the systems of ODEs describing chemistry are not possible, except for the simplest cases, which are of little or no practical value. Consequently, there is a need for fast and reliable numerical solution techniques for chemical kinetics problems. In addition to solving the ODEs describing chemical kinetics, it is often necessary to know what effects variations in either initial condition values or chemical reaction mechanism parameters have on the solution. Such a need arises in the development of reaction mechanisms from experimental data. The rate coefficients are often not known with great precision and in general, the experimental data are not sufficiently detailed to accurately estimate the rate coefficient parameters. The development of a reaction mechanism is facilitated by a systematic sensitivity analysis

  10. Adaptive approach for nonlinear sensitivity analysis of reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Horenko, Illia; Lorenz, Sönke; Schütte, Christof; Huisinga, Wilhelm

    2005-07-15

    We present a unified approach for linear and nonlinear sensitivity analysis for models of reaction kinetics that are stated in terms of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The approach is based on the reformulation of the ODE problem as a density transport problem described by a Fokker-Planck equation. The resulting multidimensional partial differential equation is herein solved by extending the TRAIL algorithm originally introduced by Horenko and Weiser in the context of molecular dynamics (J. Comp. Chem. 2003, 24, 1921) and discussed it in comparison with Monte Carlo techniques. The extended TRAIL approach is fully adaptive and easily allows to study the influence of nonlinear dynamical effects. We illustrate the scheme in application to an enzyme-substrate model problem for sensitivity analysis w.r.t. to initial concentrations and parameter values.

  11. Norepinephrine metabolism in humans. Kinetic analysis and model

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, O.A.; Jacquez, J.A.; Zech, L.A.; Smith, M.J.; Sanfield, J.A.; Morrow, L.A.; Rosen, S.G.; Halter, J.B.

    1987-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to quantify more precisely and to begin to address the problem of heterogeneity of the kinetics of distribution and metabolism of norepinephrine (NE) in humans, by using compartmental analysis. Steady-state NE specific activity in arterialized plasma during (/sup 3/H)NE infusion and postinfusion plasma disappearance of (/sup 3/H)NE were measured in eight healthy subjects in the supine and upright positions. Two exponentials were clearly identified in the plasma (/sup 3/H)NE disappearance curves of each subject studied in the supine (r = 0.94-1.00, all P less than 0.01) and upright (r = 0.90-0.98, all P less than 0.01) positions. A two-compartment model was the minimal model necessary to simultaneously describe the kinetics of NE in the supine and upright positions. The NE input rate into the extravascular compartment 2, estimated with the minimal model, increased with upright posture (1.87 +/- 0.08 vs. 3.25 +/- 0.2 micrograms/min per m2, P less than 0.001). Upright posture was associated with a fall in the volume of distribution of NE in compartment 1 (7.5 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.7 +/- 0.3 liters, P less than 0.001), and as a result of that, there was a fall in the metabolic clearance rate of NE from compartment 1 (1.80 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.21 +/- 0.08 liters/min per m2, P less than 0.001). We conclude that a two-compartment model is the minimal model that can accurately describe the kinetics of distribution and metabolism of NE in humans.

  12. A novel optical biosensor for direct and selective determination of serotonin in serum by Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a novel biosensor which combines the use of nanotechnology (non-woven nanofibre mat) with Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence (SS-RTP) measurement for the determination of serotonin in human serum. The developed biosensor is simple and can be directly applied in serum; only requires a simple clean-up protocol. Therefore it is the first time that serotonin is analysed directly in serum with a non-enzymatic technique. This new approach is based on the covalent immobilization of serotonin directly from serum on a functional nanofibre material (Tiss®-Link) with a preactivated surface for direct covalent immobilization of primary and secondary amines, and the subsequent measurement of serotonin phosphorescent emission from the solid surface. The phosphorescent detection allows avoiding the interference from any fluorescence emission or scattering light from any molecule present in the serum sample which can be also immobilised on the nanofibre material. The determination of serotonin with this SS-RTP sensor overcomes some limitations, such as large interference from the matrix and high cost and complexity of many of the methods widely used for serotonin analysis. The potential applicability of the sensor in the clinical diagnosis was demonstrated by analysing serum samples from seven healthy volunteers. The method was validated with an external reference laboratory, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.997 which indicates excellent correlation between the two methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A DNA probe based on phosphorescent resonance energy transfer for detection of transgenic 35S promoter DNA.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinzhi; Miao, Yanming; Yang, Jiajia; Qin, Jin; Li, Dongxia; Yan, Guiqin

    2017-05-15

    A QDs-DNA nano-probe was made by combining Mn-doped ZnS room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) quantum dots (QDs) and DNA. Then an RTP sensor for quantitative detection of genetically-modified mark sequence cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (Ca MV 35S) DNA was built on basis of phosphorescent resonance energy transfer (PRET). The underlying principles were that a QDs-DNA water-soluble nano-probe was built by connecting single-strand DNA to the surfaces of QDs via a ligand exchange method. This probe had good RTP performance and could well identify Ca MV 35S. Thereby, the simple, rapid and efficient detection of genetically-modified organisms was realized. With the increase of target DNA sequence, the phosphorescent intensity of QDs was gradually reduced due to the energy transfer between QDs and the organic quencher BHQ2. This sensor had a detection limit of 4.03nM and a detection range of 12-300nM. Moreover, this sensor had high selectivity. This sensor could effectively detect the target DNA compared with mismatched and random sequences. Thus, this method is very promising for biological analysis.

  14. Light-Emitting Diodes: Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2016).

    PubMed

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    On page 320, R. R. Lunt and co-workers demonstrate electroluminescence from earth-abundant phosphorescent metal halide nanoclusters. These inorganic emitters, which exhibit rich photophysics combined with a high phosphorescence quantum yield, are employed in red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes, providing a new platform of phosphorescent emitters for low-cost and high-performance light-emission applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Red phosphorescence from benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gregory D.; Sazama, Graham T.; Wu, Tony; Baldo, Marc A.; Swager, Timothy M.

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, we describe the red phosphorescence exhibited by a class of structurally simple benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at room temperature. The photophysical properties of these molecules in deoxygenated cyclohexane, including their absorption spectra, steady-state photoluminescence and excitation spectra, and phosphorescence lifetimes, are presented. Finally, time-dependent density functional theory calculations were carried out to better understand the electronic excited states of these benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles and why they are capable of phosphorescence.

  16. Red phosphorescence from benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Gutierrez, Gregory D.; Sazama, Graham T.; Wu, Tony; ...

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, we describe the red phosphorescence exhibited by a class of structurally simple benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at room temperature. The photophysical properties of these molecules in deoxygenated cyclohexane, including their absorption spectra, steady-state photoluminescence and excitation spectra, and phosphorescence lifetimes, are presented. Finally, time-dependent density functional theory calculations were carried out to better understand the electronic excited states of these benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles and why they are capable of phosphorescence.

  17. Red Phosphorescence from Benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Gregory D; Sazama, Graham T; Wu, Tony; Baldo, Marc A; Swager, Timothy M

    2016-06-03

    We describe the red phosphorescence exhibited by a class of structurally simple benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at room temperature. The photophysical properties of these molecules in deoxygenated cyclohexane, including their absorption spectra, steady-state photoluminescence and excitation spectra, and phosphorescence lifetimes, are presented. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were carried out to better understand the electronic excited states of these benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles and why they are capable of phosphorescence.

  18. Kinetic analysis of manure pyrolysis and combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lopez, M; Pedrosa-Castro, G J; Valverde, J L; Sanchez-Silva, L

    2016-12-01

    Due to the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the environmental issues derived from their use, biomass seems to be an excellent source of renewable energy. In this work, the kinetics of the pyrolysis and combustion of three different biomass waste samples (two dairy manure samples before (Pre) and after (Dig R) anaerobic digestion and one swine manure sample (SW)) was studied by means of thermogravimetric analysis. In this work, three iso-conversional methods (Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS)) were compared with the Coats-Redfern method. The Ea values of devolatilization stages were in the range of 152-170kJ/mol, 148-178kJ/mol and 156-209kJ/mol for samples Pre, Dig R and SW, respectively. Concerning combustion process, char oxidation stages showed lower Ea values than that obtained for the combustion devolatilization stage, being in the range of 140-175kJ/mol, 178-199kJ/mol and 122-144kJ/mol for samples Pre, Dig R and SW, respectively. These results were practically the same for samples Pre and Dig R, which means that the kinetics of the thermochemical processes were not affected by anaerobic digestion. Finally, the distributed activation energy model (DAEM) and the pseudo-multi component stage model (PMSM) were applied to predict the weight loss curves of pyrolysis and combustion. DAEM was the best model that fitted the experimental data.

  19. Plasmonic Purcell effect reveals obliquely ordered phosphorescent emitters in Organic LEDs.

    PubMed

    Mac Ciarnain, R; Michaelis, D; Wehlus, T; Rausch, A F; Wehrmeister, S; Schmidt, T D; Brütting, W; Danz, N; Bräuer, A; Tünnermann, A

    2017-05-12

    The non-isotropic alignment of molecules can increase the interaction efficiency with propagating light fields. This applies to both emissive and absorptive systems and can be exploited for achieving unprecedented efficiencies of organic opto-electronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes. Optical analysis has revealed certain phosphorescent emitters to align spontaneously in an advantageous orientation. Unfortunately, established approaches only determine an average orientation because emission patterns solely depend on the second moments of the transition dipole vector distribution. In order to resolve further details of such a distribution, additional differences in the emission characteristics of parallel and perpendicularly oriented emitters need to be introduced. A thin metal layer near the emitters introduces plasmon mediated losses mostly for perpendicular emitters. Then, analyzing the emission at different polarizations allows one to measure emission lifetimes of mostly parallel or mostly perpendicular oriented emitters. This should alter the transient emission when observing the temporal phosphorescence decay under different directions and/or polarizations. The angular width of the orientation distribution can be derived from the degree of such lifetime splitting. Our results suggest a narrow but obliquely oriented molecular ensemble of Ir(MDQ)2(acac) doped into the α-NPD host inside an Organic LED stack.

  20. Green Phosphorescence and Electroluminescence of Sulfur Pentafluoride-Functionalized Cationic Iridium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Shavaleev, Nail M; Xie, Guohua; Varghese, Shinto; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Momblona, Cristina; Ortí, Enrique; Bolink, Henk J; Samuel, Ifor D W; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2015-06-15

    We report on four cationic iridium(III) complexes [Ir(C^N)2(dtBubpy)](PF6) that have sulfur pentafluoride-modified 1-phenylpyrazole and 2-phenylpyridine cyclometalating (C^N) ligands (dtBubpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridyl). Three of the complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. In cyclic voltammetry, the complexes undergo reversible oxidation of iridium(III) and irreversible reduction of the SF5 group. They emit bright green phosphorescence in acetonitrile solution and in thin films at room temperature, with emission maxima in the range of 482-519 nm and photoluminescence quantum yields of up to 79%. The electron-withdrawing sulfur pentafluoride group on the cyclometalating ligands increases the oxidation potential and the redox gap and blue-shifts the phosphorescence of the iridium complexes more so than the commonly employed fluoro and trifluoromethyl groups. The irreversible reduction of the SF5 group may be a problem in organic electronics; for example, the complexes do not exhibit electroluminescence in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs). Nevertheless, the complexes exhibit green to yellow-green electroluminescence in doped multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with emission maxima ranging from 501 nm to 520 nm and with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 1.7% in solution-processed devices.

  1. Synthesis of Phosphorescent Asymmetrically π-Extended Porphyrins for Two-Photon Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Significant effort has been directed in recent years toward porphyrins with enhanced two-photon absorption (2PA). However, the properties of their triplet states, which are central to many applications, have rarely been examined in parallel. Here we report the synthesis of asymmetrically π-extended platinum(II) and palladium(II) porphyrins, whose 2PA into single-photon-absorbing states is enhanced as a result of the broken center-of-inversion symmetry and whose triplet states can be monitored by room-temperature phosphorescence. 5,15-Diaryl-syn-dibenzoporphyrins (DBPs) and syn-dinaphthoporphyrins (DNPs) were synthesized by [2 + 2] condensation of the corresponding dipyrromethanes and subsequent oxidative aromatization. Butoxycarbonyl groups on the meso-aryl rings render these porphyrins well-soluble in a range of organic solvents, while 5,15-meso-aryl substitution causes minimal nonplanar distortion of the macrocycle, ensuring high triplet emissivity. A syn-DBP bearing four alkoxycarbonyl groups in the benzo rings and possessing a large static dipole moment was also synthesized. Photophysical properties (2PA brightness and phosphorescence quantum yields and lifetimes) of the new porphyrins were measured, and their ground-state structures were determined by DFT calculations and/or X-ray analysis. The developed synthetic methods should facilitate the construction of π-extended porphyrins for applications requiring high two-photon triplet action cross sections. PMID:25157580

  2. Novel multiple phosphorescence in nanostructured zinc oxide and calculations of correlated colour temperature.

    PubMed

    Das, Sagnik; Ghorai, Uttam Kumar; Dey, Rajib; Ghosh, Chandan Kumar; Pal, Mrinal

    2017-08-30

    The design and development of novel and high quantum efficiency luminescent materials, such as phosphors, having tuneability in properties, have received tremendous interest among scientists. In this paper, we have achieved for the first-time multiple phosphorescence (blue and green) having a life-time of ∼10 μs in nanostructured zinc oxide that was synthesized using an easy and facile sol-gel method. Importantly, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and the phosphorescence life-time could be tuned by controlling the annealing temperature under a reducing atmosphere. Temperature and atmosphere dependent variation of [VO] and has been interpreted by the detailed thermodynamic analysis of defect chemistry, for the first time. These nanostructured zinc oxide particles being sufficiently large in size (around 160 nm) are extremely stable and expected to show photoluminescence for a longer period of time than nanorods and quantum dots. The quantum yield was found to be as high as 13-15% which is comparable to the order of magnitude of that of quantum dots. The calculated correlated colour temperature is found to be suitable for cool lighting applications.

  3. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding. 2. Enormous deuterium isotope effect on the phosphorescence of 6-hydroxybenzanthrone

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, M.H.; Gillispie, G.D.; Haddon, R.C.

    1982-10-28

    The laser-excited fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra of the title compound and its hydroxy-deuterated analogue have been measured in an n-hexane Shpol'skii matrix at 10 K. The deuterium substitution has only a minor effect on the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence and phosphorescence vibronic patterns but leads to a greater than order of magnitude increase in the phosphorescence quantum yield. The phosphorescence lifetimes have been measured to be 19 ms for the normal isotopic species and 300 ms for the deuterated form. This probably represents the largest deuterium isotope effect yet observed in aromatic molecule photophysics.

  4. Synthesis of a platinum diketonate-containing polymer showing oxygen-resistant phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Hirose, Amane; Tamashima, Kenji; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of a platinum diketonate-based alternating copolymer containing a fluorene unit and its oxygen-resistant phosphorescence are reported. The polymerization is executed via palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. The synthesized polymer shows good solubility in common organic solvents and processability to form homogeneous films. By optical measurements it is found that the synthesized polymer shows phosphorescence from a triplet π-π* ligand-centered transition, and interestingly, the emission is hardly influenced by oxygen. Phosphorescence is observed from both solution and film samples under aerobic conditions. The new idea of obtaining emissive materials based on conjugated polymers showing oxygen-resistant phosphorescence is presented here.

  5. Water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes for OLED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eum, Min-Sik; Yoon, Heekoo; Kim, Tae Hyung

    2012-09-01

    Newly prepared water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes, trans-[Ir(ppy)(PAr3)2(H)L]0,+ (ppy = bidentate 2-phenylpyridinato anionic ligand; L= Cl (1), CO (2), CN- (3); H being trans to the nitrogen of ppy ligand; PAr3 (TPPTS) = P(m-C6H4SO3Na)3), have been synthesized and characterized. Those complexes containing water-soluble phosphine ligands can emit any color region as altering cyclometalated ligands in aqueous media with high quantum efficiencies. Even though these water-soluble phosphorescent iridium complexes can be the sensing probe for toxic CO gas and CN anion, they will be capable of promising materials in the solution processible OLED applications.

  6. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active Λ and ∆ isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of Λ/Δ isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the Λ/Δ iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the Λ/Δ isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes.

  7. Enhancement of platinum octaethyl porphyrin phosphorescence near nanotextured silver surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shanlin; Rothberg, Lewis J

    2005-04-27

    We observe more than a 200-fold increase in the photoexcited phosphorescent emission of PtOEP (2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphyrin platinum II) in a polystyrene film on nanotextured silver surfaces, coincident with a reduction in the triplet state lifetime by a factor of 5. The large enhancement results in films with apparent luminescence quantum yields much greater than unity and can be understood in terms of increased radiative rates due to interactions between the molecules and the electron plasma in nearby silver nanoparticles. We study the photoluminescence efficiency, excitation spectrum, and decay dynamics as a function of film thickness and silver density. We use a model of the photophysics to decompose the phosphorescent enhancement into contributions from increases in absorption, emissive rate, and quenching. Quenching increases in importance for very thin films, and we conclude that approximately 3 nm spacing between metal and chromophore leads to the largest photoluminescence enhancement.

  8. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  9. Novel bipolar bathophenanthroline containing hosts for highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ziyi; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Ando, Shinji; Ueda, Mitsuru; Akiike, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Hidetoshi; Kajita, Toru; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2008-02-07

    The electronic structures of eight bathophenanthroline derivatives were elucidated by DFT calculations, and four representatives of which CZBP, m-CZBP, m-TPAP, and BPABP were synthesized and employed as the hosts to afford highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. The calculated molecular orbital energies agree well with the experimental results, which further demonstrates that the localization of HOMO and LUMO at the respective hole- and electron-transporting moieties is desirable in bipolar molecular designs.

  10. Theoretical study of phosphorescence in dye doped light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Minaev, Boris; Jansson, Emil; Agren, Hans; Schrader, Sigurd

    2006-12-21

    Phosphorescence of platinum(II) octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP), which has been used in organic light emitting diodes to overcome the efficiency limit imposed by the formation of triplet excitons, is studied by time-dependent (TD) density functional theory (DFT). The spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects and the phosphorescence radiative lifetime (tau(p) (r)), calculated by the TD DFT method with the quadratic response technique, are analyzed for a series of porphyrins in order to elucidate the internal heavy atom effect on tau(p) (r). While the significance of the d(pi) orbital admixture into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital e(g)(pi(*)), proposed by Gouterman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 56, 4073 (1972)], is supported by our SOC calculations, we find that the charge-transfer (CT) mechanism is more important; the CT state of the (3)A(2g) symmetry provides effective SOC mixing with the ground state, and a large (3)A(2g)-(3)E(u) transition dipole moment gives the main contribution to the radiative phosphorescence rate constant. The IR and Raman spectra in the ground state and first excited triplet state (T(1)) are studied for proper assignment of vibronic patterns. An orbital angular momentum of the T(1) state is not quenched completely by the Jahn-Teller effect. A large zero-field splitting is predicted for PtP and PtOEP which results from a competition between the SOC and Jahn-Teller effects. A strong vibronic activity is found for the e(g) mode at 230 cm(-1) in PtP phosphorescence which is shifted to 260 cm(-1) in PtOEP. This out-of-plane vibration of the Pt atom produces considerable change of the SOC mixing. The role of charge-transfer state of d(pi)pi(*) type is stressed for the explanation of the electroluminescent properties of the dye doped light emitting diode.

  11. Theoretical study of phosphorescence in dye doped light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, Boris; Jansson, Emil; Ågren, Hans; Schrader, Sigurd

    2006-12-01

    Phosphorescence of platinum(II) octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP), which has been used in organic light emitting diodes to overcome the efficiency limit imposed by the formation of triplet excitons, is studied by time-dependent (TD) density functional theory (DFT). The spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects and the phosphorescence radiative lifetime (τpr), calculated by the TD DFT method with the quadratic response technique, are analyzed for a series of porphyrins in order to elucidate the internal heavy atom effect on τpr. While the significance of the dπ orbital admixture into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital eg(π*), proposed by Gouterman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 56, 4073 (1972)], is supported by our SOC calculations, we find that the charge-transfer (CT) mechanism is more important; the CT state of the A2g3 symmetry provides effective SOC mixing with the ground state, and a large A2g3-Eu3 transition dipole moment gives the main contribution to the radiative phosphorescence rate constant. The IR and Raman spectra in the ground state and first excited triplet state (T1) are studied for proper assignment of vibronic patterns. An orbital angular momentum of the T1 state is not quenched completely by the Jahn-Teller effect. A large zero-field splitting is predicted for PtP and PtOEP which results from a competition between the SOC and Jahn-Teller effects. A strong vibronic activity is found for the eg mode at 230cm-1 in PtP phosphorescence which is shifted to 260cm-1 in PtOEP. This out-of-plane vibration of the Pt atom produces considerable change of the SOC mixing. The role of charge-transfer state of dππ* type is stressed for the explanation of the electroluminescent properties of the dye doped light emitting diode.

  12. Boron Polylactide Nanoparticles Exhibiting Fluorescence and Phosphorescence in Aqueous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Anne; Zhang, Guoqing; Zareno, Jessica; Horwitz, Alan F.; Fraser, Cassandra L.

    2008-01-01

    Difluoroboron dibenzoylmethane-polylactide, BF2dbmPLA, a biocompatible polymerluminophore conjugate was fabricated as nanoparticles. Spherical particles <100 nm in size were generated via nanoprecipitation. Intense blue fluorescence, two-photon absorption, and long-lived room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) are retained in aqueous suspension. The nanoparticles were internalized by cells and visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Luminescent boron biomaterials show potential for imaging and sensing. PMID:19081748

  13. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  14. Fluctuation analysis of motor protein movement and single enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, K; Mitra, P P; Block, S M

    1994-01-01

    We studied fluctuations in the displacement of silica beads driven by single molecules of the motor protein kinesin, moving under low mechanical loads at saturating ATP concentrations. The variance in position was significantly smaller than expected for the case of stepwise movement along a regular lattice of positions with exponentially distributed intervals. The small variance suggests that two or more sequential processes with comparable reaction rates dominate the biochemical cycle. The low value is inconsistent with certain recently proposed thermal ratchet models for motor movement as well as with scenarios where the hydrolysis of a single ATP molecule leads to a cluster of several steps. Fluctuation analysis is a potential powerful tool for studying kinetic behavior whenever the output of a single enzyme can be monitored. PMID:7991536

  15. Piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor for ricin detection and kinetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Wei; Tong, Zhao-Yang; Liu, Bing; Hao, Lan-Qun; Mu, Xi-Hui; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Gao, Chuan

    2015-04-01

    Up to now, there has been no report on target molecules detection by a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor. In order to evaluate the test performance and investigate the response dynamic characteristics of a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor, a novel method for ricin detection and kinetic analysis based on a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor was proposed, where ricin aptamer was immobilised on the microcantilever surface by biotin-avidin binding system. Results showed that the detection limit of ricin was 0.04μg L-1 (S/N ≥ 3). A linear relationship between the response voltage and the concentration of ricin in the range of 0.2μg L-1-40μg L-1 was obtained, with the linear regression equation of ΔUe = 0.904C + 5.852 (n = 5, R = 0.991, p < 0.001). The sensor showed no response for abrin, BSA, and could overcome the influence of complex environmental disruptors, indicating high specificity and good selectivity. Recovery and reproducibility in the result of simulated samples (simulated water, soil, and flour sample) determination met the analysis requirements, which was 90.5˜95.5% and 7.85%˜9.39%, respectively. On this basis, a reaction kinetic model based on ligand-receptor binding and the relationship with response voltage was established. The model could well reflect the dynamic response of the sensor. The correlation coefficient (R) was greater than or equal to 0.9456 (p < 0.001). Response voltage (ΔUe) and response time (t0) obtained from the fitting equation on different concentrations of ricin fitted well with the measured values.

  16. Analysis of Network Topologies Underlying Ethylene Growth Response Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Aaron M.; McCollough, Forest W.; Eldreth, Bryan L.; Binder, Brad M.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Most models for ethylene signaling involve a linear pathway. However, measurements of seedling growth kinetics when ethylene is applied and removed have resulted in more complex network models that include coherent feedforward, negative feedback, and positive feedback motifs. The dynamical responses of the proposed networks have not been explored in a quantitative manner. Here, we explore (i) whether any of the proposed models are capable of producing growth-response behaviors consistent with experimental observations and (ii) what mechanistic roles various parts of the network topologies play in ethylene signaling. To address this, we used computational methods to explore two general network topologies: The first contains a coherent feedforward loop that inhibits growth and a negative feedback from growth onto itself (CFF/NFB). In the second, ethylene promotes the cleavage of EIN2, with the product of the cleavage inhibiting growth and promoting the production of EIN2 through a positive feedback loop (PFB). Since few network parameters for ethylene signaling are known in detail, we used an evolutionary algorithm to explore sets of parameters that produce behaviors similar to experimental growth response kinetics of both wildtype and mutant seedlings. We generated a library of parameter sets by independently running the evolutionary algorithm many times. Both network topologies produce behavior consistent with experimental observations, and analysis of the parameter sets allows us to identify important network interactions and parameter constraints. We additionally screened these parameter sets for growth recovery in the presence of sub-saturating ethylene doses, which is an experimentally-observed property that emerges in some of the evolved parameter sets. Finally, we probed simplified networks maintaining key features of the CFF/NFB and PFB topologies. From this, we verified observations drawn from the larger networks about mechanisms underlying ethylene

  17. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution. PMID:26390855

  18. Temperature Measurement Technique Using Phosphorescence of Porphyrin Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Kentaro; Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2007-11-01

    LIF have been developed to measure the temperature, pH and the oxygen concentration in the fluid. However, the frequent excitation of the fluorescent dye causes the quenching effect. In addition, two color LIF should be applied in order to cancel the effect of non-uniform light intensity of excitation. The phosphor emitting the phosphorescence for a few milliseconds by an excitation was measured at the high time resolution, while the phosphorescence lifetime is the function of the temperature. As the phosphorescence dyes, PtTFPP and PdTFPP were tested. Those mixed with Coumarin30 were also demonstrated. These dyes were excited by a CW laser with the wavelength of 405nm. As the result, it was clarified to be able to measure the temperature using these dyes and this laser. Present study is the result of ``High speed three-dimensional direct measurement technology development for the evaluation of heat flux and flow of liquid metal'' entrusted to the University of Tokyo by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT).

  19. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  20. Highly efficient phosphorescent emission from organic electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M. A.; O'Brien, D. F.; You, Y.; Shoustikov, A.; Sibley, S.; Thompson, M. E.; Forrest, S. R.

    1998-09-01

    The efficiency of electroluminescent organic light-emitting devices, can be improved by the introduction of a fluorescent dye. Energy transfer from the host to the dye occurs via excitons, but only the singlet spin states induce fluorescent emission; these represent a small fraction (about 25%) of the total excited-state population (the remainder are triplet states). Phosphorescent dyes, however, offer a means of achieving improved light-emission efficiencies, as emission may result from both singlet and triplet states. Here we report high-efficiency (≳90%) energy transfer from both singlet and triplet states, in a host material doped with the phosphorescent dye 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphine platinum(II) (PtOEP). Our doped electroluminescent devices generate saturated red emission with peak external and internal quantum efficiencies of 4% and 23%, respectively. The luminescent efficiencies attainable with phosphorescent dyes may lead to new applications for organic materials. Moreover, our work establishes the utility of PtOEP as a probe of triplet behaviour and energy transfer in organic solid-state systems.

  1. Kinetic analysis of overlapping multistep thermal decomposition comprising exothermic and endothermic processes: thermolysis of ammonium dinitramide.

    PubMed

    Muravyev, Nikita V; Koga, Nobuyoshi; Meerov, Dmitry B; Pivkina, Alla N

    2017-01-25

    This study focused on kinetic modeling of a specific type of multistep heterogeneous reaction comprising exothermic and endothermic reaction steps, as exemplified by the practical kinetic analysis of the experimental kinetic curves for the thermal decomposition of molten ammonium dinitramide (ADN). It is known that the thermal decomposition of ADN occurs as a consecutive two step mass-loss process comprising the decomposition of ADN and subsequent evaporation/decomposition of in situ generated ammonium nitrate. These reaction steps provide exothermic and endothermic contributions, respectively, to the overall thermal effect. The overall reaction process was deconvoluted into two reaction steps using simultaneously recorded thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) curves by considering the different physical meanings of the kinetic data derived from TG and DSC by P value analysis. The kinetic data thus separated into exothermic and endothermic reaction steps were kinetically characterized using kinetic computation methods including isoconversional method, combined kinetic analysis, and master plot method. The overall kinetic behavior was reproduced as the sum of the kinetic equations for each reaction step considering the contributions to the rate data derived from TG and DSC. During reproduction of the kinetic behavior, the kinetic parameters and contributions of each reaction step were optimized using kinetic deconvolution analysis. As a result, the thermal decomposition of ADN was successfully modeled as partially overlapping exothermic and endothermic reaction steps. The logic of the kinetic modeling was critically examined, and the practical usefulness of phenomenological modeling for the thermal decomposition of ADN was illustrated to demonstrate the validity of the methodology and its applicability to similar complex reaction processes.

  2. Cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes for phosphorescence sensing of biological metal ions.

    PubMed

    You, Youngmin; Cho, Somin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-02-17

    Phosphorescence signaling provides a valuable alternative to conventional bioimaging based on fluorescence. The benefits of using phosphorescent molecules include improved sensitivity and capabilities for effective elimination of background signals by time-gated acquisition. Cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes are promising candidates for facilitating phosphorescent bioimaging because they provide synthetic versatility and excellent phosphorescence properties. In this Forum Article, we present our recent studies on the development of phosphorescence sensors for the detection of metal ions based on cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes. The constructs contained cyclometalating (C^N) ligands with the electron densities and band-gap energies of the C^N ligand structures systematically varied. Receptors that chelated zinc, cupric, and chromium ions were tethered to the ligands to create phosphorescence sensors. The alterations in the C^N ligand structures had a profound influence on the phosphorescence responses to metal ions. Mechanistic studies suggested that the phosphorescence responses could be explained on the basis of the modulation of photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) from the receptor to the photoexcited iridium species. The PeT behaviors strictly adhered to the Rehm-Weller principle, and the occurrence of PeT was located in the Marcus-normal region. It is thus anticipated that improved responses will be obtainable by increasing the excited-state reduction potential of the iridium(III) complexes. Femtosecond transient absorption experiments provided evidence for the presence of an additional photophysical mechanism that involved metal-ion-induced alteration of the intraligand charge-transfer (ILCT) transition state. Utility of the mechanism by PeT and ILCT has been demonstrated for the phosphorescence sensing of biologically important transition-metal ions. In particular, the phosphorescence zinc sensor could report the presence of intracellular zinc pools by

  3. Stochastic lumping analysis for linear kinetics and its application to the fluctuation relations between hierarchical kinetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, De-Ming; Chang, Cheng-Hung

    2015-05-14

    Conventional studies of biomolecular behaviors rely largely on the construction of kinetic schemes. Since the selection of these networks is not unique, a concern is raised whether and under which conditions hierarchical schemes can reveal the same experimentally measured fluctuating behaviors and unique fluctuation related physical properties. To clarify these questions, we introduce stochasticity into the traditional lumping analysis, generalize it from rate equations to chemical master equations and stochastic differential equations, and extract the fluctuation relations between kinetically and thermodynamically equivalent networks under intrinsic and extrinsic noises. The results provide a theoretical basis for the legitimate use of low-dimensional models in the studies of macromolecular fluctuations and, more generally, for exploring stochastic features in different levels of contracted networks in chemical and biological kinetic systems.

  4. Analysis of interface kinetics: solutions of the Gibbs-Thomson-type equation and of the kinetic rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhoumi, A.; Galenko, P. K.

    2017-04-01

    Rapidly moving solid-liquid interface is treated analytically and numerically. Derivation and qualitative analysis of interface propagation kinetics is presented. Quantitative predictions of solutions, which follow from the Kinetic Rate Theory and the solution of Gibbs-Thomson-type equation, are compared with Molecular Dynamics simulation data (MD-data) on crystallization and melting of fcc-lattice of nickel. It is shown in the approximation of a linear behavior of the interface velocity versus undercooling that the Gibbs-Thomson-type equation and kinetic rate theory describe MD-data well enough, in the range of small growth velocity and within the range of relatively small undercooling, with a relative error for the obtained values of kinetic coefficient of the order 1.1%. Within the small-and long range of undercooling, in nonlinear behavior of the interface velocity versus undercooling, the kinetic rate theory disagrees sharply with MD-data, qualitatively and quantitatively, unlike to the Gibbs-Thomson-type equation which is in a good agreement with MD-data within the whole range of undercooling and crystal growth velocity.

  5. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of Arundo donax using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeguirim, Mejdi; Trouvé, Gwenaelle

    2009-09-01

    The increase of the price of fossil means, as well as their programmed disappearing, contributed to increase among appliances based on biomass and energy crops. The thermal behavior of Arundo donax by thermogravimetric analysis was studied under inert atmosphere at heating rates ranging from 5 to 20 degrees C min(-1) from room temperature to 750 degrees C. Gaseous emissions as CO(2), CO and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured and global kinetic parameters were determined during pyrolysis with the study of the influence of the heating rate. The thermal process describes two main phases. The first phase named active zone, characterizes the degradation of hemicellulose and cellulose polymers. It started at low temperature (200 degrees C) comparatively to wood samples and was finished at 350 degrees C. The pyrolysis of the lignin polymer occurred during the second phase from 350 to 750 degrees C, named passive zone. Carbon oxides are emitted during the active zone whereas VOC are mainly formed during the passive zone. Mass losses, mass loss rates and emission factors were strongly affected by the variation of the heating rate in the active zone. It was found that the global pyrolysis of A. donax can be satisfactorily described using global independent reactions model for hemicellulose and cellulose in the active zone. The activation energy for hemicellulose was not affected by a variation of the heating rate with a value close to 110 kJ mol(-1) and presented a reaction order close to 0.5. An increase of the heating rate decreased the activation energy of the cellulose. However, a first reaction order was observed for cellulose decomposition. The experimental results and kinetic parameters may provide useful data for the design of pyrolytic processing system using A. donax as feedstock.

  6. Physico-Geometrical Kinetics of Solid-State Reactions in an Undergraduate Thermal Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Goshi, Yuri; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    An undergraduate kinetic experiment of the thermal decomposition of solids by microscopic observation and thermal analysis was developed by investigating a suitable reaction, applicable techniques of thermal analysis and microscopic observation, and a reliable kinetic calculation method. The thermal decomposition of sodium hydrogen carbonate is…

  7. Physico-Geometrical Kinetics of Solid-State Reactions in an Undergraduate Thermal Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Goshi, Yuri; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    An undergraduate kinetic experiment of the thermal decomposition of solids by microscopic observation and thermal analysis was developed by investigating a suitable reaction, applicable techniques of thermal analysis and microscopic observation, and a reliable kinetic calculation method. The thermal decomposition of sodium hydrogen carbonate is…

  8. Analysis and Interpretation of Single Molecule Protein Unfolding Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannon, Herbert; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of protein unfolding under a stretching force has been extensively studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) over the past decade [1]. Experimental artifacts at the single molecule level introduce uncertainties in the data analysis that have led to several competing physical models for the unfolding process. For example, the unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin under constant force has been described by probability distributions as diverse as exponential [2,3], a sum of exponentials, log-normal [4], and more recently a function describing static disorder in the Arrhenius model [5]. A new method for data analysis is presented that utilizes maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) combined with other traditional statistical tests to unambiguously rank the consistency of these and other models with the experimental data. These techniques applied to the ubiquitin unfolding data shows that the probability of unfolding is best fit with a stretched exponential distribution, with important implications on the complexity of the mechanism of protein unfolding. [4pt] [1] Carrion-Vazquez, et. al. Springer Series in Biophys. 2006 [0pt] [2] Fernandez et. al. Science 2004 [0pt] [3] Brujic et. al. Nat. Phys 2006 [0pt] [4] Garcia-Manyes et. al. Biophys. J. 2007 [0pt] [5] Kuo et. al. PNAS 2010

  9. Phosphorescence, ODMR and ODNQR investigation of the distorted lowest excited triplet state of sym-tetrachloropyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Borczyskowski, C.

    The lowest excited triplet state of sym-tetrachloropyrazine has been investigated at 1·5 K in single crystals of sym-tetramethylbenzene (TMB) and symtetrachlorobenzene (TCB). By analysis of the chlorine and nitrogen hyperfine interaction a 3ππ* state with B2u symmetry has been identified which is contrary to the B1u symmetry of TCB. The large difference between chlorine quadrupole resonance transitions in the singlet ground and excited triplet state of 2·75 MHz (TCB) and 3·3 MHz (TMB) suggests an out-of-plane position of chlorine nuclei in the triplet state. Analysis of the vibronic structure of the phosphorescence reveals that vibronic coupling to an energetically close lying 3nπ* state is, in comparison with other pyrazines, greatly reduced.

  10. Phosphorescent nanoparticles and their applications for time-resolved luminescent biological assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuedong; Huang, Lei; Knotts, Mike; Wu, Bin

    2009-02-01

    A new class of phosphorescent nanoparticles has been developed that use halogen-containing polymers and copolymers to encapsulate phosphorescent molecules. Their strong phosphorescence of long lifetime and large Stoke shift are not subject to oxygen quenching under ambient conditions due to the low oxygen permeability of the encapsulation matrix. The cross-linked phosphorescent particles are very stable and easily re-suspendable in aqueous media with surface functional groups to allow covalent tagging of biological recognition molecules such as antibodies. The conjugates can be used to provide very sensitive detection of analytes through time-resolved phosphorescence measurements. In addition to their applications for solution-based biological assays, those particles have also been demonstrated to be very useful for dry-chemistry-based time-resolved luminescent lateral flow assays.

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of heterogeneous photocatalysis for semiconductor systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian; Terashima, Chiaki; Fujishima, Akira; Nakata, Kazuya

    2014-05-21

    Since the report of the Honda-Fujishima effect, heterogeneous photocatalysis has attracted much attention around the world because of its potential energy and environmental applications. Although great progresses have been made in recent years, most were focused on preparing highly-active photocatalysts and investigating visible light utilization. In fact, we are still unclear on the thermodynamic and kinetic nature of photocatalysis to date, which sometimes leads to misunderstandings for experimental results. It is timely to give a review and discussion on the thermodynamics and kinetics of photocatalysis, so as to direct future researches. However, there is an absence of a detailed review on this topic until now. In this article, we tried to review and discuss the thermodynamics and kinetics of photocatalysis. We explained the thermodynamic driving force of photocatalysis, and distinguished the functions of light and heat in photocatalysis. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model, the ˙OH oxidation mechanism, and the direct-indirect (D-I) kinetic model were reviewed and compared. Some applications of the D-I model to study photocatalytic kinetics were also discussed. The electron transport mode and its importance in photocatalysis were investigated. Finally, the intrinsic relation between the kinetics and the thermodynamics of photocatalytic reactions was discussed.

  12. Kinetic analysis of Legionella inactivation using ozone in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Li, Kunquan; Zhou, Yan; Li, Xuebin; Tao, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Legionella inactivation using ozone was studied in wastewater using kinetic analysis and modeling. The experimental results indicate that the relationship between the ozone concentration, germ concentration, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be used to predict variations in germ and COD concentrations. The ozone reaction with COD and inactivation of Legionella occurred simultaneously, but the reaction with COD likely occurred at a higher rate than the inactivation, as COD is more easily oxidized by ozone than Legionella. Higher initial COD concentrations resulted in a lower inactivation rate and higher lnN/N0. Higher temperature led to a higher inactivation efficiency. The relationship of the initial O3 concentration and Legionella inactivation rate was not linear, and thus, the Ct value required for a 99.99% reduction was not constant. The initial O3 concentration was more important than the contact time, and a reduction of the initial O3 concentration could not be compensated by increasing the contact time. The Ct values were compared over a narrow range of initial concentrations; the Ct values could only be contrasted when the initial O3 concentrations were very similar. A higher initial O3 concentration led to a higher inflection point value for the lnN/N0 vs C0t curve. Energy consumption using a plasma corona was lower than when using boron-doped diamond electrodes.

  13. [Kinetic analysis of additive effect on desulfurization activity].

    PubMed

    Han, Kui-hua; Zhao, Jian-li; Lu, Chun-mei; Wang, Yong-zheng; Zhao, Gai-ju; Cheng, Shi-qing

    2006-02-01

    The additive effects of A12O3, Fe2O3 and MnCO3 on CaO sulfation kinetics were investigated by thermogravimetic analysis method and modified grain model. The activation energy (Ea) and the pre-exponential factor (k0) of surface reaction, the activation energy (Ep) and the pre-exponential factor (D0) of product layer diffusion reaction were calculated according to the model. Additions of MnCO3 can enhance the initial reaction rate, product layer diffusion and the final CaO conversion of sorbents, the effect mechanism of which is similar to that of Fe2O3. The method based isokinetic temperature Ts and activation energy can not estimate the contribution of additive to the sulfation reactivity, the rate constant of the surface reaction (k), and the effective diffusivity of reactant in the product layer (Ds) under certain experimental conditions can reflect the effect of additives on the activation. Unstoichiometric metal oxide may catalyze the surface reaction and promote the diffusivity of reactant in the product layer by the crystal defect and distinct diffusion of cation and anion. According to the mechanism and effect of additive on the sulfation, the effective temperature and the stoichiometric relation of reaction, it is possible to improve the utilization of sorbent by compounding more additives to the calcium-based sorbent.

  14. Thermal decomposition kinetics of sorghum straw via thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Dhyani, Vaibhav; Kumar, Jitendra; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2017-09-01

    The thermal decomposition of sorghum straw was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis, where the determination of kinetic triplet (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction model), was the key objective. The activation energy was determined using different isoconversional methods: Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Starink, Iterative method of Chai & Chen, Vyazovkin AIC method, and Li & Tang equation. The pre-exponential factor was calculated using Kissinger's equation; while the reaction model was predicted by comparison of z-master plot obtained from experimental values with the theoretical plots. The values of activation energy obtained from isoconversional methods were further used for evaluation of thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy. Results showed three zones of pyrolysis having average activation energy values of 151.21kJ/mol, 116.15kJ/mol, and 136.65kJ/mol respectively. The data was well fitting with two-dimension 'Valensi' model for conversion values from 0 to 0.4 with a coefficient of determination (R(2)) value of 0.988, and with third order reaction model for values from 0.4 to 0.9 with an R(2) value of 0.843. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantifying a pathway: kinetic analysis of actin dendritic nucleation.

    PubMed

    Kraikivski, Pavel; Slepchenko, Boris M

    2010-08-04

    Progress in uncovering the reaction networks that underlie important cell functions is laying the groundwork for quantitative identification of protein-interaction pathways. Since direct measurement of rate constants is not always feasible, the parameters are often inferred from multiple pieces of data using kinetic analyses based on appropriate mathematical models. The success of this approach relies on the sufficiency of available experimental data for a unique parameterization of the network. The concept of a rate-limiting step is applied to the analysis of experimental data that are usually used to quantify a pathway of actin dendritic nucleation, the Arp2/3-mediated mechanism that enables rapid changes of cell shape in response to external cues. The method yields analytical descriptions of the dynamics of polymerized actin and provides insights into how the experimental curves should be analyzed. It is shown that dynamics measured by pyrene-labeled actin assays with varying Arp2/3 concentrations are equally well described by two different rate-limiting steps: 1), binding of a nucleating complex to the side of a preexisting filament; or 2), its subsequent activation. To distinguish between the alternatives, we propose experiments with varying concentrations of actin monomers, taking advantage of the fact that the number of branches in the two cases depends differently on the initial monomer concentration. The idea is tested by simulating the proposed experiments with the use of spatial stochastic modeling.

  16. Kinetic Analysis of Protein Crystal Nucleation in Gel Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2008-01-01

    The effect of agarose on nucleation of hen egg white lysozyme crystal was examined quantitatively using a temperature-jumping technique. For the first time, to our knowledge, the inhibition of agarose during the nucleation of lysozyme was quantified in two respects: a), the effect of increasing interfacial nucleation barrier, described by the so-called interfacial correlation parameter f(m); and b), the ratio of diffusion to interfacial kinetics obtained from dynamic surface tension measurements. It follows from a dynamic surface tension analysis that the agarose network inhibits the nucleation of lysozyme by means of an enhancement of the repulsion and interfacial structure mismatch between foreign bodies and lysozyme crystals, slowing down the diffusion process of the protein molecules and clusters toward the crystal-fluid interface and inhibiting the rearrangement of protein molecules at the interface. Our results, based on ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, also show no evidence of the supersaturation enhancement effect in protein agarose gels. The effects of nucleation suppression and transport limitation in gels result in bigger, fewer, and perhaps better quality protein crystals. The understandings obtained in this study will improve our knowledge in controlling the crystallization of proteins and other biomolecules. PMID:18835910

  17. Kinetic analysis of pre-ribosome structure in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Wlotzka, Wiebke; Tuck, Alex; Barrass, J. David; Beggs, Jean D.; Tollervey, David

    2012-01-01

    Pre-ribosomal particles undergo numerous structural changes during maturation, but their high complexity and short lifetimes make these changes very difficult to follow in vivo. In consequence, pre-ribosome structure and composition have largely been inferred from purified particles and analyzed in vitro. Here we describe techniques for kinetic analyses of the changes in pre-ribosome structure in living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To allow this, in vivo structure probing by DMS modification was combined with affinity purification of newly synthesized 20S pre-rRNA over a time course of metabolic labeling with 4-thiouracil. To demonstrate that this approach is generally applicable, we initially analyzed the accessibility of the region surrounding cleavage site D site at the 3′ end of the mature 18S rRNA region of the pre-rRNA. This revealed a remarkably flexible structure throughout 40S subunit biogenesis, with little stable RNA–protein interaction apparent. Analysis of folding in the region of the 18S central pseudoknot was consistent with previous data showing U3 snoRNA–18S rRNA interactions. Dynamic changes in the structure of the hinge between helix 28 (H28) and H44 of pre-18S rRNA were consistent with recently reported interactions with the 3′ guide region of U3 snoRNA. Finally, analysis of the H18 region indicates that the RNA structure matures early, but additional protection appears subsequently, presumably reflecting protein binding. The structural analyses described here were performed on total, affinity-purified, newly synthesized RNA, so many classes of RNA and RNA–protein complex are potentially amenable to this approach. PMID:23093724

  18. Development of a room-temperature phosphorescence fiber-optic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Campiglia, A.D.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1996-05-01

    The design of a new fiber optic sensor based on solid-surface room temperature phosphorimetry is presented for the analyses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples. Analytical figures of merit are given for several compounds of environmental importance. Limits of detection at the nanograms per milliliter level were estimated for pyrene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, 1,2:3,4-dibenzanthracene, coronene, and 2,3-benzofluorene. The linearity of response of the phosphorescence sensor was evaluated, showing a fairly linear behavior for quantitative analysis. Finally, the feasibility of monitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous media was illustrated by identifying pyrene in a contaminated ground water sample. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Synchronous wavelength scanning room temperature phosphorescence: Comparison of cyclodextrin and micellar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femia, Robert A.; Love, L. J. Cline

    Application of synchronous wavelength scanning to two fluid phase room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) techniques using β-cyclodextrin and micelles are evaluated and compared. The selectivity, sensitivity, susceptibility to light scattering interference and classes of compounds amenable to determination by the two RTP approaches are discussed. Synchronous wavelength scanning cyclodextrin RTP studies focus on its usefulness for identification of nitrogen heterocyclic phosphors. Spectral resolution is improved in both RTP techniques by second derivative manipulation of the digitally stored synchronous spectra. A significant scatter interference resulting from turbidity produced by the cyclodextrin inclusion complexes imposes constraints on the selectivity and sensitivity achievable with the cyclodextrin medium, especially when using synchronous wavelength scanning. Generally, micelle-induced RTP was found to be superior to cyclodextrin-induced RTP for analysis of various mixtures of the 12 heterocyclics and 15 carbocyclics studied, as well as for a mixture of the drug, propranolol, and its 4-hydroxy metabolite.

  20. A precision synchrotron radiation detector using phosphorescent screens

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J. ); Butler, J. ); Wormser, G. . Lab. de l'Accelerateur Lineaire); Levi, M.; Rouse, F. )

    1990-01-01

    A precision detector to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions has been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 {mu}m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. White phosphorescent organic light emitting devices for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrade, Brian; Alleyne, Bert; Hack, Mike; Hewitt, Richard; Brown, Julie J.

    2006-08-01

    Consumer display manufacturers are increasingly interested in white organic light emitting devices (WOLEDs), because these devices offer thinner display profiles, and in combination with color filters eliminate the need for high-resolution shadow masks. Additionally, WOLEDs are well suited for general-purpose illumination, since the power efficiencies of laboratory devices have surpassed that of today's commercial incandescent bulbs. In this paper, we report on an all phosphorescent 25 cm2 WOLED lighting system that achieves (31+/-3) lm/W at 850 cd/m2 with CIE coordinates (0.37, 0.36), and an external quantum efficiency of (29+/-3)%.

  2. Enhancement of phosphorescence and unimolecular behavior in the solid state by perfect insulation of platinum-acetylide polymers.

    PubMed

    Masai, Hiroshi; Terao, Jun; Makuta, Satoshi; Tachibana, Yasuhiro; Fujihara, Tetsuaki; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2014-10-22

    Controlling the thermal fluctuations and molecular environment of a phosphorescent polymer backbone is vital to enhancing its phosphorescence intensity in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate enhanced phosphorescence control through a systematic investigation of cyclodextrin-based insulated platinum-acetylide polymers with well-defined coverage areas. Modification of the coverage areas revealed two unprecedented effects of macrocyclic insulation on phosphorescence behavior. First, the insulation of particular areas suppresses the thermal relaxation processes of the triplet species because of the restriction of structural fluctuations. Cyclic insulation fixes a polymer chain and concomitantly enhances the phosphorescence intensity in both the solution and solid states. Second, complete three-dimensional insulation protects the polymer from interactions with other platinum and acetylide units, and even oxygen molecules. Notably, these polymers display identical phosphorescence behaviors in both the solution and solid states, essentially achieving "unimolecular phosphorescence."

  3. TChem - A Software Toolkit for the Analysis of Complex Kinetic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Najm, Habib N.; Knio, Omar

    2011-05-01

    The TChem toolkit is a software library that enables numerical simulations using complex chemistry and facilitates the analysis of detailed kinetic models. The toolkit provide capabilities for thermodynamic properties based on NASA polynomials and species production/consumption rates. It incorporates methods that can selectively modify reaction parameters for sensitivity analysis. The library contains several functions that provide analytically computed Jacobian matrices necessary for the efficient time advancement and analysis of detailed kinetic models.

  4. Kinetic analysis and mechanistic aspects of autoxidation of catechins.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Manabu; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Kano, Kenji; Ikeda, Tokuji

    2002-01-15

    A peroxidase-based bioelectrochemical sensor of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and a Clark-type oxygen electrode were applied to continuous monitoring and kinetic analysis of the autoxidation of catechins. Four major catechins in green tea, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, were used as model compounds. It was found that dioxygen (O(2)) is quantitatively reduced to H(2)O(2). The initial rate of autoxidation is suppressed by superoxide dismutase and H(+), but is independent of buffer capacity. Based on these results, a mechanism of autoxidation is proposed; the initial step is the one-electron oxidation of the B ring of catechins by O(2) to generate a superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) and a semiquinone radical, as supported in part by electron spin resonance measurements. O(2)(*-) works as a stronger one-electron oxidant than O(2) against catechins and is reduced to H(2)O(2). The semiquinone radical is more susceptible to oxidation with O(2) than fully reduced catechins. The autoxidation rate increases with pH. This behavior can be interpreted in terms of the increase in the stability of O(2)(*-) and the semiquinone radical with increasing pH, rather than the acid dissociation of phenolic groups. Cupric ion enhances autoxidation; most probably it functions as a catalyst of the initial oxidation step of catechins. The product cuprous ion can trigger a Fenton reaction to generate hydroxyl radical. On the other hand, borate ion suppresses autoxidation drastically, due to the strong complex formation with catechins. The biological significance of autoxidation and its effectors are also discussed.

  5. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis of transcriptional regulation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Tovar, Hugo; Mejía, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is an extremely complex and interesting phenomenon whose dynamics are controlled by a large number of subtle physicochemical processes commonly described by means of gene regulatory networks. Such networks consist in a series of coupled chemical reactions, conformational changes, and other biomolecular processes involving the interaction of the DNA molecule itself with a number of proteins usually called transcription factors as well as enzymes and other components. The kinetics behind the functioning of such gene regulatory networks are largely unknown, though its description in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been discussed recently. In this work we will derive general kinetic equations for a gene regulatory network from a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description and discuss its use in understanding the free energy constrains imposed in the network structure. We also will discuss explicit expressions for the kinetics of a simple model of gene regulation and show that the kinetic role of mRNA decay during the RNA synthesis stage (or transcription) is somehow limited due to the comparatively low values of decay rates. At the level discussed here, this implies a decoupling of the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation a fact that may become quite useful when modeling gene regulatory networks from experimental data on whole genome gene expression.

  6. Creation of a U.S. Phosphorescent OLED Lighting Panel Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Michael

    2013-09-30

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has pioneered high efficacy phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) technology to enable the realization of an exciting new form of high quality, energy saving solid-date lighting. In laboratory test devices, we have demonstrated greater than 100 lm/W conversion efficacy. In this program, Universal Display will demonstrate the scalability of its proprietary UniversalPHOLED technology and materials for the manufacture of white OLED lighting panels that meet commercial lighting targets. Moser Baer Technologies will design and build a U.S.- based pilot facility. The objective of this project is to establish a pilot phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED) manufacturing line in the U.S. Our goal is that at the end of the project, prototype lighting panels could be provided to U.S. luminaire manufacturers for incorporation into products to facilitate the testing of design concepts and to gauge customer acceptance, so as to facilitate the growth of the embryonic U.S. OLED lighting industry. In addition, the team will provide a cost of ownership analysis to quantify production costs including OLED performance metrics which relate to OLED cost such as yield, materials usage, cycle time, substrate area, and capital depreciation. This project was part of a new DOE initiative designed to help establish and maintain U.S. leadership in this program will support key DOE objectives by showing a path to meet Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap cost targets, as well as meeting its efficiency targets by demonstrating the energy saving potential of our technology through the realization of greater than 76 lm/W OLED lighting panels by 2012.

  7. Photomultiplier window materials under electron irradiation - Fluorescence and phosphorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Eubanks, A. G.; Pieper, G. F.; Bredekamp, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The fluorescence and phosphorescence of photomultiplier window materials under electron irradiation have been investigated using a Sr-90/Y-90 beta emitter as the electron source. Spectral emission curves of UV-grade, optical-grade, and electron-irradiated samples of MgF2 and LiF, and of CaF2, BaF2, sapphire, fused silica, and UV-transmitting glasses were obtained over the 200-650-nm spectral range. Fluorescence yields were determined on these materials utilizing photomultiplier tubes with cesium telluride, bialkali, and trialkali (S-20) photocathodes, respectively. Optical-grade MgF2 and LiF, as well as electron-irradiated UV-grade samples of these two materials, show enhanced fluorescence due to color-center formation and associated emission bands in the blue and red wavelength regions. Large variations in fluorescence intensities were found in UV-grade sapphire samples of different origins, particularly in the red end of the spectrum, presumably due to various amounts of chromium-ion content. Phosphorescence decay with time is best described by a sum of exponential terms, with time constants ranging from a few minutes to several days.

  8. Time resolved imaging microscopy. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, G; Clegg, R M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1991-01-01

    An optical microscope capable of measuring time resolved luminescence (phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence) images has been developed. The technique employs two phase-locked mechanical choppers and a slow-scan scientific CCD camera attached to a normal fluorescence microscope. The sample is illuminated by a periodic train of light pulses and the image is recorded within a defined time interval after the end of each excitation period. The time resolution discriminates completely against light scattering, reflection, autofluorescence, and extraneous prompt fluorescence, which ordinarily decrease contrast in normal fluorescence microscopy measurements. Time resolved image microscopy produces a high contrast image and particular structures can be emphasized by displaying a new parameter, the ratio of the phosphorescence to fluorescence. Objects differing in luminescence decay rates are easily resolved. The lifetime of the long lived luminescence can be measured at each pixel of the microscope image by analyzing a series of images that differ by a variable time delay. The distribution of luminescence decay rates is displayed directly as an image. Several examples demonstrate the utility of the instrument and the complementarity it offers to conventional fluorescence microscopy. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1723311

  9. Heavy atom induced phosphorescence study on the influence of internal structural factors on the photophysics of tryptophan in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka; Gałęcki, Krystian; Rożniakowski, Kamil; Kolesińska, Beata; Kamiński, Zbigniew J.; Wysocki, Stanisław

    2014-07-01

    In this study the effect of alanyl residue insertion into tryptophan and to some extent the effect of peptide bond on the photophysics of tryptophan chromophore has been studied. The photophysical parameters crucial in triplet state decay mechanism of aqueous AW, WA and AWA peptides have been determined applying our previously proposed methodology based on the heavy atom effect and compared with the previously reported values for tryptophan (Kowalska-Baron et al., 2012). The obtained results clearly indicated that the presence of alanyl residue and the peptide bond results in the changes in the fluorescence and phosphorescence decay kinetics of tryptophan. The fluorescence decays of the oligopeptides studied at pH 7 were biexponential. The longer lifetime component of WA arises from anionic form of this dipeptide, while the shorter one may be assigned to the zwitterionic form of WA. The observed invariance of the lifetimes of anionic and zwitterionic forms of WA throughout the pH studied supports the idea that these two components of WA fluorescence decay correspond to nearly independent species, possibly interconverting but at a rate slower than the fluorescence decay rates. Comparing the determined phosphorescence spectra of the oligopeptides studied with that of tryptophan, a slight blue-shift and more evident red-shift was observed in the spectrum of AW and WA, respectively. On the basis of the results of the phosphorescence measurements performed at pH 10, the 170 μs lifetime of WA, observed even at pH 7, may be assigned to the anionic form of the compound. It may be suggested that at pH 7 during the excited triplet state lifetime of WA there is a shift in the equilibrium towards the anionic form of this dipeptide. In the case of AW and AWA at pH 7 the obtained monoexponential decay kinetics, most probably, arise from zwitterionic forms of these peptides. The determined triplet quantum yield of AWA is slightly lower than that of tryptophan, while the quantum

  10. Kinetic analysis of bioconversion of cellulose in attrition bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.O.; Lee, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymatic conversion of cellulosic wastes has great potential for the production of fuels and chemicals. However, the widespread conversion of cellulosic waste has been delayed by unfavorable process economics. The attrition bioreactor (ABR) combines wet ball milling and enzymatic hydrolysis in one process step. It was found that the ABR did not accelerate enzyme deactivation. Interfacial forces, not shear forces, caused the most deactivation. Elimination of the air-liquid interface by covering the reactor substantially increased enzyme stability. A simple exponential kinetic model was tested to predict the cellulose conversion in an ABR. Kinetic parameters were estimated from batch runs performed at various enzyme and substrate concentrations.

  11. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA.

    PubMed

    Szulik, Marta W; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P

    2014-12-12

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base-pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double-stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state-of-the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed.

  12. A water-soluble and highly phosphorescent cyclometallated iridium complex with versatile sensing capability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Chan; Song, Qijun; Pang, Qingfeng

    2017-05-01

    A water-soluble and highly phosphorescent cyclometallated iridium complex [(pq)2Ir(bpy-COOK)](+)Cl(-) (where pq=2-phenylquinoline, bpy-COOK= potassium 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate) (Ir) has been synthesized and characterized. Its phosphorescence can be sensitively and selectively quenched by tryptophan through a photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) process. Furthermore, the phosphorescence of Ir is drastically increased upon binding with bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the enhanced signal is effectively quenched in the presence of Cu(2+). Thus, Ir can be used as a multifunctional chemosensor for tryptophan, BSA, and Cu(2+) determination as well as for cell imaging.

  13. Phosphorescent Neutral Iridium (III) Complexes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Bin Mohd Yusoff, Abd Rashid; Huckaba, Aron J; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2017-04-01

    The development of transition metal complexes for application in light-emitting devices is currently attracting significant research interest. Among phosphorescent emitters, those involving iridium (III) complexes have proven to be exceedingly useful due to their relatively short triplet lifetime and high phosphorescence quantum yields. The emission wavelength of iridium (III) complexes significantly depends on the ligands, and changing the electronic nature and the position of the ligand substituents can control the properties of the ligands. In this chapter, we discuss recent developments of phosphorescent transition metal complexes for organic light-emitting diode applications focusing solely on the development of iridium metal complexes.

  14. A KINETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CONFORMATIONAL FLEXIBILITY OF STEROID HORMONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a set of 10 androgen steroids and estradiol (E2), the kinetic feasibility of conformation flexibility of the cyclic moieties was studied under the constraint of maintaining the B/C trans and C/D trans ring fusion of the natural and biologically active enantiomer. To this end,...

  15. A KINETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CONFORMATIONAL FLEXIBILITY OF STEROID HORMONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a set of 10 androgen steroids and estradiol (E2), the kinetic feasibility of conformation flexibility of the cyclic moieties was studied under the constraint of maintaining the B/C trans and C/D trans ring fusion of the natural and biologically active enantiomer. To this end,...

  16. Nonisothermal Analysis of Solution Kinetics by Spreadsheet Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A fast and generally applicable alternative solution to the problem of determining the useful shelf life of medicinal solutions is described. It illustrates the power and convenience of the combination of numerical simulation and nonlinear least squares with a practical pharmaceutical application of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, validated…

  17. Nonisothermal Analysis of Solution Kinetics by Spreadsheet Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A fast and generally applicable alternative solution to the problem of determining the useful shelf life of medicinal solutions is described. It illustrates the power and convenience of the combination of numerical simulation and nonlinear least squares with a practical pharmaceutical application of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, validated…

  18. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Salmon Roe - a kinetic analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in unsalted and salted (3%) salmon roe. Growth curves, developed using inoculated samples incubated at constant temperatures between 5 and 30 degrees C, were analyzed by curve-fitting to the Huang and Baran...

  19. Optical and magnetic studies on the phosphorescent state of phthalazine in polar and non-polar hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Seigo; Ueno, Tetsuo; Hirota, Noboru

    The optical and magnetic properties of the lowest triplet state (T1) of phthalazine were investigated in benzoic acid (BAC), p-dichlorobenzene (DCB) and p-dibromobenzene (DBB) by means of phosphorescence spectroscopy, ODMR and E.P.R. at liquid helium temperatures. Well resolved phosphorescence spectra were observed in DCB and DBB and a vibrational analysis of the spectra was made. The transition energies of the T2(nπ*) and the S1(nπ*) states were estimated from the excitation spectra. The energy gaps between T1 and T2 were estimated to be 2150, 694 and 788 cm-1 in BAC, DCB and DBB, respectively. The sublevel schemes and the zero field splittings (ZFS) were determined. The observed changes of the ZFS on going from the polar to the non-polar hosts are discussed in terms of the vibronic and spin-orbit interactions with the nearby T2(nπ*) state. The most radiative sublevel was found to be T2 in DCB, but Ty in BAC. This difference is attributed to the shifts of the energy levels and the reduction of the molecular symmetry in the polar host. In the non-radiative decay Ty was found to be the most active. Tremendous increases in the non-radiative decay rate constants were observed on going from BAC to DCB. Possible explanations for these observations are presented. The external heavy atom effect on the phosphorescence was observed in the case of DBB. The mechanisms enhancing the radiative decay rates, including those for the vibronic bands are discussed.

  20. Kinetic analysis of a Michaelis-Menten mechanism in which the enzyme is unstable.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-del Solo, C; García-Cánovas, F; Havsteen, B H; Varón-Castellanos, R

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the Michaelis-Menten mechanism is made for the cases in which the free enzyme, or the enzyme-substrate complex, or both, are unstable, either spontaneously or as a result of the addition of a reagent. The explicit time-course equations of all of the species involved has been derived under conditions of limiting enzyme concentration. The validity of these equations has been checked by using numerical simulations. An experimental design and a kinetic data analysis allowing the evaluation of the parameters and kinetic constants are recommended. PMID:8373361

  1. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  2. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  3. Kinetic stability analysis of protein assembly on the center manifold around the critical point.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2017-02-02

    Non-linear kinetic analysis is a useful method for illustration of the dynamic behavior of cellular biological systems. To date, center manifold theory (CMT) has not been sufficiently applied for stability analysis of biological systems. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the application of CMT to kinetic analysis of protein assembly and disassembly, and to propose a novel framework for nonlinear multi-parametric analysis. We propose a protein assembly model with nonlinear kinetics provided by the fluctuation in monomer concentrations during their diffusion. When the diffusion process of a monomer is self-limited to give kinetics non-linearity, numerical simulations suggest the probability that the assembly and disassembly oscillate near the critical point. We applied CMT to kinetic analysis of the center manifold around the critical point in detail, and successfully demonstrated bifurcation around the critical point, which explained the observed oscillation. The stability kinetics of the present model based on CMT illustrates a unique feature of protein assembly, namely non-linear behavior. Our findings are expected to provide methodology for analysis of biological systems.

  4. Co-combustion of different sewage sludge and coal: a non-isothermal thermogravimetric kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Otero, M; Calvo, L F; Gil, M V; García, A I; Morán, A

    2008-09-01

    The kinetics of the combustion of coal, two different sewage sludge and their blends (containing different dried weight percentages of sewage sludge) was studied by simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis. Once the weight percentage of sludge in the blend was 10%, the effects on the combustion of coal were hardly noticeable in terms of weight loss. The Arrhenius activation energy corresponding to the co-combustion of the blends was evaluated by non-isothermal kinetic analysis. This showed that, though differences between coal and sewage sludge, the combustion of their blends kept kinetically alike to that of the coal. This work illustrates how thermogravimetric analysis may be used as an easy rapid tool to asses, not only mass loss, but also kinetics of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and coal blends.

  5. Comparative kinetic analysis on thermal degradation of some cephalosporins using TG and DSC data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The thermal decomposition of cephalexine, cefadroxil and cefoperazone under non-isothermal conditions using the TG, respectively DSC methods, was studied. In case of TG, a hyphenated technique, including EGA, was used. Results The kinetic analysis was performed using the TG and DSC data in air for the first step of cephalosporin’s decomposition at four heating rates. The both TG and DSC data were processed according to an appropriate strategy to the following kinetic methods: Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose, Friedman, and NPK, in order to obtain realistic kinetic parameters, even if the decomposition process is a complex one. The EGA data offer some valuable indications about a possible decomposition mechanism. The obtained data indicate a rather good agreement between the activation energy’s values obtained by different methods, whereas the EGA data and the chemical structures give a possible explanation of the observed differences on the thermal stability. A complete kinetic analysis needs a data processing strategy using two or more methods, but the kinetic methods must also be applied to the different types of experimental data (TG and DSC). Conclusion The simultaneous use of DSC and TG data for the kinetic analysis coupled with evolved gas analysis (EGA) provided us a more complete picture of the degradation of the three cephalosporins. It was possible to estimate kinetic parameters by using three different kinetic methods and this allowed us to compare the Ea values obtained from different experimental data, TG and DSC. The thermodegradation being a complex process, the both differential and integral methods based on the single step hypothesis are inadequate for obtaining believable kinetic parameters. Only the modified NPK method allowed an objective separation of the temperature, respective conversion influence on the reaction rate and in the same time to ascertain the existence of two simultaneous steps. PMID:23594763

  6. Progress Toward the Analysis of the Kinetic Stabilizer Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Byers, J A; Cohen, R H; Fowler, T K; Ryutov, D D; Tung, L S

    2005-02-08

    The Kinetic Stabilizer (K-S) concept [1] represents a means for stabilizing axisymmetric mirror and tandem-mirror (T-M) magnetic fusion systems against MHD interchange instability modes. Magnetic fusion research has given us examples of axisymmetric mirror confinement devices in which radial transport rates approach the classical ''Spitzer'' level, i.e. situations in which turbulence if present at all, is at too low a level to adversely affect the radial transport [2,3,4]. If such a low-turbulence condition could be achieved in a T-M system it could lead to a fusion power system that would be simpler, smaller, and easier to develop than one based on closed-field confinement, e.g., the tokamak, where the transport is known to be dominated by turbulence. However, since conventional axisymmetric mirror systems suffer from the MHD interchange instability, the key to exploiting this new opportunity is to find a practical way to stabilize this mode. The K-S represents one avenue to achieving this goal. The starting point for the K-S concept is a theoretical analysis by Ryutov [5]. He showed that a MHD-unstable plasma contained in an axisymmetric mirror cell can be MHD-stabilized by the presence of a low-density plasma on the expanding field lines outside the mirrors. If this plasma communicates well electrically with the plasma in the then this exterior plasma can stabilize the interior, confined, plasma. This stabilization technique was conclusively demonstrated in the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) experiment [6] at Novosibirsk, Russia, at mirror-cell plasma beta values of 40 percent. The GDT operates in a high collisionality regime. Thus the effluent plasma leaking through the mirrors, though much lower in density than that of the confined plasma, is still high enough to satisfy the stabilization criterion. This would not, however, be the case in a fusion T-M with axisymmetric plug and central cell fields. In such a case the effluent plasma would be far too low in density to

  7. Multicompartmental Analysis of Calcium Kinetics in Normal Adult Males*

    PubMed Central

    Neer, R.; Berman, M.; Fisher, L.; Rosenberg, L. E.

    1967-01-01

    This report describes studies of calcium kinetics in ten normal young men. Serum, urinary, and fecal radioactivity was measured from 1 minute to 20 days after intravenous tracer 47Ca injection, and these results were analyzed jointly with data obtained from a simultaneous metabolic balance study, using digital computer techniques. Surface radioactivity measurements were also obtained to gain further insight into the anatomic correlates of the tracer distribution. The data were satisfied by a model with four exchanging compartments. Series, branching, and mammillary models were analyzed. Several parameters of physiologic interest were independent of the model, but two were dependent on the duration of the study. Individual and mean values for these kinetic analyses are presented with their statistical uncertainties. These studies present detailed analyses in a healthy, normal population and provide a reference for future studies of skeletal metabolism and serum calcium homeostasis. Images PMID:16695925

  8. NMR analysis of staphylococcal nuclease thermal quench refolding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kautz, R A; Fox, R O

    1993-05-01

    Thermally unfolded staphylococcal nuclease has been rapidly quenched to temperatures near 0 degree C and the refolding behavior examined using an NMR kinetic experiment. Unfolded protein, exhibiting random coil chemical shifts, persists following the quench and refolds in two distinct kinetic phases. A protein folding intermediate with a trans Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond is transiently overpopulated and relaxes to the predominantly cis native cis-trans equilibrium. The rate of trans-->cis isomerization in the native-like nuclease intermediate is approximately 100-fold faster than that observed in a Lys-Pro model peptide. The activation enthalpy of 20 kcal/mol observed for the nuclease Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond is comparable to that observed for other X-Pro isomerizations.

  9. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  10. Kinetic analysis of supine stepping for early rehabilitation of walking.

    PubMed

    Fang, Juan; Galen, Sujay; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Conway, Bernard A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In order to promote gait restoration in patients who cannot maintain an upright position in the early post-injury phase, a Gait Orthosis for Early Rehabilitation was proposed for supine stepping. Although supine stepping can generate lower-limb joint trajectories which are close to normal gait, the inter-segmental dynamics of supine stepping are believed to be different from those of upright walking. Furthermore, training in a supine position requires a certain loading on the foot to mimic the ground reaction forces, where different loading amplitudes influence the joint dynamics. This work analysed the kinetics of supine stepping with variable loading and investigated structural modifications for the Gait Orthosis for Early Rehabilitation system to address this kinetic difference. Three able-bodied subjects walked overground while their walking performance was recorded. Based on the experimental data, a leg-linkage model was developed to simulate the dynamics of upright walking. This model was then rotated by 90° with different foot loadings to investigate the kinetics of supine stepping. Compared to upright walking, supine stepping had a large kinetic difference at the hip joint due to the supine leg position. The ankle joint during supine stepping was sensitive to the force amplitude simulated on the foot. Thus, the Gait Orthosis for Early Rehabilitation system requires a leg frame to compensate the position change and a shoe platform to activate the leg muscles, especially at the ankle joint. This study provided important structural information for the further development of the Gait Orthosis for Early Rehabilitation system.

  11. A cyclometalated iridium(III) complex with enhanced phosphorescence emission in the solid state (EPESS): synthesis, characterization and its application in bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huazhou; Yang, Tianshe; Zhao, Qiang; Zhou, Jing; Li, Chunyan; Li, Fuyou

    2011-03-07

    Iridium(III) complexes with intense phosphorescence in solution have been widely applied in organic light-emitting diodes, chemosensors and bioimaging. However, little attention has been paid to iridium(III) complexes showing weak phosphorescence in solution and enhanced phosphorescence emission in the solid state (EPESS). In the present study, two β-diketonate ligands with different degrees of conjugation, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (HL1) and 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-phenylacetyl-5-pyrazolone (HL2), have been synthesized to be used as ancillary ligands for two iridium(III) complexes, Ir(ppy)(2)(L1) and Ir(ppy)(2)(L2) (Hppy = 2-phenylpyridine). The two complexes have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, (1)H NMR and elemental analysis. Interestingly, Ir(ppy)(2)(L1) is EPESS-active whereas Ir(ppy)(2)(L2) exhibits moderately intense emission both in solution and as a neat film, indicating that the degree of conjugation of the β-diketone ligands determines the EPESS-activity. The single-crystal X-ray analysis has indicated that there are π-π interactions between the adjacent ppy ligands in Ir(ppy)(2)(L1) but not in Ir(ppy)(2)(L2). Finally, EPESS-active Ir(ppy)(2)(L1) has been successfully embedded in polymer nanoparticles and used as a luminescent label in bioimaging.

  12. Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Devices: Working Principle and Iridium Based Emitter Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kappaun, Stefan; Slugovc, Christian; List, Emil J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Even though organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology has evolved to a point where it is now an important competitor to liquid crystal displays (LCDs), further scientific efforts devoted to the design, engineering and fabrication of OLEDs are required for complete commercialization of this technology. Along these lines, the present work reviews the essentials of OLED technology putting special focus on the general working principle of single and multilayer OLEDs, fluorescent and phosphorescent emitter materials as well as transfer processes in host materials doped with phosphorescent dyes. Moreover, as a prototypical example of phosphorescent emitter materials, a brief discussion of homo- and heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes is enclosed concentrating on their synthesis, photophysical properties and approaches for realizing iridium based phosphorescent polymers. PMID:19325819

  13. Suppressing molecular motions for enhanced room-temperature phosphorescence of metal-free organic materials

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Sang; Yu, Youngchang; Coburn, Caleb; Phillips, Andrew W.; Chung, Kyeongwoon; Shanker, Apoorv; Jung, Jaehun; Kim, Gunho; Pipe, Kevin; Forrest, Stephen R.; Youk, Ji Ho; Gierschner, Johannes; Kim, Jinsang

    2015-01-01

    Metal-free organic phosphorescent materials are attractive alternatives to the predominantly used organometallic phosphors but are generally dimmer and are relatively rare, as, without heavy-metal atoms, spin–orbit coupling is less efficient and phosphorescence usually cannot compete with radiationless relaxation processes. Here we present a general design rule and a method to effectively reduce radiationless transitions and hence greatly enhance phosphorescence efficiency of metal-free organic materials in a variety of amorphous polymer matrices, based on the restriction of molecular motions in the proximity of embedded phosphors. Covalent cross-linking between phosphors and polymer matrices via Diels–Alder click chemistry is devised as a method. A sharp increase in phosphorescence quantum efficiency is observed in a variety of polymer matrices with this method, which is ca. two to five times higher than that of phosphor-doped polymer systems having no such covalent linkage. PMID:26626796

  14. Suppressing molecular motions for enhanced room-temperature phosphorescence of metal-free organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Min Sang; Yu, Youngchang; Coburn, Caleb; Phillips, Andrew W.; Chung, Kyeongwoon; Shanker, Apoorv; Jung, Jaehun; Kim, Gunho; Pipe, Kevin; Forrest, Stephen R.; Youk, Ji Ho; Gierschner, Johannes; Kim, Jinsang

    2015-12-01

    Metal-free organic phosphorescent materials are attractive alternatives to the predominantly used organometallic phosphors but are generally dimmer and are relatively rare, as, without heavy-metal atoms, spin-orbit coupling is less efficient and phosphorescence usually cannot compete with radiationless relaxation processes. Here we present a general design rule and a method to effectively reduce radiationless transitions and hence greatly enhance phosphorescence efficiency of metal-free organic materials in a variety of amorphous polymer matrices, based on the restriction of molecular motions in the proximity of embedded phosphors. Covalent cross-linking between phosphors and polymer matrices via Diels-Alder click chemistry is devised as a method. A sharp increase in phosphorescence quantum efficiency is observed in a variety of polymer matrices with this method, which is ca. two to five times higher than that of phosphor-doped polymer systems having no such covalent linkage.

  15. Cyclometalated iridium(III) polypyridine dibenzocyclooctyne complexes as the first phosphorescent bioorthogonal probes.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing; Chan, Bruce Ting-Ngok; Liu, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Li, Steve Po-Yam; Tang, Tommy Siu-Ming

    2013-05-14

    We report the synthesis, photophysical behavior, and biological properties of new cyclometalated iridium(iii) polypyridine complexes appended with a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) moiety; these complexes have been utilized as the first phosphorescent bioorthogonal probes for azide-modified biomolecules.

  16. Conformational changes in the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum detected using phosphorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Restall, C J; Coke, M; Murray, E K; Chapman, D

    1985-02-28

    The technique of time-averaged phosphorescence has been used to study the interaction of calcium ions and ATP with the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The presence of excess calcium ions was found to cause a 20% decrease in the phosphorescence emission anisotropy. This is interpreted as being due to a conformational change in the protein and is supported by data from time-resolved phosphorescence measurements which also show a lowering of the anisotropy. This change in the decay of the emission anisotropy is associated with only minor changes in the rotational relaxation time of the protein and is again suggestive of a conformational change in the protein. In some cases ATP was also observed to lower the time-averaged phosphorescence anisotropy possibly via an interaction with the low-affinity regulatory site of the protein.

  17. Joint factor and kinetic analysis of dynamic FDOPA PET scans of brain cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dowson, N; Bourgeat, P; Rose, S; Daglish, M; Smith, J; Fay, M; Coulthard, A; Winter, C; MacFarlane, D; Thomas, P; Crozier, S; Salvado, O

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic analysis is an essential tool of Positron Emission Tomography image analysis. However it requires a pure tissue time activity curve (TAC) in order to calculate the system parameters. Pure tissue TACs are particularly difficult to obtain in the brain as the low resolution of PET means almost all voxels are a mixture of tissues. Factor analysis explicitly accounts for mixing but is an underdetermined problem that can give arbitrary results. A joint factor and kinetic analysis is proposed whereby factor analysis explicitly accounts for mixing of tissues. Hence, more meaningful parameters are obtained by the kinetic models, which also ensure a less ambiguous solution to the factor analysis. The method was tested using a cylindrical phantom and the 18F-DOPA data of a brain cancer patient.

  18. Sensitized phosphorescence studies of p-xylene+biacetyl system, an optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Bayrakçeken, Fuat

    2007-04-01

    p-Xylene sensitized biacetyl fluorescence and phosphorescence has been investigated and photosensitized phosphorescence lifetimes of biacetyl in the vapor phase has been determined. Attempts to detect the triplet of biacetyl by its absorption spectrum were unsuccessful, due to primarily, it is believed, to the low extinction coefficients of the triplet, and the low triplet concentrations produced by the optical pumping device at room temperature.

  19. Combustor kinetic energy efficiency analysis of the hypersonic research engine data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, K. V.

    1993-11-01

    A one-dimensional method for measuring combustor performance is needed to facilitate design and development scramjet engines. A one-dimensional kinetic energy efficiency method is used for measuring inlet and nozzle performance. The objective of this investigation was to assess the use of kinetic energy efficiency as an indicator for scramjet combustor performance. A combustor kinetic energy efficiency analysis was performed on the Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE) data. The HRE data was chosen for this analysis due to its thorough documentation and availability. The combustor, inlet, and nozzle kinetic energy efficiency values were utilized to determine an overall engine kinetic energy efficiency. Finally, a kinetic energy effectiveness method was developed to eliminate thermochemical losses from the combustion of fuel and air. All calculated values exhibit consistency over the flight speed range. Effects from fuel injection, altitude, angle of attack, subsonic-supersonic combustion transition, and inlet spike position are shown and discussed. The results of analyzing the HRE data indicate that the kinetic energy efficiency method is effective as a measure of scramjet combustor performance.

  20. Photon counting phosphorescence lifetime imaging with TimepixCam

    DOE PAGES

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Suhling, Klaus; ...

    2017-01-12

    TimepixCam is a novel fast optical imager based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window, and read out by a Timepix ASIC. The 256 x 256 pixel sensor has a time resolution of 15 ns at a sustained frame rate of 10 Hz. We used this sensor in combination with an image intensifier for wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) imaging. We have characterised the photon detection capabilities of this detector system, and employed it on a wide-field epifluorescence microscope to map phosphorescence decays of various iridium complexes with lifetimes of about 1 μs in 200more » μm diameter polystyrene beads.« less

  1. White phosphorescent organic light emitting devices for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrade, Brian; Brown, Julie J.

    2006-05-01

    Consumer display manufacturers are increasingly interested in white organic light emitting devices (WOLEDs), because these devices offer thinner display profiles, and in combination with color filters eliminate the need for shadow masks. Additionally, WOLEDs are well suited for general-purpose illumination, and laboratory results show that their power efficiencies have surpassed that of incandescent bulbs. To replace current backlight technologies with WOLEDs, further increases must be made in the power efficiency of blue and red phosphorescent devices, and in the power density of OLEDs. In this paper, we report on a blue-red-green 6" square striped lighting panel emitting >100 lumens, and on a stacked OLED (SOLED) 6" square panel. The SOLED consists of a red and green OLED connected by a 70 nm- thick aluminum electrode that simultaneously serves as the cathode for the bottom green device and as the anode for the top red device.

  2. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of photomultiplier window materials under electron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Eubanks, A. G.; Bredekamp, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The fluorescence and phosphorescence of photomultiplier window materials under electron irradiation were investigated using a Sr-90/Y-90 beta emitter as the electron source. Spectral emission curves of UV grade, optical grade, and electron-irradiated samples of MGF2 and LiF, CaF2, BaF2, sapphire, fused silica, and UV transmitting glasses were obtained over the spectral range of 200 nm to 650 nm. Fluorescence yields, expressed as the number of counts in a solid angle of 2 pi steradian per 1MeV of incident electron energy deposited, were determined on these materials utilizing photomultiplier tubes with cesium telluride, bialkali, and trialkali (S-20) photocathodes, respectively.

  3. High efficiency deep-blue and white phosphorescent OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Eom, Sang-Hyun; Zheng, Ying; Wrzesniewski, Edward; Chopra, Neetu; Lee, Jaewon; So, Franky

    2009-08-01

    We report studies on blue and white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) based on the deep-blue electrophosphorescent dye iridium(III) bis(4',6'-difluorophenylpyridinato)tetrakis(1-pyrazolyl)borate (FIr6). Using high triplet energy charge transport layers and a dual-emissive-layer structure as well as the p-i-n device structure, we have achieved external quantum efficiencies of 20% and maximum power efficiency of 36 lm/W in these deep-blue OLEDs. White OLEDs with a CRI of 79 and a maximum power efficiency of 40 lm/W were also demonstrated by incorporating red and green phosphorescent dopants together with FIr6.

  4. Photon counting phosphorescence lifetime imaging with TimepixCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Suhling, Klaus; Nomerotski, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    TimepixCam is a novel fast optical imager based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window and read out by a Timepix Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The 256 × 256 pixel sensor has a time resolution of 15 ns at a sustained frame rate of 10 Hz. We used this sensor in combination with an image intensifier for wide-field time-correlated single photon counting imaging. We have characterised the photon detection capabilities of this detector system and employed it on a wide-field epifluorescence microscope to map phosphorescence decays of various iridium complexes with lifetimes of about 1 μs in 200 μm diameter polystyrene beads.

  5. Glycerol effects on protein flexibility: a tryptophan phosphorescence study.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, M.; Strambini, G. B.

    1993-01-01

    In exploring the dynamic properties of protein structure, numerous studies have focussed on the dependence of structural fluctuations on solvent viscosity, but the emerging picture is still not well defined. Exploiting the sensitivity of the phosphorescence lifetime of tryptophan to the viscosity of its environment we have used the delayed emission as an intrinsic probe of protein flexibility and investigated the effects of glycerol as a viscogenic cosolvent. The phosphorescence lifetime of alcohol dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, apoazurin and RNase T1, as a function of glycerol concentration was studied at various temperatures. Flexibility data, which refer to rather rigid sites of the globular structures, point out that, for some concentration ranges glycerol, effects on the rate of structural fluctuations of alcohol dehydrogenase and RNase T1 do not obey Kramers' a power law on solvent viscosity and emphasize that cosolvent-induced structural changes can be important, even for inner cores of the macromolecule. When the data is analyzed in terms of Kramers' model, for the temperature range 0-30 degrees C one derives frictional coefficients that are relatively large (0.6-0.7) for RNase T1, where the probe is in a flexible region near the surface of the macromolecule and much smaller, less than 0.2, for the rigid sites of the other proteins. For the latter sites the frictional coefficient rises sharply between 40 and 60 degrees C, and its value correlates weakly with molecular parameters such as the depth of burial or the rigidity of a particular site. For RNase T1, coupling to solvent viscosity increases at subzero temperatures, with the coefficient becoming as large as 1 at -20 degrees C. Temperature effects were interpreted by proposing that solvent damping of internal protein motions is particularly effective for low frequency, large amplitude, structural fluctuations yielding highly flexible conformers of the macromolecule. PMID:8369422

  6. Room temperature phosphorescence of metal-free organic materials in amorphous polymer matrices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwook; Bolton, Onas; Kim, Byoung Choul; Youk, Ji Ho; Takayama, Shuichi; Kim, Jinsang

    2013-04-24

    Developing metal-free organic phosphorescent materials is promising but challenging because achieving emissive triplet relaxation that outcompetes the vibrational loss of triplets, a key process to achieving phosphorescence, is difficult without heavy metal atoms. While recent studies reveal that bright room temperature phosphorescence can be realized in purely organic crystalline materials through directed halogen bonding, these organic phosphors still have limitations to practical applications due to the stringent requirement of high quality crystal formation. Here we report bright room temperature phosphorescence by embedding a purely organic phosphor into an amorphous glassy polymer matrix. Our study implies that the reduced beta (β)-relaxation of isotactic PMMA most efficiently suppresses vibrational triplet decay and allows the embedded organic phosphors to achieve a bright 7.5% phosphorescence quantum yield. We also demonstrate a microfluidic device integrated with a novel temperature sensor based on the metal-free purely organic phosphors in the temperature-sensitive polymer matrix. This unique system has many advantages: (i) simple device structures without feeding additional temperature sensing agents, (ii) bright phosphorescence emission, (iii) a reversible thermal response, and (iv) tunable temperature sensing ranges by using different polymers.

  7. Characterization of the low-temperature triplet state of chlorophyll in photosystem II core complexes: Application of phosphorescence measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, Alexey A; Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorescence measurements at 77 K and light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 95 K were applied to study of the triplet state of chlorophyll a ((3)Chl) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from spinach. Using both methods, (3)Chl was observed in the core preparations with doubly reduced primary quinone acceptor QA. The spectral parameters of Chl phosphorescence resemble those in the isolated PSII reaction centers (RCs). The main spectral maximum and the lifetime of the phosphorescence corresponded to 955±1 nm and of 1.65±0.05 ms respectively; in the excitation spectrum, the absorption maxima of all core complex pigments (Chl, pheophytin a (Pheo), and β-carotene) were observed. The differential signal at 1667(-)/1628(+)cm(-1) reflecting a downshift of the stretching frequency of the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Chl was found to dominate in the triplet-minus-singlet FTIR difference spectrum of core complexes. Based on FTIR results and literature data, it is proposed that (3)Chl is mostly localized on the accessory chlorophyll that is in triplet equilibrium with P680. Analysis of the data suggests that the Chl triplet state responsible for the phosphorescence and the FTIR difference spectrum is mainly generated due to charge recombination in the reaction center radical pair P680(+)PheoD1(-), and the energy and temporal parameters of this triplet state as well as the molecular environment and interactions of the triplet-bearing Chl molecule are similar in the PSII core complexes and isolated PSII RCs.

  8. Kinetic analysis of virus adsorption and inactivation in batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Stanley B.; List, E. John; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    1993-07-01

    The mobility and ecology of viruses in natural environments is strongly influenced by the adsorption of virus particles to sand or soil surfaces. This binding process is frequently studied by conducting batch experiments in which fluid suspensions of virus particles are contacted with the adsorbent of interest. In this report, a simple first-order kinetic theory is presented which accounts for many of the complicated interactions that can occur when viruses contact an adsorbent in a batch system. Closed-form solutions and numerical simulations of the model indicate that four classes of virus-surface interactions can be identified, including quasi-equilibrium adsorption, quasi-equilibrium adsorption with surface sinks, quasi-equilibrium adsorption with reduced inactivation, and direct irreversible adsorption. Based on these results, a new experimental approach for studying virus-surface interactions is proposed and tested using a model system consisting of bacteriophage lambda and Ottawa sand. Fluid samples were collected from sand-containing and sand-free virus suspensions over the course of 5-6 days and analyzed for plaque forming units (PFU). These experiments were repeated using three different pH values and six different electrolyte compositions. Nondimensionalization of the PFU data from the sand-free suspension collapsed all of the data onto a single line, as predicted by the kinetic model. When plotted in a nondimensional format, data from the sandcontaining suspensions exhibited behavior which tould readily be interpreted within the context of the kinetic model. These results suggest that the proposed approach offers a powerful alternative to conventional methods for studying virus adsorption at the solid-liquid interface, and for predicting the potential mobility and fate of viruses in porous media.

  9. Units of analysis and kinetic structure of behavioral repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis; Lubinski, David

    1986-01-01

    It is suggested that molar streams of behavior are constructed of various arrangements of three elementary constituents (elicited, evoked, and emitted response classes). An eight-cell taxonomy is elaborated as a framework for analyzing and synthesizing complex behavioral repertoires based on these functional units. It is proposed that the local force binding functional units into a smoothly articulated kinetic sequence arises from temporally arranged relative response probability relationships. Behavioral integration is thought to reflect the joint influence of the organism's hierarchy of relative response probabilities, fluctuating biological states, and the arrangement of environmental and behavioral events in time. PMID:16812461

  10. From kinetic-structure analysis to engineering crystalline fiber networks in soft materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Yao; Wang, Peng; Li, Jing-Liang; Yuan, Bing; Liu, Yu; Li, Li; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2013-03-07

    Understanding the role of kinetics in fiber network microstructure formation is of considerable importance in engineering gel materials to achieve their optimized performances/functionalities. In this work, we present a new approach for kinetic-structure analysis for fibrous gel materials. In this method, kinetic data is acquired using a rheology technique and is analyzed in terms of an extended Dickinson model in which the scaling behaviors of dynamic rheological properties in the gelation process are taken into account. It enables us to extract the structural parameter, i.e. the fractal dimension, of a fibrous gel from the dynamic rheological measurement of the gelation process, and to establish the kinetic-structure relationship suitable for both dilute and concentrated gelling systems. In comparison to the fractal analysis method reported in a previous study, our method is advantageous due to its general validity for a wide range of fractal structures of fibrous gels, from a highly compact network of the spherulitic domains to an open fibrous network structure. With such a kinetic-structure analysis, we can gain a quantitative understanding of the role of kinetic control in engineering the microstructure of the fiber network in gel materials.

  11. Kinetic Isotope Effect Analysis of RNA 2'-O-Transphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael E; York, Darrin M; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Anderson, Vernon E

    2017-01-01

    The breaking of RNA strands by 2'-O-transphosphorylation is a ubiquitous reaction in biology, and enzymes that catalyze this reaction play key roles in RNA metabolism. The mechanisms of 2'-O-transphosphorylation in solution are relatively well studied, but complex and can involve different transition states depending on how the reaction is catalyzed. Because of this complexity and the lack of experimental information on transition-state structure, pinning down the chemical details of enzyme-catalyzed RNA strand cleavage has been difficult. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide information about changes in bonding as a reaction proceeds from ground state to transition state, and therefore they provide a powerful tool for revealing mechanistic detail. Application of kinetic isotope analyses to RNA 2'-O-transphosphorylation faces three fundamental challenges: synthesis of RNA substrate isotopomers with (18)O substitutions at the 2'-O, 5'-O and nonbridging phosphoryl oxygens; determination of the (18)O/(16)O ratios in the residual unreacted substrate or product RNAs; and analyzing these data to allow calculation of the KIEs for use in evaluating different mechanistic scenarios. In this chapter, we outline methods for surmounting these challenges for solution RNA 2'-O-transphosphorylation reactions, and we describe their initial application to understand nonenzymatic solution reactions and reactions catalyzed by the enzyme ribonuclease A. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interaction of Nitric Oxide with Catalase: Structural and Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present the structures of bovine catalase in its native form and complexed with ammonia and nitric oxide, obtained by X-ray crystallography. Using the NO generator 1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, we were able to generate sufficiently high NO concentrations within the catalase crystals that substantial occupation was observed despite a high dissociation rate. Nitric oxide seems to be slightly bent from the heme normal that may indicate some iron(II) character in the formally ferric catalase. Microspectrophotometric investigations inline with the synchrotron X-ray beam reveal photoreduction of the central heme iron. In the cases of the native and ammonia-complexed catalase, reduction is accompanied by a relaxation phase. This is likely not the case for the catalase NO complex. The kinetics of binding of NO to catalase were investigated using NO photolyzed from N,N′-bis(carboxymethyl)-N,N′-dinitroso-p-phenylenediamine using an assay that combines catalase with myoglobin binding kinetics. The off rate is 1.5 s–1. Implications for catalase function are discussed. PMID:21524057

  13. Determination of Trace Deoxyribonucleic Acid by Using Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Phenosafranine as a Double-Luminescent Phosphorescence Probe

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Zhen-Bo; Li, Fei-Ming; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Lin, Chang-Qing; Huang, Ya-Hong; Li, Zhi-Ming; Lin, Shao-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Using Pb2+ as ion perturber, phenosafranine (PF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) could emit strong and stable room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) signal on the filter paper, respectively. When they were mixed, the phenomenon that the RTP signal of PF and FITC enhanced significantly was found. And 1.12 ag DNA spot−1 (sample volume was 0.40 μL, corresponding concentration was 2.8 × 10–15 g mL–1) could cause the RTP signal of both PF and FITC to enhance sharply. The content of DNA was proportional to the ΔIp of PF and FITC in the system at 634 and 659 nm. Thus, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of trace DNA was established by using FITC-PF as double-luminescent phosphorescence probe. The detection limit (LD) of this method calculated by 3Sb/k was 14 zg DNA spot–1 for PF and 18 zg DNA spot–1 for FITC, respectively, showing high sensitivity. It has been applied to the determination of trace DNA in practical samples and the analysis results were in accordance with those of fluorescence probe. The reaction mechanism of SSRTP for the determination of trace DNA was also discussed. PMID:20665096

  14. Nonparametric analysis of nonexponential and multidimensional kinetics. I. Quantifying rate dispersion, rate heterogeneity, and exchange dynamics.

    PubMed

    Berg, Mark A; Kaur, Harveen

    2017-02-07

    The quantification of nonexponential (dispersed) kinetics has relied on empirical functions, which yield parameters that are neither unique nor easily related to the underlying mechanism. Multidimensional kinetics provide more information on dispersed processes, but a good approach to their analysis is even less clear than for standard, one-dimensional kinetics. This paper is the first in a series that analyzes kinetic data in one or many dimensions with a scheme that is nonparametric: it quantifies nonexponential decays without relying on a specific functional form. The quantities obtained are directly related to properties of the mechanism causing the rate dispersion. Log-moments of decays, which parallel the standard moments of distributions (mean, standard deviation, etc.), are introduced for both one- and multi-dimensional decays. Kinetic spectra are defined to visualize the data. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on a simple, but general, model of dispersed kinetics-a nonexponential homogeneous decay combined with slowly exchanging rate heterogeneity. The first log-moments give a geometric-mean relaxation time. Second log-moments quantify the magnitude of rate dispersion, the fraction of the dispersion due to heterogeneity, and the dynamics of exchange between different rate subensembles. A suitable combination of these moments isolates exchange dynamics from three-dimensional kinetics without contamination by the rate-filtering effects that were identified in a recent paper [M. A. Berg and J. R. Darvin, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 054119 (2016)].

  15. Acrylonitrile quenching of trp phosphorescence in proteins: a probe of the internal flexibility of the globular fold.

    PubMed

    Strambini, Giovanni B; Gonnelli, Margherita

    2010-08-04

    Quenching of Trp phosphorescence in proteins by diffusion of solutes of various molecular sizes unveils the frequency-amplitude of structural fluctuations. To cover the sizes gap between O(2) and acrylamide, we examined the potential of acrylonitrile to probe conformational flexibility of proteins. The distance dependence of the through-space acrylonitrile quenching rate was determined in a glass at 77 K, with the indole analog 2-(3-indoyl) ethyl phenyl ketone. Intensity and decay kinetics data were fitted to a rate, k(r) =k(0) exp[-(r -r(0))/r(e)], with an attenuation length r(e) = 0.03 nm and a contact rate k(0) = 3.6 x 10(10) s(-1). At ambient temperature, the bimolecular quenching rate constant (kq) was determined for a series of proteins, appositely selected to test the importance of factors such as the degree of Trp burial and structural rigidity. Relative to kq = 1.9 x 10(9) M(-1)s(-1) for free Trp in water, in proteins kq ranged from 6.5 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1) for superficial sites to 1.3 x 10(2) M(-1)s(-1) for deep cores. The short-range nature of the interaction and the direct correlation between kq and structural flexibility attest that in the microsecond-second timescale of phosphorescence acrylonitrile readily penetrates even compact protein cores and exhibits significant sensitivity to variations in dynamical structure of the globular fold.

  16. Kinetic Analysis of Pasma Transport in a Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, O.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of the plasma transport and oscillation phenomena in the Xe-gas discharge of the SPT and TAL Hall effect thruster were subject of many theoretical-numerical and experimental studies [1-4]. Despite this fact, the origin of a so-called anomalous transport is not understood to this date. As a result, in the theoretical and numerical models [5-6] researches assume ad-hoc cross-field diffusion coefficients, which may differ by several times from the classical Bohm result. To study the transport phenomenon we develop a specialized kinetic model. Our model is 2-dimensional in space (for axial and azimuthal directions), but 3-dimensional in velocity. A similar geometry was adopted in references [1,3]. However, we try to push the simulation to the realistic scale (several centimeters), while keeping the minimum spatial resolution on the order of the local Debye length. New transport results will be compared to the results from the 2D3V axisymmetrical model [6], which is a further development of the fully kinetic model for plasma and neutral gas [5]. The PIC [7] code is applied to the realistic SPT thruster geometry. We add new elementary plasma-chemistry reaction and modify boundary conditions to capture self-consistent dynamics of high ionization states of xenon atoms. It is hoped that the numerical results will provide a better understanding of the anomalous transport in a Hall effect thruster due to the collective modes, and shed light on the nature of the experimentally observed high-frequency oscillations. [1] M.Hirakawa and Y.Arakawa, Particle simulation of plasma phenomena in Hall thrusters, IEPC-95-164 technical paper, 1995. [2] V. I. Baranov et al, "New Conceptions of Oscillation Mechanisms in the Accelerator with Closed Drift of Electrons". IEPC-95-44, 24thInternational Electric Propulsion Conference, Moscow, 1995. [3] M.Hirakawa, Electron transport mechanism in a Hall thruster, IEPC-97-021 technical paper, 1997. [4] N.B.Meerzan, W.A.Hargus, M

  17. Kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of plasma-assisted combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togai, Kuninori

    Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising combustion enhancement technique that shows great potential for applications to a number of different practical combustion systems. In this dissertation, the chemical kinetics associated with PAC are investigated numerically with a newly developed model that describes the chemical processes induced by plasma. To support the model development, experiments were performed using a plasma flow reactor in which the fuel oxidation proceeds with the aid of plasma discharges below and above the self-ignition thermal limit of the reactive mixtures. The mixtures used were heavily diluted with Ar in order to study the reactions with temperature-controlled environments by suppressing the temperature changes due to chemical reactions. The temperature of the reactor was varied from 420 K to 1250 K and the pressure was fixed at 1 atm. Simulations were performed for the conditions corresponding to the experiments and the results are compared against each other. Important reaction paths were identified through path flux and sensitivity analyses. Reaction systems studied in this work are oxidation of hydrogen, ethylene, and methane, as well as the kinetics of NOx in plasma. In the fuel oxidation studies, reaction schemes that control the fuel oxidation are analyzed and discussed. With all the fuels studied, the oxidation reactions were extended to lower temperatures with plasma discharges compared to the cases without plasma. The analyses showed that radicals produced by dissociation of the reactants in plasma plays an important role of initiating the reaction sequence. At low temperatures where the system exhibits a chain-terminating nature, reactions of HO2 were found to play important roles on overall fuel oxidation. The effectiveness of HO2 as a chain terminator was weakened in the ethylene oxidation system, because the reactions of C 2H4 + O that have low activation energies deflects the flux of O atoms away from HO2. For the

  18. Kinetic theory analysis of solar wind interaction with planetary objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1973-01-01

    A purely kinetic treatment is proposed for the interaction of the solar wind with any small planetary object. Small refers to those cases where the solar wind proton's thermal gyroradius is arbitrarily taken to be greater than 0.1 radius of the object under investigation. The 'object' may possibly include an ionosphere or magnetosphere. The collisionless Boltzmann equation, neglecting the magnetic field, is used to calculate steady-state profiles of density and velocity around the obstacle. A low density plasma void in the umbral region and a compression in the penumbral region are clearly found. The present technique, despite its neglect of the interplanetary magnetic field, is proposed as an alternative zeroth order approach to the continuum, local magnetic anomaly, and guiding center approaches used by others for the particular case of moon. Some recent, potentially relevant, observations on and in front of the moon are discussed.

  19. Molecular kinetic analysis of a local equilibrium Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2017-07-01

    We identify a velocity distribution function of ideal gas particles that is compatible with the local equilibrium assumption and the fundamental thermodynamic relation satisfying the endoreversibility. We find that this distribution is a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a spatially uniform temperature and a spatially varying local center-of-mass velocity. We construct the local equilibrium Carnot cycle of an ideal gas, based on this distribution, and show that the efficiency of the present cycle is given by the endoreversible Carnot efficiency using the molecular kinetic temperatures of the gas. We also obtain an analytic expression of the efficiency at maximum power of our cycle under a small temperature difference. Our theory is also confirmed by a molecular dynamics simulation.

  20. KINETIC AND EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS OF THE MYOSIN ATPase

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Ostap, E. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The myosin superfamily consists of more than 35 classes (each consisting of multiple isoforms) that have diverse cellular activities. The reaction pathway of the actin-activated myosin ATPase appears to be conserved for all myosin isoforms, but the rate and equilibrium constants that define the ATPase pathway vary significantly across the myosin superfamily, resulting in kinetic differences that that allow myosins to carry out diverse mechanical functions. Therefore, it is important to determine the lifetimes and relative populations of the key biochemical intermediates to obtain an understanding of a particular myosin’s cellular function. This chapter provides procedures for determining the overall and individual rate and equilibrium constants of the actomyosin ATPase cycle, including actomyosin binding and dissociation, ATP binding, ATP hydrolysis, phosphate release, and ADP release and binding. Many of the methods described in the chapter are applicable to the characterization of other ATPase enzymes. PMID:19289206

  1. Kinetic analysis of the template effect in ribooligoguanylate elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; White, David H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents kinetic studies on the reaction of elongation of the 3-prime-5-prime-linked ribooligoguanylates with guanosine 5-prime-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MelmpG) in the presence or absence of a complementary template, the polycytidylic acid. In the absence of poly(C), the reaction leads to three isomeric oligomers that are elongated by one monomer unit: the 3-prime-5-prime linked, the 2-prime-5-prime linked, and the pyrophosphate, formed in a ratio of 1:2:5. In the presence of the template, the reaction is 20-fold faster and yields products (n + 1), (n + 2), (n + 3), etc., as long as 2-MelmpG is available. The formation of the natural, 3-prime-5-prime-linked isomer, is enhanced selectively by 140-fold at 37 C, and its relative yield increases with decreasing temperature.

  2. Elimination of "hook-effect" in two-site immunoradiometric assays by kinetic rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K L; Parsons, G H; Allerdt, L J; Brooks, J M; Miles, L E

    1984-09-01

    Two-site or sandwich immunoradiometric assays (IRMAs) offer theoretical advantages over competitive immunoassay systems for sensitivity, precision, and rapid incubation. The practical realization of these advantages has been limited by the phenomenon of the "high-dose hook effect," such that high concentrations of an analyte give similar responses to those of much lower concentrations. We have developed a kinetic rate monitoring IRMA system for use with the Kineti-Count 48TM, an automated kinetic radioassay analyzer, which eliminates "hook-effect" interference, thereby permitting optimal assay design for increasing sensitivity and reducing incubation time. Practical illustration of these concepts is demonstrated by a 10-min, automated, quantitative assay we developed for human choriogonadotropin. The assay can detect as little as 1.2 int. units/L and kinetically screens for the hook effect. Kinetic rate analysis of the two-site IRMA and potentially of nonisotopic counterparts permits improvements in the speed and reliability of these immunoassays.

  3. Kinetic analysis of the control through inhibition of autocatalytic zymogen activation.

    PubMed Central

    Manjabacas, M C; Valero, E; García-Moreno, M; García-Cánovas, F; Rodríguez, J N; Varón, R

    1992-01-01

    A global kinetic analysis of a model of an autocatalytic zymogen-activation process in which an irreversible inhibitor competes with the zymogen for the active site of the proteinase is presented. Processes like the one here described are of great physiological interest because they are involved in the enzyme regulation of the gastrointestinal-tract enzymes, in blood coagulation, in fibrinolysis and in the complement system. The kinetic equations of both the transient phase and the steady state are derived for this mechanism. In addition, we have introduced a new parameter related to the kinetic behaviour of the system which allows us to predict whether the inhibition route or the activation route prevails in the steady state of the system. Finally, we extend the kinetic equations derived to different particular cases of the system studied. PMID:1546972

  4. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  5. Microbial kinetic analysis of three different types of EBNR process.

    PubMed

    Pai, T Y; Tsai, Y P; Chou, Y J; Chang, H Y; Leu, H G; Ouyang, C F

    2004-04-01

    The disadvantages of developed biological nutrient removal (BNR) processes (additional energy for liquid circulation and addition of external carbon substrate for denitrification in anoxic zones) were improved by reconfiguring the process into (1) an anaerobic zone followed by multiple stages of aerobic-anoxic zones (TNCU3 process) or (2) anaerobic, oxic, anoxic, oxic zones in sequence (TNCU2 process). These two pilot plants were operated at a recycling sludge ratio of 0.5 without internal recycle of nitrified supernatant. The sludge retention time was maintained at 10 d. The main objective of this study is to analyze the kinetics of different microorganisms in these two processes and A2O process by using the Activated Sludge Model No. 2d. The effective removal efficiency of carbon, total phosphorus and total nitrogen at 87-98%, 92-100% and 63-80%, respectively, were achieved in the testing runs. According to model simulations, the microbial kinetics in the TNCU3 and TNCU2 processes would be affected by different operations. When the step feeding strategy was adopted, the HRT was longer due to the less influent flowrate in the front stages and the microbes would grow in quantities by about 6% in the aerobic reactors. In the followed anoxic reactors, the microbes would decrease in quantities by about 12% due to the dilution effect. The dilution effects in TNCU3 and TNCU2 processes did not take place in A2O process because the recycling mixed liquid from the aerobic reactor to the anoxic reactor still contained particulate components. The XH, XPAO, and XAUT concentrations in the effluent of the last tank were lower when the step-feeding mode was adopted. The TNCU3 and TNCU2 processes could be operated efficiently without nitrified liquid circulation and addition of external carbon substrate for denitrification.

  6. Kinetic analysis of barium currents in chick cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zidanic, M; Fuchs, P A

    1995-01-01

    Inward barium current (IBa) through voltage-gated calcium channels was recorded from chick cochlear hair cells using the whole-cell clamp technique. IBa was sensitive to dihydropyridines and insensitive to the peptide toxins omega-agatoxin IVa, omega-conotoxin GVIa, and omega-conotoxin MVIIC. Changing the holding potential over a -40 to -80 mV range had no effect on the time course or magnitude of IBa nor did it reveal any inactivating inward currents. The activation of IBa was modeled with Hodgkin-Huxley m2 kinetics. The time constant of activation, tau m, was 550 microseconds at -30 mV and gradually decreased to 100 microseconds at +50 mV. A Boltzmann fit to the activation curve, m infinity, yielded a half activation voltage of -15 mV and a steepness factor of 7.8 mV. Opening and closing rate constants, alpha m and beta m, were calculated from tau m and m infinity, then fit with modified exponential functions. The H-H model derived by evaluating the exponential functions for alpha m and beta m not only provided an excellent fit to the time course of IBa activation, but was predictive of the time course and magnitude of the IBa tail current. No differences in kinetics or voltage dependence of activation of IBa were found between tall and short hair cells. We conclude that both tall and short hair cells of the chick cochlea predominantly, if not exclusively, express noninactivating L-type calcium channels. These channels are therefore responsible for processes requiring voltage-dependent calcium entry through the basolateral cell membrane, such as transmitter release and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels. PMID:7787021

  7. Kinetic analysis of several variations of push-ups.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Wurm, Bradley; VanderZanden, Tyler L; Spadavecchia, Mark L; Durocher, John J; Bickham, Curtis T; Petushek, Erich J

    2011-10-01

    Push-ups are a common and practical exercise that is used to enhance fitness, including upper body strength or endurance. The kinetic characteristics of push-ups and its variations are yet to be quantified. Kinetic quantification is necessary to accurately evaluate the training load, and thus the nature of the training stimulus, for these exercise variations. This study assessed the peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRFs) of push-up variations including the regular push-up and those performed with flexed knee, feet elevated on a 30.48-cm box, and a 60.96-cm box, and hands elevated on a 30.48-cm box and a 60.96-cm box. Twenty-three recreationally fit individuals (14 men, 9 women) performed each of the 6 push-up variations in a randomized order. Peak GRF and peak GRF expressed as a coefficient of subject body mass were obtained with a force platform. Push-ups with the feet elevated produced a higher GRF than all other push-up variations (p ≤ 0.05). Push-ups with hands elevated and push-ups from the flexed knee position produced a lower GRF than all other push-up variations (p ≤ 0.05). No gender differences in response to these push-up variations were found (p > 0.05). Additionally, subject height was not related to the GRF for any of the push-up conditions (p > 0.05) other than the condition where hands were elevated on a 60.96-cm box (p ≤ 0.05; r = 0.63). These data can be used to progress the intensity of push-ups in a program and to quantify the training load as a percentage of body mass.

  8. RETRAN-3D MOD003 Peach Bottom Turbine Trip 2 Multidimensional Kinetics Analysis Models and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Michitsugu; Ogura, Katsunori; Gose, Garry C.; Wu, J.-Y

    2003-04-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip Test 2 (PB2/TT2) has been performed using RETRAN-3D MOD003. The purpose of the analysis was to investigate the PB2/TT2 overpressurization transient using the RETRAN-3D multidimensional kinetics model.

  9. Two-Dimensional Kinetic Analysis of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Instabilities in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1996-11-01

    Previous studies of low-toroidal-mode-number microinstabilities in tokamaks have included two-dimensional (r and θ) fully-kinetic analysis(R. Marchand, W.M. Tang, and G. Rewoldt, Phys. Fluids 23), 1164 (1980); W.M. Tang and G. Rewoldt, Phys. Fluids B 5, 2451 (1993) of electrostatic instabilities such as the trapped-ion mode. Recently, this analysis was extended to include effects of sheared toroidal plasma rotation(M. Artun, W.M. Tang, and G. Rewoldt, Phys. Plasmas 2), 3384 (1995). In the present work, the electrostatic calculation, implemented in the KIN-2DES computer code, is being extended to the electromagnetic case, in the KIN-2DEM code. This will allow treatment of both electromagnetic effects on electrostatic instabilities, and of kinetic effects on low-n tokamak MHD instabilities such as kink and ballooning modes. In the latter cases, the analysis represents the first systematic kinetic treatment of low-n MHD modes.

  10. Visual evaluation of kinetic characteristics of PET probe for neuroreceptors using a two-phase graphic plot analysis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Ikoma, Yoko; Seki, Chie; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ichise, Masanori; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kanno, Iwao

    2017-02-08

    Objectives In PET studies for neuroreceptors, tracer kinetics are described by the two-tissue compartment model (2-TCM), and binding parameters, including the total distribution volume (V T), non-displaceable distribution volume (V ND), and binding potential (BPND), can be determined from model parameters estimated by kinetic analysis. The stability of binding parameter estimates depends on the kinetic characteristics of radioligands. To describe these kinetic characteristics, we previously developed a two-phase graphic plot analysis in which V ND and V T can be estimated from the x-intercept of regression lines for early and delayed phases, respectively. In this study, we applied this graphic plot analysis to visual evaluation of the kinetic characteristics of radioligands for neuroreceptors, and investigated a relationship between the shape of these graphic plots and the stability of binding parameters estimated by the kinetic analysis with 2-TCM in simulated brain tissue time-activity curves (TACs) with various binding parameters. Methods 90-min TACs were generated with the arterial input function and assumed kinetic parameters according to 2-TCM. Graphic plot analysis was applied to these simulated TACs, and the curvature of the plot for each TAC was evaluated visually. TACs with several noise levels were also generated with various kinetic parameters, and the bias and variation of binding parameters estimated by kinetic analysis were calculated in each TAC. These bias and variation were compared with the shape of graphic plots. Results The graphic plots showed larger curvature for TACs with higher specific binding and slower dissociation of specific binding. The quartile deviations of V ND and BPND determined by kinetic analysis were smaller for radioligands with slow dissociation. Conclusions The larger curvature of graphic plots for radioligands with slow dissociation might indicate a stable determination of V ND and BPND by kinetic analysis. For

  11. k-OptForce: Integrating Kinetics with Flux Balance Analysis for Strain Design

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Anupam; Zomorrodi, Ali R.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-01-01

    Computational strain design protocols aim at the system-wide identification of intervention strategies for the enhanced production of biochemicals in microorganisms. Existing approaches relying solely on stoichiometry and rudimentary constraint-based regulation overlook the effects of metabolite concentrations and substrate-level enzyme regulation while identifying metabolic interventions. In this paper, we introduce k-OptForce, which integrates the available kinetic descriptions of metabolic steps with stoichiometric models to sharpen the prediction of intervention strategies for improving the bio-production of a chemical of interest. It enables identification of a minimal set of interventions comprised of both enzymatic parameter changes (for reactions with available kinetics) and reaction flux changes (for reactions with only stoichiometric information). Application of k-OptForce to the overproduction of L-serine in E. coli and triacetic acid lactone (TAL) in S. cerevisiae revealed that the identified interventions tend to cause less dramatic rearrangements of the flux distribution so as not to violate concentration bounds. In some cases the incorporation of kinetic information leads to the need for additional interventions as kinetic expressions render stoichiometry-only derived interventions infeasible by violating concentration bounds, whereas in other cases the kinetic expressions impart flux changes that favor the overproduction of the target product thereby requiring fewer direct interventions. A sensitivity analysis on metabolite concentrations shows that the required number of interventions can be significantly affected by changing the imposed bounds on metabolite concentrations. Furthermore, k-OptForce was capable of finding non-intuitive interventions aiming at alleviating the substrate-level inhibition of key enzymes in order to enhance the flux towards the product of interest, which cannot be captured by stoichiometry-alone analysis. This study paves

  12. Dynamics of a lamellar system with diffusion and reaction: Scaling analysis and global kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzio, F. J.; Ottino, J. M.

    1989-12-01

    The evolution of a one-dimensional array of reactive lamellae with distributed striation thickness is studied by means of simulations, scaling analysis, and space-averaged kinetics. An infinitely fast, diffusion-controlled reaction A+B-->2P occurs at the interfaces between striations. As time increases, thin striations are eaten by thicker neighbors resulting in a modification of the striation thickness distribution (STD). Scaling analysis suggests that the STD evolves into a universal form and that the behavior of the system at short and long times is characterized by two different kinetic regimes. These predictions are confirmed by means of a novel numerical algorithm.

  13. Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes Implementing Platinum Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecton, Jeremy Exton

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising approach for display and solid state lighting applications. However, further work is needed in establishing the availability of efficient and stable materials for OLEDs with high external quantum efficiency's (EQE) and high operational lifetimes. Recently, significant improvements in the internal quantum efficiency or ratio of generated photons to injected electrons have been achieved with the advent of phosphorescent complexes with the ability to harvest both singlet and triplet excitons. Since then, a variety of phosphorescent complexes containing heavy metal centers including Os, Ni, Ir, Pd, and Pt have been developed. Thus far, the majority of the work in the field has focused on iridium based complexes. Platinum based complexes, however, have received considerably less attention despite demonstrating efficiency's equal to or better than their iridium analogs. In this study, a series of OLEDs implementing newly developed platinum based complexes were demonstrated with efficiency's or operational lifetimes equal to or better than their iridium analogs for select cases. In addition to demonstrating excellent device performance in OLEDs, platinum based complexes exhibit unique photophysical properties including the ability to form excimer emission capable of generating broad white light emission from a single emitter and the ability to form narrow band emission from a rigid, tetradentate molecular structure for select cases. These unique photophysical properties were exploited and their optical and electrical properties in a device setting were elucidated. Utilizing the unique properties of a tridentate Pt complex, Pt-16, a highly efficient white device employing a single emissive layer exhibited a peak EQE of over 20% and high color quality with a CRI of 80 and color coordinates CIE(x=0.33, y=0.33). Furthermore, by employing a rigid, tetradentate platinum complex, PtN1N, with a narrow band emission into a

  14. Novel Smart Windows Based on Transparent Phosphorescent OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D'Andrade; Stephen Forest

    2006-09-15

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and Princeton University developed the use of white transparent phosphorescent organic light emitting devices (PHOLEDs{trademark}) to make low-cost ''transparent OLED (TOLED) smart windows'', that switch rapidly from being a highly efficient solid-state light source to being a transparent window. PHOLEDs are ideal for large area devices, and the UDC-Princeton team has demonstrated white PHOLEDs with efficiencies of >24 lm/W at a luminance of 1,000 cd/m{sup 2}. TOLEDs have transparencies >70% over the visible wavelengths of light, but their transparency drops to less than 5% for wavelengths shorter than 350 nm, so they can also be used as ultraviolet (UV) light filters. In addition to controlling the flow of UV radiation, TOLEDs coupled with an electromechanical or electrically activated reflecting shutter on a glass window can be employed to control the flow of heat from infrared (IR) radiation by varying the reflectance/transparency of the glass for wavelengths greater than 800nm. One particularly attractive shutter technology is reversible electrochromic mirrors (REM). Our goal was therefore to integrate two innovative concepts to meet the U.S. Department of Energy goals: high power efficiency TOLEDs, plus electrically controlled reflectors to produce a ''smart window''. Our efforts during this one year program have succeeded in producing a prototype smart window shown in the Fig. I, below. The four states of the smart window are pictured: reflective with lamp on, reflective with lamp off, transparent with lamp on, and transparent with lamp off. In the transparent states, the image is an outdoor setting viewed through the window. In the reflective states, the image is an indoor setting viewed via reflection off the window. We believe that the integration of our high efficiency white phosphorescent TOLED illumination source, with electrically activated shutters represents an innovative low-cost approach to

  15. Kinetic analysis of microbial respiratory response to substrate addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Yuyukina, Tatayna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Heterotrophic component of CO2 emitted from soil is mainly due to the respiratory activity of soil microorganisms. Field measurements of microbial respiration can be used for estimation of C-budget in soil, while laboratory estimation of respiration kinetics allows the elucidation of mechanisms of soil C sequestration. Physiological approaches based on 1) time-dependent or 2) substrate-dependent respiratory response of soil microorganisms decomposing the organic substrates allow to relate the functional properties of soil microbial community with decomposition rates of soil organic matter. We used a novel methodology combining (i) microbial growth kinetics and (ii) enzymes affinity to the substrate to show the shift in functional properties of the soil microbial community after amendments with substrates of contrasting availability. We combined the application of 14C labeled glucose as easily available C source to soil with natural isotope labeling of old and young soil SOM. The possible contribution of two processes: isotopic fractionation and preferential substrate utilization to the shifts in δ13C during SOM decomposition in soil after C3-C4 vegetation change was evaluated. Specific growth rate (µ) of soil microorganisms was estimated by fitting the parameters of the equation v(t) = A + B * exp(µ*t), to the measured CO2 evolution rate (v(t)) after glucose addition, and where A is the initial rate of non-growth respiration, B - initial rate of the growing fraction of total respiration. Maximal mineralization rate (Vmax), substrate affinity of microbial enzymes (Ks) and substrate availability (Sn) were determined by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. To study the effect of plant originated C on δ13C signature of SOM we compared the changes in isotopic composition of different C pools in C3 soil under grassland with C3-C4 soil where C4 plant Miscanthus giganteus was grown for 12 years on the plot after grassland. The shift in 13δ C caused by planting of M. giganteus

  16. Kinetic analysis of the lower limbs in baseball tee batting.

    PubMed

    Ae, Kazumichi; Koike, Sekiya; Fujii, Norihisa; Ae, Michiyoshi; Kawamura, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the ground reaction forces on the rotation of the body as a whole and on the joint torques of the lower limbs associated with trunk and pelvic rotation in baseball tee batting. A total of 22 male collegiate baseball players participated in this study. Three-dimensional coordinate data were acquired by a motion capture system (250 Hz), and ground reaction forces of both legs were measured with three force platforms (1,000 Hz). Kinetic data were used to calculate the moment about the vertical axis through the body's centre of mass resulting from ground reaction forces, as well as to calculate the torque and mechanical work in the lower limb joints. The lateral/medial ground reaction force generated by both legs resulted in the large whole body moment about its vertical axis. The joint torques of flexion/extension of both hips, adduction of the stride hip and extension of the stride knee produced significantly larger mechanical work than did the other joint torques. To obtain high bat-head speed, the batter should push both legs in the lateral/medial direction by utilising both hips and stride knee torques so as to increase the whole body rotation.

  17. Temporal Kinetics and Quantitative Analysis of Cryptococcus neoformans Nonlytic Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Stukes, Sabriya A.; Cohen, Hillel W.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of cryptococcosis, a disease that is often fatal to those with compromised immune systems. C. neoformans has the capacity to escape phagocytic cells through a process known as nonlytic exocytosis whereby the cryptococcal cell is released from the macrophage into the extracellular environment, leaving both the host and pathogen alive. Little is known about the mechanism behind nonlytic exocytosis, but there is evidence that both the fungal and host cells contribute to the process. In this study, we used time-lapse movies of C. neoformans-infected macrophages to delineate the kinetics and quantitative aspects of nonlytic exocytosis. We analyzed approximately 800 macrophages containing intracellular C. neoformans and identified 163 nonlytic exocytosis events that were further characterized into three subcategories: type I (complete emptying of macrophage), type II (partial emptying of macrophage), and type III (cell-to-cell transfer). The majority of type I and II events occurred after several hours of intracellular residence, whereas type III events occurred significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in the course of macrophage infection. Our results show that nonlytic exocytosis is a morphologically and temporally diverse process that occurs relatively rapidly in the course of macrophage infection. PMID:24595144

  18. Nonparametric analysis of nonexponential and multidimensional kinetics. I. Quantifying rate dispersion, rate heterogeneity, and exchange dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Kaur, Harveen

    2017-02-01

    The quantification of nonexponential (dispersed) kinetics has relied on empirical functions, which yield parameters that are neither unique nor easily related to the underlying mechanism. Multidimensional kinetics provide more information on dispersed processes, but a good approach to their analysis is even less clear than for standard, one-dimensional kinetics. This paper is the first in a series that analyzes kinetic data in one or many dimensions with a scheme that is nonparametric: it quantifies nonexponential decays without relying on a specific functional form. The quantities obtained are directly related to properties of the mechanism causing the rate dispersion. Log-moments of decays, which parallel the standard moments of distributions (mean, standard deviation, etc.), are introduced for both one- and multi-dimensional decays. Kinetic spectra are defined to visualize the data. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on a simple, but general, model of dispersed kinetics—a nonexponential homogeneous decay combined with slowly exchanging rate heterogeneity. The first log-moments give a geometric-mean relaxation time. Second log-moments quantify the magnitude of rate dispersion, the fraction of the dispersion due to heterogeneity, and the dynamics of exchange between different rate subensembles. A suitable combination of these moments isolates exchange dynamics from three-dimensional kinetics without contamination by the rate-filtering effects that were identified in a recent paper [M. A. Berg and J. R. Darvin, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 054119 (2016)].

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure and photoluminescence of phosphorescent copper (I) complexes containing hole-transporting carbazoly moiety.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianzhi; Chai, Haifang; Zhao, Yuling; Zhang, Chengcheng; Liu, Peng; Fan, Duowang

    2013-05-15

    Two new mononuclear Cu(I) complexes based on 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazolyl derivative ligand containing hole-transporting carbazole (L), [Cu(L)(DPEphos)](BF4) and [Cu(L)(PPh3)2](BF4), where L=(4-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl)methyl-2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole; DPEphos=bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl]ether and PPh3=triphenylphosphine, have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectra. The structures of the ligand L and the Cu(I) complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The results reveal that in the Cu(I) complexes the central Cu(I) ions assume the irregular distorted tetrahedral geometry and are tetra-coordinated by the two nitrogen atoms from L ligand and two phosphorus atoms from ancillary ligands. The photophysical properties of the complexes were examined by using UV-vis, photoluminescence spectroscopic analysis. The complexes exhibit weak MLCT absorption bands ranging from 360 to 480 nm, and display strong orange phosphorescence in the solid states at room temperature, which is completely quenched in solutions.

  20. Phosphorescence and Structure of a Tetrameric Copper(I)-Amide Cluster.

    PubMed

    James, Alicia M.; Laxman, Ravi K.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Maverick, Andrew W.

    1998-07-27

    The colorless copper(I) cluster [CuN(Si(CH(3))(3))(2)](4), which contains a square-planar Cu(4)N(4) core, phosphoresces in CH(2)Cl(2) solution (lambda(max), 512 nm; lifetime, 30 &mgr;s) and in the solid state at room temperature. Its electronic absorption spectrum in CH(2)Cl(2) consists of two intense bands at 283 and 246 nm; these transitions, as well as the phosphorescence, are likely to involve population of MOs reflecting substantial Cu.Cu interactions. Solid [CuN(Si(CH(3))(3))(2)](4) luminesces with approximately the same spectrum as that of the CH(2)Cl(2) solutions. At 77 K, the solid-state luminescence red-shifts slightly (lambda(max), 524 nm) and narrows substantially (fwhm, 2400 cm(-)(1); vs 3500 cm(-)(1) at 300 K); the emission lifetime in glassy Et(2)O solution is 690 &mgr;s. X-ray analysis of crystals of [CuN(Si(CH(3))(3))(2)](4) at 130 and 296 K shows that, although the previously reported structure solution (in space group I2/m, with the molecules on 2/m sites; Eur. J. Solid State Inorg. Chem. 1992, 29, 573-583) is approximately correct, the lattice is actually primitive, P2/n, and the only crystallographically required symmetry element for the molecule is a 2-fold axis. C(24)H(72)Cu(4)N(4)Si(8): monoclinic, space group P2/n, Z = 2. At 130 K, a = 9.285(3) Å, b = 13.393(3) Å, c = 17.752(5) Å, and beta = 90.53(2) degrees. [At 296 K, a = 9.3773(4) Å, b = 13.5836(7) Å, c = 17.814(2) Å, and beta = 90.207(7) degrees.] At 130 K, the Cu and N atoms in the cluster are planar within 0.007 Å, and the Cu-N and Cu.Cu distances are 1.917(4)-1.925(4) and 2.6770(7)-2.6937(7) Å, respectively. Despite the low volatility of the compound, it can be used as a precursor for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of copper metal, under H(2) carrier gas, with both source and substrate at ca. 200 degrees C. Smaller amounts of Cu metal films are also deposited when the substrate temperature is as low as 145 degrees C (in the dark) or 136-138 degrees C (under Pyrex-filtered Xe

  1. Development and Utilization of Host Materials for White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ching; Chen, Shaw

    2013-05-31

    Our project was primarily focused on the MYPP 2015 goal for white phosphorescent organic devices (PhOLEDs or phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes) for solid-state lighting with long lifetimes and high efficiencies. Our central activity was to synthesize and evaluate a new class of host materials for blue phosphors in the PhOLEDs, known to be a weak link in the device operating lifetime. The work was a collaborative effort between three groups, one primarily responsible for chemical design and characterization (Chen), one primarily responsible for device development (Tang) and one primarily responsible for mechanistic studies and degradation analysis (Rothberg). The host materials were designed with a novel architecture that chemically links groups with good ability to move electrons with those having good ability to move “holes” (positive charges), the main premise being that we could suppress the instability associated with physical separation and crystallization of the electron conducting and hole conducting materials that might cause the devices to fail. We found that these materials do prevent crystallization and that this will increase device lifetimes but that efficiencies were reduced substantially due to interactions between the materials creating new low energy “charge transfer” states that are non-luminescent. Therefore, while our proposed strategy could in principle improve device lifetimes, we were unable to find a materials combination where the efficiency was not substantially compromised. In the course of our project, we made several important contributions that are peripherally related to the main project goal. First, we were able to prepare the proposed new family of materials and develop synthetic routes to make them efficiently. These types of materials that can transport both electrons and holes may yet have important roles to play in organic device technology. Second we developed an important new method for controlling the

  2. Development and sensitivity analysis of a fully kinetic model of sequential reductive dechlorination in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Chambon, Julie C; Bjerg, Poul L; Scheutz, Charlotte; Binning, Philip J

    2011-10-01

    A fully kinetic biogeochemical model of sequential reductive dechlorination (SERD) occurring in conjunction with lactate and propionate fermentation, iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis was developed. Production and consumption of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) by microorganisms have been modeled using modified Michaelis-Menten kinetics and has been implemented in the geochemical code PHREEQC. The model have been calibrated using a Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis algorithm to observations of chlorinated solvents, organic acids, and H(2) concentrations in laboratory batch experiments of complete trichloroethene (TCE) degradation in natural sediments. Global sensitivity analysis was performed using the Morris method and Sobol sensitivity indices to identify the most influential model parameters. Results show that the sulfate concentration and fermentation kinetics are the most important factors influencing SERD. The sensitivity analysis also suggests that it is not possible to simplify the model description if all system behaviors are to be well described.

  3. Kinetic analysis of forwards and backwards stair descent.

    PubMed

    D Beaulieu, François G; Pelland, Lucie; Robertson, D Gordon E

    2008-05-01

    The activity of descending stairs increases loading at the joints of the lower extremities as compared to walking, which may cause discomfort and or difficulties in completing the task. This study compared and contrasted the kinematics and kinetics of both forwards and backwards stair descent to those of level walking. We compared the support moments and moment powers of the lower limb joints while descending stairs forwards at a self-selected pace, backwards at a self-selected pace and forwards at the same pace as backwards. Participants were 10 healthy young adults (6 men and 4 women) aged 20-35 years. Sagittal plane kinematics and ground reaction forces were collected and moments of force computed using inverse dynamics. The ratio of stance/swing phase changed from 59:41 for normal level walking to between 65:35 and 70:30 for forward stair descent but backwards descent was 58:42. Stair descent produced larger double-peak support moments with reduced ankle plantar flexor and increased knee extensor moments as compared to level walking (>+/-95th-percentile confidence interval). The hip moments during stair descent were relatively small and highly variable. We observed significantly larger distances between the centres of pressure and the stair edges for backwards stair descent versus forwards stair descent. These results demonstrate that stair descent, even at a slower pace, requires greater power from the knee extensors than level walking but that backwards stair descent significantly reduced the peak knee power during midstance and provided a potentially safer means of descending stairs than forwards stair descent.

  4. In vitro comparative kinetic analysis of the chloroplast Toc GTPases.

    PubMed

    Reddick, L Evan; Vaughn, Michael D; Wright, Sarah J; Campbell, Ian M; Bruce, Barry D

    2007-04-13

    A unique aspect of protein transport into plastids is the coordinate involvement of two GTPases in the translocon of the outer chloroplast membrane (Toc). There are two subfamilies in Arabidopsis, the small GTPases (Toc33 and Toc34) and the large acidic GTPases (Toc90, Toc120, Toc132, and Toc159). In chloroplasts, Toc34 and Toc159 are implicated in precursor binding, yet mechanistic details are poorly understood. How the GTPase cycle is modulated by precursor binding is complex and in need of careful dissection. To this end, we have developed novel in vitro assays to quantitate nucleotide binding and hydrolysis of the Toc GTPases. Here we present the first systematic kinetic characterization of four Toc GTPases (cytosolic domains of atToc33, atToc34, psToc34, and the GTPase domain of atToc159) to permit their direct comparison. We report the KM, Vmax, and Ea values for GTP hydrolysis and the Kd value for nucleotide binding for each protein. We demonstrate that GTP hydrolysis by psToc34 is stimulated by chloroplast transit peptides; however, this activity is not stimulated by homodimerization and is abolished by the R133A mutation. Furthermore, we show peptide stimulation of hydrolytic rates are not because of accelerated nucleotide exchange, indicating that transit peptides function as GTPase-activating proteins and not guanine nucleotide exchange factors in modulating the activity of psToc34. Finally, by using the psToc34 structure, we have developed molecular models for atToc33, atToc34, and atToc159G. By combining these models with the measured enzymatic properties of the Toc GTPases, we provide new insights of how the chloroplast protein import cycle may be regulated.

  5. Validation of Bayesian analysis of compartmental kinetic models in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Arkadiusz; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic compartmental analysis is frequently used to compute physiologically relevant quantitative values from time series of images. In this paper, a new approach based on Bayesian analysis to obtain information about these parameters is presented and validated. The closed-form of the posterior distribution of kinetic parameters is derived with a hierarchical prior to model the standard deviation of normally distributed noise. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used for numerical estimation of the posterior distribution. Computer simulations of the kinetics of F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are used to demonstrate drawing statistical inferences about kinetic parameters and to validate the theory and implementation. Additionally, point estimates of kinetic parameters and covariance of those estimates are determined using the classical non-linear least squares approach. Posteriors obtained using methods proposed in this work are accurate as no significant deviation from the expected shape of the posterior was found (one-sided P>0.08). It is demonstrated that the results obtained by the standard non-linear least-square methods fail to provide accurate estimation of uncertainty for the same data set (P<0.0001). The results of this work validate new methods for a computer simulations of FDG kinetics. Results show that in situations where the classical approach fails in accurate estimation of uncertainty, Bayesian estimation provides an accurate information about the uncertainties in the parameters. Although a particular example of FDG kinetics was used in the paper, the methods can be extended for different pharmaceuticals and imaging modalities. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heat Transfer Analysis and Assessment of Kinetics Systems for PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Jorenby, Jeffrey W.

    2006-07-01

    The study of thermal decomposition in high explosive (HE) charges has been an ongoing process since the early 1900s. This work is specifically directed towards the analysis of PBX 9501. In the early 1970s, Dwight Jaeger of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a single-step, two-species kinetics system that was used in the development of one of the first finite element codes for thermal analyses known as EXPLO. Jaeger's research focused on unconfined spherical samples of HE charges to determine if varied heating ramps would cause detonation or deflagration. Tarver and McGuire of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) followed soon after with a three-step, four-species kinetics system that was developed for confined spheres under relatively fast heating conditions. Peter Dickson et al. of LANL then introduced a kinetics system with four steps and five species that included bimolecular products to capture the effects of the endothermic phase change that the HE undergoes. The results of four experiments are examined to study the effectiveness of these kinetics systems. The experiments are: (1) The LLNL scaled thermal explosion (STEX) experiments on confined cylindrical charges with long heating ramps in the range of 90 hours. (2) The LLNL one-dimensional time to explosion (ODTX) experiments on spherical charges that include confined, partially confined, and aged HE experiments. (3) The LANL unconfined one-dimensional experiments for small spheres. (4) The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake experiments on small confined cylinders. The three kinetics systems are applied to each of the four experiments with the use of the finite element analysis (FEA) heat conduction solver COYOTE. The numerical results using the kinetics systems are compared to each other and to the experimental data to determine which kinetics systems are best suited for analyzing conditions such as time to ignition, containment, heating time, and location of

  7. Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Simplified Device Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hoe Min; Choi, Eun Young; Choi, Dae Hyuk; Park, Jung Hwan; Yoo, Han Seong; Kang, Hyun Ju; Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Kwan

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrated that single-layered red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) can have high a efficiency without carrier transport and injection layers. This high efficiency is caused by the direct injection of carriers from electrodes into a dopant, bis(2-phenylquinoline) iridium(III) (acetylacetonate) [Ir(ppy)2(acac)]. This mechanism is proved by analyzing the single-layered devices with various hosts, 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP), 9-phenyl-3-[4-(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl]-9H-carbazole (LPGH 114), 9-(naphthalen-2-yl)-3-[4-(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl]-9H-carbazole (LPGH 124), and 9-phenyl-3,6-bis[4-(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl]-9H-carbazole (LPGH 153). Among the devices, the single-layered device with LPGH 153 shows a luminous efficiency, a power efficiency, and a quantum efficiency of 9.3 cd/A, 5.2 lm/W, and 6.2%, respectively. The single-layered device with CBP was compared with a multilayered device with CBP. As a result, the single-layered device shows a reduced operating voltage, an enhanced roll-off efficiency, and a pure emitting color in comparison with the multilayered device owing to the direct injection of carriers into a dopant and the suppression of exciplex formation.

  8. Phosphorescent sensor for phosphorylated peptides based on an iridium complex.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hee Jin; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Hong, Jong-In

    2014-07-03

    A bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-N,C(2')]iridium(III) picolinate (FIrpic) derivative coupled with bis(Zn(2+)-dipicolylamine) (ZnDPA) was developed as a sensor (1) for phosphorylated peptides, which are related to many cellular mechanisms. As a control, a fluorescent sensor (2) based on anthracene coupled to ZnDPA was also prepared. When the total negative charge on the phosphorylated peptides was changed to -2, -4, and -6, the emission intensity of sensor 1 gradually increased by factors of up to 7, 11, and 16, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in the emission intensity of sensor 1 upon the addition of a neutral phosphorylated peptide, non-phosphorylated peptides, or various anions such as CO3(2-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), phosphate, azide, and pyrophosphate. Furthermore, sensor 1 could be used to visually discriminate between phosphorylated peptides and adenosine triphosphate in aqueous solution under a UV-vis lamp, unlike fluorescent sensor 2. This enhanced luminance of phosphorescent sensor 1 upon binding to a phosphorylated peptide is attributed to a reduction in the repulsion between the Zn(2+) ions due to the phenoxy anion, its strong metal-to-ligand charge transfer character, and a reduction in self-quenching.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of Haloacetonitrile Stability in Drinking Waters.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun; Reckhow, David A

    2015-09-15

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are an important class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that are reactive and can undergo considerable transformation on time scales relevant to system distribution (i.e., from a few hours to a week or more). The stability of seven mono-, di-, and trihaloacetonitriles was examined under a variety of conditions including different pH levels and disinfectant doses that are typical of drinking water distribution systems. Results indicated that hydroxide, hypochlorite, and their protonated forms could react with HANs via nucleophilic attack on the nitrile carbon, forming the corresponding haloacetamides (HAMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) as major reaction intermediates and end products. Other stable intermediate products, such as the N-chloro-haloacetamides (N-chloro-HAMs), may form during the course of HAN chlorination. A scheme of pathways for the HAN reactions was proposed, and the rate constants for individual reactions were estimated. Under slightly basic conditions, hydroxide and hypochlorite are primary reactants and their associated second-order reaction rate constants were estimated to be 6 to 9 orders of magnitude higher than those of their protonated conjugates (i.e., neutral water and hypochlorous acid), which are much weaker but more predominant nucleophiles at neutral and acidic pHs. Developed using the estimated reaction rate constants, the linear free energy relationships (LFERs) summarized the nucleophilic nature of HAN reactions and demonstrated an activating effect of the electron withdrawing halogens on nitrile reactivity, leading to decreasing HAN stability with increasing degree of halogenation of the substituents, while subsequent shift from chlorine to bromine atoms has a contrary stabilizing effect on HANs. The chemical kinetic model together with the reaction rate constants that were determined in this work can be used for quantitative predictions of HAN concentrations depending on pH and free chlorine

  10. Data Capture and Analysis Using the BBC Microcomputer--an Interfacing Project Applied to Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lawrence; Graham, Ian

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the main principles of interfacing and discusses the software developed to perform kinetic data capture and analysis with a BBC microcomputer linked to a recording spectrophotometer. Focuses on the steps in software development. Includes results of a lactate dehydrogenase assay. (ML)

  11. Data Capture and Analysis Using the BBC Microcomputer--an Interfacing Project Applied to Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lawrence; Graham, Ian

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the main principles of interfacing and discusses the software developed to perform kinetic data capture and analysis with a BBC microcomputer linked to a recording spectrophotometer. Focuses on the steps in software development. Includes results of a lactate dehydrogenase assay. (ML)

  12. A probabilistic framework for the exploration of enzymatic capabilities based on feasible kinetics and control analysis.

    PubMed

    Saa, Pedro A; Nielsen, Lars K

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of limiting steps within enzyme-catalyzed reactions is fundamental to understand their behavior and regulation. Methods capable of unravelling control properties and exploring kinetic capabilities of enzymatic reactions would be particularly useful for protein and metabolic engineering. While single-enzyme control analysis formalism has previously been applied to well-studied enzymatic mechanisms, broader application of this formalism is limited in practice by the limited amount of kinetic data and the difficulty of describing complex allosteric mechanisms. To overcome these limitations, we present here a probabilistic framework enabling control analysis of previously unexplored mechanisms under uncertainty. By combining a thermodynamically consistent parameterization with an efficient Sequential Monte Carlo sampler embedded in a Bayesian setting, this framework yields insights into the capabilities of enzyme-catalyzed reactions with modest kinetic information, provided that the catalytic mechanism and a thermodynamic reference point are defined. The framework was used to unravel the impact of thermodynamic affinity, substrate saturation levels and effector concentrations on the flux control and response coefficients of a diverse set of enzymatic reactions. Our results highlight the importance of the metabolic context in the control analysis of isolated enzymes as well as the use of statistically sound methods for their interpretation. This framework significantly expands our current capabilities for unravelling the control properties of general reaction kinetics with limited amount of information. This framework will be useful for both theoreticians and experimentalists in the field. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Study on the paper substrate room temperature phosphorescence of theobromine, caffeine and theophylline and analytical application.

    PubMed

    Chuan, Dong; Yan-Li, Wei; Shao-Min, Shuang

    2003-05-01

    Paper substrate room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) of theobromine (TB), caffeine (CF) and theophylline (TP) were investigated. The method is based on fast speed quantitative filter paper as substrate and KI-NaAc as heavy atom perturber. Various factors affecting their RTP were discussed in detail. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the linear dynamic range, limit of detection (LOD), and relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) were 14.41 approximately 576.54 ng per spot, 1.14 ng per spot, 4.8% for TB, 5.44 approximately 699.08 ng per spot, 0.78 ng per spot, 1.56% for CF, 7.21 approximately 360.34 ng per spot, 1.80 ng per spot, 3.80% for TP, respectively. The first analytical application for the determination of these compounds was developed. The recovery of standard samples added to commercial products chocolate, tea, coffee and aminophylline is in the range 92.80-106.08%. The proposed method was successfully applied to real sample analysis without separation.

  14. Study on the paper substrate room temperature phosphorescence of theobromine, caffeine and theophylline and analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Dong; Yan-Li, Wei; Shao-Min, Shuang

    2003-05-01

    Paper substrate room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) of theobromine (TB), caffeine (CF) and theophylline (TP) were investigated. The method is based on fast speed quantitative filter paper as substrate and KI-NaAc as heavy atom perturber. Various factors affecting their RTP were discussed in detail. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the linear dynamic range, limit of detection (LOD), and relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) were 14.41˜576.54 ng per spot, 1.14 ng per spot, 4.8% for TB, 5.44˜699.08 ng per spot, 0.78 ng per spot, 1.56% for CF, 7.21˜360.34 ng per spot, 1.80 ng per spot, 3.80% for TP, respectively. The first analytical application for the determination of these compounds was developed. The recovery of standard samples added to commercial products chocolate, tea, coffee and aminophylline is in the range 92.80-106.08%. The proposed method was successfully applied to real sample analysis without separation.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of phosphorescent platinum and iridium complexes with cyclometalated corannulene.

    PubMed

    Facendola, John W; Seifrid, Martin; Siegel, Jay; Djurovich, Peter I; Thompson, Mark E

    2015-05-14

    Synthesis, structural and characterization data are provided for Pt(II) and Ir(III) complexes cyclometalated with 2-(corannulene)pyridine (corpy), (corpy)Pt(dpm) and (corpy)Ir(ppz)2 (dpm = dipivaloylmethanato, ppz = 1-phenylpyrazolyl). A third compound, (phenpy)Ir(ppz)2 (phenpy = 2-(5-phenanthryl)pyridyl), was also prepared to mimic the steric bulk of (corpy)Ir(ppz)2. X-ray analysis reveals bowl depths of 0.895 Å for (corpy)Pt(dpm) and 0.837 Å in (corpy)Ir(ppz)2. Neither complex displayed bowl-to-bowl stacking in the crystal lattice. A fluxional process for (corpy)Ir(ppz)2 attributed to bowl inversion of corrannulene is observed in solution with a barrier (ΔG(‡) = 13 kcal mol(-1)) and rate (k = 2.5 × 10(3) s(-1)) as determined using variable temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy. All of the complexes display red phosphorescence at room temperature with quantum yields of 0.05 in solution and 0.2 in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA).

  16. Highly efficient and stable organic light-emitting diodes with a greatly reduced amount of phosphorescent emitter

    PubMed Central

    Fukagawa, Hirohiko; Shimizu, Takahisa; Kamada, Taisuke; Yui, Shota; Hasegawa, Munehiro; Morii, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been intensively studied as a key technology for next-generation displays and lighting. The efficiency of OLEDs has improved markedly in the last 15 years by employing phosphorescent emitters. However, there are two main issues in the practical application of phosphorescent OLEDs (PHOLEDs): the relatively short operational lifetime and the relatively high cost owing to the costly emitter with a concentration of about 10% in the emitting layer. Here, we report on our success in resolving these issues by the utilization of thermally activated delayed fluorescent materials, which have been developed in the past few years, as the host material for the phosphorescent emitter. Our newly developed PHOLED employing only 1 wt% phosphorescent emitter exhibits an external quantum efficiency of over 20% and a long operational lifetime of about 20 times that of an OLED consisting of a conventional host material and 1 wt% phosphorescent emitter. PMID:25985084

  17. A kinetic analysis of strand breaks on large DNA induced by cigarette smoke extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Takata, Tatsuya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We report a kinetic analysis of strand breakages on large DNA molecules induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE), an extract of soluble cigarette smoke components. Previously, this DNA damage was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, whereas we used fluorescence to kinetically analyze damage to individual DNA molecules. CSE caused a marked change in length of DNA molecules. The rate of CSE-induced double-strand breakage on large random-coiled DNA molecules was determined using a simple theoretical model, allowing the facile estimation of the rate of double-strand breaks on large DNA molecules.

  18. Moving Beyond Boron-Based Substituents To Achieve Phosphorescence in Tellurophenes.

    PubMed

    Torres Delgado, William; Braun, Christina A; Boone, Michael P; Shynkaruk, Olena; Qi, Yanyu; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Data, Przemyslaw; Almeida, Shawan K C; Aguiar, Inara de; de Souza, Gabriel L C; Brown, Alex; He, Gang; Rivard, Eric

    2017-10-02

    Previous research in our group showed that tellurophenes with pinacolboronate (BPin) units at the 2- and/or 5-positions displayed efficient phosphorescence in the solid state, both in the presence of oxygen and water. In this current study, we show that luminescence from a tellurophene is possible when various aryl-based substituents are present, thus greatly expanding the family of known (and potentially accessible) Te-based phosphors. Moreover, for the green phosphorescent perborylated tellurium heterocycle, 2,3,4,5-TeC4BPin4 (4BTe), oxygen-mediated quenching of phosphorescence is an important contributor to the lack of emission in solution (when exposed to air); thus, this system displays aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE). These discoveries should facilitate the future design of color tunable tellurium-based luminogens.

  19. Triplet diffusion leads to triplet-triplet annihilation in organic phosphorescent emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifan; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-12-01

    In organic materials, triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) can be dominated by triplet diffusion or triplet-to-triplet energy transfer. Here, we discuss the diffusion and transfer dominated mechanisms in the context of photoluminescence (PL) transient measurements from thin films of archetype phosphorescent organic light emitters based on Ir and Pt complexes. We find that TTA in these emitters is controlled by diffusion due to a Dexter-type exchange interaction, suggesting triplet radiative decay and TTA are independent processes. Minimizing the PL and absorption spectral overlap in phosphorescent emitters can lead to a significantly decreased TTA rate, and thus suppressed efficiency roll-off in phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes at high brightness.

  20. Lifetime enhanced phosphorescent organic light emitting diode using an electron scavenger layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokhwan; Kim, Ji Whan; Lee, Sangyeob

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a method to improve lifetime of a phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (OLED) using an electron scavenger layer (ESL) in a hole transporting layer (HTL) of the device. We use a bis(1-(phenyl)isoquinoline)iridium(III)acetylacetonate [Ir(piq)2(acac)] doped HTL to stimulate radiative decay, preventing thermal degradation in HTL. The ESL effectively prevented non-radiative decay of leakage electron in HTL by converting non-radiative decay to radiative decay via a phosphorescent red emitter, Ir(piq)2(acac). The lifetime of device (t95: time after 5% decrease of luminance) has been increased from 75 h to 120 h by using the ESL in a phosphorescent green-emitting OLED.

  1. Line phosphorescence spectrum of octachlorodibenzo- p-dioxine at 4.2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, V. G.; Nurmukhametov, R. N.; Gastilovich, E. A.; Lebedev, S. A.

    2000-03-01

    The line phosphorescence spectrum of octachlorodibenzo- p-dioxine (OCDX) is obtained and interpreted. The symmetry of the lowest triplet state of this molecule is established. The vibrational frequencies found from the vibronic phosphorescence spectrum at 4.2 k are assigned to the vibrational modes of certain symmetry related to individual functional atomic groups of the molecule. The relation between contributions from the spin-orbit (SO) and vibronic-spin-orbit (VSO) interactions to the phosphorescence rate constant k ph of the OCDX molecule is found from the vibronic line intensities. It is found that the increase in the number of Cl atoms in OCDX compared to that in tetrachlorobenzo- p-dioxine results in the increase in the relative contribution of the VSO interaction to k ph.

  2. Lifetime enhanced phosphorescent organic light emitting diode using an electron scavenger layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokhwan; Kim, Ji Whan; Lee, Sangyeob

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate a method to improve lifetime of a phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (OLED) using an electron scavenger layer (ESL) in a hole transporting layer (HTL) of the device. We use a bis(1-(phenyl)isoquinoline)iridium(III)acetylacetonate [Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac)] doped HTL to stimulate radiative decay, preventing thermal degradation in HTL. The ESL effectively prevented non-radiative decay of leakage electron in HTL by converting non-radiative decay to radiative decay via a phosphorescent red emitter, Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac). The lifetime of device (t{sub 95}: time after 5% decrease of luminance) has been increased from 75 h to 120 h by using the ESL in a phosphorescent green-emitting OLED.

  3. Pink light emitting long-lasting phosphorescence in Sm 3+-doped CdSiO 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bingfu; Liu, Yingliang; Liu, Jie; Ye, Zeren; Shi, Chunshan

    2004-04-01

    Novel pink light emitting long-lasting afterglow CdSiO 3:Sm 3+ phosphors are prepared by the conventional high-temperature solid-state method and their luminescent properties are investigated. XRD and photoluminescence (PL) spectra are used to characterize the synthesized phosphors. The phosphors are well crystallized by calcinations at 1050°C for 5 h. These phosphors emit pink light and show long-lasting phosphorescence after they are excited with 254 nm ultraviolet light. The phosphorescence lasts for nearly 5 h in the light perception of the dark-adapted human eye (0.32 mcd/m 2). The phosphorescence mechanism is also investigated. All the results indicate that these phosphors have promising potential practical applications.

  4. Phosphorescent dye-based supramolecules for high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Lee, Sunghun; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Sei-Yong; Park, Young-Seo; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Woo Lee, Jin; Huh, June; You, Youngmin; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2014-09-10

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are among the most promising organic semiconductor devices. The recently reported external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of 29-30% for green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are considered to be near the limit for isotropically oriented iridium complexes. The preferred orientation of transition dipole moments has not been thoroughly considered for phosphorescent OLEDs because of the lack of an apparent driving force for a molecular arrangement in all but a few cases, even though horizontally oriented transition dipoles can result in efficiencies of over 30%. Here we use quantum chemical calculations to show that the preferred orientation of the transition dipole moments of heteroleptic iridium complexes (HICs) in OLEDs originates from the preferred direction of the HIC triplet transition dipole moments and the strong supramolecular arrangement within the co-host environment. We also demonstrate an unprecedentedly high EQE of 35.6% when using HICs with phosphorescent transition dipole moments oriented in the horizontal direction.

  5. Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Fluorinated Aromatic Sulfonyl Group with Nearly Unity Phosphorescent Quantum Yields and Outstanding Electroluminescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Yu, Yue; Yang, Xiaolong; Yan, Xiaogang; Zhang, Huiming; Xu, Xianbin; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin; Ren, Yixia; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2015-11-11

    A series of heteroleptic functional Ir(III) complexes bearing different fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl groups has been synthesized. Their photophysical features, electrochemical behaviors, and electroluminescent (EL) properties have been characterized in detail. These complexes emit intense yellow phosphorescence with exceptionally high quantum yields (ΦP > 0.9) at room temperature, and the emission maxima of these complexes can be finely tuned depending upon the number of the fluorine substituents on the pendant phenyl ring of the sulfonyl group. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties and electron injection/transporting (EI/ET) abilities of these Ir(III) phosphors can also be effectively tuned by the fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl group to furnish some desired characters for enhancing the EL performance. Hence, the maximum luminance efficiency (ηL) of 81.2 cd A(-1), corresponding to power efficiency (ηP) of 64.5 lm W(-1) and external quantum efficiency (ηext) of 19.3%, has been achieved, indicating the great potential of these novel phosphors in the field of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Furthermore, a clear picture has been drawn for the relationship between their optoelectronic properties and chemical structures. These results should provide important information for developing highly efficient phosphors.

  6. Kinetic analysis of the simultaneous nondispersive extraction and back-extraction of chromium(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, I.; Galan, B.; Irabien, A.

    1996-04-01

    This work has been focused on the study of the viability and kinetics of Cr(6) removal from industrial waste waters and simultaneous concentration for its reuse in electroplating processes, working with liquid-liquid systems in two hollow-fiber (HF) modules, and using Aliquat 336 as an organic carrier. For the kinetic analysis of the non-steady-state system the macroscopic mass balances of the chromium in the fluid phases into HF modules were developed and solved simultaneously with the mass balances in the homogenization stirred tanks. An optimization procedure to calculate the mass transport parameters was developed, leading to the value K{sub m} = 1.92 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s (membrane mass-transport coefficient). In the extraction process a kinetic mass-transfer parameter depending on the experimental conditions was obtained.

  7. Automated analysis of single and joint kinetic and morphologic features for non-masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2012-06-01

    The evaluation of kinetic and/or morphologic characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have not well-dened and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these diculties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphologic descriptors separately, and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions. We additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  8. Thermal Decomposition of Thermoelectric Material CoSb3: A Thermogravimetry Kinetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fang; He, Qingli; Hu, Dinxu; Gao, Feng; Song, Hongzhang; Jia, Jianfeng; Hu, Xing

    2013-08-01

    The thermal decomposition of the thermoelectric CoSb3 alloy was investigated using thermogravimetry (TG). TG curves obtained in inert gas flow with different heating rates were used to perform kinetic analysis based on the Arrhenius equation. Kinetic parameters, such as the effective activation energy, the pre-exponential factor, and the kinetic model function f(α ) , were obtained using the Freeman-Carroll method, the multiheating rates method, and the Coats-Redfern equation. The activation energy was found to be around 200 kJ/mol, and the reaction mechanism for the decomposition of CoSb3 alloy mostly obeys the second-order chemical decomposition process f(α ) = (1 - α )2.

  9. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raswan, T. R.; Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  10. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Raswan, T. R. Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-30

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  11. Stochastic kinetic analysis of developmental pathway bifurcation in phage lambda-infected Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Arkin, A; Ross, J; McAdams, H H

    1998-08-01

    Fluctuations in rates of gene expression can produce highly erratic time patterns of protein production in individual cells and wide diversity in instantaneous protein concentrations across cell populations. When two independently produced regulatory proteins acting at low cellular concentrations competitively control a switch point in a pathway, stochastic variations in their concentrations can produce probabilistic pathway selection, so that an initially homogeneous cell population partitions into distinct phenotypic subpopulations. Many pathogenic organisms, for example, use this mechanism to randomly switch surface features to evade host responses. This coupling between molecular-level fluctuations and macroscopic phenotype selection is analyzed using the phage lambda lysis-lysogeny decision circuit as a model system. The fraction of infected cells selecting the lysogenic pathway at different phage:cell ratios, predicted using a molecular-level stochastic kinetic model of the genetic regulatory circuit, is consistent with experimental observations. The kinetic model of the decision circuit uses the stochastic formulation of chemical kinetics, stochastic mechanisms of gene expression, and a statistical-thermodynamic model of promoter regulation. Conventional deterministic kinetics cannot be used to predict statistics of regulatory systems that produce probabilistic outcomes. Rather, a stochastic kinetic analysis must be used to predict statistics of regulatory outcomes for such stochastically regulated systems.

  12. Comparative kinetic analysis of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Rokhina, Ekaterina V; Repo, Eveliina; Virkutyte, Jurate

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic study of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol in water was performed to qualitatively assess the effect of ultrasound on the process kinetics. Various kinetic parameters such as the apparent kinetic rate constants, the surface utilization coefficient and activation energy of phenol oxidation over RuI(3) catalyst were investigated. Comparative analysis revealed that the use of ultrasound irradiation reduced the energy barrier of the reaction but had no impact on the reaction pathway. The activation energy for the oxidation of phenol over RuI(3) catalyst in the presence of ultrasound was found to be 13kJmol(-1), which was four times smaller in comparison to the silent oxidation process (57kJmol(-1)). Finally, 'figures-of-merit' was utilized to assess different experimental strategies such as sonolysis alone, H(2)O(2)-enhanced sonolysis and sono-catalytic oxidation of phenol in order to estimate the electric energy consumption based on the kinetic rate constants of the oxidation process.

  13. An explicit expression for determining cometabolism kinetics using progress curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Goudar, Chetan T

    2012-05-31

    We present an explicit expression for describing the kinetics of cometabolic biotransformation of environmental pollutants. This expression is based on the Lambert W function and explicitly relates the substrate concentration, S, to time, t, the two experimentally measured variables. This explicit relationship simplifies kinetic parameter estimation as differential equation solution and iterative estimation of the substrate concentration are eliminated. The applicability of this new expression for nonlinear kinetic parameter estimation was first demonstrated using noise containing synthetic data where final estimates of the kinetic parameters were very close to their actual values. Subsequently 1.1.1-trichloroethane degradation data at initial concentrations of 750 and 375 μM were described using the explicit expression resulting in r and K(s) estimates of 0.26 μM/mg d and 28.08 μM and 0.30 μM/mg d and 28.70 μM, respectively, very similar to 0.276 μM/mg d and 31.2 μM, respectively, that were reported in the original study. The new explicit expression presented in this study simplifies estimation of cometabolic kinetic parameters and can be easily used across all computational platforms thereby providing an attractive alternative for progress curve analysis.

  14. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Analysis of Acetyl-CoA Activation of Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Westerhold, Lauren E; Bridges, Lance C; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Zeczycki, Tonya N

    2017-07-11

    Allosteric regulation of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) activity is pivotal to maintaining metabolic homeostasis. In contrast, dysregulated PC activity contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, rendering PC a possible target for allosteric therapeutic development. Recent research efforts have focused on demarcating the role of acetyl-CoA, one of the most potent activators of PC, in coordinating catalytic events within the multifunctional enzyme. Herein, we report a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of acetyl-CoA activation of the Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC)-catalyzed carboxylation of pyruvate to identify novel means by which acetyl-CoA synchronizes catalytic events within the PC tetramer. Kinetic and linked-function analysis, or thermodynamic linkage analysis, indicates that the substrates of the biotin carboxylase and carboxyl transferase domain are energetically coupled in the presence of acetyl-CoA. In contrast, both kinetic and energetic coupling between the two domains is lost in the absence of acetyl-CoA, suggesting a functional role for acetyl-CoA in facilitating the long-range transmission of substrate-induced conformational changes within the PC tetramer. Interestingly, thermodynamic activation parameters for the SaPC-catalyzed carboxylation of pyruvate are largely independent of acetyl-CoA. Our results also reveal the possibility that global conformational changes give rise to observed species-specific thermodynamic activation parameters. Taken together, our kinetic and thermodynamic results provide a possible allosteric mechanism by which acetyl-CoA coordinates catalysis within the PC tetramer.

  15. A kinetic sensitivity analysis for the SO2 and NOx removal using the electron beam technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolińska, Ewa; Gogulancea, Valentina; Sun, Yongxia; Lavric, Vasile; Chmielewski, Andrzej

    2017-09-01

    The mathematical modeling of the phenomena taking place during the electron beam flue gas treatment is a complex endeavor due to the different time scales of the processes occurring as accelerated electrons are bombarding the flue gas. The paper presents a complex kinetic model for these gas phase interactions, consisting of 1034 chemical reactions with the participation of 115 reactive species. The mathematical model couples the complex gas phase kinetics with a liquid phase kinetic model, taking into account the nucleation and condensation phenomena occurring due to the presence of sulfuric acid. The modeling results for both coupled and uncoupled gas phase kinetics are validated against a set of literature experimental data with satisfactory outcome. The work aims to identify the most important chemical reactions influencing the pollutants removal, proposing a sensitivity analysis using the concept of generated entropy. To the best of the authors' knowledge a sensitivity analysis of this extent has not been performed for the electron beam flue gas treatment. The results of this analysis emphasize the link between the removal efficiencies of NOx and SO2, the importance of hydroxyl radicals and can aid in future model reduction efforts.

  16. Water-soluble triscyclometalated organoiridium complex: phosphorescent nanoparticle formation, nonlinear optics, and application for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuanpeng; Zhao, Jingyi; Yan, Qifan; Chen, Peng R; Zhao, Dahui

    2014-03-12

    Two water-soluble triscyclometalated organoiridium complexes, 1 and 2, with polar side chains that form nanoparticles emitting bright-red phosphorescence in water were synthesized. The optimal emitting properties are related to both the triscyclometalated structure and nanoparticle-forming ability in aqueous solution. Nonlinear optical properties are also observed with the nanoparticles. Because of their proper cellular uptake in addition to high emission brightness and effective two-photon absorbing ability, cell imaging can be achieved with nanoparticles of 2 bearing quaternary ammonium side chains at ultra-low effective concentrations using NIR incident light via the multiphoton excitation phosphorescence process.

  17. Phosphorescence quenching by mechanical stimulus in CaZnOS:Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Dong; Kamimura, Sunao; Xu, Chao-Nan; Fujio, Yuki; Sakata, Yoshitaro; Ueno, Naohiro

    2014-07-07

    We have found that phosphorescence intensity of CaZnOS:Cu decreased visibly under an applied load. This mechanical quenching (MQ) of phosphorescence in CaZnOS:Cu corresponded to the mechanical stimuli. We have thus demonstrated that the MQ of CaZnOS:Cu could be used for visualizing stress distributions in practical applications. We propose that MQ arises from non-radiative recombination due to electron-transfer from trap levels to non-radiative centers as a result of the mechanical load.

  18. Efficiency enhancement of blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes using mixed electron transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Seung Il; Yoon, Ju-An; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Young Kwan; He, Gufeng; Kim, Woo Young

    2015-01-01

    Blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) using mixed electron transport layer (ETL) were fabricated with the device structure of ITO/NPB/mCP:Firpic-8%/TPBi:BCP or TPBi:3TPYMB/Liq/Al to observe mixed ETL's influence on their electrical and optical characteristics. OLED device with mixed ETL of TPBi with BCP or 3TPYMB significantly improved its current efficiency to 30.4 and 34.2 cd/A comparing to 19.8 cd/A of single ETL with BCP only. We examined mixed ETL's capability of electron transport and triplet exciton confinement enhancing phosphorescent OLED's luminance and luminous efficiency.

  19. [Kinetic analysis of drug disposition and biological response].

    PubMed

    Koizumi, T

    2000-05-01

    This review deals with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis of drugs. For the analysis of antipyretics, it was assumed that: (1) The rat body is divided into two compartments, core and skin. (2) Metabolic heat (M) is generated in the core compartment. (3) Heat loss by vaporization (V) is mainly originated from a respiratory effect and occurs in the core compartment. (4) At the skin compartment, heat is gained from the core compartment by conduction (K) and is transferred to the ambient air by radiation and convection. (5) Central nervous system commands efferent signals for M, K and V to change their values according to changes in afferent signals from core and skin temperatures. (6) The effect of antipyretics is shown as afferent signals to the controller. For loop diuretics, it was assumed that: (1) The diuretic rate can be correlated with the urinary excretion rate of diuretics. (2) If there is no intervention in a body fluid regulation system, the relationship between the diuretic rate and the corresponding urinary excretion rate can be described by a Hill equation. (3) Intensity of the body fluid regulation is also described by the Hill equation, in which the intensity is correlated with cumulative amount of drugs excreted in the urine. For neuromuscular blockade, assumptions were: (1) There exists an acetylcholine (ACh) compartment at a motor nerve terminal. (2) ACh in the compartment is eliminated by a first-order rate process. (3) All of the ACh in the compartment is released by one electrical stimulus. (4) The compartment is replenished by two kinds of ACh mobilization. One is a slow mobilization with a constant rate and the other is a momentary mobilization which takes place just after the release of ACh. (5) The released ACh is metabolized immediately after binding to receptors and causing a twitch response. For centrally acting drugs, the quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) method was used as a surrogate measure of a pharmacological response

  20. High Efficancy Integrated Under-Cabinet Phosphorescent OLED

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Hack

    2001-10-31

    In this two year program Universal Display Corporation (UDC) together with the University of Michigan, Teknokon, developed and delivered an energy efficient phosphorescent OLED under cabinet illumination system. Specifically the UDC team goal was in 2011 to deliver five (5) Beta level OLED under cabinet lighting fixtures each consisting of five 6-inch x 6-inch OLED lighting panels, delivering over 420 lumens, at an overall system efficacy of >60 lm/W, a CRI of >85, and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 20,000 hours. During the course of this program, the Team pursued the commercialization of these OLED based under cabinet lighting fixtures, to enable the launch of commercial OLED lighting products. The UDC team was ideally suited to develop these novel and efficient solid state lighting fixtures, having both the technical experience and commercial distribution mechanisms to leverage work performed under this contract. UDC's business strategy is to non-exclusively license its PHOLED technology to lighting manufacturers, and also supply them with our proprietary PHOLED materials. UDC is currently working with several licensees who are manufacturing OLED lighting panels using our technology. During this 2 year program, we further developed our high efficiency white Phosphorescent OLEDs from the first milestone, achieving a 80 lm/W single pixel to the final milestone, achieving an under-cabinet PHOLED lighting system that operates at 56 lm/W at 420 lumens. Each luminaire was comprised of ten 15cm x 7.5cm lighting modules mounted in outcoupling enhancement lenses and a control module. The lamps modules are connected together using either plugs or wires with plugs on each end, allowing for unlimited configurations. The lamps are driven by an OLED driver mounted in an enclosure which includes the AC plug. As a result of advancements gained under this program, the path to move OLED lighting panels from development into manufacturing has been

  1. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  2. Kinetic and phylogenetic analysis of plant polyamine uptake transporters.

    PubMed

    Mulangi, Vaishali; Chibucos, Marcus C; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Morris, Paul F

    2012-10-01

    The rice gene Polyamine Uptake Transporter1 (PUT1) was originally identified based on its homology to the polyamine uptake transporters LmPOT1 and TcPAT12 in Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi, respectively. Here we show that five additional transporters from rice and Arabidopsis that cluster in the same clade as PUT1 all function as high affinity spermidine uptake transporters. Yeast expression assays of these genes confirmed that uptake of spermidine was minimally affected by 166 fold or greater concentrations of amino acids. Characterized polyamine transporters from both Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa along with the two polyamine transporters from L. major and T. cruzi were aligned and used to generate a hidden Markov model. This model was used to identify significant matches to proteins in other angiosperms, bryophytes, chlorophyta, discicristates, excavates, stramenopiles and amoebozoa. No significant matches were identified in fungal or metazoan genomes. Phylogenic analysis showed that some sequences from the haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi, as well as sequences from oomycetes and diatoms clustered closer to sequences from plant genomes than from a homologous sequence in the red algal genome Galdieria sulphuraria, consistent with the hypothesis that these polyamine transporters were acquired by horizontal transfer from green algae. Leishmania and Trypansosoma formed a separate cluster with genes from other Discicristates and two Entamoeba species. We surmise that the genes in Entamoeba species were acquired by phagotrophy of Discicristates. In summary, phylogenetic and functional analysis has identified two clades of genes that are predictive of polyamine transport activity.

  3. The fate of cells in skin: from clonal analysis to cell kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Allon M.; Doupe, David P.; Winton, Douglas J.; Jones, Phil H.; Simons, Benjamin D.

    2007-03-01

    Biologists are keen to understand the mechanisms of development and maintenance of tissues in mammals. As well as its intrinsic scientific interest, an understanding of the kinetics of cell division has important implications for mechanisms of aging and cancer development. Analysis of cell populations (clones) resulting from progenitor cells provides indirect access to the laws governing cell division and fate. Yet, until recently, the quality of clonal fate data acquired in vivo has inhibited reliable quantitative analysis. By addressing a recent, detailed, and extensive experimental study of mammalian skin, we develop a general theoretical framework which shows that the wide range of clonal fate data are consistent with a remarkably simple cell kinetic model. As well as overturning the accepted paradigm for skin maintenance, the analysis introduces a general framework for analysing clone fate data in future experiments. We now have a robust platform to study the effect of drug treatments and the influence of cell mutations on the epidermis.

  4. Automatic network coupling analysis for dynamical systems based on detailed kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Lebiedz, Dirk; Kammerer, Julia; Brandt-Pollmann, Ulrich

    2005-10-01

    We introduce a numerical complexity reduction method for the automatic identification and analysis of dynamic network decompositions in (bio)chemical kinetics based on error-controlled computation of a minimal model dimension represented by the number of (locally) active dynamical modes. Our algorithm exploits a generalized sensitivity analysis along state trajectories and subsequent singular value decomposition of sensitivity matrices for the identification of these dominant dynamical modes. It allows for a dynamic coupling analysis of (bio)chemical species in kinetic models that can be exploited for the piecewise computation of a minimal model on small time intervals and offers valuable functional insight into highly nonlinear reaction mechanisms and network dynamics. We present results for the identification of network decompositions in a simple oscillatory chemical reaction, time scale separation based model reduction in a Michaelis-Menten enzyme system and network decomposition of a detailed model for the oscillatory peroxidase-oxidase enzyme system.

  5. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens.

    PubMed

    Varón, R; García-Moreno, M; Valera-Ruipérez, D; García-Molina, F; García-Cánovas, F; Ladrón-de Guevara, R G; Masiá-Pérez, J; Havsteen, B H

    2006-10-07

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving an uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous route, the time course equation of the concentration of the zymogen and of the activated enzyme have been derived. From these equations, an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the two routes has been carried out for the first time. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect of the initial zymogen and activating enzyme concentrations, on the relative weight. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed. Finally, we apply some of our results to experimental data obtained by other authors in experimental studies of the activation of some aspartic proteinase zymogens.

  6. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-15

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  7. Chemorheological analysis and model-free kinetics of acid catalysed furfuryl alcohol polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guigo, Nathanael; Mija, Alice; Vincent, Luc; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas

    2007-10-21

    The complete curing of furfuryl alcohol (FA), was studied by chemorheological analysis and model-free kinetics under isothermal and non-isothermal modes. Polymerization of FA under acidic catalysis involves complex reactions, with several steps (such as condensations and Diels-Alder cycloadditions). To account for the polymerization complexity, kinetic analysis of DSC data was performed with a model-free isoconversional method. The obtained E(alpha)-dependencies were closely-correlated with the variation of complex viscosity during curing. Linear condensations are predominant during the early curing stage and are followed by two distinct stages of branching cycloadditions. Gelation and vitrification, identified by rheometric measurements, were associated with a decrease of the overall reaction rate that becomes controlled by diffusion of small oligomers. Before vitrification, the rate of crosslinking is limited by the mobility of longer polymer chains and diffusion encounters a large energy barrier due to the cooperative nature of the motions, leading to higher E(alpha) values.

  8. Quantification of DNA repair protein kinetics after γ-irradiation using number and brightness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Poudel, Milan; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2011-03-01

    The kinetics of most proteins involved in DNA damage sensing, signaling and repair following ionizing radiation exposure cannot be quantified by current live cell fluorescence microscopy methods. This is because most of these proteins, with only few notable exceptions, do not attach in large numbers at DNA damage sites to form easily detectable foci in microscopy images. As a result a high fluorescence background from freely moving and immobile fluorescent proteins in the nucleus masks the aggregation of proteins at sparse DNA damage sites. Currently, the kinetics of these repair proteins are studied by laser-induced damage and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching that rely on the detectability of high fluorescence intensity spots of clustered DNA damage. We report on the use of Number and Brightness (N&B) analysis methods as a means to monitor kinetics of DNA repair proteins during sparse DNA damage created by γ-irradiation, which is more relevant to cancer treatment than laser-induced clustered damage. We use two key double strand break repair proteins, namely Ku 70/80 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKCS), as specific examples to showcase the feasibility of the proposed methods to quantify dose-dependent kinetics for DNA repair proteins after exposure to γ-rays.

  9. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer analysis for kinetic determinations of SUMO-specific protease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Song, Yang; Madahar, Vipul; Liao, Jiayu

    2012-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research, and it is a very powerful tool for elucidating protein interactions in either dynamic or steady state. SUMOylation (the process of SUMO [small ubiquitin-like modifier] conjugation to substrates) is an important posttranslational protein modification with critical roles in multiple biological processes. Conjugating SUMO to substrates requires an enzymatic cascade. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as an endopeptidase to process the pre-SUMO or as an isopeptidase to deconjugate SUMO from its substrate. To fully understand the roles of SENPs in the SUMOylation cycle, it is critical to understand their kinetics. Here, we report a novel development of a quantitative FRET-based protease assay for SENP1 kinetic parameter determination. The assay is based on the quantitative analysis of the FRET signal from the total fluorescent signal at acceptor emission wavelength, which consists of three components: donor (CyPet-SUMO1) emission, acceptor (YPet) emission, and FRET signal during the digestion process. Subsequently, we developed novel theoretical and experimental procedures to determine the kinetic parameters, k(cat), K(M), and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) of catalytic domain SENP1 toward pre-SUMO1. Importantly, the general principles of this quantitative FRET-based protease kinetic determination can be applied to other proteases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetic analysis of two-phase enzymatic hydrolysis of hemicellulose of xylan type.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sajal Kanti; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2015-12-01

    We present a coupled experimental and theoretical framework for quantifying the kinetics of two-phase enzymatic hydrolysis of hemicellulose. For xylan loading of 1-5mg/ml, the nature of inhibition by the product xylose (non-competitive), the kinetic constants (Km=3.93 mg/ml, Vmax=0.0252 mg/ml/min) and the xylose inhibition constant (Kx=0.122 mg/ml) are experimentally determined. Our multi-step two-phase kinetic model incorporating enzyme adsorption to the solid substrate and non-competitive product inhibition is simulated using our kinetic data and validated against our experimentally measured temporal dynamics of xylose and reducing sugars. Further experiments show that higher substrate loading reduces the specific adsorption of the endoxylanase to the solid xylan and the enzyme's solid-liquid distribution ratio, which decelerates the solid hydrolysis and accelerates the liquid phase reactions. Thus, the xylose yield increases with substrate loading, which increases product inhibition and decreases reducing sugar yields. An operating cost analysis gives 3mg/ml as the optimal substrate loading. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous cultivation of fission yeast: analysis of single-cell protein synthesis kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Agar, D.W.; Bailey, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    A fundamental problem in microbial reactor analysis is identification of the relation between environment and individual cell metabolic activity. Population balance equations provide a link between experimental measurements of composition frequency functions in microbial populations on the one hand and macromolecule synthesis kinetics and cell division control parameters for single cells on the other. Flow microfluorometry measurements of frequency functions for single-cell protein content in Schizosaccharomyces pombe in balanced exponential growth were analyzed by 2 different methods. One approach utilizes the integrated form of the population balance equation known as the Collins-Richmond equation, and the other method involves optimization of parameters in assumed kinetic and cell division functional forms to fit measured frequency functions with corresponding model solutions. Both data interpretation techniques indicate that rates of protein synthesis increase most in low-protein-content cells as the population specific growth rate increases, leading to parabolic single-cell protein synthesis kinetics at large specific growth rates. Utilization of frequency function data for an asynchronous population is in this case a far more sensitive method for determination of single-cell kinetics than is monitoring the metabolic dynamics of a single cell or, equivalently, synchronous culture analyses.

  12. Raman mapping for kinetic analysis of crystallization of amorphous drug based on distributional images.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Ida, Yasuo; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi

    2014-02-28

    The feasibility of Raman mapping for understanding the crystallization mechanism of an amorphous drug was investigated using described images. The crystallization tendency of amorphous indomethacin under dry condition at 30 °C was kinetically evaluated by means of Raman mapping and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) with change in the calculated crystallinities. Raman images directly revealed the occurrence of particle size-dependent non-uniform crystallization; slow crystallization of large particles, but fast crystallization of small particles. Kinetic analysis by fitting to the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was performed for the crystallization profiles of both Raman mapping and XRPD data. For the Raman mapping data, the distribution of large particles was characterized and examined. The kinetic parameters calculated from the whole Raman image area agreed well with those of XRPD, suggesting accurate prediction of both techniques for the entire crystallization. Raman images revealed the change in the crystallization mechanism for the focused area; the large particles showed a reduced crystallization rate constant and an increase in the dimensional crystal growth exponent. Raman mapping is an attractive tool for quantitative and kinetic investigation of the crystallization mechanism with distributional images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. On-Line Analysis and Kinetic Behavior of Arsenic Release during Coal Combustion and Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fenghua; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zhen; Dai, Jinxin

    2015-11-17

    The kinetic behavior of arsenic (As) release during coal combustion and pyrolysis in a fluidized bed was investigated by applying an on-line analysis system of trace elements in flue gas. This system, based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), was developed to measure trace elements concentrations in flue gas quantitatively and continuously. Obvious variations of arsenic concentration in flue gas were observed during coal combustion and pyrolysis, indicating strong influences of atmosphere and temperature on arsenic release behavior. Kinetic laws governing the arsenic release during coal combustion and pyrolysis were determined based on the results of instantaneous arsenic concentration in flue gas. A second-order kinetic law was determined for arsenic release during coal combustion, and the arsenic release during coal pyrolysis followed a fourth-order kinetic law. The results showed that the arsenic release rate during coal pyrolysis was faster than that during coal combustion. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to identify the forms of arsenic in vapor and solid phases during coal combustion and pyrolysis, respectively. Ca3(AsO4)2 and Ca(AsO2)2 are the possible species resulting from As-Ca interaction during coal combustion. Ca(AsO2)2 is the most probable species during coal pyrolysis.

  14. Multifunctional Phosphorescent Conjugated Polymer Dots for Hypoxia Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Liang, Hua; Jiang, Pengfei; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Tianshe; Yang, Lijuan; Lv, Wen; Yu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) plays a key role in many physiological processes, and becomes a toxicant to kill cells when excited to 1O2. Intracellular O2 levels, or the degree of hypoxia, are always viewed as an indicator of cancers. Due to the highly efficient cancer therapy ability and low side effect, photodynamic therapy (PDT) becomes one of the most promising treatments for cancers. Herein, an early‐stage diagnosis and therapy system is reported based on the phosphorescent conjugated polymer dots (Pdots) containing Pt(II) porphyrin as an oxygen‐responsive phosphorescent group and 1O2 photosensitizer. Intracellular hypoxia detection has been investigated. Results show that cells treated with Pdots display longer lifetimes under hypoxic conditions, and time‐resolved luminescence images exhibit a higher signal‐to‐noise ratio after gating off the short‐lived background fluorescence. Quantification of O2 is realized by the ratiometric emission intensity of phosphorescence/fluorescence and the lifetime of phosphorescence. Additionally, the PDT efficiency of Pdots is estimated by flow cytometry, MTT cell viability assay, and in situ imaging of PDT induced cell death. Interestingly, Pdots exhibit a high PDT efficiency and would be promising in clinical applications. PMID:27722081

  15. A Brief History of Fluorescence and Phosphorescence before the Emergence of Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valeur, Bernard; Berberan-Santos, Mario N.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence and phosphorescence are two forms of photoluminescence used in modern research and in practical applications. The early observations of these phenomena, before the emergence of quantum theory, highlight the investigation into the mechanism of light emission. In contrast to incandescence, photoluminescence does not require high…

  16. Molecular Engineering of Host Materials for Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs: Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip K.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Rainbolt, James E.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2010-04-15

    We report molecular design considerations for blue phosphorescent host materials, as well as propose design rules necessary to build ambipolar hosts and thus reach charge balance in a device. Our beginning developments are presented followed by the evolution of the original design to our state-of-the-art, with the help of computational modeling.

  17. Novel carbazole/fluorene hybrids: host materials for blue phosphorescent OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ping-I; Chiang, Chih-Long; Dixit, Ajay Kumar; Chen, Ching-Kun; Yuan, Mao-Chuan; Lee, Rei-Yuen; Chen, Chin-Ti; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Shu, Ching-Fong

    2006-06-22

    [reaction: see text] A series of carbazole/fluorene (CBZm-Fn) hybrids were effectively synthesized through Friedel-Crafts-type substitution of the carbazole rings. These compounds were thermally and morphologically stable host materials for OLED applications. Efficient blue phosphorescent OLEDs were obtained when employing CBZ1-F2 as the host and FIrpic as the guest.

  18. Phosphorescent probes for two-photon microscopy of oxygen (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Esipova, Tatiana V.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to quantify oxygen in vivo in 3D with high spatial and temporal resolution is much needed in many areas of biological research. Our laboratory has been developing the phosphorescence quenching technique for biological oximetry - an optical method that possesses intrinsic microscopic capability. In the past we have developed dendritically protected oxygen probes for quantitative imaging of oxygen in tissue. More recently we expanded our design on special two-photon enhanced phosphorescent probes. These molecules brought about first demonstrations of the two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy (2PLM) of oxygen in vivo, providing new information for neouroscience and stem cell biology. However, current two-photon oxygen probes suffer from a number of limitations, such as sub-optimal brightness and high cost of synthesis, which dramatically reduce imaging performance and limit usability of the method. In this paper we discuss principles of 2PLM and address the interplay between the probe chemistry, photophysics and spatial and temporal imaging resolution. We then present a new approach to brightly phosphorescent chromophores with internally enhanced two-photon absorption cross-sections, which pave a way to a new generation of 2PLM probes.

  19. Crystal induced phosphorescence from Benz(a)anthracene microcrystals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Maity, Samir; Mazumdar, Prativa; Shyamal, Milan; Sahoo, Gobinda Prasad; Misra, Ajay

    2016-03-15

    Pure organic compounds that are also phosphorescent at room temperature are very rare in literature. Here, we report efficient phosphorescence emission from aggregated hydrosol of Benz(a)anthracene (BaA) at room temperature. Aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been synthesized by re-precipitation method and SDS is used as morphology directing agent. Morphology of the particles is characterized using optical and scanning electronic microcopy (SEM). Photophysical properties of the aggregated hydrosol are carried out using UV-vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence study. The large stoke shifted structured emission from aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been explained due to phosphorescence emission of BaA at room temperature. In the crystalline state, the restricted intermolecular motions (RIM) such as rotations and vibrations are activated by crystal lattice. This rigidification effect makes the chromophore phosphorescent at room temperature. The possible stacking arrangement of the neighboring BaA within the aggregates has been substantiated by computing second order Fukui parameter as local reactivity descriptors. Computational study also reveals that the neighboring BaA molecules are present in parallel slipped conformation in its aggregated crystalline form.

  20. Crystal induced phosphorescence from Benz(a)anthracene microcrystals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Samir; Mazumdar, Prativa; Shyamal, Milan; Sahoo, Gobinda Prasad; Misra, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Pure organic compounds that are also phosphorescent at room temperature are very rare in literature. Here, we report efficient phosphorescence emission from aggregated hydrosol of Benz(a)anthracene (BaA) at room temperature. Aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been synthesized by re-precipitation method and SDS is used as morphology directing agent. Morphology of the particles is characterized using optical and scanning electronic microcopy (SEM). Photophysical properties of the aggregated hydrosol are carried out using UV-vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence study. The large stoke shifted structured emission from aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been explained due to phosphorescence emission of BaA at room temperature. In the crystalline state, the restricted intermolecular motions (RIM) such as rotations and vibrations are activated by crystal lattice. This rigidification effect makes the chromophore phosphorescent at room temperature. The possible stacking arrangement of the neighboring BaA within the aggregates has been substantiated by computing second order Fukui parameter as local reactivity descriptors. Computational study also reveals that the neighboring BaA molecules are present in parallel slipped conformation in its aggregated crystalline form.

  1. A phosphorescent rhenium(I) histone deacetylase inhibitor: mitochondrial targeting and paraptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Lin, Yan-Nan; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-05-14

    In this report, we designed a histone deacetylase-targeted phosphorescent Re(I) complex ReLMito. Colocalization studies suggested that ReLMito could specially localize to mitochondria. We also demonstrated that ReLMito could induce paraptosis in cancer cells. These features endowed the complex with potential to induce and monitor mitochondrial morphological changes during the paraptosis simultaneously.

  2. Photochemistry in polymer solids. Decay of benzophenone phosphorescence in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Kazuyuki; Mita, Itaru

    1982-11-01

    Decay curves and lifetimes of benzophenone phosphorescence in PMMA at 80-433 K significantly reflect the change in molecular motion of the matrix polymer such as glass transition, α' transition, and β transition. The non-exponential decay observed at temperatures between Tβ and Tg is attributed to the intermolecular quenching of benzophenone triplet by carbonyl group in the side chain of PMMA.

  3. Second-sphere coordination-induced morphology transformation from phosphorescent nanowires to microcubes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fengfeng; Ma, Yunsheng; Zhou, Zhiguo; Qin, Lijie; Lu, Yang; Yang, Hong; Yang, Shiping

    2015-02-21

    Nanowires of a pyridyl-functionalized iridium complex are transformed into microcubes as a result of hydrogen-bond-assisted second-sphere coordination between pyridyl groups and monovalent anions of 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H2BTC(-)). This is accompanied by a blue-shift of the phosphorescence from 662 to 638 nm.

  4. Phosphorescent Imaging of Living Cells Using a Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Fu, Wai-Chung; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Fong, Wang-Fun; Chung, Lai-Hon; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2013-01-01

    A cell permeable cyclometalated iridium(III) complex has been developed as a phosphorescent probe for cell imaging. The iridium(III) solvato complex [Ir(phq)2(H2O]2)] preferentially stains the cytoplasm of both live and dead cells with a bright luminescence. PMID:23457478

  5. Mitochondria-targeting phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes for living cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingqing; Cao, Rui; Fei, Hao; Zhou, Ming

    2014-11-28

    Two phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes conjugated to a lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation moiety, IrMitoOlivine and IrMitoNIR, were synthesized. The complexes show high mitochondria-specificity and relatively lower cytotoxicity. Time-lapse confocal imaging indicates that both complexes exhibit an excellent anti-photobleaching capability under continuous laser irradiation.

  6. Visible-Light-Excited Ultralong Organic Phosphorescence by Manipulating Intermolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Suzhi; Shi, Huifang; Li, Jiewei; Gu, Long; Ni, Yun; Cheng, Zhichao; Wang, Shan; Xiong, Wei-Wei; Li, Lin; An, Zhongfu; Huang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Visible light is much more available and less harmful than ultraviolet light, but ultralong organic phosphorescence (UOP) with visible-light excitation remains a formidable challenge. Here, a concise chemical approach is provided to obtain bright UOP by tuning the molecular packing in the solid state under irradiation of available visible light, e.g., a cell phone flashlight under ambient conditions (room temperature and in air). The excitation spectra exhibit an obvious redshift via the incorporation of halogen atoms to tune intermolecular interactions. UOP is achieved through H-aggregation to stabilize the excited triplet state, with a high phosphorescence efficiency of 8.3% and a considerably long lifetime of 0.84 s. Within a brightness of 0.32 mcd m(-2) that can be recognized by the naked eye, UOP can last for 104 s in total. Given these features, ultralong organic phosphorescent materials are used to successfully realize dual data encryption and decryption. Moreover, well-dispersed UOP nanoparticles are prepared by polymer-matrix encapsulation in an aqueous solution, and their applications in bioimaging are tentatively being studied. This result will pave the way toward expanding metal-free organic phosphorescent materials and their applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum thin film as ETL in efficient green phosphorescent OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, K.; Kim, Yun-Hi; Kwon, Soon-Ki

    2013-02-01

    Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum thin film as ETL in green phosphorescent OLEDs improves the device performances to a maximum of 34.2 cd/A, 11.3% with the maximum brightness of 63,150 cd/m2 and broadens the device emission in yellow-green region suitable in the white OLEDs for the lighting applications.

  8. Fast responsive and highly efficient optical upconverter based on phosphorescent OLED.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xinbo; Guan, Min; Niu, Litao; Zeng, Yiping; Li, Yiyang; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Zhanping; Wang, Baoqiang

    2014-11-12

    In this work, an organic-inorganic hybrid optical upconverter that can convert irradiated 980 nm IR light to 510 nm green phosphorescence sensitively was fabricated and studied. fac-Tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy)3) doped 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CBP) was used as emitting layer in the phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) unit. The upconverter using a phosphorescent OLED as display unit can achieve a higher upconversion efficiency and a low power consumption when compared with the one using fluorescent. An upconversion efficiency of 4.8% can be achieved for phosphorescent device at 15 V, much higher than that of fluorescent one (2.0%). The upconverter's transient optical and electric response to IR pulse were also investigated for the first time. The response time was found to be influenced by IR intensity and applied voltage. It has a response time as short as 60 μs. The rapid response property of the upconverter makes it feasible to be applied to high-speed IR imaging systems.

  9. A Brief History of Fluorescence and Phosphorescence before the Emergence of Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valeur, Bernard; Berberan-Santos, Mario N.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence and phosphorescence are two forms of photoluminescence used in modern research and in practical applications. The early observations of these phenomena, before the emergence of quantum theory, highlight the investigation into the mechanism of light emission. In contrast to incandescence, photoluminescence does not require high…

  10. The derivative assay--an analysis of two fast components of DNA rejoining kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The DNA rejoining kinetics of human U-118 MG cells were studied after gamma-irradiation with 4 Gy. The analysis of the sealing rate of the induced DNA strand breaks was made with a modification of the DNA unwinding technique. The modification meant that rather than just monitoring the number of existing breaks at each time of analysis, the velocity, at which the rejoining process proceeded, was determined. Two apparent first-order components of single-strand break repair could be identified during the 25 min of analysis. The half-times for the two components were 1.9 and 16 min, respectively.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, Albert H.; Cobb, Charles E.; Beechem, Joseph M.

    1992-04-01

    A spin-labeled derivative of eosin was chemically synthesized from 5-aminoeosin and the nitroxide spin label 2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl-3-carboxylic acid. Following determination of the chemical identity of the spin-labeled eosin (5-SLE) by FAB mass spectroscopy, its optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopic properties were characterized in aqueous solution and compared to a diamagnetic eosin derivative, 5-acetamido eosin (5- AcE). The visible light absorption maximum of 5-SLE was 518 nm, the same as for 5-AcE. The fluorescence quantum yield of 5-SLE was only reduced by approximately 10% relative to 5-AcE, and the fluorescence lifetime was marginally reduced relative to 5-AcE. The phosphorescence lifetime and yield for 5-SLE were very similar to those for 5-AcE. The phosphorescence yield of 5-SLE bound noncovalently to BSA was reduced by approximately 60% relative to 5-AcE, and the phosphorescence lifetime reduced from approximately 2.4 msec (5-AcE) to 1.6 msec (5-SLE). Reduction of the nitroxide moiety of the 5-SLE with sodium ascorbate resulted in minimal changes in the fluorescence and phosphorescence quantum yields and lifetimes. This indicated that the unpaired electron of the nitroxide spin label did not seriously affect the optical spectroscopic characteristics of the spin-labeled eosin molecule. The quantum yields and lifetimes of 5-SLE were still quite acceptable for time- resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence studies. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of 5-SLE in aqueous solution has a lineshape consistent with a molecule the size of 5-SLE undergoing rapid rotational reorientation. When bound to BSA, the EPR spectrum of 5-SLE was broadened to a near slow motion limit for EPR, as expected for the relatively slowly rotating protein-5-SLE complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy and saturation transfer EPR (ST-EPR) experiments with samples of 5-SLE bound to BSA in solutions of varying glycerol concentrations at 2

  12. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Guillermo Bazan; Alexander Mikhailovsky

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop the fundamental understanding and practical techniques for enhancement of Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) performance by utilizing radiative decay control technology. Briefly, the main technical goal is the acceleration of radiative recombination rate in organometallic triplet emitters by using the interaction with surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures. Increased photonic output will enable one to eliminate constraints imposed on PhOLED efficiency by triplet-triplet annihilation, triplet-polaron annihilation, and saturation of chromophores with long radiative decay times. Surface plasmon enhanced (SPE) PhOLEDs will operate more efficiently at high injection current densities and will be less prone to degradation mechanisms. Additionally, introduction of metal nanostructures into PhOLEDs may improve their performance due to the improvement of the charge transport through organic layers via multiple possible mechanisms ('electrical bridging' effects, doping-like phenomena, etc.). SPE PhOLED technology is particularly beneficial for solution-fabricated electrophosphorescent devices. Small transition moment of triplet emitters allows achieving a significant enhancement of the emission rate while keeping undesirable quenching processes introduced by the metal nanostructures at a reasonably low level. Plasmonic structures can be introduced easily into solution-fabricated PhOLEDs by blending and spin coating techniques and can be used for enhancement of performance in existing device architectures. This constitutes a significant benefit for a large scale fabrication of PhOLEDs, e.g. by roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Besides multieexciton annihilation, the power efficacy of PhOLEDs is often limited by high operational bias voltages required for overcoming built-in potential barriers to injection and transport of electrical charges through a device. This problem is especially

  13. Binding of naproxen enantiomers to human serum albumin studied by fluorescence and room-temperature phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, Ivonne; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Ariese, Freek; Miranda, Miguel A.; Gooijer, Cees

    2013-03-01

    The interaction of the enantiomers of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen (NPX) with human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated using fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy in the steady-state and time-resolved mode. The absorption, fluorescence excitation, and fluorescence emission spectra of (S)-NPX and (R)-NPX differ in shape in the presence of HSA, indicating that these enantiomers experience a different environment when bound. In solutions containing 0.2 M KI, complexation with HSA results in a strongly increased NPX fluorescence intensity and a decreased NPX phosphorescence intensity due to the inhibition of the collisional interaction with the heavy atom iodide. Fluorescence intensity curves obtained upon selective excitation of NPX show 8-fold different slopes for bound and free NPX. No significant difference in the binding constants of (3.8 ± 0.6) × 105 M-1 for (S)-NPX and (3.9 ± 0.6) × 105 M-1 for (R)-NPX was found. Furthermore, the addition of NPX quenches the phosphorescence of the single tryptophan in HSA (Trp-214) based on Dexter energy transfer. The short-range nature of this mechanism explains the upward curvature of the Stern-Volmer plot observed for HSA: At low concentrations NPX binds to HSA at a distance from Trp-214 and no quenching occurs, whereas at high NPX concentrations the phosphorescence intensity decreases due to dynamic quenching by NPX diffusing into site I from the bulk solution. The dynamic quenching observed in the Stern-Volmer plots based on the longest phosphorescence lifetime indicates an overall binding constant to HSA of about 3 × 105 M-1 for both enantiomers.

  14. A specific Tween-80-Rhodamine S-MWNTs phosphorescent reagent for the detection of trace calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Jiao, Li; Cui, Ma-Lin; Jiang, Shu-Lian; Lin, Shao-Qin

    2012-09-26

    The present study proposed a simple sensitive and specific immunoassay for the quantification of calcitonin (CT) in human serum with water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The COOH group of MWNTs could react with the NH group of rhodamine S (Rhod.S) molecules to form Rhod.S-MWNTs, which could emit room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on acetate cellulose membrane (ACM) and react with Tween-80 to form micellar compound. Tween-80-Rhod.S-MWNTs (TRM), as a phosphorescent labelling reagent, could dramatically enhance the RTP signal of the system. The developed TRM phosphorescent reagent was used to label anti-calcitonin antibody (Ab(CT)) to form the TRM-Ab(CT) labelling product, which could take high specific immunoreaction with CT, and the ΔI(p) (= I(p2)-I(p1), I(p2) and I(p1) were the phosphorescence intensity of the test solution and the blank sample, respectively) of the system was linear to the content of CT. Hence, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence immunoassay (SSRTPIA) was established for the determination of CT in human serum. This sensitive (limit of quantification (LOQ) was 8.0×10(-14) g mL(-1)), accurate, selective and precise method has been applied to determine CT in human serum and predict primary osteoporosis and fractures, with the results in good agreement with those obtained by chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA). Simultaneously, the structure of MWNTs was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR), and the reaction mechanisms of both labelling Ab(CT) with TRM and SSRTPIA for the determination of trace CT were discussed.

  15. Ultra-sensitive complex as phosphorescence probe for the determination of trace protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Jiang, Shu-Lian; Cui, Ma-Lin; Jiao, Li; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2013-02-01

    β-CD-HMTA-L-Tyr complex, formed in the host guest inclusion reaction carried out between host molecule β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in β-CD-HMTA (HMTA is methenamine) and guest molecule L-tryptophan (L-Tyr), possessing the characteristic of room temperature phosphorescence (RTP). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reacted with L-Tyr to form a complex of cage structure bringing in the sharply RTP signal quenching of L-Tyr. Based on the above facts, a new ultra-sensitive solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of trace protein has been established using β-CD-HMTA-L-Tyr complex as a phosphorescence probe. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range of this method was 0.0040-0.56 agspot(-1) with a detection limit (D.L.) as 0.92 zgspot(-1), and the regression equations of working curve was ΔI(p)=0.8239+162.5 m(BSA) (agspot(-1), n=8) with the correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9994. The relatively standard deviation (RSD) and the recovery of SSRTP were 4.8-3.3% and 96.7-102%, respectively, indicating that this method had good repeatability. The proposed phosphorescence probe has been applied in the detection of protein in real samples and the results agreed well with those obtained with SSRTP using methylene blue-sodium tetraphenylborate as phosphorescence probe. Meanwhile, the reaction mechanism for the determination of trace protein with β-CD-HMTA-L-Tyr complex as phosphorescence probe has been discussed.

  16. Microscopic basis for kinetic gating in Cytochrome c oxidase: insights from QM/MM analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Puja; Yang, Shuo; Cui, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of vectorial proton pumping in biomolecules requires establishing the microscopic basis for the regulation of both thermodynamic and kinetic features of the relevant proton transfer steps. For the proton pump cytochrome c oxidase, while the regulation of thermodynamic driving force for key proton transfers has been discussed in great detail, the microscopic basis for the control of proton transfer kinetics has been poorly understood. Here we carry out extensive QM/MM free energy simulations to probe the kinetics of relevant proton transfer steps and analyze the effects of local structure and hydration level. We show that protonation of the proton loading site (PLS, taken to be a propionate of heme a3) requires a concerted process in which a key glutamic acid (Glu286H) delivers the proton to the PLS while being reprotonated by an excess proton coming from the D-channel. The concerted nature of the mechanism is a crucial feature that enables the loading of the PLS before the cavity containing Glu286 is better hydrated to lower its pKa to experimentally measured range; the charged rather than dipolar nature of the process also ensures a tight coupling with heme a reduction, as emphasized by Siegbahn and Blomberg. In addition, we find that rotational flexibility of the PLS allows its protonation before that of the binuclear center (the site where oxygen gets reduced to water). Together with our recent study (P. Goyal, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 110:18886-18891, 2013) that focused on the modulation of Glu286 pKa, the current work suggests a mechanism that builds in a natural sequence for the protonation of the PLS prior to that of the binuclear center. This provides microscopic support to the kinetic constraints revealed by kinetic network analysis as essential elements that ensure an efficient vectorial proton transport in cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:25678950

  17. Branched pore kinetic model analysis of geosmin adsorption on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-07-01

    Super-powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) is activated carbon of much finer particle size than powdered activated carbon (PAC). Geosmin is a naturally occurring taste and odor compound that impairs aesthetic quality in drinking water. Experiments on geosmin adsorption on S-PAC and PAC were conducted, and the results using adsorption kinetic models were analyzed. PAC pulverization, which produced the S-PAC, did not change geosmin adsorption capacity, and geosmin adsorption capacities did not differ between S-PAC and PAC. Geosmin adsorption kinetics, however, were much higher on S-PAC than on PAC. A solution to the branched pore kinetic model (BPKM) was developed, and experimental adsorption kinetic data were analyzed by BPKM and by a homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM). The HSDM describing the adsorption behavior of geosmin required different surface diffusivity values for S-PAC and PAC, which indicated a decrease in surface diffusivity apparently associated with activated carbon particle size. The BPKM, consisting of macropore diffusion followed by mass transfer from macropore to micropore, successfully described the batch adsorption kinetics on S-PAC and PAC with the same set of model parameter values, including surface diffusivity. The BPKM simulation clearly showed geosmin removal was improved as activated carbon particle size decreased. The simulation also implied that the rate-determining step in overall mass transfer shifted from intraparticle radial diffusion in macropores to local mass transfer from macropore to micropore. Sensitivity analysis showed that adsorptive removal of geosmin improved with decrease in activated carbon particle size down to 1microm, but further particle size reduction produced little improvement.

  18. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei Trypanothione Synthetase by Kinetic Analysis and Computational Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Alejandro E.; Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Krauth-Siegel, R. Luise

    2013-01-01

    In pathogenic trypanosomes, trypanothione synthetase (TryS) catalyzes the synthesis of both glutathionylspermidine (Gsp) and trypanothione (bis(glutathionyl)spermidine (T(SH)2)). Here we present a thorough kinetic analysis of Trypanosoma brucei TryS in a newly developed phosphate buffer system at pH 7.0 and 37 °C, mimicking the physiological environment of the enzyme in the cytosol of bloodstream parasites. Under these conditions, TryS displays Km values for GSH, ATP, spermidine, and Gsp of 34, 18, 687, and 32 μm, respectively, as well as Ki values for GSH and T(SH)2 of 1 mm and 360 μm, respectively. As Gsp hydrolysis has a Km value of 5.6 mm, the in vivo amidase activity is probably negligible. To obtain deeper insight in the molecular mechanism of TryS, we have formulated alternative kinetic models, with elementary reaction steps represented by linear kinetic equations. The model parameters were fitted to the extensive matrix of steady-state data obtained for different substrate/product combinations under the in vivo-like conditions. The best model describes the full kinetic profile and is able to predict time course data that were not used for fitting. This system's biology approach to enzyme kinetics led us to conclude that (i) TryS follows a ter-reactant mechanism, (ii) the intermediate Gsp dissociates from the enzyme between the two catalytic steps, and (iii) T(SH)2 inhibits the enzyme by remaining bound at its product site and, as does the inhibitory GSH, by binding to the activated enzyme complex. The newly detected concerted substrate and product inhibition suggests that TryS activity is tightly regulated. PMID:23814051

  19. Kinetic Analysis of the Digestion of Bovine Type I Collagen Telopeptides with Porcine Pepsin.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Okada, Yukari; Ogura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Keisuke; Hattori, Shunji; Ito, Shinji; Satoh, Junko; Takita, Teisuke; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is frequently digested using pepsin in industries to produce a triple helical collagen without the N- and C-terminal telopeptides. However, kinetic analysis of this reaction is difficult because several Lys residues in the N- and in the C-terminal telopeptides form covalent bonds, leading to multiple substrates species, and pepsin cleaves collagen at various sites in the N-terminal and in the C-terminal telopeptides, yielding different products. Here we performed kinetic analysis of the digestion of bovine type I collagen with porcine pepsin. The reaction could be monitored by SDS-PAGE by measuring the intensity of the protein bands corresponding to the variant β11 chain. We obtained kinetic parameters relative to the decrease in the variant β11 chain upon digestion. At pH 4.0, the Km and kcat values increased with increasing temperature (30 to 65 °C), although the kcat /Km values were stable. Additional cleavage at the helical region was detected at 45 to 65 °C. At 37 °C, the Km and kcat values increased with decreasing pH, and the kcat /Km values at pH 2.1 to 4.5 were stable and higher than those at pH 5.0 and 5.5. No additional cleavage was detected at the examined pH. Thus, the optimal pH and temperatures for selective digestion of collagen telopeptides with pepsin are 2.1 to 4.5 and 30 to 40 °C, respectively. These results suggest that the method might be useful for the kinetic analysis of the digestion of collagen telopeptides with pepsin.

  20. A comprehensive analysis of the influence of drug binding kinetics on drug action at molecular and systems levels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ning; Pei, Jianfeng; Lai, Luhua

    2013-06-01

    Binding kinetics is closely related to the efficacy of drugs. Several aspects of binding kinetics, such as long residence or frequent dissociation, have been proposed to affect drug properties such as efficacy, selectivity, and multi-target potency. However, a comprehensive and balanced study of binding kinetics in various scenarios is still needed. We performed a comprehensive computational analysis of the role of drug binding kinetics in various situations such as enzyme inhibition, receptor binding, multi-target drug targeting, signal transduction pathways, and metabolic networks. Molecular studies of enzyme inhibition, receptor binding, and multi-target drugs have shown that at constant binding affinity, fast associating drugs show better enzyme inhibitory effects, earlier and higher receptor occupancy peaks, and better multi-target performances, while slow dissociating drugs show prolonged receptor occupancy, as suggested by others. Different situations exemplify slightly different kinetic-efficacy relationships, and each must be considered separately. At the systems level, binding kinetics can not only change the overall effect of drugs, but can also affect signaling dynamics. For example, in the tumor necrosis factor α-induced nuclear factor-κB pathway, inhibitor addition can delay the onset of oscillations and decrease their frequencies, with these changes varying with the binding kinetics of the inhibitor. The effects of drug binding kinetics also depend on network topology and where the target is located in the network. For successful drug discovery, both molecular binding kinetics and systems level requirements need to be considered.

  1. Mechanistic analysis of multi-omics datasets to generate kinetic parameters for constraint-based metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Constraint-based modeling uses mass balances, flux capacity, and reaction directionality constraints to predict fluxes through metabolism. Although transcriptional regulation and thermodynamic constraints have been integrated into constraint-based modeling, kinetic rate laws have not been extensively used. Results In this study, an in vivo kinetic parameter estimation problem was formulated and solved using multi-omic data sets for Escherichia coli. To narrow the confidence intervals for kinetic parameters, a series of kinetic model simplifications were made, resulting in fewer kinetic parameters than the full kinetic model. These new parameter values are able to account for flux and concentration data from 20 different experimental conditions used in our training dataset. Concentration estimates from the simplified kinetic model were within one standard deviation for 92.7% of the 790 experimental measurements in the training set. Gibbs free energy changes of reaction were calculated to identify reactions that were often operating close to or far from equilibrium. In addition, enzymes whose activities were positively or negatively influenced by metabolite concentrations were also identified. The kinetic model was then used to calculate the maximum and minimum possible flux values for individual reactions from independent metabolite and enzyme concentration data that were not used to estimate parameter values. Incorporating these kinetically-derived flux limits into the constraint-based metabolic model improved predictions for uptake and secretion rates and intracellular fluxes in constraint-based models of central metabolism. Conclusions This study has produced a method for in vivo kinetic parameter estimation and identified strategies and outcomes of kinetic model simplification. We also have illustrated how kinetic constraints can be used to improve constraint-based model predictions for intracellular fluxes and biomass yield and identify potential

  2. Mechanistic analysis of multi-omics datasets to generate kinetic parameters for constraint-based metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Cameron; Reed, Jennifer L

    2013-01-30

    Constraint-based modeling uses mass balances, flux capacity, and reaction directionality constraints to predict fluxes through metabolism. Although transcriptional regulation and thermodynamic constraints have been integrated into constraint-based modeling, kinetic rate laws have not been extensively used. In this study, an in vivo kinetic parameter estimation problem was formulated and solved using multi-omic data sets for Escherichia coli. To narrow the confidence intervals for kinetic parameters, a series of kinetic model simplifications were made, resulting in fewer kinetic parameters than the full kinetic model. These new parameter values are able to account for flux and concentration data from 20 different experimental conditions used in our training dataset. Concentration estimates from the simplified kinetic model were within one standard deviation for 92.7% of the 790 experimental measurements in the training set. Gibbs free energy changes of reaction were calculated to identify reactions that were often operating close to or far from equilibrium. In addition, enzymes whose activities were positively or negatively influenced by metabolite concentrations were also identified. The kinetic model was then used to calculate the maximum and minimum possible flux values for individual reactions from independent metabolite and enzyme concentration data that were not used to estimate parameter values. Incorporating these kinetically-derived flux limits into the constraint-based metabolic model improved predictions for uptake and secretion rates and intracellular fluxes in constraint-based models of central metabolism. This study has produced a method for in vivo kinetic parameter estimation and identified strategies and outcomes of kinetic model simplification. We also have illustrated how kinetic constraints can be used to improve constraint-based model predictions for intracellular fluxes and biomass yield and identify potential metabolic limitations through the

  3. Thermodynamic Analysis of Chemically Reacting Mixtures and Their Kinetics: Example of a Mixture of Three Isomers.

    PubMed

    Pekař, Miloslav

    2016-10-18

    Thermodynamics provides consequences of and restrictions on chemically reacting mixtures, particularly their kinetics, which have not been fully explored. Herein, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis is illustrated for a reacting mixture of three isomers. The rate equation is first derived on the basis of the results of nonequilibrium continuum thermodynamics of linear fluids, and is then subjected to the requirement of consistency with entropic inequality (the second law). This consistency test involves the correct representation of the reaction rate as a function of affinities. It is shown that entropic inequality restricts the signs or values of coefficients in the constitutive equations for reaction rates/rate constants. The use of reverse rate constants and the identification of thermodynamic and kinetic equilibrium constants are not necessary in this approach. Although the presented thermodynamic analysis works only for independent reactions, the rates of dependent reactions are not excluded from having effects on kinetics. It is shown that the rates of dependent reactions are combined from the rates of independent reactions differently than dependent reactions are combined from independent reactions. The results are compared to the classical mass-action rate equations, and new restrictions on the values of the classical rate constants are derived.

  4. Quantitative kinetic analysis of hydrogen transfer reactions from dietary polyphenols to the DPPH radical.

    PubMed

    Goupy, Pascale; Dufour, Claire; Loonis, Michele; Dangles, Olivier

    2003-01-29

    Diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) is widely used for quickly assessing the ability of polyphenols to transfer labile H atoms to radicals, a likely mechanism of antioxidant protection. This popular test generally pays no attention to the kinetics of H atom transfer, which however could be even more important than the total H-atom-donating capacities (stoichiometry, EC50) typically evaluated. In the present work, a series of dietary polyphenols belonging to the most representative families (flavonols from onion, flavanol monomers and oligomers from barley, and caffeic acid and caffeoyl esters from artichoke and endive) are characterized not only by their total stoichiometries (n(tot)) but also by their rate constants of first H atom abstraction by DPPH (k(1)), deduced from the kinetic analysis of the decay of the DPPH visible band following addition of the antioxidant. The mildly reactive DPPH radical allows a good discrimation between polyphenols, as demonstrated by the relatively large ranges of k(1) (ca. 400-5000 M(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and n(tot) (ca. 1-5) values typically measured with antioxidants having a single polyphenolic nucleus. With antioxidants displaying more than one polyphenolic nucleus (procyanidin oligomers, dicaffeoyl esters), the kinetic analysis makes it possible to demonstrate significant differences in reactivity between the subunits (two distinct k(1) values whose ratio lies in the range 3-10) and nonadditive stoichiometries.

  5. Graph-based analysis of kinetics on multidimensional potential-energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Okushima, T; Niiyama, T; Ikeda, K S; Shimizu, Y

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: one is to give a detailed description of an alternative graph-based analysis method, which we call saddle connectivity graph, for analyzing the global topography and the dynamical properties of many-dimensional potential-energy landscapes and the other is to give examples of applications of this method in the analysis of the kinetics of realistic systems. A Dijkstra-type shortest path algorithm is proposed to extract dynamically dominant transition pathways by kinetically defining transition costs. The applicability of this approach is first confirmed by an illustrative example of a low-dimensional random potential. We then show that a coarse-graining procedure tailored for saddle connectivity graphs can be used to obtain the kinetic properties of 13- and 38-atom Lennard-Jones clusters. The coarse-graining method not only reduces the complexity of the graphs, but also, with iterative use, reveals a self-similar hierarchical structure in these clusters. We also propose that the self-similarity is common to many-atom Lennard-Jones clusters.

  6. Ligand-receptor binding kinetics in surface plasmon resonance cells: a Monte Carlo analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jacob; Raum, Matthew; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2016-12-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips are widely used to measure association and dissociation rates for the binding kinetics between two species of chemicals, e.g., cell receptors and ligands. It is commonly assumed that ligands are spatially well mixed in the SPR region, and hence a mean-field rate equation description is appropriate. This approximation however ignores the spatial fluctuations as well as temporal correlations induced by multiple local rebinding events, which become prominent for slow diffusion rates and high binding affinities. We report detailed Monte Carlo simulations of ligand binding kinetics in an SPR cell subject to laminar flow. We extract the binding and dissociation rates by means of the techniques frequently employed in experimental analysis that are motivated by the mean-field approximation. We find major discrepancies in a wide parameter regime between the thus extracted rates and the known input simulation values. These results underscore the crucial quantitative importance of spatio-temporal correlations in binary reaction kinetics in SPR cell geometries, and demonstrate the failure of a mean-field analysis of SPR cells in the regime of high Damköhler number {{Da}}\\gt 0.1, where the spatio-temporal correlations due to diffusive transport and ligand-receptor rebinding events dominate the dynamics of SPR systems.

  7. The conformation of serum albumin in solution: a combined phosphorescence depolarization-hydrodynamic modeling study.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, M L; Duchowicz, R; Carrasco, B; de la Torre, J G; Acuña, A U

    2001-01-01

    There is a striking disparity between the heart-shaped structure of human serum albumin (HSA) observed in single crystals and the elongated ellipsoid model used for decades to interpret the protein solution hydrodynamics at neutral pH. These two contrasting views could be reconciled if the protein were flexible enough to change its conformation in solution from that found in the crystal. To investigate this possibility we recorded the rotational motions in real time of an erythrosin-bovine serum albumin complex (Er-BSA) over an extended time range, using phosphorescence depolarization techniques. These measurements are consistent with the absence of independent motions of large protein segments in solution, in the time range from nanoseconds to fractions of milliseconds, and give a single rotational correlation time phi(BSA, 1 cP, 20 degrees C) = 40 +/- 2 ns. In addition, we report a detailed analysis of the protein hydrodynamics based on two bead-modeling methods. In the first, BSA was modeled as a triangular prismatic shell with optimized dimensions of 84 x 84 x 84 x 31.5 A, whereas in the second, the atomic-level structure of HSA obtained from crystallographic data was used to build a much more refined rough-shell model. In both cases, the predicted and experimental rotational diffusion rate and other hydrodynamic parameters were in good agreement. Therefore, the overall conformation in neutral solution of BSA, as of HSA, should be rigid, in the sense indicated above, and very similar to the heart-shaped structure observed in HSA crystals. PMID:11325741

  8. Rotational diffusion of receptors for epidermal growth factor measured by time-resolved phosphorescence depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidovetzki, Raphael; Johnson, David A.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    1991-06-01

    The cell surface receptor for epidermal growth factor (EGFR) is one of the most studied integral membrane proteins. The receptor is widely distributed in cells and tissues of mammalian and avian tissues and plays an important role in growth control. Binding of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGFR initiates a complex biological response, which includes self-phosphorylation of the receptor due to an intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, phosphorylation of other membrane proteins, increased intake of metabolites, and increased proliferation. Complete amino acid sequence of EGFR revealed a high degree of homology with viral oncogenes and allowed tentative identification of an external hormone binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain that includes tyrosine kinase activity. EGF binding induces rapid aggregation of EGFR, a process which was also observed on other receptor systems. These and other observations led to a hypothesis that microaggregation of EGFR is a necessary prerequisite for the biological response of EGF. A direct approach to study the processes of oligomerization of cell membrane proteins is to measure their mobility under various conditions. The lateral mobility of the EGFR was studied on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and on A431 cells. However, an examination of the equations for the lateral and rotational diffusion in membranes shows that only rotational diffusion is strongly dependent on the size of the diffusing entity. A method of measuring protein rotational diffusion by time-resolved phosphorescence has proved to be very useful in the analysis of both in vivo and in vitro systems. The authors apply this method to study the mobility of EGFR on living A431 cells and membrane preparations.

  9. Analysis of proton exchange kinetics with time-dependent exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2010-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is used to probe the kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in lysozyme in pH 5, 6 and 7.4. An analysis based on a Verhulst growth model is proposed and effectively applied to the kinetics of the hydrogen exchange. The data are described by a power-like function which is based on a time-dependence of the exchange rate. Experimental data ranging over many time scales is considered and accurate fits of a power-like function are obtained. Results of fittings show correlation between faster hydrogen-deuterium exchange and increase of pH. Furthermore a model is presented that discriminates between easily exchangeable hydrogens (located in close proximity to the protein surface) and those protected from the exchange (located in the protein interior). A possible interpretation of the model and its biological significance are discussed.

  10. Kinetic analysis of high-concentration isopropanol biodegradation by a solvent-tolerant mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Mark T; Meeyoo, Vissanu; Wright, Phillip C

    2002-06-20

    The ability of a previously enriched microbial population to utilize isopropanol (IPA) as the sole carbon source within a minimal salts medium is studied. The advantage of prior enrichment procedures for the improvement of IPA biodegradation performance is demonstrated for an IPA concentration of up to 24 g L(-1). Results showing the interrelationship between temperature and substrate utilization and inhibition levels at temperatures of between 2 degrees C and 45 degrees C are examined. Models of inhibition based on enzyme kinetics are assessed via nonlinear analysis, in order to accurately represent the growth kinetics of this solvent-tolerant mixed culture. The model that best describes the data is the Levenspiel substrate inhibition model, which can predict the maximum substrate level above which growth is completely limited. This is the first report of IPA treatment of up to 24 g L(-1) by an aerobic solvent-tolerant population.

  11. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  12. Kinetic analysis of artificial peptide self-replication. Part I: the homochiral case.

    PubMed

    Islas, Jesús Rivera; Pimienta, Véronique; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Buhse, Thomas

    2003-03-25

    Computational kinetic analysis of a lately discovered homochiral peptide self-replicator is presented. A 6-step kinetic model was designed that addresses the main reactions and hydrophobic interactions involved in this template-directed, autocatalytic system and that gave rise to excellent fitting of 4 previously published independent experimental series. The model sheds light on the mechanistic principle of the reaction system and illustrates directly a number of dynamic properties such as the observed autocatalytic efficiency. It was found that the dynamics are basically governed by two reversible hydrophobic interactions: between the template and a peptide fragment and between two template species. The later association was determined to be considerably more favored, which leads to the predominant presence of the catalytically inactive template dimer in the reaction system. Our results show that the involvement of a template trimer is not necessary to obtain the observed fittings.

  13. A thermogravimetric analysis of the combustion kinetics of karanja (Pongamia pinnata) fruit hulls char.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Azharul; Auta, M; Kabir, G; Hameed, B H

    2016-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of Karanj fruit hulls char (KFH-char) was investigated with thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The TGA outlined the char combustion thermographs at a different heating rate and isoconversional methods expressed the combustion kinetics. The Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) methods authenticated the char average activation energy at 62.13 and 68.53kJ/mol respectively, enough to derive the char to burnout. However, the Coats-Redfern method verified the char combustion via complex multi-step mechanism; the second stage mechanism has 135kJ/mol average activation energy. The TGA thermographs and kinetic parameters revealed the adequacy of the KFH-char as fuel substrate than its precursor, Karanj fruit hulls (KFH). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bayesian Analysis of a One Compartment Kinetic Model Used in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Malave, Peter; Sitek, Arkadiusz

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic models are used extensively in science, engineering, and medicine. Mathematically, they are a set of coupled differential equations including a source function, otherwise known as an input function. We investigate whether parametric modeling of a noisy input function offers any benefit over the non-parametric input function in estimating kinetic parameters. Our analysis includes four formulations of Bayesian posteriors of model parameters where noise is taken into account in the likelihood functions. Posteriors are determined numerically with a Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. We compare point estimates derived from the posteriors to a weighted non–linear least squares estimate. Results imply that parametric modeling of the input function does not improve the accuracy of model parameters, even with perfect knowledge of the functional form. Posteriors are validated using an unconventional utilization of the chi square test. We demonstrate that if the noise in the input function is not taken into account, the resulting posteriors are incorrect. PMID:25408561

  15. Anion exchange kinetics of nanodimensional layered metal hydroxides: use of isoconversional analysis.

    PubMed

    Majoni, Stephen; Hossenlopp, Jeanne M

    2010-12-16

    Anion exchange reactions of nanodimensional layered metal hydroxide compounds are utilized to create materials with targeted physical and chemical properties and also as a means for controlled release of intercalated anions. The kinetics of this important class of reaction are generally characterized by model-based approaches. In this work, a different approach based on isothermal, isoconversional analysis was utilized to determine effective activation energies with respect to extent of reaction. Two different layered metal hydroxide materials were chosen for reaction with chloride anions, using a temperature range of 30-60 °C. The concentrations of anions released into solution and the changes in polycrystalline solid phases were evaluated using model-based (Avrami-Erofe'ev nucleation-growth model) and model-free (integral isoconversional) methods. The results demonstrate the utility of the isoconversional approach for identifying when fitting to a single model is not appropriate, particularly for characterizing the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics.

  16. Bioleaching kinetics and multivariate analysis of spent petroleum catalyst dissolution using two acidophiles.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Debabrata; Mishra, Debaraj; Kim, Dong J; Ahn, Jong G; Chaudhury, G Roy; Lee, Seoung W

    2010-03-15

    Bioleaching studies were conducted to evaluate the recovery of metal values from waste petroleum catalyst using two different acidophilic microorganisms, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Various leaching parameters such as contact time, pH, oxidant concentration, pulp densities, particle size, and temperature were studied in detail. Activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius equation and values for Ni, V and Mo were calculated in case of both the acidophiles. In both cases, the dissolution kinetics of Mo was lower than those of V and Ni. The lower dissolution kinetics may have been due to the formation of a sulfur product layer, refractoriness of MoS(2) or both. Multivariate statistical data were presented to interpret the leaching data in the present case. The significance of the leaching parameters was derived through principle component analysis and multi linear regression analyses for both iron and sulfur oxidizing bacteria.

  17. Chemkin-II: A Fortran chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Miller, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    This document is the user's manual for the second-generation Chemkin package. Chemkin is a software package for whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides an especially flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular Fortran subroutines that may be called to return information on equation of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates.

  18. Correction: Theoretical study and design of multifunctional phosphorescent platinum(ii) complexes containing triarylboron moieties for efficient OLED emitters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Shan, Guo-Gang; Li, Hai-Bin; Wu, Shui-Xing; Ren, Xin-Yao; Geng, Yun; Su, Zhong-Min

    2015-02-14

    Correction for 'Theoretical study and design of multifunctional phosphorescent platinum(ii) complexes containing triarylboron moieties for efficient OLED emitters' by Yong Wu et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: .

  19. INHIBIT logic operations based on light-driven β-cyclodextrin pseudo[1]rotaxane with room temperature phosphorescence addresses.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingjing; Ma, Xiang; Min, Mingri; Cao, Tiantian; Wu, Shuaifan; Tian, He

    2014-03-25

    INHIBIT logic gates based on light-driven β-cyclodextrin pseudo[1]rotaxane were conveniently fabricated in aqueous solution utilizing induced circular dichroism (ICD) and photocontrolled reversible room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) as output addresses respectively.

  20. Model-based analysis for kinetic complexation study of Pizda and Cu(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosough, M.; Maeder, M.; Jalali-Heravi, M.; Norman, S. E.

    2008-08-01

    In the present work, the multivariate kinetic complexation of a new synthesized ligand, 1-(2″-hydroxyl cyclohexyl)-3'-[aminopropyl]-4-[3'-aminopropyl]piperazine (Pizda) and Cu 2+ in 50% ethanol-water solution is investigated using the UV-vis stopped-flow technique and state-of-the-art multi-wavelength numerical analysis. Model-based least squares fitting analysis or hard modeling is a specific part of chemometrics which is based on mathematical relationships for describing the measurements. Some recent developments include the incorporation of the effects of non-ideal experimental conditions into the fitting algorithm so it can substantially simplify experimental procedures. In this study no buffers are required because pH changes are taken into computations. Some 21 multi-wavelength kinetic measurements, taken at various initial concentrations of [H +] were analyzed globally, i.e. simultaneously applying an all inclusive reaction mechanism and a common set of species spectra. Using numerical analysis, the pH of the experimental solutions was allowed to vary as a consequence of the proceeding reactions. This enabled the complete kinetic analysis of the formation and dissociation of Cu(Pizda) n+ . Here protonation equilibria have been directly incorporated into the rate law, so thus variable pH values have been allowed during each measurement. Using the independently estimated stability constants (from spectrophotometric and potentiometric measurements) for the Cu(Pizda) n+ complexes, a total of six rate constants and one protonation constant could be elucidated. The results of the analysis include the concentration distribution and spectra of all chemical species involved in the reaction. A low standard deviation and residual profiles obtained validate the results.

  1. Model-based analysis for kinetic complexation study of Pizda and Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Vosough, M; Maeder, M; Jalali-Heravi, M; Norman, S E

    2008-08-01

    In the present work, the multivariate kinetic complexation of a new synthesized ligand, 1-(2''-hydroxyl cyclohexyl)-3'-[aminopropyl]-4-[3'-aminopropyl]piperazine (Pizda) and Cu(2+) in 50% ethanol-water solution is investigated using the UV-vis stopped-flow technique and state-of-the-art multi-wavelength numerical analysis. Model-based least squares fitting analysis or hard modeling is a specific part of chemometrics which is based on mathematical relationships for describing the measurements. Some recent developments include the incorporation of the effects of non-ideal experimental conditions into the fitting algorithm so it can substantially simplify experimental procedures. In this study no buffers are required because pH changes are taken into computations. Some 21 multi-wavelength kinetic measurements, taken at various initial concentrations of [H(+)] were analyzed globally, i.e. simultaneously applying an all inclusive reaction mechanism and a common set of species spectra. Using numerical analysis, the pH of the experimental solutions was allowed to vary as a consequence of the proceeding reactions. This enabled the complete kinetic analysis of the formation and dissociation of Cu(Pizda)(n+). Here protonation equilibria have been directly incorporated into the rate law, so thus variable pH values have been allowed during each measurement. Using the independently estimated stability constants (from spectrophotometric and potentiometric measurements) for the Cu(Pizda)(n+) complexes, a total of six rate constants and one protonation constant could be elucidated. The results of the analysis include the concentration distribution and spectra of all chemical species involved in the reaction. A low standard deviation and residual profiles obtained validate the results.

  2. Analysis of “On/Off” Kinetics of a CETP Inhibitor Using a Mechanistic Model of Lipoprotein Metabolism and Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J; Cleary, Y; Maugeais, C; Kiu Weber, CI; Mazer, NA

    2015-01-01

    RG7232 is a potent inhibitor of cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP). Daily oral administration of RG7232 produces a dose- and time-dependent increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoproteinA-I (ApoA-I) levels and a corresponding decrease in low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoproteinB (ApoB) levels. Due to its short plasma half-life (∼3 hours), RG7232 transiently inhibits CETP activity during each dosing interval (“on/off” kinetics), as reflected by the temporal effects on HDL-C and LDL-C. The influence of RG7232 on lipid-poor ApoA-I (i.e., pre-β1) levels and reverse cholesterol transport rates is unclear. To investigate this, a published model of lipoprotein metabolism and kinetics was combined with a pharmacokinetic model of RG7232. After calibration and validation of the combined model, the effect of RG7232 on pre-β1 levels was simulated. A dose-dependent oscillation of pre-β1, driven by the “on/off” kinetics of RG7232 was observed. The possible implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26380155

  3. Kinetic products in coordination networks: ab initio X-ray powder diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Martí-Rujas, Javier; Kawano, Masaki

    2013-02-19

    Porous coordination networks are materials that maintain their crystal structure as molecular "guests" enter and exit their pores. They are of great research interest with applications in areas such as catalysis, gas adsorption, proton conductivity, and drug release. As with zeolite preparation, the kinetic states in coordination network preparation play a crucial role in determining the final products. Controlling the kinetic state during self-assembly of coordination networks is a fundamental aspect of developing further functionalization of this class of materials. However, unlike for zeolites, there are few structural studies reporting the kinetic products made during self-assembly of coordination networks. Synthetic routes that produce the necessary selectivity are complex. The structural knowledge obtained from X-ray crystallography has been crucial for developing rational strategies for design of organic-inorganic hybrid networks. However, despite the explosive progress in the solid-state study of coordination networks during the last 15 years, researchers still do not understand many chemical reaction processes because of the difficulties in growing single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction: Fast precipitation can lead to kinetic (metastable) products, but in microcrystalline form, unsuitable for single crystal X-ray analysis. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) routinely is used to check phase purity, crystallinity, and to monitor the stability of frameworks upon guest removal/inclusion under various conditions, but rarely is used for structure elucidation. Recent advances in structure determination of microcrystalline solids from ab initio XRPD have allowed three-dimensional structure determination when single crystals are not available. Thus, ab initio XRPD structure determination is becoming a powerful method for structure determination of microcrystalline solids, including porous coordination networks. Because of the great interest across scientific

  4. Solid surface luminescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtubise, R. J.

    1984-04-01

    Several advances were made in understanding the interactions responsible for room-temperature phosphorescence. Infrared data showed strong room-temperature phosphorescence from compounds adsorbed on some surfaces which contained adsorbed water. A partial model for phosphor/solid-surface interactions was developed for nitrogen heterocycles and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed on poly(acrylic acid)-salt mixtures. Hydroxyl aromatics behave as hydrogen donors, hydrogen accepting species, or as both hydrogen donors and hydrogen acceptors when adsorbed on solid-surfaces. Several new analytical methods and techniques were developed. Poly(acrylic acid)-phosphor solutions that were spotted on filter paper resulted in lower limits of detection and better reproducibility. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures were achieved at the nanogram level by using room-temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence. In addition, the combined use of zeroth and second derivative room-temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra was developed into a useful analytical approach.

  5. Red-emitting dendritic iridium(III) complexes for solution processable phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tianshi; Ding, Junqiao; Baumgarten, Martin; Wang, Lixiang; Müllen, Klaus

    2012-06-27

    Functionalization of a red phosphorescent iridium(III) complex core surrounded by rigid polyphenylene dendrons with a hole-transporting triphenylamine surface allows to prevent the intermolecular aggregation-induced emission quenching, improves charge recombination, and therefore enhances photo- and electroluminescence efficiencies of dendrimer in solid state. These multifunctional shape-persistent dendrimers provide a new pathway to design highly efficient solution processable materials for phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs).

  6. Glass Stability and Kinetic Analysis of Iron-Metalloid Bulk Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhaweesuk, Charuayporn

    Multicomponent Fe-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with a combination of excellent properties such as good soft magnetic properties, high strength, high hardness, and high corrosion resistance have attracted increasing attention both from a basic science research standpoint and due to their industrial application potential. However, many of the elemental additions which lead to the easiest glass formation are expensive. The identification of alloys composed of abundant and inexpensive elements that still retain excellent properties would promote applications for engineering and industry. In short, the development of the Fe-based BMG without any glass-forming metal elements and with high glass forming ability is desired. This study shows that the thermal stability of the Fe-based alloys can be improved beyond a simple rule of mixtures prediction by utilizing a well-balance multi-metalloid approach. The kinetics aspect of glass-forming ability is studied experimentally for Fe-B-Si-P alloys. The systematic variation in alloy composition gives access to differences in phase selection and the final dimensions of glass formation. Two alloys, representing the best glass-forming composition and the poorest glass-forming composition, were studied in terms of their stability to crystallization, solidification microstructure evolution and thermal history. The utility of the wedge-casting technique is developed to examine bulk glass-forming alloys by combining multiple temperature profiles of the quenching melt with a measurement-based kinetic analysis of the phase selection competition and critical cooling rate conditions. Based upon direct thermal measurement, microstructural analysis and kinetic modeling, it was found that both representative alloys show a board spectrum of solidification microstructures which include a critical cooling rate range. The kinetic competition in the formation of certain phases can enhance or detract from the final dimension of bulk glass

  7. Searching for alternatives to full kinetic analysis in 18F-FDG PET: an extension of the simplified kinetic analysis method.

    PubMed

    Hapdey, Sebastien; Buvat, Irene; Carson, Joann M; Carson, Joan M; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Whatley, Millie; Bacharach, Stephen L

    2011-04-01

    The most accurate way to estimate the glucose metabolic rate (or its influx constant) from (18)F-FDG PET is to perform a full kinetic analysis (or its simplified Patlak version), requiring dynamic imaging and the knowledge of arterial activity as a function of time. To avoid invasive arterial blood sampling, a simplified kinetic analysis (SKA) has been proposed, based on blood curves measured from a control group. Here, we extend the SKA by allowing for a greater variety of arterial input function (A(t)) curves among patients than in the original SKA and by accounting for unmetabolized (18)F-FDG in the tumor. Ten A(t)s measured in patients were analyzed using a principal-component analysis to derive 2 principal components describing most of the variability of the A(t). The mean distribution volume of (18)F-FDG in tumors for these patients was used to estimate the corresponding quantity in other patients. In subsequent patient studies, the A(t) was described as a linear combination of the 2 principal components, for which the 2 scaling factors were obtained from an early and a late venous sample drawn for the patient. The original and extended SKA (ESKA) were assessed using fifty-seven (18)F-FDG PET scans with various tumor types and locations and using different injection and acquisition protocols, with the K(i) derived from Patlak analysis as a reference. ESKA improved the accuracy or precision of the input function (area under the blood curve) for all protocols examined. The mean errors (±SD) in K(i) estimates were -12% ± 33% for SKA and -7% ± 22% for ESKA for a 20-s injection protocol with a 55-min postinjection PET scan, 20% ± 42% for SKA and 1% ± 29% for ESKA (P < 0.05) for a 120-s injection protocol with a 55-min postinjection PET scan, and -37% ± 19% for SKA and -4% ± 6% for ESKA (P < 0.05) for a 20-s injection protocol with a 120-min postinjection PET scan. Changes in K(i) between the 2 PET scans in the same patients also tended to be estimated more

  8. Kinetic Analysis of Competitive Electrocatalytic Pathways: New Insights into Hydrogen Production with Nickel Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Brown, Houston J.; Helm, Monte L.

    2016-01-20

    The hydrogen production electrocatalyst Ni(PPh2NPh2)22+ (1) is capable of traversing multiple electrocatalytic pathways. When using dimethylformamidium, DMF(H)+, the mechanism of formation of H2 catalyzed by 1 changes from an ECEC to an EECC mechanism as the potential approaches the Ni(I/0) couple. Two recent electrochemical methods, current-potential analysis and foot-of-the-wave analysis (FOWA), were performed on 1 to measure the detailed chemical kinetics of the competing ECEC and EECC pathways. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the electrochemical methods using digital simulations to gain a better understanding of their strengths and limitations. Notably, chemical rate constants were significantly underestimated when not accounting for electron transfer kinetics, even when electron transfer was fast enough to afford a reversible non-catalytic wave. The EECC pathway of 1 was found to be faster than the ECEC pathway under all conditions studied. Using buffered DMF: DMF(H)+ mixtures led to an increase in the catalytic rate constant (kobs) of the EECC pathway, but kobs for the ECEC pathway did not change when using buffered acid. Further kinetic analysis of the ECEC path revealed that added base increases the rate of isomerization of the exo-protonated Ni(0) isomers to the catalytically active endo-isomers, but decreases the net rate of protonation of Ni(I). FOWA on 1 did not provide accurate rate constants due to incomplete reduction of the exo-protonated Ni(I) intermediate at the foot of the wave, but FOWA could be used to estimate the reduction potential of this previously undetected intermediate. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Use of kinetic gait analysis for detection, quantification, and differentiation of hind limb lameness and spinal ataxia in horses.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Reed, Stephen M; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J; Robertson, James T; Bertone, Alicia L

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate use of kinetic gait analysis for detection, quantification, and differentiation of hind limb lameness and spinal ataxia in horses. Prospective clinical study. 36 horses. Procedures-Kinetic gait analysis with a force plate was performed for 12 clinically normal horses, 12 horses with hind limb lameness, and 12 horses with spinal ataxia. Kinetic variables were compared among groups, correlated to subjective grading, and used to build predictive models to assess the accuracy of discrimination. Subsets of kinetic variables were characteristically altered in ataxic and lame gaits. Ataxic horses had significantly increased lateral force peak and variation in vertical force peaks in both hind limbs. Lame horses had significantly decreased vertical force peak and increased variation in vertical force peaks only in the lame hind limb. These variables were used to differentiate between spinal ataxia and hind limb lameness with excellent accuracy. There were significant correlations between a subset of kinetic variables and subjective lameness and neurologic grades. Kinetic gait variables, specifically lateral force peak and the variation in vertical force, can be used to support the differential diagnosis between spinal ataxia and hind limb lameness in horses. Kinetic gait analysis may also be applied for quantification of equine hind limb gait abnormalities as well as confirming lack of lameness and ataxia in soundness examinations.

  10. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    PubMed

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites.

  11. Solvent-induced lysozyme gels: rheology, fractal analysis, and sol-gel kinetics.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcelo A; Arêas, Elizabeth P G

    2005-09-15

    In this work, the gelation kinetics and fractal character of lysozyme gel matrices developed in tetramethylurea (TMU)-water media were investigated. Gelation times were determined from the temporal crossover point between the storage, G', and loss, G'', moduli, as a function of the binary solvent composition and of protein concentration. The inverse dependence of the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region (gamma0) on protein concentration indicate that the lysozyme gels belong to the "strong link" kind, a gel category where interparticle links are stronger than intraparticle ones. Lysozyme gel fractal dimensions (Df) were determined from the analysis of rheological data according to a scaling theory by Shih et al. [Phys. Rev. A 42 (1990) 4772-4779] and were found to be compatible with a diffusion-limited cluster-aggregation kinetics (DLCA) for lysozyme gels formed at the TMU mass fraction in the binary organic-aqueous solvent, wTMU=0.9, and with a reaction-limited cluster aggregation kinetics (RLCA) for wTMU in the 0.6< or =wTMU< or =0.8 range.

  12. Quantification of exocytosis kinetics by DIC image analysis of cortical lawns.

    PubMed

    Mooney, James; Thakur, Saumitra; Kahng, Peter; Trapani, Josef G; Poccia, Dominic

    2014-04-01

    Cortical lawns prepared from sea urchin eggs have offered a robust in vitro system for study of regulated exocytosis and membrane fusion events since their introduction by Vacquier almost 40 years ago (Vacquier in Dev Biol 43:62-74, 1975). Lawns have been imaged by phase contrast, darkfield, differential interference contrast, and electron microscopy. Quantification of exocytosis kinetics has been achieved primarily by light scattering assays. We present simple differential interference contrast image analysis procedures for quantifying the kinetics and extent of exocytosis in cortical lawns using an open vessel that allows rapid solvent equilibration and modification. These preparations maintain the architecture of the original cortices, allow for cytological and immunocytochemical analyses, and permit quantification of variation within and between lawns. When combined, these methods can shed light on factors controlling the rate of secretion in a spatially relevant cellular context. We additionally provide a subroutine for IGOR Pro® that converts raw data from line scans of cortical lawns into kinetic profiles of exocytosis. Rapid image acquisition reveals spatial variations in time of initiation of individual granule fusion events with the plasma membrane not previously reported.

  13. Iso-conversional kinetic analysis of quaternary glass re-crystallization.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Chandel, Namrata; Mehta, Neeraj

    2017-02-01

    Iso-conversional kinetic analysis is popular in scientific community for analyzing solid-state reactions (e.g., glass/amorphous and amorphous/crystal phase transformations, re-crystallization etc). It is a recognized significant tool to achieve useful outcomes for the solid state reaction under consideration. Present work is devoted to explore some insights of thermally activated crystallization using various heating rates (VHR) method. We have examined the correlation between iso-conversional activation energy and iso-conversional rate of crystal growth. In fact, we have observed the compensation law and iso-kinetic relationship using two different approaches for the study of crystallization phenomenon that drives thermally in an Arrhenian manner. Moreover, we found that the estimated intercepts and gradients (i.e., Meyer-Neldel energy and Meyer-Neldel pre-factor respectively) for both approaches also vary linearly and both sets are remarkably identical. These results approach to an inference for ensuring the equivalence of compensation law and iso-kinetic relationship and provide an understanding of various advanced materials in physical chemistry, materials sciences and solid-state physics.

  14. Direct determination of enzyme kinetic parameters from single reactions using a new progress curve analysis tool.

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, Felix; Zotter, Agnes; Schreiber, Gideon

    2016-10-15

    With computer-based data-fitting methods becoming a standard tool in biochemistry, progress curve analysis of enzyme kinetics is a feasible, yet seldom used tool. Here we present a versatile Matlab-based tool (PCAT) to analyze catalysis progress curves with three complementary model approaches. The first two models are based on the known closed-form solution for this problem: the first describes the required Lambert W function with an analytical approximation and the second provides a numerical solution of the Lambert W function. The third model is a direct simulation of the enzyme kinetics. Depending on the chosen model, the tools excel in speed, accuracy or initial value requirements. Using simulated and experimental data, we show the strengths and pitfalls of the different fitting models. Direct simulation proves to have the highest level of accuracy, but it also requires reasonable initial values to converge. Finally, we propose a standard procedure to obtain optimized enzyme kinetic parameters from single progress curves.

  15. Theoretical analysis of the kinetic performance of laboratory- and full-scale composting systems.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marco; Silveira, Ana; Antunes, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    Composting research at laboratory-scale is critical for the development of optimized full-scale plants. Discrepancies between processes at laboratory-scale and full-scale systems have been investigated in terms of heat balances, but a kinetic analysis of this issue is still missing. In this study, the composting rate at laboratory-scale was, on average, between 1.9 and 5.7 times faster than in full-scale systems for a set of published studies using municipal solid waste, food waste or similar materials. Laboratory-scale performance and full-scale systems were limited to 71 and 46%, respectively, of their maximum potential due to poor management of environmental process conditions far from their optimum. The main limiting environmental factor was found to be moisture content, followed by temperature. Besides environmental factors, waste composition and particle size were identified as factors accounting for kinetic differences between laboratory- and full-scale systems. Overall, this study identifies those factors that affect the kinetics of the composting process most and revealed a significant margin for reducing process time in full-scale composting.

  16. [Degradation kinetics of naphthalene by anaerobic sludge and analysis of the bacterial biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xin-Kai; Yang, Qi; Hao, Chun-Bo

    2012-10-01

    For efficient biological treatment of naphthalene in the industrial wastewater, activated anaerobic sludge was collected from a wastewater treatment plant of petroleum industry, and domesticated with naphthalene, naphthalene and lactate as electron donors, respectively. When the removal efficiency of naphthalene reached more than 90% in a domestication cycle, degradation kinetics were investigated in batch reactions with naphthalene, naphthalene and lactate as electron donors, respectively. Meanwhile, the microbial DNA was extracted from the sludge with high naphthalene removal efficiency, the 16S rDNA clone library was built up, and the bacterial community was analyzed. The results indicated that the degradation rate of naphthalene in reaction with naphthalene as the sole electron donor was much lower than that with naphthalene and lactate as electron donors. In both domestication modes, the naphthalene concentration and the time followed the first order reaction kinetics model and the kinetic constant K were 3.5 x 10(-3) h(-1) and 16 x 10(-3) h(-1), respectively. In addition, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the bacterial communities in naphthalene and lactate co-metabolism sludge were mainly composed of Deltaproteobacteria, Thermotogae, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi and Unclassified bacteria. Deltaproteobacteria was the main phylum in the sludge. In mature anaerobic activated sludge, Desulfobulbus sp. and Kosmotoga accounted for 24.2% and 21.0%, respectively. Smithella, Syntrophobacter and Levilinea were also found in the bioreactor. The study of the bacteria diversity in the anaerobic sludge is conducive to the optimization of reaction conditions for efficient removal of naphthalene.

  17. In-depth investigation on the pyrolysis kinetics of raw biomass. Part I: kinetic analysis for the drying and devolatilization stages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Zheng, Yan; Zhu, Xifeng

    2013-03-01

    An in-depth investigation was conducted on the kinetic analysis of raw biomass using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), from which the activation energy distribution of the whole pyrolysis process was obtained. Two different stages, namely, drying stage (Stage I) and devolatilization stage (Stage II), were shown in the pyrolysis process in which the activation energy values changed with conversion. The activation energy at low conversions (below 0.15) in the drying stage ranged from 10 to 30 kJ/mol. Such energy was calculated using the nonisothermal Page model, known as the best model to describe the drying kinetics. Kinetic analysis was performed using the distributed activation energy model in a wide range of conversions (0.15-0.95) in the devolatilization stage. The activation energy first ranged from 178.23 to 245.58 kJ/mol and from 159.66 to 210.76 kJ/mol for corn straw and wheat straw, respectively, then increasing remarkably with an irregular trend. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fast and sensitive optical toxicity bioassay based on dual wavelength analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Vila, F; Vigués, N; Díaz-González, M; Muñoz-Berbel, X; Mas, J

    2015-05-15

    Global urban and industrial growth, with the associated environmental contamination, is promoting the development of rapid and inexpensive general toxicity methods. Current microbial methodologies for general toxicity determination rely on either bioluminescent bacteria and specific medium solution (i.e. Microtox(®)) or low sensitivity and diffusion limited protocols (i.e. amperometric microbial respirometry). In this work, fast and sensitive optical toxicity bioassay based on dual wavelength analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction kinetics is presented, using Escherichia coli as a bacterial model. Ferricyanide reduction kinetic analysis (variation of ferricyanide absorption with time), much more sensitive than single absorbance measurements, allowed for direct and fast toxicity determination without pre-incubation steps (assay time=10 min) and minimizing biomass interference. Dual wavelength analysis at 405 (ferricyanide and biomass) and 550 nm (biomass), allowed for ferricyanide monitoring without interference of biomass scattering. On the other hand, refractive index (RI) matching with saccharose reduced bacterial light scattering around 50%, expanding the analytical linear range in the determination of absorbent molecules. With this method, different toxicants such as metals and organic compounds were analyzed with good sensitivities. Half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) obtained after 10 min bioassay, 2.9, 1.0, 0.7 and 18.3 mg L(-1) for copper, zinc, acetic acid and 2-phenylethanol respectively, were in agreement with previously reported values for longer bioassays (around 60 min). This method represents a promising alternative for fast and sensitive water toxicity monitoring, opening the possibility of quick in situ analysis.

  19. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Lei; Vocks, Christian; Marsch, Eckart; Peter, Hardi

    2016-03-25

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the “wave + beam flow” kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  20. Chromatographic preparation and kinetic analysis of interactions between tabun enantiomers and acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Tenberken, O; Thiermann, H; Worek, F; Reiter, G

    2010-06-02

    The easy accessibility to highly toxic OP (organophosphorus)-type chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) underlines the necessity for an effective medical treatment. Acute OP toxicity is primarily caused by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7). Reactivators (oximes) of inhibited AChE are a mainstay of treatment. However, the commercially available compounds, obidoxime and pralidoxime, are considered rather ineffective against various nerve agents, including tabun. OP-type chemical warfare agents include an asymmetrical P-atom and consist of at least two stereoisomers. Previous studies with the nerve agents sarin and soman showed marked differences between (-)- and (+)-P isomers regarding AChE inhibition and stability in biological matrices. Hence, stereoselectivity is a key parameter for the development of optimized treatment. In the present study, the tabun enantiomers were isolated by semi-preparative liquid-chromatography (LC) with offline analysis by GC-PCI-MS and final characterization of optical purity (99.98% (-)-tabun and 99.83% (+)-tabun) and specific optical rotation. The inhibition and reactivation kinetics of the tabun enantiomers were determined with human and swine AChE and the aging kinetics with human AChE. The results show a large difference in the inhibitory potency between (-)- and (+)-tabun. The determination of reactivation and aging kinetics indicates that both reactions are at least in part determined by the residual (-)-tabun contamination (0.17%) of the (+)-tabun preparation. These data provide further insight into the kinetic interactions between tabun enantiomers and AChE and may contribute to the development of more effective treatment options.

  1. Temperature dependence of blue phosphorescent cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Sajoto, Tissa; Djurovich, Peter I; Tamayo, Arnold B; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Thompson, Mark E

    2009-07-22

    The photophysical properties for a series of facial (fac) cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (fac-Ir(C--N)(3) (C--N = 2-phenylpyridyl (ppy), 2-(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridyl (F2ppy), 1-phenylpyrazolyl (ppz), 1-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyrazolyl) (F2ppz), and 1-(2-(9,9'-dimethylfluorenyl))pyrazolyl (flz)), fac-Ir(C--N)(2)(C--N') (C--N = ppz or F2ppz and C--N' = ppy or F2ppy), and fac-Ir(C--C')(3) (C--C' = 1-phenyl-3-methylbenzimidazolyl (pmb)) have been studied in dilute 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF) solution in a temperature range of 77-378 K. Photoluminescent quantum yields (Phi) for the 10 compounds at room temperature vary between near zero and unity, whereas all emit with high efficiency at low temperature (77 K). The quantum yield for fac-Ir(ppy)(3) (Phi = 0.97) is temperature-independent. For the other complexes, the temperature-dependent data indicates that the luminescent efficiency is primarily determined by thermal deactivation to a nonradiative state. Activation energies and rate constants for both radiative and nonradiative processes were obtained using a Boltzmann analysis of the temperature-dependent luminescent decay data. Activation energies to the nonradiative state are found to range between 1600 and 4800 cm(-1). The pre-exponential factors for deactivation are large for complexes with C--N ligands (10(11)-10(13) s(-1)) and significantly smaller for fac-Ir(pmb)(3) (10(9) s(-1)). The kinetic parameters for decay and results from density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the triplet state are consistent with a nonradiative process involving Ir-N (Ir-C for fac-Ir(pmb)(3)) bond rupture leading to a five-coordinate species that has triplet metal-centered ((3)MC) character. Linear correlations are observed between the activation energy and the energy difference calculated for the emissive and (3)MC states. The energy level for the (3)MC state is estimated to lie between 21,700 and 24,000 cm(-1) for the fac-Ir(C--N)(3) complexes and at 28,000 cm(-1) for

  2. Demon voltammetry and analysis software: Analysis of cocaine-induced alterations in dopamine signaling using multiple kinetic measures

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    The fast sampling rates of fast scan cyclic voltammetry make it a favorable method for measuring changes in brain monoamine release and uptake kinetics in slice, anesthetized, and freely moving preparations. The most common analysis technique for evaluating changes in dopamine signaling uses well-established Michaelis-Menten kinetic methods that can accurately model dopamine release and uptake parameters across multiple experimental conditions. Nevertheless, over the years, many researchers have turned to other measures to estimate changes in dopamine release and uptake, yet to our knowledge no systematic comparison amongst these measures has been conducted. To address this lack of uniformity in kinetic analyses, we have created the Demon Voltammetry and Analysis software suite, which is freely available to academic and non-profit institutions. Here we present an explanation of the Demon Acquisition and Analysis features, and demonstrate its utility for acquiring voltammetric data under in vitro, in vivo anesthetized, and freely moving conditions. Additionally, the software was used to compare the sensitivity of multiple kinetic measures of release and uptake to cocaine-induced changes in electrically evoked dopamine efflux in nucleus accumbens core slices. Specifically, we examined and compared tau, full width at half height, half-life, T20, T80, slope, peak height, calibrated peak dopamine concentration, and area under the curve to the well-characterized Michaelis-Menten parameters, dopamine per pulse, maximal uptake rate, and apparent affinity. Based on observed results we recommend tau for measuring dopamine uptake and calibrated peak dopamine concentration for measuring dopamine release. PMID:21392532

  3. Demon voltammetry and analysis software: analysis of cocaine-induced alterations in dopamine signaling using multiple kinetic measures.

    PubMed

    Yorgason, Jordan T; España, Rodrigo A; Jones, Sara R

    2011-11-15

    The fast sampling rates of fast scan cyclic voltammetry make it a favorable method for measuring changes in brain monoamine release and uptake kinetics in slice, anesthetized, and freely moving preparations. The most common analysis technique for evaluating changes in dopamine signaling uses well-established Michaelis-Menten kinetic methods that can accurately model dopamine release and uptake parameters across multiple experimental conditions. Nevertheless, over the years, many researchers have turned to other measures to estimate changes in dopamine release and uptake, yet to our knowledge no systematic comparison amongst these measures has been conducted. To address this lack of uniformity in kinetic analyses, we have created the Demon Voltammetry and Analysis software suite, which is freely available to academic and non-profit institutions. Here we present an explanation of the Demon Voltammetry acquisition and analysis features, and demonstrate its utility for acquiring voltammetric data under in vitro, in vivo anesthetized, and freely moving conditions. Additionally, the software was used to compare the sensitivity of multiple kinetic measures of release and uptake to cocaine-induced changes in electrically evoked dopamine efflux in nucleus accumbens core slices. Specifically, we examined and compared tau, full width at half height, half-life, T₂₀, T₈₀, slope, peak height, calibrated peak dopamine concentration, and area under the curve to the well-characterized Michaelis-Menten parameters, dopamine per pulse, maximal uptake rate, and apparent affinity. Based on observed results we recommend tau for measuring dopamine uptake and calibrated peak dopamine concentration for measuring dopamine release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Solid-state phosphorescence of trans-bis(salicylaldiminato)platinum(II) complexes bearing long alkyl chains: morphology control towards intense emission.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Naruyoshi; Itami, Nao; Naota, Takeshi

    2013-07-15

    Morphology control for intense solid-state phosphorescence of non-emissive, but potentially emissive crystals of platinum complexes and the mechanistic rationale are described. A series of trans-bis(salicylaldiminato)platinum(II) complexes bearing linear alkyl chains (1a: n=5; 1b: n=8; 1c: n=12; 1d: n=14; 1e: n=16; 1f: n=18) was synthesized and the solid-state emission properties were examined by using crystals/aggregates prepared under various precipitation conditions. Crystals of 1e, prepared using "kinetic" conditions including rapid cooling, high concentrations, and poor solvents, emit intensive yellow phosphorescence (λ(max)=545 nm) under UV irradiation at 298 K with an absolute quantum efficiency of 0.36, whereas all the crystals of 1a-1f prepared using "thermodynamic" conditions including slow cooling, low concentrations, and good solvents were either non- or less emissive with Φ(298K) values of 0.12 (1a), 0.11 (1b), 0.10 (1c), 0.07 (1d), 0.02 (1e), and 0.02 (1f) under the same measurement conditions. The amorphous solid 1e, prepared by rapid cooling and freeze-drying, was also non-emissive (Φ(298K)=0.02, 0.02). Temperature-dependent emission spectra showed that the kinetic crystals of 1e exhibit high heat-resistance towards emission decay with increasing temperature, whereas the amorphous solid 1e is entirely heat-quenchable. This is a rare example of the change from a non-emissive crystal into a highly emissive crystal by morphology control through crystal engineering. Emission spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the emissive, kinetic crystals of 1e are clearly distinct from those of the less emissive, thermodynamic crystals of 1a-1f. Single-crystal XRD unequivocally establishes that the thermodynamic crystals of 1d have a multilayered lamellar structure supported by highly regulated, consecutive π-stacking interactions between imine moieties, whereas the kinetic crystals of 1e have a face-to-edge lamellar structure with less

  5. Laser photolysis studies on Cu I complexes of thia-calix[3]pyridine. Phosphorescence from the intramolecular charge-transfer excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Isamu; Hamazawa, Akihisa; Nishioka, Takanori; Adachi, Haruna; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Yoshio; Tsuboyama, Akira; Okada, Shinjiro; Hoshino, Mikio

    2003-04-01

    Copper(I) complexes of thia-calix[3]pyridine in dichloromethane exhibit phosphorescence from the MLCT triplet states at room temperature. The phosphorescence spectrum shifts to red on going from 300 to 180 K. The laser photolysis study carried out in the temperature range 300-180 K reveals that phosphorescence originates from the two triplet states, TH and TL, which are in thermal equilibrium with the energy difference of ca. 5 kcal mol -1.

  6. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  7. Purification of SUMO conjugating enzymes and kinetic analysis of substrate conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMO conjugation to protein substrates requires the concerted action of a dedicated E2 ubiquitin conjugation enzyme (Ubc9) and associated E3 ligases. Although Ubc9 can directly recognize and modify substrate lysine residues that occur within a consensus site for SUMO modification, E3 ligases can redirect specificity and enhance conjugation rates during SUMO conjugation in vitro and in vivo. In this chapter, we will describe methods utilized to purify SUMO conjugating enzymes and model substrates which can be used for analysis of SUMO conjugation in vitro. We will also describe methods to extract kinetic parameters during E3-dependent or E3-independent substrate conjugation. PMID:19107417

  8. Blood, urine, and hair kinetic analysis following an acute lead intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ho, G; Keutgens, A; Schoofs, R; Kotolenko, S; Denooz, R; Charlier, C

    2011-01-01

    A case of lead exposure resulting from the accidental ingestion of a lead-containing solution is reported. Because of clinical management rapidly performed through chelation therapy by 2,3-dimercaptopropane sulfonate sodium and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid, blood lead levels of this 51-year-old patient were moderate (412.9 μg/L) and no clinical symptoms were observed. Numerous blood and urine samples were collected for kinetic analysis of lead elimination. However, we report the first case in which hair samples were analyzed to determine the excretion level of lead after acute intoxication.

  9. Interaction and kinetic analysis for coal and biomass co-gasification by TG-FTIR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaofen; Hu, Song; Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Liqi; Sun, Lushi; Shuai, Chao; Chen, Qindong; He, Limo; Edreis, Elbager M A

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the interaction and kinetic behavior of CO2 gasification of coal, biomass and their blends by thermogravimetry analysis (TG). The gas products evolved from gasification were measured online with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with TG. Firstly, TG experiments indicated that interaction between the coals and biomasses mainly occurred during co-gasification process. The most significant synergistic interaction occurred for LN with SD at the blending mass ratio 4:1. Furthermore, thermal kinetic analysis indicated that the activation energy involved in co-gasification decreased as the SD content increased until the blending ratio of SD with coal reached 4:1. The rise of the frequency factor indicated that the increase of SD content favored their synergistic interaction. Finally, FTIR analysis of co-gasification of SD with LN indicated that except for CO, most gases including CH3COOH, C6H5OH, H2O, etc., were detected at around 50-700°C.

  10. The effect of salinity on waste activated sludge alkaline fermentation and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Baodan; Wang, Shuying; Xing, Liqun; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of salinity on sludge alkaline fermentation at low temperature (20°C) was investigated, and a kinetic analysis was performed. Different doses of sodium chloride (NaCl, 0-25g/L) were added into the fermentation system. The batch-mode results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) increased with salinity. The hydrolysate (soluble protein, polysaccharide) and the acidification products (short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), NH4(+)-N, and PO4(3-)-P) increased with salinity initially, but slightly declined respectively at higher level salinity (20g/L or 20-25g/L). However, the hydrolytic acidification performance increased in the presence of salt compared to that without salt. Furthermore, the results of Haldane inhibition kinetics analysis showed that the salt enhanced the hydrolysis rate of particulate organic matter from sludge particulate and the specific utilization of hydrolysate, and decreased the specific utilization of SCFAs. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis indicated that the importance of polysaccharide on the accumulation of SCFAs was reduced with salt addition, but the importance of protein and NH4(+)-N on SCFA accumulation was increased.

  11. DURIP: Electrokinetic Injection and Separation System for Analysis of Protein and Peptide Transport, Adsorption and Kinetics Instrumentation Proposal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We requested equipment necessary to build an electrokinetic injection and separation system for the analysis of protein...Jul-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: DURIP: Electrokinetic Injection and Separation System for Analysis of...Injection and Separation System for Analysis of Protein and Peptide Transport, Adsorption and Kinetics Instrumentation Proposal Report Title We requested

  12. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  13. Bismuth-Based Coordination Polymers with Efficient Aggregation-Induced Phosphorescence and Reversible Mechanochromic Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Toma, Oksana; Allain, Magali; Meinardi, Francesco; Forni, Alessandra; Botta, Chiara; Mercier, Nicolas

    2016-07-04

    Two bismuth coordination polymers (CPs), (TBA)[BiBr4 (bp4mo)] (TBA=tetrabutylammonium) and [BiBr3 (bp4mo)2 ], which are based on the rarely used simple ditopic ligand N-oxide-4,4'-bipyridine (bp4mo), show mechanochromic luminescence (MCL). High solid-state phosphorescence quantum yields of up to 85 % were determined for (TBA)[BiBr4 (bp4mo)] (λem =540 nm). Thorough investigations of the luminescence properties combined with DFT and TDDFT calculations revealed that the emission is due to aggregation-induced phosphorescence (AIP). Upon grinding, both samples became amorphous, and their luminescence changed from yellow to orange and red, respectively. Heating or exposure to water vapor led to the recovery of the initial luminescence. These materials are the first examples of mechanochromic phosphors based on bismuth(III). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Organic Nanocrystals with Bright Red Persistent Room-Temperature Phosphorescence for Biological Applications.

    PubMed

    Fateminia, S M Ali; Mao, Zhu; Xu, Shidang; Yang, Zhiyong; Chi, Zhenguo; Liu, Bin

    2017-09-25

    Persistent room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) in pure organic materials has attracted great attention because of their unique optical properties. The design of organic materials with bright red persistent RTP remains challenging. Herein, we report a new design strategy for realizing high brightness and long lifetime of red-emissive RTP molecules, which is based on introducing an alkoxy spacer between the hybrid units in the molecule. The spacer offers easy Br-H bond formation during crystallization, which also facilitates intermolecular electron coupling to favor persistent RTP. As the majority of RTP compounds have to be confined in a rigid environment to quench nonradiative relaxation pathways for bright phosphorescence emission, nanocrystallization is used to not only rigidify the molecules but also offer the desirable size and water-dispersity for biomedical applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Protein Labelling with Versatile Phosphorescent Metal Complexes for Live Cell Luminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Connell, Timothy U; James, Janine L; White, Anthony R; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-09-28

    To take advantage of the luminescent properties of d(6) transition metal complexes to label proteins, versatile bifunctional ligands were prepared. Ligands that contain a 1,2,3-triazole heterocycle were synthesised using Cu(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" chemistry and were used to form phosphorescent Ir(III) and Ru(II) complexes. Their emission properties were readily tuned, by changing either the metal ion or the co-ligands. The complexes were tethered to the metalloprotein transferrin using several conjugation strategies. The Ir(III)/Ru(II)-protein conjugates could be visualised in cancer cells using live cell imaging for extended periods without significant photobleaching. These versatile phosphorescent protein-labelling agents could be widely applied to other proteins and biomolecules and are useful alternatives to conventional organic fluorophores for several applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. High efficiency and stable-yellow phosphorescence from OLEDs with a novel fluorinated heteroleptic iridium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yan-Li; Hu, Yong-Xu; Zhao, Jin-Hui; Zhao, Guang-Wei; Qi, Ying; Li, Xiao; Chi, Hai-Jun; Dong, Yan; Xiao, Guo-Yong; Su, Zi-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a heteroleptic bis-cyclometalated iridium complex based on 2-(2,3,4-trifluorophenyl)benzo[d]thiazole [(tfbt)2Ir(acac)] was investigated as a new phosphorescent emitter in OLEDs. The devices showed very high efficiency at various dopant concentrations and maximum efficiency was achieved at 6 wt% dopant concentration. A comparison of the performances of phosphorescent OLEDs with the new emitter versus those with prototype-based (bt)2Ir(acac) emitter revealed a remarkable improvement of efficiency at all dopant concentrations. These preliminary results obtained with the tfbt-based emitter indicate that this family of cyclometalated ligands with multi-fluorine functionalization is a promising compound for the development of highly emissive complexes.

  17. Intracellular and in vivo oxygen sensing using phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Seiji; Yoshihara, Toshitada

    2016-08-01

    Molecular oxygen plays an indispensable role as a terminal electron acceptor in the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Acute or chronic oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) in organisms results in various diseases, and the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanism of hypoxia-related diseases and various cellular responses to hypoxia is an urgent issue. Optical oxygen imaging methods using phosphorescent probes have opened up techniques for noninvasive imaging of the intracellular and tissue oxygen status, and oxygen-sensitive probes play a key role in the development of this approach. We expect that phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes can serve as new oxygen-sensing probes for intracellular and intravascular oxygen imaging in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Employing exciton transfer molecules to increase the lifetime of phosphorescent red organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindla, Florian; Boesing, Manuel; van Gemmern, Philipp; Bertram, Dietrich; Keiper, Dietmar; Heuken, Michael; Kalisch, Holger; Jansen, Rolf H.

    2011-04-01

    The lifetime of phosphorescent red organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is investigated employing either N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB), TMM117, or 4,4',4″-tris(N-carbazolyl)-triphenylamine (TCTA) as hole-conducting host material (mixed with an electron conductor). All OLED (organic vapor phase deposition-processed) show similar efficiencies around 30 lm/W but strongly different lifetimes. Quickly degrading OLED based on TCTA can be stabilized by doping exciton transfer molecules [tris-(phenyl-pyridyl)-Ir (Ir(ppy)3)] to the emission layer. At a current density of 50 mA/cm2 (12 800 cd/m2), a lifetime of 387 h can be achieved. Employing exciton transfer molecules is suggested to prevent the degradation of the red emission layer in phosphorescent white OLED.

  19. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin; Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young; Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse; Young Kim, Woo

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (-0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m2. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq)3 as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  20. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin; Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young; Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse; Young Kim, Woo

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  1. Enhanced exciton diffusion in an organic photovoltaic cell by energy transfer using a phosphorescent sensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, Wade A.; Holmes, Russell J.

    2009-04-01

    We demonstrate enhanced exciton diffusion in an organic photovoltaic cell through the incorporation of a phosphorescent sensitizer. The increase in exciton diffusion length (LD) is realized using a composite electron donor layer consisting of a N ,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N ,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPD) host doped with the phosphorescent guest fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy)3]. The presence of the phosphor at low concentration allows for the population of the long-lived NPD triplet state and an increase in LD. An increase in the NPD LD from 6.5±0.3 to 11.8±0.6 nm is extracted from measurements of the external quantum efficiency for donor layers containing 5 wt % Ir(ppy)3. This enhancement leads to a ˜80% improvement in the power conversion efficiency relative to devices containing an undoped donor layer.

  2. Room-temperature phosphorescence logic gates developed from nucleic acid functionalized carbon dots and graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Rijun; Jin, Hui; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Feifei; Xia, Jianfei; Yang, Min; Bi, Sai; Xia, Yanzhi

    2015-04-01

    Room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) logic gates were developed using capture ssDNA (cDNA) modified carbon dots and graphene oxide (GO). The experimental results suggested the feasibility of these developed RTP-based ``OR'', ``INHIBIT'' and ``OR-INHIBIT'' logic gate operations, using Hg2+, target ssDNA (tDNA) and doxorubicin (DOX) as inputs.Room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) logic gates were developed using capture ssDNA (cDNA) modified carbon dots and graphene oxide (GO). The experimental results suggested the feasibility of these developed RTP-based ``OR'', ``INHIBIT'' and ``OR-INHIBIT'' logic gate operations, using Hg2+, target ssDNA (tDNA) and doxorubicin (DOX) as inputs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: All experimental details, Part S1-3, Fig. S1-6 and Table S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07620f

  3. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of geopolymer gel nanostructure formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    White, Claire E; Provis, John L; Bloomer, Breaunnah; Henson, Neil J; Page, Katharine

    2013-06-14

    With the ever-increasing environmentally-driven demand for technologically advanced structural materials, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to its proven engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted during manufacturing (as much as 80% less CO2 emitted in manufacture, compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of reaction responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerisation process. Here, in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction as a function of time for alkali-activated metakaolin/slag geopolymer binders, including the impact of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerisation reaction. Quantifying the reaction process in situ from X-ray PDF data collected during the initial ten hours can provide an estimate of the total reaction extent, but when combined with data obtained at longer times (128 days here) enables more accurate determination of the overall rate of reaction. To further assess the initial stages of the geopolymerisation reaction process, a pseudo-single step first order rate equation is fitted to the extent of reaction data, which reveals important mechanistic information regarding the role of free silica in the activators in the evolution of the binder systems. Hence, it is shown that in situ X-ray PDF analysis is an ideal experimental local structure tool to probe the reaction kinetics of complex reacting systems involving transitions between disordered/amorphous phases, of which geopolymerisation is an important example.

  4. Kinetics of allosteric conformational transition of a macromolecule prior to ligand binding: analysis of stopped-flow kinetic experiments.

    PubMed

    Galletto, Roberto; Jezewska, Maria J; Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz

    2005-01-01

    Two fundamentally different mechanisms of ligand binding are commonly encountered in biological kinetics. One mechanism is a sequential multistep reaction in which the bimolecular binding step is followed by first-order steps. The other mechanism includes the conformational transition of the macromolecule, before the ligand binding, followed by the ligand binding process to one of the conformational states. In stopped-flow kinetic studies, the reaction mechanism is established by examining the behavior of relaxation times and amplitudes as a function of the reactant concentrations. A major diagnostic tool for detecting the presence of a conformational equilibrium of the macromolecule, before the ligand binding, is the decreasing value of one of the reciprocal relaxation times with the increasing [ligand]. The sequential mechanism cannot generate this behavior for any of the relaxation times. Such dependence is intuitively understood on the basis of approximate expressions for the relaxation times that can be comprehensively derived, using the characteristic equation of the coefficient matrix and polynomial theory. Generally, however, the used approximations may not be fulfilled. On the other hand, the two kinetic mechanisms can always be distinguished, using the approach based on the combined application of pseudo-first-order conditions, with respect to the ligand and the macromolecule. The two experimental conditions differ profoundly in the extent of the effect of the ligand on the protein conformational equilibrium. In a large excess of the ligand, the conformational equilibrium of the macromolecule, before the ligand binding, is strongly affected by the binding process. However, in a large excess of the macromolecule, ligand binding does not perturb the internal equilibrium of the macromolecule. As a result, the normal mode, affected by the conformational transition, is absent in the observed relaxation process. In the case of a sequential mechanism, the number

  5. Identification and characterization of EX1 kinetics in H/D exchange mass spectrometry by peak width analysis.

    PubMed

    Weis, David D; Wales, Thomas E; Engen, John R; Hotchko, Matthew; Ten Eyck, Lynn F

    2006-11-01

    Proteins that undergo cooperative unfolding events display EX1 kinetic signatures in hydrogen exchange mass spectra. The hallmark bimodal isotope pattern observed for EX1 kinetics is distinct from the binomial isotope pattern for uncorrelated exchange (EX2), the normal exchange regime for folded proteins. Detection and characterization of EX1 kinetics is simple when the cooperative unit is large enough that the isotopic envelopes in the bimodal pattern are resolved in the m/z scale but become complicated in cases where the unit is small or there is a mixture of EX1 and EX2 kinetics. Here we describe a data interpretation method involving peak width analysis that makes characterization of EX1 kinetics simple and rapid. The theoretical basis for EX1 and EX2 isotopic signatures and the effects each have on peak width are described. Modeling of EX2 widening and analysis of empirical data for proteins and peptides containing purely EX2 kinetics showed that the amount of widening attributable to stochastic forward- and back exchange in a typical experiment is small and can be quantified. Proteins and peptides with both obvious and less obvious EX1 kinetics were analyzed with the peak width method. Such analyses provide the half-life for the cooperative unfolding event and the relative number of residues involved. Automated analysis of peak width was performed with custom Excel macros and the DEX software package. Peak width analysis is robust, capable of automation, and provides quick interpretation of the key information contained in EX1 kinetic events.

  6. [Hemocirculation and metabolism in intraventricular tumors: kinetic analysis of glucose metabolism].

    PubMed

    Shioya, H; Mineura, K; Kowada, M; Iida, H; Murakami, M; Ogawa, T; Hatazawa, J; Uemura, K

    1996-03-01

    To estimate hemocirculation and proliferating activity of intraventricular tumor, we measured kinetic rate constants (k1, k2, k3) and glucose metabolic rate (kinetic-rCMRGl) using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET), as well as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), blood volume (rCBV), oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF), oxygen metabolic rate (rCMRO2) and autoradiographic rCMRGl (arg-rCMRGl), in patients with intraventricular tumor. The subjects included ten patients, five males and five females, aged from 13 to 53 years with a mean age of 32 years old. Eight tumors were located in the lateral ventricle and two extended into the third ventricle through the foramen of Monro. Another two tumors were located in the fourth ventricle. Histological diagnosis was as follows: five cases of central neurocytoma, one subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, one ependymoma, one choroid plexus carcinoma, one subependymoma, and one meningioma. Tumor lesion on the PET images was determined using CT or MRI, which was performed at levels equivalent to those for the PET scans. For quantitative analysis, regions of interest (ROI) on PET images were delineated on the tumor and the contralateral gray matter. Hemocirculation (rCBF, rCBV) of the tumor was similar to or higher than that of the contralateral gray matter, which corresponded to neuroradiological findings of abundant tumor vessels. Oxygen metabolic parameters (rOEF, rCMRO2) were significantly lower than those of the contralateral gray matter. Especially, low rOEF resulted in an excessive blood flow beyond oxygen demand of the tumor. The raised metabolic rate (rCMRO2/rCMRGl), as compared with that of meningiomas or malignant gliomas, suggested aerobic glycolysis. The kinetic rate constants of tracer transport from blood to brain (k1), reverse transport from brain to blood (k2), and phosphorylation (k3) were analyzed according to the three-compartment model of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG). Tumor k1 and k2 values were similar

  7. Ultraviolet-stimulated fluorescence and phosphorescence of aromatic hydrocarbons in water ice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul V; Hodyss, Robert; Bolser, Diana K; Bhartia, Rohit; Lane, Arthur L; Kanik, Isik

    2011-03-01

    A principal goal of astrobiology is to detect and inventory the population of organic compounds on extraterrestrial bodies. Targets of specific interest include the wealth of icy worlds that populate our Solar System. One potential technique for in situ detection of organics trapped in water ice matrices involves ultraviolet-stimulated emission from these compounds. Here, we report a preliminary investigation into the feasibility of this concept. Specifically, fluorescence and phosphorescence of pure benzene ice and 1% mixtures of benzene, toluene, p-xylene, m-xylene, and o-xylene in water ice, respectively, were studied at temperatures ranging from ∼17 K up to 160 K. Spectra were measured from 200-500 nm (50,000-20,000 cm(-1)) while ice mixtures were excited at 248.6 nm. The temperature dependence of the fluorescence and phosphorescence intensities was found to be independent of the thermal history and phase of the ice matrix in all cases examined. All phosphorescent emissions were found to decrease in intensity with increasing temperature. Similar behavior was observed for fluorescence in pure benzene, while the observed fluorescence intensity in water ices was independent of temperature.

  8. Multi-Faceted Scientific Strategies Toward Better Solid-State Lighting of Phosphorescent OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad Omary; Bruce Gnade; Qi Wang; Oussama Elbjeirami; Chi Yang; Nigel Shepherd; Huiping Jia; Manuel Quevedo; Husam Alshareef; Minghang Li; Ming-Te Lin; Wei-Hsuan Chen; Iain Oswald; Pankaj Sinha; Ravi Arvapally; Usha Kaipa; John Determan; Sreekar Marpu; Roy McDougald; Gustavo Garza; Jason Halbert; Unnat Bhansali; Michael Perez

    2010-08-31

    This project has advanced solid-state lighting (SSL) by utilizing new phosphorescent systems for use in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The technical approach was two-fold: a) Targeted synthesis and screening of emitters designed to exhibit phosphorescence with maximized brightness in the solid state; and b) Construction and optimizing the performance of monochromatic and white OLEDs from the best new emitters to improve performance metrics versus the state of the art. The phosphorescent systems were screened candidates among a large variety of recentlysynthesized and newly-designed molecular and macromolecular metal-organic phosphors. The emitters and devices have been optimized to maximize light emission and color metrics, improve the long-term durability of emitters and devices, and reduce the manufacturing cost both by simplifying the process flow and by seeking less expensive device components than common ones. The project succeeded in all these goals upon comparison of the best materials and devices investigated vs. the state of the art of the technology.

  9. Phosphorescent ruthenium complexes with a nitroimidazole unit that image oxygen fluctuation in tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Son, Aoi; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Hara, Daiki; Ito, Takeo; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2015-02-02

    Understanding oxygen fluctuation in a cancerous tumor is important for effective treatment, especially during radiotherapy. In this paper, ruthenium complexes bearing a nitroimidazole group are shown to report the oxygen status in tumor tissue directly. The nitroimidazole group was known to be accumulated in hypoxic tumor tissues. On the other hand, the ruthenium complex showed strong phosphorescence around 600 nm. The emission of ruthenium is quenched instantaneously by molecular oxygen due to energy transfer between triplet states of oxygen and ruthenium complex, but the emission is then recovered by the removal of oxygen. Thus, we could observe oxygen fluctuation in tumor tissue in a real-time manner by monitoring the phosphorescence of the ruthenium complex. The versatility of the probe is demonstrated by monitoring oxygen fluctuation in living cells and tumor tissue planted in mice. The ruthenium complex promptly penetrated plasma membrane and accumulated in cells to emit its oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. In vivo experiments revealed that the oxygen level in tumor tissue seems to fluctuate at the sub-minute timescale. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Phosphorescent oxygen sensor with dendritic protection and two-photon absorbing antenna.

    PubMed

    Briñas, Raymond P; Troxler, Thomas; Hochstrasser, Robin M; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2005-08-24

    Imaging oxygen in 3D with submicron spatial resolution can be made possible by combining phosphorescence quenching technique with multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Because Pt and Pd porphyrin-based phosphorescent dyes, traditionally used as phosphors in biological oxygen measurements, exhibit extremely low two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections, we designed a nanosensor for oxygen, in which a 2P absorbing antenna is coupled to a metalloporphyrin core via intramolecular energy transfer (ET) with the purpose of amplifying the 2PA induced phosphorescence of the metalloporphyrin. The central component of the device is a polyfunctionalized Pt porphyrin, whose triplet state emission at ambient temperatures is strong, occurs in the near infrared and is sensitive to O2. The 2PA chromophores are chosen in such a way that their absorption is maximal in the near infrared (NIR) window of tissue (e.g., 700-900 nm), while their fluorescence is overlapped with the absorption band(s) of the core metalloporphyrin, ensuring an efficient antenna-core resonance ET. The metalloporphyrin-antenna construct is embedded inside the protecting dendritic jacket, which isolates the core from interactions with biological macromolecules, controls diffusion of oxygen and makes the entire sensor water-soluble. Several Pt porphyrin-coumarin based sensors were synthesized and their photophyics studied to evaluate the proposed design.

  11. Hybrid detection of target sequence DNA based on phosphorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yanming; Lv, Jinzhi; Yan, Guiqin

    2017-03-07

    The severe background fluorescence and scattering light of real biological samples or environmental samples largely reduce the sensitivity and accuracy of fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors based on fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). To solve this problem, we designed a novel target sequence DNA biosensor based on phosphorescent resonance energy transfer (PRET). This sensor relied on Mn-doped ZnS (Mn-ZnS) room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) QDs/poly-(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) nanocomposite (QDs(+)) as the energy donor and the single-strand DNA-ROX as the energy receptor. Thereby, an RTP biosensor was built and used to quantitatively detect target sequence DNA. This biosensor had a detection limit of 0.16nM and a linear range of 0.5-20nM for target sequence DNA. The dependence on RTP of QDs effectively avoided the interference from background fluorescence and scattering light in biological samples. Moreover, this sensor did not need sample pretreatment. Thus, this sensor compared with FRET is more feasible for quantitative detection of target sequence DNA in biological samples. Interestingly, the QDs(+) nanocomposite prolonged the phosphorescence lifetime of Mn-ZnS QDs by 2.6 times to 4.94ms, which was 5-6 magnitude-order larger than that of fluorescent QDs. Thus, this sensor largely improves the optical properties of QDs and permits chemical reactions at a long enough time scale.

  12. Phosphorescence detection of manganese(VII) based on Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Pan; Lu, Li-Qiang; Cao, Wei-Cheng; Tian, Xi-Ke

    2017-02-01

    The phosphorescent L-cysteine modified manganese-doped zinc sulfide quantum dots (L-cys-MnZnS QDs) was developed for a highly sensitive detection of permanganate anions (MnO4-). L-cys-MnZnS QDs, which were easily synthesized in aqueous media using safe and low-cost materials, can emit intense phosphorescence even though the solution was not deoxygenated. However, the phosphorescence of L-cys-Mn-ZnS QDs was strongly quenched by MnO4- ascribed to the oxidation of L-cys and the increase of surface defects on L-cys-MnZnS QDs. Under the optimal conditions, L-cys-MnZnS QDs offer high selectivity over other anions for MnO4- determination, and good linear Stern-Volmer equation was obtained for MnO4- in the range of 0.5-100 μM with a detection limit down to 0.24 μM. The developed method was finally applied to the detection of MnO4- in water samples, and the spike-recoveries fell in the range of 95-106%.

  13. Mono- and Dinuclear Phosphorescent Rhenium(I) Complexes: Impact of Subcellular Localization on Anticancer Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Chen, Mu-He; Hao, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Elucidation of relationship among chemical structure, cellular uptake, localization, and biological activity of anticancer metal complexes is important for the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Organometallic rhenium(I) tricarbonyl compounds have emerged as potential multifunctional anticancer drug candidates that can integrate therapeutic and imaging capabilities in a single molecule. Herein, two mononuclear phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes (Re1 and Re2), along with their corresponding dinuclear complexes (Re3 and Re4), were designed and synthesized as potent anticancer agents. The subcellular accumulation of Re1-Re4 was conveniently analyzed by confocal microscopy in situ in live cells by utilizing their intrinsic phosphorescence. We found that increased lipophilicity of the bidentate ligands could enhance their cellular uptake, leading to improved anticancer efficacy. The dinuclear complexes were more potent than the mononuclear counterparts. The molecular anticancer mechanisms of action evoked by Re3 and Re4 were explored in detail. Re3 with a lower lipophilicity localizes to lysosomes and induces caspase-independent apoptosis, whereas Re4 with higher lipophilicity specially accumulates in mitochondria and induces caspase-independent paraptosis in cancer cells. Our study demonstrates that subcellular localization is crucial for the anticancer mechanisms of these phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes.

  14. Real-time tracking mitochondrial dynamic remodeling with two-photon phosphorescent iridium (III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Diao, JiaJie; Liu, Jiankang; Ji, Liangnian; Long, Jiangang; Chao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion control the shape, size, number, and function of mitochondria in the cells of organisms from yeast to mammals. The disruption of mitochondrial fission and fusion is involved in severe human diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Agents that can real-time track the mitochondrial dynamics are of great importance. However, the short excitation wavelengths and rapidly photo-bleaching properties of commercial mitochondrial dyes render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics. Thus, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior photo-stability under continual light irradiation, deep tissue penetration and at intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds employ low-energy near-infrared light and have emerged as a non-invasive tool for real-time cell imaging. Here, cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir5) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for the real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion. The results indicate that Ir2 is well suited for two-photon phosphorescent tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion in living cells and in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This study provides a practical use for mitochondrial targeting two-photon phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  16. An Inducible Reconstitution System for the Real-Time Kinetic Analysis of Protease Activity and Inhibition Inside the Membrane.

    PubMed

    Baker, R P; Urban, S

    2017-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are an ancient and diverse group of multispanning membrane proteins that cleave transmembrane substrates inside the membrane to effect a wide range of biological processes. As proteases, a clear understanding of their function requires kinetic dissection of their catalytic mechanism, but this is difficult to achieve for membrane proteins. Kinetic measurements in detergent systems are complicated by micelle fusion/exchange, which introduces an additional kinetic step and imposes system-specific behaviors (e.g., cooperativity). Conversely, kinetic analysis in proteoliposomes is hindered by premature substrate cleavage during coreconstitution, and lack of methods to quantify proteolysis in membranes in real time. In this chapter, we describe a method for the real-time kinetic analysis of intramembrane proteolysis in model liposomes. Our assay is inducible, because the enzyme is held inactive by low pH during reconstitution, and fluorogenic, since fluorescence emission from the substrate is quenched near lipids but restored upon proteolytic release from the membrane. The precise measurement of initial reaction velocities continuously in real time facilitates accurate steady-state kinetic analysis of intramembrane proteolysis and its inhibition inside the membrane environment. Using real data we describe a step-by-step strategy to implement this assay for essentially any intramembrane protease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathway and kinetic analysis on the propyl radical + 02 reaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzelli, J.W.; Pitz, W.J.

    1997-05-01

    In this study of the reaction of alkyl radicals with molecular oxygen, we analyze the propyl + 02 reaction system using thermochemical kinetics, Transition State Theory (TST), molecular thermodynamic properties, quantum Kassel analysis (quantum RRK) for k(E) and modified strong collision analysis for fall off. Cyclic transition states for both hydrogen transfer and the H02 concerted elimination from propylperoxy are calculated using semi-empirical (MOPAC PM3) calculations [8] in addition to transition states for H02 elimination and epoxide formation from hydroperoxy-isopropyl. Computed rate constants for propyl + 02 are compared to the values of Gulati and Walker who measured the rate constants at 50 torr and over a temperature range of 653 to 773 K. Computed rate constants are also used in a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and compared to the n- propyl + 02 data of Slagle. They measured the rate of disappearance of n-propyl by reaction with 02 over a temperature range of 297 to 635 K and a pressure range of 0.4 to 7 Torr, as well as the fall off data of the Kaiser and Wallington.

  18. Characterization of the efficiency of microbore liquid chromatography columns by van Deemter and kinetic plot analysis.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, Terence; Loeker, Denise; Teutenberg, Thorsten; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-10-01

    The efficiency of miniaturized liquid chromatography columns with inner diameters between 200 and 300 μm has been investigated using a dedicated micro-liquid chromatography system. Fully porous, core-shell and monolithic commercially available stationary phases were compared applying van Deemter and kinetic plot analysis. The sub-2 μm fully porous as well as the 2.7 μm core-shell particle packed columns showed superior efficiency and similar values for the minimum reduced plate heights (2.56-2.69) before correction for extra-column contribution compared to normal-bore columns. Moreover, the influence of extra-column contribution was investigated to demonstrate the difference between apparent and intrinsic efficiency by replacing the column by a zero dead volume union to determine the band spreading caused by the system. It was demonstrated that 72% of the intrinsic efficiency could be reached. The results of the kinetic plot analysis indicate the superior performance of the sub-2 μm fully porous particle packed column for ultra-fast liquid chromatography.

  19. Theoretical analysis of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with gel-immobilized oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Livshits, M A; Mirzabekov, A D

    1996-01-01

    A new method of DNA sequencing by hybridization using a microchip containing a set of immobilized oligonucleotides is being developed. A theoretical analysis is presented of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with deoxynucleotide molecules chemically tethered in a polyacrylamide gel layer. The analysis has shown that long-term evolution of the spatial distribution and of the amount of DNA bound in a hybridization cell is governed by "retarded diffusion," i.e., diffusion of the DNA interrupted by repeated association and dissociation with immobile oligonucleotide molecules. Retarded diffusion determines the characteristic time of establishing a final equilibrium state in a cell, i.e., the state with the maximum quantity and a uniform distribution of bound DNA. In the case of cells with the most stable, perfect duplexes, the characteristic time of retarded diffusion (which is proportional to the equilibrium binding constant and to the concentration of binding sites) can be longer than the duration of the real hybridization procedure. This conclusion is indirectly confirmed by the observation of nonuniform fluorescence of labeled DNA in perfect-match hybridization cells (brighter at the edges). For optimal discrimination of perfect duplexes from duplexes with mismatches the hybridization process should be brought to equilibrium under low-temperature nonsaturation conditions for all cells. The kinetic differences between perfect and nonperfect duplexes in the gel allow further improvement in the discrimination through additional washing at low temperature after hybridization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913616

  20. Kinetic analysis for formation of Cd1-xZnxSe solid-solution nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yun-Mo; Lee, Yong-Ji; Park, Kyung-Soo

    2006-07-19

    Kinetic analysis on the nanocrystal solid-solution formation was performed by heat treating CdSe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals, synthesized via a typical TOP/TOPO approach, at different temperatures for different time periods. X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak shifts in Cd1-xZnxSe cores according to the solid-solution treatments were monitored and used for the estimation of the lattice parameter change. The degree of solid-solution formation was determined considering the compositional variation in Cd1-xZnxSe cores, which was obtained from the Vegard's law. The degree of solid-solution formation (x) was applied to Jander analysis, and an Arrhenius-type plot was produced using the slopes of Jander plots. The activation energy for solid-solution formation was determined as approximately 152 kJ/mol, which evidently indicates that the diffusion of Zn2+ ions in the CdSe-ZnSe system is the governing mechanism for the Cd1-xZnxSe solid-solution formation. The Jander equation to predict the solid-solution formation kinetics for the CdSe/ZnSe core/shell systems was completed using the reaction rate constant (k).

  1. A common neighbor analysis of crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charged spherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia Bañuelos, Efraín; Contreras Aburto, Claudio; Maldonado Arce, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The topological analysis tool known as the common neighbor analysis (CNA) is used for the first time in this work to analyze crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. For this purpose, Brownian dynamics computer simulations are implemented to investigate the crystallization kinetics of homogeneously melted colloidal crystals that are composed of hard-core-screened-Coulomb interacting particles. The results are in agreement with recent static structure factor measurements that could indicate the presence of icosahedral units in the metastable melt, and with the fact that weakly screened charged colloids crystallize into body-centered-cubic (bcc) ordering. A two-step crystallization pathway is found, in which the population of bcc-subunit CNA-pairs satisfactorily obeys a Verhulst model. Moreover, the CNA helped to unveil that the excess entropy obeys a quasi-universal functional form, relating the behavior of colloidal, molecular, and metallic liquid systems. The work contributes to the scientific understanding of the crystallization pathway of charged colloids, and to the development of new ways to assess the degree of crystalline order, starting from the excess entropy.

  2. Kinetic and Kinematic Analysis for Assessing the Differences in Countermovement Jump Performance in Rugby Players.

    PubMed

    Floría, Pablo; Gómez-Landero, Luis A; Suárez-Arrones, Luis; Harrison, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Floría, P, Gómez-Landero, LA, Suárez-Arrones, L, and Harrison, AJ. Kinetic and kinematic analysis for assessing the differences in countermovement jump performance in rugby players. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2533-2539, 2016-The aim of this study was to ascertain the differences in kinetic and kinematic profiles between better and poorer performers of the vertical jump within a homogeneous group of trained adults. Fifty rugby players were divided into low scoring (LOW) and high scoring (HIGH) groups based on their performance in the vertical jump. The force, velocity, displacement, and rate of force development (RFD)-time curves were analyzed to determine the differences between groups. The analysis of the data showed differences in all the patterns of the ensemble mean curves of the HIGH and LOW groups. During the eccentric phase, the differences in the HIGH group with respect to the LOW group were lower crouch position, higher downward velocity, and higher force and RFD during the braking of the downward movement. During the concentric phase, the HIGH group achieved higher upward velocity, higher force at the end of phase, and a higher position at takeoff. The higher jump performances seem to be related to a more effective stretch-shortening cycle function that is characterized by a deeper and faster countermovement with higher eccentric forces being applied to decelerate the downward movement leading to enhanced force generation during the concentric phase.

  3. A common neighbor analysis of crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charged spherical colloids.

    PubMed

    Urrutia Bañuelos, Efraín; Contreras Aburto, Claudio; Maldonado Arce, Amir

    2016-03-07

    The topological analysis tool known as the common neighbor analysis (CNA) is used for the first time in this work to analyze crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. For this purpose, Brownian dynamics computer simulations are implemented to investigate the crystallization kinetics of homogeneously melted colloidal crystals that are composed of hard-core-screened-Coulomb interacting particles. The results are in agreement with recent static structure factor measurements that could indicate the presence of icosahedral units in the metastable melt, and with the fact that weakly screened charged colloids crystallize into body-centered-cubic (bcc) ordering. A two-step crystallization pathway is found, in which the population of bcc-subunit CNA-pairs satisfactorily obeys a Verhulst model. Moreover, the CNA helped to unveil that the excess entropy obeys a quasi-universal functional form, relating the behavior of colloidal, molecular, and metallic liquid systems. The work contributes to the scientific understanding of the crystallization pathway of charged colloids, and to the development of new ways to assess the degree of crystalline order, starting from the excess entropy.

  4. Improved efficiency in blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices using host materials of lower triplet energy than the phosphorescent blue emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, James S.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Wang, Liang; Sapochak, Linda S.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2011-03-15

    Data from a series of phosphorescent blue organic light emitting devices OLEDs with emissive layers consisting of either CBP:6% Firpic or mCP:6% FIrpic show that the triplet energy of the hole and electron transport layers can have a larger influence on the external quantum efficiency of an operating OLED than the triplet energy of the host material. These results are important and insightful given the commonly held view that host materials for phosphorescent OLEDs must have a triplet energy higher than that of the emitter in order to obtain high external quantum efficiency (EQE). A new host material, 4-(di-ptolylaminophenyl)diphenylphosphine oxide (DHM-A2), which has a triplet energy less than that of FIrpic is also reported. OLEDs fabricated using DHM-A2 show improved performance (lower drive voltage and higher external quantum efficiency) over OLEDs using 4- (diphenylphosphoryl)-N,N-diphenylaniline (HMA1), a high performance ambipolar DHM-A2 analogue with a triplet energy greater than FIrpic. Our results suggest modified design rules for the development of new, high performance host materials., ames, more focus can be placed on molecular structures that provide good charge transport (i.e., ambipolarity for charge balance) and good molecular stability (for long lifetimes). This improved understanding provides additional flexibility in order to generate OLEDs with lower operating voltage and longer lifetime, while still providing high EQE.

  5. Engineering substrate preference in subtilisin: structural and kinetic analysis of a specificity mutant.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Biao; London, Viktoriya; Fisher, Kathryn E; Gallagher, D Travis; Bryan, Philip N

    2008-06-24

    Bacillus subtilisin has been a popular model protein for engineering altered substrate specificity. Although some studies have succeeded in increasing the specificity of subtilisin, they also demonstrate that high specificity is difficult to achieve solely by engineering selective substrate binding. In this paper, we analyze the structure and transient state kinetic behavior of Sbt160, a subtilisin engineered to strongly prefer substrates with phenylalanine or tyrosine at the P4 position. As in previous studies, we measure improvements in substrate affinity and overall specificity. Structural analysis of an inactive version of Sbt160 in complex with its cognate substrate reveals improved interactions at the S4 subsite with a P4 tyrosine. Comparison of transient state kinetic behavior against an optimal sequence (DFKAM) and a similar, but suboptimal, sequence (DVRAF) reveals the kinetic and thermodynamic basis for increased specificity, as well as the limitations of this approach. While highly selective substrate binding is achieved in Sbt160, several factors cause sequence specificity to fall short of that observed with natural processing subtilisins. First, for substrate sequences which are nearly optimal, the acylation reaction becomes faster than substrate dissociation. As a result, the level of discrimination among these substrates diminishes due to the coupling between substrate binding and the first chemical step (acylation). Second, although Sbt160 has 24-fold higher substrate affinity for the optimal substrate DFKAM than for DVRAF, the increased substrate binding energy is not translated into improved transition state stabilization of the acylation reaction. Finally, as interactions at subsites become stronger, the rate-determining step in peptide hydrolysis changes from acylation to product release. Thus, the release of the product becomes sluggish and leads to a low k(cat) for the reaction. This also leads to strong product inhibition of substrate

  6. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of microalgae via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): A state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Bach, Quang-Vu; Chen, Wei-Hsin

    2017-06-19

    Pyrolysis is a promising route for biofuels production from microalgae at moderate temperatures (400-600°C) in an inert atmosphere. Depending on the operating conditions, pyrolysis can produce biochar and/or bio-oil. In practice, knowledge for thermal decomposition characteristics and kinetics of microalgae during pyrolysis is essential for pyrolyzer design and pyrolysis optimization. Recently, the pyrolysis kinetics of microalgae has become a crucial topic and received increasing interest from researchers. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has been employed as a proven technique for studying microalgae pyrolysis in a kinetic control regime. In addition, a number of kinetic models have been applied to process the TGA data for kinetic evaluation and parameters estimation. This paper aims to provide a state-of-the art review on recent research activities in pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of various microalgae. Common kinetic models predicting the thermal degradation of microalgae are examined and their pros and cons are illustrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. White-light-emitting long-lasting phosphorescence in Dy{sup 3+}-doped SrSiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang Jinyong; Liu Yingliang . E-mail: tliuyl@jnu.edu.cn; Zhang Jianxian

    2006-01-15

    We report on a luminescent phenomenon in Dy{sup 3+}-doped SrSiO{sub 3} long-lasting phosphor. After irradiation by a 254-nm UV lamp for 5min, the Dy{sup 3+}-doped SrSiO{sub 3} phosphor emits white light-emitting long-lasting phosphorescence for more than 1h even after the irradiation source has been removed. Photoluminescence, long-lasting phosphorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra are used to explain this phenomenon. Photoluminescence spectra reveal that the white light-emitting long-lasting phosphorescence originated from the two mixtures of Dy{sup 3+} characteristic luminescence, the 480-nm blue emission ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}->{sup 6}H{sub 15/2}) and the 572-nm yellow emission ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}->{sup 6}H{sub 13/2}). TL spectra shows that the introduction of Dy{sup 3+} ions into the SrSiO{sub 3} host produces a highly dense trapping level at 377K (0.59eV), which is responsible for the long-lasting phosphorescence at room temperature. A possible mechanism of the long-lasting phosphorescence based on the experimental results is proposed. It is considered that the long-lasting phosphorescence is due to persistent energy transfer from the electron traps to the Dy{sup 3+} ions, which creates the persistent luminescence of Dy{sup 3+} to produce the white light-emitting long-lasting phosphorescence.

  8. Kinetic analysis and probability mapping applied to the detection of ovarian cancer by radioimmunoscintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Granowska, M.; Nimmon, C.C.; Britton, K.E.; Crowther, M.; Mather, S.J.; Slevin, M.L.; Shepherd, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    Kinetic analysis with probability mapping is an objective method of serial image analysis applicable to radioimmunoscintigraphy. The technique is described and subjected to clinical testing by comparing the prediction of biopsy histology from the probability map in patients coming to operation. In those with ovarian cancer undergoing second-look laparotomy after completing full courses of chemotherapy, the prediction of histology in 108 biopsy sites was 45 true positives and 38 true negatives, sensitivity 80%, specificity 73%, accuracy 77% p less than 0.001. In patients with tumors less than 2 cm diameter, 41 biopsy sites were predicted with a specificity of 78% and an accuracy of 76%, p less than 0.01. The technique is reducing the need for second-look laparotomy in patients with subclinical and subradiological disease. Such disease is suitable for intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy.

  9. A critical analysis of the accuracy of several numerical techniques for combustion kinetic rate equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhadrishnan, Krishnan

    1993-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the accuracy of several techniques recently developed for integrating stiff ordinary differential equations is presented. The techniques include two general-purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE developed for an arbitrary system of ordinary differential equations, and three specialized codes CHEMEQ, CREK1D, and GCKP4 developed specifically to solve chemical kinetic rate equations. The accuracy study is made by application of these codes to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical reactions at constant pressure, and include all three combustion regimes: induction, heat release, and equilibration. To illustrate the error variation in the different combustion regimes the species are divided into three types (reactants, intermediates, and products), and error versus time plots are presented for each species type and the temperature. These plots show that CHEMEQ is the most accurate code during induction and early heat release. During late heat release and equilibration, however, the other codes are more accurate. A single global quantity, a mean integrated root-mean-square error, that measures the average error incurred in solving the complete problem is used to compare the accuracy of the codes. Among the codes examined, LSODE is the most accurate for solving chemical kinetics problems. It is also the most efficient code, in the sense that it requires the least computational work to attain a specified accuracy level. An important finding is that use of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation to compute the temperature can be more accurate and efficient than integrating the temperature differential equation.

  10. Simultaneous kinetic spectrophotometric analysis of five synthetic food colorants with the aid of chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yongnian; Wang, Yong; Kokot, Serge

    2009-04-30

    This paper describes a simple and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of Amaranth, Ponceau 4R, Sunset Yellow, Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue in mixtures with the aid of chemometrics. The method involved two coupled reactions, viz. the reduction of iron(III) by the analytes to iron(II) in sodium acetate/hydrochloric acid solution (pH 1.71) and the chromogenic reaction between iron(II) and hexacyanoferrate(III) ions to yield a Prussian blue peak at 760 nm. The spectral data were recorded over the 500-1000 nm wavelength range every 2s for 600 s. The kinetic data were collected at 760 nm and 600 s, and linear calibration models were satisfactorily constructed for each of the dyes with detection limits in the range of 0.04-0.50 mg L(-1). Multivariate calibration models for kinetic data were established and verified for methods such as the Iterative target transform factor analysis (ITTFA), principal component regression (PCR), partial least squares (PLS), and principal component-radial basis function-artificial neural network (PC-RBF-ANN) with and without wavelet packet transform (WPT) pre-treatment. The PC-RBF-ANN with WPT calibration performed somewhat better than others on the basis of the %RPE(T) (approximately 9) and %Recovery parameters (approximately 108), although the effect of the WPT pre-treatment was marginal (approximately 0.5% RPE(T)). The proposed method was applied for the simultaneous determination of the five colorants in foodstuff samples, and the results were comparable with those from a reference HPLC method.

  11. Kinetic analysis of the unique error signature of human DNA polymerase ν†

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Mercedes E.; Potapova, Olga; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Joyce, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    The fidelity of DNA synthesis by A-family DNA polymerases ranges from very accurate for bacterial, bacteriophage and mitochondrial family members to very low for certain eukaryotic homologues. The latter include Pol ν which, among all A-family polymerases, is uniquely prone to misincorporate dTTP opposite template G in a highly sequence-dependent manner. Here we present a kinetic analysis of this unusual error specificity, in four different sequence contexts and in comparison to Pol ν’s more accurate Family A homologue, the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I. The kinetic data strongly correlate with rates of stable misincorporation during gap-filling DNA synthesis. The lower fidelity of Pol ν compared to Klenow fragment can be attributed primarily to a much lower catalytic efficiency for correct dNTP incorporation, whereas both enzymes have similar kinetic parameters for G-dTTP misinsertion. The major contributor to sequence-dependent differences in Pol ν error rates is the reaction rate, kpol. In the sequence context where fidelity is highest, kpol for correct G-dCTP incorporation by Pol ν is ~ 15-fold faster than kpol for G-dTTP misinsertion. However, in sequence contexts where the error rate is higher, kpol is the same for both correct and mismatched dNTPs, implying that the transition state does not provide additional discrimination against misinsertion. The results suggest that Pol ν may be fine-tuned to function when high enzyme activity is not a priority and may even be disadvantageous, and that the relaxed active-site specificity towards the G-dTTP mispair may be associated with its cellular function(s). PMID:22008035

  12. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  13. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-“coupled”- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz–Kalos–Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary

  14. Cerebral Blood Oxygenation Measurement Based on Oxygen-dependent Quenching of Phosphorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Wu, Weicheng; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of the spatiotemporal characteristics of cerebral blood and tissue oxygenation is crucial for better understanding of the neuro-metabolic-vascular relationship. Development of new pO2 measurement modalities with simultaneous monitoring of pO2 in larger fields of view with higher spatial and/or temporal resolution will enable greater insight into the functioning of the normal brain and will also have significant impact on diagnosis and treatment of neurovascular diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and head injury. Optical imaging modalities have shown a great potential to provide high spatiotemporal resolution and quantitative imaging of pO2 based on hemoglobin absorption in visible and near infrared range of optical spectrum. However, multispectral measurement of cerebral blood oxygenation relies on photon migration through the highly scattering brain tissue. Estimation and modeling of tissue optical parameters, which may undergo dynamic changes during the experiment, is typically required for accurate estimation of blood oxygenation. On the other hand, estimation of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence should not be significantly affected by the changes in the optical parameters of the tissue and provides an absolute measure of pO2. Experimental systems that utilize oxygen-sensitive dyes have been demonstrated in in vivo studies of the perfused tissue as well as for monitoring the oxygen content in tissue cultures, showing that phosphorescence quenching is a potent technology capable of accurate oxygen imaging in the physiological pO2 range. Here we demonstrate with two different imaging modalities how to perform measurement of pO2 in cortical vasculature based on phosphorescence lifetime imaging. In first demonstration we present wide field of view imaging of pO2 at the cortical surface of a rat. This imaging modality has relatively simple experimental setup based on a CCD camera and a

  15. Energy transfer and device performance in phosphorescent dye doped polymer light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Yong-Young; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Jang-Joo; Yase, Kiyoshi

    2003-02-01

    Singlet and triplet-triplet energy transfer in phosphorescent dye doped polymer light emitting devices were investigated. Poly(N-vinylcarbazol) and poly[9,9'-di-n-hexyl-2,7-fluorene-alt- 1,4-(2,5-di-n-hexyloxy)phenylene] (PFHP) were selected as the host polymer for the phosphorescent dopants fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium(III) [Ir(ppy)3] and 2,3,7,8,12,13, 17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphyrin platinum(II) (PtOEP) because of their high triplet energy levels and long phosphorescence lifetimes. In case of PVK film, efficient triplet energy transfers to both PtOEP and Ir(ppy)3 were observed. In contrast, the triplet energy transfer did not occur or was very weak from PFHP to both PtOEP and Ir(ppy)3 although usual requirements for triplet energy transfer were satisfied. Furthermore, the singlet-singlet energy transfer did not take place from PFHP to Ir(ppy)3 in doped films even though the Förster radius is more than 30 Å. However, the blended film of Ir(ppy)3 with PFHP and PMMA showed the green emission from Ir(ppy)3 via singlet energy transfer. In addition, the solution of PFHP and Ir(ppy)3 (8 wt. %) in p-xylene also showed green emission. The blocking of the energy transfers in the phosphorescent dye doped PFHP films is found to be originated from the formation of aggregates which is evident from the microscopic images taken by transmission electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and fluorescence microscope. The formation of aggregates prevents dopant molecules from being in close proximity with host molecules thereby inhibiting energy transfer processes. The phase separation deteriorates the device performance also. Therefore, the chemical compatibility of a dopant with a host polymer as well as conventional requirements for energy transfers must be significantly considered to fabricate efficient phosphorescent dye doped polymer light emitting devices.

  16. Unraveling the Decomposition Process of Lead(II) Acetate: Anhydrous Polymorphs, Hydrates, and Byproducts and Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Casado, Francisco J; Ramos-Riesco, Miguel; Rodríguez-Cheda, José A; Cucinotta, Fabio; Matesanz, Emilio; Miletto, Ivana; Gianotti, Enrica; Marchese, Leonardo; Matěj, Zdeněk

    2016-09-06

    Lead(II) acetate [Pb(Ac)2, where Ac = acetate group (CH3-COO(-))2] is a very common salt with many and varied uses throughout history. However, only lead(II) acetate trihydrate [Pb(Ac)2·3H2O] has been characterized to date. In this paper, two enantiotropic polymorphs of the anhydrous salt, a novel hydrate [lead(II) acetate hemihydrate: Pb(Ac)2·(1)/2H2O], and two decomposition products [corresponding to two different basic lead(II) acetates: Pb4O(Ac)6 and Pb2O(Ac)2] are reported, with their structures being solved for the first time. The compounds present a variety of molecular arrangements, being 2D or 1D coordination polymers. A thorough thermal analysis, by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), was also carried out to study the behavior and thermal data of the salt and its decomposition process, in inert and oxygenated atmospheres, identifying the phases and byproducts that appear. The complex thermal behavior of lead(II) acetate is now solved, finding the existence of another hydrate, two anhydrous enantiotropic polymorphs, and some byproducts. Moreover, some of them are phosphorescent at room temperature. The compounds were studied by TGA, DSC, X-ray diffraction, and UV-vis spectroscopy.

  17. Rhenium(I) polypyridine dibenzocyclooctyne complexes as phosphorescent bioorthogonal probes: Synthesis, characterization, emissive behavior, and biolabeling properties.

    PubMed

    Choi, Alex Wing-Tat; Liu, Hua-Wei; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of rhenium(I) polypyridine complexes appended with a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) moiety as bioorthogonal probes for azide-modified biomolecules. Three phosphorescent rhenium(I) polypyridine DIBO complexes [Re(N^N)(CO)3(py-C6-DIBO)][CF3SO3] (py-C6-DIBO=3-(N-(6-(3,4:7,8-dibenzocyclooctyne-5-oxycarbonylamino)hexyl)aminocarbonyl)pyridine; N^N=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1a), 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me4-phen) (2a), 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Ph2-phen) (3a)) and their DIBO-free counterparts [Re(N^N)(CO)3(py-C6-BOC)][CF3SO3] (py-C6-BOC=3-(N-(6-(tert-butoxycarbonylamino)hexyl)aminocarbonyl)pyridine; N^N=phen (1b), Me4-phen (2b), Ph2-phen (3b)) were synthesized and characterized. Upon photoexcitation, all the complexes displayed intense and long-lived yellow triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)MLCT) (dπ(Re)→π*(N^N)) emission. The DIBO complexes underwent facile reactions with benzyl azide in methanol at 298 K with second-order rate constants (k2) in the range of 0.077 to 0.091 M(-1) s(-1). As revealed from SDS-PAGE analysis, the DIBO complexes can selectively label azide-modified proteins and the resulting bioconjugates displayed strong phosphorescence upon photoexcitation. Results of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays indicated that the DIBO complexes accumulated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells with considerable cytotoxic activity. Upon incubation of CHO cells with these complexes, relatively weak intracellular emission was observed. In contrast, upon pretreatment of the cells with 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-N-azidoacetyl-D-mannosamine (Ac4ManNAz), intense emission was observed from the cell membrane and some internal compartments. The results suggest that the DIBO complexes are promising candidates for imaging azide-labeled biomolecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Soil sample preparation using microwave digestion for uranium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MOHAGHEGHI,AMIR H.; PRESTON,ROSE; AKBARZADEH,MANSOOR; BAKHTIAR,STEVEN

    2000-04-05

    A new sample preparation procedure has been developed for digestion of soil samples for uranium analysis. The technique employs a microwave oven digestion system to digest the sample and to prepare it for separation chemistry and analysis. The method significantly reduces the volume of acids used, eliminates a large fraction of acid vapor emissions, and speeds up the analysis time. The samples are analyzed by four separate techniques: Gamma Spectrometry, Alpha Spectroscopy using the open digestion method, Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) using open digestion, and KPA by Microwave digestion technique. The results for various analytical methods are compared and used to confirm the validity of the new procedure. The details of the preparation technique along with its benefits are discussed.

  19. Photoacoustic Analysis of the Penetration Kinetics of Cordia verbenacea DC in Human Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, S. S.; Barja, P. R.

    2012-11-01

    Phonophoresis consists of the utilization of ultrasound radiation associated to pharmacological agents in order to enhance transdermal penetration of applied drugs. It is a widely employed resource in physiotherapy practice, normally associated with anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Acheflan. This drug was developed in Brazil from the essential oil of Cordia verbenacea DC, a native plant of the Brazilian southern coast. In previous studies, the photoacoustic (PA) technique proved effective in the study of the penetration kinetics of topically applied products and in the evaluation of drug delivery after phonophoresis application. The present work aimed to evaluate the penetration kinetics of Acheflan in human skin, employing in vivo PA measurements after massage application or phonophoresis application. Ten volunteers (aged between 18 and 30 years) took part in the study. Time evolution of the PA signal was fitted to a Boltzmann curve, S-shaped. After statistical analysis, PA measurements have shown drug penetration for both application forms, but drug delivery was more evident after phonophoresis application, with a characteristic penetration time of less than 15 min for the stratum corneum.

  20. Non-isothermal pyrolysis of de-oiled microalgal biomass: Kinetics and evolved gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Saravaia, Hitesh; Paliwal, Chetan; Ghosh, Arup; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-12-01

    Non-isothermal (β=5, 10, 20, 35°C/min) pyrolysis of de-oiled microalgal biomass (DMB) of Chlorella variabilis was investigated by TGA-MS (30-900°C, Argon atmosphere) to understand thermal decomposition and evolved gas analysis (EGA). The results showed that three-stage thermal decomposition and three volatilization zone (100-400°C, 400-550°C and 600-750°C) of organic matters during pyrolysis. The highest rate of weight-loss is 8.91%/min at 302°C for 35°C/min heating-rate. Kinetics of pyrolysis were investigated by iso-conversional (KAS, FWO) and model-fitting (Coats-Redfern) method. For Zone-1and3, similar activation energy (Ea) is found in between KAS (α=0.4), FWO (α=0.4) and Avrami-Erofe'ev (n=4) model. Using the best-fitted kinetic model Avrami-Erofe'ev (n=4), Ea values (R(2)=>0.96) are 171.12 (Zone-1), 404.65 (Zone-2) and 691.42kJ/mol (Zone-3). EGA indicate the abundance of most gases observed consequently between 200-300°C and 400-500°C. The pyrolysis of DMB involved multi-step reaction mechanisms for solid-state reactions having different Ea values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toward theoretical analysis of long-range proton transfer kinetics in biomolecular pumps.

    PubMed

    König, P H; Ghosh, N; Hoffmann, M; Elstner, M; Tajkhorshid, E; Frauenheim, Th; Cui, Q

    2006-01-19

    Motivated by the long-term goal of theoretically analyzing long-range proton transfer (PT) kinetics in biomolecular pumps, researchers made a number of technical developments in the framework of quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. A set of collective reaction coordinates is proposed for characterizing the progress of long-range proton transfers; unlike previous suggestions, the new coordinates can describe PT along highly nonlinear three-dimensional pathways. Calculations using a realistic model of carbonic anhydrase demonstrated that adiabatic mapping using these collective coordinates gives reliable energetics and critical geometrical parameters as compared to minimum energy path calculations, which suggests that the new coordinates can be effectively used as reaction coordinate in potential of mean force calculations for long-range PT in complex systems. In addition, the generalized solvent boundary potential was implemented in the QM/MM framework for rectangular geometries, which is useful for studying reactions in membrane systems. The resulting protocol was found to produce water structure in the interior of aquaporin consistent with previous studies including a much larger number of explicit solvent and lipid molecules. The effect of electrostatics for PT through a membrane protein was also illustrated with a simple model channel embedded in different dielectric continuum environments. The encouraging results observed so far suggest that robust theoretical analysis of long-range PT kinetics in biomolecular pumps can soon be realized in a QM/MM framework.

  2. Characterization and kinetic analysis of a thermostable GH3 beta-glucosidase from Penicillium brasilianum.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Kristian B R M; Harris, Paul V; Olsen, Carsten L; Johansen, Katja S; Hojer-Pedersen, Jesper; Borjesson, Johan; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2010-03-01

    A GH3 beta-glucosidase (BGL) from Penicillium brasilianum was purified to homogeneity after cultivation on a cellulose and xylan rich medium. The BGL was identified in a genomic library, and it was successfully expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The BGL had excellent stability at elevated temperatures with no loss in activity after 24 h of incubation at 60 degrees C at pH 4-6, and the BGL was shown to have significantly higher stability at these conditions in comparison to Novozym 188 and to other fungal GH3 BGLs reported in the literature. The BGL had significant lower affinity for cellobiose compared with the artificial substrate para-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (pNP-Glc) and further, pronounced substrate inhibition using pNP-Glc. Kinetic studies demonstrated the high importance of using cellobiose as substrate and glucose as inhibitor to describe the inhibition kinetics of BGL taking place during cellulose hydrolysis. A novel assay was developed to characterize this glucose inhibition on cellobiose hydrolysis. The assay uses labelled glucose-13C6 as inhibitor and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis to quantify the hydrolysis rates.

  3. Analysis of kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic patterns during root canal preparation with rotary and manual instruments

    PubMed Central

    PASTERNAK-JÚNIOR, Braulio; de SOUSA NETO, Manoel Damião; DIONÍSIO, Valdeci Carlos; PÉCORA, Jesus Djalma; SILVA, Ricardo Gariba

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the muscular activity during root canal preparation through kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (EMG). Material and Methods The operators prepared one canal with RaCe rotary instruments and another with Flexo-files. The kinematics of the major joints was reconstructed using an optoelectronic system and electromyographic responses of the flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi radialis, brachioradialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius were recorded. The joint torques of the shoulder, elbow and wrist were calculated using inverse dynamics. In the kinematic analysis, angular movements of the wrist and elbow were classified as low risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. With respect to the shoulder, the classification was medium-risk. Results There was no significant difference revealed by the kinetic reports. The EMG results showed that for the middle deltoid and upper trapezius the rotary instrumentation elicited higher values. The flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis, as well as the brachioradialis showed a higher value with the manual method. Conclusion The muscular recruitment for accomplishment of articular movements for root canal preparation with either the rotary or manual techniques is distinct. Nevertheless, the rotary instrument presented less difficulty in the generation of the joint torque in each articulation, thus, presenting a greater uniformity of joint torques. PMID:22437679

  4. Kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of acetone-butanol-ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hideaki; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Yamashita, Mayu; Kobayashi, Genta; Sekiguchi, Tatsuya; Hanai, Taizo; Kuriya, Yuki; Okamoto, Masahiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2007-08-01

    A kinetic simulation model of metabolic pathways that describes the dynamic behaviors of metabolites in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 was proposed using a novel simulator WinBEST-KIT. This model was validated by comparing with experimental time-course data of metabolites in batch cultures over a wide range of initial glucose concentrations (36.1-295 mM). By introducing substrate inhibition, product inhibition of butanol, activation of butyrate and considering the cessation of metabolic reactions in the case of insufficiency of energy after glucose exhaustion, the revised model showed 0.901 of squared correlation coefficient (r(2)) between experimental time-course of metabolites and calculated ones. Thus, the final revised model is assumed to be one of the best candidates for kinetic simulation describing dynamic behavior of metabolites in ABE production. Sensitivity analysis revealed that 5% increase in reaction of reverse pathway of butyrate production (R(17)) and 5% decrease in reaction of CoA transferase for butyrate (R(15)) highly contribute to high production of butanol. These system analyses should be effective in the elucidation which pathway is metabolic bottleneck for high production of butanol.

  5. Nanopore Detector based analysis of single-molecule conformational kinetics and binding interactions

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Background A Nanopore Detector provides a means to transduce single molecule events into observable channel current changes. Nanopore-based detection can report directly, or indirectly, on single molecule kinetics. The nanopore-based detector can directly measure molecular characteristics in terms of the blockade properties of individual molecules – this is possible due to the kinetic information that is embedded in the blockade measurements, where the adsorption-desorption history of the molecule to the surrounding channel, and the configurational changes in the molecule itself, imprint on the ionic flow through the channel. This rich source of information offers prospects for DNA sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. A nanopore-based detector can also measure molecular characteristics indirectly, by using a reporter molecule that binds to certain molecules, with subsequent distinctive blockade by the bound-molecule complex. Results It is hypothesized that reaction histories of individual molecules can be observed on model DNA/DNA, DNA/Protein, and Protein/Protein systems. Preliminary results are all consistent with this hypothesis. Nanopore detection capabilities are also described for highly discriminatory biosensing, binding strength characterization, and rapid immunological screening. Conclusion In essence, the heart of chemistry is now accessible to a new, single-molecule, observation method that can track both external molecular binding states, and internal conformation states. PMID:17118143

  6. Microwave treatment of dairy manure for resource recovery: Reaction kinetics and energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asha; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2016-12-01

    A newly designed continuous-flow 915 MHz microwave wastewater treatment system was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H2O2-AOP) for treating dairy manure. After the treatment, about 84% of total phosphorus and 45% of total chemical oxygen demand were solubilized with the highest H2O2 dosage (0.4% H2O2 per %TS). The reaction kinetics of soluble chemical oxygen demand revealed activation energy to be in the range of 5-22 kJ mole(-1). The energy required by the processes was approximately 0.16 kWh per liter of dairy manure heated. A higher H2O2 dosage used in the system had a better process performance in terms of solids solubilization, reaction kinetics, and energy consumption. Cost-benefit analysis for a farm-scale MW/H2O2-AOP treatment system was also presented. The results obtained from this study would provide the basic knowledge for designing an effective farm-scale dairy manure treatment system.

  7. Reflectance spectroscopy in analysis of UO2 scale: derivation of a kinetic model of uranium oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chernia, Z

    2009-03-21

    In this study, we analyzed the development of a compact oxide scale built in course of Uranium surface oxidation. The process was monitored by an in-situ acquisition of the reflectance interference peaks in the NIR-MIR. Dielectric properties of the growing oxide scale were derived in accord to the oscillator model. We used effective media approach to simulate heterogeneous dielectric content in the oxide-metal interface. Following dielectric parameterization, structural properties (e.g., scale thickness) of the proposed multi-scale scheme were calculated. As scale's growth process quantified, a valid kinetic model was proposed. Analysis showed that oxidation dynamics is governed by a multi-parabolic, true diffusion-limited mechanism of activation energy conveniently equaling the known anion diffusion enthalpy of 26 kcal/mol. The applied kinetic model suggested a setup of two consecutive oxide scales, characterized by differing anion diffusion rates. Though mathematical formalism presented a similar to the paralinear, time-dependent solution, here, in contrast to the classic paralinear assumption, both scales consisted of a compact, diffusion limited oxide barriers. As a result, the difference in anion flow across the outer and inner scale barriers assigned the overall, pseudo-linear rate constant-kl, of a negative (in contrast to the paralinear approach) value. Next, Uranium oxidation has been studied in the post-elastic domain. Markedly, upon breakaway of the compact oxide scale, classic paralinear behavior was reestablished for scale thickness of > or = 0.5 microm.

  8. Kinetic analysis of the thermal stability of the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Arwel V; Rees, Paul; Heathcote, Peter; Jones, Michael R

    2006-06-01

    The temperature-induced denaturation of the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been studied through the changes that occur in the absorption spectrum of the bound chromophores on heating. At elevated temperatures, the characteristic absorbance bands of the bacteriochlorins bound to the polypeptides within the reaction center are lost, and are replaced by features typical of unbound bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin. The kinetics of the spectral changes cannot be explained by a direct conversion from the functional to the denatured form of the protein, and require the presence of at least one intermediate. Possible mechanisms for the transformation via an intermediate are examined using a global analysis of the kinetic data, and the most likely mechanism is shown to involve a reversible transformation between the native state and an off-pathway intermediate, coupled to an irreversible transformation to the denatured state. The activation energies for the transformations between the three components are calculated from the effect of temperature on the individual rate constants, and the likely structural changes of the protein during the temperature-induced transformation are discussed.

  9. A new algorithm for the kinetic analysis of intra-beam scattering in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkevich, P.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Bolshakov, A.

    2006-06-01

    For the kinetic analysis of multiple intra-beam scattering (IBS) in storage rings the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) or equivalent kinetic equations is needed. The exact solution of the FPE for a beam presented by a set of the macro-particles can be found using the "binary collision" model (BCM). However this method requires a large number of macro-particles (>10 4). Here we suggest a simple approximate method based on the following assumptions: (1) the friction force has a linear dependence on momentum; (2) the components of the diffusion tensor are constant. The friction coefficients and components of the diffusion tensor are chosen in order to provide the correct growth rates of the invariants describing the motion in storage rings. The integration over the distribution function (which is assumed to be Gaussian) is performed for strong focusing lattice according to the Bjorken-Mtingwa (BM) scheme. Change of the particle momentum is calculated using Langevin equations with account of correlation between the horizontal and longitudinal momentum changes. This algorithm allows us to present IBS effects as a "collective map" in the momentum space acting on each macro-particle. A numerical code using this algorithm is validated for the ITEP ring by comparing the BM code with results of the code based on the BCM algorithm. The algorithm allows including the IBS process in "turn by turn" macro-particle methods, which usually operate with a small number of macro-particles (about 100-1000).

  10. Single-cell analysis of transcription kinetics across the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Samuel O; Xu, Heng; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Freire, Pablo R; Zwaka, Thomas P; Golding, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a highly stochastic process. To infer transcription kinetics for a gene-of-interest, researchers commonly compare the distribution of mRNA copy-number to the prediction of a theoretical model. However, the reliability of this procedure is limited because the measured mRNA numbers represent integration over the mRNA lifetime, contribution from multiple gene copies, and mixing of cells from different cell-cycle phases. We address these limitations by simultaneously quantifying nascent and mature mRNA in individual cells, and incorporating cell-cycle effects in the analysis of mRNA statistics. We demonstrate our approach on Oct4 and Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Both genes follow similar two-state kinetics. However, Nanog exhibits slower ON/OFF switching, resulting in increased cell-to-cell variability in mRNA levels. Early in the cell cycle, the two copies of each gene exhibit independent activity. After gene replication, the probability of each gene copy to be active diminishes, resulting in dosage compensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12175.001 PMID:26824388

  11. Towards theoretical analysis of long-range proton transfer kinetics in biomolecular pumps

    PubMed Central

    König, P. H.; Ghosh, N.; Hoffmann, M.; Elstner, M.; Tajkhorshid, E.; Frauenheim, Th.; Cui, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the long-term goal of theoretically analyzing long-range proton transfer (PT) kinetics in biomolecular pumps, a number of technical developments were made in the framework of QM/MM simulations. A set of collective reaction co-ordinates is proposed for characterizing the progress of long-range proton transfers; unlike previous suggestions, the new coordinates can describe PT along highly non-linear three-dimensional pathways. Calculations using a realistic model of carbonic anhydrase demonstrated that adiabatic mapping using these collective coordinates gives reliable energetics and critical geometrical parameters as compared to minimum energy path calculations, which suggests that the new coordinates can be effectively used as reaction coordinate in potential of mean force calculations for long-range PT in complex systems. In addition, the generalized solvent boundary potential was implemented in the QM/MM framework for rectangular geometries, which is useful for studying reactions in membrane systems. The resulting protocol was found to produce water structure in the interior of aquaporin consistent with previous studies including much larger number of explicit solvent and lipid molecules. The effect of electrostatics for PT through membrane protein was also illustrated with a simple model channel embedded in different dielectric continuum environments. The encouraging results observed so far suggest that robust theoretical analysis of long-range PT kinetics in biomolecular pumps can soon be realized in a QM/MM framework. PMID:16405327

  12. Statistical assessment of change point detectors for single molecule kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2013-05-01

    Change point detectors (CPDs) are used to segment recordings of single molecules for the purpose of kinetic analysis. The assessment of the accuracy of CPD algorithms has usually been based on testing them with simulated data. However, there have not been methods to assess the output of CPDs from real data independent of simulation. Here we present one method to do this based on the assumption that the elementary kinetic unit is a stationary period (SP) with a normal distribution of samples, separated from other SPs by change points (CPs). Statistical metrics of normality can then be used to assess SPs detected by a CPD algorithm (detected SPs, DSPs). Two statistics in particular were found to be useful, the z-transformed skew (S(Z)) and z-transformed kurtosis (K(Z)). K(Z)(S(Z)) plots of DSP from noise, simulated data and single ion channel recordings showed that DSPs with false negative CP could be distinguished. Also they showed that filtering had a significant effect on the normality of data and so filtering should be taken into account when calculating statistics. This method should be useful for analyzing single molecule recordings where there is no simple model for the data.

  13. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  14. Single-cell analysis of transcription kinetics across the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Samuel O; Xu, Heng; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Freire, Pablo R; Zwaka, Thomas P; Golding, Ido

    2016-01-29

    Transcription is a highly stochastic process. To infer transcription kinetics for a gene-of-interest, researchers commonly compare the distribution of mRNA copy-number to the prediction of a theoretical model. However, the reliability of this procedure is limited because the measured mRNA numbers represent integration over the mRNA lifetime, contribution from multiple gene copies, and mixing of cells from different cell-cycle phases. We address these limitations by simultaneously quantifying nascent and mature mRNA in individual cells, and incorporating cell-cycle effects in the analysis of mRNA statistics. We demonstrate our approach on Oct4 and Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Both genes follow similar two-state kinetics. However, Nanog exhibits slower ON/OFF switching, resulting in increased cell-to-cell variability in mRNA levels. Early in the cell cycle, the two copies of each gene exhibit independent activity. After gene replication, the probability of each gene copy to be active diminishes, resulting in dosage compensation.

  15. Understanding protein lids: kinetic analysis of active hinge mutants in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    1999-08-31

    In previous work we tested what three amino acid sequences could serve as a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase [Sun, J., and Sampson, N. S. (1998) Protein Sci. 7, 1495-1505]. We generated a genetic library encoding all 8000 possible 3 amino acid combinations at the C-terminal hinge and selected for those combinations of amino acids that formed active mutants. These mutants were classified into six phylogenetic families. Two families resembled wild-type hinges, and four families represented new types of hinges. In this work, the kinetic characteristics and thermal stabilities of mutants representing each of these families were determined in order to understand what properties make an efficient protein hinge, and why all of the families are not observed in nature. From a steady-state kinetic analysis of our mutants, it is clear that the partitioning between protonation of intermediate to form product and intermediate release from the enzyme surface to form methylglyoxal (a decomposition product) is not affected. The two most impaired mutants undergo a change in rate-limiting step from enediol formation to dihydroxyacetone phosphate binding. Thus, it appears that k(cat)/K(m)'s are reduced relative to wild type as a result of slower Michaelis complex formation and dissociation, rather than increased loop opening speed.

  16. Kinetic analysis of the effects of target structure on siRNA efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Zhang, Wenbing

    2012-12-01

    RNAi efficiency for target cleavage and protein expression is related to the target structure. Considering the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) as a multiple turnover enzyme, we investigated the effect of target mRNA structure on siRNA efficiency with kinetic analysis. The 4-step model was used to study the target cleavage kinetic process: hybridization nucleation at an accessible target site, RISC-mRNA hybrid elongation along with mRNA target structure melting, target cleavage, and enzyme reactivation. At this model, the terms accounting for the target accessibility, stability, and the seed and the nucleation site effects are all included. The results are in good agreement with that of experiments which show different arguments about the structure effects on siRNA efficiency. It shows that the siRNA efficiency is influenced by the integrated factors of target's accessibility, stability, and the seed effects. To study the off-target effects, a simple model of one siRNA binding to two mRNA targets was designed. By using this model, the possibility for diminishing the off-target effects by the concentration of siRNA was discussed.

  17. Multisubstrate kinetics of PAH mixture biodegradation: analysis in the double-logarithmic plot.

    PubMed

    Baboshin, Mikhail; Golovleva, Ludmila

    2011-02-01

    The proposed method of kinetic analysis of aqueous-phase biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mixture presupposes representation of kinetic curves for each pair of mixture components, S(x) and S(y), in double-logarithmic coordinates (ln S(x); ln S(y)). If PAH mixture conversion corresponds to the multisubstrate model with a common active site, then the graphs in double-logarithmic coordinates are straight lines with the angular coefficients equal to the ratio of respective first-order rate constants k(y)(x)= V(y)K(x)/K(y)V(x), where K(x) and K(y) are half-saturation constants, V(x) and V( y ) are the maximum conversion rates for substrates S(x) and S(y); the graph slope does not depend on any concentrations and remains constant during the change of reaction rates as a result of inhibition, induction/inactivation of enzymes or biomass growth. The formulated method has been used to analyze PAH mixture conversion by the culture of Sphingomonas sp. VKM B-2434. It has been shown that this process does not satisfy the multisubstrate model with a single active site. The results suggest that the strain VKM B-2434 contains at least two dioxygenases of different substrate specificity: one enzyme converts phenanthrene and fluoranthene and the other converts acenaphthene and acenaphthylene. The ratios of first-order rate constants have been obtained for these pairs of substrates.

  18. Thermogravimetric Analysis and Kinetics on Reducing Low-Grade Manganese Dioxide Ore by Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Guocai; Yan, Hong; Li, Tiancheng; Feng, Xiujuan

    2013-08-01

    Nonisothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to evaluate rice straw, sawdust, wheat stalk, maize straw, and bamboo to explore their potential for reduction of manganese dioxide ore. Results from the biomass pyrolysis experiments showed that wood-based biomass materials, such as sawdust and bamboo, could produce more reductive agents, while herb-based biomass materials, such as rice straw, wheat stalk, and maize straw, had lower reaction temperatures. The peak temperatures for biomass reduction tests were 20 K to 50 K (20 °C to 50 °C) higher compared with the pyrolysis tests, and a clear shoulder at around 523 K (250 °C) could be observed. The effects of heating rate, biomass/manganese dioxide ore ratio, and different components of biomass were also investigated. An independent parallel first-order reaction kinetic model was used to calculate the values of activation energy and frequency factor for biomass pyrolysis and reduction of manganese dioxide ore. For better understanding the reduction process, kinetic parameters of independent behavior of manganese dioxide ore were also calculated by simple mathematical treatment. Finally, the isokinetic temperature T i and the rate constant k 0 for reduction of manganese oxide ore by reductive volatiles of biomass were derived according to the Arrhenius equation, which were determined to be 603 K (330 °C) and 108.99 min-1, respectively.

  19. Kinetic energy entrainment in wind turbine and actuator disc wakes: an experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lignarolo, L. E. M.; Ragni, D.; Simão Ferreira, C. J.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2014-06-01

    The present experimental study focuses on the comparison between the wake of a two-bladed wind turbine and the one of an actuator disk. The flow field at the middle plane of the wake is measured with a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, in the low-speed Open Jet Facility wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology. The wind turbine wake is characterized by the complex dynamics of the tip vortex development and breakdown. Analysis of the flow statistics show anisotropic turbulent fluctuations in the turbine wake, with stronger components in the radial direction. The wake of the actuator disc is instead characterized by isotropic random fluctuations. The mixing process in the shear layer is further analysed in terms of flux of mean flow kinetic energy, to show the main differences between the kinetic energy entrainment in the actuator and the turbine wake. This project is intended to provide the basis for understanding the origin of the limitations of the current wake models based on the actuator disc assumption.

  20. Pyrolysis kinetics of raw and hydrothermally carbonized Karanj (Pongamia pinnata) fruit hulls via thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Azharul; Asif, M; Hameed, B H

    2015-03-01

    The pyrolysis of karanj fruit hulls (KFH) and karanj fruit hull hydrothermal carbonization (KFH-HTC) hydrochar was thermogravimetrically investigated under a nitrogen environment at 5 °C/min, 10 °C/min, and 20 °C/min. The pyrolysis decomposition of KFH biomass was faster than that of KFH-HTC hydrochar because of the high volatility and fixed carbon of KFH biomass. Weight loss percentage was also affected by the heating rates. The kinetic data were evaluated with the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods. The activation energy values obtained with these two methods were 61.06 and 68.53 kJ/mol for KFH biomass and 130.49 and 135.87 kJ/mol for KFH-HTC hydrochar, respectively. The analysis of kinetic process mechanisms was verified with the Coats-Redfern method. KFH-HTC hydrochar may play a potential role in transforming biomass to energy-rich feedstock for thermochemical applications because of its high heating value, high fixed carbon, and low ash and sulfur contents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinematic and kinetic analysis of two gymnastics acrobatic series to performing the backward stretched somersault.

    PubMed

    Mkaouer, Bessem; Jemni, Monèm; Amara, Samiha; Chaabène, Helmi; Tabka, Zouhair

    2013-01-01

    Back swing connections during gymnastics acrobatic series considerably influence technical performance and difficulties, particularly in the back somersault. The aim of this study was to compare the take-off's kinetic and kinematic variables between two acrobatic series leading to perform the backward stretched somersault (also called salto): round-off, flic-flac to stretched salto versus round-off, tempo-salto to stretched salto. Five high level male gymnasts (age 23.17 ± 1.61 yrs; body height 1.65 ± 0.05 m; body mass 56.80 ± 7.66 kg) took part in this investigation. A force plate synchronized with a two dimensional movement analysis system was used to collect kinetic and kinematic data. Statistical analysis via the non-parametric Wilcoxon Rank-sum test showed significant differences between the take-offs' variables. The backswing connections were different in the take-off angle, linear momentum, vertical velocity and horizontal and vertical displacements. In conclusion, considering that the higher elevation of the centre of mass in the flight phase would allow best performance and lower the risk of falls, particularly when combined to a great angular momentum, this study demonstrated that the optimal connection series was round-off, flic-flac to stretched salto which enabled the best height in the somersault. Analysis of the results suggests that both connections facilitate the performance of single and double (or triple) backward somersaults with or without rotations around the longitudinal axis. Gymnasts could perform these later while gaining height if they chose the round-off, flic-flac technique or gaining some backward displacement if they choose the round-off, salto tempo.

  2. Kinematic and Kinetic Analysis of Two Gymnastics Acrobatic Series to Performing the Backward Stretched Somersault

    PubMed Central

    Mkaouer, Bessem; Jemni, Monèm; Amara, Samiha; Chaabène, Helmi; Tabka, Zouhair

    Back swing connections during gymnastics acrobatic series considerably influence technical performance and difficulties, particularly in the back somersault. The aim of this study was to compare the take-off’s kinetic and kinematic variables between two acrobatic series leading to perform the backward stretched somersault (also called salto): round-off, flic-flac to stretched salto versus round-off, tempo-salto to stretched salto. Five high level male gymnasts (age 23.17 ± 1.61 yrs; body height 1.65 ± 0.05 m; body mass 56.80 ± 7.66 kg) took part in this investigation. A force plate synchronized with a two dimensional movement analysis system was used to collect kinetic and kinematic data. Statistical analysis via the non-parametric Wilcoxon Rank-sum test showed significant differences between the take-offs’ variables. The backswing connections were different in the take-off angle, linear momentum, vertical velocity and horizontal and vertical displacements. In conclusion, considering that the higher elevation of the centre of mass in the flight phase would allow best performance and lower the risk of falls, particularly when combined to a great angular momentum, this study demonstrated that the optimal connection series was round-off, flic-flac to stretched salto which enabled the best height in the somersault. Analysis of the results suggests that both connections facilitate the performance of single and double (or triple) backward somersaults with or without rotations around the longitudinal axis. Gymnasts could perform these later while gaining height if they chose the round-off, flic-flac technique or gaining some backward displacement if they choose the round-off, salto tempo. PMID:24146701

  3. Wetting of biopolymer coatings: contact angle kinetics and image analysis investigation.

    PubMed

    Farris, Stefano; Introzzi, Laura; Biagioni, Paolo; Holz, Torsten; Schiraldi, Alberto; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2011-06-21

    The surface wetting of five biopolymers, used as coating materials for a plastic film, was monitored over a span of 8 min by means of the optical contact angle technique. Because most of the total variation was observed to occur during the first 60 s, we decided to focus on this curtailed temporal window. Initial contact angle values (θ(0)) ranged from ∼91° for chitosan to ∼30° for pullulan. However, the water drop profile began to change immediately following drop deposition for all biocoatings, confirming that the concept of water contact angle equilibrium is not applicable to most biopolymers. First, a three-parameter decay equation [θ(t) = θ(0) exp(kt(n))] was fit to the experimental contact angle data to describe the kinetics of the contact angle change for each biocoating. Interestingly, the k constant correlated well with the contact angle evolution rate and the n exponent seemed to be somehow linked to the physicochemical phenomena underlying the overall kinetics process. Second, to achieve a reliable description of droplet evolution, the contact angle (CA) analysis was coupled with image analysis (IA) through a combined geometric/trigonometric approach. Absorption and spreading were the key factors governing the overall mechanism of surface wetting during the 60 s analysis, although the individual quantification of both phenomena demonstrated that spreading provided the largest contribution for all biopolymers, with the only exception of gelatin, which showed two quasi-equivalent and counterbalancing effects. The possible correlation between these two phenomena and the topography of the biopolymer surfaces are then discussed on the basis of atomic force microscopy analyses.

  4. A practical approach to the sensitivity analysis for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Max J; Engelmann, Felix; Matera, Sebastian

    2017-01-28

    Lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have become a vital tool for predictive quality atomistic understanding of complex surface chemical reaction kinetics over a wide range of reaction conditions. In order to expand their practical value in terms of giving guidelines for the atomic level design of catalytic systems, it is very desirable to readily evaluate a sensitivity analysis for a given model. The result of such a sensitivity analysis quantitatively expresses the dependency of the turnover frequency, being the main output variable, on the rate constants entering the model. In the past, the application of sensitivity analysis, such as degree of rate control, has been hampered by its exuberant computational effort required to accurately sample numerical derivatives of a property that is obtained from a stochastic simulation method. In this study, we present an efficient and robust three-stage approach that is capable of reliably evaluating the sensitivity measures for stiff microkinetic models as we demonstrate using the CO oxidation on RuO2(110) as a prototypical reaction. In the first step, we utilize the Fisher information matrix for filtering out elementary processes which only yield negligible sensitivity. Then we employ an estimator based on the linear response theory for calculating the sensitivity measure for non-critical conditions which covers the majority of cases. Finally, we adapt a method for sampling coupled finite differences for evaluating the sensitivity measure for lattice based models. This allows for an efficient evaluation even in critical regions near a second order phase transition that are hitherto difficult to control. The combined approach leads to significant computational savings over straightforward numerical derivatives and should aid in accelerating the nano-scale design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  5. Rapid quantification and analysis of kinetic • OH radical footprinting data using SAFA

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Katrina; Martin, Joshua S.; Shcherbakova, Inna; Laederach, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The use of highly reactive chemical species to probe the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids is greatly simplified by software that enables rapid quantification of the gel images that result from these experiments. SAFA (Semi-Automated Footprinting Analysis) allows a user to quickly and reproducibly quantify a chemical footprinting gel image through a series of steps that rectify, assign, and integrate the relative band intensities. The output of this procedure is raw band intensities that report on the relative reactivity of each nucleotide with the chemical probe. We describe here how to obtain these raw band intensities using SAFA and the subsequent normalization and analysis procedures required to process this data. In particular, we focus on analyzing time-resolved hydroxyl radical (•OH) data, which we use to monitor the kinetics of folding of a large RNA (the L-21 T. thermophila group I intron). Exposing the RNA to bursts of •OH radicals at specific time-points during the folding process monitors the time-progress of the reaction. Specifically, we identify protected (nucleotides that become inaccessible to the •OH radical probe when folded) and invariant (nucleotides with constant accessibility to the •OH probe) residues that we use for monitoring and normalization of the data. With this analysis, we obtain time-progress curves from which we determine kinetic rates of folding. We also report on a data visualization tool implemented in SAFA that allows users to map data onto a secondary structure diagram. PMID:20946764

  6. A practical approach to the sensitivity analysis for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Max J.; Engelmann, Felix; Matera, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have become a vital tool for predictive quality atomistic understanding of complex surface chemical reaction kinetics over a wide range of reaction conditions. In order to expand their practical value in terms of giving guidelines for the atomic level design of catalytic systems, it is very desirable to readily evaluate a sensitivity analysis for a given model. The result of such a sensitivity analysis quantitatively expresses the dependency of the turnover frequency, being the main output variable, on the rate constants entering the model. In the past, the application of sensitivity analysis, such as degree of rate control, has been hampered by its exuberant computational effort required to accurately sample numerical derivatives of a property that is obtained from a stochastic simulation method. In this study, we present an efficient and robust three-stage approach that is capable of reliably evaluating the sensitivity measures for stiff microkinetic models as we demonstrate using the CO oxidation on RuO2(110) as a prototypical reaction. In the first step, we utilize the Fisher information matrix for filtering out elementary processes which only yield negligible sensitivity. Then we employ an estimator based on the linear response theory for calculating the sensitivity measure for non-critical conditions which covers the majority of cases. Finally, we adapt a method for sampling coupled finite differences for evaluating the sensitivity measure for lattice based models. This allows for an efficient evaluation even in critical regions near a second order phase transition that are hitherto difficult to control. The combined approach leads to significant computational savings over straightforward numerical derivatives and should aid in accelerating the nano-scale design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  7. Mg(OH) 2 dehydroxylation: A kinetic study by controlled rate thermal analysis (CRTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahdi, Kais; Rouquerol, Françoise; Trabelsi Ayadi, Malika

    2009-05-01

    The present work is the first kinetic study of Mg(OH) 2 dehydroxylation carried out by controlled rate thermal analysis technique. Its aim is first to highlight the importance of controlling the residual water vapor pressure above the sample as well as the rate of the thermal decomposition during the thermal dehydroxylation of brucite Mg(OH) 2 and second to investigate its kinetics of dehydroxylation. For this reason, the dehydroxylation of the titled compound was followed by both: the constant rate thermal analysis technique at PO=10-3 hPa and the conventional thermal analysis techniques (TG and DSC) in air. It has been shown that the structure of the final product depends strongly on the nature of the thermal treatment. However, in air atmosphere brucite decomposes in the temperature range 610-772 K, to obtain a high defect MgO as an intermediate phase which retains the brucite structure. This defect structure collapses progressively to the cubic MgO in the temperature range 772-810 K, whereas decomposition carried out at PO=10-3 hPa by CRTA technique, gives a high defect MgO phase which retains the brucite structure even after the end of the dehydroxylation. In first approximation, it can be supposed that this step is controlled by a process of nucleation and growth of nuclei in three dimensions (A3). This conclusion is confirmed by the comparison of two isokinetic CRTA curves for dehydroxylation of Mg(OH) 2 carried out under the same water vapor pressure (PO=10-3 hPa) which allows to use the Arrhenius law and so to calculate an apparent activation energy equal to 188 ± 10 kJ mol -1 in almost the total dehydroxylation interval.

  8. A practical approach to the sensitivity analysis for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of heterogeneous catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffmann, Max J.; Engelmann, Felix; Matera, Sebastian

    2017-01-31

    Lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have become a vital tool for predictive quality atomistic understanding of complex surface chemical reaction kinetics over a wide range of reaction conditions. In order to expand their practical value in terms of giving guidelines for atomic level design of catalytic systems, it is very desirable to readily evaluate a sensitivity analysis for a given model. The result of such a sensitivity analysis quantitatively expresses the dependency of the turnover frequency, being the main output variable, on the rate constants entering the model. In the past the application of sensitivity analysis, such as Degree ofmore » Rate Control, has been hampered by its exuberant computational effort required to accurately sample numerical derivatives of a property that is obtained from a stochastic simulation method. Here in this study we present an efficient and robust three stage approach that is capable of reliably evaluating the sensitivity measures for stiff microkinetic models as we demonstrate using CO oxidation on RuO2(110) as a prototypical reaction. In a first step, we utilize the Fisher Information Matrix for filtering out elementary processes which only yield negligible sensitivity. Then we employ an estimator based on linear response theory for calculating the sensitivity measure for non-critical conditions which covers the majority of cases. Finally we adopt a method for sampling coupled finite differences for evaluating the sensitivity measure of lattice based models. This allows efficient evaluation even in critical regions near a second order phase transition that are hitherto difficult to control. The combined approach leads to significant computational savings over straightforward numerical derivatives and should aid in accelerating the nano scale design of heterogeneous catalysts.« less

  9. Potentiometric sensors doped with biomolecules as a new approach to small molecule/biomolecule binding kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Daems, D; De Wael, K; Vissenberg, K; Van Camp, G; Nagels, L

    2014-04-15

    The most successful binding kinetics analysis systems at this moment include surface plasmon resonance (SPR), quartz microcrystal balance (QMB) and surface acoustic wave (SAW). Although these are powerful methods, they generally are complex, expensive and require the use of monolayers. Here, we report on potentiometric sensors as an inexpensive and simple alternative to do binding kinetics analysis between small molecules in solution and biomolecules (covalently) attached in a biopolymer sensor coating layer. As an example, dopamine and an anti-dopamine aptamer were used as the small molecule and the biomolecule respectively. Binding between both follows a Langmuir adsorption type model and creates a surface potential. The system operates in Flow Injection Analysis mode (FIA). Besides being an interesting new binding kinetics tool, the approach allows systematic design of potentiometric biosensors (in the present study a dopamine sensor), and gives new insights into the functioning of ion-selective electrodes (ISE's).

  10. Acquisition and analysis of fast single channel kinetic data on an Apple IIe microcomputer.

    PubMed

    Kits, K S; Mos, G J; Leeuwerik, F J; Wattel, C

    1987-05-01

    We describe a method for acquisition and analysis of single channel kinetic data, that uses a ubiquitous microcomputer, the Apple IIe (and is thus cheap), and is yet sensitive and powerful (analysis of up to 6000 events per run of the program; event detection only limited by the amplifier bandwidth). For data acquisition, the original record is converted into an idealized record of open and closed times, using half amplitude threshold analysis or a two-cursor window discriminator. A Time Interval Meter (TIM) has been developed that measures the durations of the TTL-signal from the window discriminator and stores up to 256 intervals in a FIFO-buffer. Each cycle of the TIM is completed within 1 microsecond. The, largely Pascal, software reads the intervals from the FIFO-buffer and stores them in the main memory of the microcomputer (cycle time 70 microseconds). The package is completed with Pascal programs for statistical analysis, including histogram construction of open and closed times, non-linear fit of up to 3 exponentials and correlation analysis.

  11. A steady-state kinetic analysis of the prolyl-4-hydroxylase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Soskel, N T; Kuby, S A

    1981-01-01

    Published kinetic data by Kivirikko, et al. on the prolyl-4-hydroxylase reaction have been re-evaluated using the overall steady-state velocity equation in the forward and reverse directions for an ordered ter ter kinetic mechanism. Qualitatively, the published data for prolyl-4-hydroxylase appear to fit the predicted patterns for this kinetic mechanism. More kinetic data are needed to confirm these results and to quantitate the kinetic parameters but, tentatively, the order of substrate addition would appear to be alpha-ketoglutarate, oxygen, and peptide; and the order of product release would be hydroxylated peptide (or collagen), carbon dioxide, and succinate.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the experimental O-J-I-P chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics. Apparent activation energy and origin of each kinetic step.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Steve; Joly, David; Carpentier, Robert

    2006-10-01

    Fluorescence induction has been studied for a long time, but there are still questions concerning what the O-J-I-P kinetic steps represent. Most studies agree that the O-J rise is related to photosystem II primary acceptor (Q(A)) reduction, but several contradictory theories exist for the J-I and I-P rises. One problem with fluorescence induction analysis is that most work done to date has used only qualitative or semiquantitative data analysis by visually comparing traces to observe the effects of different chemicals or treatments. Although this method is useful to observe major changes, a quantitative method must be used to detect more subtle, yet important, differences in the fluorescence induction trace. To achieve this, we used a relatively simple mathematical approach to extract the amplitudes and half-times of the three major fluorescence induction phases obtained from traces measured in thylakoid membranes kept at various temperatures. Apparent activation energies (E(A)) were also obtained for each kinetic step. Our results show that each phase has a different E(A), with E(A O-J) kinetic phase.

  13. Luminescence properties of a new bluish green long-lasting phosphorescence phosphor Ca9Bi(PO4)7:Eu2+,Dy3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yonglei; Li, Haifeng; Zhao, Ran; Sun, Wenzhi; Su, Qiang; Pang, Ran; Li, Chengyu

    2014-09-01

    A new long-lasting phosphorescence phosphor Ca9Bi(PO4)7:Eu2+,Dy3+ was synthesized by solid state reaction and its long-lasting phosphorescence properties were investigated for the first time. The X-ray powder diffraction, photoluminescence, long-lasting phosphorescence spectra, decay curves and thermoluminescence curves were measured. The Ca9Bi(PO4)7:Eu2+,Dy3+ phosphor exhibits an asymmetric emission centered at 475 nm, which can be ascribed to the 4f65d1-4f7 electronic transition of Eu2+. For the optimized sample, the bright bluish green long-lasting phosphorescence could be observed for 5 h by naked eyes after the excitation source was removed. The long-lasting phosphorescence spectra show that the co-doping of Dy3+ ions greatly enhance the intensity of the long-lasting phosphorescence. Meanwhile, the long-lasting phosphorescence mechanism of this phosphor was discussed. Based on our study, Dy3+ ions are suggested to increase the density of electron or hole traps so as to improve the performance of the bluish green phosphorescence of Eu2+, including the intensity and persistent time.

  14. Rational design of NIR-emitting iridium(iii) complexes for multimodal phosphorescence imaging of mitochondria under two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chengzhi; Guan, Ruilin; Wu, Jingheng; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Lili; Huang, Juanjuan; Wang, Hui; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2017-09-25

    A series of NIR-emitting iridium(iii) complexes were developed for multimodal phosphorescence imaging (NIR imaging, phosphorescence lifetime imaging and time-gated imaging) of mitochondria in living cells, 3D multicellular spheroids (MTCCs) and hippocampus slice under two-photon excitation.

  15. Quantitative kinetic analysis of lung nodules by temporal subtraction technique in dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung cancer is one of the most effective means to reduce cancer mortality; chest X-ray radiography has been widely used as a screening examination or health checkup. The new examination method and the development of computer analysis system allow obtaining respiratory kinetics by the use of flat panel detector (FPD), which is the expanded method of chest X-ray radiography. Through such changes functional evaluation of respiratory kinetics in chest has become available. Its introduction into clinical practice is expected in the future. In this study, we developed the computer analysis algorithm for the purpose of detecting lung nodules and evaluating quantitative kinetics. Breathing chest radiograph obtained by modified FPD was converted into 4 static images drawing the feature, by sequential temporal subtraction processing, morphologic enhancement processing, kinetic visualization processing, and lung region detection processing, after the breath synchronization process utilizing the diaphragmatic analysis of the vector movement. The artificial neural network used to analyze the density patterns detected the true nodules by analyzing these static images, and drew their kinetic tracks. For the algorithm performance and the evaluation of clinical effectiveness with 7 normal patients and simulated nodules, both showed sufficient detecting capability and kinetic imaging function without statistically significant difference. Our technique can quantitatively evaluate the kinetic range of nodules, and is effective in detecting a nodule on a breathing chest radiograph. Moreover, the application of this technique is expected to extend computer-aided diagnosis systems and facilitate the development of an automatic planning system for radiation therapy.

  16. /sup 15/N kinetic analysis of N/sub 2/O production by Nitrosomonas europaea: an examination of nitrifier denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Poth, M.; Focht, D.D.

    1985-05-01

    A series of /sup 15/N isotope tracer experiments showed that Nitrosomonas europaea produces nitrous oxide only under oxygen-limiting conditions and that the labeled N from nitrite, but not nitrate, is incorporated into nitrous oxide, indicating the presence of the denitrifying enzyme nitrite reductase. A kinetic analysis of the m/z 44, 45, and 46 nitrous oxide produced by washed cell suspensions of N. europaea when incubated with 4 mM ammonium (99% /sup 14/N) and 0.4 mM nitrite (99% /sup 15/N) was performed. No labeled nitirte was reduced to ammonium. All labeled material added was accounted for as either nitrite or nitrous oxide. The hypothesis that nitrous oxide is produced directly from nitrification was rejected since (i) it does not allow for the large amounts of double-labeled (m/z 46) nitrous oxide observed; (ii) the observed patterns of m/z 44, 45, 46 nitrous oxide were completely consistent with a kinetic analysis based on denitrification as the sole mechanism of nitrous oxide production but not with a kinetic analysis based on both mechanisms; (iii) the asymptotic ratio of m/z 45 to m/z 46 nitrous oxide was consistent with denitrification kinetics but inconsistent with nitrification kinetics, which predicted no limit to m/z 45 production. It is concluded that N. europaea is a denitrifier which, under conditions of oxygen stress, uses nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor and produces nitrous oxide.

  17. Kinetics Analysis of Higher Temperature Salt Bath Nitriding for Aisi 1045 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mingyang; Chen, Yao; Chai, Yating; Hu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Rapid salt bath nitriding was conducted at higher temperature above 600∘C instead of normally used 560∘C for AISI 1045 steel. Optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-hardness tester were employed to characterize the microstructure, phase constituents and micro-hardness of the treated specimens. The results showed that salt bath nitriding at higher temperature could significantly increase the compound layer thickness and higher cross-sectional hardness can be obtained. Kinetics analysis illustrated that the nitrogen atoms diffusion coefficient was obviously increased with temperature, and the activation energy of nitrogen atom diffusion was decreased from 220kJṡmol-1 to 142kJṡmol-1.

  18. Kinetics analysis and quantitative calculations for the successive radioactive decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiping; Yan, Deyue; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2015-01-01

    The general radioactive decay kinetics equations with branching were developed and the analytical solutions were derived by Laplace transform method. The time dependence of all the nuclide concentrations can be easily obtained by applying the equations to any known radioactive decay series. Taking the example of thorium radioactive decay series, the concentration evolution over time of various nuclide members in the family has been given by the quantitative numerical calculations with a computer. The method can be applied to the quantitative prediction and analysis for the daughter nuclides in the successive decay with branching of the complicated radioactive processes, such as the natural radioactive decay series, nuclear reactor, nuclear waste disposal, nuclear spallation, synthesis and identification of superheavy nuclides, radioactive ion beam physics and chemistry, etc.

  19. Kinetic theory analysis of rarefied gas flow through finite length slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghuraman, P.; Willis, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A kinetic-theory analysis is made of the flow of a rarefied monatomic gas through a two-dimensional slot connecting two reservoirs. Numerical solutions are obtained by the moment and discrete-ordinate methods. The former method portrays the transition-regime characteristics well but has limitations in the free-molecule regime. The latter method gives accurate results in the free-molecule and slip regimes and bolsters confidence in the accuracy of the transition-regime results. The numerical solution for the mass flux through the slot agrees well with an approximate analytical solution of the moment equations for length-to-width ratios from 6 to 0.5, pressure ratios from 0.8 to 0.1, and Knudsen numbers from 5 to 0.5.

  20. Reduced-order kinetic plasma models using principal component analysis: Model formulation and manifold sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellemans, Aurélie; Magin, Thierry; Coussement, Axel; Parente, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Plasma flows involve hundreds of species and thousands of reactions at different time scales, resulting in a very large set of governing equations to solve. Simulating large reacting systems in nonequilibrium plasma mixtures remains a challenge with the currently available computational resources. Principal component analysis (PCA) offers a general and rather simple and automated method to reduce large kinetic mechanisms by principal variable selection. This work shows how to adapt and apply the PCA-scores technique, which has its origin in the combustion field, to a collisional-radiative model. We have successfully applied this technique to argon plasmas, reducing the set of governing equations by more than 90%, leading to an important speed-up of the calculation and a reduction of computational cost.

  1. Retorting of oil shale followed by solvent extraction of spent shale: Experiment and kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Khraisha, Y.H.

    2000-05-01

    Samples of El-Lajjun oil shale were thermally decomposed in a laboratory retort system under a slow heating rate (0.07 K/s) up to a maximum temperature of 698--773 K. After decomposition, 0.02 kg of spent shale was extracted by chloroform in a Soxhlet extraction unit for 2 h to investigate the ultimate amount of shale oil that could be produced. The retorting results indicate an increase in the oil yields from 3.24% to 9.77% of oil shale feed with retorting temperature, while the extraction results show a decrease in oil yields from 8.10% to 3.32% of spent shale. The analysis of the data according to the global first-order model for isothermal and nonisothermal conditions shows kinetic parameters close to those reported in literature.

  2. Kinetic analysis reveals the ordered coupling of translation termination and ribosome recycling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Christopher J; Green, Rachel

    2011-12-20

    Although well defined in bacterial systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cells have only begun to be explored. Recent studies have proposed a direct role for eukaryotic termination factors eRF1 and eRF3 (and the related factors Dom34 and Hbs1) in downstream recycling processes; however, our understanding of the connection between termination and recycling in eukaryotes is limited. Here, using an in vitro reconstituted yeast translation system, we identify a key role for the multifunctional ABC-family protein Rli1 in stimulating both eRF1-mediated termination and ribosome recycling in yeast. Through subsequent kinetic analysis, we uncover a network of regulatory features that provides mechanistic insight into how the events of termination and recycling are obligately ordered. These results establish a model in which eukaryotic termination and recycling are not clearly demarcated events, as they are in bacteria, but coupled stages of the same release-factor mediated process.

  3. Uncertainty in the analysis of tracer kinetics using dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Buckley, David L

    2002-03-01

    In recent years a number of physiological models have gained prominence in the analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI data. However, there remains little evidence to support their use in estimating the absolute values of tissue physiological parameters such as perfusion, capillary permeability, and blood volume. In an attempt to address this issue, data were simulated using a distributed pathway model of tracer kinetics, and three published models were fitted to the resultant concentration-time curves. Parameter estimates obtained from these fits were compared with the parameters used for the simulations. The results indicate that the use of commonly accepted models leads to systematic overestimation of the transfer constant, Ktrans, and potentially large underestimates of the blood plasma volume fraction, Vp. In summary, proposals for a practical approach to physiological modeling using MRI data are outlined.

  4. Analysis of thickness dependent on crystallization kinetics in thin isotactic-polysterene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairuddin

    2016-11-01

    Crystalliaztion kinetics of thin film of Isotactic Polysterene (it-PS) films has been studied. Thin PET films having thickness of 338, 533, 712, 1096, 1473, and 2185 A° were prepared by using spin-cast technique. The it-PS crystals were grown on Linkam-hostage in the temperature range 130-240°C with an interval of 10°C. The crystal growths are measured by optical microscopy in lateral direction. It was found that a substantial thickness dependence on crystallisation rate. The analysis using fitting technique based on theory crystal growth of Lauritzen-Hoffman showed that the fitting technique could not resolve to predict the mechanism controlling the thickness dependence on the rate of crystallisation. The possible reasons were due to the crystallisation rate varies with the type of crystals (smooth, rough, overgrowth terrace), and the crystallisation rate changes with the time of crystallisation.

  5. Kinetic analysis of lauric acid hydroxylation by human cytochrome P450 4A11.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghak; Cha, Gun-Su; Nagy, Leslie D; Yun, Chul-Ho; Guengerich, F Peter

    2014-10-07

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4A11 is the only functionally active subfamily 4A P450 in humans. P450 4A11 catalyzes mainly ω-hydroxylation of fatty acids in liver and kidney; this process is not a major degradative pathway, but at least one product, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, has important signaling properties. We studied catalysis by P450 4A11 and the issue of rate-limiting steps using lauric acid ω-hydroxylation, a prototypic substrate for this enzyme. Some individual reaction steps were studied using pre-steady-state kinetic approaches. Substrate and product binding and release were much faster than overall rates of catalysis. Reduction of ferric P450 4A11 (to ferrous) was rapid and not rate-limiting. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments yielded low but reproducible values (1.2-2) for 12-hydroxylation with 12-(2)H-substituted lauric acid. However, considerable "metabolic switching" to 11-hydroxylation was observed with [12-(2)H3]lauric acid. Analysis of switching results [Jones, J. P., et al. (1986) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 108, 7074-7078] and the use of tritium KIE analysis with [12-(3)H]lauric acid [Northrop, D. B. (1987) Methods Enzymol. 87, 607-625] both indicated a high intrinsic KIE (>10). Cytochrome b5 (b5) stimulated steady-state lauric acid ω-hydroxylation ∼2-fold; the apoprotein was ineffective, indicating that electron transfer is involved in the b5 enhancement. The rate of b5 reoxidation was increased in the presence of ferrous P450 mixed with O2. Collectively, the results indicate that both the transfer of an electron to the ferrous·O2 complex and C-H bond-breaking limit the rate of P450 4A11 ω-oxidation.

  6. Analysis of IgG kinetic stability by differential scanning calorimetry, probe fluorescence and light scattering.

    PubMed

    Nemergut, Michal; Žoldák, Gabriel; Schaefer, Jonas V; Kast, Florian; Miškovský, Pavol; Plückthun, Andreas; Sedlák, Erik

    2017-08-19

    Monoclonal antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) type have become mainstream therapeutics for the treatment of many life-threatening diseases. For their successful application in the clinic and a favorable cost-benefit ratio, the design and formulation of these therapeutic molecules must guarantee long-term stability for an extended period of time. Accelerated stability studies, e.g., by employing thermal denaturation, have the great potential for enabling high-throughput screening campaigns to find optimal molecular variants and formulations in a short time. Surprisingly, no validated quantitative analysis of these accelerated studies has been performed yet, which clearly limits their application for predicting IgG stability. Therefore, we have established a quantitative approach for the assessment of the kinetic stability over a broad range of temperatures. To this end, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments were performed with a model IgG, testing chaotropic formulations and an extended temperature range, and they were subsequently analyzed by our recently developed three-step sequential model of IgG denaturation, consisting of one reversible and two irreversible steps. A critical comparison of the predictions from this model with data obtained by an orthogonal fluorescence probe method, based on 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate binding to partially unfolded states, resulted in very good agreement. In summary, our study highlights the validity of this easy-to-perform analysis for reliably assessing the kinetic stability of IgGs, which can support accelerated formulation development of monoclonal antibodies by ranking different formulations as well as by improving colloidal stability models. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  7. Kinetic Analysis of Lauric Acid Hydroxylation by Human Cytochrome P450 4A11

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4A11 is the only functionally active subfamily 4A P450 in humans. P450 4A11 catalyzes mainly ω-hydroxylation of fatty acids in liver and kidney; this process is not a major degradative pathway, but at least one product, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, has important signaling properties. We studied catalysis by P450 4A11 and the issue of rate-limiting steps using lauric acid ω-hydroxylation, a prototypic substrate for this enzyme. Some individual reaction steps were studied using pre-steady-state kinetic approaches. Substrate and product binding and release were much faster than overall rates of catalysis. Reduction of ferric P450 4A11 (to ferrous) was rapid and not rate-limiting. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments yielded low but reproducible values (1.2–2) for 12-hydroxylation with 12-2H-substituted lauric acid. However, considerable “metabolic switching” to 11-hydroxylation was observed with [12-2H3]lauric acid. Analysis of switching results [Jones, J. P., et al. (1986) J. Am. Chem. Soc.108, 7074–7078] and the use of tritium KIE analysis with [12-3H]lauric acid [Northrop, D. B. (1987) Methods Enzymol.87, 607–625] both indicated a high intrinsic KIE (>10). Cytochrome b5 (b5) stimulated steady-state lauric acid ω-hydroxylation ∼2-fold; the apoprotein was ineffective, indicating that electron transfer is involved in the b5 enhancement. The rate of b5 reoxidation was increased in the presence of ferrous P450 mixed with O2. Collectively, the results indicate that both the transfer of an electron to the ferrous·O2 complex and C–H bond-breaking limit the rate of P450 4A11 ω-oxidation. PMID:25203493

  8. relax: the analysis of biomolecular kinetics and thermodynamics using NMR relaxation dispersion data

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Sébastien; Linnet, Troels E.; Lescanne, Mathilde; Schanda, Paul; Thompson, Gary S.; Tollinger, Martin; Teilum, Kaare; Gagné, Stéphane; Marion, Dominique; Griesinger, Christian; Blackledge, Martin; d’Auvergne, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool for observing the motion of biomolecules at the atomic level. One technique, the analysis of relaxation dispersion phenomenon, is highly suited for studying the kinetics and thermodynamics of biological processes. Built on top of the relax computational environment for NMR dynamics is a new dispersion analysis designed to be comprehensive, accurate and easy-to-use. The software supports more models, both numeric and analytic, than current solutions. An automated protocol, available for scripting and driving the graphical user interface (GUI), is designed to simplify the analysis of dispersion data for NMR spectroscopists. Decreases in optimization time are granted by parallelization for running on computer clusters and by skipping an initial grid search by using parameters from one solution as the starting point for another —using analytic model results for the numeric models, taking advantage of model nesting, and using averaged non-clustered results for the clustered analysis. Availability and implementation: The software relax is written in Python with C modules and is released under the GPLv3+ license. Source code and precompiled binaries for all major operating systems are available from http://www.nmr-relax.com. Contact: edward@nmr-relax.com PMID:24764461

  9. relax: the analysis of biomolecular kinetics and thermodynamics using NMR relaxation dispersion data.

    PubMed

    Morin, Sébastien; Linnet, Troels E; Lescanne, Mathilde; Schanda, Paul; Thompson, Gary S; Tollinger, Martin; Teilum, Kaare; Gagné, Stéphane; Marion, Dominique; Griesinger, Christian; Blackledge, Martin; d'Auvergne, Edward J

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool for observing the motion of biomolecules at the atomic level. One technique, the analysis of relaxation dispersion phenomenon, is highly suited for studying the kinetics and thermodynamics of biological processes. Built on top of the relax computational environment for NMR dynamics is a new dispersion analysis designed to be comprehensive, accurate and easy-to-use. The software supports more models, both numeric and analytic, than current solutions. An automated protocol, available for scripting and driving the graphical user interface (GUI), is designed to simplify the analysis of dispersion data for NMR spectroscopists. Decreases in optimization time are granted by parallelization for running on computer clusters and by skipping an initial grid search by using parameters from one solution as the starting point for another -using analytic model results for the numeric models, taking advantage of model nesting, and using averaged non-clustered results for the clustered analysis. The software relax is written in Python with C modules and is released under the GPLv3+ license. Source code and precompiled binaries for all major operating systems are available from http://www.nmr-relax.com. edward@nmr-relax.com. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Effect of two yellow delta-emitting layers on device performance of phosphorescent white organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Yu, Junsheng; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) with a structure of ITO/TAPC/δ-EML1/mCP:FIrpic/δ-EML2/Bphen/Mg:Ag were fabricated, wherein two ultrathin and host-free emitting layers (EMLs) were formed by using yellow bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C2'] iridium (acetylacetonate) [(tbt)2Ir(acac)] and referred to as delta-EMLs (δ-EML1 and δ-EML2). By adjusting the thicknesses of δ-EMLs, a maximum current efficiency of 27.6 cd/A, an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 10%, together with low efficiency roll-off at high luminance were achieved. The results showed that δ-EML1 played a dominant role on charge carrier trapping, while δ-EML2 had major impact on yellow light emission, which were highly sensitive to the location of δ-EMLs. Furthermore, by introducing 5-nm Au as anode modifying layer, high device efficiency was maintained along with excellent color stability of warm white emission, displaying color coordinates of (0.38, 0.42) and color temperature of 4348 K at a luminance of 7000 cd/m2. Importantly, explanation and analysis for the influence of both ultrathin δ-EMLs and anode modifying layer on device performance were proposed.

  11. Room temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence study on the interactions of iodide ions with single tryptophan containing serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Gałęcki, Krystian; Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka

    2016-12-05

    In this study, the influence of heavy-atom perturbation, induced by the addition of iodide ions, on the fluorescence and phosphorescence decay parameters of some single tryptophan containing serum albumins isolated from: human (HSA), equine (ESA) and leporine (LSA) has been studied. The obtained results indicated that, there exist two distinct conformations of the proteins with different exposure to the quencher. In addition, the Stern-Volmer plots indicated saturation of iodide ions in the binding region. Therefore, to determine quenching parameter, we proposed alternative quenching model and we have performed a global analysis of each conformer to define the effect of iodide ions in the cavity by determining the value of the association constant. The possible quenching mechanism may be based on long-range through-space interactions between the buried chromophore and quencher in the aqueous phase. The discrepancies of the decay parameters between the albumins studied may be related with the accumulation of positive charge at the main and the back entrance to the Drug Site 1 where tryptophan residue is located.

  12. Spectroscopic mapping and selective electronic tuning of molecular orbitals in phosphorescent organometallic complexes - a new strategy for OLED materials.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Pascal R; Sanning, Jan; Koch, Tobias; Doltsinis, Nikos L; Strassert, Cristian A; Wegner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of molecular electronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes requires fundamental knowledge about the structural and electronic properties of the employed molecules as well as their interactions with neighboring molecules or interfaces. We show that highly resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) are powerful tools to correlate the electronic properties of phosphorescent complexes (i.e., triplet emitters) with their molecular structure as well as the local environment around a single molecule. We used spectroscopic mapping to visualize several occupied and unoccupied molecular frontier orbitals of Pt(II) complexes adsorbed on Au(111). The analysis showed that the molecules exhibit a peculiar localized strong hybridization that leads to partial depopulation of a dz² orbital, while the ligand orbitals are almost unchanged. We further found that substitution of functional groups at well-defined positions can alter specific molecular orbitals without influencing the others. The results open a path toward the tailored design of electronic and optical properties of triplet emitters by smart ligand substitution, which may improve the performance of future OLED devices.

  13. Room temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence study on the interactions of iodide ions with single tryptophan containing serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałęcki, Krystian; Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the influence of heavy-atom perturbation, induced by the addition of iodide ions, on the fluorescence and phosphorescence decay parameters of some single tryptophan containing serum albumins isolated from: human (HSA), equine (ESA) and leporine (LSA) has been studied. The obtained results indicated that, there exist two distinct conformations of the proteins with different exposure to the quencher. In addition, the Stern-Volmer plots indicated saturation of iodide ions in the binding region. Therefore, to determine quenching parameter, we proposed alternative quenching model and we have performed a global analysis of each conformer to define the effect of iodide ions in the cavity by determining the value of the association constant. The possible quenching mechanism may be based on long-range through-space interactions between the buried chromophore and quencher in the aqueous phase. The discrepancies of the decay parameters between the albumins studied may be related with the accumulation of positive charge at the main and the back entrance to the Drug Site 1 where tryptophan residue is located.

  14. BIOINTERACTION ANALYSIS BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: KINETIC STUDIES OF IMMOBILIZED ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mary Anne; Moser, Annette; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    A system based on high-performance affinity chromatography was developed for characterizing the binding, elution and regeneration kinetics of immobilized antibodies and immunoaffinity supports. This information was provided by using a combination of frontal analysis, split-peak analysis and peak decay analysis to determine the rate constants for antibody-antigen interactions under typical sample application and elution conditions. This technique was tested using immunoaffinity supports that contained monoclonal antibodies for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Association equilibrium constants measured by frontal analysis for 2,4-D and related compounds with the immobilized antibodies were 1.7–12 × 106 M−1 at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Split-peak analysis gave association rate constants of 1.4–12 × 105 M−1s−1 and calculated dissociation rate constants of 0.01–0.4 s−1 under the application conditions. Elution at pH 2.5 for the analytes from the antibodies was examined by peak decay analysis and gave dissociation rate constants of 0.056–0.17 s−1. A comparison of frontal analysis results after various periods of column regeneration allowed the rate of antibody regeneration to be examined, with the results giving a first-order regeneration rate constant of 2.4 × 10−4 s−1. This combined approach and the information it provides should be useful in the design and optimization of immunoaffinity chromatography and other analytical methods that employ immobilized antibodies. The methods described are not limited to the particular analytes and antibodies employed in this study but should be useful in characterizing other targets, ligands and supports. PMID:19394281

  15. Exact and user-friendly kinetic analysis of the two-step rapid equilibrium Michaelis-Menten mechanism.

    PubMed

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Shkel, Irina A; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2009-04-15

    Most enzyme kinetic experiments are carried out under pseudo-first-order conditions, that is, when one of the reactant species (the enzyme or the substrate) is in a large excess of the other species. More accurate kinetic information about the system can be gained without the restrictions of the pseudo-first-order conditions. We present a practical and general method of analysis of the common two-step rapid equilibrium Michaelis-Menten mechanism. The formalism is exact in that it does not involve any other approximations such as the steady-state, limitations on the reactant concentrations or on reaction times. We apply this method to the global analysis of kinetic progress curves for bovine alkaline phosphatase assays carried out under both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order conditions.

  16. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of bamboo waste treated by Echinodontium taxodii using a modified three-parallel-reactions model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbo; Liu, Fang; Ke, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of pretreatment with Echinodontium taxodii on thermal decomposition characteristics and kinetics of bamboo wastes was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed fungal pretreatment can enhance the thermal degradation of bamboo. The negative effect of extractives in bamboo on the thermal decomposition can be decreased by the pretreatment. A modified three-parallel-reactions model based on isolated lignin was firstly proposed to study pyrolysis kinetics of bamboo lignocellulose. Kinetic analysis showed that with increasing pretreatment time fungal delignification was enhanced to transform the lignin component with high activation energy into that with low activation energy and raise the cellulose content in bamboo, making the thermal decomposition easier. These results demonstrated fungal pretreatment provided a potential way to improve thermal conversion efficiency of bamboo.

  17. Effect of Triplet Harvesting on the Lifetime Based on Fluorescence and Phosphorescence in Hybrid White Organic Light Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun; Lee, Ho Won; Yang, Hyung Jin; Sun, Yong; Lee, Jae Woo; Hwang, Kyo Min; Kim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Kwan

    2016-03-01

    We investigated efficient hybrid white organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) apply to triplet harvesting (TH) concept based on three complementary colors by mixing containing blue fluorescent emitter with phosphorescent emitters. The TH is to transfer these triplet excitons from a fluorescence to a phosphorescence, where they can decay radiatively. We fabricated several hybrid WOLEDs, having various emitting layer structures with blue fluorescent emitter and red, green phosphorescent emitter. The WOLED exhibited maximum luminous efficiency of 9.02 cd/A, and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 4.17%. The WOLED showed a highly color-stable white emission with the Commission International de L'Éclairage chromaticity of (0.38, 0.36) at 1,000 cd/m2.

  18. Low-temperature (77 K) phosphorescence of triplet chlorophyll in isolated reaction centers of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Zabelin, Alexey A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorescence characterized by the main emission band at 952 ± 1 nm (1.30 eV), the lifetime of 1.5 ± 0.1 ms and the quantum yield nearly equal to that for monomeric chlorophyll a in aqueous detergent dispersions, has been detected in isolated reaction centers (RCs) of spinach photosystem II at 77 K. The excitation spectrum shows maxima corresponding to absorption bands of chlorophyll a, pheophytin a, and β-carotene. The phosphorescence intensity strongly depends upon the redox state of RCs. The data suggest that the phosphorescence signal originates from the chlorophyll triplet state populated via charge recombination in the radical pair [Formula: see text].

  19. Long-lived phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes conjugated with cationic polyfluorenes for heparin sensing and cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiayang; Zhang, Chuanqi; Lin, Wenpeng; Liu, Yahong; Liu, Shujuan; Xu, Yunjian; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The applications of conjugated polyelectrolytes in biosensing and bioimaging have attracted more and more research interests due to their excellent photophysical properties. In this work, a new series of conjugated polyelectrolytes containing long-lived phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes is designed and synthesized, which can be used for ratiometric and lifetime-based sensing of heparin utilizing the electrostatic interaction between cationic polymers and anionic heparin. By changing the ligand structures of Ir(III) complexes, the sensing performances of phosphorescent-conjugated polyelectrolytes (PCPEs) are optimized. In addition, the application of PCPEs in cellular imaging is carried out. These polymers can be applied for specific staining of cell membrane. Importantly, utilizing the long emission lifetime of phosphorescent signal of Ir(III) complexes, time-gated luminescent imaging is carried out, which can eliminate the short-lived background fluorescence interferences from the environment or biological samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quantitative surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for kinetic analysis of aldol condensation using Ag-Au core-shell nanocubes.

    PubMed

    Weatherston, Joshua D; Worstell, Nolan C; Wu, Hung-Jen

    2016-10-17

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful tool with high potential for multiplexed detection of dilute analytes. However, quantitative SERS of kinetic assays can be difficult due to the variation in enhancement factors caused by changing reaction conditions. We report a method for quantitative SERS kinetic analysis using colloidal Ag-Au core-shell nanocubes (Ag@AuNCs) as the SERS substrate. This substrate is mass producible, possesses large SERS enhancement, and is resistant to degradation in most environments. The SERS enhancement of the Ag@AuNCs was evaluated both experimentally and computationally. Quantitation was achieved by covalently attaching a non-reactive internal standard (IS) to substrate surfaces and normalizing SERS spectra to the IS signal. We demonstrated that IS normalization corrects for temporal variations in enhancement factor and particle concentration. Quantitation was demonstrated by monitoring the base-catalyzed aldol condensation of surface-bound 4-(methylthio)benzaldehyde with free acetone. The kinetic model of this reaction was fitted to IS normalized SERS data, resulting in kinetic parameters that agreed well with published values. This SERS platform is a robust and sensitive method for quantitative analysis of kinetic assays, with potential applications in many fields.

  1. Role of manganese in red long-lasting phosphorescence of manganese-doped diopside for in vivo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lecointre, A.; Bessière, A.; Priolkar, K.R.; Gourier, D.; Wallez, G.; Viana, B.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Long-lasting phosphorescence of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Mn is studied for bioimaging application. ► CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Mn yields orange and red luminescence of Mn{sup II}{sub Ca} and Mn{sup II}{sub Mg}, respectively. ► Red Mn{sup II}{sub Mg} emission dominates long-lasting phosphorescence spectra. ► Mn mainly substitutes Mg. ► Mn{sup II}{sub Mg} plays the role of hole trap in the persistent luminescence mechanism. - Abstract: Materials with red long-lasting phosphorescence, such as Mn{sup II}-doped diopsides, can be used for small animal in vivo imaging. CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Mn powders with various amounts of Mn were prepared by sol–gel to investigate their long-lasting phosphorescence mechanism. X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine and near-edge structure and electron paramagnetic resonance showed that manganese is quantitatively introduced in the structure as Mn{sup II}. Most of the Mn doping ions substitute Mg and possess a highly elongated octahedral environment. While photoluminescence and X-ray excited optical luminescence spectra show both orange (585 nm) and red (685 nm) {sup 4}T{sub 1} ({sup 4}G) → {sup 6}A{sub 1} ({sup 6}S) emission of Mn{sup II}{sub Ca} and Mn{sup II}{sub Mg}, respectively, Mn{sup II}{sub Mg} red emission dominates long-lasting phosphorescence and thermally stimulated luminescence spectra. These results point to Mn{sup II}{sub Mg} as the preferential hole trap and recombination center in the long-lasting phosphorescence mechanism. An intense persistent red emission suitable for in vivo imaging probes is obtained for the highest nominal Mn content (7.5%)

  2. Inverse problem analysis for identification of reaction kinetics constants in microreactors for biodiesel synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, P. C.; Naveira-Cotta, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical analysis for the design of microreactors in biodiesel production is a complicated task due to the complex liquid-liquid flow and mass transfer processes, and the transesterification reaction that takes place within these microsystems. Thus, computational simulation is an important tool that aids in understanding the physical-chemical phenomenon and, consequently, in determining the suitable conditions that maximize the conversion of triglycerides during the biodiesel synthesis. A diffusive-convective-reactive coupled nonlinear mathematical model, that governs the mass transfer process during the transesterification reaction in parallel plates microreactors, under isothermal conditions, is here described. A hybrid numerical-analytical solution via the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT) for this partial differential system is developed and the eigenfunction expansions convergence rates are extensively analyzed and illustrated. The heuristic method of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is applied in the inverse analysis of the proposed direct problem, to estimate the reaction kinetics constants, which is a critical step in the design of such microsystems. The results present a good agreement with the limited experimental data in the literature, but indicate that the GITT methodology combined with the PSO approach provide a reliable computational algorithm for direct-inverse analysis in such reactive mass transfer problems.

  3. Kinetic analysis of the hydrolysis of methyl parathion using citrate-stabilized 10 nm gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nita, Rafaela; Trammell, Scott A; Ellis, Gregory A; Moore, Martin H; Soto, Carissa M; Leary, Dagmar H; Fontana, Jake; Talebzadeh, Somayeh F; Knight, D Andrew

    2016-02-01

    "Ligand-free" citrate-stabilized 10 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) promote the hydrolysis of the thiophosphate ester methyl parathion (MeP) on the surface of gold as a function of pH and two temperature values. At 50 °C, the active surface gold atoms show catalytic turnover ∼4 times after 8 h and little turnover of gold surface atoms at 25 °C with only 40% of the total atoms being active. From Michaelis-Menten analysis, k(cat) increases between pH 8 and 9 and decreases above pH 9. A global analysis of the spectral changes confirmed the stoichiometric reaction at 25 °C and the catalytic reaction at 50 °C and mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of p-nitrophenolate (PNP) product. Additional decomposition pathways involving oxidation and hydrolysis independent of the formation of PNP were also seen at 50 °C for both catalyzed and un-catalyzed reactions. This work represents the first kinetic analysis of ligand-free AuNP catalyzed hydrolysis of a thiophosphate ester.

  4. Neutron activation analysis via nuclear decay kinetics using gamma-ray spectroscopy at SFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Thomas; Chester, Aaron; Starosta, Krzysztof; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool used in a variety of fields including nuclear and analytical chemistry, environmental science, and health risk management. At SFU, the Germanium detector for Elemental Analysis and Radiation Studies (GEARS), a low-background shielded high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector, has been used recently in all of the above fields. The current project aims to expand upon the number of applications for which GEARS can be used while enhancing its current functionality. A recent addition to the SFU Nuclear Science laboratory is the Thermo Scientific P 385 neutron generator. This device provides a nominal yield of 3 ×108 neutrons/s providing the capacity for neutron activation analysis, opening a major avenue of research at SFU which was previously unavailable. The isotopes created via neutron activation have a wide range of half-lives. To measure and study isotopes with half-lives above a second, a new analogue data acquisition system has been installed on GEARS allowing accurate measurements of decay kinetics. This new functionality enables identification and quantification of the products of neutron activation. Results from the neutron activation analysis of pure metals will be presented.

  5. Large-scale kinetic energy spectra from Eulerian analysis of EOLE wind data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desbois, M.

    1975-01-01

    A data set of 56,000 winds determined from the horizontal displacements of EOLE balloons at the 200 mb level in the Southern Hemisphere during the period October 1971-February 1972 is utilized for the computation of planetary- and synoptic-scale kinetic energy space spectra. However, the random distribution of measurements in space and time presents some problems for the spectral analysis. Two different approaches are used, i.e., a harmonic analysis of daily wind values at equi-distant points obtained by space-time interpolation of the data, and a correlation method using the direct measurements. Both methods give similar results for small wavenumbers, but the second is more accurate for higher wavenumbers (k above or equal to 10). The spectra show a maximum at wavenumbers 5 and 6 due to baroclinic instability and then decrease for high wavenumbers up to wavenumber 35 (which is the limit of the analysis), according to the inverse power law k to the negative p, with p close to 3.

  6. Determination of reaction kinetics of rice husks in air using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mansaray, K.G.; Ghaly, A.E.

    1999-12-01

    Rice husk is produced in large quantities as a by-product of rice milling in rice-producing countries and has posed disposal problems in these countries. Disposal of or energy recovery from rice husk can be accomplished by thermochemical conversion processes (pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification). However, it appears that the kinetics of rice husk, which can contribute to the accurate modeling and design of thermochemical conversion processes, have not been studied extensively. In this paper the technique of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the thermochemical behavior of four varieties of rice husk (Lemont LG, ROK 14, CP 4, and Pa Potho). The thermal degradation of rice husk was studied in an air atmosphere (21% oxygen and 79% nitrogen) from ambient temperature to 700 C at the heating rate of 20 C/min. The thermograms showed two distinct reaction zones. The kinetic parameters (activation energy, preexponential factor, and order of reaction) were determined for the two reaction zones by applying thermoanalytical techniques to the reaction kinetics. Higher thermal degradation rates were observed in the first reaction zone due to rapid release of volatiles as compared to those in the second reaction zone. In the first reaction zone the activation energies ranged from 37.0 to 54.7 kJ/mol. Relatively lower activation energies (18.0--21.0 kJ/mol) were obtained in the second reaction zone. The preexponential factors were in the range of 4.3 x 10{sup 4} to 6.4 x 10{sup 6} min{sup {minus}1} in the first reaction zone and 4.5 x 10{sup 2} to 1.5 x 10{sup 3} min{sup {minus}1} in the second reaction zone. The orders of reaction were in the range of 1.2--1.6 and 0.4--0.5 for the first and second reaction zones, respectively. The predicted thermal degradations were in good agreement with the experimental data in both the first and second reaction zones.

  7. STATIC AND KINETIC SITE-SPECIFIC PROTEIN-DNA PHOTOCROSSLINKING: ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL TRANSCRIPTION INITIATION COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Naryshkin, Nikolai; Druzhinin, Sergei; Revyakin, Andrei; Kim, Younggyu; Mekler, Vladimir; Ebright, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Static site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking permits identification of protein-DNA interactions within multiprotein-DNA complexes. Kinetic site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking--involving rapid-quench-flow mixing and pulsed-laser irradiation--permits elucidation of pathways and kinetics of formation of protein-DNA interactions within multiprotein-DNA complexes. We present detailed protocols for application of static and kinetic site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking to bacterial transcription initiation complexes. PMID:19378179

  8. Non-isothermal kinetic analysis of thermal decomposition of the Ca-bentonite from Santai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-hui; He, Chuan; Wang, Ling; Li, Zhong-quan; Deng, Miao; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong-kui; Feng, Qian

    2015-06-01

    The thermal decompositions of Ca-bentonites (CaB) from Santai, Shichuan Province, China, over the temperature range of 30-1,100 °C were investigated by simultaneous thermal analyzer. Non-isothermal kinetic analysis was employed to study the thermal decomposition mechanism by using Netzsch Thermokinetics software. Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Friedman isoconversional methods were used to calculate the activation energy and analyze the reaction steps. The probable mechanism and the corresponding kinetic parameters were determined by multivariate non-linear regression program. The results show that the thermal decomposition process of CaB over the temperature range of 30-800 °C is a kind of six-step, competitive reaction ( F 1 D 3 F n C 1E F n F n model). The dehydration reaction is controlled by two consecutive mechanisms, nucleation and growth, followed by a diffusion-controlled reaction ( F 1 D 3 model), the first step: E = 61.68 kJ mol-1, log A = 6.75 s-1; the second step: E = 50.73 kJ mol-1, log A = 3.11 s-1. The dehydroxylation reaction is controlled by three-step competitive mechanisms, an autocatalytically activated, initial reaction followed by n-order competitive reaction ( C 1E F n F n model), the first step: E = 124.74 kJ mol-1, log A = 5.67 s-1; the second step: E = 245.29 kJ mol-1, log A = 11.69 s-1; the third step : E = 261.73 kJ mol-1, log A = 11.23 s-1. A combination reaction of the dehydration and dehydroxylation is observed, and controlled by one n-order reaction ( F n model), E = 8.99 kJ mol-1, log A = -1.91 s-1.

  9. Cell kinetics, DNA integrity, differentiation, and lipid fingerprinting analysis of rabbit adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Letícia Siqueira de Sá; Lessio, Camila; Sawaki e Nakamura, Ahy Natally; Lo Turco, Edson Guimarães; da Silva, Camila Gonzaga; Zambon, João Paulo; Gozzo, Fábio César; Pilau, Eduardo Jorge; de Almeida, Fernando Gonçalves

    2014-10-01

    Human adipose tissue has been described as a potential alternative reservoir for stem cells. Although studies have been performed in rabbits using autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC), these cells have not been well characterized. The primary objectives of this study were to demonstrate the presence of adipose-derived stem cells isolated from rabbit inguinal fat pads and to characterize them through osteogenic and adipogenic in vitro differentiation and lipid fingerprinting analysis. The secondary objective was to evaluate cell behavior through growth kinetics, cell viability, and DNA integrity. Rabbit ADSCs were isolated to determine the in vitro growth kinetics and cell viability. DNA integrity was assessed by an alkaline Comet assay in passages 0 and 5. The osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by Von Kossa, and Alizarin Red S staining and adipogenic differentiation were assessed by Oil Red O staining. Lipid fingerprinting analyses of control, adipogenic, and osteogenic differentiated cells were performed by MALDI-TOF/MS. We demonstrate that rabbit ADSC have a constant growth rate at the early passages, with increased DNA fragmentation at or after passage 5. Rabbit ADSC viability was similar in passages 2 and 5 (90.7% and 86.6%, respectively), but there was a tendency to decreased cellular growth rate after passage 3. The ADSC were characterized by the expression of surface markers such as CD29 (67.4%) and CD44 (89.4%), using CD 45 (0.77%) as a negative control. ADSC from rabbits were successfully isolated form the inguinal region. These cells were capable to differentiate into osteogenic and adipogenic tissue when they were placed in inductive media. After each passage, there was a trend towards decreased cell growth. On the other hand, DNA fragmentation increased at each passage. ADSC had a different lipid profile when placed in control, adipogenic, or osteogenic media.

  10. Simultaneous Kinetic Analysis of Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activities 1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Samuel S.; Young, Joseph D.

    1980-01-01

    An assay was developed for simultaneous kinetic analysis of the activities of the bifunctional plant enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase [EC 4.1.1.39]. [1-14C,5-3H]Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) was used as the labeled substrate. Tritium enrichment of the doubly labeled 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) product, common to both enzyme activities, may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios from the expression A/(B-A) where A and B represent the 3H/14C isotope ratios of doubly labeled RuBP and 3-PGA, and Vc and Vo represent the activities of carboxylase and oxygenase, respectively. Doubly labeled substrate was synthesized from [2-14C]glucose and [6-3H]glucose using the enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway coupled with phosphoribulokinase. The kinetic properties of a commercial preparation of fully activated spinach carboxylase were studied under approximated physiological conditions of 20% O2 (252 micromolar), 295 μl/l CO2 (10 micromolar), 25 C, and pH 8.19. The Vc/Vo ratio was, within experimental error, constant at 30 seconds and 1 minute. This double label assay method may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios for the Laing-Ogren-Hageman equation, Vc/Vo = (VcKo/VoKc) ([CO2]/[O2]) where Vc and Vo represent Vmax, and Kc and Ko represent Michaelis constants for the carboxylase and oxygenase activities, respectively. PMID:16661214

  11. Stoichiometric and kinetic analysis of extreme halophilic Archaea on various substrates in a corrosion resistant bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Seyer, Bernhard; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-25

    Extreme halophilic Archaea are extremophile species which can thrive in hypersaline environments of up to 3-5 M sodium chloride concentration. Although their ecology and physiology are widely identified on the microbiological level, little emphasis has been laid on quantitative bioprocess development with extreme halophiles. The goal of this study was to establish, on the one hand, a methodological basis for quantitative bioprocess analysis of extreme halophilic Archaea with an extreme halophilic strain as an example. Firstly, as a novel usage, a corrosion resistant bioreactor setup for extreme halophiles has been implemented. Then, paying special attention to total bioprocess quantification approaches, an indirect method for biomass quantification using on-line process signals was introduced. Subsequently, robust quantitative data evaluation methods for halophiles could be developed, providing defined and controlled cultivation conditions in the bioreactor and therefore obtaining suitable quality of on-line as well as off-line datasets. On the other hand, new physiological results of extreme halophiles in bioreactor have also been obtained based on the quantitative methodological tools. For the first time, quantitative data on stoichiometry and kinetics were collected and evaluated on different carbon sources. The results on various substrates were interpreted, with proposed metabolic mechanisms, by linking to the reported primary carbon metabolism of extreme halophilic Archaea. Moreover, results of chemostat cultures demonstrated that extreme halophilic organisms show Monod-kinetics on different sole carbon sources. A diauxic growth pattern was described on a mixture of substrates in batch cultivations. In addition, the methodologies presented here enable one to characterize the utilized strain Haloferax mediterranei (HFX) as a potential new host organism. Thus, this study offers a strong methodological basis as well as a fundamental physiological assessment for

  12. Effect of Composition and Impurities on the Phosphorescence of Green-Emitting Alkaline Earth Aluminate Phosphor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doory; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements to SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors have enabled the use of luminescent hosts with a stable crystal structure and high physical and chemical stability, thus overcoming the bottleneck in the applicability of ZnS:Cu phosphors. However, enhancement of afterglow lifetime and brightness in SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors remains a challenging task. Here, we have improved the afterglow characteristics in terms of persistence time and brightness by a systematic investigation of the composition of Eu-doped alkaline earth aluminate SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ crystals. We found that a Dy3+/Eu2+ ratio of ~2.4 and ~0.935 mol Eu2+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) gave the brightest and longest emissions (11% and 9% increase for each). Doping with Si4+ also resulted in a slight increase in brightness up to ~15%. Doping with alkali metal or alkaline earth metal significantly enhanced the phosphorescence intensity. In particular, doping with 0.005 mol Li+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) alone boosted the phosphorescence intensity to 239% of the initial value, as compared to that observed for the non-doped crystal, while doping with 0.01 mol Mg2+ and 0.005 mol Li+ (per 1 mol SrAl2O4) boosted the phosphorescence intensity up to 313% of the initial value. The results of this investigation are expected to act as a guideline for the synthesis of bright and long persistent phosphors, and facilitate the development of persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors. PMID:26731086

  13. Ultralong Persistent Room Temperature Phosphorescence of Metal Coordination Polymers Exhibiting Reversible pH-Responsive Emission.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ke-Zhi; Yan, Dongpeng

    2016-06-22

    Ultra-long-persistent room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) materials have attracted much attention and present various applications in illumination, displays, and the bioimaging field; however, the persistent RTP is generally from the inorganic phosphor materials to date. Herein, we show that the metal coordination polymers (CPs) could be new types of emerging long-lived RTP materials for potential sensor applications. First, two kinds of Cd-based CPs, Cd(m-BDC)(H2O) (1) and Cd(m-BDC)(BIM) (2) (m-BDC = 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid; BIM = benzimidazole), were obtained through a hydrothermal process, and the samples were found to exhibit two-dimensional layered structures, which are stabilized by interlayer C-H···π interaction and π···π interaction, respectively. The CPs show unexpected second-time-scale ultra-long-persistent RTP after the removal of UV excitation, and this persistent emission can be detected easily on a time scale of 0-10 s. The CPs also feature a tunable luminescence decay lifetime by adjusting their coordination situation and packing fashion of ligands. Theoretical calculation further indicates that the introduction of the second ligand could highly influence the electronic structure and intermolecular electron transfer toward tailoring the RTP of the CP materials. Moreover, CP 2 exhibits well-defined pH- and temperature-dependent phosphorescence responses. Therefore, this work provides a facile way to develop new type of CPs with steady-state and dynamic tuning of the RTP properties from both experimental and theoretical perspectives, which have potential applications in the areas of displays, pH/temperature sensors, and phosphorescence logic gates. On account of suitable incorporation of inorganic and organic building blocks, it can be expected that the ultra-long-persistent RTP CPs can be extended to other similar systems due to the highly tunable structures and facile synthesis routes.

  14. Recent development of organic light-emitting diode utilizing energy transfer from exciplex to phosphorescent emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Satoshi; Shitagaki, Satoko; Ohsawa, Nobuharu; Inoue, Hideko; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Nowatari, Hiromi; Takahashi, Tatsuyoshi; Hamada, Takao; Watabe, Takeyoshi; Yamada, Yui; Mitsumori, Satomi

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) utilizing energy transfer from an excited complex (exciplex) comprising donor and acceptor molecules to a phosphorescent dopant. An exciplex has a very small energy gap between the lowest singlet and triplet excited states (S1 and T1). Thus, both S1 and T1 energies of the exciplex can be directly transferred to the T1 of the phosphorescent dopant by adjusting the emission energy of the exciplex to the absorption-edge energy of the dopant. Such an exciplex‒triplet energy transfer (ExTET) achieves high efficiency at low drive voltage because the electrical excitation energy of the exciplex approximates the T1 energy of the dopant. Furthermore, the efficiency of the reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) of the exciplex does not affect the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the ExTET OLED. The RISC of the exciplex is inhibited when the T1 energy of either donor or acceptor molecules is close to or lower than that of the exciplex itself. Even in this case, however, the ExTET OLED maintains its high efficiency because the T1 energy of each component of the exciplex or the T1 energy of the exciplex itself can be transferred to the dopant. We also varied the emission colors of ExTET OLEDs from sky-blue to red by introducing various phosphorescent dopants. These devices achieved high EQEs (≍30%), low drive voltages (≍3 V), and extremely long lifetimes (e.g., 1 million hours for the orange OLED) at a luminance of 1,000 cd/m2.

  15. High efficient white organic light-emitting diodes with single emissive layer using phosphorescent red, green, and blue dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, You-Hyun; Wai Cheah, Kok; Young Kim, Woo

    2013-07-01

    Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) with single emissive layer were fabricated by co-doping phosphorescent blue, green, and red emitters with different concentrations. WOLEDs using Ir(piq)3 and Ir(ppy)3 as red and green dopants along with 8% of Firpic as blue dopant with host materials of 4CzPBP in the emissive layer were compared under various doping ratio between Ir(piq)3 and Ir(ppy)3. Triplet-triplet Dexter energy transfer in single emissive PHWOLEDs including three primary colors was saturated from higher triplet energy levels to lower triplet energy levels directly.

  16. A highly selective OFF-ON red-emitting phosphorescent thiol probe with large stokes shift and long luminescent lifetime.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shaomin; Guo, Huimin; Yuan, Xiaolin; Li, Xiaohuan; Ding, Haidong; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Chunxia; Wu, Wenting; Wu, Wanhua; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2010-06-18

    An OFF-ON red-emitting phosphorescent thiol probe is designed by using the (3)MLCT photophysics of Ru(II) complexes, i.e., with Ru(II) as the electron donor. The probe is non-luminescent because the MLCT is corrupted by electron transfer from Ru(II) to an intramolecular electron sink (2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl). Thiols cleave the electron sink, and the MLCT is re-established. Phosphorescence at 598 nm was enhanced by 90-fold, with a 143 nm (5256 cm(-1)) Stokes shift and a 1.1 mus luminescent lifetime.

  17. Kinetic Model Facilitates Analysis of Fibrin Generation and Its Modulation by Clotting Factors: Implications for Hemostasis-Enhancing Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    investigating its potential as a hemostatic agent in trauma and surgery.6,7 These applications necessitate a detailed understanding of fibrin ...facilitates analysis of fibrin generation and its modulation by clotting factors: implications for hemostasis-enhancing therapies† Alexander Y...ability of the suggested molecular mechanisms to account for fibrin generation and degradation kinetics in diverse, physiologically relevant in vitro

  18. Direct dynamic kinetic analysis and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey during cooling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research applied a new one-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model for describing the growth of C. perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using mu...

  19. Determination of the Kinetic Oxidation Constants of Carbon Materials on the Basis of Analysis of Experiments on Their Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorskii, V. V.; Koval‧skii, M. G.; Olenicheva, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach to the determination of the ablation properties of a heat-shield carbon material on the basis of analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of its ablation in the jet of an electric-arc plant in the nonstationary regime has been formulated. Original data on the kinetic constants of oxidation of carbon by atomic oxygen have been obtained.

  20. Integrated luminometer for the determination of trace metals in seawater using fluorescence, phosphorescence and chemiluminescence detection

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, E. P.; Bowie, A. R.; Cannizzaro, V.; Charles, S.; Costa, J. M.; Dubois, F.; Pereiro, R.; San Vicente, B.; Sanz-Medel, A.; Vandeloise, R.; Donckt, E. Vander; Wollast, P.; Yunus, S.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes an integrated luminometer able to perform fluorescence (FL), room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) and chemiluminescence (CL) measurements on seawater samples. The technical details of the instrumentation are presented together with flow injection (FI) manifolds for the determination of cadmium and zinc (by FL), lead (RTP) and cobalt (CL). The analytical figures of merit are given for each manifold and results are presented for the determination of the four trace metals in seawater reference materials (NASS-5, SLEW-2) and Scheldt estuarine water samples. PMID:18924742