Science.gov

Sample records for kinetic plasma descriptions

  1. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  2. Unified fluid/kinetic description of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zuoyang; Callen, J.D.

    1991-06-01

    Unified fluid/kinetic equations for the plasma perturbed density ({tilde n}), parallel flow velocity ({tilde u}{sub {parallel}}) and temperature ({tilde T}) are developed in a sheared slab geometry by calculating the fluid moment closure relations kinetically. At first, a set of (unclosed) nonlinear perturbed fluid equations for {tilde n}, {tilde u}{sub {parallel}} and {tilde T} is developed using a drift ordering analysis and a new gyroviscous force ({del} {center dot} {product}{sub g}). Thereafter, to develop linear closure relations for b {center dot} {del} {center dot} {tilde product}{sub {parallel}} and {tilde q}{sub {parallel}}, a drift-kinetic version of a Chapman-Enskog-like (CEL) equation is developed and solved by using a moment approach and a physically realistic collision operator (Lorentz scattering operator plus the momentum restoring terms.) The resultant closure relations for b {center dot} {del} {center dot} {tilde product}{sub {parallel}} and {tilde q}{sub {parallel}} unify both the fluid and kinetic approaches. In the collisional fluid limit the equations reduce to the well-known Braginskii equations. In the adiabatic limit they reproduce the usual kinetic results, including Landau damping. It is shown that the CEL approach is more compatible with a fluid-like description of plasmas than the usual drift/gyro kinetic approach. A remarkable simplification of these complicated closure relations is achieved by using single power of plasma dispersion functions with modified arguments. The results are compared with other recently developed Landau damping models and shown to be more accurate, complete and physically meaningful. The resultant set of nonlinear fluid/kinetic equations (with linear closure relations) will be applied to various microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas and drift type microturbulence in a separate paper. 19 refs., 7 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Generalized Kinetic Description of Steady-State Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Krivorutsky, E. N.

    1997-01-01

    We present a general solution to the collisionless Boltzmann (Vlasov) equation for a free-flowing plasma along a magnetic field line using Liouville's theorem, allowing for an arbitrary potential structure including non-monotonicities. The constraints of the existing collisionless kinetic transport models are explored, and the need for a more general approach to the problem of self- consistent potential energy calculations is described. Then a technique that handles an arbitrary potential energy distribution along the field line is presented and discussed. For precipitation of magnetospherically trapped hot plasma, this model yields moment calculations that vary by up to a factor of two for various potential energy structures with the same total potential drop. The differences are much greater for the high-latitude outflow scenario, giving order of magnitude variations depending on the shape of the potential energy distribution.

  4. Kinetic and spectral descriptions of autoionization phenomena associated with atomic processes in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Verne L.

    2017-03-01

    This investigation is devoted to the theoretical description and computer modeling of atomic processes giving rise to radiative emission in energetic electron and ion beam interactions and in laboratory plasmas. We are also interested in the effects of directed electron and ion collisions and of anisotropic electric and magnetic fields. In the kinetic-theory description, we treat excitation, de-excitation, ionization, and recombination in electron and ion encounters with partially ionized atomic systems, including the indirect contributions from processes involving autoionizing resonances. These fundamental collisional and electromagnetic interactions provide particle and photon transport mechanisms. From the spectral perspective, the analysis of atomic radiative emission can reveal detailed information on the physical properties in the plasma environment, such as non-equilibrium electron and charge-state distributions as well as electric and magnetic field distributions. In this investigation, a reduced-density-matrix formulation is developed for the microscopic description of atomic electromagnetic interactions in the presence of environmental (collisional and radiative) relaxation and decoherence processes. Our central objective is a fundamental microscopic description of atomic electromagnetic processes, in which both bound-state and autoionization-resonance phenomena can be treated in a unified and self-consistent manner. The time-domain (equation-of-motion) and frequency-domain (resolvent-operator) formulations of the reduced-density-matrix approach are developed in a unified and self-consistent manner. This is necessary for our ultimate goal of a systematic and self-consistent treatment of non-equilibrium (possibly coherent) atomic-state kinetics and high-resolution (possibly overlapping) spectral-line shapes. We thereby propose the introduction of a generalized collisional-radiative atomic-state kinetics model based on the reduced-density-matrix formulation

  5. Unified fluid/kinetic description of plasma microinstabilities. Part I: Basic equations in a sheared slab geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z.; Callen, J.D. )

    1992-05-01

    Unified fluid/kinetic equations for the plasma perturbed density ({ital {tilde n}}), parallel flow velocity ({ital {tilde u}}{sub {parallel}}) and temperature ({ital {tilde T}}) are developed in a sheared slab geometry by calculating the fluid moment closure relations kinetically. At first, a set of (unclosed) nonlinear perturbed fluid equations for {ital {tilde n}}, {ital {tilde u}}{sub {parallel}} and {ital {tilde T}} is developed using a drift ordering analysis and a new gyroviscous force ((spec. char. missing){center dot}{Pi}{sub {ital g}}). Thereafter, to develop linear closure relations for {bold b}{center dot}{del}{center dot}{tilde {Pi}}{sub {parallel}} and {ital {tilde q}}{sub {parallel}}, a drift-kinetic version of a new Chapman--Enskog-like (CEL) equation is developed and solved by using a moment approach and a physically realistic collision operator (Lorentz scattering operator plus the momentum restoring terms). The resultant closure relations for {bold b}{center dot}(spec. char. missing){center dot}{tilde {Pi}}{sub {parallel}} and {ital {tilde q}}{sub {parallel}} unify the fluid and kinetic approaches. In the collisional fluid limit the equations reduce to the well-known Braginskii equations. In the adiabatic limit they reproduce the usual kinetic results, including Landau damping. It is shown that this new CEL approach is more compatible with a fluidlike description of plasmas than the usual drift/gyrokinetic approach. Remarkably simplified forms of the closure relations are presented. The results are compared with other Landau damping models and shown to be more accurate, complete, and physically realistic. Applications of this set of equations to various microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas are presented in a separate paper (Part II) (Phys. Fluids B {bold 4}, 1182 (1992)).

  6. Kinetic description of the 3D electromagnetic structures formation in flows of expanding plasma coronas. Part 1: General

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    In part I of the work, the physical effects responsible for the formation of low-speed flows in plasma coronas, coupled with formation of coronas magnetosphere-like structures, are described qualitatively. Coronal domain structures form if we neglect scales of spatial plasma dispersion: high-speed flows are accumulated in magnetic tubes of the open domains, while magnetic structures and low-speed flows are concentrated within boundaries of domains. The inductive electromagnetic process occurring in flows of the hot collisionless plasma is shown to underlie the formation of magnetosphere-like structures. Depending on the form of the velocity distribution function of particles (PDF), a hot flow differently reveals its electromagnetic properties, which are expressed by the induction of resistive and diamagnetic scales of spatial dispersion. These determine the magnetic structure scales and structure reconstruction. The inductive electromagnetic process located in lines of the plasma nontransparency and absorption, in which the structures of excited fields are spatially aperiodic and skinned to the magnetic field sources. The toroidal and dipole magnetic sources of different configurations are considered for describing the corona structures during the solar maximum and solar minimum.

  7. Lagrangian description of warm plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.

    1970-01-01

    Efforts are described to extend the averaged Lagrangian method of describing small signal wave propagation and nonlinear wave interaction, developed by earlier workers for cold plasmas, to the more general conditions of warm collisionless plasmas, and to demonstrate particularly the effectiveness of the method in analyzing wave-wave interactions. The theory is developed for both the microscopic description and the hydrodynamic approximation to plasma behavior. First, a microscopic Lagrangian is formulated rigorously, and expanded in terms of perturbations about equilibrium. Two methods are then described for deriving a hydrodynamic Lagrangian. In the first of these, the Lagrangian is obtained by velocity integration of the exact microscopic Lagrangian. In the second, the expanded hydrodynamic Lagrangian is obtained directly from the expanded microscopic Lagrangian. As applications of the microscopic Lagrangian, the small-signal dispersion relations and the coupled mode equations are derived for all possible waves in a warm infinite, weakly inhomogeneous magnetoplasma, and their interactions are examined.

  8. Kinetic Theory of Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    particles (atoms, molecules, and ions ), given the strong disparity of mass between both types of species. The square root of the ratio of the electron mass to...ionized plasmas composed of one single ion species. However, the scaling used in this study does not comply with a dimensional analysis of the...Boltzmann equation The plasma is a gas mixture composed of electrons, denoted by the index e, and heavy particles (atoms, molecules, and ions

  9. Kinetic Description of the Impedance Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens; Lapke, Martin; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. The authors acknowledge the support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) via the Ruhr University Research School and the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in frame of the PluTO project.

  10. Multiflow approach to plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatov, A. M.

    2015-10-15

    Instead of the commonly used Vlasov equation, one is able to treat kinetic phenomena in collisionless plasma with the help of the infinite set of hydrodynamic equations. The present paper deals with the linear approximation of multiflow hydrodynamics. It is shown that single-particle and collective excitations analogous to Van Kampen waves are explicitly separated. Expressions for the energy of all eigenmodes are obtained.

  11. Ion Kinetics in Silane Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    reaction are determined not only by the chemical reactivity but by the electrical properties of the plasma. Current continuity, impedence match- ing...conventional kinetic theory. Since the chemical and physical properties of the noble-gases vary monotonically down the periods of Mendeleev’s table, one...formation. Most literature with the phrase ion chemistry in its title is concerned only with the properties and reactions of positively charged species

  12. Kinetic theory of relativistic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The thermalization of particle kinetic motion by binary collisions is considered for a plasma with a Boltzmann constant-temperature product approximately equal to 10 to 100 times the product of the electron mass with the square of the speed of light. At this temperature, the principal mechanism for relaxation of electron motion is via radiationless electron-electron collisions (Moller scattering). Ions are nonrelativistic, but are energetic enough so that their Coulomb scattering can be treated in the Born approximation. Relaxation times are computed and Boltzmann-equation Fokker-Planck operators are derived for the various binary-collision processes. The expression for the rate of kinetic energy exchange between electron and ion gases is derived for the case where the gases are at different temperatures.

  13. Accelerated simulation methods for plasma kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Russel

    2016-11-01

    Collisional kinetics is a multiscale phenomenon due to the disparity between the continuum (fluid) and the collisional (particle) length scales. This paper describes a class of simulation methods for gases and plasmas, and acceleration techniques for improving their speed and accuracy. Starting from the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation for plasmas, the focus will be on a binary collision model that is solved using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Acceleration of this method is achieved by coupling the particle method to a continuum fluid description. The velocity distribution function f is represented as a combination of a Maxwellian M (the thermal component) and a set of discrete particles fp (the kinetic component). For systems that are close to (local) equilibrium, this reduces the number N of simulated particles that are required to represent f for a given level of accuracy. We present two methods for exploiting this representation. In the first method, equilibration of particles in fp, as well as disequilibration of particles from M, due to the collision process, is represented by a thermalization/dethermalization step that employs an entropy criterion. Efficiency of the representation is greatly increased by inclusion of particles with negative weights. This significantly complicates the simulation, but the second method is a tractable approach for negatively weighted particles. The accelerated simulation method is compared with standard PIC-DSMC method for both spatially homogeneous problems such as a bump-on-tail and inhomogeneous problems such as nonlinear Landau damping.

  14. Kinetic equation for spin-polarized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Valeo, E.

    1984-07-01

    The usual kinetic description of a plasma is extended to include variables to describe the spin. The distribution function, over phase-space and the new spin variables, provides a sufficient description of a spin-polarized plasma. The evolution equation for the distribution function is given. The equations derived are used to calculate depolarization due to four processes, inhomogeneous fields, collisions, collisions in inhomogeneous fields, and waves. It is found that depolarization by field inhomogeneity on scales large compared with the gyroradius is totally negligible. The same is true for collisional depolarization. Collisions in inhomogeneous fields yield a depolarization rate of order 10/sup -4/S/sup -1/ for deuterons and a negligible rate for tritons in a typical fusion reactor design. This is still sufficiently small on reactor time scales. However, small amplitude magnetic fluctuations (of order one gauss) resonant with the spin precession frequency can lead to significant depolarization (depolarises triton in ten seconds and deuteron in a hundred seconds.)

  15. NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 159 NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database (Web database for purchase)   This database contains benchmark results for simulation of plasma population kinetics and emission spectra. The data were contributed by the participants of the 4th Non-LTE Code Comparison Workshop who have unrestricted access to the database. The only limitation for other users is in hidden labeling of the output results. Guest users can proceed to the database entry page without entering userid and password.

  16. Kinetic effects in edge plasma: kinetic modeling for edge plasma and detached divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, T.

    2017-03-01

    Detached divertor is considered a solution for the heat control in magnetic-confinement fusion reactors. Numerical simulations using the comprehensive divertor codes based on the plasma fluid modeling are indispensable for the design of the detached divertor in future reactors. Since the agreement in the results between detached-divertor experiments and simulations has been rather fair but not satisfactory, further improvement of the modeling is required. The kinetic effect is one of key issues for improving the modeling. Complete kinetic behaviors are able to be simulated by the kinetic modeling. In this paper at first, major kinetic effects in edge plasma and detached divertor are listed. One of the most powerful kinetic models, particle-in-cell (PIC) model, is described in detail. Several results of PIC simulations of edge-plasma kinetic natures are presented. Future works on PIC modeling and simulation for the deeper understanding of edge plasma and detached divertor are discussed.

  17. Relativistic (covariant) kinetic theory of linear plasma waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2006-06-19

    The fundamental kinetic description is of vital importance in high-energy astrophysics and fusion plasmas where wave phenomena evolve on scales small comparing with binary collision scales. A rigorous relativistic analysis is required even for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures for which the classical theory yielded unphysical results: e.g. collisonless damping of superluminal waves (phase velocity exceeds the speed of light). The existing nonrelativistic approaches are now improved by covariantly correct dispersion theory. As an important application, the Weibel instability has been recently investigated and confirmed as the source of primordial magnetic field in the intergalactic medium.

  18. Kinetic theory of the interdiffusion coefficient in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.

    1986-08-01

    Naive applications of Spitzer's theory to very dense plasmas can lead to negative diffusion coefficients. The interdiffusion coefficients in Binary Ionic Mixtures (two species of point ions in a uniform neutralizing background) have been calculated recently using molecular dynamics techniques. These calculations can provide useful benchmarks for theoretical evaluations of the diffusion coefficient in dense plasma mixtures. This paper gives a brief description of a kinetic theoretic approximation to the diffusion coefficient which generalizes Spitzer to high density and is in excellent agreement with the computer simulations. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Neutral Vlasov kinetic theory of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-02-15

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the neutral Vlasov kinetic theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime.

  20. Kinetic modeling of active plasma resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The term ``active plasma resonance spectroscopy'' (APRS) refers to a plasma diagnostic method which employs the natural ability of plasmas to resonate close to the plasma frequency. Essential for this method is an appropriate model to determine the relation between the resonance parameters and demanded plasma parameters. Measurements with these probes in plasmas of a few Pa typically show a broadening of the spectrum that cannot be predicted by a fluid model. Thus, a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model of APRS probes, which can be described in electorstatic approximation, valid for all pressures has been presented. This model is used to analyze the dynamic behavior of such probes by means of functional analytic methods. One of the main results is, that the system response function Y (ω) is given in terms of the matrix elements of the resolvent of the dynamic operator evaluated for values on the imaginary axis. The spectrum of this operator is continuous which implies a new phenomenon related to anomalous or non-collisional dissipation. Based on the scalar product, which is motivated by the kinetic free energy, the non-collisional damping can be interpreted: In a periodic state, the probe constantly emits plasma waves which propagate to ``infinity''. The free energy simply leaves the ``observation range'' of the probe which is recorded as damping. The kinetic damping, which depends on the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, is responsible for the broadening of a resonance peak in the measured spectrum of APRS probes. The ultimate goal is to determine explicit formulas for the relation between the broadening of the resonance peak and the ``equivalent electron temperature'', especially in the case of the spherical Impedance Probe and the Multipole Resonance Probe. Gratitude is expressed to the internal funding of Leuphana University, the BMBF via PluTO+, the DFG via Collaborative Research Center TR 87, and the Ruhr University Research School.

  1. Ion Kinetics in Silane Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-20

    reactivity but by the electrical properties of the plasma. Current continuity, impedance matching, and the cou- pling between total charged particle fluxes...theory. Since the chemical and physical properties of the noble-gases vary monotonically down the periods of Mendeleev’s table, one might anticipate a...chemistry in its title is concerned only with the properties and reactions of positively charged species. Anions play a qualitatively different and important

  2. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  3. Kinetic Approach for Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Banaz; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2008-10-22

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electron gas and phonon gas excited with ultrashort intense laser pulses are calculated for laser-induced plasmas occurring in solids. The excitation during femtosecond irradiation and the subsequent thermalization of the free electrons, as well as the dynamics of phonons are described by kinetic equations. The microscopic collision processes, such as absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung, electron-electron collisions, and electron-phonon interactions are considered by complete Boltzmann collision integrals. We apply our kinetic approach for gold by taking s-band electron into account and compare it with the case of excitation of d-band electrons.

  4. Kinetic equilibria of very high- β plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Plasma equilibria with many large ion orbits, such as an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration, are neither static (Grad-Shafranov) nor describable as a flowing, multi-fluid. A fully-kinetic treatment of the ions is essential for such high- β plasmas. A kinetic equilibrium is needed to properly support realistic stability and transport analyses, both of which are strongly affected by large-orbit ions. A hybrid equilibrium model has been developed with a fully-kinetic treatment of both thermal ions and a rapidly-rotating ``beam-ion'' component, such as produced by neutral beam injection, relevant to the C-2U experiments at TAE. It employs analytic Vlasov solutions in that the distribution depends only on the two constants of motion, the Hamiltonian (H) and the canonical angular momentum (Pθ) . Electrons are treated as a pressure-bearing fluid. Since realistic forms of f (H ,Pθ) are affected by collisions, f is limited to solutions of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation. Importantly, a kinetic end-loss condition applies to unconfined ions, using a particle sink at a rate consistent with Monte-Carlo-like simulations of end loss accounting for a strong end mirror.

  5. Kinetic Stress and Intrinsic Flow in a Toroidal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Almagri, A. F.; Chapman, B. E.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Sarff, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    A new mechanism for intrinsic plasma flow has been experimentally identified in a toroidal plasma. For reversed field pinch plasmas with a few percent β (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure), measurements show that parallel pressure fluctuations correlated with magnetic fluctuations create a kinetic stress that can affect momentum balance and the evolution of intrinsic plasma flow. This implies kinetic effects are important for flow generation and sustainment.

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic theory of plasma waves, homogeneous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    1998-11-01

    The linear theory of plasma waves in homogeneous plasma is arguably the most mature and best understood branch of plasma physics. Given the recently revised version of Stix's excellent Waves in Plasmas (1992), one might ask whether another book on this subject is necessary only a few years later. The answer lies in the scope of this volume; it is somewhat more detailed in certain topics than, and complementary in many fusion research relevant areas to, Stix's book. (I am restricting these comments to the homogeneous plasma theory only, since the author promises a second volume on wave propagation in inhomogeneous plasmas.) This book is also much more of a theorist's approach to waves in plasmas, with the aim of developing the subject within the logical framework of kinetic theory. This may indeed be pleasing to the expert and to the specialist, but may be too difficult to the graduate student as an `introduction' to the subject (which the author explicitly states in the Preface). On the other hand, it may be entirely appropriate for a second course on plasma waves, after the student has mastered fluid theory and an introductory kinetic treatment of waves in a hot magnetized `Vlasov' plasma. For teaching purposes, my personal preference is to review the cold plasma wave treatment using the unified Stix formalism and notation (which the author wisely adopts in the present book, but only in Chapter 5). Such an approach allows one to deal with CMA diagrams early on, as well as to provide a framework to discuss electromagnetic wave propagation and accessibility in inhomogeneous plasmas (for which the cold plasma wave treatment is perfectly adequate). Such an approach does lack some of the rigour, however, that the author achieves with the present approach. As the author correctly shows, the fluid theory treatment of waves follows logically from kinetic theory in the cold plasma limit. I only question the pedagogical value of this approach. Otherwise, I welcome this

  7. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Krommes

    2001-02-16

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  8. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  9. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  10. Plasma kinetic effects on interfacial mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Vold, E. L.; Chacon, L.; Simakov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    Mixing at interfaces in dense plasma media is a problem central to inertial confinement fusion and high energy density laboratory experiments. In this work, collisional particle-in-cell simulations are used to explore kinetic effects arising during the mixing of unmagnetized plasma media. Comparisons are made to the results of recent analytical theory in the small Knudsen number limit and while the bulk mixing properties of interfaces are in general agreement, some differences arise. In particular, "super-diffusive" behavior, large diffusion velocity, and large Knudsen number are observed in the low density regions of the species mixing fronts during the early evolution of a sharp interface prior to the transition to a slow diffusive process in the small-Knudsen-number limit predicted by analytical theory. A center-of-mass velocity profile develops as a result of the diffusion process and conservation of momentum.

  11. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Kinetic theory of partially ionized complex (dusty) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsytovich, V.N.; De Angelis, U.; Ivlev, A.V.; Morfill, G.E.

    2005-08-15

    The general approach to the kinetic theory of complex (dusty) plasmas [Tsytovich and de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1093 (1999)], which was formulated with the assumption of a regular (nonfluctuating) source of plasma particles, is reformulated to include ionization by electron impact on neutrals as the plasma source and the effects of collisions of ions and dust particles with neutrals.

  13. Quantum kinetic theories in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodin, Gert; Ekman, Robin; Zamanian, Jens

    2017-01-01

    In this review we give an overview of the recent work on quantum kinetic theories of plasmas. We focus, in particular, on the case where the electrons are fully degenerate. For such systems, perturbation methods using the distribution function can be problematic. Instead we present a model that considers the dynamics of the Fermi surface. The advantage of this model is that, even though the value of the distribution function can be greatly perturbed outside the equilibrium Fermi surface, deformation of the Fermi surface is small up to very large amplitudes. Next, we investigate the short-scale dynamics for which the Wigner-Moyal equation replaces the Vlasov equation. In particular, we study wave-particle interaction, and deduce that new types of wave damping can occur due to the simultaneous absorption (or emission) of multiple wave quanta. Finally, we consider exchange effects within a quantum kinetic formalism to find a model that is more accurate than those using exchange potentials from density functional theory. We deduce the exchange corrections to the dispersion relations for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. In comparison to results based on exchange potentials deduced from density functional theory we find that the latter models are reasonably accurate for Langmuir waves, but rather inaccurate for ion acoustic waves.

  14. Parametric instabilities of Alfven waves in a multispecies plasma: Kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffmann, K.; Araneda, J. A.

    2008-06-15

    Parametric instabilities of a circularly polarized Alfven wave in a multispecies magnetized plasma are considered. An analytic kinetic description and hybrid simulations for the linear behavior of the instabilities are given. It is found that, even for low-{beta} regimes, both the kinetic effects and the presence of heavy ions substantially modify the characteristics of parametric instabilities as compared to the fluid model. The decay instability can be severely quenched in a plasma composed of massless electrons, protons, and alpha particles when the alphas are slightly hotter than the protons. These results could be important in describing the heating processes of heavy ions in the solar corona.

  15. Development of a hybrid kinetic-fluid model for line radiation transport in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Reiter, D.; Stamm, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a transport model for the Lyman line radiation in optically thick divertor plasma conditions encountered in exhaust systems in magnetic fusion devices. The model is designed to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions and to the spectral range. A kinetic treatment is retained for photons with a large mean free path (line wings), whereas a continuum description of the radiation field is invoked in highly absorbing or scattering regions (core photons). Prototypical calculations of this so-called δf Monte Carlo type of the Lyman α photo-excitation rate in slab geometry are performed as an illustration. The hybrid method is suggested as a candidate for speeding up the kinetic transport codes currently involved in magnetic fusion research for ITER and DEMO divertor (power and particle exhaust system) design.

  16. Solitary kinetic Alfven waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Wu, D. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-08-15

    Solitary kinetic Alfven waves in dusty plasmas are studied by considering the dust charge variation. The effect of the dust charge-to-mass ratio on the soliton solution is discussed. The Sagdeev potential is derived analytically with constant dust charge and then calculated numerically by taking the dust charge variation into account. We show that the dust charge-to-mass ratio plays an important role in the soliton properties. The soliton solutions are comprised of two branches. One branch is sub-Alfvenic and the soliton velocity is obviously smaller than the Alfven speed. The other branch is super-Alfvenic and the soliton velocity is very close to or greater than the Alfven speed. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons can exist. For the sub-Alfvenic branch, the rarefactive soliton is bell-shaped and it is much narrower than the compressive one. However, for the super-Alfvenic branch, the compressive soliton is bell-shaped and narrower, and the rarefactive one is broadened. When the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust grains is sufficiently high, the width of the rarefactive soliton, in the super-Alfvenic branch, will broaden extremely and a electron depletion will be observed. It is also shown that the bell-shaped soliton can transition to a cusped structure when the velocity is sufficiently high.

  17. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. Kinetic plasma modeling with quiet Monte Carlo direct simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, B. J.; Jones, M. E.; Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.

    2001-01-01

    The modeling of collisions among particles in space plasma media poses a challenge for computer simulation. Traditional plasma methods are able to model well the extremes of highly collisional plasmas (MHD and Hall-MHD simulations) and collisionless plasmas (particle-in-cell simulations). However, neither is capable of trealing the intermediate, semi-collisional regime. The authors have invented a new approach to particle simulation called Quiet Monte Carlo Direct Simulation (QMCDS) that can, in principle, treat plasmas with arbitrary and arbitrarily varying collisionality. The QMCDS method will be described, and applications of the QMCDS method as 'proof of principle' to diffusion, hydrodynamics, and radiation transport will be presented. Of particular interest to the space plasma simulation community is the application of QMCDS to kinetic plasma modeling. A method for QMCDS simulation of kinetic plasmas will be outlined, and preliminary results of simulations in the limit of weak pitch-angle scattering will be presented.

  19. Towards adaptive kinetic-fluid simulations of weakly ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Arslanbekov, R. R.

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes an Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) methodology for multi-scale simulations of gas flows and the challenges associated with extending this methodology for simulations of weakly ionized plasmas. The AMAR method combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic selection of kinetic or continuum solvers in different parts of computational domains. We first review the discrete velocity method for solving Boltzmann and Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck kinetic equations for rarefied gases. Then, peculiarities of AMR implementation with octree Cartesian mesh are discussed. A Unified Flow Solver (UFS) uses AMAR method with adaptive Cartesian mesh to dynamically introduce kinetic patches for multi-scale simulations of gas flows. We describe fluid plasma models with AMR capabilities and illustrate how physical models affect simulation results for gas discharges, especially in the areas where electron kinetics plays an important role. We introduce Eulerian solvers for plasma kinetic equations and illustrate the concept of adaptive mesh in velocity space. Specifics of electron kinetics in collisional plasmas are described focusing on deterministic methods of solving kinetic equations for electrons under different conditions. We illustrate the appearance of distinct groups of electrons in the cathode region of DC discharges and discuss the physical models appropriate for each group. These kinetic models are currently being incorporated into AMAR methodology for multi-scale plasma simulations.

  20. Comet giacobini-zinner: plasma description.

    PubMed

    Bame, S J; Anderson, R C; Asbridge, J R; Baker, D N; Feldman, W C; Fuselier, S A; Gosling, J T; McComas, D J; Thomsen, M F; Young, D T; Zwickl, R D

    1986-04-18

    A strong interaction between the solar wind and comet Giacobini-Zinner was observed oh 11 September 1985 with the Los Alamos plasma electron experiment on the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft. As ICE approached an intercept point 7800 kilometers behind the nucleus from the south and receded to the north, upstream phenomena due to the comet were observed. Periods of enhanced electron heat flux from the comet as well as almost continuous electron density fluctuations were measured. These effects are related to the strong electron heating observed in the cometary interaction region and to cometary ion pickup by the solar wind, respectively. No evidence for a conventional bow shock was found as ICE entered and exited the regions of strongest interaction of the solar wind with the cometary environment. The outer extent of this strong interaction zone was a transition region in which the solar wind plasma was heated, compressed, and slowed. Inside the inner boundary of the transition region was a sheath that enclosed a cold intermediate coma. In the transition region and sheath, small-scale enhancements in density were observed. These density spikes may be due to an instability associated with cometary ion pickup or to the passage of ICE through cometary ray structures. In the center of the cold intermediate coma a narrow, high-density core of plasma, presumably the developing plasma tail was found. In some ways this tail can be compared to the plasma sheet in Earth's magnetotail and to the current sheet in the tail at Venus. This type of configuration is expected in the double-lobe magnetic topology detected at the comet, possibly caused by the theoretically expected draping of the interplanetary magnetic field around its ionosphere.

  1. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Flame Regimes and Kinetic Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    effect dominant Kinetic effect 1. Plasma Activated Low Temperature Combustion and cool flames for liquid hydrocarbon fuels >1100 K High temperature...better understood) 800-1100 K Intermediate 500-800 K Low Plasma has more kinetic enhancement effect in lower temperature combustion However...species Absorption Dispersion ν ν HO2 energy levels Zeeman splitting New diagnostics: HO2/OH using mid-IR Faraday Rotational Spectroscopy

  2. Plasma kinetics in ethanol/water/air mixture in a 'tornado'-type electrical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Shchedrin, A.; Chernyak, V.; Olszewski, S.; Nedybaliuk, O.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical and experimental study of plasma-assisted reforming of ethanol into molecular hydrogen in a modified 'tornado'-type electrical discharge. Numerical modelling clarifies the nature of non-thermal conversion and explains the kinetic mechanism of non-equilibrium plasma chemical transformations in the gas-liquid system and the evolution of hydrogen during the reforming as a function of discharge parameters and ethanol-to-water ratio in the mixture. We also propose a scheme of chemical reactions for plasma kinetics description. It is shown that some characteristics of the investigated reactor are at least not inferior to the characteristics of other plasma chemical reactors.

  3. Kinetic signatures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma.

    PubMed

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-06-29

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 A.U. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are nonuniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  4. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Granetz, R. S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Vlainic, M.

    2015-09-01

    Runaway electrons can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force owing to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate runaway electrons mainly through knock-on collisions (Hender et al 2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 S128-202), where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of runaway electrons. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. For this purpose, a bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of runaway electrons from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a solver of the 3D linearized bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker-Planck equation (Decker and Peysson 2004 DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3D drift kinetic equation Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA), through the calculation of the response of the electron distribution function to a constant parallel electric field. The model, which has been successfully benchmarked against the standard Dreicer runaway theory now describes the runaway generation by knock-on collisions as proposed by Rosenbluth (Rosenbluth and Putvinski 1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 1355-62). This paper shows that the avalanche effect can be important even in non-disruptive scenarios. Runaway formation through knock-on collisions is found to be strongly reduced when taking place off the magnetic axis, since trapped electrons can not contribute to the runaway electron population. Finally, the

  5. Scrape-off layer modeling with kinetic or diffusion description of charge-exchange atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope atoms, generated by charge-exchange (c-x) of neutral particles recycling from the first wall of a fusion reactor, are described either kinetically or in a diffusion approximation. In a one-dimensional (1-D) geometry, kinetic calculations are accelerated enormously by applying an approximate pass method for the assessment of integrals in the velocity space. This permits to perform an exhaustive comparison of calculations done with both approaches. The diffusion approximation is deduced directly from the velocity distribution function of c-x atoms in the limit of charge-exchanges with ions occurring much more frequently than ionization by electrons. The profiles across the flux surfaces of the plasma parameters averaged along the main part of the scrape-off layer (SOL), beyond the X-point and divertor regions, are calculated from the one-dimensional equations where parallel flows of charged particles and energy towards the divertor are taken into account as additional loss terms. It is demonstrated that the heat losses can be firmly estimated from the SOL averaged parameters only; for the particle loss the conditions in the divertor are of importance and the sensitivity of the results to the so-called "divertor impact factor" is investigated. The coupled 1-D models for neutral and charged species, with c-x atoms described either kinetically or in the diffusion approximation, are applied to assess the SOL conditions in a fusion reactor, with the input parameters from the European DEMO project. It is shown that the diffusion approximation provides practically the same profiles across the flux surfaces for the plasma density, electron, and ion temperatures, as those obtained with the kinetic description for c-x atoms. The main difference between the two approaches is observed in the characteristics of these species themselves. In particular, their energy flux onto the wall is underestimated in calculations with the diffusion approximation by 20 % - 30

  6. A new kinetic model for time-dependent polar plasma outflow - Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Ho, C. W.; Horwitz, J. L.; Singh, N.; Moore, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new time-dependent kinetic plasma outflow model has been developed, which uses a kinetic description of the parallel motions of the ion guiding centers, while assuming the electrons are a massless neutralizing fluid. The ions, O(+) and H(+) are followed as individual particles which respond to the gravitational, magnetic mirror and ambipolar electric forces as they move in one dimension along a magnetic flux tube. Results are presented for a case where the electron temperature in the flux tube is raised from a value near the ion temperature (3000 K) to a value of 10,000 K.

  7. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  8. Theory of spatially non-symmetric kinetic equilibria for collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2013-01-15

    The problem posed by the possible existence/non-existence of spatially non-symmetric kinetic equilibria has remained unsolved in plasma theory. For collisionless magnetized plasmas, this involves the construction of stationary solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. In this paper, the issue is addressed for non-relativistic plasmas both in astrophysical and laboratory contexts. The treatment is based on a Lagrangian variational description of single-particle dynamics. Starting point is a non-perturbative formulation of gyrokinetic theory, which allows one to construct 'a posteriori' with prescribed order of accuracy an asymptotic representation for the magnetic moment. In terms of the relevant particle adiabatic invariants generalized bi-Maxwellian equilibria are proved to exist. These are shown to recover, under suitable assumptions, a Chapman-Enskog form which permits an analytical treatment of the corresponding fluid moments. In particular, the constrained posed by the Poisson and the Ampere equations are analyzed, both for quasi-neutral and non-neutral plasmas. The conditions of existence of the corresponding non-symmetric kinetic equilibria are investigated. As a notable feature, both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas are shown to exhibit, under suitable conditions, a kinetic dynamo, whereby the equilibrium magnetic field can be self-generated by the equilibrium plasma currents.

  9. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  10. Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection - Kinetic Mechanisms Underlying the Fluid Description of Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aunai, icolas; Belmont, Gerard; Smets, Roch

    2012-01-01

    Because of its ability to transfer the energy stored in magnetic field together with the breaking of the flux freezing constraint, magnetic reconnection is considered as one of the most important phenomena in plasma physics. When it happens in a collision less environment such as the terrestrial magnetosphere, it should a priori be modelled with in the framework of kinetic physics. The evidence of kinetic features has incidentally for a long time, been shown by researchers with the help of both numerical simulations and satellite observations. However, most of our understanding of the process comes from the more intuitive fluid interpretation with simple closure hypothesis which do not include kinetic effects. To what extent are these two separate descriptions of the same phenomenon related? What is the role of kinetic effects in the averaged/fluid dynamics of reconnection? This thesis addresses these questions for the proton population in the particular case of anti parallel merging with the help of 2D Hybrid simulations. We show that one can not assume, as is usually done, that the acceleration of the proton flow is only due to the Laplace force. Our results show, for symmetric and asymmetric connection, the importance of the pressure force, opposed to the electric one on the separatrices, in the decoupling region. In the symmetric case, we emphasize the kinetic origin of this force by analyzing the proton distribution functions and explain their structure by studying the underlying particle dynamics. Protons, as individual particles, are shown to bounce in the electric potential well created by the Hall effect. The spatial divergence of this well results in a mixing in phase space responsible for the observed structure of the pressure tensor. A detailed energy budget analysis confirms the role of the pressure force for the acceleration; but, contrary to what is sometimes assumed, it also reveals that the major part of the incoming Poynting flux is transferred to

  11. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M.; Welch, D.; Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C.

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  12. Kinetics of complex plasma with liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper provides a theoretical basis for the reduction of electron density by spray of water (or other liquids) in hot plasma. This phenomenon has been observed in a hypersonic flight experiment for relief of radio black out, caused by high ionization in the plasma sheath of a hypersonic vehicle, re-entering the atmosphere. The analysis incorporates a rather little known phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of ions from the surface and includes the charge balance on the droplets and number cum energy balance of electrons, ions, and neutral molecules; the energy balance of the evaporating droplets has also been taken into account. The analysis has been applied to a realistic situation and the transient variations of the charge and radius of water droplets, and other plasma parameters have been obtained and discussed. The analysis through made in the context of water droplets is applicable to all liquids.

  13. KINETIC THEORY OF EQUILIBRIUM AXISYMMETRIC COLLISIONLESS PLASMAS IN OFF-EQUATORIAL TORI AROUND COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-11-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modeling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion disks. However, accretion disk coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can also be determined in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than a fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic, multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution function are constructed, which are expressed in terms of generalized Maxwellian functions characterized by isotropic temperature and non-uniform fluid fields. The conditions for the existence of off-equatorial tori are investigated. It is proved that these levitating systems are admitted under general conditions when both gravitational and magnetic fields contribute to shaping the spatial profiles of equilibrium plasma fluid fields. Then, specifically, kinetic effects carried by the equilibrium solution are explicitly provided and identified here with diamagnetic energy-correction and electrostatic contributions. It is shown that these kinetic terms characterize the plasma equation of state by introducing non-vanishing deviations from the assumption of thermal pressure.

  14. Kinetic Theory of Equilibrium Axisymmetric Collisionless Plasmas in Off-equatorial Tori around Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-11-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modeling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion disks. However, accretion disk coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can also be determined in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than a fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic, multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution function are constructed, which are expressed in terms of generalized Maxwellian functions characterized by isotropic temperature and non-uniform fluid fields. The conditions for the existence of off-equatorial tori are investigated. It is proved that these levitating systems are admitted under general conditions when both gravitational and magnetic fields contribute to shaping the spatial profiles of equilibrium plasma fluid fields. Then, specifically, kinetic effects carried by the equilibrium solution are explicitly provided and identified here with diamagnetic energy-correction and electrostatic contributions. It is shown that these kinetic terms characterize the plasma equation of state by introducing non-vanishing deviations from the assumption of thermal pressure.

  15. Modeling the heating and atomic kinetics of a photoionized neon plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockard, Tom E.

    Motivated by gas cell photoionized plasma experiments performed by our group at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories, we discuss in this dissertation a modeling study of the heating and ionization of the plasma for conditions characteristic of these experiments. Photoionized plasmas are non-equilibrium systems driven by a broadband x-ray radiation flux. They are commonly found in astrophysics but rarely seen in the laboratory. Several modeling tools have been employed: (1) a view-factor computer code constrained with side x-ray power and gated monochromatic image measurements of the z-pinch radiation, to model the time-history of the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux driving the photoionized plasma, (2) a Boltzmann self-consistent electron and atomic kinetics model to simulate the electron distribution function and configuration-averaged atomic kinetics, (3) a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline non-equilibrium atomic kinetics to perform a comprehensive numerical simulation of the experiment and plasma heating, and (4) steady-state and time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics calculations with fine-structure energy level description to assess transient effects in the ionization and charge state distribution of the plasma. The results indicate that the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux impinging on the front window of the gas cell is very well approximated by a linear combination of three geometrically-diluted Planckian distributions. Knowledge of the spectral details of the x-ray drive turned out to be important for the heating and ionization of the plasma. The free electrons in the plasma thermalize quickly relative to the timescales associated with the time-history of the x-ray drive and the plasma atomic kinetics. Hence, electrons are well described by a Maxwellian energy distribution of a single temperature. This finding is important to support the application of a radiation-hydrodynamic model to simulate the experiment. It is found

  16. Nonlinear kinetic description of Raman growth using an envelope code, and comparisons with Vlasov simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent; Siminos, Evangelos; Strozzi, David

    2010-11-01

    Using a nonlinear kinetic analysis, we provide a theoretical description for the nonlinear Landau damping rate, frequency, and group velocity of a slowly varying electron plasma wave (EPW). In particular, we show that the nonlinear group velocity of the EPW is not the derivative of its frequency with respect to its wave number, and we discuss previous results on the nonlinear Landau damping rate and on the nonlinear frequency shift of the EPW. Our theoretical predictions are moreover very carefully compared against results from Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and an excellent agreement is found between numerical and theoretical results. We use the previous analysis to derive envelope equations modeling SRS in the nonlinear kinetic regime. These equations provide very accurate predictions regarding threshold intensities for SRS and the growth time of SRS beyond threshold, provided that one uses the ansatz of self-optimization that we detail. Finally, we discuss saturation of SRS and, in particular, we derive growth rates for sidebands using a spectral method.

  17. Kinetics of the mildly relativistic plasma and GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, A. G.

    2010-03-24

    We consider optically thick photon-pair-proton plasma in the framework of Boltzmann equations. For the sake of simplicity we consider the uniform and isotropic plasma. It has been shown that arbitrary initial distribution functions evolve to the thermal equilibrium state through so called kinetic equilibrium state with common temperature of all particles and nonzero chemical potentials. For the plasma temperature 0.1-10 MeV relevant for GRB (Gamma-Ray Burst) sources we evaluate the thermalization time scale as function of total energy density and baryonic loading parameter.

  18. Emergence of kinetic behavior in streaming ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillen, P.; Castro, J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2015-04-15

    We create streaming ultracold neutral plasmas by tailoring the photoionizing laser beam that creates the plasma. By varying the electron temperature, we control the relative velocity of the streaming populations, and, in conjunction with variation of the plasma density, this controls the ion collisionality of the colliding streams. Laser-induced fluorescence is used to map the spatially resolved density and velocity distribution function for the ions. We identify the lack of local thermal equilibrium and distinct populations of interpenetrating, counter-streaming ions as signatures of kinetic behavior. Experimental data are compared with results from a one-dimensional, two-fluid numerical simulation.

  19. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  20. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power-law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of the potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied include the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings (and hence the direction of the radial electric field), the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  1. Modified Enskog kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas.

    PubMed

    Baalrud, Scott D; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-06-01

    Concepts underlying the Enskog kinetic theory of hard-spheres are applied to include short-range correlation effects in a model for transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas. The approach is based on an extension of the effective potential transport theory [S. D. Baalrud and J. Daligault, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 235001 (2013)] to include an exclusion radius surrounding individual charged particles that is associated with Coulomb repulsion. This is obtained by analogy with the finite size of hard spheres in Enskog's theory. Predictions for the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients of the one-component plasma are tested against molecular dynamics simulations. The theory is found to accurately capture the kinetic contributions to the transport coefficients, but not the potential contributions that arise at very strong coupling (Γ≳30). Considerations related to a first-principles generalization of Enskog's kinetic equation to continuous potentials are also discussed.

  2. Non Equilbrium Vibrational Kinetics in Expanding Plasma Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, Gianpiero

    2008-12-31

    The supersonic expansion of a plasma is a system of interest for aerospace applications, ranging from propulsion to hypersonic wind tunnels. Under these conditions the plasma shows significant departures from chemical and thermal equilibrium, similarly to post-discharge conditions. The multitemperature description is not adequate because the internal level distributions show tails overpopulated with respect to a Boltzmann distribution. The state-to-state approach has to be used, including the interaction with free electrons which follow non-maxwellian distributions.

  3. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2013-03-15

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  4. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  5. A spectral Poisson solver for kinetic plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Obberath, Jens; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic method, realized in several designs. One of these designs is the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In its idealized - geometrically simplified - version it consists of two dielectrically shielded, hemispherical electrodes to which an RF signal is applied. A numerical tool is under development which is capable of simulating the dynamics of the plasma surrounding the MRP in electrostatic approximation. In this contribution we concentrate on the specialized Poisson solver for that tool. The plasma is represented by an ensemble of point charges. By expanding both the charge density and the potential into spherical harmonics, a largely analytical solution of the Poisson problem can be employed. For a practical implementation, the expansion must be appropriately truncated. With this spectral solver we are able to efficiently solve the Poisson equation in a kinetic plasma simulation without the need of introducing a spatial discretization.

  6. Plasma kinetic processes in a strong d.c. magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in the kinetic theory of a strongly magnetized plasma are surveyed. Emphasis is on the electrostatic guiding-center plasma in two dimensions, in both the fluid and 'charged rod' descriptions. The basic kinetic description of the plasma is in terms of the statistically-distributed Fourier coefficients associated with the velocity and 'enstrophy' (charge density) fields. It is a universal tendency in such media for enstrophy to flow to shorter wavelengths but for energy to flow to longer wavelengths. A consequence of the energy flow to longer wavelengths is the generation of long-range order in the form of macroscopic vortices. These kinds of structure have been called 'convection cells' and can be extraordinarily efficient in transporting particles transverse to a magnetic field. The tendency to vortex formation can be disrupted by collisions between particles. Modifications of the Fokker-Planck equation for a plasma produced by a strong dc magnetic field are considered in both two and three dimensions.

  7. TRANSITION FROM KINETIC TO MHD BEHAVIOR IN A COLLISIONLESS PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Tulasi N.; Matthaeus, William H.; Shay, Michael A.; Wan, Minping

    2015-10-01

    The study of kinetic effects in heliospheric plasmas requires representation of dynamics at sub-proton scales, but in most cases the system is driven by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity at larger scales. The latter requirement challenges available computational resources, which raises the question of how large such a system must be to exhibit MHD traits at large scales while kinetic behavior is accurately represented at small scales. Here we study this implied transition from kinetic to MHD-like behavior using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, initialized using an Orszag–Tang Vortex. The PIC code treats protons, as well as electrons, kinetically, and we address the question of interest by examining several different indicators of MHD-like behavior.

  8. Transition from Kinetic to MHD Behavior in a Collisionless Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Tulasi N.; Matthaeus, William H.; Shay, Michael A.; Wan, Minping

    2015-10-01

    The study of kinetic effects in heliospheric plasmas requires representation of dynamics at sub-proton scales, but in most cases the system is driven by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity at larger scales. The latter requirement challenges available computational resources, which raises the question of how large such a system must be to exhibit MHD traits at large scales while kinetic behavior is accurately represented at small scales. Here we study this implied transition from kinetic to MHD-like behavior using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, initialized using an Orszag-Tang Vortex. The PIC code treats protons, as well as electrons, kinetically, and we address the question of interest by examining several different indicators of MHD-like behavior.

  9. Kinetic equilibria of relativistic collisionless plasmas in the presence of non-stationary electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2014-03-15

    The kinetic description of relativistic plasmas in the presence of time-varying and spatially non-uniform electromagnetic (EM) fields is a fundamental theoretical issue both in astrophysics and plasma physics. This refers, in particular, to the treatment of collisionless and strongly-magnetized plasmas in the presence of intense radiation sources. In this paper, the problem is investigated in the framework of a covariant gyrokinetic treatment for Vlasov–Maxwell equilibria. The existence of a new class of kinetic equilibria is pointed out, which occur for spatially-symmetric systems. These equilibria are shown to exist in the presence of non-uniform background EM fields and curved space-time. In the non-relativistic limit, this feature permits the determination of kinetic equilibria even for plasmas in which particle energy is not conserved due to the occurrence of explicitly time-dependent EM fields. Finally, absolute stability criteria are established which apply in the case of infinitesimal symmetric perturbations that can be either externally or internally produced.

  10. Fluid description of multi-component solar partially ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khomenko, E. Collados, M.; Vitas, N.; Díaz, A.

    2014-09-15

    We derive self-consistent formalism for the description of multi-component partially ionized solar plasma, by means of the coupled equations for the charged and neutral components for an arbitrary number of chemical species, and the radiation field. All approximations and assumptions are carefully considered. Generalized Ohm's law is derived for the single-fluid and two-fluid formalism. Our approach is analytical with some order-of-magnitude support calculations. After general equations are developed, we particularize to some frequently considered cases as for the interaction of matter and radiation.

  11. Kinetic Description of Vacuum Creation of Massive Vector Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Blaschke, D.B.; Prozorkevich, A.V.; Smolyansky, S.A.; Reichel, A.V.

    2005-06-01

    In the simple model of massive vector field in a flat spacetime, we derive the kinetic equation of non-Markovian type describing the vacuum pair creation under action of external fields of different nature. We use for this aim the nonperturbative methods of kinetic theory in combination with a new element when the transition of the instantaneous quasiparticle representation is realized within the oscillator (holomorphic) representation. We study in detail the process of vacuum creation of vector bosons generated by a time-dependent boson mass in accordance with the framework of a conformal-invariant scalar-tensor gravitational theory and its cosmological application. It is indicated that the choice of the equation of state allows one to obtain a number density of vector bosons that is sufficient to explain the observed number density of photons in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  12. Kinetic theory of quasi-stationary collisionless axisymmetric plasmas in the presence of strong rotation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2013-05-15

    The problem of formulating a kinetic treatment for quasi-stationary collisionless plasmas in axisymmetric systems subject to the possibly independent presence of local strong velocity-shear and supersonic rotation velocities is posed. The theory is developed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for multi-species non-relativistic plasmas. Applications to astrophysical accretion discs arising around compact objects and to plasmas in laboratory devices are considered. Explicit solutions for the equilibrium kinetic distribution function (KDF) are constructed based on the identification of the relevant particle adiabatic invariants. These are shown to be expressed in terms of generalized non-isotropic Gaussian distributions. A suitable perturbative theory is then developed which allows for the treatment of non-uniform strong velocity-shear/supersonic plasmas. This yields a series representation for the equilibrium KDF in which the leading-order term depends on both a finite set of fluid fields as well as on the gradients of an appropriate rotational frequency. Constitutive equations for the fluid number density, flow velocity, and pressure tensor are explicitly calculated. As a notable outcome, the discovery of a new mechanism for generating temperature and pressure anisotropies is pointed out, which represents a characteristic feature of plasmas considered here. This is shown to arise as a consequence of the canonical momentum conservation and to contribute to the occurrence of temperature anisotropy in combination with the adiabatic conservation of the particle magnetic moment. The physical relevance of the result and the implications of the kinetic solution for the self-generation of quasi-stationary electrostatic and magnetic fields through a kinetic dynamo are discussed.

  13. Kinetic models for the VASIMR thruster helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, Oleg; Molvig, Kim

    2001-10-01

    Helicon gas discharge [1] is widely used by industry because of its remarkable efficiency [2]. High energy and fuel efficiencies make it very attractive for space electrical propulsion applications. For example, helicon plasma source is used in the high specific impulse VASIMR [3] plasma thruster, including experimental prototypes VX-3 and upgraded VX-10 [4] configurations, which operate with hydrogen (deuterium) and helium plasmas. We have developed a set of models for the VASIMR helicon discharge. Firstly, we use zero-dimensional energy and mass balance equations to characterize partially ionized gas condition/composition. Next, we couple it to one-dimensional hybrid model [6] for gas flow in the quartz tube of the helicon. We compare hybrid model results to a purely kinetic simulation of propellant flow in gas feed + helicon source subsystem. Some of the experimental data [3-4] are explained. Lastly, we discuss full-scale kinetic modeling of coupled gas and plasmas [5-6] in the helicon discharge. [1] M.A.Lieberman, A.J.Lihtenberg, 'Principles of ..', Wiley, 1994; [2] F.F.Chen, Plas. Phys. Contr. Fus. 33, 339, 1991; [3] F.Chang-Diaz et al, Bull. APS 45 (7) 129, 2000; [4] J.Squire et al., Bull. APS 45 (7) 130, 2000; [5] O.Batishchev et al, J. Plasma Phys. 61, part II, 347, 1999; [6] O.Batishchev, K.Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2000-3754, -14p, 2001.

  14. Kinetic ballooning/interchange instability in a bent plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Kubyshkina, M. G.; Artemyev, A. V.; Sergeev, V. A.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D.

    2012-06-01

    We use Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and GOES observations to investigate the plasma sheet evolution on 28 February 2008 between 6:50 and 7:50 UT, when there developed strong magnetic field oscillations with periods of 100 s. Using multispacecraft analysis of the plasma sheet observations and an empirical plasma sheet model, we determine both the large-scale evolution of the plasma sheet and the properties of the oscillations. We found that the oscillations exhibited signatures of kinetic ballooning/interchange instability fingers that developed in a bent current sheet. The interchange oscillations had a sausage structure, propagated duskward at a velocity of about 100 km/s, and were associated with fast radial electron flows. We suggest that the observed negative gradient of the ZGSM magnetic field component (∂BZ/∂X) was a free energy source for the kinetic ballooning/interchange instability. Tens of minutes later a fast elongation of ballooning/interchange fingers was detected between 6 and 16 RE downtail with the length-to-width ratio exceeding 20. The finger elongation ended with signatures of reconnection in an embedded current sheet near the bending point. These observations suggest a complex interplay between the midtail and near-Earth plasma sheet dynamics, involving localized fluctuations in both cross-tail and radial directions before current sheet reconnection.

  15. Kinetic theory of Jeans instability of a dusty plasma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, B P; Lakhina, G S; Krishan, V

    1999-12-01

    A kinetic theory of the Jeans instability of a dusty plasma has been developed in the present work. The effect of grain charge fluctuations due to the attachment of electrons and ions to the grain surface has been considered in the framework of Krook's collisional model. We demonstrate that the grain charge fluctuations alter the growth rate of the gravitational collapse of the dusty plasma. The Jeans length has been derived under limiting cases, and its dependence on the attachment frequency is shown. In the absence of gravity, we see that the damping rate of the dust acoustic mode is proportional to the electron-dust collision frequency.

  16. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  17. Transition of energy transfer from MHD turbulence to kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William; Parashar, Tulasi; Shi, Yipeng; Wan, Minping; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    The classical energy cascade scenario is of great importance in explaining the heating of corona and solar wind. One can envision that energy residing in large-scale fluctuations is transported to smaller scales where dissipation occurs and finally drives kinetic processes that absorb the energy flux and energize charged particles. Here we inquire how the cascade operates in a compressible plasma, and how the characteristics of energy transfer vary going from MHD to kinetic scales. When filtering MHD equations, we can get an apparent inertial range over which the conservative energy cascade occurs and the scale locality of energy transfer is similar to the cases of incompressible MHD turbulence. Pervasive shocks not only make a significant difference on energy cascade and magnetic amplification, but can also introduce considerable pressure dilation, a complement of viscous and ohmic dissipation that can trigger an alternative channel of the conversion between kinetic and internal energy. The procedure can also be applied to the Vlasov equation and kinetic simulation, in comparison with MHD turbulence, and is a good candidate to investigate the energy cascade process and the analogous role of the (tensor) pressure dilation in collisionless plasma.

  18. Kinetic and mean field description of Gibrat's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscani, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    I introduce and analyze a linear kinetic model that describes the evolution of the probability density of the number of firms in a society, in which the microscopic rate of change obeys to the so-called law of proportional effect proposed by Gibrat (1930, 1931). Despite its apparent simplicity, the possible mean field limits of the kinetic model are varied. In some cases, the asymptotic limit can be described by a first-order partial differential equation. In other cases, the mean field equation is a linear diffusion with a non constant diffusion coefficient that can be studied analytically, by virtue of a transformation of variables recently utilized in Iagar and Sánchez (2013) to study the heat equation in a nonhomogeneous medium with critical density. In this case, it is shown that the large-time behavior of the solution is represented, for a large class of initial data, by a lognormal distribution with constant mean value and variance increasing exponentially in time at a precise rate.

  19. Kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of plasma-assisted combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togai, Kuninori

    Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising combustion enhancement technique that shows great potential for applications to a number of different practical combustion systems. In this dissertation, the chemical kinetics associated with PAC are investigated numerically with a newly developed model that describes the chemical processes induced by plasma. To support the model development, experiments were performed using a plasma flow reactor in which the fuel oxidation proceeds with the aid of plasma discharges below and above the self-ignition thermal limit of the reactive mixtures. The mixtures used were heavily diluted with Ar in order to study the reactions with temperature-controlled environments by suppressing the temperature changes due to chemical reactions. The temperature of the reactor was varied from 420 K to 1250 K and the pressure was fixed at 1 atm. Simulations were performed for the conditions corresponding to the experiments and the results are compared against each other. Important reaction paths were identified through path flux and sensitivity analyses. Reaction systems studied in this work are oxidation of hydrogen, ethylene, and methane, as well as the kinetics of NOx in plasma. In the fuel oxidation studies, reaction schemes that control the fuel oxidation are analyzed and discussed. With all the fuels studied, the oxidation reactions were extended to lower temperatures with plasma discharges compared to the cases without plasma. The analyses showed that radicals produced by dissociation of the reactants in plasma plays an important role of initiating the reaction sequence. At low temperatures where the system exhibits a chain-terminating nature, reactions of HO2 were found to play important roles on overall fuel oxidation. The effectiveness of HO2 as a chain terminator was weakened in the ethylene oxidation system, because the reactions of C 2H4 + O that have low activation energies deflects the flux of O atoms away from HO2. For the

  20. Kinetic aspects of the formation of aluminium oxide by use of a microwave-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Quade, A; Steffen, H; Hippler, R; Wulff, H

    2002-10-01

    The oxidation of thin aluminium layers in a microwave plasma has been investigated to determine the kinetics of oxide growth. Thin Al-coatings were oxidized by means of a variety of gas mixtures, characterized by different partial pressures of oxygen, in microwave-induced plasmas of different power. To study the whole kinetic process the Al-metal and the oxide formed were investigated by means of a combination of grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD). XPS and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of stoichiometric Al(2)O(3). The alumina formed is X-ray amorphous. Quantitative description of oxide formation was achieved indirectly by determination of the decrease in the integrated intensity of the Al(111)-peak and the total thickness of the whole coating. These values enabled calculation of kinetic data. It was found that oxide growth was a combination of two simultaneous processes - diffusion and sputter processes. The diffusion coefficient D (cm(2) s(-1)) and the sputter rate S (nm s(-1)) were determined. The effect of the composition of the gas mixture, microwave power, and concentration of activated oxygen species on the oxidation process will be discussed. For calculation of the activation energy, E(A), of this plasma-enhanced diffusion process the temperature-dependence of D was investigated.

  1. Modeling Plasma-to-Interstitium Glucose Kinetics from Multitracer Plasma and Microdialysis Data

    PubMed Central

    Schiavon, Michele; Dalla Man, Chiara; Dube, Simmi; Slama, Michael; Kudva, Yogish C.; Peyser, Thomas; Basu, Ananda; Basu, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Quantitative assessment of the dynamic relationship between plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) glucose and the estimation of the plasma-to-ISF delay are of major importance to determine the accuracy of subcutaneous glucose sensors, an essential component of open- and closed-loop therapeutic systems for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The goal of this work is to develop a model of plasma-to-ISF glucose kinetics from multitracer plasma and interstitium data, obtained by microdialysis, in healthy and T1DM subjects, under fasting conditions. Materials and Methods: A specific experimental design, combining administration of multiple tracers with the microdialysis technique, was used to simultaneously frequently collect plasma and ISF data. Linear time-invariant compartmental modeling was used to describe glucose kinetics from the tracer data because the system is in steady state. Results: A two-compartment model was shown accurate and was identified from both plasma and ISF data. An “equilibration time” between plasma and ISF of 9.1 and 11.0 min (median) in healthy and T1DM subjects, respectively, was calculated. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that, in steady-state condition, the glucose plasma-to-ISF kinetics can be modeled with a linear two-compartment model and that the “equilibration time” between the two compartments can be estimated with precision. Future studies will assess plasma-to-interstitium glucose kinetics during glucose and insulin perturbations in both healthy and T1DM subjects. PMID:26313215

  2. Dust kinetic Alfven and acoustic waves in a Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rubab, N.; Biernat, H. K.; Erkaev, N. V.

    2009-10-15

    Dust kinetic Alfven waves (DKAWs) with finite Larmor radius effects have been examined rigorously in a uniform dusty plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field. A dispersion relation of low-frequency DKAW on the dust acoustic velocity branch is obtained in a low-{beta} Lorentzian plasma. It is found that the influence of the Lorentzian distribution function is more effective for perpendicular component of group velocity as compared with parallel one. Lorentzian-type charging currents are obtained with the aid of Vlasov theory. Damping/instability due to dust charge fluctuation is found to be insensitive with the form of distribution function for DKAW. The possible applications to dusty space plasmas are pointed out.

  3. Unification of Plasma Fluid and Kinetic Theory via Gaussian Radial Basis Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental macroscopic description of a magnetized plasma is the Vlasov equation supplemented by the nonlinear inverse-square force Fokker-Planck collision operator [Rosenbluth et al., Phys. Rev. 107, 1957]. The Vlasov part describes advection in a six-dimensional phase space whereas the collision operator contains friction and diffusion coefficients that are weighted velocity-space integrals of the particle distribution function. The Fokker-Planck collision operator is an integro-differential, nonlinear (bilinear) operator. Numerical discretization of the operator, in particular for collisions of unlike species, is extremely challenging. In this work, we describe a new approach to discretize the entire kinetic system based on an expansion in Gaussian Radial Basis functions (RBFs). This approach is particularly well-suited to treat the collision operator because the friction and diffusion coefficients can be analytically calculated. Although the RBF method is known to be a powerful scheme for the interpolation of scattered multidimensional data, Gaussian RBFs also have a deep physical interpretation in statistical mechanics and plasma physics as local thermodynamic equilibria. We outline the general theory, highlight the connection to plasma fluid theories, and also give 2D and 3D numerical solutions of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation. A broad spectrum of applications for the new method is anticipated in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In particular, we believe that the RBF method may provide a new bridge between fluid and kinetic descriptions of magnetized plasma. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54963.

  4. Kinetic description of electron beams in the solar chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Mauas, Pablo J.

    1992-01-01

    We formulate the relativistic Fokker-Plank equation for a beam of accelerated electrons interacting with a partially ionized plasma. In our derivation we conserved those terms contributing to velocity diffusion and found that this effect cannot be neglected a priori. We compute the terms accounting for elastic and inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen and helium. Collisions with neutral hydrogen are found to be dominant throughout the chromosphere, except at the uppermost layers close to the transition region. As an application, we compute the loss of energy and momentum for a power-law beam impinging on the solar chromosphere, for a particular case in which the Fokker-Planck equation can be integrated analytically. We find that most of the beam energy is deposited in a relatively thin region of the chromosphere, a result which is largely insensitive to the theoretical method employed to compute the energy deposition rate.

  5. Linear gyrokinetic theory for kinetic magnetohydrodynamic eigenmodes in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1999-06-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) numerical solution method is developed for the recently derived linear gyrokinetic system which describes arbitrary wavelength electromagnetic perturbations in tokamak plasmas. The system consists of the gyrokinetic equation, the gyrokinetic Poisson equation, and the gyrokinetic moment equation. Since familiar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) results can be recovered entirely from this gyrokinetic model, and all interesting kinetic effects are intrinsically included, this gyrokinetic system offers an approach for kinetic MHD phenomena which is more rigorous, self-consistent, and comprehensive than the previous hybrid models. Meanwhile, drift type microinstabilities can be also investigated systematically in this theoretical framework. The linear gyrokinetic equation is solved for the distribution function in terms of the perturbed fields by integrating along unperturbed particle orbits. The solution is substituted back into the gyrokinetic moment equation and the gyrokinetic Poisson equation. When the boundary conditions are incorporated, an eigenvalue problem is formed. The resulting numerical code, KIN-2DEM, is applied to kinetic ballooning modes, internal kink modes, and toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs). The numerical results are benchmarked against the well-established FULL code [G. Rewoldt, W. M. Tang, and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 25, 480 (1982)], the PEST code [J. Manickam, Nucl. Fusion 24, 595 (1984)], and the NOVA-K code [C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Rep. 211, No. 1 (1992)]. More importantly, kinetic effects on MHD modes can be investigated nonperturbatively. In particular, the kinetic effects of the background plasma on internal kink modes and the hot particle destabilization of TAEs are studied numerically.

  6. Analysis of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in a Magnetized Re-Entry Plasma Sheath Via the Kinetic Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a theoretical model of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a hypersonically induced plasma, it has been demonstrated that the classical radiofrequency communications blackout that is experienced during atmospheric reentry can be mitigated through the appropriate control of an external magnetic field of nominal magnitude. The model is based on the kinetic equation treatment of Vlasov and involves an analytical solution for the electric and magnetic fields within the plasma allowing for a description of the attendant transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients. The ability to transmit through the magnetized plasma is due to the magnetic windows that are created within the plasma via the well-known whistler modes of propagation. The case of 2 GHz transmission through a re-entry plasma is considered. The coefficients are found to be highly sensitive to the prevailing electron density and will thus require a dynamic control mechanism to vary the magnetic field as the plasma evolves through the re-entry phase.

  7. A Quantitative Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2014-10-01

    Every second millions of small meteoroids hit the Earth from space, the vast majority too small to observe visually. Radars easily detect the plasma they generate and use the data they gather to characterize the meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. These diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Meteors become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently that they begin to sublimate. The sublimated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around and behind the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from the plasma around the descending meteoroid produces a localized signal called a head echo. This research applies kinetic theory to show that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. This analytical model will serve as a basis for quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements, the ionization efficiency (called the Beta parameter), and should help us calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. Work supported by NSF Grant AGS-1244842.

  8. Electron plasma wave filamentation in the kinetic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel; Rose, Harvey; Silantyev, Denis

    2016-10-01

    We consider nonlinear electron plasma wave (EPW) dynamics in the kinetic wavenumber regime, 0.25 < kλD < 0.45 , which is typical for current high temperature laser-plasma interaction experiments, where k is the EPW wavenumber and λD is the electron Debye length. In this kinetic regime, EPW frequency reduction due to electron trapping may dominate the ponderomotive frequency shift. Previous 3D PIC simulations showed that the trapped electron EPW filamentation instability can saturate stimulated Raman backscatter by reducing the EPWs coherence but multidimensional Vlasov simulations [1] are needed to address that saturation in details. We performed nonlinear, non-equilibrium 2D Vlasov simulations to study the EPW filamentation. The initial conditions are created either by external forcing or by constructing the appropriate 1D travelling Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) mode. Transverse perturbations of any of these initial conditions grow with time eventually producing strongly nonlinear filamentation followed by plasma turbulence. We compared these simulations with the theoretical results on growth rates of the transverse instability BGK mode showing the satisfactory agreement. Supported by the New Mexico Consortium and NSF DMS-1412140.

  9. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Told, D.; Cookmeyer, J.; Astfalk, P.; Jenko, F.

    2016-07-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm’s law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  10. Hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics simulation for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method and lattice Boltzmann method is presented for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. In this framework, the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model considering both elastic and Coulomb collisions and the multicomponent force model based on the Guo model are introduced, which supply a hyperfine description on the interaction between electromagnetic wave and weakly ionized plasma. Cubic spline interpolation and mean filtering technique are separately introduced to solve the multiscalar problem and enhance the physical quantities, which are polluted by numerical noise. Several simulations have been implemented to validate our model. The numerical results are consistent with a simplified analytical model, which demonstrates that this model can obtain satisfying numerical solutions successfully.

  11. Propagation of radiation in fluctuating multiscale plasmas. II. Kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pal Singh, Kunwar; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H.; Tyshetskiy, Yu.

    2012-11-15

    A numerical algorithm is developed and tested that implements the kinetic treatment of electromagnetic radiation propagating through plasmas whose properties have small scale fluctuations, which was developed in a companion paper. This method incorporates the effects of refraction, damping, mode structure, and other aspects of large-scale propagation of electromagnetic waves on the distribution function of quanta in position and wave vector, with small-scale effects of nonuniformities, including scattering and mode conversion approximated as causing drift and diffusion in wave vector. Numerical solution of the kinetic equation yields the distribution function of radiation quanta in space, time, and wave vector. Simulations verify the convergence, accuracy, and speed of the methods used to treat each term in the equation. The simulations also illustrate the main physical effects and place the results in a form that can be used in future applications.

  12. Application of Nonlocal Electron Kinetics to Plasma Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2011-10-01

    Partially ionized plasmas are typically in a highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic state: the electrons are not in equilibrium with the neutral particle species or the ions, and the electrons are also not in equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas-discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Significant progress in understanding the formation of non-Maxwellian EVDF in the self-consistent electric fields has been one of the major achievements in the low-temperature plasmas during the last decade. This progress was made possible by a synergy between full-scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. Specific examples include rf discharges, dc discharges with auxiliary electrodes, Hall thruster discharges. In each example, nonlocal kinetic effects are identified as the main mechanisms responsible for the surprising degree of discharge self-organization. These phenomena include: explosive generation of cold electrons with rf power increase in low-pressure rf discharges; abrupt changes in discharge structure with increased bias voltage on a third electrode in a dc discharge with hot cathode; absence of a steady-state regime in Hall thruster discharges with intense secondary electron emission due to coupling of the sheath properties and the EVDF. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, M. Campanell, V. I. Demidov, D. Sydorenko, I. Schweigert, and A. S. Mustafaev. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Hybrid kinetic/fluid modeling of silicon nanoparticles dynamics in silane plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlac'h, J.-M.; Giovangigli, V.; Novikova, T.; Cabarrocas, P. Roca i.

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully coupled self-consistent model for the evolution of nanoparticles in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor. The plasma is treated as a fluid while the nanoparticles are handled kinetically. The plasma fluid model is derived from kinetic theory applied to multicomponent two-temperature chemically reactive polyatomic plasmas. The model has been implemented numerically for a silane-hydrogen plasma in the early stage of nanoparticles generation.

  14. Chemical Cycle Kinetics: Removing the Limitation of Linearity of a Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubi, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.; Kjelstrup, S.; Pagonabarraga, I.

    2013-07-01

    Chemical cycle kinetics is customarily analyzed by means of the law of mass action which describes how the concentrations of the substances vary with time. The connection of this approach with non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) has traditionally been restricted to the linear domain close to equilibrium in which the reaction rates are linear functions of the affinities. We show, by a pertinent formulation of the concept of local equilibrium in the mesoscopic description along the reaction coordinates, that the connection between kinetic and thermodynamic approaches is deeper than thought and holds in the nonlinear domain far from equilibrium, for higher values of the affinity. This new perspective indicates how to overcome the inherent limitation of classical NET in treating cyclic reactions, providing a description of closed and open cycles operating far from equilibrium, in accordance with thermodynamic principles. We propose that the new set of equations are tested and used for data reduction in chemical reaction kinetics.

  15. Kinetic theory of low-frequency cross-field instability in a weakly ionized plasma. I

    SciTech Connect

    Dimant, Y.S.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-04-01

    A consistent kinetic theory is developed for the description of electrons under conditions of a low-frequency two-stream {bold E}{times}{bold B} instability in collisionally dominated, weakly ionized plasmas. Starting from the Boltzmann collision integral, a simplified kinetic equation for the electron distribution function has been derived, which takes into account strong pitch-angle scattering of electrons by neutrals, velocity dependence of the electron--neutral collision frequency, etc. Linearized equations describing small oscillations of the electron distribution function and ion density are presented. For the asymptotic case of short waves, the dispersion relation of the {bold E}{times}{bold B} instability has been obtained and analyzed under conditions typical for the lower ionosphere. Under certain conditions, the rigorous kinetic consideration yields substantial changes in results compared to previous theories. The general approach may be applied to other linear and nonlinear low-frequency processes in a weakly ionized plasma. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Hybrid Kinetic-Fluid Electromagnetic Simulations of Imploding High Energy Density Plasmas for IFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Genoni, Thomas; Bruner, Nichelle; Clark, Robert; Stygar, William; Leeper, Ramon

    2011-10-01

    A new simulation technique is being developed to study high current and moderate density-radius product (ρR) z-pinch plasmas relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). Fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the time evolution of up to 40-MA current (deuterium and DT) z-pinches, but with relatively low ρR, have yielded new insights into the mechanisms of neutron production. At fusion relevant conditions (ρR > 0.01 gm/cm2) , however, this technique requires a prohibitively large number of cells and particles. A new hybrid implicit technique has been developed that accurately describes high-density and magnetized imploding plasmas. The technique adapts a recently published algorithm, that enables accurate descriptions of highly magnetized particle orbits, to high density plasmas and also makes use of an improved kinetic particle remap technique. We will discuss the new technique, stable range of operation, and application to an IFE relevant z-pinch design at 60 MA. Work supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  17. Age differences in plasma norepinephrine kinetics in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, R.C.; Featherstone, J.A.; Linares, O.A.; Halter, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    To determine if the increased plasma norepinephrine (NE) of older individuals is due to greater plasma NE appearance rate and/or decreased NE clearance, arterialized plasma NE kinetics were measured in 25 healthy young (27 +/- 6 yr, M +/- SD) and 18 healthy older volunteers (68 +/- 5 yr) using a tritium-labeled NE isotope dilution technique. Basal NE levels were 54% greater in the older participants (282 +/- 24 vs. 183 +/- 11 pg/ml, M +/- SEM, p less than .001). The mean plasma NE appearance rate was 32% higher (0.33 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.02 microgram/m2/min, p less than .016) and NE clearance was 19% lower (1.21 +/- 0.08 vs. 1.49 +/- 0.06 L/min/m2, p less than .006) in the older participants. There was a close correlation between NE appearance rate and NE levels (r = .76, p less than .001, N = 43), but only modest inverse correlation between NE clearance and NE levels (r = -.37, p less than .01, N = 43). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed that NE appearance rate and clearance explained 80% of the variance in NE levels and that 57% of the variance was attributable to NE appearance, F (1,41) = 54.8, p less than .001, compared with only 14% by NE clearance, F (1, 41) = 6.5, p = .01. We conclude that the principal factor accounting for the higher plasma NE levels of older individuals is an increase in plasma NE appearance rate.

  18. Magnetic Null Points in Kinetic Simulations of Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  19. Continuum Kinetic Modeling of the Tokamak Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    The problem of edge plasma transport provides substantial challenges for analytical or numerical analysis due to (a) complex magnetic geometry including both open and closed magnetic field lines B, (b) steep radial gradients comparable to ion drift-orbit excursions, and (c) a variation in the collision mean-free path along B from long to short compared to the magnetic connection length. Here, the first 4D continuum drift-kinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented, motivated in part by the success of continuum kinetic codes for core physics and in part by the potential for high accuracy. The calculations include fully-nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions and electrostatic potential variations. The problem of intrinsic toroidal rotation driven by ion orbit loss is addressed in detail. The code, COGENT, developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory collaboration, is distinguished by a fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasma transport and the complex magnetic X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. Previously, successful performance of high-order algorithms has been demonstrated in a simpler closed magnetic-flux-surface geometry for the problems of neoclassical transport and collisionless relaxation of geodesic acoustic modes in a tokamak pedestal, including the effects of a strong radial electric field under H-mode conditions. Work performed for USDOE, at LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. [Study on Chemical Kinetic Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma].

    PubMed

    Zrang, Peng; Hong, Yan-ji; Shen, Shuang-yan; Ding, Xiao-yu; Ma, Di

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the mechanism of plasma (assisted the ignition process of methane/air further, schematic of dielectric barrier discharge plasma system with atmospheric air was designed and set up, the emission spectrum of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air was measured, and the active particles produced by the interaction of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air were analyzed with the spectrum technology, the ignition model and calculation methods of sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis were given, effects of NO and O3 on the ignition delay time were simulated, and the chemical kinetics mechanism of NO and O3 assisted ignition was revealed via sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis. The results show that main excited particles of N2 and O3 are generated via effect of plasma on the atmospheric air, which are converted into active particles of NO(ξ) and O3 in the end, the life of which are longer than any other active particles, effects of plasma on the ignition is simplified as effects of NO(ξ) and O3 on the ignition; NO and O3 could reduce the ignition delay time significantly, but the amplitude decrease with increase of the initial temperature, this is because the rate of ignition is decided by the oxidation rate of CH3, the oxidized pathway of CH3 is R155 and R156 for auto-ignition and their rates are slower when temperature is low, so the ignition delay time of methane/air is longer; NO could reduce the ignition delay time significantly because of the oxidized pathway of CH3 is changed to R327 CH3O2 + NO = CH3O + NO2, R328 CH3 + NO2 = CH3O + NO for NO(ξ) (assisted ignition process from R155 and R156 for auto-ignition; and the chemical kinetic effect is the dominating factor of O3 on the ignition and which change the reaction path.

  1. Consistent kinetic simulation of plasma and sputtering in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frederik; Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Plasmas are commonly used in sputtering applications for the deposition of thin films. Although magnetron sources are a prominent choice, capacitively coupled plasmas have certain advantages (e.g., sputtering of non-conducting and/or ferromagnetic materials, aside of excellent control of the ion energy distribution). In order to understand the collective plasma and sputtering dynamics, a kinetic simulation model is helpful. Particle-in-Cell has been proven to be successful in simulating the plasma dynamics, while the Test-Multi-Particle-Method can be used to describe the sputtered neutral species. In this talk a consistent combination of these methods is presented by consistently coupling the simulated ion flux as input to a neutral particle transport model. The combined model is used to simulate and discuss the spatially dependent densities, fluxes and velocity distributions of all particles. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of Transregional Collaborative Research Center (SFB) TR-87.

  2. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  3. Linking the hydrodynamic and kinetic description of a dissipative relativistic conformal theory

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, E.; Peralta-Ramos, J.

    2010-11-15

    We use the entropy production variational method to associate a one-particle distribution function to the assumed known energy-momentum and entropy currents describing a relativistic conformal fluid. Assuming a simple form for the collision operator we find this one-particle distribution function explicitly, and show that this method of linking the hydro and kinetic descriptions is a nontrivial generalization of Grad's ansatz. The resulting constitutive relations are the same as in the conformal dissipative type theories discussed by J. Peralta-Ramos and E. Calzetta [Phys. Rev. D 80, 126002 (2009)]. Our results may prove useful in the description of freeze-out in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  4. Effects of Kinetic Processes in Shaping Io's Global Plasma Environment: A 3D Hybrid Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD and the electrodynamics approaches. One of the main significant results from the simplified two-fluid model simulations was a production of the structure of the double-peak in the magnetic field signature of the I0 flyby that could not be explained by standard MHD models. In this paper, we develop a method of kinetic ion simulation. This method employs the fluid description for electrons and neutrals whereas for ions multilevel, drift-kinetic and particle, approaches are used. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. Our model provides much more accurate description for ion dynamics and allows us to take into account the realistic anisotropic ion distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this paper.

  5. Wakes in complex plasmas: A self-consistent kinetic theory.

    PubMed

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E; Ivlev, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    In ground-based experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas, charged microparticles are levitated against gravity by an electric field, which also drives ion flow in the parent gas. Existing analytical approaches to describe the electrostatic interaction between microparticles in such conditions generally ignore the field and ion-neutral collisions, assuming free ion flow with a certain approximation for the ion velocity distribution function (usually a shifted Maxwellian). We provide a comprehensive analysis of our previously proposed self-consistent kinetic theory including the field, ion-neutral collisions, and the corresponding ion velocity distribution. We focus on various limiting cases and demonstrate how the interplay of these factors results in different forms of the shielding potential.

  6. Wakes in complex plasmas: A self-consistent kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-06-01

    In ground-based experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas, charged microparticles are levitated against gravity by an electric field, which also drives ion flow in the parent gas. Existing analytical approaches to describe the electrostatic interaction between microparticles in such conditions generally ignore the field and ion-neutral collisions, assuming free ion flow with a certain approximation for the ion velocity distribution function (usually a shifted Maxwellian). We provide a comprehensive analysis of our previously proposed self-consistent kinetic theory including the field, ion-neutral collisions, and the corresponding ion velocity distribution. We focus on various limiting cases and demonstrate how the interplay of these factors results in different forms of the shielding potential.

  7. Limitation of the ECRIS performance by kinetic plasma instabilities (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Toivanen, V.; Machicoane, G.

    2016-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropic electron velocity distribution. The instabilities are associated with strong microwave emission and periodic bursts of energetic electrons escaping the magnetic confinement. The instabilities explain the periodic ms-scale oscillation of the extracted beam current observed with several high performance ECRISs and restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of extracted beam currents of highly charged ions. Experiments with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS have demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field is less than 0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of ECRISs.

  8. Kinetic theory of weak turbulence in magnetized plasmas: Perpendicular propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-08-15

    The present paper formulates a weak turbulence theory in which electromagnetic perturbations are assumed to propagate in directions perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. By assuming that all wave vectors lie in one direction transverse to the ambient magnetic field, the linear solution and second-order nonlinear solutions to the equation for the perturbed distribution function are obtained. Nonlinear perturbed current from the second-order nonlinearity is derived in general form, but the limiting situation of cold plasma temperature is taken in order to derive an explicit nonlinear wave kinetic equation that describes three-wave decay/coalescence interactions among X and Z modes. A potential application of the present formalism is also discussed.

  9. Advances in petascale kinetic plasma simulation with VPIC and Roadrunner

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Kevin J; Albright, Brian J; Yin, Lin; Daughton, William S; Roytershteyn, Vadim; Kwan, Thomas J T

    2009-01-01

    VPIC, a first-principles 3d electromagnetic charge-conserving relativistic kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, was recently adapted to run on Los Alamos's Roadrunner, the first supercomputer to break a petaflop (10{sup 15} floating point operations per second) in the TOP500 supercomputer performance rankings. They give a brief overview of the modeling capabilities and optimization techniques used in VPIC and the computational characteristics of petascale supercomputers like Roadrunner. They then discuss three applications enabled by VPIC's unprecedented performance on Roadrunner: modeling laser plasma interaction in upcoming inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), modeling short pulse laser GeV ion acceleration and modeling reconnection in magnetic confinement fusion experiments.

  10. Air Plasma Kinetics Under the Influence of Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated to an impulsive (t = 5 ms) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer going through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63 km, 68 km and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the Boltzmann transport equation so that, in this way, all the kinetics is self-consistent, although, in the present approach, the electrodynamics (no Poisson equation is considered) is not coupled. The chemical model set up for air plasmas includes more than 75 species and almost 500 reactions. In addition, a complete set of reactions (more than 110) has been considered to take into account the possible impact of including H2O (humid chemistry) in the generated air plasmas. This study also considers the vibrational kinetics of N2 and CO2, and explicitly evaluates the optical emissions associated to a number of excited states of N2, O2, O in the visible, CO2 in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions of sprite streamers due to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) and the NO-γ band systems. All the calculations are conducted for midnight conditions in mid- latitude regions (+ 38°), and 0° longitude, using as initial values for the neutral species those provided by the latest version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). According to our calculations, the impact of 4 ppm of H2O is only slightly visible in O3- at 68 km and 78 km while it strongly affects the behaviour of the anion CO4- at all the altitudes investigated. The local enhancement of NOX predicted by the present model varies with the altitude. At 68 km, the concentrations of NO and NO2 increase in about one order of magnitude while that of NO3 exhibits a remarkable growth of up to almost three

  11. Air plasma kinetics under the influence of sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated with an impulsive (τ = 5 µs) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer passing through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63, 68 and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the Boltzmann transport equation so that, in this way, all the kinetics is self-consistent, although, in the present approach, the electrodynamics (no Poisson equation is considered) is not coupled. The chemical model set up for air plasmas includes more than 75 species and almost 500 reactions. In addition, a complete set of reactions (more than 110) has been considered to take into account the possible impact of including H2O (humid chemistry) in the generated air plasmas. This study also considers the vibrational kinetics of N2 and CO2 and explicitly evaluates the optical emissions associated with a number of excited states of N2, O2, O in the visible, CO2 in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions of sprite streamers due to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) and the NO-γ band systems. All the calculations are conducted for midnight conditions in mid-latitude regions (+38°N) and 0° longitude, using as initial values for the neutral species those provided by the latest version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). According to our calculations, the impact of 4 ppm of H2O is only slightly visible in O_{3}^{-} at 68 and 78 km while it strongly affects the behaviour of the anion CO_{4}^{-} at all the altitudes investigated. The local enhancement of NOx predicted by the present model varies with the altitude. At 68 km, the concentrations of NO and NO2 increase by about one order of magnitude while that of NO3 exhibits a remarkable growth of up to almost

  12. Covariant formulation of spatially non-symmetric kinetic equilibria in magnetized astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2014-05-15

    Astrophysical plasmas in the surrounding of compact objects and subject to intense gravitational and electromagnetic fields are believed to give rise to relativistic regimes. Theoretical and observational evidences suggest that magnetized plasmas of this type are collisionless and can persist for long times (e.g., with respect to a distant observer, coordinate, time), while exhibiting geometrical structures characterized by the absence of well-defined spatial symmetries. In this paper, the problem is posed whether such configurations can correspond to some kind of kinetic equilibrium. The issue is addressed from a theoretical perspective in the framework of a covariant Vlasov statistical description, which relies on the method of invariants. For this purpose, a systematic covariant variational formulation of gyrokinetic theory is developed, which holds without requiring any symmetry condition on the background fields. As a result, an asymptotic representation of the relativistic particle magnetic moment is obtained from its formal exact solution, in terms of a suitably defined invariant series expansion parameter (perturbative representation). On such a basis, it is shown that spatially non-symmetric kinetic equilibria can actually be determined, an example being provided by Gaussian-like distributions. As an application, the physical mechanisms related to the occurrence of a non-vanishing equilibrium fluid 4-flow are investigated.

  13. MAGNETIC NULL POINTS IN KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3–9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  14. Kinetic and dynamic probability-density-function descriptions of disperse turbulent two-phase flows.

    PubMed

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Profeta, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    This article analyzes the status of two classical one-particle probability density function (PDF) descriptions of the dynamics of discrete particles dispersed in turbulent flows. The first PDF formulation considers only the process made up by particle position and velocity Z(p)=(x(p),U(p)) and is represented by its PDF p(t; y(p),V(p)) which is the solution of a kinetic PDF equation obtained through a flux closure based on the Furutsu-Novikov theorem. The second PDF formulation includes fluid variables into the particle state vector, for example, the fluid velocity seen by particles Z(p)=(x(p),U(p),U(s)), and, consequently, handles an extended PDF p(t; y(p),V(p),V(s)) which is the solution of a dynamic PDF equation. For high-Reynolds-number fluid flows, a typical formulation of the latter category relies on a Langevin model for the trajectories of the fluid seen or, conversely, on a Fokker-Planck equation for the extended PDF. In the present work, a new derivation of the kinetic PDF equation is worked out and new physical expressions of the dispersion tensors entering the kinetic PDF equation are obtained by starting from the extended PDF and integrating over the fluid seen. This demonstrates that, under the same assumption of a Gaussian colored noise and irrespective of the specific stochastic model chosen for the fluid seen, the kinetic PDF description is the marginal of a dynamic PDF one. However, a detailed analysis reveals that kinetic PDF models of particle dynamics in turbulent flows described by statistical correlations constitute incomplete stand-alone PDF descriptions and, moreover, that present kinetic-PDF equations are mathematically ill posed. This is shown to be the consequence of the non-Markovian characteristic of the stochastic process retained to describe the system and the use of an external colored noise. Furthermore, developments bring out that well-posed PDF descriptions are essentially due to a proper choice of the variables selected to

  15. Diamagnetic boundary layers - A kinetic theory. [for collisionless magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory is presented for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma, such as those observed in the solar wind. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases are considered in which the magnetic-field intensity, direction, or both, changed across the layer. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii, and the field changed smoothly, although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. These results are consistent with observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  16. The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) description and test program. [electrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma interaction experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the LANDSAT-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  17. Hydrodynamic description of an unmagnetized plasma with multiple ion species. II. Two and three ion species plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Molvig, Kim

    2016-03-17

    Paper I [A. N. Simakov and K. Molvig, Phys. Plasmas23, 032115 (2016)] obtained a fluid description for an unmagnetized collisional plasma with multiple ion species. To evaluate collisional plasmatransport fluxes, required for such a description, two linear systems of equations need to be solved to obtain corresponding transport coefficients. In general, this should be done numerically. Herein, the general formalism is used to obtain analytical expressions for such fluxes for several specific cases of interest: a deuterium-tritium plasma; a plasma containing two ion species with strongly disparate masses, which agrees with previously obtained results; and a three ion species plasma made of deuterium, tritium, and gold. We find that these results can be used for understanding the behavior of the aforementioned plasmas, or for verifying a code implementation of the general multi-ion formalism.

  18. Electrical and kinetic model of an atmospheric rf device for plasma aerodynamics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pinheiro, Mario J.; Martins, Alexandre A.

    2010-08-15

    The asymmetrically mounted flat plasma actuator is investigated using a self-consistent two-dimensional fluid model at atmospheric pressure. The computational model assumes the drift-diffusion approximation and uses a simple plasma kinetic model. It investigated the electrical and kinetic properties of the plasma, calculated the charged species concentrations, surface charge density, electrohydrodynamic forces, and gas speed. The present computational model contributes to understand the main physical mechanisms, and suggests ways to improve its performance.

  19. Construction of reduced transport model by gyro-kinetic simulation with kinetic electrons in helical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Nakata, M.; Nunami, M.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.

    2016-10-01

    A reduced model of the turbulent ion heat diffusivity is proposed by the gyrokinetic simulation code (GKV-X) with the adiabatic electrons for the high-Ti Large Helical Device discharge. The plasma parameter region of the short poloidal wavelength is studied, where the ion temperature gradient mode becomes unstable. The ion heat diffusivity by the nonlinear simulation with the kinetic electrons is found to be several times larger than the simulation results using the adiabatic electrons in the radial region 0.46 <= r / a <= 0.80 . The electromagnetic contribution is about a several percent in the ion energy flux. The model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation and the squared zonal flow potential. Next, the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation is approximated with the mixing length estimate. The squared zonal flow potential fluctuation is shown as the linear zonal flow response function. The reduced model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the physical parameters by the linear GKV-X simulation with the kinetic electrons. This reduced model is applied to the transport code with the same procedure as.

  20. Hydrodynamic description of an unmagnetized plasma with multiple ion species. II. Two and three ion species plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Molvig, Kim

    2016-03-17

    Paper I [A. N. Simakov and K. Molvig, Phys. Plasmas23, 032115 (2016)] obtained a fluid description for an unmagnetized collisional plasma with multiple ion species. To evaluate collisional plasmatransport fluxes, required for such a description, two linear systems of equations need to be solved to obtain corresponding transport coefficients. In general, this should be done numerically. Herein, the general formalism is used to obtain analytical expressions for such fluxes for several specific cases of interest: a deuterium-tritium plasma; a plasma containing two ion species with strongly disparate masses, which agrees with previously obtained results; and a three ion species plasmamore » made of deuterium, tritium, and gold. We find that these results can be used for understanding the behavior of the aforementioned plasmas, or for verifying a code implementation of the general multi-ion formalism.« less

  1. Coupling Kinetic and Hydrodynamic Models for Simulations of Gas Flows and Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Arslanbekov, R. R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents adaptive kinetic/fluid models for simulations of gases and weakly ionized plasmas. We first describe a Unified Flow Solver (UFS), which combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement with automatic selection of kinetic or hydrodynamic models for different parts of flows. This Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) technique limits expensive atomistic-scale solutions only to the regions where they are needed. We present examples of plasma simulations with fluid models and describe kinetic solvers for electrons which are currently being incorporated into AMAR techniques for plasma simulations.

  2. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  3. Effects of Kinetic Processes in Shaping Io's Global Plasma Environment: A 3D Hybrid Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Combi, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter s corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io. Stationary simulations of this problem have already been done using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the electrodynamics approaches. One of the major results of recent simplified two-fluid model simulations [Saur, J., Neubauer, F.M., Strobel, D.F., Summers, M.E., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (SMP5), 1-18] was the production of the structure of the double-peak in the magnetic field signature of the Io flyby. These could not be explained before by standard MHD models. In this paper, we present a hybrid simulation for Io with kinetic ions and fluid electrons. This method employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas for ions a particle approach is used. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. Our model may provide a much more accurate description for the ion dynamics than previous approaches and allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. The first results of such a simulation of the dynamics of ions in Io s environment are discussed in this paper. Comparison with the Galileo IO flyby results shows that this approach provides an accurate physical basis for the interaction and can therefore naturally reproduce all the observed salient features.

  4. Effects of dust particles in plasma kinetics: Ion dynamics time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, U. de; Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.

    2012-07-15

    The self-consistent kinetic theory of dusty plasmas [V. N. Tsytovich and U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1093 (1999)] is extended to frequency regimes relevant for ion dynamics, accounting for both constant and fluctuating plasma sources. In contrast to earlier models, binary plasma collisions are no longer neglected with respect to collisions with dust; hence, the model developed here is also valid for low dust densities. Expressions are found for the system's permittivity, the ion collision integral, and the spectral densities of ion density fluctuations. The structure of the ion kinetic equation is analyzed, and applications of the model for both astrophysical and laboratory environments are discussed.

  5. Effect of antenna size on electron kinetics in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-10-15

    Spatially resolved measurements of electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are investigated in inductively coupled plasmas with two planar antenna coils. When the plasma is sustained by the antenna with a diameter of 18 cm, the nonlocal kinetics is preserved in the argon gas pressure range from 2 mTorr to 20 mTorr. However, electron kinetics transit from nonlocal kinetics to local kinetics in discharge sustained by the antenna coil with diameter 34 cm. The results suggest that antenna size as well as chamber length are important parameters for the transition of the electron kinetics. Spatial variations of plasma potential, effective electron temperature, and EEDF in terms of total electron energy scale are also presented.

  6. Jupiter's Magnetosphere: Plasma Description from the Ulysses Flyby.

    PubMed

    Bame, S J; Barraclough, B L; Feldman, W C; Gisler, G R; Gosling, J T; McComas, D J; Phillips, J L; Thomsen, M F; Goldstein, B E; Neugebauer, M

    1992-09-11

    Plasma observations at Jupiter show that the outer regions of the Jovian magnetosphere are remarkably similar to those of Earth. Bow-shock precursor electrons and ions were detected in the upstream solar wind, as at Earth. Plasma changes across the bow shock and properties of the magnetosheath electrons were much like those at Earth, indicating that similar processes are operating. A boundary layer populated by a varying mixture of solar wind and magnetospheric plasmas was found inside the magnetopause, again as at Earth. In the middle magnetosphere, large electron density excursions were detected with a 10-hour periodicity as planetary rotation carried the tilted plasma sheet past Ulysses. Deep in the magnetosphere, Ulysses crossed a region, tentatively described as magnetically connected to the Jovian polar cap on one end and to the interplanetary magnetic field on the other. In the inner magnetosphere and lo torus, where corotation plays a dominant role, measurements could not be made because of extreme background rates from penetrating radiation belt particles.

  7. Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows Briefers: Andrew Ketsdever Sergey Gimelshein PIs: Andrew Ketsdever...number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling ...magnetic field in opposite direction of applied field Extreme pressure tends to drive plasma out of discharge chamber Difficulties in modeling FRCs High

  8. Towards adaptive kinetic-fluid simulations of low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of new types of gaseous electronics in multi-phase systems calls for computational tools with adaptive kinetic-fluid simulation capabilities. We will present an Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) methodology for multi-scale simulations of gas flows and discuss current efforts towards extending this methodology for weakly ionized plasmas. The AMAR method combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic selection of kinetic or fluid solvers in different parts of computational domains. This AMAR methodology was implemented in our Unified Flow Solver (UFS) for mixed rarefied and continuum flows. UFS uses discrete velocity method for solving Boltzmann kinetic equation under rarefied flow conditions coupled to fluid (Navier-Stokes) solvers for continuum flow regimes. The main challenge of extending AMAR to plasmas comes from the distinction of electron and atom mass. We will present multi-fluid, two-temperature plasma models with AMR capabilities for simulations of glow, corona, and streamer discharges. We will briefly discuss specifics of electron kinetics in collisional plasmas, and deterministic methods of solving kinetic equations for different electron groups. Kinetic solvers with Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) will be introduced to solve Boltzmann equation for electrons in the presence of electric fields, elastic and inelastic collisions with atoms. These kinetic and fluid models are currently being incorporated into AMAR methodology for multi-scale simulations of low-temperature plasmas in multi-phase systems. Supported by AFOSR, NASA, and DoE

  9. Complexity Reduction of Collisional-Radiative Kinetics for Atomic Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-23

    or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional...prohibitively large, making multidimensional and unsteady simulations of non- equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we...published online 23 December 2013) Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional

  10. Measurement of the kinetic dust temperature of a weakly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.; Thomas, Edward Jr.

    2007-06-15

    Measurements of the kinetic velocity space distribution function of 3.11 {mu}m diam melamine and 1.51 {mu}m diam silica particles in an argon dc glow discharge dusty plasma are made through the use of stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. These distribution functions are then used to determine the kinetic temperature of the dust component. These measurements show that the kinetic temperature of the dust component is significantly larger than the other plasma components (electrons, ions, and background neutrals)

  11. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The transition from reactive to kinetic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Particle simulation experiments were used to analyze the electron beam-plasma instability. It is shown that there is a transition from the reactive state of the electron beam-plasma instability to the kinetic instability of Langmuir waves. Quantitative tests, which include an evaluation of the dispersion relation for the evolving non-Maxwellian beam distribution, show that a quasi-linear theory describes the onset of this transition and applies again fully to the kinetic stage. This stage is practically identical to the late stage seen in simulations of plasma waves in the electron foreshock described by Dum (1990).

  12. Magnetic reconnection in multispecies plasmas investigated by a kinetic fluid code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Wang, Liang; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Hakim, Ammar; Huang, Yi-Min; Germaschewski, Kai

    2016-10-01

    We first study the reconnection process in multispecies plasmas by using Gkeyll, which is a kinetic fluid code solving the continuity, momentum and energy equations of each species, and the full Maxwell equations. Thus, there is no assumption by solving the generalized ohm's law in Gkeyll. We studied the reconnection processes in the plasma consisting of electrons, protons and oxygen ions. If time allows, we also plan to show some preliminary results of magnetic reconnection in dusty plasmas with negatively charged dust.

  13. Formation of collisionless shocks in magnetized plasma interaction with kinetic-scale obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, F.; Alves, E. P.; Bamford, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the formation of collisionless magnetized shocks triggered by the interaction between magnetized plasma flows and miniature-sized (order of plasma kinetic-scales) magnetic obstacles resorting to massively parallel, full particle-in-cell simulations, including the electron kinetics. The critical obstacle size to generate a compressed plasma region ahead of these objects is determined by independently varying the magnitude of the dipolar magnetic moment and the plasma magnetization. We find that the effective size of the obstacle depends on the relative orientation between the dipolar and plasma internal magnetic fields, and we show that this may be critical to form a shock in small-scale structures. We study the microphysics of the magnetopause in different magnetic field configurations in 2D and compare the results with full 3D simulations. Finally, we evaluate the parameter range where such miniature magnetized shocks can be explored in laboratory experiments.

  14. Kinetic theory of plasma equilibrium in an electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, L. M.; Gradov, O. M.; Ziunder, D.; Ramazashvili, R. R.

    1981-04-01

    The present study examines the equilibrium of a direct-current-carrying plasma in an electromagnetic field under the assumption that the particles escaping from the plasma have a Maxwellian distribution. It is shown that an equilibrium state is possible only in the case of a definite relationship between the amplitude of the incident wave and the concentration of escaping particles. Attention is given to spatial variations of the electromagnetic field, and of the plasma density and flow velocity. The application of these effects in microwave devices is discussed.

  15. Description of plasma focus current sheath as the Turner relaxed state of a Hall magnetofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2009-12-15

    The central mystery of plasma focus research is the two orders-of-magnitude-higher-than-thermal fusion reaction rate and the fact that both the space-resolved neutron spectra and space-resolved reaction proton spectra show features which can be ascribed only to a rotational motion of the center-of-mass of the reacting deuteron population. It has been suggested earlier [S. K. H. Auluck, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 25, 37 (1997)] that this and other experimental observations can be consistently explained in terms of a hypothesis involving rotation of the current carrying plasma annulus behind the imploding gas-dynamic shock. Such rotation (more generally, mass flow) is an in-built feature of relaxed state of a two-fluid plasma [R. N. Sudan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 1277 (1979)]. Relaxation in the 'Hall magnetofluid' approximation, in which the generalized Ohm's law includes the Hall effect term and the magnetic convection term but omits the contributions to the electric field from resistive dissipation, electron pressure gradient, thermoelectric effect, electron inertia, etc., has been extensively studied by many authors. In the present paper, Turner's [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 849 (1986)] degenerate solution for the relaxed state of the Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasma has been adapted to the case of an infinitely long annular current carrying plasma, a tractable idealization of the current sheath of a plasma focus. The resulting model is consistent with experimental values of ion kinetic energy and observation of predominantly radially directed neutron emission in good shots.

  16. Description of plasma focus current sheath as the Turner relaxed state of a Hall magnetofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2009-12-01

    The central mystery of plasma focus research is the two orders-of-magnitude-higher-than-thermal fusion reaction rate and the fact that both the space-resolved neutron spectra and space-resolved reaction proton spectra show features which can be ascribed only to a rotational motion of the center-of-mass of the reacting deuteron population. It has been suggested earlier [S. K. H. Auluck, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 25, 37 (1997)] that this and other experimental observations can be consistently explained in terms of a hypothesis involving rotation of the current carrying plasma annulus behind the imploding gas-dynamic shock. Such rotation (more generally, mass flow) is an in-built feature of relaxed state of a two-fluid plasma [R. N. Sudan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 1277 (1979)]. Relaxation in the "Hall magnetofluid" approximation, in which the generalized Ohm's law includes the Hall effect term and the magnetic convection term but omits the contributions to the electric field from resistive dissipation, electron pressure gradient, thermoelectric effect, electron inertia, etc., has been extensively studied by many authors. In the present paper, Turner's [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 849 (1986)] degenerate solution for the relaxed state of the Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasma has been adapted to the case of an infinitely long annular current carrying plasma, a tractable idealization of the current sheath of a plasma focus. The resulting model is consistent with experimental values of ion kinetic energy and observation of predominantly radially directed neutron emission in good shots.

  17. [Changes in Kinetics of Chemiluminescence of Plasma as a Measure of Systemic Oxidative Stress in Humans].

    PubMed

    Sozarukova, M M; Polimova, A M; Proskurnina, E V; Vladimirov, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathogenetic factor of many diseases. The control of its level is important for early diagnosis and therapy adjustment. In this work, antioxidant status was estimated in blood plasma. In the system of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride-luminol a set of chemiluminescence kinetic curve parameters is proposed for oxidative stress level estimation (the latent period τ(lat) and the increasing of analytical signal ΔI(CL)). Uric acid and albumin were shown as the main components that responsible for changes in chemiluminescence kinetic curve of plasma. Serum albumin undergoes oxidative modification in dose-depend manner under the action of UV irradiation, it causes the enhancement of antioxidant properties. Changes in plasma chemiluminescence kinetics are proposed as a measure of oxidative stress in human body.

  18. Kinetic instability of drift magnetosonic wave in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naim, H.; Bashir, M. F.; Vranjes, J.; Murtaza, G.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetic instability of the obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic wave for temperature anisotropic low beta plasmas is studied by using the gyro-kinetic model. The interplay between the temperature anisotropy and the density inhomogeneity free energy sources is discussed in order to provide stabilization of drift instability by the temperature anisotropy effect. It is shown that the anisotropy suppresses the growth rate when the anisotropy ratio A e , i ( = T ⊥ ( e , i ) / T ∥ ( e , i ) ) is greater than unity, whereas it enhances the growth rate for A e , i < 1 . Comparison of kinetic instability with reactive instability [Naim et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 102112 (2014)] and the scaling of growth time with the diffusion and the anisotropy relaxation times are presented. Additionally, the stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is also performed.

  19. The role of kinetic effects, including plasma rotation and energetic particles, in resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Betti, R.; Hu, B.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Manickam, J.; Podesta, M.

    2010-08-15

    The resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in high-beta tokamaks is stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and kinetic effects. Kinetic modification of ideal stability calculated with the 'MISK' code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)] is outlined. For an advanced scenario ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)] plasma, the present calculation finds that alpha particles are required for RWM stability at presently expected levels of plasma rotation. Kinetic stabilization theory is tested in an experiment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] that produced marginally stable plasmas with various energetic particle contents. Plasmas with the highest and lowest energetic particle content agree with calculations predicting that increased energetic particle pressure is stabilizing but does not alter the nonmonotonic dependence of stability on plasma rotation due to thermal particle resonances. Presently, the full MISK model, including thermal particles and an isotropic slowing-down distribution function for energetic particles, overpredicts stability in NSTX experiments. Minor alteration of either effect in the theory may yield agreement; several possibilities are discussed.

  20. Closure of a kinetic model of plasma in strong turbulence by relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    A Fokker-Planck kinetic equation for a turbulent plasma is derived by a repeated cascade decomposition. Calculation of the propagator and the kinetic equation determine the transport coefficients (diffusivity and turbulent viscosity) by means of a closure based on a relaxation procedure governing the approach to equilibrium. The k to the minus third power spectral law is obtained, which governs the coupling between the velocity and the electrostatic field fluctuations.

  1. The Role of Kinetic Effects, Including Plasma Rotation and Energetic Particles, in Resistive Wall Mode Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, John W.

    2009-11-01

    Continuous, disruption-free operation of tokamaks requires stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM). Theoretically, the RWM is thought to be stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and other parameters, with kinetic effects being emphasized.footnotetextB. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 057301. Experiments in NSTX show that the RWM can be destabilized in high rotation plasmas while low rotation plasmas can be stable, which calls into question the concept of a simple critical plasma rotation threshold for stability. The present work tests theoretical stabilization mechanisms against experimental discharges with various plasma rotation profiles created by applying non-resonant n=3 braking, and with various fast particle fractions. Kinetic modification of ideal stability is calculated with the MISK code, using experimental equilibrium reconstructions. Analysis of NSTX discharges with unstable RWMs predicts near-marginal mode growth rates. Trapped ions provide the dominant kinetic resonances, while fast particles contribute an important stabilizing effect. Increasing or decreasing rotation in the calculation drives the prediction farther from the marginal point, showing that unlike simpler critical rotation theories, kinetic theory allows a more complex relationship between plasma rotation and RWM stability. Results from JT-60U show that energetic particle modes can trigger RWMsfootnotetextG. Matsunaga et al., IAEA FEC 2008 Paper EX/5-2.. Kinetic theory may explain how fast particle loss can trigger RWMs through the loss of an important stabilization mechanism. These results are applied to ITER advanced scenario equilibria to determine the impact on RWM stability.

  2. Kinetic measurements are necessary for description of brain receptors with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, M.; Me, R.

    1984-01-01

    Following injection of radiolabeled spiperone a brain PET image demonstrates a distribution of tracer similar to the known distribution of dopamine receptors. However, the usefulness of a single PET image to quantitate receptor density can be limited by the effect of local blood flow (CBF), brain permeability (P), forward receptor rate constant (k1), and the reverse receptor rate constant (k-1). Using a 3-compartment model that the authors have described and successfully employed to interpret brain receptor kinetics with PET, the authors have simulated the effect of changes in the above variables on the image contrast (IC) between receptor-containing tissue (T), and receptor-free tissue like cerebellum (C), expressing this contrast as (T-C)/C. The blood activity curve and initial values for the variables were taken from their in vivo PET work in baboons using 18-F-spiperone. The model shows IC increases directly with time, not reaching 90% of maximum until over 3 hours. Thus, the timing of a single PET scan is critical for reproducible results. While the effect of changes in CBF are very small, changes in P, k1 and k-1 at 60 minutes, and k1 and k-1 at 120 minutes result in substantial changes in the observed IC. Until more is known about the behavior of these variables reliable description of brain receptors requires dynamic PET data from sequential images, analyzed by an appropriate mathematical model.

  3. Adsorption kinetics of organophosphonic acids on plasma-modified oxide-covered aluminum surfaces.

    PubMed

    Giza, M; Thissen, P; Grundmeier, G

    2008-08-19

    Tailoring of oxide chemistry on aluminum by means of low-pressure water and argon plasma surface modification was performed to influence the kinetics of the self-assembly process of octadecylphosphonic acid monolayers. The plasma-induced surface chemistry was studied by in situ FTIR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Ex situ IRRAS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of the adsorbed self-assembled monolayers. The plasma-induced variation of the hydroxide to oxide ratio led to different adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid from dilute ethanol solutions as measured by means of a quartz crystal microbalance. Water plasma treatment caused a significant increase in the density of surface hydroxyl groups in comparison to that of the argon-plasma-treated surface. The hydroxyl-rich surface led to significantly accelerated adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid with a time of monolayer formation of less than 1 min. On the contrary, decreasing the surface hydroxyl density slowed the adsorption kinetics.

  4. Kinetic Dispersion of the Langmuir Decay Instability and its Relevance for Ignition Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Divol, L.; Michel, P.; Williams, E. A.; Strozzi, D.

    2008-11-01

    In indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, laser pulses must propagate through several millimeters of plasma to reach the hohlraum wall. During propagation, the pulse can drive large amplitude electron plasma waves (EPW) via Raman scattering. EPWs can severely inhibit the conversion of pulse energy to x-rays at the hohlraum wall through pump depletion and backscatter of the light. In addition, large amplitude EPWs can heat the plasma through particle trapping and wave breaking, which may result in preheat of the ignition fuel. The Langmuir decay instability (LDI), where a large amplitude EPW decays into a secondary EPW and an ion acoustic wave (IAW), may provide a saturation mechanism for the growth of EPWs, and thus limit both backscatter and plasma heating. Here we calculate a fully kinetic dispersion relation for LDI and compare it to the standard fluid dispersion relation. We find that to lowest order in primary EPW amplitude the kinetic dispersion relation predicts phenomena not captured by fluid dispersion. The kinetic dispersion does, however, reproduce the fluid dispersion for small kλd, where k is the wave number for the incident EPW, and λd is the Debye length. The relevance of kinetic dispersive effects for ignition plasmas is also presented.

  5. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Diego M.; Cañizal, Ana M.; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B.; Benetucci, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease. PMID:24470944

  6. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Diego M; Cañizal, Ana M; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B; Benetucci, Jorge A

    2012-04-27

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease.

  7. Quartz crystal microbalance for the cardiac markers/antibodies binding kinetic measurements in the plasma samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, L. E.; Shumyantseva, V. V.; Archakov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was exploited for cardiac markers detection and kinetic studies of immunochemical reaction of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and human heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) with the corresponding monoclonal antibodies in undiluted plasma (serum) and standard solutions. The QCM technique allowed to dynamically monitor the kinetic differences in specific interactions and nonspecific sorption, without multiple labeling procedures and separation steps. The affinity binding process was characterized by the association (ka) and the dissociation (kd) kinetic constants and the equilibrium association (K) constant, all of which were obtained from experimental data.

  8. Electrical description of N2 capacitively coupled plasmas with the global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ming-Lu; Lu, Yi-Jia; Cheng, Jia; Ji, Lin-Hong; Engineering Design Team

    2016-10-01

    N2 discharges in a commercial capacitively coupled plasma reactor are modelled by a combination of an equivalent circuit and the global model, for a range of gas pressure at 1 4 Torr. The ohmic and inductive plasma bulk and the capacitive sheath are represented as LCR elements, with electrical characteristics determined by plasma parameters. The electron density and electron temperature are obtained from the global model in which a Maxwellian electron distribution is assumed. Voltages and currents are recorded by a VI probe installed after the match network. Using the measured voltage as an input, the current flowing through the discharge volume is calculated from the electrical model and shows excellent agreement with the measurements. The experimentally verified electrical model provides a simple and accurate description for the relationship between the external electrical parameters and the plasma properties, which can serve as a guideline for process window planning in industrial applications.

  9. Kinetic dissipation and anisotropic heating in a turbulent collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2009-03-15

    The kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. At large length scales, the evolution of the hybrid simulations is very similar to MHD, with magnetic power spectra displaying scaling similar to a Kolmogorov scaling of -5/3. At small scales, differences from MHD arise, as energy dissipates into heat almost exclusively through the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum of the hybrid simulation shows a break where linear theory predicts that the Hall term in Ohm's law becomes significant, leading to dispersive kinetic Alfven waves. A key result is that protons are heated preferentially in the plane perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, creating a proton temperature anisotropy of the type observed in the corona and solar wind.

  10. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasma transport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalous radial transport.

  11. Kinetic theory of transverse plasmons in pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Q.; Liu, Y.

    2011-04-01

    A set of nonlinear governing equations for interactions of transverse plasmons with pair plasmas is derived from Vlasov-Maxwell equations. It is shown the ponderomotive force induced by high-frequency transverse plasmons will expel the pair particles away, resulting in the formation of density cavity in which transverse plasmons are trapped. Numerical results show the envelope of wave fields will collapse and break into a filamentary structure due to the spatially inhomogeneous growth rate. The results obtained would be useful for understanding the nonlinear propagation behavior of intense electromagnetic waves in pair plasmas.

  12. Solar wind kinetic instabilities at small plasma betas

    SciTech Connect

    Ibscher, D. Schlickeiser, R.

    2014-02-15

    The ordinary perpendicular mode of drifting bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distributions with and without temperature anisotropy can provide aperiodic instabilities. These instabilities occur if the perpendicular thermal energy is much smaller than the streaming energy. This provides instabilities at small parallel plasma betas β{sub ∥}<1 and temperature anisotropies A < 1. In this regime, the solar wind is unstable, which cannot be explained so far. To clarify if the ordinary perpendicular mode can be responsible for this instability, here we compare measurements in the solar wind with the instability provided by this mode.

  13. Analytical solution of the kinetic equation for a uniform plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D.

    2010-07-15

    The kinetic equation for a single-component uniform plasma in a magnetic field is analytically solved by the moment method. The linear system of ordinary differential equations for the moments is decomposed into subsystems of lower dimensions by a geometric method. The eigensystem of each subsystem shows that parallel moments decay monotonically, but perpendicular lth harmonic moments decay while oscillating with the l,l-2,...,-th harmonics of gyrofrequency. A generalization to a multicomponent plasma is discussed.

  14. Analytical solution of the kinetic equation for a uniform plasma in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D

    2010-07-01

    The kinetic equation for a single-component uniform plasma in a magnetic field is analytically solved by the moment method. The linear system of ordinary differential equations for the moments is decomposed into subsystems of lower dimensions by a geometric method. The eigensystem of each subsystem shows that parallel moments decay monotonically, but perpendicular lth harmonic moments decay while oscillating with the l,l-2,… ,-th harmonics of gyrofrequency. A generalization to a multicomponent plasma is discussed.

  15. Nonlocal, kinetic stimulated Raman scattering in nonuniform plasmas: Averaged variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, P.; Friedland, L.; Shagalov, A. G.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2012-07-15

    Excitation of continuously phase-locked (autoresonant) plasma waves in a nonuniform plasma via stimulated Raman backscattering is analyzed with a focus on the kinetic regime (k{lambda}{sub D}{approx}1). The dominant nonlinear effect in this regime is that of resonant particles, and the plasma wave excitation is a nonlocal process involving formation and transport of the electron phase space holes. Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied in studying the coupled plasma, laser pump, and seed waves dynamics. A flat-top electron velocity distribution is used as the simplest model allowing a variational formulation within the water bag theory. The corresponding Lagrangian, averaged over the fast phase variable, yields evolution equations for the slow field variables. The adiabatic multiple water bag extension of the theory for application to autoresonant plasma waves in nonuniform plasmas with more realistic initial distributions is also discussed. Numerical solutions of the system of slow variational equations are compared with Vlasov-Ampere simulations.

  16. On the existence of a holographic description of the LHC quark-gluon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett; Ong, Yen Chin

    2017-04-01

    Peripheral collisions of heavy ions can give rise to extremely intense magnetic fields. It has been suggested that these fields might invalidate the holographic description of the corresponding quark-gluon plasmas, assuming that these can be modelled by strongly coupled field theories. In the case of the plasmas produced in collisions at the RHIC facility (including in the beam energy scans), it is known how to deal with this problem: one has to take into account the large angular momenta generated in these plasmas, and the effects of the baryonic chemical potential. But this does not work for the plasmas produced in peripheral collisions at the LHC. However, these results neglect some (less significant) aspects of bulk physics; could it be that the problem is resolved by taking into account these lower-order effects? Here we use a bulk dilatonic field (fully compatible with boundary data, as well as with the asymptotically AdS character of the bulk geometry) as a model of these effects, and show that this is unlikely to be the solution. Thus, the existence of a consistent holographic description of the most extreme LHC plasmas remains open to question.

  17. Kinetic and fluid descriptions of charged particle swarms in gases and nonpolar fluids: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujko, Sasa

    2016-09-01

    In this work we review the progress achieved over the last few decades in the fundamental kinetic theory of charged particle swarms with the focus on numerical techniques for the solution of Boltzmann's equation for electrons, as well as on the development of fluid models. We present a time-dependent multi term solution of Boltzmann's equation valid for electrons and positrons in varying configurations of electric and magnetic fields. The capacity of a theory and associated computer code will be illustrated by considering the heating mechanisms for electrons in radio-frequency electric and magnetic fields in a collision-dominated regime under conditions when electron transport is greatly affected by non-conservative collisions. The kinetic theory for solving the Boltzmann equation will be followed by a fluid equation description of charged particle swarms in both the hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic regimes, highlighting (i) the utility of momentum transfer theory for evaluating collisional terms in the balance equations and (ii) closure assumptions and approximations. The applications of this theory are split into three sections. First, we will present our 1.5D model of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) which are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments. The model is employed to study the avalanche to streamer transition in RPCs under the influence of space charge effects and photoionization. Second, we will discuss our high-order fluid model for streamer discharges. Particular emphases will be placed on the correct implementation of transport data in streamer models as well as on the evaluation of the mean-energy-dependent collision rates for electrons required as an input in the high-order fluid model. In the last segment of this work, we will present our model to study the avalanche to streamer transition in non-polar fluids. Using a Monte Carlo simulation technique we have calculated transport coefficients for electrons in

  18. Test-particle method in kinetic theory of a plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, K.

    1971-01-01

    The introduction of a test particle into a system is considered. The system may be described by the Born-Bogoliubov-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. The field particles form a cloud which surrounds the test particle. The cloud is described by a conditional probability function which satisfies a certain equation. A generalization of the superposition principle reported by Rostoker (1964) to higher order correlation functions is discussed. Kinetic equations with the generalized Lenard-Balescu term are obtained, taking into account also diffusion by waves. The characteristics regarding the absorption or emission of waves by particles can be calculated.

  19. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  20. Kinetics of plasma electrons in static and rf fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Y.A.; Lebedev, Y.A.; Polak, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the frequency of the field producing a plasma on the isotropic part of the electron energy distribution is analyzed. Analytic solutions of the Boltzmann equation are derived for high-energy tail of the electron energy distribution for static and rf fields. The results show that the shape of the tail of the distribution can be effectively controlled by changing the ratio of the field frequency to the effective frequency with which electrons collide with heavy particles and by choosing the appropriate dependence of the cross section for elastic scattering of electrons by heavy particles on the electron energy (by appropriate choice of the gas from which the plasma is formed). These results agree with experimental results in the literature.

  1. Kinetic simulation of plasma flows in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Rasmussen, Craig E.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Khazanov, Georgi V.; Winske, Dan

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid particle code is used to study the interactions between upflowing thermal ions from conjugate ionospheres. The simulation model allows for multiple species, convection of plasmaspheric flux tubes, and Coulomb self-collisions which conserve momentum and energy locally. The model incorporates a variable-flux boundary condition where the flux, at the boundaries, approaches zero as the plasmasphere fills and equilibrium conditions are reached. The effects of two important processes on plasmaspheric refilling have been considered. The first includes convection of the plasmaspheric flux tube. The second is the interaction of ionospheric thermal plasma and particle injection from an external source. Particle injection seems to play an important role in the evolution of the total particle distribution on the early timescales (t less than 1 hour); however, for late timescales (t larger than 8 days) the thermal plasma from the ionosphere dominates the particle distribution.

  2. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Welch, D.; Ellsworth, J.; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  3. Thermal ablation of plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak disruptions: Sensitivity to particle kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-02-01

    Ablation damage to solid targets with high heat flux impulses is generally greater high-energy electron beam heat sources compared to low-energy plasma guns. This sensitivity to incoming particle kinetic energy is explored with computer modelling; a fast-running routine (DESIRE) is developed for initial scoping analysis and is found to be in reasonable agreement with several experiments on graphite and tungsten targets. If tokamak disruptions are characterized by particle energies less than {approximately}1 keV, then we expect plasma guns are a better analogue than electron beams for simulating disruption behavior and testing candidate plasma-facing materials.

  4. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  5. Kinetics in Gas Mixtures for Problem of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    exothermal chemical hydrocarbon oxidation process, and (iii) subsequent thermal ignition. The role of gas temperature increase in the experiments on...the nonequilibrium plasma, (ii) chemical reactions of hydrocarbon oxidation with participa- tion of O atoms and gas heating due to net exothermal ...autoignition) the ignition delay de- pends upon the rate of the dissociation reaction which is endothermic . Generally the induction delay time is greatly

  6. High-order continuum kinetic method for modeling plasma dynamics in phase space

    DOE PAGES

    Vogman, G. V.; Colella, P.; Shumlak, U.

    2014-12-15

    Continuum methods offer a high-fidelity means of simulating plasma kinetics. While computationally intensive, these methods are advantageous because they can be cast in conservation-law form, are not susceptible to noise, and can be implemented using high-order numerical methods. Advances in continuum method capabilities for modeling kinetic phenomena in plasmas require the development of validation tools in higher dimensional phase space and an ability to handle non-cartesian geometries. To that end, a new benchmark for validating Vlasov-Poisson simulations in 3D (x,vx,vy) is presented. The benchmark is based on the Dory-Guest-Harris instability and is successfully used to validate a continuum finite volumemore » algorithm. To address challenges associated with non-cartesian geometries, unique features of cylindrical phase space coordinates are described. Preliminary results of continuum kinetic simulations in 4D (r,z,vr,vz) phase space are presented.« less

  7. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  8. Transition from gas to plasma kinetic equilibria in gravitating axisymmetric structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2014-04-15

    The problem of the transition from gas to plasma in gravitating axisymmetric structures is addressed under the assumption of having initial and final states realized by kinetic Maxwellian-like equilibria. In astrophysics, the theory applies to accretion-disc scenarios around compact objects. A formulation based on non-relativistic kinetic theory for collisionless systems is adopted. Equilibrium solutions for the kinetic distribution functions describing the initial neutral matter and the resulting plasma state are constructed in terms of single-particle invariants and expressed by generalized Maxwellian distributions. The final plasma configuration is related to the initial gas distribution by the introduction of appropriate functional constraints. Qualitative aspects of the solution are investigated and physical properties of the system are pointed out. In particular, the admitted functional dependences of the fluid fields carried by the corresponding equilibrium distributions are determined. Then, the plasma is proved to violate the condition of quasi-neutrality, implying a net charge separation between ions and electrons. This result is shown to be independent of the precise realization of the plasma distribution function, while a physical mechanism able to support a non-neutral equilibrium state is proposed.

  9. One-dimensional hybrid-direct kinetic simulation of the discharge plasma in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain D.; Kolobov, Vladimir I.

    2012-11-15

    In order to model the non-equilibrium plasma within the discharge region of a Hall thruster, the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) must be obtained accurately. A direct kinetic (DK) simulation method that directly solves the plasma Boltzmann equation can achieve better resolution of VDFs in comparison to particle simulations, such as the particle-in-cell (PIC) method that inherently include statistical noise. In this paper, a one-dimensional hybrid-DK simulation, which uses a DK simulation for heavy species and a fluid model for electrons, is developed and compared to a hybrid-PIC simulation. Time-averaged results obtained from the hybrid-DK simulation are in good agreement with hybrid-PIC results and experimental data. It is shown from a comparison of using a kinetic simulation and solving the continuity equation that modeling of the neutral atoms plays an important role for simulations of the Hall thruster discharge plasma. In addition, low and high frequency plasma oscillations are observed. Although the kinetic nature of electrons is not resolved due to the use of a fluid model, the hybrid-DK model provides spatially and temporally well-resolved plasma properties and an improved resolution of VDFs for heavy species with less statistical noise in comparison to the hybrid-PIC method.

  10. A kinetic model of the plasma flow at the magnetic z-pinch and the plasmoid structure. Part 2 (in English)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubes, P.; Prykarpatsky, A. K.; Zagrodzinski, J.; Prykarpatsky, Y. A.

    In this article we will follow the approach developed in articles N.~N.~Bogoliubov, V.~Hr.~Samoilenko, Ukr. Fiz. Zh., 37, 147 (1992); J.~Gibbon, Physica D, 3, 503 (1981) using modern Lie--algebraic and symplectic geometry methods. It is devoted to the description of Boltzman--Vlasov type kinetic equations and some two--dimensional hydrodynamic Benney type flows associated with them. In our case of the cylindrical symmetry taking place at the interrupted magnetic z--pinch in plasma we used intensively the corresponding two--dimensionality of the plasma flow under consideration which made it possible to build a kinetic model of the plasmoid vortex structure with a conserved number of linkages of vortex lines. The latter can be used to explain the observed earlier stability of the plasmoid structure at the magnetic z--pinch.

  11. Kinetic theory of a two-dimensional magnetized plasma. II - Balescu-Lenard limit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahala, G.

    1972-01-01

    The kinetic theory of a two-dimensional one-species plasma in a uniform dc magnetic field is investigated in the small plasma parameter limit. The plasma consists of charged rods interacting through the logarithmic Coulomb potential. Vahala and Montgomery earlier (1971) derived a Fokker-Planck equation for this system, but it contained a divergent integral, which had to be cut off on physical grounds. This cutoff is compared to the standard cutoff introduced in the two-dimensional unmagnetized Fokker-Planck equation. In the small plasma parameter limit, it is shown that the Balescu-Lenard collision term is zero in the long time average limit if only two-body interactions are considered. The energy transfer from a test particle to an equilibrium plasma is discussed and is also shown to be zero in the long time average limit. This supports the unexpected result of zero Balescu-Lenard collision term.

  12. Kinetic Alfven solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Panwar, A. E-mail: ryu201@postech.ac.kr Ryu, C. M. E-mail: ryu201@postech.ac.kr; Bains, A. S. E-mail: ryu201@postech.ac.kr

    2015-09-15

    A study of the ion Larmor radius effects on the solitary kinetic Alfven waves (SKAWs) in a magnetized plasma with superthermal electrons is presented by employing the kinetic theory. The linear dispersion relation of SKAW is shown to depend on the superthermal parameter κ, ion to electron temperature ratio, and the angle of wave propagation. Using the Sagdeev potential approach, the energy balance equation has been derived to study the dynamics of SKAWs. The effects of various plasma parameters are investigated for the propagation of SKAWs. It is shown that only compressive solitons can exist and in the Maxwellian limit our results are in good agreement with previous studies. Further, the characteristics of small amplitude SKAWs are investigated. Present study could be useful for the understanding of SKAWs in a low β plasma in astrophysical environment, where particle distributions are superthermal in nature.

  13. Ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves in two temperature electrons superthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Nimardeep; Saini, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation properties of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén (IAKA) solitary and rogue waves have been investigated in two temperature electrons magnetized superthermal plasma in the presence of dust impurity. A nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) describing the evolution of solitary waves. The effect of various plasma parameters on the characteristics of the IAKA solitary waves is studied. The dynamics of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (IAKARWs) are also studied by transforming the KdV equation into nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The characteristics of rogue wave profile under the influence of various plasma parameters (κc, μc, σ , θ) are examined numerically by using the data of Saturn's magnetosphere (Schippers et al. 2008; Sakai et al. 2013).

  14. Kinetic shear Alfvén instability in the presence of impurity ions in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Gaimin; Shen, Y.; Xie, T.; He, Zhixiong; He, Hongda; Qi, Longyu; Cui, Shaoyan

    2013-10-15

    The effects of impurity ions on the kinetic shear Alfvén (KSA) instability in tokamak plasmas are investigated by numerically solving the integral equations for the KSA eigenmode in the toroidal geometry. The kinetic effects of hydrogen and impurity ions, including transit motion, finite ion Larmor radius, and finite-orbit-width, are taken into account. Toroidicity induced linear mode coupling is included through the ballooning-mode representation. Here, the effects of carbon, oxygen, and tungsten ions on the KSA instability in toroidal plasmas are investigated. It is found that, depending on the concentration and density profile of the impurity ions, the latter can be either stabilizing or destabilizing for the KSA modes. The results here confirm the importance of impurity ions in tokamak experiments and should be useful for analyzing experimental data as well as for understanding anomalous transport and control of tokamak plasmas.

  15. Theoretical studies on kinetics of singlet oxygen in nonthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Mikhail P.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Kotkov, Andrei A.; Kochetov, Igor V.; Napartovich, Anatolii P.; Podmarkov, Yurii P.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitrii V.; Vagin, Nikolai P.; Yuryshev, Nikolay N.

    2004-09-01

    An idea to replace singlet delta oxygen (SDO) generator working with wet chemistry by electric discharge generator has got much attention last years. Different kinds of discharge were examined for this purpose, but without a great success. The existing theoretical models are not validated by well-characterized experimental data. To describe complicated kinetics in gas discharge with oxygen one needs to know in detail processes involving numerous electronic excited oxygen molecules and atoms. To gain new knowledge about these processes experimental studies were made on electric discharge properties in gas mixture flow with independent control of inlet SDO concentration. The theoretical model extended to include minor additives like oxygen atoms, water molecules, ozone was developed. Comparison with careful experimental measurements of electric characteristics along with gas composition allows us to verify the model and make theoretical predictions more reliable. Results of numerical simulations using this model for an electron-beam sustained discharge are reported and compared with the experimental data.

  16. Orszag Tang vortex - Kinetic study of a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Servidio, S.; Shay, M. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Cassak, P. A.

    2010-03-25

    Kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations based on particle in cell ions and fluid electrons. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. An earlier study estimated the dissipation in the system. A comparison of MHD and hybrid simulations showed similar behavior at large scales but substantial differences at small scales. The hybrid magnetic energy spectrum shows a break at the scale where Hall term in the Ohm's law becomes important. The protons heat perpendicularly and most of the energy is dissipated through magnetic interactions. Here, the space time structure of the system is studied using frequency-wavenumber (k-omega) decomposition. No clear resonances appear, ruling out the cyclotron resonances as a likely candidate for the perpendicular heating. The only distinguishable wave modes present, which constitute a small percentage of total energy, are magnetosonic modes.

  17. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; Hittinger, J.; Cohen, R.

    2016-03-10

    In this study, the first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasmatransport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalous radial transport.

  18. New Combustion Regimes and Kinetic Studies of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    species: O, H, O2(a∆g) … Most combustors Disappear of the “S-curve” the classical S-curve . Can plasma assisted combustion enhances sublimit...species: O, H, O2(a∆g) … Most combustors Disappear of the “S-curve” the classical S-curve Ignition Extinction Hypothesis 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20...Ether (DME) Oxidation 23 Molecular beam P la sm a R e ac to r ex it R e ac ti o n p ro d u ct s 0.1-5 atm Quartz nozzle

  19. Nonlinear frequency shift of electrostatic waves in general collisionless plasma: Unifying theory of fluid and kinetic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Dodin, Ilya Y.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear frequency shift is derived in a transparent asymptotic form for intense Langmuir waves in general collisionless plasma. The formula describes both fluid and kinetic effects simultaneously. The fluid nonlinearity is expressed, for the first time, through the plasma dielectric function, and the kinetic nonlinearity accounts for both smooth distributions and trapped-particle beams. Various known limiting scalings are reproduced as special cases. The calculation avoids differential equations and can be extended straightforwardly to other nonlinear plasma waves.

  20. The kinetics of energetic O‑ ions in oxygen discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. A.; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2017-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was used to study the translational relaxation of energetic O‑ ions produced by dissociative electron attachment to O2 molecules in oxygen plasmas in a strong electric field. Initial O‑ ions have rather high energies and are more reactive than the ions reaching equilibrium with the electric field. Therefore, there is a noticeable probability that the energetic O‑ ions participate in endothermic reactions prior to energy relaxation of these ions. The probabilities of charge exchange, electron detachment and ion impact vibrational excitation of O2 molecules were calculated versus the reduced electric field. It was shown that up to 6% of energetic O‑ ions produced in oxygen by dissociative electron attachment to O2 molecules are rapidly transformed to {{{{O}}}2}- ions due to charge exchange collisions. The probability of electron detachment from energetic O‑ ions and the probability of vibrational excitation were smaller that the probability of charge exchange. Estimates showed that the increase in the effective rates of the ion–molecule reactions due to high reactivity of energetic O‑ ions can be important in oxygen plasmas for reduced electric fields of 50–100 Td.

  1. Hydrodynamic description of an unmagnetized plasma with multiple ion species. I. General formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Molvig, Kim

    2016-03-17

    A generalization of the Braginskii ion fluid description [S. I. Braginskii, Sov. Phys. JETP 6, 358 (1958)] to the case of an unmagnetized collisional plasma with multiple ion species is presented. An asymptotic expansion in the ion Knudsen number is used to derive the individual ion species continuity, as well as the total ion mass density, momentum, and energy evolution equations accurate through the second order. Expressions for the individual ion species drift velocities with respect to the center of mass reference frame, as well as for the total ion heat flux and viscosity, which are required to close the fluid equations, are evaluated in terms of the first-order corrections to the lowest order Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions. A variational formulation for evaluating such corrections and its relation to the plasma entropy are presented. Employing trial functions for the corrections, written in terms of expansions in generalized Laguerre polynomials, and maximizing the resulting functionals produces two systems of linear equations (for “vector” and “tensor” portions of the corrections) for the expansion coefficients. A general matrix formulation of the linear systems as well as expressions for the resulting transport fluxes are presented in forms convenient for numerical implementation. The general formulation is employed in the companion paper [A. N. Simakov and K. Molvig, Hydrodynamic description of an unmagnetized plasma with multiple ion species. II. Two and three ion species plasmas, submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2015)] to evaluate the individual ion drift velocities and the total ion heat flux and viscosity for specific cases of two and three ion species plasmas.

  2. Hydrodynamic description of an unmagnetized plasma with multiple ion species. I. General formulation

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Molvig, Kim

    2016-03-17

    A generalization of the Braginskii ion fluid description [S. I. Braginskii, Sov. Phys. JETP 6, 358 (1958)] to the case of an unmagnetized collisional plasma with multiple ion species is presented. An asymptotic expansion in the ion Knudsen number is used to derive the individual ion species continuity, as well as the total ion mass density, momentum, and energy evolution equations accurate through the second order. Expressions for the individual ion species drift velocities with respect to the center of mass reference frame, as well as for the total ion heat flux and viscosity, which are required to close themore » fluid equations, are evaluated in terms of the first-order corrections to the lowest order Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions. A variational formulation for evaluating such corrections and its relation to the plasma entropy are presented. Employing trial functions for the corrections, written in terms of expansions in generalized Laguerre polynomials, and maximizing the resulting functionals produces two systems of linear equations (for “vector” and “tensor” portions of the corrections) for the expansion coefficients. A general matrix formulation of the linear systems as well as expressions for the resulting transport fluxes are presented in forms convenient for numerical implementation. The general formulation is employed in the companion paper [A. N. Simakov and K. Molvig, Hydrodynamic description of an unmagnetized plasma with multiple ion species. II. Two and three ion species plasmas, submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2015)] to evaluate the individual ion drift velocities and the total ion heat flux and viscosity for specific cases of two and three ion species plasmas.« less

  3. Electromagnetic fluctuations in magnetized plasmas. I. The rigorous relativistic kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2015-07-01

    Using the system of the Klimontovich and Maxwell equations, the general linear fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas is developed. General expressions for the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra (electric and magnetic fields) from uncorrelated plasma particles in plasmas with a uniform magnetic field are derived, which are covariantly correct within the theory of special relativity. The general fluctuation spectra hold for plasmas of arbitrary composition, arbitrary momentum dependences of the plasma particle distribution functions, and arbitrary orientations of the wave vector with respect to the uniform magnetic field. Moreover, no restrictions on the values of the real and the imaginary parts of the frequency are made. The derived fluctuation spectra apply to both non-collective fluctuations and collective plasma eigenmodes in magnetized plasmas. In the latter case, kinetic equations for the components of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in magnetized plasmas are derived that include the effect of spontaneous emission and absorption. In the limiting case of an unmagnetized plasmas, the general fluctuation spectra correctly reduce to the unmagnetized fluctuation spectra derived before.

  4. Electromagnetic fluctuations in magnetized plasmas. I. The rigorous relativistic kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R. E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu; Yoon, P. H. E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu

    2015-07-15

    Using the system of the Klimontovich and Maxwell equations, the general linear fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas is developed. General expressions for the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra (electric and magnetic fields) from uncorrelated plasma particles in plasmas with a uniform magnetic field are derived, which are covariantly correct within the theory of special relativity. The general fluctuation spectra hold for plasmas of arbitrary composition, arbitrary momentum dependences of the plasma particle distribution functions, and arbitrary orientations of the wave vector with respect to the uniform magnetic field. Moreover, no restrictions on the values of the real and the imaginary parts of the frequency are made. The derived fluctuation spectra apply to both non-collective fluctuations and collective plasma eigenmodes in magnetized plasmas. In the latter case, kinetic equations for the components of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in magnetized plasmas are derived that include the effect of spontaneous emission and absorption. In the limiting case of an unmagnetized plasmas, the general fluctuation spectra correctly reduce to the unmagnetized fluctuation spectra derived before.

  5. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    DOE PAGES

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; ...

    2016-03-10

    In this study, the first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasmatransport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalousmore » radial transport.« less

  6. Kinetic theory of a two-dimensional magnetized plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahala, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Several features of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a two-dimensional plasma in a uniform dc magnetic field are investigated. The charges are assumed to interact only through electrostatic potentials. The problem is considered both with and without the guiding-center approximation. With the guiding-center approximation, an appropriate Liouville equation and BBGKY hierarchy predict no approach to thermal equilibrium for the spatially uniform case. For the spatially nonuniform situation, a guiding-center Vlasov equation is discussed and solved in special cases. For the nonequilibrium, nonguiding-center case, a Boltzmann equation, and a Fokker-Planck equation are derived in the appropriate limits. The latter is more tractable than the former, and can be shown to obey conservation laws and an H-theorem, but contains a divergent integral which must be cut off on physical grounds. Several unsolved problems are posed.

  7. Arbitrary amplitude kinetic Alfven solitary waves in two temperature electron superthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Singh Saini, Nareshpal; Ghai, Yashika

    2016-07-01

    Through various satellite missions it is observed that superthermal velocity distribution for particles is more appropriate for describing space and astrophysical plasmas. So it is appropriate to use superthermal distribution, which in the limiting case when spectral index κ is very large ( i.e. κ→∞), shifts to Maxwellian distribution. Two temperature electron plasmas have been observed in auroral regions by FAST satellite mission, and also by GEOTAIL and POLAR satellite in the magnetosphere. Kinetic Alfven waves arise when finite Larmor radius effect modifies the dispersion relation or characteristic perpendicular wavelength is comparable to electron inertial length. We have studied the kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in a plasma comprising of positively charged ions, superthermal hot electrons and Maxwellian distributed cold electrons. Sagdeev pseudo-potential has been employed to derive an energy balance equation. The critical Mach number has been determined from the expression of Sagdeev pseudo-potential to see the existence of solitary structures. It is observed that sub-Alfvenic compressive solitons and super-Alfvenic rarefactive solitons exist in this plasma model. It is also observed that various parameters such as superthermality of hot electrons, relative concentration of cold and hot electron species, Mach number, plasma beta, ion to cold electron temperature ratio and ion to hot electron temperature ratio have significant effect on the amplitude and width of the KAWs. Findings of this investigation may be useful to understand the dynamics of coherent non-linear structures (i.e. KAWs) in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  8. Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in a superthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, N. S. Singh, Manpreet; Bains, A. S.

    2015-11-15

    Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) have been examined in a low-β dusty plasma comprising of negatively charged dust grains, superthermal electrons, and ions. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation has been derived using the reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of superthermality of charged particles (via κ), plasma β, obliqueness of propagation (θ), and dust concentration (via f) on the shape and size of the DKASWs have been examined. Only negative potential (rarefactive) structures are observed. Further, characteristics of dust kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (DKARWs), by deriving the non-linear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) from the KdV equation, are studied. Rational solutions of NLSE show that rogue wave envelopes are supported by this plasma model. It is observed that the influence of various plasma parameters (superthermality, plasma β, obliqueness, and dust concentration) on the characteristics of the DKARWs is very significant. This fundamental study may be helpful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures in space and astrophysical plasma environments where superthermal particles are present.

  9. Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in a superthermal dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, N. S.; Singh, Manpreet; Bains, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) have been examined in a low-β dusty plasma comprising of negatively charged dust grains, superthermal electrons, and ions. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation has been derived using the reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of superthermality of charged particles (via κ), plasma β, obliqueness of propagation (θ), and dust concentration (via f) on the shape and size of the DKASWs have been examined. Only negative potential (rarefactive) structures are observed. Further, characteristics of dust kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (DKARWs), by deriving the non-linear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) from the KdV equation, are studied. Rational solutions of NLSE show that rogue wave envelopes are supported by this plasma model. It is observed that the influence of various plasma parameters (superthermality, plasma β, obliqueness, and dust concentration) on the characteristics of the DKARWs is very significant. This fundamental study may be helpful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures in space and astrophysical plasma environments where superthermal particles are present.

  10. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  11. Distinctive features of kinetics of plasma at high specific energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, Nikita; Popov, Nikolay; Starikovskaia, Svetlana

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen at moderate pressures is used as an experimental tool for plasma kinetics studies at conditions of high specific deposited energy up to 1 eV/molecule. Experimental observations based on electrical (back current shunts, capacitive probe) and spectroscopic measurements (quenching rates; translational, rotational and vibrational temperature measurements) demonstrate that high specific deposited energy, at electric fields of 200-300 Td, can significantly change gas kinetics in the discharge and in the afterglow. The numerical calculations in 1D axially symmetric geometry using experimental data as input parameters show that changes in the plasma kinetics are caused by extremely high excitation degree: up to 10% of molecular nitrogen is electronically excited at present conditions. Distinctive features of kinetics of plasma at high specific energy deposition as well as details of the experimental technique and numerical calculations will be present. The work was partially supported by French National Agency, ANR (PLASMAFLAME Project, 2011 BS09 025 01), AOARD AFOSR, FA2386-13-1-4064 grant (Program Officer Prof. Chiping Li), LabEx Plas@Par and Linked International Laboratory LIA KaPPA (France-Russia).

  12. Kinetic Theory in Hot Plasmas and Neutral Gases Applications to the Computation of the transport coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    The conference is devoted to the study of systems consisting of a large number of particles by using the kinetic theory. In a first part, we present a general overview of the kinetic theory. In particular, the role of the correlations between particles is shown and discussed through the main models reported in the literature. In a second part, we present three applications to the transport properties in plasmas and neutral gases. The first application is devoted to the transport in hot plasmas perturbed with respect to the global equilibrium. The quasi-static and collisionless distribution function and transport coefficients are established. The influence of relativistic effects is also discussed. The second application deals with strongly inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas. The transport coefficients of Braginskii are calculated numerically in the local and the weakly nonlocal approximations. New nonlocal transport coefficients are emphasized. Finally, we apply the kinetic theory to the neutral gases by calculating the semi-collisional dispersion relation of acoustic waves. In particular, the dispersion and the damping of these waves in rarefied gases are highlighted. The method used to solve the kinetic equations is compared with the conventional method of Chapman-Enskog.

  13. Momentum transfer of solar wind plasma in a kinetic scale magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritaka, Toseo; Kajimura, Yoshihiro; Usui, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Masaharu; Matsui, Tatsuki; Shinohara, Iku

    2012-03-01

    Solar wind interaction with a kinetic scale magnetosphere and the resulting momentum transfer process are investigated by 2.5-dimensional full kinetic particle-in-cell simulations. The spatial scale of the considered magnetosphere is less than or comparable to the ion inertial length and is relevant for magnetized asteroids or spacecraft with mini-magnetosphere plasma propulsion. Momentum transfer is evaluated by studying the Lorentz force between solar wind plasma and a hypothetical coil current density that creates the magnetosphere. In the zero interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) limit, solar wind interaction goes into a steady state with constant Lorentz force. The dominant Lorentz force acting on the coil current density is applied by the thin electron current layer at the wind-filled front of the magnetosphere. Dynamic pressure of the solar wind balances the magnetic pressure in this region via electrostatic deceleration of ions. The resulting Lorentz force is characterized as a function of the scale of magnetosphere normalized by the electron gyration radius, which determines the local structure of the current layer. For the finite northward IMF case, solar wind electrons flow into the magnetosphere through the reconnecting region. The inner electrons enhance the ion deceleration, and this results in temporal increment of the Lorentz force. It is concluded that the momentum transfer of solar wind plasma could take place actively with variety of kinetic plasma phenomena, even in a magnetosphere with a small scale of less than the ion inertial length.

  14. Fokker-Planck Kinetic Description of Small-scale Fluid Turbulence for Classical Incompressible Fluids§

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, M.; Ellero, M.; Sarmah, D.; Nicolini, P.

    2008-12-01

    Extending the statistical approach proposed in a parallel paper [1], purpose of this work is to propose a stochastic inverse kinetic theory for small-scale hydrodynamic turbulence based on the introduction of a suitable local phase-space probability density function (pdf). In particular, we pose the problem of the construction of Fokker-Planck kinetic models of hydrodynamic turbulence. The approach here adopted is based on the so-called IKT approach (inverse kinetic theory), developed by Tessarotto et al. (2004-2008) which permits an exact phase-space description of incompressible fluids based on the adoption of a local pdf. We intend to show that for prescribed models of stochasticity the present approach permits to determine uniquely the time evolution of the stochastic fluid fields. The stochastic-averaged local pdf is shown to obey a kinetic equation which, although generally non-Markovian, locally in velocity-space can be approximated by means of a suitable Fokker-planck kinetic equation. As a side result, the same pdf is proven to have generally a non-Gaussian behavior.

  15. Kinetic Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Oxidation on Diffusion Flame Extinction Limits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    reactions (1)-(6)). The formed CH3, CH2 and CH were oxidized further to CH2O, HCO, CO and finally CO2 as shown in Fig. 7a. Among those reaction paths, a...pulsed discharge Plasma flame chemistry reactions Path flux analysis Counterflow extinction Partially premixed flames a b s t r a c t The kinetic...the kinetic model over-predicted the CO, H2O and H2 concentrations and under-predicted CO2 concentration. A path flux analysis showed that O generated

  16. 3D Kinetic Simulation of Plasma Jet Penetration in Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.

    2009-11-01

    A high velocity plasmoid penetration through a magnetic barrier is a problem of a great experimental and theoretical interest. Our LSP PIC code 3D fully kinetic numerical simulations of high density (10^16 cm-3) high velocity (30-140 km/sec) plasma jet/bullet, penetrating through the transversal magnetic field, demonstrate three different regimes: reflection by field, penetration by magnetic field expulsion and penetration by magnetic self-polarization. The behavior depends on plasma jet parameters and its composition: hydrogen, carbon (A=12) and C60-fullerene (A=720) plasmas were investigated. The 3D simulation of two plasmoid head-on injections along uniform magnetic field lines is analyzed. Mini rail plasma gun (accelerator) modeling is also presented and discussed.

  17. Kinetic plasma processes occurring in the outer plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gordon R.

    1992-01-01

    One area of data analysis work that was begun under this contract is the fitting of the perpendicular velocity distributions of equatorially trapped ions with a Kappa function. This type of characterization of the trapped ions will be very useful for comparison with velocity distributions produced by the model. A second area of data analysis is to study data from consecutive passes when DE 1's apogee was near the magnetic equator and the spacecraft was often skimming along nearly the same L shell. In 1982 three such periods occurred in May, June, and July. For these consecutive events we have Kp histories, density measurements from a number of sources (Whistler data, DE SFR, ISEE SFR) and consecutive samples of ion pitch angle distributions along field lines. It is clear from this data how the pitch angle distributions evolve during a flux tube refilling event. Our modeling of the flow of plasma along closed field lines is following two basic tracks. The first is a study of the basic refilling process without the effect of wave-particle heating near the equator or the effect of large or abrupt field-aligned electric potential drops. This model includes the effects of Coulomb self-collisions and collisions with the O+ ions in the topside ionosphere. The second track is a study of the effects of wave produced pitch-angle scattering and perpendicular heating occurring near the magnetic equator, in connection with the development of large potential drops that result from electron heating and the development of density gradients.

  18. Kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in superthermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Li, Bo Xia, Li-Dong

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the small but finite amplitude solitary Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in low β plasmas with superthermal electrons modeled by a kappa-type distribution. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the evolution of KAWs is derived by using the standard reductive perturbation method. Examining the dependence of the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients of the KdV equation on the superthermal parameter κ, plasma β, and obliqueness of propagation, we show that these parameters may change substantially the shape and size of solitary KAW pulses. Only sub-Alfvénic, compressive solitons are supported. We then extend the study to examine kinetic Alfvén rogue waves by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger equation from the KdV equation. Rational solutions that form rogue wave envelopes are obtained. We examine how the behavior of rogue waves depends on the plasma parameters in question, finding that the rogue envelopes are lowered with increasing electron superthermality whereas the opposite is true when the plasma β increases. The findings of this study may find applications to low β plasmas in astrophysical environments where particles are superthermally distributed.

  19. Integral propagator method as a kinetic operator to describe discontinuous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoso, J. M.; Jimenez, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Conde, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present a path-integral-like method to numerically solve drift-diffusion equations for plasma physics. The algorithm uses short-time propagators as approximate Green's functions that tend to smooth typical discontinuities arising in plasma dynamics as, for instance, the effects of plasma-wall interaction or localized particle flows. The usual numerical schemes based on differences may fail to represent these abrupt conditions by inducing numerical viscosities and instabilities. However, the robust mesli-free computational integral method has been proved to be unconditionally stable in the simple case of no imposed restrictions by boundary conditions. The extension of the method to deal with boundary value problems is analysed. The advancing scheme is also useful to deal with the merging of natural discontinuities in the system as those induced by the effects of electromagnetic fields generated by charge separation as well as for the existence of two differentiated plasma regimes. In any case, the kinetic equation may have drift and/or diffusion coefficients that are likewise discontinuous. The method works almost being numerically insensitive to these discontinuities, leading to feasible physically meaningful solutions. The scheme works as an effective integral kinetic operator even for Fokker-Planck equations connecting two different dynamical statistics, like Maxwell-Bolt.zmann and Fermi- Dirac ones. It is robust to describe spatially heterogeneous plasmas.

  20. Weakly relativistic quantum kinetic theory for electrostatic wave modes in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Azhar; Stefan, Martin; Brodin, Gert

    2014-03-15

    We have derived the electrostatic dispersion relation in a magnetized plasma using a recently developed quantum kinetic model based on the Dirac equation. The model contains weakly relativistic spin effects such as Thomas precession, the polarization currents associated with the spin and the spin-orbit coupling. It turns out that for strictly electrostatic perturbations the non-relativistic spin effects vanish, and the modification of the classical dispersion relation is solely associated with the relativistic terms. Several new wave modes appear due the electron spin effects, and an example for astrophysical plasmas are given.

  1. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  2. Kinetic theory of low-frequency cross-field instability in a weakly ionized plasma. II

    SciTech Connect

    Dimant, Y.S.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-04-01

    The consistent kinetic approach developed in Paper I [Ya. S. Dimant and R. N. Sudan, Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 1157 (1995)] is applied to obtain the general dispersion relation of the two-stream {bold E}{times}{bold B} instability in collisionally dominated weakly ionized plasmas for wave frequencies small compared to the ion--neutral collision frequency. This dispersion relation covers the whole low-frequency band from the asymptotic short-wave limit studied in Paper I to the long-wave limit. Previous theories employing simplified kinetic theory or fluid equations for electron behavior are only correct in the long-wave limit. The principal new results are that the threshold conditions for this instability and the growth rates are altered from those predicted by earlier simplified theories. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. Effect of driving frequency on excitation of turbulence in a kinetic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Shay, M. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Breech, B.

    2011-09-15

    The effect of driving frequency on the efficiency of turbulence generation through magnetic forcing is studied using kinetic hybrid simulations with fully kinetic ions and fluid electrons. The efficiency of driving is quantified by examining the energy input into magnetic field as well as the thermal energy for various driving frequencies. The driving is efficient in exciting turbulence and heating the plasma when the time period of the driving is larger than the nonlinear time of the system. For driving at faster time scales, the energy input is weak and the steady state energy is much lower. The heating of the plasma is correlated with intermittent properties of the magnetic field, which are manifested as non-Gaussian statistics. Implications for turbulence in solar corona are discussed.

  4. Small amplitude Kinetic Alfven waves in a superthermal electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Mahmood, Sahahzad; Qamar, Anisa; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-11-01

    We are investigating the propagating properties of coupled Kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves in a low beta plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons. Using the standard reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) type equation is derived which describes the evolution of Kinetic Alfven waves. It is found that nonlinearity and Larmor radius effects can compromise and give rise to solitary structures. The parametric role of superthermality and positron content on the characteristics of solitary wave structures is also investigated. It is found that only sub-Alfvenic and compressive solitons are supported in the present model. The present study may find applications in a low β electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons.

  5. Plasma kinetic effects on interfacial mix in settings relevant to inertial confinement fusion and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Fernández, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hegelich, B. M.; Dyer, G.; Roycroft, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing of high-Z/low-Z interfaces in dense plasma media is a problem of importance for understanding mix in inertial confinement fusion experiments and recent experiments at the LANL Trident facility. In this presentation, we apply the VPIC particle-in-cell code with a binary collision model to explore kinetic effects of the atomic mixing. Comparisons are made to published analytic theory and hybrid modeling results and conditions are identified under which plasma kinetic behavior may lead to anomalously rapid atomic mixing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  6. Variable Charge State Impurities in Coupled Kinetic Plasma-Kinetic Neutral Transport Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Hager, R.; Kim, K.; Koskela, T.; Park, G.

    2015-11-01

    A previous version of the XGC0 neoclassical particle transport code with two fully stripped impurity species was used to study kinetic neoclassical transport in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal. To properly simulate impurities in the scrape-off layer and divertor and to account for radiative cooling, however, the impurity charge state distributions must evolve as the particles are transported into regions of different electron temperatures and densities. To do this, the charge state of each particle in XGC0 is included as a parameter in the list that represents the particle's location in phase space. Impurity ionizations and recombinations are handled with a dedicated collision routine. The associated radiative cooling is accumulated during the process and applied to the electron population later in the time step. The density profiles of the neutral impurities are simulated with the DEGAS 2 neutral transport code and then used as a background for electron impact ionization in XGC0 via a test particle Monte Carlo method analogous to that used for deuterium. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Kinetic temperature of dust particle motion in gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Norman, G E; Timofeev, A V

    2011-11-01

    A system of equations describing motion of dust particles in gas discharge plasma is formulated. This system is developed for a monolayer of dust particles with an account of dust particle charge fluctuations and features of the discharge near-electrode layer. Molecular dynamics simulation of the dust particles system is performed. A mechanism of dust particle average kinetic energy increase is suggested on the basis of theoretical analysis of the simulation results. It is shown that heating of dust particles' vertical motion is initiated by forced oscillations caused by the dust particles' charge fluctuations. The process of energy transfer from vertical to horizontal motion is based on the phenomenon of the parametric resonance. The combination of parametric and forced resonances explains the abnormally high values of the dust particles' kinetic energy. Estimates of frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the experimental values.

  8. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasmas using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2014-12-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic tokamak plasmas is theoretically analyzed by using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation. The bi-Maxwellian distribution function for guiding-center ions is assumed to obtain a self-consistent form, yielding pressures satisfying the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) anisotropic equilibrium condition. The double adiabatic model gives the dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which agrees well with the one derived from gyro-kinetic equation. The GAM frequency increases with the ratio of pressures, p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, and the Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}. MHD result shows a low-frequency zonal flow existing for all p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, while according to the kinetic dispersion relation, no low-frequency branch exists for p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}≳ 2.

  9. Fokker–Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal α-particles in a fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peigney, B.E.

    2014-12-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the transport of suprathermal α-particles in inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (α-particles) at a kinetic level. The model assumes spherical symmetry in configuration space and axial symmetry in velocity space around the mean flow velocity. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal α-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are then validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  10. Kinetic simulations and photometry measurements of the E-H transition in cylindrical inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, S.; Nishida, K.; Mochizuki, S.; Grudiev, A.; Lettry, J.; Tran, M. Q.; Hatayama, A.

    2016-12-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are well known to exhibit two modes of operation: a low density capacitive E-mode and a high density inductive H-mode. In this study we investigate the E-H transition in a cylindrical ICP, and show the effect of an external magnetic cusp field on the transition dynamics. The plasma is simulated by an electro-magnetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code in order to take into account spatio-temporal variations of the plasma dynamics as well as kinetic effects. Simulations are compared to photometry measurements on the Linac4 H-ion source plasma chamber. We show that the E-H transition is characterized by strong spatial variations of the plasma parameters, with an axial plasma oscillation in E-mode followed by a centring in the coil region in H-mode. The external magnetic cusp field prevents electrons close to the wall to be accelerated and reduces the inductive power deposition in the plasma. This resulted in a  ≈50% higher current to achieve E-H transition compared to the configuration without cusp field. The results indicate possible improvements to the magnetic cusp field configuration in order to achieve optimal power transfer.

  11. A DRIFT ORDERED SHORT MEAN-FREE DESCRIPTION FOR PARTIALLY IONIZED MAGNETIZED PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    SIMAKOV, ANDERI N.

    2007-02-08

    Effects of neutral particles, most prominently the associated heat flux and viscosity, can be very important or even dominant at the edge of a tokamak and so must be self-consistently accounted for in a description of magnetized tokamak edge plasma. To the best of our knowledge, this has only been done so far for short mean-free path plasma under MHD-like Braginskii's orderings i.e. assuming that species velocities are on the order of the ion thermal speed. Since plasma flows in modern tokamaks are usually slow compared with the ion thermal speed (at least in the absence of strong external momentum sources) it is more appropriate to use drift orderings in which the plasma flow velocity is instead comparable with the diamagnetic heat flow divided by pressure. Employing drift orderings and evaluating species distribution functions through second order in the small gyroradius and mean-free path expansion parameters allows accounting for the important effects of heat fluxes on species momentum transport (viscosities), which are missing from the large flow ordered treatments. In this work we consider short mean-free path plasma consisting of electrons and single species of singly-charged ions and neutrals. We neglect neutral-neutral and elastic electron-neutral collisions and approximate the neutral-ion charge-exchange cross-section with a constant. We employ drift orderings to evaluate ion, neutral, and electron heat fluxes, viscosity tensors, and momentum and energy exchange terms and formulate a self-consistent system of electron, ion, and neutral fluid equations, thereby generalizing the drift-ordered treatment of fully ionized plasma.

  12. Hydrodynamic description of an unmagnetized plasma with multiple ion species. I. General formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Andrei N.; Molvig, Kim

    2016-03-01

    A generalization of the Braginskii ion fluid description [S. I. Braginskii, Sov. Phys. - JETP 6, 358 (1958)] to the case of an unmagnetized collisional plasma with multiple ion species is presented. An asymptotic expansion in the ion Knudsen number is used to derive the individual ion species continuity, as well as the total ion mass density, momentum, and energy evolution equations accurate through the second order. Expressions for the individual ion species drift velocities with respect to the center of mass reference frame, as well as for the total ion heat flux and viscosity, which are required to close the fluid equations, are evaluated in terms of the first-order corrections to the lowest order Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions. A variational formulation for evaluating such corrections and its relation to the plasma entropy are presented. Employing trial functions for the corrections, written in terms of expansions in generalized Laguerre polynomials, and maximizing the resulting functionals produce two systems of linear equations (for "vector" and "tensor" portions of the corrections) for the expansion coefficients. A general matrix formulation of the linear systems as well as expressions for the resulting transport fluxes are presented in forms convenient for numerical implementation. The general formulation is employed in Paper II [A. N. Simakov and K. Molvig, Phys. Plasmas 23, 032116 (2016)] to evaluate the individual ion drift velocities and the total ion heat flux and viscosity for specific cases of two and three ion species plasmas.

  13. Fully kinetic simulations of collisionless, mesothermal plasma emission: Macroscopic plume structure and microscopic electron characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a fully kinetic particle particle-in-cell simulation study on the emission of a collisionless plasma plume consisting of cold beam ions and thermal electrons. Results are presented for both the two-dimensional macroscopic plume structure and the microscopic electron kinetic characteristics. We find that the macroscopic plume structure exhibits several distinctive regions, including an undisturbed core region, an electron cooling expansion region, and an electron isothermal expansion region. The properties of each region are determined by microscopic electron kinetic characteristics. The division between the undisturbed region and the cooling expansion region approximately matches the Mach line generated at the edge of the emission surface, and that between the cooling expansion region and the isothermal expansion region approximately matches the potential well established in the beam. The interactions between electrons and the potential well lead to a new, near-equilibrium state different from the initial distribution for the electrons in the isothermal expansion region. The electron kinetic characteristics in the plume are also very anisotropic. As the electron expansion process is mostly non-equilibrium and anisotropic, the commonly used assumption that the electrons in a collisionless, mesothermal plasma plume may be treated as a single equilibrium fluid in general is not valid.

  14. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations

  15. A Kinetic Vlasov Model for Plasma Simulation Using Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Many-Core Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddell, Noah

    Advances are reported in the three pillars of computational science achieving a new capability for understanding dynamic plasma phenomena outside of local thermodynamic equilibrium. A continuum kinetic model for plasma based on the Vlasov-Maxwell system for multiple particle species is developed. Consideration is added for boundary conditions in a truncated velocity domain and supporting wall interactions. A scheme to scale the velocity domain for multiple particle species with different temperatures and particle mass while sharing one computational mesh is described. A method for assessing the degree to which the kinetic solution differs from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is introduced and tested on a thoroughly studied test case. The discontinuous Galerkin numerical method is extended for efficient solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in five or more particle phase-space dimensions using tensor-product hypercube elements with arbitrary polynomial order. A scheme for velocity moment integration is integrated as required for coupling between the plasma species and electromagnetic waves. A new high performance simulation code WARPM is developed to efficiently implement the model and numerical method on emerging many-core supercomputing architectures. WARPM uses the OpenCL programming model for computational kernels and task parallelism to overlap computation with communication. WARPM single-node performance and parallel scaling efficiency are analyzed with bottlenecks identified guiding future directions for the implementation. The plasma modeling capability is validated against physical problems with analytic solutions and well established benchmark problems.

  16. Simulation of 2D Kinetic Effects in Plasmas using the Grid Based Continuum Code LOKI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeffrey; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Tom; Brunner, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic simulation of multi-dimensional plasma waves through direct discretization of the Vlasov equation is a useful tool to study many physical interactions and is particularly attractive for situations where minimal fluctuation levels are desired, for instance, when measuring growth rates of plasma wave instabilities. However, direct discretization of phase space can be computationally expensive, and as a result there are few examples of published results using Vlasov codes in more than a single configuration space dimension. In an effort to fill this gap we have developed the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. The code is designed to reduce the cost of phase-space computation by using fully 4th order accurate conservative finite differencing, while retaining excellent parallel scalability that efficiently uses large scale computing resources. In this poster I will discuss the algorithms used in the code as well as some aspects of their parallel implementation using MPI. I will also overview simulation results of basic plasma wave instabilities relevant to laser plasma interaction, which have been obtained using the code.

  17. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  18. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  19. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  20. The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application to W plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James; Abdallah, Joseph; Fontes, Christopher; Zhang, Honglin

    2010-12-10

    This is the work of the LANL group on atomic kinetics modelling. There are various levels of detail in the LANL suite of atomic physics codes: (1) Non-relativistic configuration average kinetics (nl{sup w}) + UTA spectra, (2) Relativistic configuration average kinetics (nlj{sup w}) + UTA spectra, (3) Mixed UTA (MUTA) - configuration average kinetics and spectra composed of mixture of UTAs and fine-structure features and (4) Fine-structure levels. The LANL suite of atomic physics codes consists of 5 codes: (1) CATS/RATS atomic structure codes (semi-relativistic Cowan code or Dirac-Fock-Slater code), (2) ACE collisional excitation code (Plane-wave Born, Columb-Born and distorted-wave methods) and (3) GIPPER ionization code (scaled-hydrogenic and distorted-wave methods). An on-line version of the codes is available at http://aphysics2.lanl.gov/tempweb. ATOMIC kinetics modelling code uses the atomic data for LTE or NLTE population kinetics models and spectral modelling of a broad range of plasma applications. The mixed UTA (MUTA) approach was developed for the spectra of complex ions and the results are in very good agreement with the Sandia-Z Iron opacity experiments. The LANL configuration-average/MUTA calculations were applied to tungsten problems of the non-LTE kinetics code comparison workshops. The LANL group plans to perform much larger calculations to assess the accuracy of the older results and to investigate low-temperature tungsten processes relevant to the divertor modelling.

  1. Modulation of release kinetics by plasma polymerization of ampicillin-loaded β-TCP ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labay, C.; Buxadera-Palomero, J.; Avilés, M.; Canal, C.; Ginebra, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) bioceramics are employed in bone repair surgery. Their local implantation in bone defects puts them in the limelight as potential materials for local drug delivery. However, obtaining suitable release patterns fitting the required therapeutics is a challenge. Here, plasma polymerization of ampicillin-loaded β-TCP is studied for the design of a novel antibiotic delivery system. Polyethylene glycol-like (PEG-like) coating of β-TCP by low pressure plasma polymerization was performed using diglyme as precursor, and nanometric PEG-like layers were obtained by simple and double plasma polymerization processes. A significant increase in hydrophobicity, and the presence of plasma polymer was visible on the surface by SEM and quantified by XPS. As a main consequence of the plasma polymerisation, the release kinetics were successfully modified, avoiding burst release, and slowing down the initial rate of release leading to a 4.5 h delay in reaching the same antibiotic release percentage, whilst conservation of the activity of the antibiotic was simultaneously maintained. Thus, plasma polymerisation on the surface of bioceramics may be a good strategy to design controlled drug delivery matrices for local bone therapies.

  2. Axisymmetric Bernstein modes in a finite-length non-neutral plasma: simulation and kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Grant; Peterson, Bryan G.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2016-10-01

    We are using a 2-D PIC code to model high-frequency (near the cyclotron frequency) axisymmetric oscillations in a finite-length pure-ion plasma. We previously modeled these modes for infinite-length plasmas, where they are not detectable in the surface charge on the walls because of axisymmetry and lack of z-dependence. This is not true in a finite-length plasma, however, because the eigenfunction of the oscillation has to have nodes a short distance beyond the ends of the plasma. This gives the modes a cos (kz z) or sin (kz z) dependence, with a kz such that an integral number (approximately) of half-wavelengths fit into the plasma. This z-dependence makes the mode detectable in the surface charge on the walls. The modes also have r-dependence. The radial-velocity eigenfunctions of the modes behave as J1 (kr r) . We have simulated the plasma with different kz and kr values and find that increasing kz introduces a small frequency shift, either upward or downward depending on which mode is measured. The damping of the modes also increases as kz or kr increases. We are developing an appropriate kinetic theory of these modes that will include both the finite-Larmour-radius effects and the axial bouncing motion of the particles.

  3. Methods of description of the polycondensation kinetics and the structures of the polymers formed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irzhak, Vadim I.

    1997-06-01

    The modern mathematical methods which make it possible to describe the kinetics of the formation reactions and the structures of polymers formed via polycondensation are examined: direct differentiation of an infinite system of differential equations, statistical approaches, and the concept of bond blocks. The possibilities and limits of applicability of each method are demonstrated. The bibliography includes 83 references.

  4. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  5. Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Simulation of Collisionless Plasma Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lin; Xueyi Wang; Liu Chen; Zhihong Lin

    2009-08-11

    Fully kinetic-particle simulations and hybrid simulations have been utilized for decades to investigate various fundamental plasma processes, such as magnetic reconnection, fast compressional waves, and wave-particle interaction. Nevertheless, due to disparate temporal and spatial scales between electrons and ions, existing fully kinetic-particle codes have to employ either unrealistically high electron-to-ion mass ratio, me/mi, or simulation domain limited to a few or a few ten's of the ion Larmor radii, or/and time much less than the global Alfven time scale in order to accommodate available computing resources. On the other hand, in the hybrid simulation, the ions are treated as fully kinetic particles but the electrons are treated as a massless fluid. The electron kinetic effects, e.g., wave-particle resonances and finite electron Larmor radius effects, are completely missing. Important physics, such as the electron transit time damping of fast compressional waves or the triggering mechanism of magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas is absent in the hybrid codes. Motivated by these considerations and noting that dynamics of interest to us has frequencies lower than the electron gyrofrequency, we planned to develop an innovative particle simulation model, gyrokinetic (GK) electrons and fully kinetic (FK) ions. In the GK-electron and FK-ion (GKe/FKi) particle simulation model, the rapid electron cyclotron motion is removed, while keeping finite electron Larmor radii, realistic me/mi ratio, wave-particle interactions, and off-diagonal components of electron pressure tensor. The computation power can thus be significantly improved over that of the full-particle codes. As planned in the project DE-FG02-05ER54826, we have finished the development of the new GK-electron and FK-ion scheme, finished its benchmark for a uniform plasma in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D systems against linear waves obtained from analytical theories, and carried out a further convergence test

  6. High-order continuum kinetic method for modeling plasma dynamics in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Vogman, G. V.; Colella, P.; Shumlak, U.

    2014-12-15

    Continuum methods offer a high-fidelity means of simulating plasma kinetics. While computationally intensive, these methods are advantageous because they can be cast in conservation-law form, are not susceptible to noise, and can be implemented using high-order numerical methods. Advances in continuum method capabilities for modeling kinetic phenomena in plasmas require the development of validation tools in higher dimensional phase space and an ability to handle non-cartesian geometries. To that end, a new benchmark for validating Vlasov-Poisson simulations in 3D (x,vx,vy) is presented. The benchmark is based on the Dory-Guest-Harris instability and is successfully used to validate a continuum finite volume algorithm. To address challenges associated with non-cartesian geometries, unique features of cylindrical phase space coordinates are described. Preliminary results of continuum kinetic simulations in 4D (r,z,vr,vz) phase space are presented.

  7. Kinetics of ion and prompt electron emission from laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2013-07-15

    We investigated ion emission dynamics of laser-produced plasma from several elements, comprised of metals and non-metals (C, Al, Si, Cu, Mo, Ta, W), under vacuum conditions using a Faraday cup. The estimated ion flux for various targets studied showed a decreasing tendency with increasing atomic mass. For metals, the ion flux is found to be a function of sublimation energy. A comparison of temporal ion profiles of various materials showed only high-Z elements exhibited multiple structures in the ion time of flight profile indicated by the observation of higher peak kinetic energies, which were absent for low-Z element targets. The slower ions were seen regardless of the atomic number of target material propagated with a kinetic energy of 1–5 keV, while the fast ions observed in high-Z materials possessed significantly higher energies. A systematic study of plasma properties employing fast photography, time, and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and electron analysis showed that there existed different mechanisms for generating ions in laser ablation plumes. The origin of high kinetic energy ions is related to prompt electron emission from high-Z targets.

  8. Wind/SWE Plasma Observations of Kinetic-Scale Magnetic Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.; Seeluangsawat, P.

    2002-05-01

    Magnetic holes are sudden depletions of solar wind magnetic field strength with durations of seconds to hours. First discovered with IMP 6 magnetic field observations in 1977, their origin, evolution and spatial structure are still subject to debate. Magnetic holes lasting on the order of hours have been studied extensively with field, plasma and composition experiments, most recently with ACE and Ulysses. Due to their large size relative to a proton gyroradius a fluid treatment is often employed to model these holes as pressure balanced structures. It is not clear that this can be extended to the smallest magnetic holes, where kinetic effects such as instabilities may play a dominant role. To date the short duration of kinetic-scale magnetic holes has placed them below the time resolution of existing ion instruments capable of measuring the velocity distributions needed to study kinetic phenomena. All observational details of kinetic-scale magnetic holes are based on magnetic field measurements and extrapolations of the features of large-scale holes. A method has been developed for extracting solar wind ion parameters once every 1.5 seconds from existing 90 second spectra recorded by the Wind/SWE Faraday Cup instruments since the start of the mission in 1994. In our first scientific application of this increased time resolution we report observations of ion properties within kinetic-scale magnetic holes. Characterizing the velocity distribution of protons as bi-Maxwellian distribution, we determine their density, velocity, and parallel and perpendicular temperatures. In these first-ever observations of the ion distribution function within kinetic-scale magnetic holes, observations are compared to a simple double adiabatic equation of state. Temperature anisotropy is discussed in terms of limits imposed by the firehose and mirror instabilities.

  9. Three species one-dimensional kinetic model for weakly ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Donoso, J. M.; Tierno, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    A three species one-dimensional kinetic model is presented for a spatially homogeneous weakly ionized plasma subjected to the action of a time varying electric field. Planar geometry is assumed, which means that the plasma evolves in the privileged direction of the field. The energy transmitted to the electric charges is channelized to the neutrals thanks to collisions, a mechanism that influences the plasma dynamics. Charge-charge interactions have been designed as a one-dimensional collision term equivalent to the Landau operator used for fully ionized plasmas. Charge-neutral collisions are modelled by a conservative drift-diffusion operator in the Dougherty's form. The resulting set of coupled integro-differential equations is solved with the stable and robust propagator integral method. This semi-analytical method feasibility accounts for non-linear effects without appealing to linearisation or simplifications, providing conservative physically meaningful solutions even for initial or emerging sharp velocity distribution function profiles. It is found that charge-neutral collisions exert a significant effect since a quite different plasma evolution arises if compared to the collisionless limit. In addition, substantial differences in the system motion are found for constant and temperature dependent collision frequencies cases.

  10. Continuum kinetic plasma modeling by the Vlasov-Maxwell system in multiple dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddell, Noah; Shumlak, Uri

    2014-10-01

    A kinetic plasma model for multiple particle species described by the Vlasov equation and coupled to fully dynamic electromagnetic forces is presented. The model is implemented as evolving continuous PDFs (probability density functions) in particle phase space (position-velocity) as opposed to particle-in-cell (PIC) methods which discretely sample the PDF. The hyperbolic model is evolved using a high-order finite element method (discontinuous Galerkin), with excellent conservation of system mass, momentum, and energy - an advantage compared to PIC. Simulations of two- to six-dimensional phase space while resolving the plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency are computationally expensive. To maximize performance and scaling to large simulations, a new framework, WARPM, has been developed for many-core (e.g. GPU) computing architectures. WARPM supports both multi-fluid and continuum kinetic plasma models as coupled hyperbolic systems with nearest neighbor predictable communication. Simulation results are compared to existing benchmark problems and newly achievable studies of wave-particle interactions are presented. This research was supported by a grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Dept. of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship.

  11. Vibrational kinetics in Cl2 and O2 low-pressure inductively-coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Foucher, Mickael; Marinov, Daniil; Chabert, Pascal; Annusova, Anna; Guerra, Vasco; Agarwal, Ankur; Rauf, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    Low energy electron interactions with molecules via resonances can cause vibrational excitation (affecting chemical kinetics), electron energy loss and modification of the EEDF. However, with the exception of N2 and H2 plasmas, very little attention has been paid to this subject. We have implemented a novel high-sensitivity ultra-broadband UV absorption bench, allowing spectra to be recorded with noise as low as 2×10-5 over a 250 nm wavelength range, and recording of complete vibronic bands. We applied this to radiofrequency inductively-coupled plasmas in low pressure (5-50 mTorr) pure O2 and pure Cl2. In O2 plasmas we surprisingly observe highly vibrationally excited O2 (v'' up to 18) via B-X Schumann-Runge bands. Cl2 molecules show a broad UV absorption spectrum in the region 250-400 nm, with distinctly different absorption spectra for vibrationally excited molecules. However, only a small fraction of the Cl2 molecules were observed in vibrationally excited states and the vibrational temperature is close to equilibrium with the local gas translational temperature (up to 1000 K), in contrast to O2. We are currently working on global models with vibrational kinetics to explain these results. Work supported by LABEX Plas@par (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02), and Applied Materials.

  12. Kinetic description of fermion flavor mixing and CP-violating sources for baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstandin, Thomas; Prokopec, Tomislav; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    We derive transport equations for fermionic systems with a space-time dependent mass matrix in flavor space allowing for complex elements leading to CP violation required for electroweak baryogenesis. By constructing appropriate projectors in flavor space of the relevant tree level Kadanoff-Baym equations, we split the constraint equations into "diagonal" and "transversal" parts in flavor space, and show that they decouple. While the diagonal densities exhibit standard dispersion relations at leading order in gradients, the transverse densities exhibit a novel on-shell structure. Next, the kinetic equations are considered to second order in gradients and the CP-violating source terms are isolated. This requires a thorough discussion of a flavor independent definition of charge-parity symmetry operation. To make a link with baryogenesis in the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, we construct the Green functions for the leading order kinetic operator and solve the kinetic equations for two mixing fermions (charginos). We take account of flavor blind damping, and consider the cases of inefficient and moderate diffusion. The resulting densities are the CP-violating chargino currents that source baryogenesis.

  13. Microstructural prototyping of ceramics by kinetic engineering: applications of spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhijian; Nygren, Mats

    2005-01-01

    The significance of kinetics on the development of microstructures in connection with sintering of ceramics is well recognized. In practice, however, it still remains a challenge to prepare designed microstructures via engineering the sintering kinetics because of an insufficient understanding of the different operative mechanisms that are in many cases overlapping. In this article the kinetic issues involved in sintering are described and discussed with respect to their potential for prototyping microstructures that yield desired properties. By exploiting and mastering the differences present in the kinetics of grain sliding, densification, chemical reactions, and grain growth, respectively, we have established processing principles for producing bulk ceramics with microstructures consisting of nano-sized grains, aligned grains, and/or non-equilibrium-phase constitutions, and for achieving radically improved superplasticity in brittle ceramics. Although the studies quoted in this article were mainly carried out by spark plasma sintering, more general implications of them are expected, including efficient particle sliding, deformation-induced dynamic ripening, superplastic deformation-induced dynamic ripening, and non-equilibrium integration.

  14. Viriato: a Fourier-Hermite spectral code for strongly magnetised fluid-kinetic plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, Nuno; Dorland, William; Fazendeiro, Luis; Kanekar, Anjor; Mallet, Alfred; Zocco, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    We report on the algorithms and numerical methods used in Viriato, a novel fluid-kinetic code that solves two distinct sets of equations: (i) the Kinetic Reduced Electron Heating Model equations [Zocco & Schekochihin, 2011] and (ii) the kinetic reduced MHD (KRMHD) equations [Schekochihin et al., 2009]. Two main applications of these equations are magnetised (Alfvnénic) plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection. Viriato uses operator splitting to separate the dynamics parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field (assumed strong). Along the magnetic field, Viriato allows for either a second-order accurate MacCormack method or, for higher accuracy, a spectral-like scheme. Perpendicular to the field Viriato is pseudo-spectral, and the time integration is performed by means of an iterative predictor-corrector scheme. In addition, a distinctive feature of Viriato is its spectral representation of the parallel velocity-space dependence, achieved by means of a Hermite representation of the perturbed distribution function. A series of linear and nonlinear benchmarks and tests are presented, with focus on 3D decaying kinetic turbulence. Work partially supported by Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia via Grants UID/FIS/50010/2013 and IF/00530/2013.

  15. Kinetic Alfven wave in the presence of kappa distribution function in plasma sheet boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, G. Ahirwar, G.; Shrivastava, J.

    2015-07-31

    The particle aspect approach is adopted to investigate the trajectories of charged particles in the electromagnetic field of kinetic Alfven wave. Expressions are found for the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in the presence of kappa distribution function. Kinetic effect of electrons and ions are included to study kinetic Alfven wave because both are important in the transition region. It is found that the ratio β of electron thermal energy density to magnetic field energy density and the ratio of ion to electron thermal temperature (T{sub i}/T{sub e}), and kappa distribution function affect the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in both cases(warm and cold electron limit).The treatment of kinetic Alfven wave instability is based on assumption that the plasma consist of resonant and non resonant particles. The resonant particles participate in an energy exchange process, whereas the non resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave.

  16. Evolution of large amplitude Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas: Kinetic-fluid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyuki, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Large amplitude Alfven waves are ubiquitously observed in solar wind plasmas. Mjolhus(JPP, 1976) and Mio et al(JPSJ, 1976) found that nonlinear evolution of the uni-directional, parallel propagating Alfven waves can be described by the derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation (DNLS). Later, the multi-dimensional extension (Mjolhus and Wyller, JPP, 1988; Passot and Sulem, POP, 1993; Gazol et al, POP, 1999) and ion kinetic modification (Mjolhus and Wyller, JPP, 1988; Spangler, POP, 1989; Medvedev and Diamond, POP, 1996; Nariyuki et al, POP, 2013) of DNLS have been reported. Recently, Nariyuki derived multi-dimensional DNLS from an expanding box model of the Hall-MHD system (Nariyuki, submitted). The set of equations including the nonlinear evolution of compressional wave modes (TDNLS) was derived by Hada(GRL, 1993). DNLS can be derived from TDNLS by rescaling of the variables (Mjolhus, Phys. Scr., 2006). Nariyuki and Hada(JPSJ, 2007) derived a kinetically modified TDNLS by using a simple Landau closure (Hammet and Perkins, PRL, 1990; Medvedev and Diamond, POP, 1996). In the present study, we revisit the ion kinetic modification of multi-dimensional TDNLS through more rigorous derivations, which is consistent with the past kinetic modification of DNLS. Although the original TDNLS was derived in the multi-dimensional form, the evolution of waves with finite propagation angles in TDNLS has not been paid much attention. Applicability of the resultant models to solar wind turbulence is discussed.

  17. Viriato: A Fourier-Hermite spectral code for strongly magnetized fluid-kinetic plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, N. F.; Dorland, W.; Fazendeiro, L.; Kanekar, A.; Mallet, A.; Vilelas, M. S.; Zocco, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the algorithms and numerical methods used in Viriato, a novel fluid-kinetic code that solves two distinct sets of equations: (i) the Kinetic Reduced Electron Heating Model (KREHM) equations (Zocco and Schekochihin, 2011) (which reduce to the standard Reduced-MHD equations in the appropriate limit) and (ii) the kinetic reduced MHD (KRMHD) equations (Schekochihin et al., 2009). Two main applications of these equations are magnetized (Alfvénic) plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection. Viriato uses operator splitting (Strang or Godunov) to separate the dynamics parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field (assumed strong). Along the magnetic field, Viriato allows for either a second-order accurate MacCormack method or, for higher accuracy, a spectral-like scheme composed of the combination of a total variation diminishing (TVD) third order Runge-Kutta method for the time derivative with a 7th order upwind scheme for the fluxes. Perpendicular to the field Viriato is pseudo-spectral, and the time integration is performed by means of an iterative predictor-corrector scheme. In addition, a distinctive feature of Viriato is its spectral representation of the parallel velocity-space dependence, achieved by means of a Hermite representation of the perturbed distribution function. A series of linear and nonlinear benchmarks and tests are presented, including a detailed analysis of 2D and 3D Orszag-Tang-type decaying turbulence, both in fluid and kinetic regimes.

  18. Kinetic description of ionospheric dynamics in the three-fluid approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Conservation equations are developed in the three-fluid approximation for general application problems of ionospheric dynamics in the altitude region 90 km to 800 km for all geographic locations. These equations are applied to a detailed study of auroral E region neutral winds and their relationship to ionospheric plasma motions.

  19. Self-consistent nonlinear kinetic simulations of the anomalous Doppler instability of suprathermal electrons in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-10-15

    Suprathermal tails in the distributions of electron velocities parallel to the magnetic field are found in many areas of plasma physics, from magnetic confinement fusion to solar system plasmas. Parallel electron kinetic energy can be transferred into plasma waves and perpendicular gyration energy of particles through the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI), provided that energetic electrons with parallel velocities v{sub ||}≥(ω+Ω{sub ce})/k{sub ||} are present; here Ω{sub ce} denotes electron cyclotron frequency, ω the wave angular frequency, and k{sub ||} the component of wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field. This phenomenon is widely observed in tokamak plasmas. Here, we present the first fully self-consistent relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the ADI, spanning the linear and nonlinear regimes of the ADI. We test the robustness of the analytical theory in the linear regime and follow the ADI through to the steady state. By directly evaluating the parallel and perpendicular dynamical contributions to j·E in the simulations, we follow the energy transfer between the excited waves and the bulk and tail electron populations for the first time. We find that the ratio Ω{sub ce}/(ω{sub pe}+Ω{sub ce}) of energy transfer between parallel and perpendicular, obtained from linear analysis, does not apply when damping is fully included, when we find it to be ω{sub pe}/(ω{sub pe}+Ω{sub ce}); here ω{sub pe} denotes the electron plasma frequency. We also find that the ADI can arise beyond the previously expected range of plasma parameters, in particular when Ω{sub ce}>ω{sub pe}. The simulations also exhibit a spectral feature which may correspond to the observations of suprathermal narrowband emission at ω{sub pe} detected from low density tokamak plasmas.

  20. Modeling of inductively coupled plasma SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar plasma discharge: Effect of O{sub 2} on the plasma kinetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pateau, Amand; Rhallabi, Ahmed Fernandez, Marie-Claude; Boufnichel, Mohamed; Roqueta, Fabrice

    2014-03-15

    A global model has been developed for low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures. This model is based on a set of mass balance equations for all the considered species, coupled with the discharge power balance equation and the charge neutrality condition. The present study is an extension of the kinetic global model previously developed for SF{sub 6}/Ar ICP plasma discharges [Lallement et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 025001 (2009)]. It is focused on the study of the impact of the O{sub 2} addition to the SF{sub 6}/Ar gas mixture on the plasma kinetic properties. The simulation results show that the electron density increases with the %O{sub 2}, which is due to the decrease of the plasma electronegativity, while the electron temperature is almost constant in our pressure range. The density evolutions of atomic fluorine and oxygen versus %O{sub 2} have been analyzed. Those atomic radicals play an important role in the silicon etching process. The atomic fluorine density increases from 0 up to 40% O{sub 2} where it reaches a maximum. This is due to the enhancement of the SF{sub 6} dissociation processes and the production of fluorine through the reactions between SF{sub x} and O. This trend is experimentally confirmed. On the other hand, the simulation results show that O(3p) is the preponderant atomic oxygen. Its density increases with %O{sub 2} until reaching a maximum at almost 40% O{sub 2}. Over this value, its diminution with O{sub 2}% can be justified by the high increase in the loss frequency of O(3p) by electronic impact in comparison to its production frequency by electronic impact with O{sub 2}.

  1. Kinetic models for space plasmas: Recent progress for the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, V.; Moschou, S. P.; Lazar, M.; Borremans, K.; Rosson, G. Lopez

    2016-11-01

    Recent models for the solar wind and the inner magnetosphere have been developed using the kinetic approach. The solution of the evolution equation is used to determine the velocity distribution function of the particles and their moments. The solutions depend on the approximations and assumptions made in the development of the models. Effects of suprathermal particles often observed in space plasmas are taken into account to show their influence on the characteristics of the plasma, with specific applications for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. We describe in particular the results obtained with the collisionless exospheric approximation based on the Lorentzian velocity distribution function for the electrons and its recent progress in three dimensions. The effects of Coulomb collisions obtained by using a Fokker-Planck term in the evolution equation were also investigated, as well as effects of the whistler wave turbulence at electron scale and the kinetic Alfven waves at the proton scale. For solar wind especially, modelling efforts with both magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic treatments have been compared and combined in order to improve the predictions in the vicinity of the Earth. Photospheric magnetograms serve as observational input in semi-empirical coronal models used for estimating the plasma characteristics up to coronal heliocentric distances taken as boundary conditions in solar wind models. The solar wind fluctuations may influence the dynamics of the space environment of the Earth and generate geomagnetic storms. In the magnetosphere of the Earth, the trajectories of the particles are simulated to study the plasmasphere, the extension of the ionosphere along closed magnetic field lines and to better understand the physical mechanisms involved in the radiation belts dynamics.

  2. Ion kinetics in Ar/H2 cold plasmas: the relevance of ArH+

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Cueto, Maite; Doménech, José Luis; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has awakened the interest in the chemistry of this ion. In this work, the ion-molecule kinetics of cold plasmas of Ar/H2 is investigated in glow discharges spanning the whole range of [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) proportions for two pressures, 1.5 and 8 Pa. Ion concentrations are determined by mass spectrometry, and electron temperatures and densities, with Langmuir probes. A kinetic model is used for the interpretation of the results. The selection of experimental conditions evinces relevant changes with plasma pressure in the ion distributions dependence with the H2 fraction, particularly for the major ions: Ar+, ArH+ and H3+. At 1.5 Pa, ArH+ prevails for a wide interval of H2 fractions: 0.3<[H2]/([H2]+[Ar])<0.7. Nevertheless, a pronounced displacement of the ArH+ maximum towards the lowest H2 fractions is observed at 8 Pa, in detriment of Ar+, which becomes restricted to very small [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) ratios, whereas H3+ becomes dominant for all [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) > 0.1. The analysis of the data with the kinetic model allows the identification of the sources and sinks of the major ions over the whole range of experimental conditions sampled. Two key factors turn out to be responsible for the different ion distributions observed: the electron temperature, which determines the rate of Ar+ formation and thus of ArH+, and the equilibrium ArH+ + H2 ⇄ H3+ + Ar, which can be strongly dependent of the degree of vibrational excitation of H3+. The results are discussed and compared with previously published data on other Ar/H2 plasmas. PMID:26702354

  3. Plasma drift-kinetic equation calculations in three-dimensional magnetic geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2010-07-15

    A new code to simulate three-dimensional plasmas in complex toroidal geometries is presented. It solves drift-kinetic equations for the one-particle distribution function f based on their projection onto a functional basis consisting of an arbitrary number of Legendre-Laguerre polynomials. In this paper, these theoretical aspects of the code are exposed together with their relation with the standard formalism. Comparisons with neoclassical theory for the large aspect ratio case and first calculations in the geometry of the TJ-II Heliac are also presented.

  4. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  5. Enhancing Understanding of High Energy Density Plasmas Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Masti, Robert; King, Jake

    2016-10-01

    This work seeks to understand possible stabilization mechanisms of the early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) experiments. Such mechanisms may include electron thermal conduction, viscosity, and large magnetic fields. Experiments have shown that the high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions require physics modelling that goes well beyond simple models such as ideal MHD. The plan is to develop a multi-fluid extended-MHD model that includes kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity using codes that are easily available to the wider research community. Such an effort would provide the community with a well-benchmarked tool capable of advanced modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  6. Kinetic theory of the filamentation instability in a collisional current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2015-07-15

    The evolution of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma with nonextensive distribution was studied in the diffusion frequency region, taking into account the effects of electron-neutral collisions. Using the kinetic theory, Lorentz transformation formulas, and Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, the generalized dielectric permittivity functions of this plasma system were achieved. By obtaining the dispersion relation of low-frequency waves, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate were investigated. It was shown that collisions can increase the maximum growth rate of instability. The analysis of temporal evolution of filamentation instability revealed that the growth rate of instability increased by increasing the q-parameter and electron drift velocity. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions were compared and discussed.

  7. Plasma heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.; Tanaka, M.; Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, which is the finite beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure) extension of the modified two stream instability, is studied. Heating rates are derived from quasi-linear theory and compared with results from particle simulations to show that electron heating relative to ion heating and heating parallel to the magnetic field relative to perpendicular heating for both the electrons and ions increase with beta. The simulations suggest that electron dynamics determine the saturation level of the instability, which is manifested by the formation of a flattop electron distribution parallel to the magnetic field. As a result, both the saturation levels of the fluctuations and the heating rates decrease sharply with beta. Applications of these results to plasma heating in simulations of shocks and the earth's bow shock are described.

  8. Kinetic simulation of capacitively coupled plasmas driven by trapezoidal asymmetric voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diomede, Paola; Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-06-01

    A kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation with Monte Carlo Collisions was performed of a geometrically symmetric capacitively coupled, parallel-plate discharge in argon, driven by trapezoidal asymmetric voltage pulses with a period of 200 ns. The discharge was electrically asymmetric, making the ion energy distributions at the two electrodes different from one another. The fraction of the period (α), during which the voltage was kept at a constant (top-flat) positive value, was a critical control parameter. For the parameter range investigated, as α increased, the mean ion energy on the grounded electrode increased and the ions became more directional, whereas the opposite was found for the ions striking the powered electrode. The absolute value of the DC self-bias voltage decreased as α increased. Plasma instabilities, promoted by local double layers and electric field reversals during the time of the positive voltage excursion, were characterized by electron plasma waves launched from the sheath edge.

  9. Unchanged peripheral sympathetic activity following withdrawal of chronic metoprolol treatment. A study of noradrenaline concentrations and kinetics in plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, G; Daleskog, M; Hjemdahl, P; Rehnqvist, N

    1984-01-01

    Noradrenaline plasma kinetics were assessed in 17 male patients, who had been treated with metoprolol 100-200 mg daily (n = 8) or placebo for 3 years after an acute myocardial infarction, before and 1 week after gradual withdrawal (during 1 week) of the study treatment. Endogenous noradrenaline concentrations in plasma were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Noradrenaline spillover rate, plasma clearance and the t1/2 for the rapid removal from plasma were determined by radio-tracer methodology. During treatment the plasma noradrenaline concentrations and noradrenaline plasma kinetic variables were similar in the two groups. Venous plasma noradrenaline concentrations were more closely correlated to the spillover rates of noradrenaline to plasma than to the clearance of noradrenaline from plasma, but the spillover rates were correlated to the clearance rates. Following the withdrawal of metoprolol noradrenaline clearance from plasma increased slightly (by 18 +/- 5%, P less than 0.05), but the plasma concentrations and spillover rates of noradrenaline were unchanged. In the placebo group withdrawal did not result in any significant changes. Our results indicate that a generalised increase in sympathetic nerve activity is not the cause of so-called rebound phenomena following withdrawal of chronic beta-adrenoceptor blockade. PMID:6487497

  10. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-07

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study.

  11. A mechanistic description of radiation-induced damage to normal tissue and its healing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a novel mechanistic model of the yield of tissue damage at the end of radiation treatment and of the subsequent healing kinetics. We find explicit expressions for the total number of functional proliferating cells as well as doomed (functional but non-proliferating) cells as a function of time post treatment. This leads to the possibility of estimating—for any given cohort of patients undergoing radiation therapy—the probability distribution of those kinetic parameters (e.g. proliferation rates) that determine times to injury onset and ensuing resolution. The model is suitable for tissues with simple duplication organization, meaning that functionally competent cells are also responsible for tissue renewal or regeneration following injury. An extension of the model to arbitrary temporal patterns of dose rate is presented. To illustrate the practical utility of the model, as well as its limitations, we apply it to data on the time course of urethral toxicity following fractionated radiation treatment and brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  12. Nonlinear, Local Kinetic Damping of Finite-Size Plasma Waves Relevant to Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Warren; Fahlen, Jay; Winjum, Benjamin; Grismayer, Thomas; Decyk, Viktor

    2009-11-01

    Computer simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) indicate that the instability is bursty in time and space, leading to finite-size plasma waves in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with an external, ponderomotive impulse driver, we present the results of detailed study of the nonlinear behavior of finite-sized plasma waves in order to better understand the long-time behavior of SRS reflectivities. In one dimension, we present recently published results (Fahlen et al., PRL 102, 245002 (2009)) showing that finite-length plasma waves erode from the rear edge as new resonant particles enter and locally damp the packet. In multiple dimensions, recent results show that finite-width plasma waves localize about their axis due primarily to local, kinetic damping at the edges. The simulations are performed using a 1D and 2D electrostatic PIC code, and also using a 2D Darwin PIC code. This work was supported by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FG52-03-NA00065, DE-FG52-06NA26195, and DE-FG02-03ER54721.

  13. Kinetic Simulations of Electron Plasma Waves: trapped electron filamentation and sideband instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Stephan; Berger, R. L.; Banks, J. W.; Cohen, B. I.; Chapman, T.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Rozmus, W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Winjum, B. J.; Valeo, E. J.

    2012-10-01

    Kinetic simulations of nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPW) are presented in 2D with the Vlasov code LOKI (2 space and 2 velocity dimensions; Banks et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 052102 (2011)). Propagating EPWs are created with an external wave potential with uniform transverse amplitude. The evolution of the plasma wave field and its self-consistent quasi-steady distribution of trapped electrons is studied after the external drive is turned off. For finite-amplitude EPWs, the onset of the trapped-electron-induced filamentation instability (H. Rose, Phys. Plasmas 15, 042311 (2008)) and trapped electron sideband instability (S. Brunner and E. Valeo, PRL 93, 145003 (2004)) are studied as a function of wave amplitude and k0λDe, where k0 is the wavenumber of the external potential. We extend the theory of Kruer et al PRL 23, 1969 to 2D to find growth rates of both instabilities and compare these to the ones obtained from the simulations. In the nonlinear state, the distribution of resonant electrons is dramatically modified

  14. Kinetic study of electrostatic twisted waves instability in nonthermal dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Kashif; Lazar, M.; Mahmood, Shahzad; Aman-ur-Rehman, Poedts, S.

    2017-03-01

    The kinetic theory of electrostatic twisted waves' instability in a dusty plasma is developed in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons, ions, and dust particles. The kappa distributed electrons are considered to have a drift velocity. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode functions defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to investigate the growth rates of the electrostatic twisted waves in a non-thermal dusty plasma. The growth rates of the dust ion acoustic twisted mode (DIATM) and dust acoustic twisted mode (DATM) are obtained analytically and also pictorial presented numerically. The instability condition for the DIATM and DATM is also discussed with different plasma parameters. The growth rates of DIATM and DATM are larger when the drifted electrons are non-Maxwellian distributed and smaller for the Maxwellian distributed drifted electrons in the presence of the helical electric field.

  15. Merging for Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic Modeling of the Multiple Plasma Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a merging procedure for the Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic (PMCPK) method in case of inter-penetrating flow (multiple plasma beams). We examine the standard particle-in-cell (PIC) and the PMCPK methods in the case of particle acceleration by shock surfing for a wide range of the control numerical parameters. The plasma dynamics is described by a hybrid (particle-ion-fluid-electron) model. Note that one may need a mesh if modeling with the computation of an electromagnetic field. Our calculations use specified, time-independent electromagnetic fields for the shock, rather than self-consistently generated fields. While a particle-mesh method is a well-verified approach, the CPK method seems to be a good approach for multiscale modeling that includes multiple regions with various particle/fluid plasma behavior. However, the CPK method is still in need of a verification for studying the basic plasma phenomena: particle heating and acceleration by collisionless shocks, magnetic field reconnection, beam dynamics, etc.

  16. Description of deviations from Arrhenius behavior in chemical kinetics and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho-Silva, Valter Henrique; Coutinho, Nayara Dantas; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    The Arrhenius law has been used successfully to describe the temperature dependence for a considerable number of rate processes in many areas of molecular science. In order to provide a description of non-Arrhenius processes, we illustrate a formula permitting to evaluate prototypes systems where the temperature dependence of the rate constant is concave (super-Arrhenius), convex (sub-Arrhenius), or may change the curvature (anti-Arrhenius) in the semilog plots against reciprocal temperature. Modern experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are providing an ample phenomenology for deviations especially at low temperatures.

  17. Comparison of plasma plume expansion simulations using fully kinetic electron treatment and electron fluid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Copplestone, S.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.; Munz, C.-D.

    2016-11-01

    The expansion of a plasma plume resulting from laser ablation plays an important role in a large number of applications, e.g., material processing, medical laser applications or novel space propulsion concepts. Here, a high-order three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code is used to simulate such a plasma plume expansion. A major challenge in this kind of simulation is the handling of the electrons due to their low inertia and resultant high acceleration. Therefore, two separate treatments of electron modeling are compared. Firstly, the electrons are simulated as a normal particle species in a kinetic manner, which strongly decreases the time step size and thereby increases the computational effort. Secondly, the electrons are simulated using an electron fluid model that reduces the computational cost but is less accurate [1]. Additionally, the results from the fully kinetic model are compared regarding chemical reactions, in this case ionization and ion recombination. The electron potential is solved using a high-order highly parallel Hybrid Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method [2]. This method also allows simulating computationally expensive three-dimensional setups.

  18. A new dynamic fluid-kinetic model for plasma transport in the plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Tu, J.; Song, P.

    2014-12-01

    A new dynamic fluid-kinetic (DyFK) model is developed for investigating the plasma transport along a closed flux tube in the plasmasphere by coupling a truncated version of the field line interhemispheric plasma (FLIP) model at altitudes below 800 km and a generalized semi-kinetic (GSK) model above it with an overlapped boundary region (800 km-1100 km) in both hemispheres. The flux tube is allowed to move both radially away from the Earth and azimuthally around the Earth. Ion species O+ and He+ are for the first time treated as simulation particles in a numerical model for the plasmasphere. The simulation particles are subjected to the parallel electric field, magnetic mirror force, gravity, centrifugal force and Coulomb collisions, as well as possible wave-particle interaction. The effects of ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling on the day-night evolution of the plasmasphere and the relative abundance of O+ and He+ are studied. Simulations are also conducted to investigate the influence of wave-particle interaction on the field-aligned density distributions of ions (O+/ H+/ He+) and their velocity distributions.

  19. Selfconsistent vibrational and free electron kinetics for CO2 dissociation in cold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitelli, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The activation of CO2 by cold plasmas is receiving new theoretical interest thanks to two European groups. The Bogaerts group developed a global model for the activation of CO2 trying to reproduce the experimental values for DBD and microwave discharges. The approach of Pietanza et al was devoted to understand the dependence of electron energy distribution function (eedf) of pure CO2 on the presence of concentrations of electronically and vibrationally excited states taken as parameter. To understand the importance of the vibrational excitation in the dissociation process Pietanza et al compared an upper limit to the dissociation process from a pure vibrational mechanism (PVM) with the corresponding electron impact dissociation rate, the prevalence of the two models depending on the reduced electric field and on the choice of the electron molecule cross section database. Improvement of the Pietanza et al model is being considered by coupling the time dependent Boltzmann solver with the non equilibrium vibrational kinetics of asymmetric mode and with simplified plasma chemistry kinetics describing the ionization/recombination process and the excitation-deexcitation of a metastable level at 10.5eV. A new PVM mechanism is also considered. Preliminary results, for both discharge and post discharge conditions, emphasize the action of superelastic collisions involving both vibrationally and electronically excited states in affecting the eedf. The new results can be used to plan a road map for future developments of numerical codes for rationalizing existing experimental values, as well as, for indicating new experimental situations.

  20. Advanced kinetic plasma model implementation for new large-scale investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddell, Noah; Shumlak, Uri

    2013-10-01

    A kinetic plasma model for of one or more particle species described by the Vlasov equation and coupled to fully dynamic electromagnetic forces is presented. The model is implemented as evolving continuous PDF (probability density function) in particle phase space (position-velocity) as opposed to particle-in-cell (PIC) methods which discretely sample the PDF. A new boundary condition for the truncated velocity-space edge, motivated by physical properties of the PDF tail, is introduced. The hyperbolic model is evolved using the discontinuous Galerkin numerical method, conserving system mass, momentum, and energy - an advantage compared to PIC. Simulations of two- to six-dimensional phase space are computationally expensive. To maximize performance and scaling to large simulations, a new framework, WARPM, has been developed for many-core (e.g. GPU) computing architectures. WARPM supports both multi-fluid and continuum kinetic plasma models as coupled hyperbolic systems with nearest neighbor predictable communication. Exemplary physics results and computational performance are presented.

  1. Benchmark of the local drift-kinetic models for neoclassical transport simulation in helical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.; Satake, S.; Kanno, R.; Sugama, H.; Matsuoka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are zero orbit width (ZOW), zero magnetic drift, DKES-like, and global, as classified in Matsuoka et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of Helically Symmetric Experiment, Large Helical Device (LHD), and Wendelstein 7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of E ×B incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models when E ×B is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. For example, Mp≤0.4 where Mp is the poloidal Mach number. On the other hand, when E ×B and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at Er≃0 . In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works well to suppress such unphysical behavior of the radial transport caused in the simulations. It is demonstrated that the ZOW model has the advantage of mitigating the unphysical behavior in the several magnetic geometries, and that it also implements the evaluation of bootstrap current in LHD with the low computation cost compared to the global model.

  2. Kinetic analysis of spin current contribution to spectrum of electromagnetic waves in spin-1/2 plasma. I. Dielectric permeability tensor for magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2017-02-01

    The dielectric permeability tensor for spin polarized plasmas is derived in terms of the spin-1/2 quantum kinetic model in six-dimensional phase space. Expressions for the distribution function and spin distribution function are derived in linear approximations on the path of dielectric permeability tensor derivation. The dielectric permeability tensor is derived for the spin-polarized degenerate electron gas. It is also discussed at the finite temperature regime, where the equilibrium distribution function is presented by the spin-polarized Fermi-Dirac distribution. Consideration of the spin-polarized equilibrium states opens possibilities for the kinetic modeling of the thermal spin current contribution in the plasma dynamics.

  3. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main results, it

  4. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-02

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main results, it

  5. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-02

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basismore » sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main

  6. Kinetic Description of Ionospheric Outflows Based on the Exact Form of Fokker-Planck Collision Operator: Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Khabibrakhmanov, Ildar K.; Glocer, Alex

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a finite difference implementation of the kinetic Fokker-Planck model with an exact form of the nonlinear collisional operator, The model is time dependent and three-dimensional; one spatial dimension and two in velocity space. The spatial dimension is aligned with the local magnetic field, and the velocity space is defined by the magnitude of the velocity and the cosine of pitch angle. An important new feature of model, the concept of integration along the particle trajectories, is discussed in detail. Integration along the trajectories combined with the operator time splitting technique results in a solution scheme which accurately accounts for both the fast convection of the particles along the magnetic field lines and relatively slow collisional process. We present several tests of the model's performance and also discuss simulation results of the evolution of the plasma distribution for realistic conditions in Earth's plasmasphere under different scenarios.

  7. Nitric oxide kinetics in the afterglow of a diffuse plasma filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, D.; Montello, A.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2014-08-01

    A suite of laser diagnostics is used to study kinetics of vibrational energy transfer and plasma chemical reactions in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge and afterglow in N2 and dry air at 100 Torr. Laser-induced fluorescence of NO and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of O and N atoms are used to measure absolute, time-resolved number densities of these species after the discharge pulse, and picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is used to measure time-resolved rotational temperature and ground electronic state N2(v = 0-4) vibrational level populations. The plasma filament diameter, determined from plasma emission and NO planar laser-induced fluorescence images, remains nearly constant after the discharge pulse, over a few hundred microseconds, and does not exhibit expansion on microsecond time scale. Peak temperature in the discharge and the afterglow is low, T ≈ 370 K, in spite of significant vibrational nonequilibrium, with peak N2 vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K. Significant vibrational temperature rise in the afterglow is likely caused by the downward N2-N2 vibration-vibration (V-V) energy transfer. Simple kinetic modeling of time-resolved N, O, and NO number densities in the afterglow, on the time scale longer compared to relaxation and quenching time of excited species generated in the plasma, is in good agreement with the data. In nitrogen, the N atom density after the discharge pulse is controlled by three-body recombination and radial diffusion. In air, N, NO and O concentrations are dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, N + NO → N2 + O, and ozone formation reaction, O + O2 + M → O3 + M, respectively. The effect of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules and excited N atoms on NO formation kinetics is estimated to be negligible. The results suggest that NO formation in the nanosecond pulse discharge is dominated by reactions of excited electronic states of nitrogen, occurring on

  8. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Y. H.; Kim, W.; Park, K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) according to different activation protocols. Methods Two manual preparation procedures (single-spin (SS) at 900 g for five minutes; double-spin (DS) at 900 g for five minutes and then 1500 g for 15 minutes) were performed for each of 14 healthy subjects. Both preparations were tested for platelet activation by one of three activation protocols: no activation, activation with calcium (Ca) only, or calcium with a low dose (50 IU per 1 ml PRP) of thrombin. Each preparation was divided into four aliquots and incubated for one hour, 24 hours, 72 hours, and seven days. The cytokine-release kinetics were evaluated by assessing PDGF, TGF, VEGF, FGF, IL-1, and MMP-9 concentrations with bead-based sandwich immunoassay. Results The concentration of cytokine released from PRP varied over time and was influenced by various activation protocols. Ca-only activation had a significant effect on the DS PRPs (where the VEGF, FGF, and IL-1 concentrations were sustained) while Ca/thrombin activation had effects on both SS and DS PRPs (where the PDGF and VEGF concentrations were sustained and the TGF and FGF concentrations were short). The IL-1 content showed a significant increase with Ca-only or Ca/thrombin activation while these activations did not increase the MMP-9 concentration. Conclusion The SS and DS methods differed in their effect on cytokine release, and this effect varied among the cytokines analysed. In addition, low dose of thrombin/calcium activation increased the overall cytokine release of the PRP preparations over seven days, relative to that with a calcium-only supplement or non-activation. Cite this article: Professor J. H. Oh. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:37–45. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000540 PMID:26862077

  9. Description of time-varying desorption kinetics. Release of naphthalene from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, D.F.; Stedinger, J.R.; Lion, L.W.; Shuler, M.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Release rates of naphthalene from suspensions of freshly contaminated (days to weeks) and aged (approximately 30 years) soil samples were obtained using a gas purge method. A continuously increasing resistance to desorption was observed with increasing purge time. Initial desorption rates were similar to those estimated using available empirical relationships, but subsequent desorption rates were lower by more than 1 order of magnitude. A model incorporating a continuum of compartments with a gamma ([Gamma]) distribution of rate coefficients was postulated to describe the experimental data. An analytical equation with two adjustable parameters was obtained for the mass fraction desorbed. Release profiles with this [open quotes][Gamma] model[close quotes] were able to describe the experimental release profiles for long term desorption experiments. An implication of the gamma model is that increased incubation time will allow organic compounds to be sorbed to compartments or regions in the sorbent that exhibit slow adsorption/desorption kinetics. This has important implications for the fate and remediation of sites that have been contaminated with hydrophobic organic compounds for extended time periods. 31 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Lattice-Gas Model Description of Kinetic Roughening and Fluctuations in Chemical Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammaro, Michael; Evans, Jim

    1996-03-01

    The ZGB model [1] for CO-oxidation on surfaces displays a discontinuous transition from a reactive to a CO-poisoned state, with increasing CO partial pressure. We consider the evolution of the interface between these two states in the vicinity of the poisoning transition [2]. We observe large ``intrinsic fluctuations" at the interface of the order of 10-20 lattice spacings, together with the gradual development of long-wavelength fluctuations. The latter are described by the KPZ-theory for noise-induced kinetic roughening of driven interfaces, for CO partial pressures strictly below the poisoning transition. Distinct behavior is observed and characterized right at the transition. We also show that the influence of introducing surface diffusion of adsorbed reactants into the model is to dramatically quench the intrinsic fluctuations. [1] R.M. Ziff, E. Gulari, and Y. Barshad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, p.2553 (1986). [2] J.W. Evans and T.R. Ray, Phys. Rev. E 50, p.4302 (1994).

  11. Sacrificial bonds and hidden length in biomaterials -- a kinetic description of strength and toughness in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.; Carlson, Jean M.

    2013-03-01

    Sacrificial bonds and hidden length in structural molecules account for the greatly increased fracture toughness of biological materials compared to synthetic materials without such structural features, by providing a molecular-scale mechanism of energy dissipation. One example of occurrence of sacrificial bonds and hidden length is in the polymeric glue connection between collagen fibrils in animal bone. In this talk, we propose a simple kinetic model that describes the breakage of sacrificial bonds and the revelation of hidden length, based on Bell's theory. We postulate a master equation governing the rates of bond breakage and formation, at the mean-field level, allowing for the number of bonds and hidden lengths to take up non-integer values between successive, discrete bond-breakage events. This enables us to predict the mechanical behavior of a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of polymers at different stretching rates. We find that both the rupture peak heights and maximum stretching distance increase with the stretching rate. In addition, our theory naturally permits the possibility of self-healing in such biological structures.

  12. Magnetic nulls in three-dimensional kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    We present a survey of magnetic nulls and associated energy dissipation in different three-dimensional kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of space plasmas. The configurations under study include: a traditional Harris current sheet and current sheets with asymmetric density distribution, dipolar and quadrupolar planetary magnetospheres, lunar magnetic anomalies, and decaying turbulence. Nulls are detected in the simulation snapshots by the topological degree method. In all runs except the quadrupolar magnetospere the dominating majority of nulls are of spiral topological type. When supported by strong currents, these nulls indicate the regions of strong energy dissipation. Dissipation, often accompanied by the changes in magnetic topology, is caused by plasma instabilities in the current channels or on their interfaces. Radial nulls show less activity, they can be created or destroyed in pairs, via topological bifurcations. Although such events demonstrate energy release, they are rather rare and short-living. An important implication of our study to observations is that magnetic topology should not be considered independently of other plasma properties such as currents.

  13. Kinetic instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma sustained by high-power microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Viktorov, M. E.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the studies of plasma kinetic instabilities in the electron cyclotron frequency range carried out over the last decade at the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod. We investigate the nonequilibrium plasma created and sustained by high-power microwave radiation of a gyrotron under the electron cyclotron resonance condition. Resonant plasma heating results in the formation of at least two electron components, one of which, more dense and cold, determines the dispersion properties of the high-frequency waves, and the other, a small group of energetic electrons with a highly anisotropic velocity distribution, is responsible for the excitation of unstable waves. Dynamic spectra and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic emission are studied with high temporal resolution. Interpretation of observed data is based on the cyclotron maser paradigm; in this context, a laboratory modeling of non-stationary wave-particle interaction processes has much in common with similar processes occurring in the magnetosphere of Earth, planets, and solar coronal loops.

  14. Jovian Plasma Torus Interaction with Europa: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation. First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa-moon-magnetosphere system with respect to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements, (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy etal.,2007;Shematovichetal.,2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyro radius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions).Non-thermal distributions of upstream plasma will be addressed in future work. Photoionization,electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider two models for background plasma:(a) with O(++) ions; (b) with O(++) and S(++) ions. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended cold population (Cassidyetal.,2007). A few first simulations already include an induced magnetic dipole; however, several important effects of induced magnetic fields arising from oceanic shell conductivity will be addressed in later work.

  15. Nonlinear Gyrokinetics: A Powerful Tool for the Description of Microturbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    John E. Krommes

    2010-09-27

    Gyrokinetics is the description of low-frequency dynamics in magnetized plasmas. In magnetic-confinement fusion, it provides the most fundamental basis for numerical simulations of microturbulence; there are astrophysical applications as well. In this tutorial, a sketch of the derivation of the novel dynamical system comprising the nonlinear gyrokinetic (GK) equation (GKE) and the coupled electrostatic GK Poisson equation will be given by using modern Lagrangian and Lie perturbation methods. No background in plasma physics is required in order to appreciate the logical development. The GKE describes the evolution of an ensemble of gyrocenters moving in a weakly inhomogeneous background magnetic field and in the presence of electromagnetic perturbations with wavelength of the order of the ion gyroradius. Gyrocenters move with effective drifts, which may be obtained by an averaging procedure that systematically, order by order, removes gyrophase dependence. To that end, the use of the Lagrangian differential one-form as well as the content and advantages of Lie perturbation theory will be explained. The electromagnetic fields follow via Maxwell's equations from the charge and current density of the particles. Particle and gyrocenter densities differ by an important polarization effect. That is calculated formally by a "pull-back" (a concept from differential geometry) of the gyrocenter distribution to the laboratory coordinate system. A natural truncation then leads to the closed GK dynamical system. Important properties such as GK energy conservation and fluctuation noise will be mentioned briefly, as will the possibility (and diffculties) of deriving nonlinear gyro fluid equations suitable for rapid numerical solution -- although it is probably best to directly simulate the GKE. By the end of the tutorial, students should appreciate the GKE as an extremely powerful tool and will be prepared for later lectures describing its applications to physical problems.

  16. Velocity Fourier transform solution of a model collision operator. [to obtain kinetic equation for waves in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catto, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    A simpler technique than those introduced by Lenard and Bernstein (1958), and Dougherty (1964) is employed to obtain the perturbed species density from a specified kinetic equation for a plasma in a given uniform magnetic field. The technique is a generalization of the velocity-Fourier transform method employed by Karpman (1967) for B sub 0 identical to zero, and relies on the fact that in transform space the model collision operator, used to obtain the kinetic equation for waves in a magnetized plasma, contains only first derivatives. The technique is illustrated by evaluating the perturbed density of an arbitrary species.

  17. Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM): description and sensitivity to some estimated kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraborrelli, Domenico; Cabrera Perez, David; Sander, Rolf; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Despite decades of reasearch, global atmospheric chemistry models still have significant biases compared to the estimated distribution and evolution of tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical. The gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is acknowledged to play an important role among the processes affecting tropospheric ozone, methane lifetime and aerosol evolution. Thus, chemical mechanisms of very diverse complexity have been developed for the major VOCs. However, all mechanisms present shortcomings such as neglection or lumping of intermediates and estimate of many rate constants and product distributions. Here, we present a VOC oxidation mechanism of intermediate complexity called the Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM). With about 400 species and 1500 reactions, it represents the oxidation of about 20 primarily emitted VOCs comprising small alkanes and alkenes, isoprene, pinenes and monocyclic aromatic compounds. The development protocol significantly borrows from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). However, MOM distinguishes itself for a number of features. First, the structure activity relationship for estimating the rate constants involving hydroxyl radical is site-specific and dependent on temperature. Second, the alkyl nitrate yields are considered to be dependent on temperature, pressure and molecular structure. RO2 + HO2 reaction kinetics is consistent with the recent direct studies of \\chem{OH}-reformation. Isoprene chemistry includes the latest experimental advancements with respect to OH-recycling and alkyl nitrate chemistry. Pinenes chemistry is largely the one by the MCM but with some modifications according to the work of the Leuven's group. Finally, the chemistry of the aromatics is also borrowed from the MCM but with additional photolysis of ortho-nitrophenols leading to \\chem{HONO} formation. The sensitivity of the model to the temperature and pressure dependence of estimated \\chem{OH} rate constants and alkyl nitrate yields will

  18. Effects of He and Ar ion kinetic energies in protection of organosilicate glass from O{sub 2} plasma damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joe; Graves, David B.; Kazi, Haseeb; Gaddam, Sneha; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2013-07-15

    In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Fourier transform infrared studies of He plasma and Ar{sup +} ion bombardment pretreatments of organosilicate glass demonstrate that such pretreatments inhibit subsequent O{sub 2} plasma-induced carbon loss by forming a SiO{sub 2}-like damaged overlayer, and that the degree of protection correlates directly with increased ion kinetic energies, but not with the thickness of the SiO{sub 2} overlayer. This thickness is observed by XPS to be roughly constant and <1 nm regardless of ion energies involved. The data indicate that ion kinetic energies are an important parameter in protective noble gas plasma pretreatments to inhibit O{sub 2} plasma-induced carbon loss.

  19. Nonlinear coupling of lower hybrid waves to the kinetic low-frequency plasma response in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanbonmatsu, K. Y.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.

    A hybrid kinetic-fluid model is developed which is relevant to lower hybrid spikelets observed in the topside auroral ionosphere [Vago et al., 1992; Eriksson et al., 1994]. In contrast to previous fluid models [Shapiro et al., 1995; Tam and Chang, 1995; Seyler, 1994; Shapiro et al., 1993] our linear low frequency plasma response is magnetized and kinetic. Fluid theory is used to incorporate the nonlinear wave coupling. Performing a linear stability analysis, we calculate the growth rate for the modulational instability, driven by a lower hybrid wave pump. We find that both the magnetic and kinetic effects inhibit the modulational instability.

  20. Theoretical Modeling of Radiation-driven Atomic Kinetics of a Neon Photoionized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmaz, Tunay

    We report on a theoretical study on atomic kinetics modeling of a photoionized neon plasma at conditions relevant to laboratory experiments performed at the Z-machine in Sandia National Laboratories. We describe an atomic kinetics model and code, ATOKIN, that was developed and used to compute the atomic level population distribution. The study includes atomic level sensitivity with respect to energy level structure, radiation and transient effects, electron temperature and x-ray drive sensitivity and an idea for electron temperature extraction from a level population ratio. The neon atomic model considers several ionization stages of highly-charged neon ions as well as a detailed structure of non-autoionizing and autoionizing energy levels in each ion. In the energy level sensitivity study, the atomic model was changed by adding certain types of energy levels such as singly-excited, auto-ionizing doubly-excited states. Furthermore, these levels were added ion by ion for the most populated ions. Atomic processes populating and de-populating the energy levels consider photoexcitation and photoionization due to the external radiation flux, and spontaneous and collisional atomic processes including plasma radiation trapping. Relevant atomic cross sections and rates were computed with the atomic structure and scattering FAC code. The calculations were performed at constant particle number density and driven by the time-histories of temperature and external radiation flux. These conditions were selected in order to resemble those achieved in photoionized plasma experiments at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories. For the same set of time histories, calculations were done in a full time-dependent mode and also as a sequence of instantaneous, steady states. Differences between both calculations are useful to identify transient effects in the ionization and atomic kinetics of the photoionized plasma, and its dependence on the atomic model and plasma environmental

  1. Nitrogen Fixation by Gliding Arc Plasma: Better Insight by Chemical Kinetics Modelling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizong; Patil, Bhaskar; Heijkers, Stjin; Hessel, Volker; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-03-08

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into valuable compounds, that is, so-called nitrogen fixation, is gaining increased interest, owing to the essential role in the nitrogen cycle of the biosphere. Plasma technology, and more specifically gliding arc plasma, has great potential in this area, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, we developed a detailed chemical kinetics model for a pulsed-power gliding-arc reactor operating at atmospheric pressure for nitrogen oxide synthesis. Experiments are performed to validate the model and reasonable agreement is reached between the calculated and measured NO and NO2 yields and the corresponding energy efficiency for NOx formation for different N2 /O2 ratios, indicating that the model can provide a realistic picture of the plasma chemistry. Therefore, we can use the model to investigate the reaction pathways for the formation and loss of NOx . The results indicate that vibrational excitation of N2 in the gliding arc contributes significantly to activating the N2 molecules, and leads to an energy efficient way of NOx production, compared to the thermal process. Based on the underlying chemistry, the model allows us to propose solutions on how to further improve the NOx formation by gliding arc technology. Although the energy efficiency of the gliding-arc-based nitrogen fixation process at the present stage is not comparable to the world-scale Haber-Bosch process, we believe our study helps us to come up with more realistic scenarios of entering a cutting-edge innovation in new business cases for the decentralised production of fertilisers for agriculture, in which low-temperature plasma technology might play an important role.

  2. Kinetic simulations and reduced modeling of longitudinal sideband instabilities in non-linear electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, S.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Hausammann, L.; Valeo, E. J.

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic Vlasov simulations of one-dimensional finite amplitude Electron Plasma Waves are performed in a multi-wavelength long system. A systematic study of the most unstable linear sideband mode, in particular its growth rate γ and quasi- wavenumber δk, is carried out by scanning the amplitude and wavenumber of the initial wave. Simulation results are successfully compared against numerical and analytical solutions to the reduced model by Kruer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 838 (1969)] for the Trapped Particle Instability (TPI). A model recently suggested by Dodin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)], which in addition to the TPI accounts for the so-called Negative Mass Instability because of a more detailed representation of the trapped particle dynamics, is also studied and compared with simulations.

  3. Fully kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnction in semi-collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William S; Roytershteyn, Vadim S; Albright, Brian J; Yin, Lin; Bowers, Kevin J; Karimabadi, Homa

    2009-01-01

    The influence of Coulomb collisions on the dynamics of magnetic reconnection is examined using fully kinetic simulations with a Monte-Carlo treatment of the Fokker-Planck collision operator. This powerful first-principles approach offers a bridge between kinetic and fluid regimes, which may prove useful for understanding the applicability of various fluid models. In order to lay the necessary groundwork, the collision algorithm is first carefully bench marked for a homogeneous plasma against theoretical predictions for beam-plasma interactions and electrical resistivity. Next, the collisional decay of a current layer is examined as a function of guide field, allowing direct comparisons with transport theory for the parallel and perpendicular resistivity as well as the thermoelectric force. Finally, the transition between collisional and collision less reconnection is examined in neutral sheet geometry. For modest Lundquist numbers S {approx}< 1000, a distinct transition is observed when the thickness of the Sweet-Parker layers falls below the ion inertia length {delta}{sub sp} {approx}< d,. At higher Lundquist number, deviations from the Sweet-Parker scaling are observed due to the growth of plasmoids (secondary-islands) within the elongated resistive layer. In certain cases, this instability leads to the onset of fast reconnection sooner than expected from {delta}{sub sp} {approx} d, condition. After the transition to fast reconnection, elongated electron current layers are formed which are unstable to the formation of new plasmoids. The structure and time-dependence of the electron diffusion region in these semi-collisional regimes is profoundly different than reported in two-fluid simulations.

  4. Steady state kinetic studies of purified yeast plasma membrane proton-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Hammes, G G

    1986-05-05

    The plasma membrane H+-ATPase from bakers' yeast was purified and reconstituted with phosphatidylserine. The steady state kinetics of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the H+-ATPase were studied over a wide range of Mg2+ and ATP concentrations. Whereas MgATP was the substrate hydrolyzed, excess concentrations of either Mg2+ or ATP were inhibitory. The dependence of the steady state initial velocity of ATP hydrolysis on the concentration of MgATP at a fixed concentration of Mg2+ was sigmoidal rather than hyperbolic. This precluded mechanisms involving only activation and inhibition by Mg2+ and competitive inhibition by ATP. Two alternative interpretations of these results are: 1) the enzyme possesses multiple catalytic sites which interact cooperatively; or 2) the enzyme can exist in multiple conformational states which catalyze MgATP hydrolysis by parallel pathways. The rate laws for both mechanisms are identical so that the two mechanisms cannot be distinguished on the basis of the kinetic data. The data are well fit by the rate law for these mechanisms with the inclusion of competitive inhibition by Mg2+ and ATP and an independent inhibition site for Mg2+.

  5. Tailoring the electron dynamics and chemical kinetics in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Timo

    2015-09-01

    Radio-frequency atmospheric pressure plasmas are versatile and efficient sources for reactive species at ambient room temperature. The non-equilibrium chemical kinetics is initiated and determined by the electron dynamics. Due to the strongly collisional environment and associated short electron energy relaxation times the electron dynamics can be tailored using multi-frequency power coupling techniques, enabling separate control of key parameters like electron density and electron mean energy. Details of the chemical kinetics depend on the feedgas composition and desired application. Measurements and predictive simulations of key reactive species are equally challenging due to the strongly collisional environment and their multi-scale nature in space and time. The most promising approach is the exploitation of complementary advantages in direct measurements combined with specifically designed numerical simulations. The employed diagnostic techniques include picosecond laser spectroscopy, synchrotron VUV spectroscopy, IR absorption spectroscopy and nanosecond optical imaging spectroscopy. The presentation will focus on examples of He-O2-N2 mixtures for bio-medical applications and He/Ar-CO2 mixtures for CO2 conversion into value-added chemicals. This work has been supported by the UK EPSRC (EP/K018388/1 & EP/H003797/1).

  6. Upper limit of electron fluxes generated by kinetic Alfvén waves in Maxwellian plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Rankin, R.; Vasko, I. Y.

    2016-09-01

    We consider electron acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves in the equatorial inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet boundary layer. The competition between the accelerating effect of the wave parallel electric field and mirror force acting on particles in an inhomogeneous background magnetic field generates an effective potential well where electrons can be trapped and accelerated. We compare energy variations of trapped and transient resonant electrons and show that these variations almost compensate each other. Thus, energy provided to waves by transient particles is transferred to trapped particles. This effect allows waves accelerate trapped electrons without being significantly damped. Using energy balance equations, we estimate the maximum flux of electrons accelerated via trapping into Landau resonance with kinetic Alfvén waves. For a wide range of system parameters (i.e., ion to electron temperature ratio, magnetic field amplitude, and wave number and wave frequency), acceleration of trapped electrons can generate fluxes with amplitude about 5-25% of the background thermal fluxes. We determine parametric regions for the most efficient acceleration.

  7. A Reduced-order NLTE Kinetic Model for Radiating Plasmas of Outer Envelopes of Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, Alessandro; Mansour, Nagi N.; Panesi, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The present work proposes a self-consistent reduced-order NLTE kinetic model for radiating plasmas found in the outer layers of stellar atmospheres. A detailed collisional-radiative kinetic mechanism is constructed by leveraging the most up-to-date set of ab initio and experimental data available in the literature. This constitutes the starting point for the derivation of a reduced-order model, obtained by lumping the bound energy states into groups. In order to determine the needed thermo-physical group properties, uniform and Maxwell–Boltzmann energy distributions are used to reconstruct the energy population of each group. Finally, the reduced set of governing equations for the material gas and the radiation field is obtained based on the moment method. Applications consider the steady flow across a shock wave in partially ionized hydrogen. The results clearly demonstrate that adopting a Maxwell–Boltzmann grouping allows, on the one hand, for a substantial reduction of the number of unknowns and, on the other, to maintain accuracy for both gas and radiation quantities. Also, it is observed that, when neglecting line radiation, the use of two groups already leads to a very accurate resolution of the photo-ionization precursor, internal relaxation, and radiative cooling regions. The inclusion of line radiation requires adopting just one additional group to account for optically thin losses in the α, β, and γ lines of the Balmer and Paschen series. This trend has been observed for a wide range of shock wave velocities.

  8. Plasma kinetics of Ar/O{sub 2} magnetron discharge by two-dimensional multifluid modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, C.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.; Gousset, G.

    2010-03-15

    Multifluid two-dimensional model was developed to describe the plasma kinetics of the direct current Ar/O{sub 2} magnetron, coupling two modules: charged particles and neutrals. The first module deals with three positive ions - Ar{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, and O{sup +} - and two negative species - e{sup -} and O{sup -} - treated by the moments of Boltzmann's equation. The second one follows seven neutral species (Ar, O{sub 2}, O, O{sub 3}, and related metastables) by the multicomponent diffusion technique. The two modules are self-consistently coupled by the mass conservation and kinetic coefficients taking into account more than 100 volume reactions. The steady state is obtained when the overall convergence is achieved. Calculations for 10%O{sub 2} in Ar/O{sub 2} mixture at 2.67 and 4 Pa show that the oxygen excited species are mainly created by electron collisions in the negative glow of the discharge. Decreasing the pressure down to 0.67 Pa, the model reveals the nonlocal behavior of the reactive species. The density gradient of O{sub 2} ground state is reversed with respect to all gradients of the other reactive species, since the latter ones originate from the molecular ground state of oxygen. It is also found that the wall reactions drastically modify the space gradient of neutral reactive species, at least as much as the pressure, even if the discharge operates in compound mode.

  9. Three-Dimensional Kinetic Simulation of the Nonlinear Evolution of Lower-Hybrid Waves in the Auroral Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2000-01-01

    Under this grant we have done research on the following topics. 1) Development of Parallel PIC Codes (PPIC); 2) Evolution of Lower-Hybrid Pump Waves; 3) Electron-beam Driven Plasma Electrodynamics; and 4) Studies on Inertial and Kinetic Alfven Waves. A brief summary of our findings and resulting publications are given.

  10. Implementation of the Kinetic Plasma Code with Locally Recursive non-Locally Asynchronous Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelkina, A. Yu; Levchenko, V. D.; Goryachev, I. A.

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulation is presently considered impractical for several relevant plasma kinetics problems due to limitations of computer hardware even with the use of supercomputers. To overcome the existing limitations it is suggested to develop algorithms which would effectively utilize the computer memory subsystem hierarchy to optimize the dependency graph traversal rules. The ideas for general cases of numerical simulation and implementation of such algorithms to particle-in-cell code is discussed in the paper. This approach enables the simulation of previously unaccessible for modeling problems and the execution of series of numerical experiments in reasonable time. The latter is demonstrated on a multiscale problem of the development of filamentation instability in laser interaction with overdense plasma. One variant of the simulation with parameters typical for simulations on supercomputers is performed with the use of one cluster node. The series of such experiments revealed the dependency of energy loss on incoming laser pulse amplitude to be nonmonotonic and reach over 4%, an interesting result for research of fast ignition concept.

  11. Nonlinear kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas via particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froese, Aaron; Smolyakov, Andrei; Sydorenko, Dmytro

    2007-11-01

    Kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas due to thermal motion of particles modified by self-consistent magnetic fields are studied using a particle-in-cell code. In the low pressure, low frequency regime, electron mean free paths are large relative to device size and the trajectories are strongly curved by the induced rf magnetic field. Analytic linear theories are unable to recover effects accumulated along each nonlinear path. Therefore, the simulated ICP is made progressively more complex to find the source of observed plasma behaviours. With only thermal motion modifying the wave-particle interaction, nonlocal behaviour becomes dominant at low frequencies, causing an anomalous skin effect with increased skin depth and power absorption and decreased ponderomotive force. However, when influenced by magnetic fields, the nonlocal effects are suppressed at large wave amplitudes due to nonlinear trapping. A mechanism is proposed for this low frequency restoration of local behaviour. Finally, a low rate of electron-neutral collisions is found to counteract the nonlinear behaviour, and hence reinforces nonlocal behaviour.

  12. Kinetic Alfven wave instability in a Lorentzian dusty plasma: Non-resonant particle approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rubab, N.; Biernat, H. K.; Erkaev, V.; Langmayr, D.

    2011-07-15

    Analysis of the electromagnetic streaming instability is carried out which is related to the cross field drift of kappa distributed ions. The linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic wave using Vlasov-fluid equations in a dusty plasma is derived. Modified two stream instability (MTSI) in a dusty plasma has been discussed in the limit {omega}{sub pd}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}<<1. Numerical calculations of the growth rate of instability have been carried out. Growth rates of kinetic Alfven instability are found to be small as compared to MTSI. Maximum growth rates for both instabilities occur in oblique directions for V{sub 0}{>=}V{sub A}. It is shown that the presence of both the charged dust particles and perpendicular ion beam sensibly modify the dispersion relation of low-frequency electromagnetic wave. The dispersion characteristics are found to be insensible to the superthermal character of the ion distribution function. Applications to different intersteller regions are discussed.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Ion Beams in Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, A.; Bennett, N.; Falabella, S.; Higginson, D. P.; Olsen, R.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Povilus, A.; Shaw, B.; Sipes, N.; Welch, D. R.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-10-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches are compact devices capable of producing MeV ion beams, x-rays, and (for D or DT gas fill) neutrons. We report on predictions of ion beam generation using the particle-in-cell code LSP. These simulations include full-scale electrodes, an external pulse power circuit and model through the run-down phase as a fluid, transitioning to a fully kinetic simulation during the run-in phase and through the pinch. Simulations of a deuterium filled DPF predict a substantial number of ions accelerated to energies greater than 50 keV escape the dense plasma in the pinch region and could be used to enhance total neutron yield by employing a solid target. Results of the simulations will be presented and compared to experimental observations. LLNL-ABS-697617 This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and with support from the Computing Grand Challenge program at LLNL.

  14. Ion probe beam experiments and kinetic modeling in a dense plasma focus Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. Ellsworth, J. Falabella, S. Link, A. McLean, H. Rusnak, B. Sears, J. Tang, V.; Welch, D.

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) emits multiple-MeV ions in a ∼cm length. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood. We are exploring the origins of these large gradients using measurements of an ion probe beam injected into a DPF during the pinch phase and the first kinetic simulations of a DPF Z-pinch. To probe the accelerating fields in our table top experiment, we inject a 4 MeV deuteron beam along the z-axis and then sample the beam energy distribution after it passes through the pinch region. Using this technique, we have directly measured for the first time the acceleration of an injected ion beam. Our particle-in-cell simulations have been benchmarked on both a kJ-scale DPF and a MJ-scale DPF. They have reproduced experimentally measured neutron yields as well as ion beams and EM oscillations which fluid simulations do not exhibit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for accelerator and neutron source applications.

  15. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-10-15

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths λ{sub D} (electron Debye length), ρ{sub i} (ion gyro-radius), and ℓ (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering λ{sub D}≪ρ{sub i}≪ℓ, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ε{sub Dm}(λ{sub D}/ρ{sub i})→0 and ε{sub mc}(ρ{sub i}/ℓ)→0 (“asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits”), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS – MPS and MPS – DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ε{sub Dm}→0 and ε{sub mc}→0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the Bohm–Chodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities.

  16. A Statistical study of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability signatures using THEMIS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurisic, Mirjana; Panov, Evgeny; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We use THEMIS data from 2010-2012 tail seasons to collect observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures. Over seventy observations with closely located THEMIS probes P3-P5 reveal that BICI-like plasma sheet oscillations may appear at different magnetic local time. For these, we derive background plasma sheet parameters such as BZ, δBZ/δx and plasma beta, and investigate solar wind conditions. We also estimate the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations such as frequency and amplitude. Based on this, we search for a relation between the background plasma sheet parameters and the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations.

  17. Statistically-Averaged Rate Equations Obtained in Kinetic Description of Intense Nonneutral Beam Propagation Through a Periodic Solenoidal Focusing Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. Wei-Li; Davidson, Ronald C.; Stoltz, Peter

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents a detailed formulation and analysis of the rate equations for statistically-averaged quantities for an intense nonneutral beam propagating through a periodic solenoidal focusing field. B^sol(x) = B_z(z)hatez - (1/2)B'_z(z)(xhatex + yhate_y), where B_z(z+S) = B_z(z), and S = const. is the axial periodicity length. The anaysis assumes a thin beam with characteristic beam radius rb << S, and is based on the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Particularly important in experimental applications and in numerical simulations schemes, such as the nonlinear δ f- scheme,(Q. Qian, W. Lee, and R. Davidson, Phys. Plasmas 4), 1915 (1997). is an understanding of the self-consistent nonlinear evolution of various quantities averaged over the distribution of beam particles f_b(x,p,t). Self-consistent rate equations are derived for the nonlinear evolution of the mean-square beam radius , mean kinetic energy (1/2), field energy ɛ_F(z), unnormalized beam emittance ɛ(z), center of mass motion, etc., and the nonlinear beam dynamics is analysed over a wide range of system parameters.

  18. Pulsar electrodynamics: Relativistic kinetic theory of radiative plasmas--collective phenomena and their radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. A. da; Diver, D. A.; Laing, E. W.; Stark, C. R.; Teodoro, L. F. A.

    2011-01-15

    The classical modeling of radiation by accelerated charged particles in pulsars predicts a cutoff in photon energy at around 25 GeV. While this is broadly consistent with observations, the classical treatment is not self-consistent, and cannot be extended to explain the rare high-energy detections of photons in the 100s of GeV range. In this paper we revisit the theoretical modeling of high-energy radiation processes in very strong electromagnetic fields, in the context of both single particles and collective plasmas. There are no classical constraints on this description. We find that there is indeed a critical energy of around 50 GeV that arises naturally in this self-consistent treatment, but rather than being a cutoff, this critical energy signals a transition from radiation that is classical to a quasiquantum description, in which the particle is able to radiate almost its total energy in a single event. This new modeling therefore places pulsar radiation processes on a more secure physical basis, and admits the possibility of the production of TeV photons in a self-consistent way.

  19. [Calmodulin can induce and control damping oscillations in the plasma membrane Ca2+ -ATPase activity: a kinetic model].

    PubMed

    Gol'dshtein, B N; Aksirov, A M; Zakrzhevskaia, D T

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase is the calcium pump that extrudes calcium ions from cells using ATP hydrolisis for the maintenance of low Ca2+ concentrations in the cell. Calmodulin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase by binding to the autoinhibitory enzyme domain, which allows the access of cytoplasmic ATP and Ca2+ to the active and transport cites. Our kinetic model predicts damped oscillations in the enzyme activity and interprets the known nonmonotonous kinetic behavior of the enzyme in the presence of calmodulin. For the parameters close to the experimental ones, the kinetic model explains the changes in frequency and damping factor of the oscillatory enzyme activity, as dependent on calmodulin concentration. The calculated pre-steady-state curves fit well the known experimental data. The kinetic analysis allows us to assign Ca2+-ATPase to the hysteretic enzymes exhibiting activity oscillations in open systems.

  20. Influence of atomic kinetics in the simulation of plasma microscopic properties and thermal instabilities for radiative bow shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, G.; Rodríguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ciardi, A.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulations of laboratory astrophysics experiments on plasma flows require plasma microscopic properties that are obtained by means of an atomic kinetic model. This fact implies a careful choice of the most suitable model for the experiment under analysis. Otherwise, the calculations could lead to inaccurate results and inappropriate conclusions. First, a study of the validity of the local thermodynamic equilibrium in the calculation of the average ionization, mean radiative properties, and cooling times of argon plasmas in a range of plasma conditions of interest in laboratory astrophysics experiments on radiative shocks is performed in this work. In the second part, we have made an analysis of the influence of the atomic kinetic model used to calculate plasma microscopic properties of experiments carried out on magpie on radiative bow shocks propagating in argon. The models considered were developed assuming both local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium and, for the latter situation, we have considered in the kinetic model different effects such as external radiation field and plasma mixture. The microscopic properties studied were the average ionization, the charge state distributions, the monochromatic opacities and emissivities, the Planck mean opacity, and the radiative power loss. The microscopic study was made as a postprocess of a radiative-hydrodynamic simulation of the experiment. We have also performed a theoretical analysis of the influence of these atomic kinetic models in the criteria for the onset possibility of thermal instabilities due to radiative cooling in those experiments in which small structures were experimentally observed in the bow shock that could be due to this kind of instability.

  1. The Plasma Interaction Experiment /PIX/ - Description and flight qualification test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the Landsat-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus 1 kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage-biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  2. Intrinsic Kinetics of Dimethyl Ether Synthesis from Plasma Activation of CO2 Hydrogenation over Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Su, Tongming; Zhou, Xinhui; Qin, Zuzeng; Ji, Hongbing

    2017-02-02

    CO2 is activated in a plasma reactor followed by hydrogenation over a Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 catalyst, and the intrinsic kinetics of the plasma catalytic process are studied. Compared with CO2 hydrogenation using Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 alone, the CO2 conversion and the dimethyl ether selectivity for the plasma catalytic process are increased by 16.3 %, and 10.1 %, respectively, indicating that the CO2 was activated by the plasma to promote hydrogenation. A study of the intrinsic kinetics shows that the activation energies of methanol formation, the reverse water-gas shift reaction, and methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether are 149.34, 75.47, and 73.18 kJ mol(-1) , respectively, which are lower than if Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 is used without plasma, indicating that the activation of CO2 in the plasma reduces the activation energy of the hydrogenation reaction and improves the yield of dimethyl ether.

  3. Plasma glucose kinetics and response of insulin and GIP following a cereal breakfast in female subjects: effect of starch digestibility

    PubMed Central

    Péronnet, F; Meynier, A; Sauvinet, V; Normand, S; Bourdon, E; Mignault, D; St-Pierre, D H; Laville, M; Rabasa-Lhoret, R; Vinoy, S

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Foods with high contents of slowly digestible starch (SDS) elicit lower glycemic responses than foods with low contents of SDS but there has been debate on the underlying changes in plasma glucose kinetics, that is, respective contributions of the increase in the rates of appearance and disappearance of plasma glucose (RaT and RdT), and of the increase in the rate of appearance of exogenous glucose (RaE) and decrease in endogenous glucose production (EGP). Subjects/Methods: Sixteen young healthy females ingested in random order four types of breakfasts: an extruded cereal (0.3% SDS: Lo-SDS breakfast) or one of three biscuits (39–45% SDS: Hi-SDS breakfasts). The flour in the cereal products was labeled with 13C, and plasma glucose kinetics were measured using [6,6-2H2]glucose infusion, along with the response of plasma glucose, insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) concentrations. Results: When compared with the Lo-SDS breakfast, after the three Hi-SDS breakfasts, excursions in plasma glucose, the response of RaE, RaT and RdT, and the reduction in EGP were significantly lower (P<0.05). The amount of exogenous glucose absorbed over the 4.5-h postprandial period was also significantly lower by ~31% (P<0.001). These differences were associated with lower responses of GIP and insulin concentrations. Conclusions: Substituting extruded cereals with biscuits slows down the availability of glucose from the breakfast and its appearance in peripheral circulation, blunts the changes in plasma glucose kinetics and homeostasis, reduces excursions in plasma glucose, and possibly distributes the glucose ingested over a longer period following the meal. PMID:25852025

  4. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  5. Kinetics of plasma membrane and mitochondrial alterations in cells undergoing apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lizard, G.; Fournel, S.; Genestier, L.; Dhedin, N.

    1995-11-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is characterized by typical morphological alterations. By transmission electron microscopy, apoptotic cells are identified by condensation of the chromatin in tight apposition to the nuclear envelope, alteration of the nuclear envelope and fragmentation of the nucleus, whereas integrity of the plasma membrane and organelles is preserved. Conversely cells undergoing necrosis display and early desintegration of cytoplasmic membrane and swelling of mitochondria. In this study we assessed by flow cytometry the sequential alterations of forward angle light scatter, 90{degrees} light scatter, and fluorescence associated with fluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123, and propidium iodide in two human B cell lines undergoing apoptosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by sodium azide. At the same time intervals, cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy and by UV microscopy after staining with Hoechst 33342. We report that sequential changes in light scatters and fluorescein diacetate are similar in cells undergoing apoptosis or necrosis, whereas apoptosis is characterized by a slightly delayed decrease of mitochondrial activity as assessed by rhodamine 123 staining. Surprisingly, a part of cells undergoing apoptosis displayed an early uptake of propidium iodide followed by a condensation and then a fragmentation of their nuclei. It is concluded that uptake of propidium iodide is a very early marker of cell death which does not discriminate between necrosis and apoptosis. Along with biochemical criteria, nuclear morphology revealed by staining with Hoechst 33342 would seem to be of the most simple and most discriminative assay of apoptosis. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Demonstration of Ion Kinetic Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions and Investigation of Magnetic Reconnection Using Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shock-driven laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions have demonstrated the presence of ion kinetic effects in ICF implosions and also have been used as a proton source to probe the strongly driven reconnection of MG magnetic fields in laser-generated plasmas. Ion kinetic effects arise during the shock-convergence phase of ICF implosions when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions (λii) approaches the size of the hot-fuel region (Rfuel) and may impact hot-spot formation and the possibility of ignition. To isolate and study ion kinetic effects, the ratio of N - K =λii /Rfuel was varied in D3He-filled, shock-driven implosions at the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility, from hydrodynamic-like conditions (NK 0.01) to strongly kinetic conditions (NK 10). A strong trend of decreasing fusion yields relative to the predictions of hydrodynamic models is observed as NK increases from 0.1 to 10. Hydrodynamics simulations that include basic models of the kinetic effects that are likely to be present in these experiments-namely, ion diffusion and Knudsen-layer reduction of the fusion reactivity-are better able to capture the experimental results. This type of implosion has also been used as a source of monoenergetic 15-MeV protons to image magnetic fields driven to reconnect in laser-produced plasmas at conditions similar to those encountered at the Earth's magnetopause. These experiments demonstrate that for both symmetric and asymmetric magnetic-reconnection configurations, when plasma flows are much stronger than the nominal Alfvén speed, the rate of magnetic-flux annihilation is determined by the flow velocity and is largely insensitive to initial plasma conditions. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Number DENA0001857.

  7. A hybrid model in inductively coupled plasma discharges with bias source: Description of model and experimental validation in Ar discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, De-Qi; Liu, Wei; Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-09-01

    Traditional fluid simulation and Particle-in-Cell/Monte-Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) are very time consuming in inductively coupled plasma. In this work, a hybrid model, i.e. global model coupled bidirectional with parallel Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) sheath model, is developed to investigate inductively coupled plasma discharge with bias source. The global model is applied to calculate plasma density in bulk plasma. The sheath model is performed to consistently calculate the electric field, ion kinetic and the sheath thickness above the bias electrode. Moreover, specific numbers of ions are tracked and ultimately ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) incident into bias electrode are obtained from MCC module. It is found that as the bias amplitude increases, the energy width of both IEDFs becomes wider, and the total outlines of IEDFs move towards higher energy. The results from the model are validated by experimental measurement and a qualitative agreement is obtained. The advantage of this model is that plasma density, ion flux and IEDF, which are widely concerned in the actual process, could be obtained within an hour. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (Grant No. 11205025 and 11335004) and (Grant No.11405018), the Important National Science and Technology Specific Project (Grant No. 2011ZX02403-001).

  8. Alfvénic wave packets collision in a kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Servidio, Sergio; Valentini, Francesco; Malara, Francesco; Matthaeus, William H.; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    The problem of two colliding and counter-propagating Alfvénic wave packets has been investigated in detail since the late Seventies. In particular Moffatt [1] and Parker [2] showed that, in the framework of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), nonlinear interactions can develop only during the overlapping of the two packets. Here we describe a similar problem in the framework of the kinetic physics. The collision of two quasi-Alfvénic packets has been analyzed by means of MHD, Hall-MHD and kinetic simulations performed with two different hybrid codes: a PIC code [3] and a Vlasov-Maxwell code [4]. Due to the huge computational cost, only a 2D-3V phase space is allowed (two dimensions in the physical space, three dimensions in the velocity space). Preliminary results suggest that, as well as in the MHD case, the most relevant nonlinear effects occur during the overlapping of the two packets. For both the PIC and Vlasov cases, strong temperature anisotropies are present during the evolution of the wave packets. Moreover, due to the absence of numerical noise, Vlasov simulations show that the collision of the counter-propagating solitary waves produces a significant beam in the velocity distribution functions [5], which, instead, cannot be appreciated in PIC simulations. We remark that, beyond the interest of studying a well-known MHD problem in the realm of the kinetic physics, our results allows also to compare different numerical codes. [1] H.K. Moffatt, Field generation in electrically conducting fluids (Cambridge University Press, 1978). [2] E.N. Parker, Cosmical magnetic fields: their origin and their activity (Oxford University Press, 1979). [3] T.N. Parashar, M.A. Shay, P.A. Cassak and W.H. Matthaeus, Physics of Plasmas 16, 032310 (2009). [4] F. Valentini, P. Trávníček, F. Califano, P. Hellinger & A. Mangeney, Journal of Computational Physics 225, 753-770 (2007). [5] J. He, C. Tu, E. Marsch, C.H. Chen, L. Wang, Z. Pei, L. Zhang, C.S. Salem and S

  9. Mechanism of N2 dissociation and kinetics of N(4S) atoms in pure nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, A. V.; Lopaev, D. V.; Popov, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with kinetics of the ground state nitrogen atoms N(4S) and N2 dissociation mechanism in pure nitrogen plasma. The experiment was carried out in positive column of DC glow discharge at a range of parameters p = 5 - 50 Torr, J = 20 - 100 mA. The use of axial homogeneous glow discharge allowed considering N(4S) balance for spatially uniform conditions controlled by only two terms: source (characterized by effective production rate k diss eff ) and loss (characterized by effective loss time τN l oss ). Analysis of these parameters gains considerably better understanding of N2 dissociation mechanism in pure nitrogen plasma that was the main goal of the given work. So N/N2 dissociation rate as function of discharge parameters was obtained using two independent emission optical methods: actinometry on Ar atoms and N2 2+ band emission decay at discharge modulation. Measurements of N/N2 radial profiles allowed estimating N atom surface loss probability γN l oss and correspondingly τN l oss . It was revealed that γN l oss depends on N(4S) concentration and thereby discharge conditions through the sorption balance of physisorbed N atoms. Simple phenomenological model taking into account basic surface processes provides γN l oss data in good agreement with experiment. Finally, k diss eff was obtained as function of reduced electric field E/N and it was shown that even EEDF self-consistently calculated with accounting for N2 vibrational excitation is unable to provide observed values of k diss eff . Reasons of that fact are discussed in detail.

  10. Products and bioenergy from the pyrolysis of rice straw via radio frequency plasma and its kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wen-Kai; Shie, Je-Lung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Lin, Cheng-Fang; Yang, Sen-Yeu; Kuo, Jing T; Shaw, Dai-Gee; You, Yii-Der; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2009-03-01

    The radio frequency plasma pyrolysis technology, which can overcome the disadvantages of common pyrolysis methods such as less gas products while significant tar formation, was used for pyrolyzing the biomass waste of rice straw. The experiments were performed at various plateau temperatures of 740, 813, 843 and 880K with corresponding loading powers of 357, 482, 574 and 664W, respectively. The corresponding yields of gas products (excluding nitrogen) from rice straw are 30.7, 56.6, 62.5 and 66.5wt.% with respect to the original dried sample and the corresponding specific heating values gained from gas products are about 4548, 4284, 4469 and 4438kcalkg(-1), respectively, for the said cases. The corresponding combustible portions remained in the solid residues are about 64.7, 35, 28.2 and 23.5wt.% with specific heating values of 4106, 4438, 4328 and 4251kcalkg(-1) with respective to solid residues, while that in the original dried sample is 87.2wt.% with specific heating value of 4042kcalkg(-1). The results indicated that the amount of combustibles converted into gas products increases with increasing plateau temperature. The kinetic model employed to describe the pyrolytic conversion of rice straw at constant temperatures agrees well with the experimental data. The best curve fittings render the frequency factor of 5759.5s(-1), activation energy of 74.29kJ mol(-1) and reaction order of 0.5. Data and information obtained are useful for the future design and operation of pyrolysis of rice straw via radio frequency plasma.

  11. Kinetic theory of current and density drift instabilities with weak charged-neutral collisions. [in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the linear kinetic theory of electrostatic instabilities driven by a density gradient drift and a magnetic-field-aligned current in a plasma with weak charged neutral collisions. The configuration is that of a uniform magnetic field B, a weak, uniform density gradient in the x direction and a weak, uniform electric field in the z direction. Collisions are represented by the BGK model. The transition from the (kinetic) universal density drift instability to the (fluidlike) current convective instability is studied in detail, and the short wavelength properties of the latter mode are investigated.

  12. Dissociation against oxidation kinetics for the conversion of VOCs in non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquiers, Stéphane; Blin-Simiand, Nicole; Magne, Lionel

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (propene, propane, acetaldehyde, acetone) were studied in plasmas of atmospheric gases using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma) or a dielectric barrier discharge (filamentary plasma). It was shown for the homogeneous plasma that quenchings of nitrogen metastable states, A3Ʃ+u and the group of singlets a' 1Ʃ-u, a 1Πg and w 1∆u, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. Recent measurements of the H2 concentration produced in the N2/C3H6 mixture emphasize that the hydrogen molecule can be an exit route for propene dissociation. It is also found that H2 and CO molecules are efficiently produced following the dissociation of CH3COCH3 and the subsequent chemical reactivity induced by radicals coming from acetone. Addition of oxygen to a N2/VOC mixture can change drastically the kinetics. However, the quenching processes of N2 metastables by the VOC are always present and compete with oxidation reactions for the conversion of the pollutant. At low temperature, oxidations by O or by OH are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the mixture. In particular, the presence of O2 has a detrimental effect on the acetone removal. Also, as evidenced for acetaldehyde and propane, some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  13. Exciting and propagating characteristics of two coexisting kinetic geodesic acoustic modes in the edge of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. F.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Yu, C. X.; Cheng, J.; Qiu, Z. Y.; Zhao, H. L.; Shen, H. G.; Yan, L. W.; Dong, J. Q.; Xu, M.; Zhao, K. J.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Y.; Chen, R.; Zhang, S. B.; Sun, X.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.

    2017-04-01

    Coexisting dual kinetic geodesic acoustic modes (KGAMs) with similar characteristics have been observed with Langmuir probe arrays in the edge plasma of HL-2A tokamak with low density Ohmic discharge. The dual KGAMs are named a low-frequency GAM (LFGAM) and a high-frequency GAM (HFGAM), respectively. By changing the line averaged density from 1.0× {{10}19}~{{\\text{m}}-3} to 0.7× {{10}19}~{{\\text{m}}-3} , the study of n e and T e profiles indicate that collision damping rate plays a crucial role on exciting of dual KGAMs, especially for the higher frequency branch (HFGAM). With the application of modulating techniques, we provide direct proof that nonlinear interactions between GAMs and ambient turbulence (AT) show great difference at different radial positions. At the exciting position of GAM, the amplitude modulation of AT is dominant, indicating that GAM is generated in the energy-conserving triad interaction. After the exciting of GAMs, they will propagate both inward and outward. During the propagation, the phase modulation of AT is dominant, GAMs can rarely gain energy from AT, yet they can give back-reactions on AT through shearing effect.

  14. Kinetic analysis of soil contained pyrene oxidation by a pulsed discharge plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijuan, Wang; Guangshun, Zhou; He, Guo; Cong, Geng

    2017-01-01

    A pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) reactor with net anode and net cathode was established for investigating the pyrene degradation in soil under different pulse peak voltage, air flow rate, pyrene content in soil, initial pH value and initial water content of the soil. Pyrene oxidation within the 60 min discharge time was fitting according to the pseudo-first order equation and the corresponding reaction kinetics constants (k values) were calculated. The obtained results show that pyrene oxidation under all the different reaction conditions obeyed the pseudo-first order equation well. Higher pulsed peak voltage and appropriate air flow rate were in favor of the increase of reaction rate of pyrene oxidation. A higher k value could be achieved in the lower initial pyrene content (the value was 100 mg kg-1). The k value of pyrene oxidation in the case of pH = 4 was 11.2 times higher than the value obtained under the condition of pH = 9, while the initial water content of the soil also has a large effect on the oxidation rate of pyrene due to the effect of PDP. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21207052).

  15. Shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma in a kinetic theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Puglisi, A.; Plumari, S.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    One of the main results of heavy ions collision (HIC) at relativistic energy experiments is the very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, close to the conjectured lower bound η/s=1/4π for systems in the infinite coupling limit. Transport coefficients like shear viscosity are responsible of non-equilibrium properties of a system: Green-Kubo relations give us an exact expression to compute these coefficients. We compute shear viscosity numerically using Green-Kubo relation in the framework of Kinetic Theory solving the relativistic transport Boltzmann equation in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. We investigate a system of particles interacting via anisotropic and energy dependent cross-section in the range of temperature of interest for HIC. Green-Kubo results are in agreement with Chapman-Enskog approximation while Relaxation Time approximation can underestimates the viscosity of a factor 2. The correct analytic formula for shear viscosity can be used to develop a transport theory with a fixed η/s and have a comparison with physical observables like elliptic flow.

  16. CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION Theory of Fusion Plasmas: Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Sauter, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas takes place every other year in a place particularly favourable for informal and in-depth discussions. Invited and contributed papers present state-of-the-art research in theoretical plasma physics, covering all domains relevant to fusion plasmas. This workshop always welcomes a fruitful mix of experienced researchers and students, to allow a better understanding of the key theoretical physics models and applications. Theoretical issues related to burning plasmas Anomalous Transport (Turbulence, Coherent Structures, Microinstabilities) RF Heating and Current Drive Macroinstabilities Plasma-Edge Physics and Divertors Fast particles instabilities Further details: http://Varenna-Lausanne.epfl.ch The conference is organized by: Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Association EURATOM - Confédération Suisse 'Piero Caldirola' International Centre for the Promotion of Science and International School of Plasma Physics Istituto di Fisica del Plasma del CNR, Milano Editors: X Garbet (CEA, Cadarache, France) and O Sauter (CRPP-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)

  17. Radical kinetics in an inductively-coupled plasma in CF4

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.P.; Abada, H.; Chabert, P.; Graves, D.B.

    2004-12-01

    Radiofrequency discharges in low pressure fluorocarbon gases are used for anisotropic and selective etching of dielectric materials (SiO2 and derivatives), a key step in the manufacture of integrated circuits. Plasmas in these gases are capable not only of etching, but also of depositing fluorocarbon films, depending on a number of factors including the ion bombardment energy, the gas composition and the surface temperature: this behavior is indeed responsible for etch selectivity between materials and plays a role in achieving the desired etched feature profiles. Free radical species, such as CFx and fluorine atoms, play important but complex roles in these processes. We have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), with time and space resolution in pulsed plasmas, to elucidate the kinetics of CF and CF2 radicals, elucidating their creation, destruction and transport mechanisms within the reactor. Whereas more complex gas mixtures are used in industrial processes, study of the relatively simple system of a pure CF4 plasma is more appropriate for the study of mechanisms. Previously the technique was applied to the study of single-frequency capacitively-coupled 'reactive ion etching' reactors, where the substrate (placed on the powered electrode) is always bombarded with high-energy CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. In this case it was found that the major source of CFx free radicals was neutralization, dissociation and backscattering of these incident ions, rather than direct dissociation of the feedstock gas. Subsequently, an inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) in pure CF4 was studied. This system has a higher plasma density, leading to higher gas dissociation, whereas the energy of ions striking the reactor surfaces is much lower (in the absence of additional RF biasing). The LIF technique also allows the gas temperature to be measured with good spatial and temporal resolution. This showed large gas temperature gradients within the ICP reactor, which must be taken into account

  18. Influence of instrumental parameters on the kinetic energy of ions and plasma temperature for a hexapole collision/reaction-cell-based inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Favre, Georges; Brennetot, René; Chartier, Frédéric; Tortajada, Jeanine

    2009-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in inorganic analytical chemistry for element and/or isotope ratio measurements. The presence of interferences, which is one of the main limitations of this method, has been addressed in recent years with the introduction of collision/reaction cell devices on ICP-MS apparatus. The study of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase then became of great importance for the development of new analytical strategies. Knowing the kinetic energy and the electronic states of the ions prior to their entrance into the cell, i.e., just before they react, thereby constitutes crucial information for the interpretation of the observed reactivities. Such studies on an ICP-MS commonly used for routine analyses require the determination of the influence of different instrumental parameters on the energy of the ions and on the plasma temperature from where ions are sampled. The kinetic energy of ions prior to their entrance into the cell has been connected to the voltage applied to the hexapole according to a linear relationship determined from measurements of ion energy losses due to collisions with neutral gas molecules. The effects of the plasma forward power, sampling depth, and the addition of a torch shield to the ICP source were then examined. A decrease of the plasma potential due to the torch shielding, already mentioned in the literature, has been quantified in this study at about 3 V.

  19. Bromsulphalein plasma kinetics after obstruction of the common bile duct in rats: curve fitting with a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, D; Ristanović, D; Malesević, J; Milutinović, B

    1983-01-01

    Plasma kinetics of bromsulphalein (BSP) after a single injection into the bloodstream of the rat with total obstruction of the common bile duct was examined. The concentrations of BSP were determined colorimetrically. A monoexponential plus a general first-degree function in time with four unknown parameters was fitted. Two programs were developed for the Texas Instruments 59 programmable calculator to estimate the values of all the parameters by an iteration procedure. The programs executed at about twice normal speed.

  20. Von Kármán energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic turbulent plasma.

    PubMed

    Wu, P; Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-09-20

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von Kármán hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics. Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitudes the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in the large amplitude turbulence regime.

  1. Synthesis of Indium-Containing Nanoparticles in Aqueous Suspension Using Plasmas in Water for Evaluating Their Kinetics in Living Body.

    PubMed

    Amano, Takaaki; Sarinont, Thapanut; Koga, Kazunori; Hirata, Miyuki; Tanaka, Akiyo; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles have great potential for medical applications such as cancer therapy, whereas their toxic effects on human body are pointed out. To study kinetics and toxicity of nanoparticles in living body, we synthesized indium-containing nanoparticles in aqueous suspension using pulsed electrical discharge plasmas in water, because no indium compounds exist in the living body in the normal situation and hence indium-containing nanoparticles are useful tracer materials for analyzing kinetics of nanoparticles in living body. The mean size of synthesized primary nanoparticles is 7 nm, whereas the mean size of secondary nanoparticles is 315 nm. EDX and XRD analysis reveal that nanoparticles are indium crystalline and indium hydroxide crystalline with the mass ratio of 8:2. Preliminary subcutaneous administration of nanoparticles to mice shows that indium is transported from subcutaneous to blood. These results show that synthesized indium-containing nanoparticles are useful for analyzing kinetics of nanoparticles in living body.

  2. Measurement of plasma histamine: description of an improved method and normal values

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, J.; Warren, K.; Merlin, S.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Kaliner, M.

    1982-08-01

    The single isotopic-enzymatic assay of histamine was modified to increase its sensitivity and to facilitate measurement of plasma histamine levels. The modification involved extracting /sup 3/H-1-methylhistamine (generated by the enzyme N-methyltransferase acting on histamine in the presence of S-(methyl-/sup 3/H)-adenosyl-L-methionine) into chloroform and isolating the /sup 3/H-1-methylhistamine by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). The TLC was developed in acetone:ammonium hydroxide (95:10), and the methylhistamine spot (Rf . 0.50) was identified with an o-phthalaldehyde spray, scraped from the plate, and assayed in a scintillation counter. The assay in plasma demonstrated a linear relationship from 200 to 5000 pg histamine/ml. Plasma always had higher readings than buffer, and dialysis of plasma returned these values to the same level as buffer, suggesting that the baseline elevations might be attributable to histamine. However, all histamine standard curves were run in dialyzed plasma to negate any additional influences plasma might exert on the assay. The arithmetic mean (+/- SEM) in normal plasma histamine was 318.4 +/- 25 pg/ml (n . 51), and the geometric mean was 280 +/- 35 pg/ml. Plasma histamine was significantly elevated by infusion of histamine at 0.05 to 1.0 micrograms/kg/min or by cold immersion of the hand of a cold-urticaria patient. Therefore this modified isotopic-enzymatic assay of histamine is extremely sensitive, capable of measuring fluctuations in plasma histamine levels within the normal range, and potentially useful in analysis of the role histamine plays in human physiology.

  3. [The tissue cage in dogs--a pharmacologic model for the representation of plasma and tissue kinetics].

    PubMed

    Scherkl, R; Hashem, A; Frey, H H

    1996-05-01

    Determination of pharmacokinetic data from plasma often is not sufficient in order to predict or to explain the clinical efficacy of drugs, e.g., in non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) with short elimination half lives in plasma a discrepancy appears between elimination half life and clinical effect. We have studied the tissue kinetics of a drug having a long elimination half life (naproxen) in comparison with phenylbutazone and flunixin, having a short elimination half life in dogs after oral application. Tissue fluid was obtained by using so called "tissue cages" implanted laterally in the neck. An inflammatory response was produced by injecting 1-2 ml of 2% carrageenan into the chamber. The drug concentrations were determined throughout the experiments both in plasma and tissue fluid. Naproxen concentrations (elimination half life of about 72 h in dogs) achieved equilibrium between tissue fluid and plasma concentration. In the case of phenylbutazone, concentration in tissue fluid declined with a definitely longer half life than in plasma and exceeded plasma concentrations after some hours. Flunixin concentrations in plasma and exudate attained equilibrium after 2-5 h. Of clinical importance is the finding that after this time flunixin accumulated in inflammatory exudate and the concentration in exudate exceeded that in plasma two to ten times, then declined with an almost identical half-life. The number of leukocytes in exudate as a measure of inflammation was reduced during 2 days after phenylbutazone, 3-4 days after flunixin and 5-7 days after naproxen. This allows therapy with a lower dosage than calculated on the basis of plasma concentrations in the case of phenylbutazone and flunixin, possibly also with other NSAIDs having a short plasma half life.

  4. Kinetic of the OH-radical in high pressure plasmas of N_2/H_2O/hydrocarbons mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baravian, G.; Fresnet, F.; Magne, L.; Pasquiers, S.; Postel, C.; Puech, V.; Rousseau, A.

    2001-10-01

    Kinetic of the OH-radical has been studied in homogeneous plasmas achieved in a photo-triggered discharge device, in N_2/H_2O with C_2H4 or C_3H_6, at 460 mbar with 1.2 concentration and a deposited energy in the plasma equal to 92 J/l. Hydrocarbon concentration ranged from 50 ppm up to 1000 ppm. Using the same technique as for NO kinetic studies ( F. Fresnet, G. Baravian, L. Magne, S. Pasquiers, C. Postel, V. Puech, A. Rousseau, Appl. Phys. Lett., 77 (2000) 4118.), a time resolved LIF diagnostic has been performed to measure the OH-radical density up to 180 µs after the short current pulse excitation, 50 ns. At fixed deposited energy, the LIF signal rapidly decreases when hydrocarbon concentration increases. Measurements have been compared to predictions of a self-consistent 0D-model which takes into account a detailed kinetic scheme, including oxidation reactions of hydrocarbons by the radical which are important processes in flue gas non-thermal plasma treatment. Results are discussed.

  5. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N2 and 20% O2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 1013 cm-3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the flash

  6. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-06-15

    We discuss the complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider the contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in the spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider the propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider the oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive the set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory to the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate the contribution of the Darwin and annihilation interactions in the Landau damping of the Langmuir waves. We should mention that the annihilation interaction does not change number of particles in the system. It does not related to annihilation itself, but it exists as a result of interaction of an electron-positron pair via conversion of the pair into virtual photon. A pair of the non-linear Schrodinger equations for the electron-positron plasmas including the Darwin and annihilation interactions is derived. Existence of the conserving helicity in electron-positron quantum plasmas of spinning particles with the Darwin and annihilation interactions is demonstrated. We show that the annihilation interaction plays an important role in the quantum electron-positron plasmas giving the contribution of the same magnitude as the spin-spin interaction.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic properties of a convecting plasma in a two-dimensional dipole field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Charged particle guiding center motion is considered in the magnetic field of a two-dimensional ('line') dipole on which is superimposed a small, static, perpendicular electric field. The parallel equation of motion is that of a simple harmonic oscillator for cos theta, the cosine of magnetic colatitude theta. Equations for the perpendicular electric and magnetic drifts are derived as well as their bounce-averaged forms. The latter are solved to yield a bounce-averaged guiding center trajectory, which is the same as that obtained from conversation of magnetic moment mu, longitudinal invariant J, and total (kinetic plus electrostatic) energy K. The algebraic simplicity of the trajectory equations is also manifest in the forms of the invariants. An interesting result is that guiding centers drift in such a way that they preserve the values of their equatorial pitch angles and (equivalently) mirror latitudes. The most general Maxwellian form of the equilibrium one-particle distribution function f is constructed from the invariants, and spatially varying density and pressure moments, parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, are identified. Much of the paper deals with the more restricted problem in which f is specified as a bi-Maxwellian over a straight line of finite length in the equatorial plane of the dipole and perpendicular to field lines. This might be thought of as specifying a cross-tail ion injection source; our formalism then describes the subsequent spatial development. The distribution away from the source is a scaled bi-Maxwellian but one that is cut off at large and small kinetic energies, which depend on position. Density and pressure components are reduced from the values they would have if the total content of individual flux tubes convected intact. The equatorial and meridional variations of density and pressure components are examined and compared systematically for the isotropic and highly anisotropic situations. There appears to be little

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface growth during plasma deposition of silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sumeet C.; Singh, Tejinder; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2009-07-01

    Based on an atomically detailed surface growth model, we have performed kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations to determine the surface chemical composition of plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films as a function of substrate temperature. Our surface growth kinetic model consists of a combination of various surface rate processes, including silyl (SiH3) radical chemisorption onto surface dangling bonds or insertion into Si-Si surface bonds, SiH3 physisorption, SiH3 surface diffusion, abstraction of surface H by SiH3 radicals, surface hydride dissociation reactions, as well as desorption of SiH3, SiH4, and Si2H6 species into the gas phase. Transition rates for the adsorption, surface reaction and diffusion, and desorption processes accounted for in the KMC simulations are based on first-principles density-functional-theory computations of the corresponding optimal pathways on the H-terminated Si(001)-(2×1) surface. Results are reported for two types of KMC simulations. The first employs a fully ab initio database of activation energy barriers for the surface rate processes involved and is appropriate for modeling the early stages of growth. The second uses approximate rates for all the relevant processes to account properly for the effects on the activation energetics of interactions between species adsorbed at neighboring surface sites and is appropriate to model later stages of growth toward a steady state of the surface composition. The KMC predictions for the temperature dependence of the surface concentration of SiHx(s) (x =1,2,3) species, the surface hydrogen content, and the surface dangling-bond coverage are compared to experimental measurements on a-Si:H films deposited under operating conditions for which the SiH3 radical is the dominant deposition precursor. The predictions of both KMC simulation types are consistent with the reported experimental data, which are based on in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed

  9. Descriptions of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Ko, W H; Lee, J H; Choi, M C

    2009-10-01

    The research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics (RAPID) device is a newly developed linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device. It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. A 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state ECR plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). The cylindrical stainless steel vacuum chamber is 300 mm in diameter and 750 mm in length and has eight radial and ten axial ports including 6-in. and 8-in. viewing windows for heating and diagnostics. Experimental observation of ECR plasma heating has been recently carried out during the initial plasma operation. The main diagnostic systems including a 94 GHz heterodyne interferometer, a high-resolution 25 channel one-dimensional array spectrometer, a single channel survey spectrometer, and an electric probe have been also prepared. The RAPID device is a flexible simulator for the understanding of tokamak edge plasma physics and new diagnostic system development. In this work, we describe the RAPID device and initial operation results.

  10. Descriptions of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, J. H.; Choi, M. C.

    2009-10-15

    The research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics (RAPID) device is a newly developed linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device. It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. A 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state ECR plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). The cylindrical stainless steel vacuum chamber is 300 mm in diameter and 750 mm in length and has eight radial and ten axial ports including 6-in. and 8-in. viewing windows for heating and diagnostics. Experimental observation of ECR plasma heating has been recently carried out during the initial plasma operation. The main diagnostic systems including a 94 GHz heterodyne interferometer, a high-resolution 25 channel one-dimensional array spectrometer, a single channel survey spectrometer, and an electric probe have been also prepared. The RAPID device is a flexible simulator for the understanding of tokamak edge plasma physics and new diagnostic system development. In this work, we describe the RAPID device and initial operation results.

  11. Dispersion and absorption of longitudinal electro-kinetic wave in ion-implanted GaN semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Dilip; Sharma, Giriraj; Saxena, Ajay; Jadhav, Akhilesh

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study on propagation characteristics of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves is presented. Based on multi-fluid model of plasma, we have derived a dispersion relation for LEK waves in colloid laden GaN semiconductor plasmas. It is assumed that ions are implanted to form colloids in the GaN sample. The colloids are continuously bombarded by the plasma particles and stick on them, but they acquire a net negative charge due to relatively higher mobility of electrons. It is found from the dispersion relation that the presence of charged colloids not only modifies the existing modes but also supports new novel modes of LEKWs. It is hoped that the study would enhance understanding on dispersion and absorption of LEKWs and help in singling out the appropriate configurations in which GaN crystal would be better suited for fabrication of microwave devices.

  12. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  13. Low frequency, electrodynamic simulation of kinetic plasmas with the DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-In-Cell (DADIPIC) method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Matthew Richard

    1995-06-01

    This dissertation describes a new algorithm for simulating low frequency, kinetic phenomena in plasmas. DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-in-Cell (DADIPIC), as its name implies, is a combination of the Darwin and direct implicit methods. One of the difficulties in simulating plasmas lies in the enormous disparity between the fundamental scale lengths of a plasma and the scale lengths of the phenomena of interest. The objective is to create models which can ignore the fundamental constraints without eliminating relevant plasma properties. Over the past twenty years several PIC methods have been investigated for overcoming the constraints on explicit electrodynamic PIC. These models eliminate selected high frequency plasma phenomena while retaining kinetic phenomena at low frequency. This dissertation shows that the combination of Darwin and Direct Implicit allows them to operate better than they have been shown to operate in the past. Through the Darwin method the hyperbolic Maxwell`s equations are reformulated into a set of elliptic equations. Propagating light waves do not exist in the formulation so the Courant constraint on the time step is eliminated. The Direct Implicit method is applied only to the electrostatic field with the result that electrostatic plasma oscillations do not have to be resolved for stability. With the elimination of these constraints spatial and temporal discretization can be much larger than that possible with explicit, electrodynamic PIC. The code functions in a two dimensional Cartesian region and has been implemented with all components of the particle velocities, the E-field, and the B-field. Internal structures, conductors or dielectrics, may be placed in the simulation region, can be set at desired potentials, and driven with specified currents.

  14. The kinetic scale structure of the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer: Implications of collisionless magnetic reconnection and first MMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorelli, J.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Nakamura, R.; Chen, L. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Gliese, U.; Barrie, A. C.; Holland, M. P.; Chandler, M. O.; Coffey, V. N.; MacDonald, E.; Salo, C.; Dickson, C.; Saito, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Baumjohann, W.; Burch, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between magnetic reconnection and the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL) is still an open problem in magnetospheric physics. While one can understand observed PSBL velocity distributions on the basis of a simple steady state drift-kinetic model with prescribed electric and magnetic fields (e.g., Onsager et al. [1990,1991]), such models do not incorporate the kinetic scale dynamics at the reconnection site. For example, Shay et al. [2011] have argued that the out-of-plane quadrupole magnetic field pattern at the reconnection site can be viewed as an obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén wave with very large parallel group velocity, the implication being that the field-aligned current structure should quickly become global, though still confined to field lines connected to the ion diffusion region at the reconnection site. This raises the very interesting question: How would such a global wave structure appear in the PSBL on the kinetic scale? Here, we present some first observations of the PSBL by NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission where Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) Burst Data (30 ms and 150 ms resolution for 3D electron and ion velocity distributions, respectively) is available during intervals where lower resolution (4.5 s) Fast Survey distributions showed evidence of connection to a remote reconnection site. This allows us to test for the first time whether the quadrupole magnetic field structure near the reconnection site -- a local structure already observed by previous spacecraft -- does indeed support a global field-aligned current pattern around the magnetic separatrix. We will also probe for the first time the electron kinetic scale sub-structure of the PSBL and compare with electron-scale features observed near the magnetic separatrix at the dayside magnetopause.

  15. A model of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics with explicit description of structural constraints of individual photosystem II units.

    PubMed

    Xin, Chang-Peng; Yang, Jin; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2013-11-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence induction (FI) kinetics, in the microseconds to the second range, reflects the overall performance of the photosynthetic apparatus. In this paper, we have developed a novel FI model, using a rule-based kinetic Monte Carlo method, which incorporates not only structural and kinetic information on PSII, but also a simplified photosystem I. This model has allowed us to successfully simulate the FI under normal or different treatment conditions, i.e., with different levels of measuring light, under 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea treatment, under 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone treatment, and under methyl viologen treatment. Further, using this model, we have systematically studied the mechanistic basis and factors influencing the FI kinetics. The results of our simulations suggest that (1) the J step is caused by the two-electron gate at the Q B site; (2) the I step is caused by the rate limitation of the plastoquinol re-oxidation in the plastoquinone pool. This new model provides a framework for exploring impacts of modifying not only kinetic but also structural parameters on the FI kinetics.

  16. Kinetic Simulation of Inhomogeneous Plasma with a Variable Sized Grid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, David

    2003-01-01

    Space plasmas are usually inhomogeneous and irregular. Particle in cell (PIC) plasma simulations, however, often consider the plasma to be homogeneous and periodic. Here non-periodic PIC simulations with inhomogeneities in the density, temperature and background magnetic field are considered. Boundary conditions and a variable sized grid system are discussed, along with an application to a magnetospheric plasma physics problem in the auroral zone.

  17. Kaluza's kinetic theory description of the classical Hall effect in a single component dilute gas within the Chapman-Enskog approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.; Garcia-Perciante, A. L.; Sagaceta-Mejia, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic theory is used to establish the explicit form of the particle flux associated to the Hall effect for the case of a dilute single component charged gas, using the Chapman-Enskog method and the BGK approximation for the collision Kernel. It is shown that when the system evolves towards mechanical equilibrium, the standard treatment using the concept of external force fails to describe the Hall effect. It is also shown that the use of a five-dimensional curved space-time in the description of the dynamics of the charged particle in the kinetic treatment (Kaluza's theory) formally solves the problem. The implications of this result are briefly discussed. The authors acknowledge support from CONACyT (Mexico) through grant CB2011/167563.

  18. Kinetic Space Weather: Toward a Global Hybrid Model of the Polar Ionosphere-Lower Magnetosphere Plasma Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, James L.

    1996-01-01

    During the indicated period of performance, we had a number of publications concerned with kinetic polar ionosphere-lower magnetosphere plasma transport. For the IUGG 1991-4 Quadrennial Report, we reviewed aspects of U.S. accomplishments concerned with polar plasma transport, among other issues. In another review, we examined the computer simulations of multiple-scale processes in space plasmas, including polar plasma outflow and transport. We also examined specifically multiscale processes in ionospheric outflows. We developed a Generalized Semi-Kinetic(GSK) model for the topside-lower magnetosphere which explored the synergistic action of wave heating and electric potentials in the formation of auroral Ion conics, in particular the "pressure cooker" mechanism. We extended the GSK model all the way down to 120 km and applied this code to illustrate the response of the ionosphere- magnetosphere to soft-electron precipitation and convection-driven frictional ion heating, respectively. Later, the convection-driven heating work was extended to a paper for the Journal of Geophysical Research. In addition to the above full published papers, we also presented the first developments of the coupled fluid-semikinetic model for polar plasma transport during this period. The results from a steady-state treatment were presented, with the second presentation being concerned with the effects of photo-electrons on the polar wind, and the first garnering an outstanding student paper award from the American Geophysical Union. We presented the first results from a time-dependent version of this coupled fluid-semikinetic model.

  19. The Effects of Kinetic Alfven and Whistler Wave Turbulence and the Evolution of Electron Distribution in Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.; Ganguli, G.; Crabtree, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The high beta solar wind plasma turbulence is dominated by the kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) [1]. Though the measured high-energy tail on the electron distribution function can be a signature of the presence of whistler waves (WW) as well [2]. In Maxwellian plasma both KAW and WW are Landau damped at high beta, and only for the specific case of WW with kperp=0 is there no Landau damping. Due to the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma these parallel propagating WW should quickly develop large perpendicular wavenumbers kperp>k|| . However, as we have shown recently using measured KAW spectra, Landau damping establishes a plateau in the parallel electron distribution function and damping is strongly diminished [3]. The theory of WW in high beta inhomogeneous plasma will be presented and the impact of the electron cyclotron resonance with WW on the evolution of the electrons high energy tail will be discussed. [1] O. Alexandrova et. al., PRL (2009) ; F. Sahraoui et. al., PRL (2010). [2] T. Nieves-Chinchilla and A. F. Vinas, JGR (2008). [3] L. Rudakov et. al., Phys. Plasma, 18, 012307 (2011).

  20. Comparisons of time explicit hybrid kinetic-fluid code Architect for Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with a full PIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimo, F.; Atzeni, S.; Marocchino, A.

    2016-12-01

    Architect, a time explicit hybrid code designed to perform quick simulations for electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration, is described. In order to obtain beam quality acceptable for applications, control of the beam-plasma-dynamics is necessary. Particle in Cell (PIC) codes represent the state-of-the-art technique to investigate the underlying physics and possible experimental scenarios; however PIC codes demand the necessity of heavy computational resources. Architect code substantially reduces the need for computational resources by using a hybrid approach: relativistic electron bunches are treated kinetically as in a PIC code and the background plasma as a fluid. Cylindrical symmetry is assumed for the solution of the electromagnetic fields and fluid equations. In this paper both the underlying algorithms as well as a comparison with a fully three dimensional particle in cell code are reported. The comparison highlights the good agreement between the two models up to the weakly non-linear regimes. In highly non-linear regimes the two models only disagree in a localized region, where the plasma electrons expelled by the bunch close up at the end of the first plasma oscillation.

  1. A Kinetic-fluid Model

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = C.Z. Cheng; Jay R. Johnson

    1998-07-10

    A nonlinear kinetic-fluid model for high-beta plasmas with multiple ion species which can be applied to multiscale phenomena is presented. The model embeds important kinetic effects due to finite ion Larmor radius (FLR), wave-particle resonances, magnetic particle trapping, etc. in the framework of simple fluid descriptions. When further restricting to low frequency phenomena with frequencies less than the ion cyclotron frequency the kinetic-fluid model takes a simpler form in which the fluid equations of multiple ion species collapse into single-fluid density and momentum equations and a low frequency generalized Ohm's law. The kinetic effects are introduced via plasma pressure tensors for ions and electrons which are computed from particle distribution functions that are governed by the Vlasov equation or simplified plasma dynamics equations such as the gyrokinetic equation. The ion FLR effects provide a finite parallel electric field, a perpendicular velocity that modifies the ExB drift, and a gyroviscosity tensor, all of which are neglected in the usual one-fluid MHD description. Eigenmode equations are derived which include magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling effects for low frequency waves (e.g., kinetic/inertial Alfven waves and ballooning-mirror instabilities).

  2. Spatially modulated phase in the holographic description of quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2011-02-11

    We present a string theory construction of a gravity dual of a spatially modulated phase. Our earlier work shows that the Chern-Simons term in the five-dimensional Maxwell theory destabilizes the Reissner-Nordström black holes in anti-de Sitter space if the Chern-Simons coupling is sufficiently high. In this Letter, we show that a similar instability is realized on the world volume of 8-branes in the Sakai-Sugimoto model in the quark-gluon plasma phase. Our result suggests a new spatially modulated phase in quark-gluon plasma when the baryon density is above 0.8Nf  fm(-3) at temperature 150 MeV.

  3. Self-consistent description of solitary surface waves on a plasma cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.; Suender, D.

    1984-03-01

    Considering a high-frequency electrostatic surface wave that propagates along a plasma cylinder, it is shown that a local change of the axial wavelength of the wave potential may cause solitary variations in the cylinder radius. The magnitudes of these surface displacements are found to depend essentially only on the wavelength perturbation of the high-frequency wave whereas their propagation velocities are defined by the wave intensity. Previous results, which only included short-wavelength oscillations, are also generalized.

  4. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Ananta R. E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com; Thoms, Brian D.; Nepal, Neeraj; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  5. Coherent Structures in Plasmas Relevant to Electric Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-24

    formation of the plasma structures requires a kinetic description supported by theory and validated by measurements of kinetic properties, including energy...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0229 Coherent Structures in Plasmas Relevant to Electric Propulsion Mark Cappelli LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coherent Structures in Plasmas Relevant to Electric Propulsion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0017 5c

  6. Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves in pre-heated, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kommoshvili, K.; Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.

    2003-03-01

    Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves to Alfvèn waves and their subsequent deposition in low aspect ratio (spherical) tokamaks (LARTs) have been investigated theoretically. More specifically, we have considered the consequences of incorporation of kinetic effects in the electron parallel (to the ambient magnetic field) dynamics derived by following the drift-tearing mode analysis of Chen et al (Chen L, Rutherford P H and Tang W M 1977 Phys. Rev. Lett. 39 460), and particle-conserving Krook collision operator for the passing electrons involved (Mett R R and Mahajan S M 1992 Phys. Fluids B 4 2885). The perpendicular plasma dynamics is described by a quite general resistive two-fluid (2F) model based dielectric tensor-operator (Cuperman S, Bruma C and Komoshvili K 2002 Solution of the resistive 2F wave equations for Alfvènic modes in spherical tokamak plasmas J. Plasma Phys. accepted for publication). The full-wave electromagnetic equations, formulated in terms of the vector and scalar potentials, have been solved by the aid of an advanced finite elements numerical code (Sewell G 1993 Adv. Eng. Software 17 105). Detailed solutions of the full-wave equations are obtained and compared with those corresponding to a pure resistive 2F model, this, for the illustrative pre-heated START-type device (Sykes 1994). Our results quantitatively confirm the general theory of the conversion of fast waves with subsequent power dissipation for the conditions of spherical tokamaks thus providing the required auxilliary energy source for the succesful operation of LARTs. Moreover, these results indicate the absolute necessity of using a full model for the parallel electron dynamics, i.e. including both kinetic and collisional effects.

  7. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, I: General transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we derive the set of general transport equations for multicomponent partially ionized reactive plasma in the presence of electric and magnetic fields taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles. Our starting point is a generalized Boltzmann equation with the collision integral in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and a reactive collision integral. We obtain a set of conservation equations for such plasma and employ a linearized variant of Grad's moment method to derive the system of moment (or transport) equations for the plasma species nonequilibrium parameters. Full and reduced transport equations, resulting from the linearized system of moment equations, are presented, which can be used to obtain transport relations and expressions for transport coefficients of electrons and heavy plasma particles (molecules, atoms and ions) in partially ionized reactive plasma.

  8. Plasma miR-221/222 Family as Novel Descriptive and Prognostic Biomarkers for Glioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Pang, Bo; Xin, Tao; Guo, Hua; Xing, Yi; Xu, Shangchen; Feng, Bin; Liu, Bin; Pang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Glioma, the most common type of primary central nervous system cancers, was progressive with poor survival. MicroRNA, as a novel biomarker, was suspected to be novel biomarkers for glioma diagnosis and prognosis. The study aimed at investigating the diagnostic and predictive value of miR-221/222 family for glioma. In the first phase, we compared plasma miR-221/222 family levels between 50 glioma patients and 51 healthy controls by real-time qRT-PCR amplification. Meanwhile, a meta-analysis based on published studies and presents study was performed to explore the diagnostic performance of miR-221/222 family in human cancers. In the second phase, we correlated the miR-221/222 family expression level with prognosis of glioma using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The plasma miR-221/222 family levels were found to be significantly upregulated in glioma patients (P = 0.001). The ROC curve analysis yielded an AUC values of 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-0.93) for miR-221 and 0.92 (95% CI 0.87-0.94) for miR-222. In the meta-analysis, the summary receiver operating characteristic (sROC) was plotted with an AUC of 0.82 (95% CI 0.78-0.85) for miR-221/222 family. It was also demonstrated that high positive plasma miR-221 and miR-222 were both correlated with poor survival rate (miR-221: HR = 2.13; 95% CI, 1.05-4.31; miR-222: HR = 2.09; 95% CI, 1.00-4.37). This study demonstrated that the detection of the miRNA-221/222 family should be considered as a new additional tool to better characterize glioma.

  9. Kinetic instabilities that limit β in the edge of a tokamak plasma: a picture of an H-mode pedestal.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, D; Roach, C M; Saarelma, S; Scannell, R; Kirk, A; Wilson, H R

    2012-03-30

    Plasma equilibria reconstructed from the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak have sufficient resolution to capture plasma evolution during the short period between edge-localized modes (ELMs). Immediately after the ELM, steep gradients in pressure, P, and density, n(e), form pedestals close to the separatrix, and they then expand into the core. Local gyrokinetic analysis over the ELM cycle reveals the dominant microinstabilities at perpendicular wavelengths of the order of the ion Larmor radius. These are kinetic ballooning modes in the pedestal and microtearing modes in the core close to the pedestal top. The evolving growth rate spectra, supported by gyrokinetic analysis using artificial local equilibrium scans, suggest a new physical picture for the formation and arrest of this pedestal.

  10. Kinetic Instabilities that Limit β in the Edge of a Tokamak Plasma: A Picture of an H-Mode Pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, D.; Roach, C. M.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Kirk, A.; Wilson, H. R.

    2012-03-01

    Plasma equilibria reconstructed from the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak have sufficient resolution to capture plasma evolution during the short period between edge-localized modes (ELMs). Immediately after the ELM, steep gradients in pressure, P, and density, ne, form pedestals close to the separatrix, and they then expand into the core. Local gyrokinetic analysis over the ELM cycle reveals the dominant microinstabilities at perpendicular wavelengths of the order of the ion Larmor radius. These are kinetic ballooning modes in the pedestal and microtearing modes in the core close to the pedestal top. The evolving growth rate spectra, supported by gyrokinetic analysis using artificial local equilibrium scans, suggest a new physical picture for the formation and arrest of this pedestal.

  11. Kinetic full wave analyses of O-X-B mode conversion of EC waves in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Atsushi; Khan, Shabbir Ahmad; Igami, Hiroe; Idei, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    For heating and current drive in a high-density plasma of tokamak, especially spherical tokamak, the use of electron Bernstein waves and the O-X-B mode conversion were proposed and experimental observations have been reported. In order to evaluate the power deposition profile and the current drive efficiency, kinetic full wave analysis using an integral form of dielectric tensor has been developed. The incident angle dependence of wave structure and O-X-B mode conversion efficiency is examined using one-dimensional analysis in the major radius direction. Two-dimensional analyses on the horizontal plane and the poloidal plane are also conducted, and the wave structure and the power deposition profile are compared with those of previous analyses using ray tracing method and cold plasma approximation. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP26630471.

  12. Gaschromatography of clemastine. A study of plasma kinetics and biological effect.

    PubMed

    Tham, R; Norlander, B; Hägermark, O; Fransson, L

    1978-01-01

    A method for estimation of clemastine in human plasma has been developed. By chronic acid oxidation the drug is degradated to chlorobenzophenone, which can then be analysed by gas-liquid-chromatography using electron-capture detection. The plasma levels of clemastine after oral and i.v. administration have been studied. Using different methods for extraction of the drug from plasma a metabolic degradation of the pyrrolidine part of clemastine is demonstrated. The metabolite proposed may be biologically active. The plasma level of the drug was found to be directly related to its biologic effect, measured as inhibition of the histamine-induced flare in human skin.

  13. Kinetics of plasma procalcitonin, soluble CD14, CCL2 and IL-10 after a sublethal infusion of lipopolysaccharide in horses.

    PubMed

    Bonelli, Francesca; Meucci, Valentina; Divers, Thomas J; Wagner, Bettina; Intorre, Luigi; Sgorbini, Micaela

    2017-02-01

    Endotoxemia represents a significant clinical and economic problem for the equine industry. This study assesses the kinetics of soluble CD14 (sCD14), chemokine (CC motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and plasma procalcitonin (PCT) in healthy horses after the intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim was to contribute to the basic understanding of the equine species-specific kinetics of these molecules in response to LPS exposure, which could support further findings in clinical studies and identify valuable inflammatory biomarkers for equine practice. Eleven healthy horses were involved in this experimental in vivo study. Horses were classified as healthy before the LPS infusion. After the pre-infusion blood collection (T0), all horses received an infusion of E. coli endotoxin (30ng/kg over 30min). Data and samples were collected 1h (T1), 2 (T2), 3 (T3) and 24h (T24) after infusion. Plasma sCD14, CCL2 and IL-10 were evaluated with a fluorescent bead-based assay, while PCT was evaluated with an equine PCT ELISA assay. A one-way ANOVA test was performed between each blood-sampling time for PCT, sCD14 and IL-10, and a Friedman test was performed for CCL2. Plasma PCT, IL-10 and CCL2 concentrations increased statistically significantly at T1, T2 and T3 compared to T0. No statistically significant differences were found between plasma IL-10 and CCL2 concentrations between T0 vs T24, although plasma PCT values remained high 24h after LPS infusion. Plasma sCD14 concentration showed no statistically significant differences for any of sampling times. Our results demonstrate that LPS injection into healthy horses results in PCT, CCL2 and IL-10 increases in plasma without an increase in sCD14. The increases in PCT, CCL2 and IL-10 are related to the inflammatory response induced by circulating lipopolysaccharide.

  14. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N(2) vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N(2), O(2), N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N(2) vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C(3)H(8)-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C(3)H(8)-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate

  15. Photocatalytic characteristic and photodegradation kinetics of toluene using N-doped TiO2 modified by radio frequency plasma.

    PubMed

    Shie, Je-Lueng; Lee, Chiu-Hsuan; Chiou, Chyow-San; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of applications of the plasma surface modification of photocatalysts and the removal of toluene from indoor environments. N-doped TiO2 is prepared by precipitation methods and calcined using a muffle furnace (MF) and modified by radio frequency plasma (RF) at different temperatures with light sources from a visible light lamp (VLL), a white light-emitting diode (WLED) and an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UVLED). The operation parameters and influential factors are addressed and prepared for characteristic analysis and photo-decomposition examination. Furthermore, related kinetic models are established and used to simulate the experimental data. The characteristic analysis results show that the RF plasma-calcination method enhanced the Brunauer Emmett Teller surface area of the modified photocatalysts effectively. For the elemental analysis, the mass percentages of N for the RF-modified photocatalyst are larger than those of MF by six times. The aerodynamic diameters of the RF-modifiedphotocatalyst are all smaller than those of MF. Photocatalytic decompositions of toluene are elucidated according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Decomposition efficiencies (eta) of toluene for RF-calcined methods are all higher than those of commercial TiO2 (P25). Reaction kinetics ofphoto-decomposition reactions using RF-calcined methods with WLED are proposed. A comparison of the simulation results with experimental data is also made and indicates good agreement. All the results provide useful information and design specifications. Thus, this study shows the feasibility and potential use of plasma modification via LED in photocatalysis.

  16. A non-LTE kinetic model for quick analysis of K-shell spectra from Z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. Huang, X. B. Cai, H. C. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Duan, S. C.

    2014-12-15

    Analyzing and modeling K-shell spectra emitted by low-to moderate-atomic number plasma is a useful and effective way to retrieve temperature density of z-pinch plasmas. In this paper, a non-LTE population kinetic model for quick analysis of K-shell spectra was proposed. The model contains ionization stages from bare nucleus to neutral atoms and includes all the important atomic processes. In the present form of the model, the plasma is assumed to be both optically thin and homogeneous with constant temperature and density, and only steady-state situation is considered. According to the detailed calculations for aluminum plasmas, contours of ratios of certain K-shell lines in electron temperature and density plane as well as typical synthesized spectra were presented and discussed. The usefulness of the model is demonstrated by analyzing the spectrum from a neon gas-puff Z-pinch experiment performed on a 1 MA pulsed-power accelerator.

  17. Shape, Pressure, and Kinetic Effects on the Resistive Wall Mode in Rotating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    A comprehensive theory of the resistive wall mode is carried out, including the effects of finite ellipticity, finite beta, and plasma rotation. In the circular-cylindrical limit, the resistive wall mode (RWM) is an external kink mode without singular surfaces inside the plasma column. In a tokamak, the noncircularity, the toroidicity, and the finite pressure of the plasma column induce the coupling of the poloidal harmonics, and the mode sidebands have singular surfaces inside the plasma. At such surfaces, the radial electric field is large and so is the power dissipated by the mode. It is well known that such a dissipation, combined with the plasma rotation, creates a window of stability in beta(R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2949 (1995).) and in b/a (wall radius/plasma radius).(A. Bondeson and D. J. Ward, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2709 (1994).) The size of the stability window is modified by the stabilizing contribution of the trapped-particle compressibility and the plasma resistivity. The size of the stability window is determined for highly elongated plasmas where the ellipticity is comparable or larger than the toroidicity. The minimum rotation velocity for stabilization is derived, and the implications for tokamak design are discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-93ER54215.

  18. Impact of cold plasma on Citrobacter freundii in apple juice: inactivation kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Surowsky, Björn; Fröhling, Antje; Gottschalk, Nathalie; Schlüter, Oliver; Knorr, Dietrich

    2014-03-17

    Various studies have shown that cold plasma is capable of inactivating microorganisms located on a variety of food surfaces, food packaging materials and process equipment under atmospheric pressure conditions; however, less attention has been paid to the impact of cold plasma on microorganisms in liquid foodstuffs. The present study investigates cold plasma's ability to inactivate Citrobacter freundii in apple juice. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and temperature measurements were performed to characterise the plasma source. The plasma-related impact on microbial loads was evaluated by traditional plate count methods, while morphological changes were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Physiological property changes were obtained through flow cytometric measurements (membrane integrity, esterase activity and membrane potential). In addition, mathematical modelling was performed in order to achieve a reliable prediction of microbial inactivation and to establish the basis for possible industrial implementation. C. freundii loads in apple juice were reduced by about 5 log cycles after a plasma exposure of 480s using argon and 0.1% oxygen plus a subsequent storage time of 24h. The results indicate that a direct contact between bacterial cells and plasma is not necessary for achieving successful inactivation. The plasma-generated compounds in the liquid, such as H2O2 and most likely hydroperoxy radicals, are particularly responsible for microbial inactivation.

  19. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions. PMID:26113853

  20. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions.

  1. Mathematical description of the kinetics of the thermal degradation of coals over a wide range of rates of heating

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, L.N.; Bronshtein, A.P.; Zadorina, E.N.; Zagorets, A.M.; Makarov, G.N.; Polyakov, A.A.; Shlenskii, O.F.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of the most effective regimes for the thermal processing of solid fuels and the control of these processes requires a well-based selection of mathematical models for them. In the reported theoretical study, the question is considered of the possibility of using the traditional equations of chemical kinetics for describing the thermal degradation of the organic matter of coals. Various methods are proposed for the detemination of thermogravimetric curves. 14 refs.

  2. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. 2: Code description and usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 2 of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 2 describes the code, how to modify it, and its usage, including preparation of the problem data file required to execute LSENS. Code usage is illustrated by several example problems, which further explain preparation of the problem data file and show how to obtain desired accuracy in the computed results. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions. Part 1 (NASA RP-1328) derives the governing equations describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved by lSENS. Part 3 (NASA RP-1330) explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity-analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results.

  3. Integrated magnetic and kinetic control of advanced tokamak plasmas on DIII-D based on data-driven models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, D.; Walker, M. L.; Ferron, J. R.; Liu, F.; Schuster, E.; Barton, J. E.; Boyer, M. D.; Burrell, K. H.; Flanagan, S. M.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R. J.; Holcomb, C. T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Johnson, R. D.; La Haye, R. J.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Park, J. M.; Penaflor, B. G.; Shi, W.; Turco, F.; Wehner, W.; the ITPA-IOS Group members; experts

    2013-06-01

    The first real-time profile control experiments integrating magnetic and kinetic variables were performed on DIII-D in view of regulating and extrapolating advanced tokamak scenarios to steady-state devices and burning plasma experiments. Device-specific, control-oriented models were obtained from experimental data using a generic two-time-scale method that was validated on JET, JT-60U and DIII-D under the framework of the International Tokamak Physics Activity for Integrated Operation Scenarios (Moreau et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 063009). On DIII-D, these data-driven models were used to synthesize integrated magnetic and kinetic profile controllers. The neutral beam injection (NBI), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) systems and ohmic coil provided the heating and current drive (H&CD) sources. The first control actuator was the plasma surface loop voltage (i.e. the ohmic coil), and the available beamlines and gyrotrons were grouped to form five additional H&CD actuators: co-current on-axis NBI, co-current off-axis NBI, counter-current NBI, balanced NBI and total ECCD power from all gyrotrons (with off-axis current deposition). Successful closed-loop experiments showing the control of (a) the poloidal flux profile, Ψ(x), (b) the poloidal flux profile together with the normalized pressure parameter, βN, and (c) the inverse of the safety factor profile, \\bar{\\iota}(x)=1/q(x) , are described.

  4. Electron-Vibrational Energy Exchange in Nitrogen-Containing Plasma: a Comparison Between an Analytical Approach and a Kinetic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the electron-vibrational (e-V) energy exchange in nitrogen-containing plasma, which is very efficient in the case of gas discharge and high speed flow. Based on Harmonic oscillator approximation and the assumption of the e-V relaxation through a continuous series of Boltzmann distributions over the vibrational states, an analytic approach is derived from the proposed scaling relation of e-V transition rates. A full kinetic model is then investigated by numerically solving the state-to-state master equation for all vibrational levels. The analytical approach leads to a Landau-Teller (LT)-type equation for relaxation of vibrational energy, and predicts the relaxation time on the right order of magnitude. By comparison with the kinetic model, the LT-type equation is valid in typical electron temperatures in gas discharge. However, the analytical approach is not capable of describing the vibrational distribution function during the e-V process in which a full kinetic model is required. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11505015) and the National High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program)

  5. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Zonca, F.

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  6. Theory and simulation of discrete kinetic beta induced Alfvén eigenmode in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zonca, F.; Chen, L.

    2010-11-01

    It is shown, both analytically and by numerical simulations, that, in the presence of thermal ion kinetic effects, the beta induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE)-shear Alfvén wave continuous spectrum can be discretized into radially trapped eigenstates known as kinetic BAE (KBAE). While thermal ion compressibility gives rise to finite BAE accumulation point frequency, the discretization occurs via the finite Larmor radius and finite orbit width effects. Simulations and analytical theories agree both qualitatively and quantitatively. Simulations also demonstrate that KBAE can be readily excited by the finite radial gradients of energetic particles.

  7. Kinetics of taurine depletion and repletion in plasma, serum, whole blood and skeletal muscle in cats.

    PubMed

    Pacioretty, L; Hickman, M A; Morris, J G; Rogers, Q R

    2001-12-01

    The relationship between taurine concentrations of plasma, whole blood, serum and skeletal muscle during taurine depletion and repletion was investigated in cats, to identify the most useful indicators of taurine status. Sixteen cats were fed a purified diet containing either 0 or 0.15 g/kg taurine for 5 months. Treatments were then reversed and the taurine concentration was measured during repletion and depletion phases. Plasma taurine exhibited the fastest rate (slow component) of depletion (t 1/2 = 4.8 wk), followed by serum (5.3 wk), whole blood (6.2 wk), and skeletal muscle (11.2 wk). Whole blood taurine was the first to replete at a rate of 0.74 wk to 1/2 maximal repletion, followed by serum (2.1 wk), skeletal muscle (3.5 wk), and plasma (3.5 wk). Whole blood more closely reflected skeletal muscle taurine concentrations than plasma during depletion, while plasma taurine concentrations appear to be the most valuable predictor of skeletal muscle taurine concentrations during repletion. This study suggests that the best clinical method to evaluate the taurine status of the cat is the determination and interpretation of both plasma and whole blood taurine concentrations.

  8. Comparison of two-fluid and gyrokinetic models for kinetic Alfvén waves in solar and space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Wu, D. J.; Wang, S. J.; Lee, L. C.

    2014-09-01

    An analytical comparative study of a two-fluid and a gyrokinetic model of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) is presented for various solar and space plasma environments. Based on the linear KAW dispersion relation for gyrokinetics (Howes et al. 2006), the wave group velocity and electromagnetic polarizations are obtained analytically. Then the gyrokinetic wave properties are compared with those of the two-fluid model. The results show that both models agree well with each other not only in the long wavelength regime (>> the ion gyroradius ρ {sub i}) for all cases considered, but also in wavelengths ∼ρ {sub i} and <<ρ {sub i} (still much larger than the electron gyroscale) for a moderate or low (≲ 1) and a high (>>1) ion/electron temperature ratio T {sub 0i}/T {sub 0e}, respectively. However, the fluid model calculations deviate strongly from the gyrokinetic model at scales <ρ {sub i} for a relatively low T {sub 0i}/T {sub 0e} due to the electron gyroradius effect. Meanwhile, the plasma β {sub i} can make the gyrokinetic dispersion relation of KAWs become complex and sometimes have an oscillation-like structure. With the inherent simplicity of the fluid theory, these results may improve our understanding of the applicability of the two-fluid model, and may have important implications for computer simulation studies of KAWs in the solar and space plasma surroundings.

  9. Kinetic modeling of evolution of 3 + 1:Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization plasma in argon at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Alexeenko, Alina A.; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2014-06-15

    We present numerical kinetic modeling of generation and evolution of the plasma produced as a result of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in Argon gas. The particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) simulations capture non-equilibrium effects in REMPI plasma expansion by considering the major collisional processes at the microscopic level: elastic scattering, electron impact ionization, ion charge exchange, and recombination and quenching for metastable excited atoms. The conditions in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) formulations correspond to known experiments in Argon at a pressure of 5 Torr. The 1D PIC/MCC calculations are compared with the published results of local drift-diffusion model, obtained for the same conditions. It is shown that the PIC/MCC and diffusion-drift models are in qualitative and in reasonable quantitative agreement during the ambipolar expansion stage, whereas significant non-equilibrium exists during the first few 10 s of nanoseconds. 2D effects are important in the REMPI plasma expansion. The 2D PIC/MCC calculations produce significantly lower peak electron densities as compared to 1D and show a better agreement with experimentally measured microwave radiation scattering.

  10. Compact, accurate description of diagnostic neutral beam propagation and attenuation in a high temperature plasma for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Bespamyatnov, Igor O; Rowan, William L; Granetz, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod relies on the use of the diagnostic neutral beam injector as a source of neutral particles which penetrate deep into the plasma. It employs the emission resulting from the interaction of the beam atoms with fully ionized impurity ions. To interpret the emission from a given point in the plasma as the density of emitting impurity ions, the density of beam atoms must be known. Here, an analysis of beam propagation is described which yields the beam density profile throughout the beam trajectory from the neutral beam injector to the core of the plasma. The analysis includes the effects of beam formation, attenuation in the neutral gas surrounding the plasma, and attenuation in the plasma. In the course of this work, a numerical simulation and an analytical approximation for beam divergence are developed. The description is made sufficiently compact to yield accurate results in a time consistent with between-shot analysis.

  11. O the Description of Space Plasmas Exhibiting Temperature Anisotropies for Subsonic Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demars, Howard Griffin

    The purpose of this paper was to compare solutions to the bi-Maxwellian based 16-moment transport equations with those obtained from the Maxwellian based 13-moment transport equations for conditions leading to the steady state, subsonic flow of a fully-ionized electron-proton plasma along geomagnetic field lines. An in-depth review of past work in the field of ionospheric temperature anisotropies, covering both theoretical models and experimental observations, was presented first in order to provide a background for and clarify the meaning of the original research to follow. Both the 16-moment and 13-moment sets were expressed in a dipolar coordinate system and numerically integrated along the direction of the geomagnetic field. The comparison was conducted for a range of lower boundary temperatures (2000 -10000 K) and temperature gradients (1-4 K km('-1)) over the altitude range from 1500-13000 km. These boundary parameters are the most important in the subsonic flow regime since they produce different temperature anisotropies and heat flows, which are handled differently in the two formula- tions. The 16-moment set of transport equations, which is based on a zeroth-order bi-Maxwellian (two-temperature) velocity distribution function, can account for large temperature anisotropies and the flow of both parallel and perpendicular thermal energy, while the 13-moment set, which is based on a zeroth-order distribution that is Maxwellian (temperature isotropic), can account for small tem- perature anisotropies and only a total heat flow. For low boundary temperatures (T (TURN) 2000 K) and low boundary temperature gradients ((DEL)T(, )< 2 K km('-1)), the differences between the bi-Maxwellian based 16-moment and Maxwellian based 13-moment solutions were found to be negligibly small. For intermediate boundary temperatures and temperature gradients, both the 16-moment and 13-moment formu- lations predict electron and proton temperature anisotropies with perpendicular

  12. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, II: Electron transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The previously obtained in (Zhdanov and Stepanenko, 2016) general transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma are employed for analysis of electron transport properties in molecular and atomic plasmas. We account for both elastic and inelastic interaction channels of electrons with atoms and molecules of plasma and also the processes of electron impact ionization of neutral particles and three-body ion-electron recombination. The system of scalar transport equations for electrons is discussed and the expressions for non-equilibrium corrections to electron ionization and recombination rates and the diagonal part of the electron pressure tensor are derived. Special attention is paid to analysis of electron energy relaxation during collisions with plasma particles having internal degrees of freedom and the expression for the electron coefficient of inelastic energy losses is deduced. We also derive the expressions for electron vector and tensorial transport fluxes and the corresponding transport coefficients for partially ionized reactive plasma, which represent a generalization of the well-known results obtained by Devoto (1967). The results of numerical evaluation of contribution from electron inelastic collisions with neutral particles to electron transport properties are presented for a series of molecular and atomic gases.

  13. Fat oxidation, hormonal and plasma metabolite kinetics during a submaximal incremental test in lean and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Salvadori, Alberto; Brunani, Amelia; Malatesta, Davide

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare fat oxidation, hormonal and plasma metabolite kinetics during exercise in lean (L) and obese (O) men. Sixteen L and 16 O men [Body Mass Index (BMI): 22.9 ± 0.3 and 39.0 ± 1.4 kg · m(-2)] performed a submaximal incremental test (Incr) on a cycle-ergometer. Fat oxidation rates (FORs) were determined using indirect calorimetry. A sinusoidal model, including 3 independent variables (dilatation, symmetry, translation), was used to describe fat oxidation kinetics and determine the intensity (Fat(max)) eliciting maximal fat oxidation. Blood samples were drawn for the hormonal and plasma metabolite determination at each step of Incr. FORs (mg · FFM(-1) · min(-1)) were significantly higher from 20 to 30% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in O than in L and from 65 to 85% VO2peak in L than in O (p ≤ 0.05). FORs were similar in O and in L from 35 to 60% VO2peak. Fat max was 17% significantly lower in O than in L (p<0.01). Fat oxidation kinetics were characterized by similar translation, significantly lower dilatation and left-shift symmetry in O compared with L (p<0.05). During whole exercise, a blunted lipolysis was found in O [lower glycerol/fat mass (FM) in O than in L (p ≤ 0.001)], likely associated with higher insulin concentrations in O than in L (p<0.01). Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) were significantly higher in O compared with L (p<0.05). Despite the blunted lipolysis, O presented higher NEFA availability, likely due to larger amounts of FM. Therefore, a lower Fat(max), a left-shifted and less dilated curve and a lower reliance on fat oxidation at high exercise intensities suggest that the difference in the fat oxidation kinetics is likely linked to impaired muscular capacity to oxidize NEFA in O. These results may have important implications for the appropriate exercise intensity prescription in training programs designed to optimize fat oxidation in O.

  14. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  15. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  16. Plasma parameters and active species kinetics in CF4/O2/Ar gas mixture: effects of CF4/O2 and O2/Ar mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmyung; Kwon, Kwang-Ho; Efremov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of both CF4/O2 and O2/Ar mixing ratios in three-component CF4/O2/Ar mixture on plasma parameters, densities and fluxes of active species determining the dry etching kinetics were analyzed. The investigation combined plasma diagnostics by Langmuir probes and zero-dimensional plasma modeling. It was found that the substitution of CF4 for O2 at constant fraction of Ar in a feed gas produces the non-monotonic change in F atom density, as it was repeatedly reported for the binary CF4/O2 gas mixtures. At the same time, the substitution of Ar for O2 at constant fraction of CF4 results in the monotonic increase in F atom density toward more oxygenated plasmas. The natures of these phenomena as well as theirs possible impacts on the etching/polymerization kinetics were discussed in details.

  17. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  18. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere –- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation

  19. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming; Borovikov, Sergey; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Zank, Gary; Gamayunov, Konstantin; Colella, Phillip

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere - the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct regions are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker–Planck equation, or

  20. Sacrificial bonds and hidden length in biomaterials: A kinetic constitutive description of strength and toughness in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.; Carlson, Jean M.

    2013-07-01

    Sacrificial bonds and hidden length in structural molecules account for the greatly increased fracture toughness of biological materials compared to synthetic materials without such structural features by providing a molecular-scale mechanism for energy dissipation. One example is in the polymeric glue connection between collagen fibrils in animal bone. In this paper we propose a simple kinetic model that describes the breakage of sacrificial bonds and the release of hidden length, based on Bell's theory. We postulate a master equation governing the rates of bond breakage and formation. This enables us to predict the mechanical behavior of a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of polymers at different stretching rates. We find that both the rupture peak heights and maximum stretching distance increase with the stretching rate. In addition, our theory naturally permits the possibility of self-healing in such biological structures.

  1. Kinetic description of intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing field based on the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Chen, C.

    1997-08-01

    A kinetic description of intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing field B{sup sol}({rvec x}) is developed. The analysis is carried out for a thin beam with characteristic beam radius r{sub b} {much_lt} S, and directed axial momentum {gamma}{sub b}m{beta}{sub b}c (in the z-direction) large compared with the transverse momentum and axial momentum spread of the beam particles. Making use of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for general distribution function f{sub b}({rvec x},{rvec p},t) and self-consistent electrostatic field consistent with the thin-beam approximation, the kinetic model is used to investigate detailed beam equilibrium properties for a variety of distribution functions. Examples are presented both for the case of a uniform solenoidal focusing field B{sub z}(z) = B{sub 0} = const. and for the case of a periodic solenoidal focusing field B{sub z}(z + S) = B{sub z}(z). The nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations are simplified in the thin-beam approximation, and an alternative Hamiltonian formulation is developed that is particularly well-suited to intense beam propagation in periodic focusing systems. Based on the present analysis, the Vlasov-Maxwell description of intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing field {rvec B}{sup sol}({rvec x}) is found to be remarkably tractable and rich in physics content. The Vlasov-Maxwell formalism developed here can be extended in a straightforward manner to investigate detailed stability behavior for perturbations about specific choices of beam equilibria.

  2. Kinetic Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas, Charged Particle Acceleration,and Cross-Scale Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-26

    694/1/618 (2009). [2] P. H. Yoon and T.-M. Fang, Proton heating by parallel Alfven wave cascade, Physics of Plasmas 16, 062314, doi: 10.1063...ANSI Std Z39-18 [5] C. S. Wu, P. H. Yoon, and C. B. Wang, On non-resonant proton heating via intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence, Physics of Plasmas 16...interaction, J. Geophys. Res. 115, A01103, doi: 10.1029/2009JA014447 (2010). [10] J. Pavan, L. F. Ziebell, P. H. Yoon, and R. Gaelzer, Ionospheric ion

  3. Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like nanoemulsion and lipid transfer to HDL in subjects with glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bertato, Marina P; Oliveira, Carolina P; Wajchenberg, Bernardo L; Lerario, Antonio C; Maranhão, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucose intolerance is frequently associated with an altered plasma lipid profile and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Nonetheless, lipid metabolism is scarcely studied in normolipidemic glucose-intolerant patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether important lipid metabolic parameters, such as the kinetics of LDL free and esterified cholesterol and the transfer of lipids to HDL, are altered in glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids. METHODS: Fourteen glucose-intolerant patients and 15 control patients were studied; none of the patients had cardiovascular disease manifestations, and they were paired for age, sex, race and co-morbidities. A nanoemulsion resembling a LDL lipid composition (LDE) labeled with 14C-cholesteryl ester and 3H-free cholesterol was intravenously injected, and blood samples were collected over a 24-h period to determine the fractional clearance rate of the labels by compartmental analysis. The transfer of free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids from the LDE to HDL was measured by the incubation of the LDE with plasma and radioactivity counting of the supernatant after chemical precipitation of non-HDL fractions. RESULTS: The levels of LDL, non-HDL and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apo A1 and apo B were equal in both groups. The 14C-esterified cholesterol fractional clearance rate was not different between glucose-intolerant and control patients, but the 3H-free- cholesterol fractional clearance rate was greater in glucose-intolerant patients than in control patients. The lipid transfer to HDL was equal in both groups. CONCLUSION: In these glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids, a faster removal of LDE free cholesterol was the only lipid metabolic alteration detected in our study. This finding suggests that the dissociation of free cholesterol from lipoprotein particles occurs in normolipidemic glucose intolerance and may participate in atherogenic

  4. Nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in space plasmas: From Alfvén waves to kinetic Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Li, B.; He, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    The nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in plasma media has been an attractive and challenge problem in space physics as well as in basic plasma physics. A wide continuous spectrum of Alfvénic turbulence from large MHD-scale Alfvén waves (AWs) in the inertial turbulence regime to small kinetic-scale kinetic AWs (KAWs) in the dissipation turbulence regime is a typical paradigm of plasma turbulence. The incorporation of current remote observations of AWs in the solar atmosphere, in situ satellite measurements of Alfvénic turbulence in the solar wind, and experimental investigations of KAWs on large plasma devices in laboratory provides a chance synthetically to study the physics nature of plasma turbulence, dissipation, and heating. A session entitled "Nature of Turbulence, Dissipation, and Heating in Space Plasmas: From Alfvén Waves to Kinetic Alfvén Waves" was held as a part of the twelfth Asia Oceania Geosciences Society Annual Meeting, which took place in Singapore between 2 and 7 August 2015. This special section is organized based on the session.

  5. Kinetic modelling for an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gaens, W.; Bogaerts, A.

    2013-07-01

    A zero-dimensional, semi-empirical model is used to describe the plasma chemistry in an argon plasma jet flowing into humid air, mimicking the experimental conditions of a setup from the Eindhoven University of Technology. The model provides species density profiles as a function of the position in the plasma jet device and effluent. A reaction chemistry set for an argon/humid air mixture is developed, which considers 84 different species and 1880 reactions. Additionally, we present a reduced chemistry set, useful for higher level computational models. Calculated species density profiles along the plasma jet are shown and the chemical pathways are explained in detail. It is demonstrated that chemically reactive H, N, O and OH radicals are formed in large quantities after the nozzle exit and H2, O2(1Δg), O3, H2O2, NO2, N2O, HNO2 and HNO3 are predominantly formed as ‘long living’ species. The simulations show that water clustering of positive ions is very important under these conditions. The influence of vibrational excitation on the calculated electron temperature is studied. Finally, the effect of varying gas temperature, flow speed, power density and air humidity on the chemistry is investigated.

  6. Kinetic Model of Auroral Plasma Formation II: Simultaneous Multi-Satellite Ion Observations and Interpretations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-30

    Geiss, P. Eberhardt, H. Balsiger , G. Haerendel, and H. Rosenbauer, Plasma composition experiment on ISEE-A, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Electron., GE-16, 266...1978. Stokholm, M., E. Amata, H. Balsiger , M. Candidi, S. Orsini, and A. Pedersen, Low energy ( < 130eV) oxygen ions at the geosynchronous orbit

  7. Full kinetic simulations of plasma flow interactions with meso- and microscale magnetic dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Y.; Yamakawa, H.; Usui, H.; Miyake, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Funaki, I.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-12-15

    We examined the plasma flow response to meso- and microscale magnetic dipoles by performing three-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulations. We particularly focused on the formation of a magnetosphere and its dependence on the intensity of the magnetic moment. The size of a magnetic dipole immersed in a plasma flow can be characterized by a distance L from the dipole center to the position where the pressure of the local magnetic field becomes equal to the dynamic pressure of the plasma flow under the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approximation. In this study, we are interested in a magnetic dipole whose L is smaller than the Larmor radius of ions r{sub iL} calculated with the unperturbed dipole field at the distance L from the center. In the simulation results, we confirmed the clear formation of a magnetosphere consisting of a magnetopause and a tail region in the density profile, although the spatial scale is much smaller than the MHD scale. One of the important findings in this study is that the spatial profiles of the plasma density as well as the current flows are remarkably affected by the finite Larmor radius effect of the plasma flow, which is different from the Earth's magnetosphere. The magnetopause found in the upstream region is located at a position much closer to the dipole center than L. In the equatorial plane, we also found an asymmetric density profile with respect to the plasma flow direction, which is caused by plasma gyration in the dipole field region. The ion current layers are created in the inner region of the dipole field, and the electron current also flows in the region beyond the ion current layer because ions with a large inertia can closely approach the dipole center. Unlike the ring current structure of the Earth's magnetosphere, the current layers in the microscale dipole fields are not circularly closed around the dipole center. Since the major current is caused by the particle gyrations, the current is independently determined

  8. Code Coupling via Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov Algorithms with Application to Magnetized Fluid Plasma and Kinetic Neutral Models

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Ilon

    2014-05-27

    Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) algorithms are a potentially powerful class of methods for solving the problem of coupling codes that address dfferent physics models. As communication capability between individual submodules varies, different choices of coupling algorithms are required. The more communication that is available, the more possible it becomes to exploit the simple sparsity pattern of the Jacobian, albeit of a large system. The less communication that is available, the more dense the Jacobian matrices become and new types of preconditioners must be sought to efficiently take large time steps. In general, methods that use constrained or reduced subsystems can offer a compromise in complexity. The specific problem of coupling a fluid plasma code to a kinetic neutrals code is discussed as an example.

  9. What is a plasma?

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, Thomas P.

    2012-08-30

    This introduction will define the plasma fourth state of matter, where we find plasmas on earth and beyond, and why they are useful. There are applications to many consumer items, fusion energy, scientific devices, satellite communications, semiconductor processing, spacecraft propulsion, and more. Since 99% of our observable universe is ionized gas, plasma physics determines many important features of astrophysics, space physics, and magnetosphere physics in our solar system. We describe some plasma characteristics, examples in nature, some useful applications, how to create plasmas. A brief introduction to the theoretical framework includes the connection between kinetic and fluid descriptions, quasi neutrality, Debye shielding, ambipolar electric fields, some plasma waves. Hands-on demonstrations follow. More complete explanations will follow next week.

  10. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value.

  11. Hybrid-Kinetic Modelling of Space Plasma with Application to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paral, Jan

    A planet's magnetosphere is often very dynamic, undergoing large topological changes in response to high speed (˜400km/s) solar wind intervals, coronal mass ejections, and naturally excited plasma wave modes. Plasma waves are very effective at transporting energy throughout the magnetosphere, and are therefore of interest in the context of the coupling between solar wind and magnetosphere. Of relevance to this thesis is Kelvin-Helmholtz macro-instability. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is excited by shear of the flows. KHI is commonly observed at equatorial regions of the magnetopause where fast flowing magnetosheath plasma may interact with slow bulk velocities of magnetospheric plasma. The instability is responsible for exciting shear Alfven waves which (at Earth) may be detected using the ground based magnetometers located at latitude of excited field lines. This thesis uses numerical modelling to understand and to explain the generation and propagation of the KHI in Mercury's magnetosphere. The instability is initiated close to the planet and convectively grows while being transported along the tail. When the wave amplitude reaches a nonlinear stage, the structure of the wave becomes complex due to the wrapping of the plasma into the vortex. A vortex structure is typical for KHI and it is used for identifying the wave in the data from satellites. The instability commonly occurs at the dawn or dusk flank magnetopause (MP) of Earth with approximately the same probability. But the data from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft, currently in the orbit of the planet Mercury, suggest a strong asymmetry in the observations of KHI. It is shown that the KHI initiated near the subsolar point evolves into large-scale vortices propagating anti-sunward along the dusk-side MP. The simulations are in agreement with the third flyby of the MESSENGER spacecraft, where saw-tooth oscillations in the plasma density, flow, and magnetic field were observed. The observed asymmetry in the

  12. Arbitrary amplitude double layers in warm dust kinetic Alfven wave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoi, Runmoni; Devi, Nirupama

    2008-07-15

    Large amplitude electrostatic structures associated with low-frequency dust kinetic Alfvenic waves are investigated under the pressure (temperature) gradient indicative of dust dynamics. The set of equations governing the dust dynamics, Boltzmann electrons, ions and Maxwell's equation have been reduced to a single equation known as the Sagdeev potential equation. Parameter ranges for the existence of arbitrary amplitude double layers are observed. Exact analytical expressions for the energy integral is obtained and computed numerically through which sub-Alfvenic arbitrary amplitude rarefactive double layers are found to exist.

  13. Densification kinetics of nanocrystalline zirconia powder using microwave and spark plasma sintering--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Vasylkiv, Oleg; Demirskyi, Dmytro; Sakka, Yoshio; Ragulya, Andrey; Borodianska, Hanna

    2012-06-01

    Two-stage densification process of nanosized 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-SZ) polycrystalline compacts during consolidation via microwave and spark-plasma sintering have been observed. The values of activation energies obtained for microwave and spark-plasma sintering 260-275 kJ x mol(-1) are quite similar to that of conventional sintering of zirconia, suggesting that densification during initial stage is controlled by the grain-boundary diffusion mechanism. The sintering behavior during microwave sintering was significantly affected by preliminary pressing conditions, as the surface diffusion mechanism (230 kJ x mol(-1)) is active in case of cold-isostatic pressing procedure was applied.

  14. A Hybrid Kinetic Model of Asymmetric Thin Current Sheets with Sheared Flows in a Collisionless Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-27

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDREss. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYVY) 12. REPORT TYPE 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 27-12...Current Sheets ........................................ 5 3 . Asymmetric Current Sheet Model ............................................. 6 3.1...Chen,l Robert A. Santoro, 2, t, Adam Szabo, 3 , and Davin E. Larson4 1 Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 2 NRC

  15. Kinetic simulations of beam-excited Langmuir waves related to Cassini/Rhea plasma measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K.; Sydora, R. D.; Santolik, O.; Gurnett, D. A.; Basovnik, M.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Schippers, P.

    2013-12-01

    During a close flyby of Saturn's moon Rhea on March 2, 2010, the plasma instruments aboard the Cassini spacecraft detected, aside from whistler-mode and ion-acoustic emissions, bursty Langmuir waves when the spacecraft is magnetically connected to the surface of the moon (Santolik et al., 2010). These waves around the electron plasma frequency are obviously generated by a cold, low-energy electron beam with relatively high density (~10%) accelerated away from Rhea. Because of the low beam speed of about twice the thermal speed of the background plasma, the beam mode is dominantly unstable and this instability extends over a broad wave number range up to kLD~1 (LD: Debye length) covering frequencies below and above the electron plasma frequency. In this respect, the Langmuir instability differs from the conditions of foreshock Langmuir waves at planets where the beam velocity is correlated with the solar wind Mach number and normally much lower beam densities are present. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam-excited Langmuir waves for the above conditions have been carried out. The wave number/frequency analysis of the electric field at the quasi-stationary state shows mode coupling between the Langmuir mode and the electron-acoustic mode which results from the formation of a plateau distribution. The transition from maximum instability to the stationary state is characterized by large amplitude modulations. By comparing the simulations with fixed and mobile ions with varying mass ratios, the role of ion acoustic fluctuations is clarified and shown to be enhanced simultaneously with the high-frequency electrostatic waves.

  16. Kinetics of lipids, apolipoproteins, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein in plasma after a bicycle marathon.

    PubMed

    Föger, B; Wohlfarter, T; Ritsch, A; Lechleitner, M; Miller, C H; Dienstl, A; Patsch, J R

    1994-05-01

    The short-term effects of prolonged intense exercise on plasma lipid transport parameters including cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), low-density lipoprotein (LD) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and its subfractions HDL2 cholesterol and HDL3 cholesterol, on apolipoproteins (apos) A-I, A-II, and B, and on mass and activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) were studied in eight male endurance-trained athletes over the first week after a bicycle marathon. CETP mass concentration in plasma was quantified by a newly developed immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, TGs, LDL cholesterol, apo B, CETP, and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) were significantly reduced in the recovery period compared with pre-exercise values (cholesterol by 20%, P < .05; TGs by 63%, P < .05; LDL cholesterol by 32%, P < .05; apo B by 18%, P < .05; CETP mass by 29%, P < .05; and CETA by 14%, P < .05). HDL cholesterol and HDL2 cholesterol, in contrast, were significantly increased in the post-exercise period (HDL cholesterol by 12%, P < .05, and HDL2 cholesterol by 96%, P < .05), whereas HDL3 cholesterol showed a tendency to decrease in the late recovery period (by 8%, NS). Although changes in cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apo B, and CETP mass and activity were already evident in the early recovery period, HDL2 cholesterol showed a delayed response, reaching its maximum 72 hours after initiation of exercise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Kinetic mechanism of plasma recombination in methane, ethane and propane after high-voltage nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, E. M.; Popov, M. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Starikovskiy, A. Yu; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the experimental and numerical study of high-voltage nanosecond discharge afterglow in pure methane, ethane and propane are presented for room temperature and pressures from 2 to 20 Torr. Time-resolved electron density during the plasma decay was measured with a microwave interferometer for initial electron densities in the range between 5  ×  1010 and 3  ×  1012 cm-3 and the effective recombination coefficients were obtained. Measured effective recombination coefficients increased with gas pressure and were much higher than the recombination coefficients for simple molecular hydrocarbon ions. The properties of plasma in the discharge afterglow were numerically simulated by solving the balance equations for charged particles and electron temperature. Calculations showed that electrons had time to thermalize prior to the recombination. The measured data were interpreted under the assumption that cluster hydrocarbon ions are formed during the plasma decay that is controlled by the dissociative electron recombination with these ions at electron room temperature. Based on the analysis of the experimental data, the rates of three-body formation of cluster ions and recombination coefficients for these ions were estimated.

  18. Kinetic model of electric potentials in localized collisionless plasma structures under steady quasi-gyrotropic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2012-08-15

    Localized plasma structures, such as thin current sheets, generally are associated with localized magnetic and electric fields. In space plasmas localized electric fields not only play an important role for particle dynamics and acceleration but may also have significant consequences on larger scales, e.g., through magnetic reconnection. Also, it has been suggested that localized electric fields generated in the magnetosphere are directly connected with quasi-steady auroral arcs. In this context, we present a two-dimensional model based on Vlasov theory that provides the electric potential for a large class of given magnetic field profiles. The model uses an expansion for small deviation from gyrotropy and besides quasineutrality it assumes that electrons and ions have the same number of particles with their generalized gyrocenter on any given magnetic field line. Specializing to one dimension, a detailed discussion concentrates on the electric potential shapes (such as 'U' or 'S' shapes) associated with magnetic dips, bumps, and steps. Then, it is investigated how the model responds to quasi-steady evolution of the plasma. Finally, the model proves useful in the interpretation of the electric potentials taken from two existing particle simulations.

  19. Plasma Creatine Kinetics After Ingestion of Microencapsulated Creatine Monohydrate with Enhanced Stability in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Hone, Michelle; Kent, Robert M; Scotto di Palumbo, Alessandro; Bleiel, Sinead B; De Vito, Giuseppe; Egan, Brendan

    2017-07-04

    Creatine monohydrate represents one of the largest sports supplement markets. Enhancing creatine (CRE) stability in aqueous solutions, such as with microencapsulation, represents innovation potential. Ten physically active male volunteers were randomly assigned in a double-blind design to either placebo (PLA) (3-g maltodextrin; n = 5) or microencapsulated CRE (3-g creatine monohydrate; n = 5) conditions. Experimental conditions involved ingestion of the samples in a 70-mL ready-to-drink format. CRE was delivered in a novel microencapsulation matrix material consisting entirely of hydrolyzed milk protein. Three hours after ingestion, plasma creatine concentrations were unchanged during PLA, and averaged ∼45 μM. During CRE, plasma creatine concentration peaked after 30 min at 101.6 ± 14.9 μM (p < 0.05), representing a 2.3-fold increase over PLA. Thereafter, plasma creatine concentration gradually trended downwards but remained significantly elevated (∼50% above resting levels) 3 hr after ingestion. These results demonstrate that the microencapsulated form of creatine monohydrate reported herein remains bioavailable when delivered in aqueous conditions, and has potential utility in ready-to-drink formulations for creatine supplementation.

  20. Kinetic Model of Electric Potentials in Localized Collisionless Plasma Structures under Steady Quasi-gyrotropic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    Localized plasma structures, such as thin current sheets, generally are associated with localized magnetic and electric fields. In space plasmas localized electric fields not only play an important role for particle dynamics and acceleration but may also have significant consequences on larger scales, e.g., through magnetic reconnection. Also, it has been suggested that localized electric fields generated in the magnetosphere are directly connected with quasi-steady auroral arcs. In this context, we present a two-dimensional model based on Vlasov theory that provides the electric potential for a large class of given magnetic field profiles. The model uses an expansion for small deviation from gyrotropy and besides quasineutrality it assumes that electrons and ions have the same number of particles with their generalized gyrocenter on any given magnetic field line. Specializing to one dimension, a detailed discussion concentrates on the electric potential shapes (such as "U" or "S" shapes) associated with magnetic dips, bumps, and steps. Then, it is investigated how the model responds to quasi-steady evolution of the plasma. Finally, the model proves useful in the interpretation of the electric potentials taken from two existing particle simulations.

  1. Kinetic and ligand binding evidence for two heme A-based terminal oxidases in plasma membranes from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Hill, B C; Vo, L; Albanese, J

    1993-02-15

    Detergent-solubilized plasma membranes from Bacillus subtilis have been characterized for their cytochrome oxidase content. Triton X-100-solubilized membranes show high O2 turnover with ascorbate plus TMPD. Reduced-oxidized difference spectroscopy of ascorbate-TMPD-reduced membranes reveals the presence of cytochrome c and cytochrome a. An additional, b-type cytochrome appears when the membranes are reduced with dithionite. Time-resolved difference spectra taken during reduction by ascorbate-TMPD reveal two kinetic forms of heme A-containing cytochromes. There is a high-turnover form that is rapidly reduced upon anaerobiosis, and a second type which is only slowly reduced upon anaerobiosis. The slowly reduced oxidase is distinguished by an alpha-band blue-shifted to 600 nm relative to the 603-nm position observed for high-turnover oxidase. Addition of CO to ascorbate-TMPD-reduced membranes gives a spectrum typical of ferrocytochrome a3-CO, and the intensity corresponds to the total ferrocytochrome a3 concentration. Photolysis of ascorbate-TMPD-reduced, CO-bound membranes indicates that both species are photosensitive with similar rates of recombination. Addition of CO to dithionite-reduced membranes shows an additional CO reactive center that has a spectrum characteristic of cytochrome o. Cyanide blocks complete reduction of high-turnover oxidase by ascorbate plus TMPD, but does not appear to effect slowly reduced oxidase. These results indicate the presence of two different types of cytochrome aa3 oxidase in plasma membranes of B. subtilis.

  2. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvén mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvén branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ∂ω/∂k > 0) and an anomalous zone (where ∂ω/∂k < 0). We find that in the anomalous zone of the Alfvén branch, the electromagnetic waves are damped, and there is a maximum wave number for which the Alfvén branch is suppressed. We also study the dependence of the Alfvén velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results.

  3. Non-modal theory of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability of plasma shear flows across the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The temporal evolution of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability and of the related anomalous transport of the ion thermal energy of plasma shear flow across the magnetic field is investigated analytically. This instability develops in a steady plasma due to the inverse ion Landau damping and has the growth rate of the order of the frequency when the ion temperature is equal to or above the electron temperature. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal methodology of the shearing modes which are the waves that have a static spatial structure in the frame of the background flow. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the instability experiences the non-modal temporal evolution in the shearing flow during which the unstable perturbation becomes very different from a canonical modal form. It transforms into the non-modal structure with vanishing frequency and growth rate with time. The obtained solution of the nonlinear integral equation, which accounts for the random scattering of the angle of the ion gyro-motion due to the interaction of ions with ensemble of shearing waves, reveals similar but accelerated process of the transformations of the perturbations into the zero frequency structures. It was obtained that in the shear flow the anomalous ion thermal conductivity decays with time. It is a strictly non-modal effect, which originates from the temporal evolution of the shearing modes turbulence.

  4. Kinetics of electrons and neutral particles in radio-frequency transformer coupled plasma H- ion source at Seoul National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, K. J.; Dang, J. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Cho, W. H.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-10-01

    In volume production H- ion sources, control of electron temperature is essential due to its close correlation with the generation of vibrationally-excited hydrogen molecules in the driver region as well as the generation of H- ions by dissociative attachment in the extraction region. In the ion source group at Seoul National University (SNU) in Korea, a lot of research effort has been made to the development of a volume production H- ion source based on radio-frequency (RF) transformer-coupled plasma (TCP) for long lifetime continuous wave (CW) operation. It has a spiral RF antenna located outside the discharge chamber to generate a plasma with high electron temperature in the driver region and employs a magnetic filter field to prevent high energy electrons from being transported to the extraction region. In this paper, we present the recent progress on understanding of the underlying physics of the RF TCP H- ion source at SNU. Special attention is paid to the characterization of electron kinetics regime for controlling electron energy distribution and the influence of relaxation of neutral particles during the transport across the magnetic filter region. Effect of the degree of dissociation on the production of H- ions is also discussed.

  5. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  6. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  7. Kinetic Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas, Charged Particle Acceleration, and Cross-Scale Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-10

    Astrophys. J. 694, 618, doi: 10.1088/0004-637X/694/1/618 (2009). [2] P. H. Yoon and T.-M. Fang, Proton heating by parallel Alfven wave cascade, Physics...doi: 10.1088/0741-3335/51/9/095011 (2009). [5] C. S. Wu, P. H. Yoon, and C. B. Wang, On non-resonant proton heating via intrinsic Alfvenic...Gaelzer, Ionospheric ion-acoustic enhancements by turbulent counterstreaming electron beam-plasma interaction, J. Geophys. Res. 115, A02310 doi

  8. PLASMA EFFECTS ON FAST PAIR BEAMS. II. REACTIVE VERSUS KINETIC INSTABILITY OF PARALLEL ELECTROSTATIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Krakau, S.; Supsar, M. E-mail: steffen.krakau@rub.de

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of TeV gamma-rays from distant blazars with the extragalactic background light produces relativistic electron-positron pair beams by the photon-photon annihilation process. Using the linear instability analysis in the kinetic limit, which properly accounts for the longitudinal and the small but finite perpendicular momentum spread in the pair momentum distribution function, the growth rate of parallel propagating electrostatic oscillations in the intergalactic medium is calculated. Contrary to the claims of Miniati and Elyiv, we find that neither the longitudinal nor the perpendicular spread in the relativistic pair distribution function significantly affect the electrostatic growth rates. The maximum kinetic growth rate for no perpendicular spread is even about an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding reactive maximum growth rate. The reduction factors in the maximum growth rate due to the finite perpendicular spread in the pair distribution function are tiny and always less than 10{sup –4}. We confirm earlier conclusions by Broderick et al. and our group that the created pair beam distribution function is quickly unstable in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium. Therefore, there is no need to require the existence of small intergalactic magnetic fields to scatter the produced pairs, so that the explanation (made by several authors) for the Fermi non-detection of the inverse Compton scattered GeV gamma-rays by a finite deflecting intergalactic magnetic field is not necessary. In particular, the various derived lower bounds for the intergalactic magnetic fields are invalid due to the pair beam instability argument.

  9. Kinetic Simulations of the Self-Focusing and Dissipation of Finite-Width Electron Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Winjum, B. J.; Berger, R. L.; Chapman, T.; Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.

    2013-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations, both Vlasov and particle-in-cell, are presented that show the evolution of the field and electron distribution of finite-width, nonlinear electron plasma waves. The intrinsically intertwined effects of self-focusing and dissipation of field energy caused by electron trapping are studied in simulated systems that are hundreds of wavelengths long in the transverse direction but only one wavelength long and periodic in the propagation direction. From various initial wave states, both the width at focus Δm relative to the initial width Δ0 and the maximum field amplitude at focus are shown to be a function of the growth rate of the transverse modulational instability γTPMI divided by the loss rate of field energy νE to electrons escaping the trapping region. With dissipation included, an amplitude threshold for self-focusing γTPMIE~1 is found that supports the analysis of Rose [Phys. Plasmas 12, 012318 (2005)].

  10. Modeling the chemical kinetics of atmospheric plasma for cell treatment in a liquid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. Y.; Kang, S. K.; Lee, H. Wk.; Lee, H. W.; Kim, G. C.; Lee, J. K.

    2012-07-15

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have been known to be effective for living cell inactivation in a liquid solution but it is not clear yet which species are key factors for the cell treatment. Using a global model, we elucidate the processes through which pH level in the solution is changed from neutral to acidic after plasma exposure and key components with pH and air variation. First, pH level in a liquid solution is changed by He{sup +} and He(2{sup 1}S) radicals. Second, O{sub 3} density decreases as pH level in the solution decreases and air concentration decreases. It can be a method of removing O{sub 3} that causes chest pain and damages lung tissue when the density is very high. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HO{sub 2}, and NO radicals are found to be key factors for cell inactivation in the solution with pH and air variation.

  11. Kinetics of fluid demixing in complex plasmas: Domain growth analysis using Minkowski tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böbel, Alexander; Räth, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    The demixing process of a binary complex plasma is analyzed and the role of distinct interaction potentials is discussed by using morphological Minkowski tensor (MT) analysis of the minority phase domain growth in a demixing simulated binary complex plasma. These MT methods are compared with previous results that utilized a power-spectrum method based on the time-dependent average structure factor. It is shown that the MT methods are superior to the previously used method in the sense of higher sensitivity to changes in domain size. By analysis of the slope of the temporal evolution of MT measures qualitative differences between the case of particle interaction with a single length scale compared to particle interactions with two different length scales (dominating long range interaction) are revealed. After proper scaling the graphs for the two length scale scenarios coincide, pointing towards universal behavior. Thus, Minkowski tensor analysis is likely to become a useful tool for further investigation of this (and other) demixing processes. It is capable to reveal (nonlinear) local topological properties, probing deeper than (linear) global power-spectrum analysis, however, still providing easily interpretable results founded on a solid mathematical framework.

  12. Kinetics and mechanical study of plasma electrolytic carburizing for pure iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çavuşlu, F.; Usta, M.

    2011-02-01

    In this work, plasma electrolytic surface carburizing of pure iron in aqueous solution consisting of water, glycerin and NH4Cl was investigated. Surface carburizing was carried out in 20% glycerin solution treated at 750 °C, 800 °C, 900 °C and 950 °C temperatures for 5, 10 and 30 min. The formation of hard carbon-rich layer on the surface of pure iron was confirmed by XRD analysis. Metallographic and SEM studies revealed a rough and dense carburized layer on the surface of the pure iron. Experimental results showed that the thickness of the carburized layers changes with the time and temperature. The average thickness of the carburized layer ranged from 20 to 160 μm. The hardness of the carburized samples decreased with the distance from the surface to the interior of the test material. The average hardness values of the carburized layers on the substrate ranged 550-850 HV, while the hardness of the substrate ranged from 110 HV to 170 HV. The dominant phases formed on the pure iron were found to be a mixture of cementite (Fe3C), martensite (Fe + C) and austenite (FCC iron) confirmed by XRD. Wear resistance in all plasma electrolytic carburized samples is considerably improved in relation to the untreated specimen. After carburizing, surface roughness of the samples was increased. Friction coefficients were also increased because of high surface roughness.

  13. Book review: Modern Plasma Physics, Vol. I: Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas, by Patrick H. Diamond, Sanae-I. Itoh and Kimitaka Itoh, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK), 2010, IX, 417 p., ISBN 978-0-521-86920-1 (Hardback)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, B. V.

    If you want to learn not only the most fundamental things about the physics of turbulent plasmas but also the current state of the problem including the most recent results in theoretical and experimental investigations - and certainly many physicists and astrophysicists do - this series of three excellent monographs is just for you. The first volume "Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas" develops the kinetic theory of turbulence through a focus on quasi-particle models and dynamics. It discusses the concepts and theoretical methods for describing weak and strong fluid and phase space turbulence in plasma systems far from equilibrium. The core material includes fluctuation theory, self-similar cascades and transport, mean field theory, resonance broadening and nonlinear wave-particle interaction, wave-wave interaction and wave turbulence, strong turbulence theory and renormalization. The book gives readers a deep understanding of the fields under consideration and builds a foundation for future applications to multi-scale processes of self-organization in tokamaks and other confined plasmas. In spite of a short pedagogical introduction, the book is addressed mainly to well prepared readers with a serious background in plasma physics, to researchers and advanced graduate students in nonlinear plasma physics, controlled fusions and related fields such as cosmic plasma physics

  14. Theoretical description based on general and exact nonextensive dispersion relations of plasma oscillation data and verification of new acoustic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, V.; Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, first we represent the differences between spatial and temporal dispersions and their dependence on the measurement techniques for electrostatic waves in unmagnetized collisionless plasma. Then, three different experimental data are compared to the solutions of exact nonextensive dispersion relations for electron-ion and pair plasma. The results confirm the existence of new acoustic plasma waves. Furthermore, these comparisons yield a Maxwellian and a nonextensive plasma with nonextensive parameter q larger than one, and a Maxwellian plasma with some abnormal dispersion properties.

  15. Development of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic Mechanism and its Validation Using Gliding Arc Integrated with Counterflow Burner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-21

    purely kinetic effect. This effect has been termed the kinetic - induced hydrodynamic enhancement. To exclude the complicated enhancement mechanism...experimental and numerical results becomes slightly larger for larger O3 concentration. This effect once again is caused by the kinetic - induced ...creates a kinetic enhancement that also induces hydrodynamic enhancement. The maximum overall flame speed enhancement in the laboratory coordinate was

  16. Development of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic Mechanism and its Validation Using Gliding Arc Integrated with Counterflow Burner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-21

    termed the kinetic - induced hydrodynamic enhancement. To exclude the complicated enhancement mechanism caused by the hydrodynamic effects discussed...between this fuel mixture fraction gradient and the purely kinetic enhancement are indicative of the kinetic - induced hydrodynamic enhancement described...slightly larger for larger O3 concentration. This effect once again is caused by the kinetic - induced hydrodynamic enhancement for larger concentrations

  17. Kinetic analysis of negative power deposition in inductive low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Negative power deposition in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) is investigated by means of an analytical model which couples Boltzmann’s equation and the quasi-stationary Maxwell’s equations. Exploiting standard Hilbert space methods an explicit solution for both, the electric field and the distribution function of the electrons for a bounded discharge configuration subject to an unsymmetrical excitation is found for the first time. The model is applied to a low pressure ICP discharge. In this context particularly the anomalous skin effect and the effect of phase mixing is discussed. The analytical solution is compared with results from electromagnetic full wave particle in cell simulations. Excellent agreement between the analytical and the numerical results is found.

  18. Kinetic Turbulence in Relativistic Plasma: From Thermal Bath to Nonthermal Continuum.

    PubMed

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Werner, Gregory R; Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2017-02-03

    We present results from particle-in-cell simulations of driven turbulence in magnetized, collisionless, and relativistic pair plasmas. We find that the fluctuations are consistent with the classical k_{⊥}^{-5/3} magnetic energy spectrum at fluid scales and a steeper k_{⊥}^{-4} spectrum at sub-Larmor scales, where k_{⊥} is the wave vector perpendicular to the mean field. We demonstrate the development of a nonthermal, power-law particle energy distribution f(E)∼E^{-α}, with an index α that decreases with increasing magnetization and increases with an increasing system size (relative to the characteristic Larmor radius). Our simulations indicate that turbulence can be a viable source of energetic particles in high-energy astrophysical systems, such as pulsar wind nebulae, if scalings asymptotically become insensitive to the system size.

  19. Kinetic Turbulence in Relativistic Plasma: From Thermal Bath to Nonthermal Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Werner, Gregory R.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2017-02-01

    We present results from particle-in-cell simulations of driven turbulence in magnetized, collisionless, and relativistic pair plasmas. We find that the fluctuations are consistent with the classical k⊥-5 /3 magnetic energy spectrum at fluid scales and a steeper k⊥-4 spectrum at sub-Larmor scales, where k⊥ is the wave vector perpendicular to the mean field. We demonstrate the development of a nonthermal, power-law particle energy distribution f (E )˜E-α, with an index α that decreases with increasing magnetization and increases with an increasing system size (relative to the characteristic Larmor radius). Our simulations indicate that turbulence can be a viable source of energetic particles in high-energy astrophysical systems, such as pulsar wind nebulae, if scalings asymptotically become insensitive to the system size.

  20. Kinetic analysis of the ion temperature gradient modes in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Tessarotto, M.

    1996-12-01

    With the two time scale feature revealed, an analytical method is developed to solve the combined eigenvalue and initial value problem describing the ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in the toroidally rotating plasmas. With full gyrokinetics and toroidal geometry effects being taken into account in an ordering consistent manner, dispersion relations are obtained for ITG modes both of toroidal and slab-like branches. The results show that the sonic rotation can be harmful for the stability, while subsonic rotation with flow shear can be expected to be stabilizing. The existence of the flow shear leads the time evolution of the fluctuation signals to display two different time scales{emdash}a fast oscillating (either fast or slow growing) signal with its amplitude modulated by a slowly varying envelope, resembling fishbone-like fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Kinetics of fluid demixing in complex plasmas: Domain growth analysis using Minkowski tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böbel, A.; Räth, C.

    2016-07-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of the demixing process of a binary complex plasma is analyzed and the role of distinct interaction potentials is discussed by using morphological Minkowski tensor analysis of the minority phase domain growth in a demixing simulated binary complex plasma. These Minkowski tensor methods are compared with previous results that utilized a power spectrum method based on the time-dependent average structure factor. It is shown that the Minkowski tensor methods are superior to the previously used power-spectrum method in the sense of higher sensitivity to changes in domain size. By analysis of the slope of the temporal evolution of Minkowski tensor measures, qualitative differences between the case of particle interaction with a single length scale compared to particle interactions with two different length scales (dominating long-range interaction) are revealed. After proper scaling the graphs for the two length scale scenarios coincide, pointing toward universal behavior. The qualitative difference in demixing scenarios is evidenced by distinct demixing behavior: in the long-range dominated cases demixing occurs in two stages. At first, neighboring particles agglomerate, then domains start to merge in cascades. However, in the case of only one interaction length scale only agglomeration but no merging of domains can be observed. Thus, Minkowski tensor analysis is likely to become a useful tool for further investigation of this (and other) demixing processes. It is capable to reveal (nonlinear) local topological properties, probing deeper than (linear) global power-spectrum analysis, however, still providing easily interpretable results founded on a solid mathematical framework.

  2. Plasma kinetics and biodistribution of water-soluble CdTe quantum dots in mice: a comparison between Cd and Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ying; Xie, Guangyun; Sun, Zhiwei; Mu, Ying; Han, Sihai; Xiao, Yang; Liu, Na; Wang, Hui; Guo, Caixia; Shi, Zhixiong; Li, Yanbo; Huang, Peili

    2011-10-01

    Water-soluble quantum dots (QDs) have shown potential as tumor diagnostic agents. However, little is known about their biological behaviors in vivo. Male ICR mice were intravenously given a single dose (2.5 μmol kg-1 body weight) of water-soluble cadmium-telluride (CdTe) QDs (the QDs are approximately 4 nm in diameter and have maximal emission at 630 nm). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for measuring the kinetic action of 111Cd and 125Te for 7 days. The plasma kinetics of Cd and Te followed a two-compartment model, in which Cd exhibited greater apparent volume of distribution, greater clearance, faster distribution half-life, and significantly slower elimination half-life compared to Te. Contrary to its relatively transient fate in the plasma, high levels of Cd persisted in the liver and kidneys. Te accumulated primarily in the spleen. The different plasma kinetics and distribution patterns of Cd and Te imply that CdTe QDs have been part of the degradation or aggregation in vivo.

  3. Purification and characterization of CRISP-3 from human seminal plasma and its real-time binding kinetics with PSP94.

    PubMed

    Anklesaria, Jenifer H; Pandya, Rushika R; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-12-15

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) have been postulated to have a role in male reproduction and prostate pathophysiology. Of the mammalian CRISPs, CRISP-3 levels in particular have been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer. Efforts have been made to obtain highly pure CRISP-3 for gaining structure-function information of this protein. However, well characterized and highly pure protein is not available yet. CRISPs from snake venom have been purified using prostate secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) has been reported earlier. In the present study, CRISP-3 was purified to homogeneity from human seminal plasma using human PSP94-immnobilized affinity column. The molecular mass of the purified protein was determined by SDS-PAGE followed by immunoblotting and found to be ∼26kDa and ∼28kDa. The purity was further verified using MALDI-TOF MS analysis, where two peaks at m/z 25509 and 27715 were obtained. The lower molecular weight peak corresponds to the calculated molecular mass of CRISP-3 (∼26kDa); whereas the higher molecular weight peak was confirmed to be the glycosylated form (∼28kDa) from the deglycosylation experiment. Binding of PSP94 in increasing concentrations to purified CRISP-3 immobilized chip was further validated using surface plasmon resonance. The kinetics data suggested that purified CRISP-3 binds specifically and with high affinity to PSP94. In conclusion, a homogeneous preparation of highly pure CRISP-3 protein is obtained from human seminal plasma.

  4. Satellite and Ground Signatures of Kinetic and Inertial Scale ULF Alfven Waves Propagating in Warm Plasma in Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.

    2015-12-01

    Results from a 3D global numerical model of Alfven wave propagation in a warm multi-species plasma in Earth's magnetosphere are presented. The model uses spherical coordinates, accounts for a non-dipole magnetic field, vertical structure of the ionosphere, and an air gap below the ionosphere. A realistic density model is used. Below the exobase altitude (2000 km) the densities and the temperatures of electrons, ions, and neutrals are obtained from the IRI and MSIS models. Above the exobase, ballistic (originating from the ionosphere and returning to ionosphere) and trapped (bouncing between two reflection points above the ionosphere) electron populations are considered similar to [Pierrard and Stegen (2008), JGR, v.113, A10209]. Plasma parameters at the exobase provided by the IRI are the boundary conditions for the ballistic electrons while the [Carpenter and Anderson (1992), JGR, v.97, p.1097] model of equatorial electron density defines parameters of the trapped electron population. In the simulations that are presented, Alfven waves with frequencies from 1 Hz to 0.01 Hz and finite azimuthal wavenumbers are excited in the magnetosphere and compared with Van Allen Probes data and ground-based observations from the CARISMA array of ground magnetometers. When short perpendicular scale waves reflect form the ionosphere, compressional Alfven waves are observed to propagate across the geomagnetic field in the ionospheric waveguide [e.g., Lysak (1999), JGR, v.104, p.10017]. Signals produced by the waves on the ground are discussed. The wave model is also applied to interpret recent Van Allen Probes observations of kinetic scale ULF waves that are associated with radiation belt electron dynamics and energetic particle injections.

  5. Kinetic Simulation and Visualization of Ion Ring Instability in Interstellar Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, A. E.; Florinski, V. A.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2015-12-01

    First observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in 2009, the mysterious band of neutral atom flux known as the IBEX ribbon is commonly attributed to the effect of a charge exchange between energetic neutral atoms originating in the inner heliosheath and secondary pickup ions (PUIs) gyrating in rings about local galactic magnetic field lines in the outer heliosheath and interstellar space. Underpinning this theory is the assumption that the newly formed PUI ring is fairly stable relative to wave generation, an assumption that has been challenged by previous simulations of ions in the local interstellar medium (LISM). However, recent data received from Voyager 1 as it entered interstellar space indicates that the LISM is much quieter than previously thought. Using linear kinetic theory and newly developed hybrid simulation software, equipped with a binning algorithm and Python interface to VisIt for 3D visualization, we reexamine the 2010 simulation of Florinski et al., investigate other possible PUI ring distributions such as the Gauss torus, and run new large scale simulations with over a billion particles for an unprecedented reduction in numerical noise. We also simulate PUI ring stability away from the ribbon, including the direction of Voyager 1's trajectory, allowing us to compare our results with actual measurements of magnetic fluctuations in the LISM. Using these improved methods, we hope to gain new insight into the previously observed instability of PUI rings in the LISM. Preliminary results suggest that while broadened rings show very low levels of turbulence (in contrast with narrow rings of PUIs, which demonstrate abundant magnetic fluctuations at resonant frequency), some particle scattering occurred for every type of ring studied. The results of these simulations will be of critical importance to existing theories about the origins of the IBEX ribbon.

  6. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry and polarimetry in high temperature fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Brower, D. L.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Duff, J.; Parke, E.

    2013-11-01

    At anticipated high electron temperatures in ITER, the effects of electron thermal motion on phase measurements made by the toroidal interferometer/polarimeter (TIP) and poloidal polarimeter (PoPola) diagnostics will be significant and must be precisely treated or the measurement accuracy will fail to meet the specified requirements for ITER operation. We calculate electron thermal corrections to the interferometric phase and polarization state of an electromagnetic wave propagating along tangential and poloidal chords (Faraday and Cotton-Mouton polarimetry) and incorporate them into the Stokes vector equation for evolution of polarization. Although these corrections are small at electron temperatures Te ≃ 1 keV, they become sizable at Te ⩾ 10 keV. The precision of the previous lowest order linear in the τ = Te/mec2 model may be insufficient; we present a more precise model with τ2-order corrections to satisfy the high accuracy required for ITER TIP and PoPola diagnostics. Proper treatment of temperature effects will ensure more accurate interpretation of interferometric and polarimetric measurements in fusion devices like ITER and DEMO. The use of precise analytic expressions is especially important for burning plasmas where various interferometric techniques will be used for direct real time feedback control of device operations with time resolution ˜1 ms to regulate the rate of the thermonuclear burn and monitor/control the safety factor profile.

  7. Developing Chemistry and Kinetic Modeling Tools for Low-Temperature Plasma Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Beckwith, Kris; Davidson, Bradley; Kruger, Scott; Pankin, Alexei; Roark, Christine; Stoltz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the use of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) methods in VSim, a FDTD plasma simulation code capable of both PIC/MCC and fluid modeling. POD methods efficiently generate smooth representations of noisy self-consistent or test-particle PIC data, and are thus advantageous in computing macroscopic fluid quantities from large PIC datasets (e.g. for particle-based closure computations) and in constructing optimal visual representations of the underlying physics. They may also confer performance advantages for massively parallel simulations, due to the significant reduction in dataset sizes conferred by truncated singular-value decompositions of the PIC data. We also demonstrate how complex LTP chemistry scenarios can be modeled in VSim via an interface with MUNCHKIN, a developing standalone python/C++/SQL code that identifies reaction paths for given input species, solves 1D rate equations for the time-dependent chemical evolution of the system, and generates corresponding VSim input blocks with appropriate cross-sections/reaction rates. MUNCHKIN also computes reaction rates from user-specified distribution functions, and conducts principal path analyses to reduce the number of simulated chemical reactions. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy SBIR program, Award DE-SC0009501.

  8. Collisionless and Kinetic Phenomena of Interpenetrating Plasma Streams via Neutron Self-Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Hatarik, R.; Link, A.; Park, H.-S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Weber, S. V.; Wilks, S. C.; Fiuza, F.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Recent NIF experiments focus on the generation and diagnosis of collisionless shocks relevant to astrophysical phenomena such as supernova remnants and gamma ray bursts. In the experiments, two opposing CD laser-generated plasmas flow into each other at high velocity ( 1000 km/s). As the ion-ion collisional mean-free-path is near to or greater than the system size, the flows interpenetrate and neutrons are generated via beam-beam deuteron interactions. We model this system using the hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP with electric and magnetic fields suppressed to capture the full temporal and spatial size of the experiment. These simulations show good agreement with the yield, spectrum and spatial/temporal profiles of the neutrons observed in the experiment. When one CD foil is replaced with CH an asymmetry develops in the neutron spectrum that is caused by the Doppler shift related to the flow velocity. Additionally, in this case the neutron yield is found to be lower in the simulations than is observed experimentally, which indicates that the deuterons thermalize more efficiently in the experiment. This suggests that another mechanism is responsible for this yield enhancement other than small angle scattering since it is included in the simulations. Possible mechanisms such as scattering across Weibel-mediated magnetic filaments and large-angle Coulomb scattering will be evaluated and discussed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Simulation of a tokamak edge plasma with the kinetic code COGENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, M.; Cohen, R.; Dorr, M.; Hittinger, J.; Rognlien, T.; Colella, P.; Martin, D.; McCorquodale, P.

    2013-10-01

    Progress on the development of the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT for edge plasma simulations is reported. The COGENT code models an axisymmetric gyrokinetic equation coupled to the long-wavelength limit of the gyro-Poisson equation. COGENT is distinguished by application of fourth-order conservative discretization, and mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the geometric complexity of the tokamak edge. The code has also a number of model collision operator options, which have been successfully verified in neoclassical simulations. Our recent development work has focused on incorporation of the full (nonlinear) Fokker-Planck collision model. The implementation of the Fokker-Plank operator is discussed in detail, and the results of the initial verification studies are presented. In addition, we report on progress and status of the newly available divertor version of the COGENT code that includes both closed and open magnetic field line regions and a model for recycled neutral gas. Work performed for USDOE, at LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and at LBNL under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  10. Ion kinetic effects on the wake potential behind a dust grain in a flowing plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Daughton, W.; Lemons, D. S.; Murillo, M. S.

    2000-06-01

    The structure of the wake potential downstream of a stationary dust grain in a flowing plasma is studied on ion time scales using particle-in-cell simulation methods. The scaling of the wake is investigated as a function of Mach number and other parameters as well as the dimensionality of the system. The results are compared and discussed in relation to various theoretical expressions for the wake. Consistent with theory, in one dimension the wake wavelength scales as M{lambda}{sub De}(1-M{sup 2}){sup -1/2} for M<1, where M is the Mach number and {lambda}{sub De} is the electron Debye length, while no wake forms for M>1. In two dimensions, a wake is formed for both M<1 and M>1, while the wake wavelength scales as M{lambda}{sub De} in both regimes. The amplitude of the wake peaks at M{approx_equal}1 in both the one- and two-dimensional simulations. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Introduction to Quantum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael; Filinov, Alexei; Böning, Jens; Dufty, James W.

    Plasmas are generally associated with a hot gas of charged particles which behave classically. However, when the temperature is lowered and/or the density is increased sufficiently, the plasma particles (most importantly, electrons) become quantum degenerate, that is, the extension of their wave functions becomes comparable to the distance between neighboring particles. This is the case in many astrophysical plasmas, such as those occurring in the interior of giant planets or dwarf and neutron stars, but also in various modern laboratory setups where charged particles are compressed by very intense ion or laser beams to multi-megabar pressures. Furthermore, quantum plasmas exist in solids - examples are the electron gas in metals and the electron-hole plasma in semiconductors. Finally, the exotic state of the Universe immediately after the Big Bang is believed to have been a quantum plasma consisting of electrons, quarks, photons, and gluons. In all these situations, a description in terms of classical mechanics, thermodynamics, or classical kinetic theory fails. In this chapter, an overview of quantum plasma features and their occurrence is given. The conditions for the relevance of quantum effects are formulated and discussed. The key concepts for a theoretical description of quantum plasmas are developed and illustrated by simple examples.

  12. Zirconium Carbide Produced by Spark Plasma Sintering and Hot Pressing: Densification Kinetics, Grain Growth, and Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xialu; Back, Christina; Izhvanov, Oleg; Haines, Christopher; Olevsky, Eugene

    2016-07-14

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been employed to consolidate a micron-sized zirconium carbide (ZrC) powder. ZrC pellets with a variety of relative densities are obtained under different processing parameters. The densification kinetics of ZrC powders subjected to conventional hot pressing and SPS are comparatively studied by applying similar heating and loading profiles. Due to the lack of electric current assistance, the conventional hot pressing appears to impose lower strain rate sensitivity and higher activation energy values than those which correspond to the SPS processing. A finite element simulation is used to analyze the temperature evolution within the volume of ZrC specimens subjected to SPS. The control mechanism for grain growth during the final SPS stage is studied via a recently modified model, in which the grain growth rate dependence on porosity is incorporated. Finally, the constant pressure specific heat and thermal conductivity of the SPS-processed ZrC are determined to be higher than those reported for the hot-pressed ZrC and the benefits of applying SPS are indicated accordingly.

  13. Refractive index of quark-gluon plasma: Kinetic theory with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisional kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-10-01

    We derive the electric permittivity ɛ and magnetic permeability μM of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with the kinetic theory associated with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collisional kernel. Based on them, we study the effect of collisions on the refractive index of QGP. Compared to the collisionless case, collisions change the ω -behavior of ɛ and μM dramatically, which is responsible for the fact that the real and imaginary parts of n2 and the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL are smooth functions of ω . For a small collision rate ν , the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL is negative in some frequency range. When the collision rate increases, the frequency range for nDL<0 becomes narrower. Numerical results show a critical collision rate ν ˜0.2 mD, above which the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL is positive for all frequency regions, which indicates a normal refractive index. In contrast to the collisionless case, there exists some frequency range in which nDL<0 and the propagating mode may satisfy the dispersion relation n2ω2=k2 simultaneously, which implies the existence of a negative refractive index.

  14. Zirconium Carbide Produced by Spark Plasma Sintering and Hot Pressing: Densification Kinetics, Grain Growth, and Thermal Properties

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, Xialu; Back, Christina; Izhvanov, Oleg; ...

    2016-07-14

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been employed to consolidate a micron-sized zirconium carbide (ZrC) powder. ZrC pellets with a variety of relative densities are obtained under different processing parameters. The densification kinetics of ZrC powders subjected to conventional hot pressing and SPS are comparatively studied by applying similar heating and loading profiles. Due to the lack of electric current assistance, the conventional hot pressing appears to impose lower strain rate sensitivity and higher activation energy values than those which correspond to the SPS processing. A finite element simulation is used to analyze the temperature evolution within the volume of ZrCmore » specimens subjected to SPS. The control mechanism for grain growth during the final SPS stage is studied via a recently modified model, in which the grain growth rate dependence on porosity is incorporated. Finally, the constant pressure specific heat and thermal conductivity of the SPS-processed ZrC are determined to be higher than those reported for the hot-pressed ZrC and the benefits of applying SPS are indicated accordingly.« less

  15. Kinetic simulations of externally driven and instability driven nonlinear electron plasma waves relevant to stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Berger, R. L.; Chapman, T.; Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.; Decyk, V. K.; Mori, W. B.

    2013-10-01

    We present 2D kinetic simulations, both Vlasov and PIC, of externally-driven, nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPWs) with wavenumber kλD ~ 1 / 3 , and we investigate their link with EPWs that evolve self-consistently in PIC simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). Simulating externally-driven EPWs is useful for isolating aspects of EPW evolution, while SRS modeling ultimately requires understanding the self-consistent evolution of EPWs with SRS light waves. In the externally-driven EPW simulations, the intrinsically intertwined effects of self-focusing and dissipation of field energy caused by electron trapping are studied. From various initial wave states, the width and field amplitude at focus are shown to be a function of the growth rate of the transverse modulational instability, γtpmi, divided by the loss rate of field energy, νE, to electrons, and we find an amplitude threshold for self-focusing, γtpmi /νE ~ 1 . These results are compared with the EPWs that arise in SRS simulations. Similarities and differences are investigated by varying the external driver and the incident and (seeded) scattered light waves. Performed by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded under project tracking code 12-ERD-061. Supported also in part under Grants DE-NA0001833 and NSF-Phy-0904039. Simulations performed on UCLA's Hoffman2 and Dawson2 and NERSC's Hopper.

  16. Temperature Dependence of the Kinetic Energy of the Correlated Electron Plasma by Restricted Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Keith; Deymier, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in orbital-free Density Functional Theory (OF-DFT), particularly with regard to temperature dependent functionals, has promise for the simulation of warm dense matter (WDM) systems. WDM includes systems with densities of an order of magnitude beyond ambient or more and temperatures measured in kilokelvin. A challenge for the development of temperature dependent OF-DFT functionals is the lack of benchmark information with temperature and pressure dependence on simple models under WDM conditions. We present an approach to fill this critical gap using the restricted path-integral molecular dynamics (rPIMD) method. Electrons are described as harmonic necklaces within the discrete path integral representation while quantum exchange takes the form of cross linking between electron necklaces. A molecular dynamics algorithm is used to sample phase space and the fermion sign problem is addressed by restricting the density matrix to positive values. The temperature dependence of kinetic energies for the strongly coupled electron plasma is presented for a number of Wigner-Seitz radii in terms of a fourth order Sommerfeld expansion. Supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0002139

  17. Self-consistent description of the core and boundary plasma in the high-field ignition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, R.; Zagórski, R.

    2000-03-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self-consistent way plasma dynamics in the center and edge region of fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of 1D radial transport model whereas a 1D analytical model along magnetic field lines for plasma and impurity transport outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model has been used to investigate operation regimes of the high-field IGNITOR experiment.

  18. Kinetic (particle-in-cell) simulation of nonlinear laser absorption in a finite-size plasma with a background inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H. Kargarian, A.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the effect of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field on the high intensity laser absorption rate in a sub-critical plasma has been investigated by employing a relativistic electromagnetic 1.5 dimensional particle-in-cell code. Relying on the effective nonlinear phenomena such as phase-mixing and scattering, this study shows that in a finite-size plasma the laser absorption increases with inhomogeneity of the magnetic field (i.e., reduction of characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, λ{sub p}) before exiting a considerable amount of laser energy from the plasma due to scattering process. On the other hand, the presence of the external inhomogeneous magnetic field causes the maximum absorption of laser to occur at a shorter time. Moreover, study of the kinetic results associated with the distribution function of plasma particles shows that, in a special range of the plasma density and the characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, a considerable amount of laser energy is transferred to the particles producing a population of electrons with kinetic energy along the laser direction.

  19. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D.; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ray, Chester A.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Gaffney, F. Andrew; Costa, Fernando; Holt, Carol; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Baisch, Friedhelm J.; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio-acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre-flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to -30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 beats min(-1)) than pre-flight (from 56 +/- 4 at rest to 62 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre-flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post-flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre-flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre-flight vs. 40 bursts min(-1) in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately and sympathetic

  20. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Andrew C; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F; Zuckerman, Julie H; Pawelczyk, James A; Ray, Chester A; Buckey, Jay C; Lane, Lynda D; Shiavi, Richard; Gaffney, F Andrew; Costa, Fernando; Holt, Carol; Blomqvist, C Gunnar; Eckberg, Dwain L; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio-acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre-flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to -30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 beats min(-1)) than pre-flight (from 56 +/- 4 at rest to 62 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre-flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post-flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre-flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre-flight vs. 40 bursts min(-1) in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately and sympathetic

  1. Kinetics of the electron beam induced crystallization of amorphous ZrO2 films obtained via ion-plasma and laser sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagmut, A. G.; Beresnev, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    The structure and electron beam induced crystallization kinetics of amorphous ZrO2 films obtained via ion-plasma and laser sputtering were compared. The studies were performed by electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy with recording video films in situ. The effect of an electron beam on an amorphous film in a vacuum was accompanied by the formation of zirconia microcrystals with an FCC lattice. For laser evaporation, the density of crystallization nuclei was β 109 cm-2, and the characteristic length unit was D 0 0.48 μm. For ion-plasma evaporation, β 1010 cm-2, and D 0 0.06 μm. The kinetic curves of the crystallization of amorphous films were analyzed using the β-variant of the Kolmogorov model as a basis.

  2. Key insights into the reacting kinetics of atmospheric pressure plasmas using He +N2 /O2 /CO2 /H2 O/Air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2015-09-01

    A zero dimensional kinetic chemistry computational modeling to identify the important collisional mechanisms and the dominant species in atmospheric pressure plasmas has been developed. This modeling provides an enhanced capability to tailor wide variety of reactive intermediates/species in atmospheric pressure plasmas using He +N2 /O2 /CO2 /H2 O/Air mixtures. The influence of the gas constituent, the gas temperature and the excitation frequency (kHz-, RF-, Pulsed-working) on the complex reacting chemical kinetics is clarified. This work also focuses on the benchmarking between the predictive outputs of this computer-based simulations and the diverse experimental diagnostics with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates/species. This work was partly supported by KAKENHI Grant Number 24561054.

  3. Potential formation in a one-dimensional bounded plasma system containing a two-electron temperature plasma: Kinetic model and PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.; Jurcic-Zlobec, B.; Cercek, M.

    2008-06-15

    Potential formation in a bounded plasma system that contains electrons with a two-temperature velocity distribution and is terminated by a floating, electron emitting electrode (collector) is studied by a one-dimensional kinetic model. A method on how to determine the boundary conditions at the collector for the numerical solution of the Poisson equation is presented. The difference between the regular and the irregular numerical solutions of the Poisson equation is explained. The regular numerical solution of the Poisson equation fulfills the boundary conditions at the source and can be computed for any distance from the collector. The irregular solution does not fulfill the source boundary conditions and the computation breaks down at some distance from the collector. An excellent agreement of the values of the potential at the inflection point found from the numerical solution of the Poisson equation with the values predicted by the analytical model is obtained. Potential, electric field, and particle density profiles found by the numerical solution of the Poisson equation are compared to the profiles obtained with the particle in cell computer simulation. A very good quantitative agreement of the potential and electric field profiles is obtained. For certain values of the parameters the analytical model predicts three possible values of the potential at the inflection point. In such cases always only one of the corresponding numerical solutions of the Poisson equation is regular, while the other two are irregular. The regular numerical solution of the Poisson equation always corresponds to the solution of the model that predicts the largest ion flux to the collector.

  4. Self-consistent description of the core and boundary plasma in the high-field ignition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, R.; Zagórski, R.

    2001-03-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self-consistent way plasma dynamics in the center and edge regions of fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of 1-D radial transport model whereas a 1-D analytical model along magnetic field lines for plasma and impurity transport outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model is suitable to fast scans of the parameter space of the tokamak type reactor and has been used to investigate operation regimes of the high-field IGNITOR experiment.

  5. A study of plasma reaction mechanisms and kinetics in glow discharges of methyl methacrylate and related precursors using in situ FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Chi Vickie

    In order to understand plasma deposition processes, it is important to have a knowledge of the plasma gas-phase reactions. In this project, in situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to study the plasma gas-phase chemistry in a capacitively coupled glow discharge. Gas-phase measurements of a number of organic plasmas were performed. The precursors include methyl methacrylate (MMA), methyl crotonate, methyl isobutyrate, ethyl methacrylate, vinyl acetate, isopropanol, methanol, tetramethyl cyclobutanedione and formaldehyde. However, MMA was studied most extensively. In addition to the gas-phase study, plasma polymerized films were also characterized. A number of dissociation products were detected by FTIR in the plasmas. Calibration curves of these products and some monomers were prepared to determine the species concentrations and gas-phase composition. Plasma reaction kinetics were studied in closed systems to determine parameters such as dissociation pathway efficiencies, monomer decomposition rate coefficients, and intermediate species decomposition rate coefficients. The study shows that there are two major electron-impact induced dissociation pathways in MMA plasmas: the C-O bond cleavage reaction and decarboxylations. The C-O bond cleavage reaction accounts for approximately half of the MMA dissociation, and neutral formaldehyde and dimethyl ketene (DMK) molecules are produced via intramolecular rearrangement. Decarboxylation reactions produce CO, COsb2 and a number of radicals that subsequently stabilize to form neutral molecules, such as propylene, allene and methanol. These intermediate species then further dissociate in the plasma to small hydrocarbons (methane, acetylene and ethylene), CO, COsb2 and Hsb2. The reaction mechanisms in the plasmas of other alpha ,beta-unsaturated esters and vinyl acetate were found to be similar to the MMA mechanisms. However, the saturated ester (methyl isobutyrate) and isopropanol plasmas were found

  6. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  7. Kinetic analysis of spin current contribution to spectrum of electromagnetic waves in spin-1/2 plasma. II. Dispersion dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2017-02-01

    The dielectric permeability tensor for spin polarized plasmas derived in terms of the spin-1/2 quantum kinetic model in six-dimensional phase space obtained in Part I of this work is applied for the study of spectra of high-frequency transverse and transverse-longitudinal waves propagating perpendicular to the external magnetic field. Cyclotron waves are studied in consideration of waves with the electric field directed parallel to the external magnetic field. It is found that the separate spin evolution modifies the spectrum of cyclotron waves. These modifications increase with the increase in spin polarization and the number of the cyclotron resonance. Spin dynamics gives a considerable modification of spectra even if the anomalous part of electron magnetic moment is not included in the model. The account of anomalous magnetic moment leads to a fine structure of each cyclotron resonance. So, each cyclotron resonance splits into three waves. Details of this spectrum and its changes with the change of spin polarization are studied for the first and second cyclotron waves. A cyclotron resonance existing at ω≈0.001 | Ωe| due to the anomalous magnetic moment is also described, where | Ωe| is the cyclotron frequency. The ordinary waves do not have any considerable modification. The electrostatic and electromagnetic Berstein modes are studied during the analysis of waves propagating perpendicular to the external magnetic field with the electric field perturbation directed perpendicular to the external field. A modification of the oscillatory structure caused by the equilibrium spin polarization is found in both regimes. Similar modification is found for the extraordinary wave spectrum.

  8. Statistical description of low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by DMSP F15 and KOMPSAT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Min, K. W.; Kim, V. P.; Kil, H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. J.; Lee, E.; Kim, S. J.; Lee, D. Y.; Hairston, M.

    We investigated the global distribution of low-latitude plasma blobs using in-situ plasma density measurements from Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-1 KOMPSAT-1 and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program DMSP F15 The seasonal-longitudinal S L distribution of blobs is generally consistent with that of equatorial plasma bubbles EPBs but between them exist two notable differences First during equinoxes the blob activity is inhibited around the Atlantic region Second during the June solstice the African peak is rather suppressed in the distribution KOMPSAT-1 at the lower altitude encountered blobs more frequently than DMSP F15 The occurrence probability of plasma blobs is less subjected to the yearly variation of solar activity And the latitudinal distribution of the blobs shows strong asymmetry during solstices Most of them are concentrated on the winter hemisphere where the background density is low and the inter-hemispheric plasma transport is poleward along the geomagnetic field line And the asymmetry becomes weak as the solar activity decreases suggesting that the blob generation bears connection with the fountain effect inside EPBs and the poleward plasma transport

  9. Kinetic Studies of Plasma Chemical Fuel Oxidation in Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges by Single and Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    kHz repetition rate in fuel lean hydrogen, methane , ethylene, and propane-air plasmas at P = 100 Torr is compared to predictions from a plasma...hydrogen, methane , ethylene, and propane-air plasmas at P = 100 Torr is compared to predictions from a plasma-chemical fuel oxidation code. It is found...3.0, USC, and Konnov mechanisms. 3. Atomic Oxygen Measurements Atomic oxygen (O) production and decay is studied in the diffuse single filament

  10. Description of the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) for the OSS-1 Shuttle mission and JSC plasma chamber test in conjunction with the fast pulse electron gun (FPEG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives, equipment, and techniques for the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) carried by the OSS-1 instrument payload of the STS-4 and scheduled for the Spacelab-2 mission are described. The goals of the first flight were to examine the Orbiter-magnetoplasma interactions by measuring the electric and magnetic field strengths, the ionized particle wakes, and the generated waves. The RMS was employed to lift the unit out of the bay in order to allow characterization of the fields, EM interference, and plasma contamination within 15 m of the Orbiter. The PDP will also be used to examine plasma depletion, chemical reaction rates, waves, and energized plasma produced by firing of the Orbiter thrusters. Operation of the PDP was carried out in the NASA Space Environment Simulation Laboratory test chamber, where the PDP was used to assay the fields, fluxes, wave amplitudes, and particle energy spectra. The PDP instrumentation is also capable of detecting thermal ions, thermal electrons suprathermal particles, VHF/UHF EMI levels, and the S-band field strength.

  11. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Pardyjak, Eric; Mahrt, Larry; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  12. Statistical description of low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by DMSP F15 and KOMPSAT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Min, K. W.; Kim, V. P.; Kil, H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. J.; Lee, E.; Kim, S. J.; Lee, D. Y.; Hairston, M.

    The global distribution of low-latitude plasma blobs was investigated by in-situ plasma density measurements from the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-1 (KOMPSAT-1) and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15. In the observations, blobs occurred in the longitude sector where the activity of the equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) was appreciable, and additional blobs were found at the lower (KOMPSAT-1) altitude as in the EPBs. However, several notable differences exist between the distributions of EPBs and blobs. First, KOMPSAT-1 found few blobs around 0°E in March and June, as did DMSP F15 from 30°W to 120°E for every season. Second, the overall occurrences in December and March at the DMSP F15 (840 km) altitude were somewhat lower than expected from those of the EBPs. Third, at the DMSP F15 altitude, the occurrence probability of plasma blobs was less controlled by yearly variations in the solar activity. These results imply that topside ionospheric conditions as well as the existence of EPBs control further development of blobs. Additionally, it was found that the blob latitudes became higher as the yearly solar activity increased. Moreover, most of the blobs were encountered in the winter hemisphere, possibly due to the low ambient density.

  13. Energetic particle physics with applications in fusion and space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-05-01

    Energetic particle physics is the study of the effects of energetic particles on collective electromagnetic (EM) instabilities and energetic particle transport in plasmas. Anomalously large energetic particle transport is often caused by low frequency MHD instabilities, which are driven by these energetic particles in the presence of a much denser background of thermal particles. The theory of collective energetic particle phenomena studies complex wave-particle interactions in which particle kinetic physics involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect the MHD structure and long-time behavior of plasmas. The difficulty of modeling kinetic-MHD multiscale coupling processes stems from the disparate scales which are traditionally analyzed separately: the macroscale MHD phenomena are studied using the fluid MHD framework, while microscale kinetic phenomena are best described by complicated kinetic theories. The authors have developed a kinetic-MHD model that properly incorporates major particle kinetic effects into the MHD fluid description. For tokamak plasmas a nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code, the NOVA-K code, has been successfully developed and applied to study problems such as the excitation of fishbone and Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and the sawtooth stabilization by energetic ions in tokamaks. In space plasmas the authors have employed the kinetic-MHD model to study the energetic particle effects on the ballooning-mirror instability which explains the multisatellite observation of the stability and field-aligned structure of compressional Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma.

  14. Plasma Retinol Kinetics and β-Carotene Bioefficacy Are Quantified by Model-Based Compartmental Analysis in Healthy Young Adults with Low Vitamin A Stores12

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael H; Ford, Jennifer Lynn; Oxley, Anthony; Green, Joanne Balmer; Park, Hyunjin; Berry, Philip; Boddy, Alan V; Lietz, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Background: Model-based compartmental analysis of data on plasma retinol kinetics after administration of labeled retinol provides unique information about whole-body vitamin A metabolism. If labeled β-carotene is coadministered, its bioefficacy relative to the retinol reference dose can also be estimated. Objectives: The objectives were to model plasma retinol kinetics after administration of labeled preformed vitamin A and provitamin A β-carotene and to determine relative β-carotene bioefficacy. Methods: We used the Simulation, Analysis and Modeling software (WinSAAM version 3.0.8; http://www.WinSAAM.org) to analyze previously collected data on plasma [13C10]- and [13C5]retinol kinetics for 14 d after oral administration of 1 mg [13C10]retinyl acetate and 2 mg [13C10]β-carotene in oil to 30 healthy young adults of European ancestry [13 men, 17 women; mean ± SD age: 24.5 ± 4.2 y; mean ± SD body weight: 65.2 ± 10 kg; mean ± SD body mass index (in kg/m2): 22.5 ± 1.9] with moderate vitamin A intakes. Results: A 6-component model provided the best fit to the data, including compartments for initial metabolism of vitamin A, plasma retinol, and extravascular vitamin A storage. The disposal rate was 6.7 ± 3.1 μmol/d, fractional catabolic rate was 6.0% ± 2.3%/d, and vitamin A stores were 123 ± 71 μmol. Relative β-carotene bioefficacy, based on the ratio of the areas under the fraction of dose curves calculated by WinSAAM, averaged 13.5% ± 6.02% (retinol activity equivalents = 7.7:1.0 μg). Interindividual variation in relative β-carotene bioefficacy was high (CV: 44%). Conclusions: Vitamin A kinetics in these young adults were best described by essentially the same model that had been previously developed by using data for older adults with higher vitamin A stores; differences in parameter values reflected differences in vitamin A status. Estimated β-carotene bioefficacy was relatively low but similar to previously reported estimates obtained by

  15. Self-consistent one dimension in space and three dimension in velocity kinetic trajectory simulation model of magnetized plasma-wall transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chalise, Roshan Khanal, Raju

    2015-11-15

    We have developed a self-consistent 1d3v (one dimension in space and three dimension in velocity) Kinetic Trajectory Simulation (KTS) model, which can be used for modeling various situations of interest and yields results of high accuracy. Exact ion trajectories are followed, to calculate along them the ion distribution function, assuming an arbitrary injection ion distribution. The electrons, on the other hand, are assumed to have a cut-off Maxwellian velocity distribution at injection and their density distribution is obtained analytically. Starting from an initial guess, the potential profile is iterated towards the final time-independent self-consistent state. We have used it to study plasma sheath region formed in presence of an oblique magnetic field. Our results agree well with previous works from other models, and hence, we expect our 1d3v KTS model to provide a basis for the studying of all types of magnetized plasmas, yielding more accurate results.

  16. Paradigm shifts in plasma processing and application of fundamental kinetics to problems targeting 5 nm technology device technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee

    2016-09-01

    It is often said that semiconductor technology is approaching the end of scaling. While fundamental device limits do approach, plasma etching has been doing the heavy lifting to supplement the basic limits in lithography. RF plasmas, pulsing in many forms, diffusion plasmas are but a few of the important developments over the last 20 years that have succeeded in the seemingly impossible tasks. The commonality of these plasmas is being self-consistent: their near-Boltzmann EEDf maintains ionization with its tail while providing charge-balance with its Te . To control the plasma chemistry is to control its EEDf; the entanglement of ionization with charge-balance in self-consistent plasmas places a constraint on the decoupling of plasma chemistry from ionization. Example like DC/RF parallel-plate hybridizes stochastic heating with DC-cathode injected e- -beam. While such arrangement offers some level of decoupling, it raised more questions than what it helped answered along the lines of beam-plasma instabilities, bounce-resonance ionization, etc. Pure e- -beam plasmas could be a drastic departure from the self-consistent plasmas. Examples like the NRL e- -beam system and the more recent TEL NEP (Nonambipolar e- Plasma) show strong decoupling of Te from ionization but it is almost certain, many more questions lurk: the functions connecting collisional relaxation with instabilities, the channels causing the dissociation of large fluorocarbons (controlling the ion-to- radical ratio), the production of the damaging deep UV in e- -beam plasmas, etc., and the list goes on. IADf is one factor on feature-profile and IEDf determines the surgical surface-excitation governing the selectivity, and both functions have Ti as the origin; what controls the e- -beam plasmas' Ti ? RF-bias has served well in applications requiring energetic excitation but, are there ways to improve the IEDf tightness? What are the adverse side-effects of ``improved IEDf''? Decades ago an infant RF-plasma

  17. Kinetic modelling of NH3 production in N2–H2 non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jungmi; Pancheshnyi, Sergey; Tam, Eugene; Lowke, John J.; Prawer, Steven; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-04-01

    Detailed plasma kinetics modelling is presented of a low electron energy N2–H2 atmospheric-pressure discharge for ammonia synthesis. The model considers both electron and vibrational kinetics, including excited N2(X, ν) and H2(X, ν) species, and surface reactions such as those occurring by the Eley–Rideal and Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanisms and dissociative adsorption of molecules. The predictions of the model are compared to the measured NH3 concentration produced in a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge reactor as a function of process parameters such as input gas composition and applied voltage. Unlike typical low-pressure plasma processes, under the plasma conditions considered here (reduced electric field E/N in the range 30–50 Td, electron density of the order 108 cm‑3), the influence of ions is not significant. Instead, the reactions between radicals and vibrationally-excited molecules are more important. The active species in surface reactions, such as surface-adsorbed atomic nitrogen N(s) or hydrogen H(s), are found to be predominantly generated through the dissociative adsorption of molecules, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms for plasma catalysis under low-pressure, high-E/N conditions. It is found that NH radicals play an important role at the early stages of the NH3-generation process, NH in turn is produced from N and H2(ν). Electron kinetics is shown to play a critical role in the molecular dissociation and vibrational excitation reactions that produce these precursors. It is further found that surface-adsorbed atomic hydrogen H(s) takes a leading role in the formation of NH3, which is another significant difference from the mechanisms in conventional thermo-chemical processes and low-pressure plasmas. The applied voltage, the gas temperature, the N2:H2 ratio in the input gas mixture and the reactivity of the surface material are all found to influence the ammonia production. The calculated results reproduce the observed

  18. Effects of parallel sound wave damping and drift kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode stability with various plasma rotation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    > The effect of a parallel viscous force induced damping and the magnetic precessional drift resonance induced damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is numerically investigated for one of the advanced steady-state scenarios in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The key element of the investigation is to study how different plasma rotation profiles affect the stability prediction. The single-fluid, toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code MARS-F (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 7, 2000, p. 3681) and the MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 112503) are used for this purpose. Three extreme rotation profiles are considered: (a) a uniform profile with no shear, (b) a profile with negative flow shear at the rational surface ( is the equilibrium safety factor), and (c) a profile with positive shear at . The parallel viscous force is found to be effective for the mode stabilization at high plasma flow speed (about a few percent of the Alfven speed) for the no shear flow profile and the negative shear flow profile, but the stable domain does not appear with the positive shear flow profile. The predicted eigenmode structure is different with different rotation profiles. With a self-consistent inclusion of the magnetic precession drift resonance of thermal particles in MARS-K computations, a lower critical flow speed, i.e. the minimum speed needed for full suppression of the mode, is obtained. Likewise the eigenmode structure is also modified by different rotation profiles in the kinetic results.

  19. On the kinetic foundations of Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, Alfredo; Sagaceta-Mejía, Alma R.; García-Perciante, Ana L.

    2015-06-01

    Recent work has shown the existence of a relativistic effect present in a single component non-equilibrium fluid, corresponding to a heat flux due to an electric field [J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 38 (2013), 141-151]. The treatment in that work was limited to a four-dimensional Minkowski space-time in which the Boltzmann equation was treated in a special relativistic approach. The more complete framework of general relativity can be introduced to kinetic theory in order to describe transport processes associated to electromagnetic fields. In this context, the original Kaluza's formalism is a promising approach [Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (1921), 966-972; Gen. Rel. Grav. 39 (2007), 1287-1296; Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000), 4823-4830]. The present work contains a kinetic theory basis for Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics and gives a novel description for the establishment of thermodynamic forces beyond the special relativistic description.

  20. A New Kinetic Simulation Model with Self-Consistent Calculation of Regolith Layer Charging for Moon-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The moon-plasma interactions and the resulting surface charging have been subjects of extensive recent investigations. While many particle-in-cell (PIC) based simulation models have been developed, all existing PIC simulation models treat the surface of the Moon as a boundary condition to the plasma flow. In such models, the surface of the Moon is typically limited to simple geometry configurations, the surface floating potential is calculated from a simplified current balance condition, and the electric field inside the regolith layer cannot be resolved. This paper presents a new full particle PIC model to simulate local scale plasma flow and surface charging. A major feature of this new model is that the surface is treated as an "interface" between two mediums rather than a boundary, and the simulation domain includes not only the plasma but also the regolith layer and the bedrock underneath it. There are no limitations on the surface shape. An immersed-finite-element field solver is applied which calculates the regolith surface floating potential and the electric field inside the regolith layer directly from local charge deposition. The material property of the regolith layer is also explicitly included in simulation. This new model is capable of providing a self-consistent solution to the plasma flow field, lunar surface charging, the electric field inside the regolith layer and the bedrock for realistic surface terrain. This new model is applied to simulate lunar surface-plasma interactions and surface charging under various ambient plasma conditions. The focus is on the lunar terminator region, where the combined effects from the low sun elevation angle and the localized plasma wake generated by plasma flow over a rugged terrain can generate strongly differentially charged surfaces and complex dust dynamics. We discuss the effects of the regolith properties and regolith layer charging on the plasma flow field, dust levitation, and dust transport.

  1. Linear hybrid kinetic-MHD model of rotating plasmas via the interface of MINERVA stability and VENUS-LEVIS delta-f PIC codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferle, David; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Graves, Jonathan P.; Cooper, Wilfred A.

    2014-10-01

    In the framework of hybrid kinetic-MHD with plasma rotation, this project focuses on computing, via a delta-f PIC scheme, the non-adiabatic contribution to the MHD pressure tensor from supra-thermal populations. The orbit code VENUS-LEVIS is employed to evolve an ensemble of weighted markers in the rotating magnetic equilibria produced by the MHD stability code MINERVA. The linearly perturbed Vlasov equation is solved by evolving the marker weights in the presence of MINERVA's most unstable MHD modes. Moments of the perturbed distribution are sequenced to yield the hot ion kinetic response. The Laplace transform of the perturbed parallel and perpendicular pressure is calculated at the resonance as a function of the radial position and the poloidal and toroidal mode number. The resulting profiles are fed back into MINERVA as an additional source term in the MHD force balance equation. The mode structure, the frequency and the growth rate of the perturbations are modified due to resonances with the hot particles' bounce/transit motion and their toroidal precession drift. The effect of toroidal plasma rotation on the mode stability is assessed.

  2. Effects of dietary energy intake and cold exposure on kinetics of plasma phenylalanine, tyrosine and protein synthesis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hiroaki; Murakami, Shingo; Sasaki, Satori; Al-Mamun, Mohammad

    2010-02-01

    An isotope dilution method of [2H5]phenylalanine (Phe) and [2H2]tyrosine (Tyr) was used to determine the effects of metabolisable energy (ME) intake and cold exposure on plasma Phe and Tyr turnover rates in sheep. Whole body protein synthesis (WBPS) was calculated with the [2H5]Phe model. Eight adult sheep were assigned to two dietary treatments receiving the same amount of crude protein and either 515 or 828 kJ x kg BW(-0.75) x d(-1) of ME (Me-ME diet and Hi-ME diet, respectively) with a crossover design for two 28 d periods. The sheep were exposed from a thermoneutral environment (23 +/- 1 degrees C) to a cold environment (2 +/- 1 to 4 +/- 1 degrees C) for 6 d for each dietary treatment. The primed-continuous infusion method of isotope dilution was conducted in both environmental temperatures. Plasma Phe turnover rate (PheTR) tended to be greater and plasma Tyr turnover rate (TyrTR) was greater (p = 0.03) for the Hi-ME diet compared with the Me-ME diet. Plasma PheTR increased (p = 0.04) and plasma TyrTR tended to increase during cold exposure. Whole body protein synthesis tended to be greater for the Hi-ME diet compared with the Me-ME diet and increased (p = 0.03) during cold exposure compared to the thermoneutral environment, but no interaction was detected. It was concluded that in sheep, plasma PheTR and WBPS (as determined by the [2H5]Phe model) tended to be influenced by and plasma TyrTR was influenced by ME intake. Further, plasma PheTR and WBPS increased and plasma TyrTR tended to increase during cold exposure.

  3. Gas dynamic theory of flight of fast electron flux in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.

    The one-dimensional flight of a fast electron flux in plasma is investigated taking into account generation and absorption of plasma waves. The transition from the kinetic description to the gas dynamics is made. The closed set of gas dynamic equations for electrons and plasmons is derived and an automodel solution is obtained in the case of instantaneous injection. This solution represents the beam-plasma formation on natural oscillations in the system electrons+plasmons is considered.

  4. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  5. Comparative kinetics of damage to the plasma and mitochondrial membranes by intra-cellularly synthesized and externally-provided photosensitizers using multi-color FACS.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Sara; Malik, Zvi; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer involves inflicting lethal damage to the cells of malignant tumors, primarily by singlet oxygen that is generated following light-absorption in a photosensitizer molecule. Dysfunction of cells is manifested in many ways, including peroxidation of cellular components, membrane rupture, depolarization of electric potentials, termination of mitochondrial activity, onset of apoptosis and necrosis and eventually cell lysis. These events do not necessarily occur in linear fashion and different types of damage to cell components occur, most probably, in parallel. In this report we measured the relative rates of damage to two cellular membranes: the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. We employed photosensitizers of diverse hydrophobicities and used different incubation procedures, which lead to their different intra-cellular localizations. We monitored the damage that was inflicted on these membranes, by employing optical probes of membrane integrity, in a multi-color FACS experiment. The potentiometric indicator JC-1 monitored the electric cross-membrane potential of the mitochondria and the fluorometric indicator Draq7 monitored the rupture of the plasma membrane. We show that the electric depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and the damage to the enveloping plasma membrane proceed with different kinetics that reflect the molecular character and intracellular location of the sensitizer: PpIX that is synthesized in the cells from ALA causes rapid mitochondrial damage and very slow damage to the plasma membrane, while externally added PpIX has an opposite effect. The hydrophilic sensitizer HypS4 can be taken up by the cells by different incubation conditions, and these affect its intracellular location, and as a consequence either the plasma membrane or the mitochondria is damaged first. A similar correlation was found for additional extracellularly-provided photosensitizers HP and PpIX.

  6. Kinetic approach to the formation of 3D electromagnetic structures in flows of expanding plasma coronas. II. flow anisotropy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of magnetic structures in moving hot solar coronal plasma and hot collisionless laser-produced plasma, as determined by nonlinear criteria for weak and strong magnetization on the basis of the friction parameter Γ B and Alfven number M A, is considered within the Vlasov and Maxwell equations in the second part of the work. The flow velocities are lower then the thermal electron velocity. The energy and pulse anisotropy parameters of a flow, which determine its electromagnetic properties in the Cherenkov resonance line, are calculated by shape of particle distribution function (PDF). The ratio of these parameters is the Q-factor G V ; it characterizes the electromagnetic properties of a plasma flow and is expressed via the ratio of diamagnetic and resistive current densities or via the ratio of irregular and diamagnetic plasma scales. A particle flow is similar to a conductive medium at G V ≪ 1 and a diamagnetic medium at G V ≫ 1. The following cases are considered. (1) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF and interacts with distributed magnetization. Expressions for anisotropy parameters are derived, 3D field structures in the tail wake are found, and a possibility of topological reconstruction into a compact state under variation in the parameter G V is shown. (2) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF; a steady-state diamagnetic current layer, characterized by an anisotropic PDF, is immersed inside it. The system is in the diamagnetic state G ≫ 1. The generalized anisotropy parameter is calculated and a possibility of the excitation of three types of diamagnetic structures with low resistive currents is shown. (3) The nonlinear dynamics of anisotropic quasi-current-free plasma ( G =-1), in which the diamagnetic and resistive current densities locally compensate each other in the phase space of particle velocities, is studied. This dynamics is implemented in the long wavelength limit in plasma with an anisotropic PDF.

  7. Global magnetosphere-like 3D structure formation in kinetics by hot magnetized plasma flow characterized by shape of the particle distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, Vladimir

    The task was to provide an analytical elementary magnetosphere-like model in kinetics for verification of the 3D EM PIC codes created for space/aerospace and HED plasmas applications. Kinetic approach versus cold MHD approach takes into account different behavior in the EM fields of resonant and non resonant particles in the velocity phase space, which appears via shape characteristics of the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) and via the spatial dispersion effect forming the collisionless dissipation in the EM fields. The external flow is a hot collisionless plasma characterized by the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) with different shapes: Maxwellian, kappa, etc. The flow is in a “hot regime”: it can be supersonic but its velocity remains less the thermal velocity of the electrons. The “internal” part of the magnetosphere formed by trapped particles is the prescribed 3D stationary magnetization considered as a spherical “quasiparticle” with internal magnetodipole and toroidal moments represented as a broadband EM driver. We obtain after the linearization of Vlasov/Maxwell equations a self-consistent 3D large scale kinetic solution of the classic problem. Namely, we: model the “outer” part of the magnetosphere formed by external hot plasma flow of the flyby particles. Solution of the Vlasov equation expressed via a tensor of dielectric permittivity of nonmagnetized and magnetized flowing plasma. Here, we obtain the direct kinetic dissipative effect of the magnetotail formation and the opposite diamagnetic effect of the magnetosphere “dipolization”. We get MHD wave cone in flow magnetized by external guiding magnetic (GM) field. Magnetosphere in our consideration is a 3D dissipative “wave” package structure of the skinned EM fields formed by the “waves” excited at frequency bands where we obtain negative values and singularities (resonances) of squared EM refractive index of the cold plasma. The hot regime

  8. Kinetics and Role of Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Albert T.; Barrett, Christopher D.; DeBusk, M. George; Ellson, Christian D.; Gautam, Shiva; Talmor, Daniel S.; Gallagher, Diana C.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Primed neutrophils that are capable of releasing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into the circulation are thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that direct measurement of plasma MMP-9 activity may be a predictor of incipient tissue damage and subsequent lung injury, which was investigated in both an animal model of ARDS and a small cohort of 38 critically ill human patients. In a mouse model of ARDS involving instillation of intratracheal LPS to induce lung inflammation, we measured neutrophil-mediated inflammation, along with MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue and MMP-9 expression in the plasma. Neutrophil recruitment, inflammation, and MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue increased throughout the 72 hours after LPS instillation, while plasma MMP-9 expression was greatest at 12–24 hours after LPS instillation. The results suggest that the peak in plasma MMP-9 activity may precede the peak of neutrophil inflammation in the airways and lung tissue in the setting of ARDS. Based on this animal study, a retrospective observational cohort study involving 38 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) at a tertiary care university hospital with acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation was conducted. Plasma samples were collected daily, and MMP-9 activity was compared with lung function as determined by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In patients that developed ARDS, a notable increase in plasma MMP-9 activity on a particular day correlated with a decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the following day (r = −0.503, p < 0.006). Taken together, these results suggest that plasma MMP-9 activity changes as a surrogate for primed neutrophils may have predictive value for the development of ARDS in a selected subset of critically ill patients. PMID:26009816

  9. Kinetics and Role of Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Albert T; Barrett, Christopher D; DeBusk, George M; Ellson, Christian D; Gautam, Shiva; Talmor, Daniel S; Gallagher, Diana C; Yaffe, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    Primed neutrophils that are capable of releasing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into the circulation are thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that direct measurement of plasma MMP-9 activity may be a predictor of incipient tissue damage and subsequent lung injury, which was investigated in both an animal model of ARDS and a small cohort of 38 critically ill human patients. In a mouse model of ARDS involving instillation of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce lung inflammation, we measured neutrophil-mediated inflammation, along with MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue and MMP-9 expression in the plasma. Neutrophil recruitment, inflammation, and MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue increased throughout the 72 h after LPS instillation, whereas plasma MMP-9 expression was greatest at 12 to 24 h after LPS instillation. The results suggest that the peak in plasma MMP-9 activity may precede the peak of neutrophil inflammation in the airways and lung tissue in the setting of ARDS. Based on this animal study, a retrospective observational cohort study involving 38 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit at a tertiary care university hospital with acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation was conducted. Plasma samples were collected daily, and MMP-9 activity was compared with lung function as determined by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In patients who developed ARDS, a notable increase in plasma MMP-9 activity on a particular day correlated with a decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the following day (r = -0.503, P < 0.006). Taken together, these results suggest that plasma MMP-9 activity changes, as a surrogate for primed neutrophils may have predictive value for the development of ARDS in a selected subset of critically ill patients.

  10. Towards First-principles Control-oriented Modeling of the Magnetic and Kinetic Plasma Profile Evolutions in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Justin E.; Schuster, Eugenio; Besseghir, Karim; Lister, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    The ``hybrid'' and ``steady-state'' advanced scenarios are characterized by q profiles higher or equal to one to mitigate plasma instabilities and improve confinement, which are key for ITER to achieve its operational objectives. To achieve these scenarios, active model-based control of the current profile and thermal state of the plasma is required. Towards this goal, two control-oriented, plasma-response models are proposed. First, the poloidal flux diffusion equation is combined with empirical models of the electron density and temperature profiles, plasma resistivity, and non-inductive current drives to obtain a physics-based model of the poloidal flux and stored energy evolutions. Second, the empirical electron temperature model is replaced by the electron heat transport equation, which is combined with empirical models of the electron heat conductivity and heat sources to obtain a physics-based model of the poloidal flux and electron temperature evolutions. Simulation results comparing the evolution of the plasma parameters predicted by the control-oriented, physic-based models and the DINA-CH+CRONOS simulation code are presented for ITER, and the control objectives and challenges are discussed.

  11. A novel robotic system for quantifying arm kinematics and kinetics: description and evaluation in therapist-assisted passive arm movements post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Culmer, P R; Jackson, A E; Makower, S G; Cozens, J A; Levesley, M C; Mon-Williams, M; Bhakta, B

    2011-04-30

    We developed a system for quantitatively measuring arm movement. Our approach provides a method to simultaneously capture upper limb kinetic and kinematic data during assisted passive arm movements. Data are analysed with respect to Cartesian and upper limb coordinate systems to obtain upper limb joint angles and torques. We undertook an evaluation of the system in participants with stroke to show the feasibility of this approach. During rehabilitation after stroke, one aspect of treatment includes the physiotherapist applying assistive forces to move the impaired arm of the patient who remains passive. There is a dearth of published data on the relationship between upper limb kinematics and the underlying forces (kinetics) in this mode of physiotherapy treatment. Such quantitative data are crucial in facilitating research into therapy practice, for example by measuring variation in practice and determining dosage. An experienced therapist prescribed passive movements tailored to the needs of 16 participants with stroke (41-81 years) with a range of anthropometric sizes and motor impairments. Our novel measurement tool recorded kinematic and kinetic data at 100 Hz for 6-11 movements per participant. The kinetic data show that the majority of movements fall within upper limits of 36.7 N in shoulder elevation, 22.4N in shoulder protraction, 4.6 Nm in shoulder abduction, 12.8 Nm in shoulder flexion, 2.4 Nm in shoulder rotation and 5.5 Nm in elbow flexion. These data show the potential of this system to better understand arm movement, in particular to objectively evaluate physical therapy treatments and support development of robotic devices to facilitate upper limb rehabilitation.

  12. LSENS, A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for Homogeneous Gas-Phase Reactions. Part 2; Code Description and Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part II of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part II describes the code, how to modify it, and its usage, including preparation of the problem data file required to execute LSENS. Code usage is illustrated by several example problems, which further explain preparation of the problem data file and show how to obtain desired accuracy in the computed results. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions. Part I (NASA RP-1328) derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved by LSENS. Part III (NASA RP-1330) explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity-analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results.

  13. Reaction kinetic model of a proposed plasma membrane two-cycle H(+)-transport system of Chara corallina.

    PubMed Central

    Fisahn, J; Hansen, U P; Lucas, W J

    1992-01-01

    Biophysical and numerical analysis methods were used to characterize and model the transport protein that gives rise to the acid and alkaline regions of Chara. A measuring system that permits the detection of area-specific current-voltage curves was used. These current-voltage curves, obtained from the inward current regions of Chara, underwent a parallel shift when the alkaline region was inverted by means of an acid pH treatment. In this situation the reversal potential of this area shifted from -120 mV to -340 mV. Together with data obtained from experiments using a divided chamber system, these results suggest that a common transport protein generates inward and outward current regions of Chara. On the basis of these experimental findings, a reaction kinetic model is proposed that assigns two operational modes to the proposed transport protein. Switching between these modes generates either acid or alkaline behavior. Since the observed pH dependence of the postulated transporter is rather complex, a reaction kinetic saturation mechanism had to be incorporated into the model. This final 10-state reaction kinetic model provides an appropriate set of mathematical relations to fit the measured current-voltage curves by computer. PMID:1373492

  14. Dynamics of pickup ion velocity distribution function in Titan's plasma environment (TA encounter): 3D hybrid kinetic modeling and comparison with CAPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a very important role in the plasma dynamics near Titan: mass loading, excitation of the low-frequency waves and the formation of the particle velocity distribution function, e.g. ring/shell-like distributions, etc. The kinetic approach is important for estimation of the collision processes e.g. a charge exchange. The particle velocity distribution function also plays a key role for understanding the observed particle fluxes. In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution function dynamics from 3D hybrid modeling. The modeling is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) ion measurements during the TA flyby. In our model the background ions, all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperatures of the background electrons and pickup electrons were also included into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. We use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components and include a simple ionosphere model with M=28 ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our modeling shows that interaction between background plasma and pickup ions H+, H2+, CH4+ and N2+ has a more complicated structure than was observed in the T9 flyby and modeling due to the large gyroradius of the background O+ ions [1,2,3,4]. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS TA observations. We also compare our kinetic modeling with other hybrid and MHD modeling of Titan's environment. References [1] Sittler, E.C., et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds

  15. Stabilities of neutral and basic esters of bendamustine in plasma compared to the parent compound: kinetic investigations by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Huber, S; Antoni, F; Schickaneder, C; Schickaneder, H; Bernhardt, G; Buschauer, A

    2015-02-01

    Esters of the cytostatic bendamustine (1), previously demonstrated to be much more potent than the parent compound as antiproliferative agents in vitro, were investigated for stability in buffer and plasma, as well as against porcine liver esterase in the presence of different amounts of albumin using a validated RP-HPLC method with fluorescence detection. The hydrolysis of the nitrogen mustard moiety was retarded (for 1: approximately 130 vs. 11 min) in the presence of plasma proteins. For the derivatives, both cleavage of ester and nitrogen mustard moieties were analyzed. Enzymatic hydrolysis was very fast in the case of 2-pyrrolidino-, 2-piperidino- and 2-(4-methylpiperazino)-ethyl esters, whereas methyl, ethyl, morpholinoethyl and branched 2-pyrrolidinoethyl esters were considerably more stable (half-lives between 41 and 116 min, compared to <5 min). Inhibition by physostigmine indicated unspecific cholinesterases to be involved in the rapid ester cleavage. Due to lower protein content and higher enzymatic activity in murine compared to human plasma, reduced stability of all investigated esters in mouse plasma (t½<2 min) has to be taken into account with respect to the design of animal studies.

  16. Integrated Kinetic Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions, Fast-Electron Generation and Transport in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A; Cohen, B; Divol, L

    2009-11-16

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale, using a new approach that combines a 3D collisional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code with an MHD-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at sub-critical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast-electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multi-picosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  17. Integrated kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions, fast-electron generation, and transport in fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A. J.; Cohen, B. I.; Divol, L.

    2010-05-15

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale using a new approach that combines a three-dimensional collisional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with a magnetohydrodynamic-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at subcritical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast- electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multipicosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  18. The Lunar dusty plasmas -levitation and transport.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atamaniuk, Barbara; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    Lunar dust can exhibit unusual behavior -due to electron photoemission via solar-UV radiation the lunar surface represents a complex plasma -"dusty plasma". The dust grains and lunar surface are electrostatically charged by the Moon's interaction with the local plasma environ-ment and the photoemission of electrons due to solar UV and X-rays. This effect causes the like-charged surface and dust particles to repel each other, and creates a near-surface electric field. Lunar dust must be treated as a dusty plasma. Using analytic (kinetic (Vlasov) and magnetohydrodynamic theory ) and numerical modeling we show physical processes related to levitation and transport dusty plasma on the Moon. These dust grains could affect the lunar environment for radio wave and plasma diagnostics and interfere with exploration activities. References: 1. Wilson T.L. (1992), in Analysis of Interplanetary Dust, M. Zolensky et al. AIP Conf.Proc. 310, 33-44 (AIP, NY), 2.Wilson T.L."LUNAR DUST AND DUSTY PLASMA PHYSICS".40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2009), 3. Grün E., et al.(1993),Nature 363, 144. 4. Morfill G. and Grün E.(1979), Planet. Space Sci.. 27, 1269, 1283, 5. Manka R. and Michel F. (1971), Proc. 2nd Lun. Sci. Conf. 2, 1717 (MIT Press, Cambridge). 6. Manka R. et al.(1973), Lun. Sci.-III, 504. 7. Barbara Atamaniuk "Kinetic Description of Localized Plasma Structure in Dusty Plasmas". Czechoslovak Journal of Physics Vol.54 C 2004

  19. Generation of a longitudinal current upon interaction of a transverse electromagnetic wave with degenerate plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    We consider degenerate plasma that is located in the field of a transverse electromagnetic wave. An electric current generated in the plasma by the electromagnetic field is sought. During classical description of the interaction of the electromagnetic wave with the plasma, the Vlasov kinetic equation is used, while, in quantum description, the quantum kinetic equation with the Wigner integral is applied. A nonlinear analysis has shown that that the electric current in the plasma has two nonzero components. One component of the electric current is directed along the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. The other nonzero component of the current is directed along the wave vector. In the present work, we analyze this component of the electric current. The case of collisionless plasma is examined.

  20. Corticosterone in drinking water: altered kinetics of a single oral dose of corticosterone and concentrations of plasma sodium, albumin, globulin, and total protein.

    PubMed

    Pung, Thitiya; Zimmerman, Kurt; Klein, Bradley; Ehrich, Marion

    2003-10-01

    Effects of chronic exposure to corticosterone in drinking water on corticosterone kinetics, blood chemistry, and concentrations of catecholamines in parts of brain were studied in Long-Evans rats. Rats were randomly grouped into 3 x 2 treatments (n=4), with three treatments of drinking water (tap water, or 2.5% ethanol, or 400 microg/mL of corticosterone in 2.5% ethanol) for 28 days and two treatments of gavage with a single dose of either corn oil or corticosterone 20 mg/kg on day 28. Blood samples were collected at 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480, and 720 min after dosing to determine plasma corticosterone concentrations. Blood samples were collected for clinical pathology on day 42. Hippocampus, cerebral cortex, caudate-putamen, and pons were examined to determine concentrations of catecholamines and activities of esterases. Concentrations of plasma corticosterone before gavage of the corticosterone-drinking rats (47.61 +/- 1.13 ng/mL) were lower than the water (418.47 +/- 1.13 ng/mL) or the ethanol rats (383.71 +/- 1.13 ng/mL, P < 0.0001). Plasma corticosterone rose to peak concentrations by 15 min after gavage in all three groups of drinking rats. Corticosterone-drinking rats had concentrations of plasma corticosterone that returned to basal levels slower than water- and ethanol-drinking rats. Plasma sodium and chloride concentrations were lower in the corticosterone-drinking rats than the water-drinking rats (P < 0.01). Plasma albumin, globulin, and total protein were highest in the corticosterone-drinking rats when compared to the other groups of drinking rats (P < 0.001, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively). Corticosterone in drinking water did not affect activities of brain neurotoxic esterase, carboxylesterase, acetylcholinesterase, or concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites. A single oral dose of corticosterone reduced neurotoxic esterase activity in the cerebral cortex (P < 0.05) and increased norepinephrine concentrations in the hippocampus

  1. Comparison of BES measurements of ion-scale turbulence with direct gyro-kinetic simulations of MAST L-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, A. R.; Dunai, D.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Hill, P.; McMillan, B.; Roach, C. M.; Saarelma, S.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Zoletnik, S.; the MAST Team

    2014-02-01

    Observations of ion-scale (kyρi ⩽ 1) density turbulence of relative amplitude ≳0.2% are available on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) using a 2D (8 radial × 4 poloidal channel) imaging beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Spatial and temporal characteristics of this turbulence, i.e., amplitudes, correlation times, radial and perpendicular correlation lengths and apparent phase velocities of the density contours, are determined by means of correlation analysis. For a low-density, L-mode discharge with strong equilibrium flow shear exhibiting an internal transport barrier in the ion channel, the observed turbulence characteristics are compared with synthetic density turbulence data generated from global, non-linear, gyro-kinetic simulations using the particle-in-cell code NEMORB. This validation exercise highlights the need to include increasingly sophisticated physics, e.g., kinetic treatment of trapped electrons, equilibrium flow shear and collisions, to reproduce most of the characteristics of the observed turbulence. Even so, significant discrepancies remain: an underprediction by the simulations of the turbulence amplitude and heat flux at plasma periphery and the finding that the correlation times of the numerically simulated turbulence are typically two orders of magnitude longer than those measured in MAST. Comparison of these correlation times with various linear timescales suggests that, while the measured turbulence is strong and may be ‘critically balanced’, the simulated turbulence is weak.

  2. Use of physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modeling to study interindividual human variation and species differences in plasma concentrations of quercetin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Boonpawa, Rungnapa; Moradi, Nooshin; Spenkelink, Albertus; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2015-12-15

    Biological activities of flavonoids in vivo ultimately depend on the systemic bioavailability of the aglycones and their metabolites. We aimed to develop physiologically based kinetic (PBK) models to predict plasma concentrations of the flavonoid quercetin and its metabolites in individual human subjects and to define species differences compared with male rat. The human models were developed based on in vitro metabolic parameters derived from incubations with pooled and 20 individual human tissue fractions and by fitting kinetic parameters to available in vivo data. The outcomes obtained were compared to a previously developed model for quercetin and its metabolites formation in male rat. Quercetin-3'-O-glucuronide was predicted to be the major circulating metabolite in 19 out of 20 individuals, while in male rat di- and tri-conjugates of quercetin containing a glucuronic acid, sulfate and/or methyl moieties are the major metabolites. Significant species differences occur in major circulating metabolites of quercetin suggesting that rat is not an adequate model to study effects of quercetin in man. The defined PBK models can be used to guide the experimental design of in vitro experiments with flavonoids, especially to better take into account the relevance of metabolism and the contribution of metabolites to the biological activity in humans.

  3. Gyrokinetic and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of guide-field reconnection. I. Macroscopic effects of the electron flows

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, P. A. Kilian, P.; Büchner, J.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we compare gyrokinetic (GK) with fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of magnetic reconnection in the limit of strong guide field. In particular, we analyze the limits of applicability of the GK plasma model compared to a fully kinetic description of force free current sheets for finite guide fields (b{sub g}). Here, we report the first part of an extended comparison, focusing on the macroscopic effects of the electron flows. For a low beta plasma (β{sub i} = 0.01), it is shown that both plasma models develop magnetic reconnection with similar features in the secondary magnetic islands if a sufficiently high guide field (b{sub g} ≳ 30) is imposed in the kinetic PIC simulations. Outside of these regions, in the separatrices close to the X points, the convergence between both plasma descriptions is less restrictive (b{sub g} ≳ 5). Kinetic PIC simulations using guide fields b{sub g} ≲ 30 reveal secondary magnetic islands with a core magnetic field and less energetic flows inside of them in comparison to the GK or kinetic PIC runs with stronger guide fields. We find that these processes are mostly due to an initial shear flow absent in the GK initialization and negligible in the kinetic PIC high guide field regime, in addition to fast outflows on the order of the ion thermal speed that violate the GK ordering. Since secondary magnetic islands appear after the reconnection peak time, a kinetic PIC/GK comparison is more accurate in the linear phase of magnetic reconnection. For a high beta plasma (β{sub i} = 1.0) where reconnection rates and fluctuations levels are reduced, similar processes happen in the secondary magnetic islands in the fully kinetic description, but requiring much lower guide fields (b{sub g} ≲ 3)

  4. Description and assessment of RAMONA-3B Mod. 0 Cycle 4: a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR system transients

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W; Cheng, H S; Diamond, D J; Khatib-Rahbar, M

    1984-01-01

    This report documents the physical models and the numerical methods employed in the BWR systems code RAMONA-3B. The RAMONA-3B code simulates three-dimensional neutron kinetics and multichannel core hydraulics of nonhomogeneous, nonequilibrium two-phase flows. RAMONA-3B is programmed to calculate the steady and transient conditions in the main steam supply system for normal and abnormal operational transients, including the performances of plant control and protection systems. Presented are code capabilities and limitations, models and solution techniques, the results of development code assessment and suggestions for improving the code in the future.

  5. Plasma concentrations of pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine and evaluation of pharmaco-kinetic data by computerized curve fitting

    PubMed Central

    Weidekamm, E.; Plozza-Nottebrock, H.; Forgo, I.; Dubach, U. C.

    1982-01-01

    For the determination of the plasma concentration profiles of pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine after the administration of 1 tablet of Fansidar, highly specific analytical methods are needed as the pyrimethamine concentration is low (0.2 - 0.02 mg/litre) and the concentration ratio of the two components in the plasma is high (> 1: 500). The microbiological method described in this paper fulfils these requirements for high specificity and sensitivity (the sensitivity limit for sulfadoxine is 1 mg/litre and for pyrimethamine is 0.013 mg/litre). Pharmacokinetic data were evaluated for 14 volunteers after administration of 1 tablet of Fansidar, and a computer simulation of multiple dosing (1 tablet per week) was performed. PMID:6979415

  6. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-11-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have signficant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D.J. Grove and D.M. Meade, Nuclear Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)], with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  7. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-12-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have significant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  8. Physics of the interaction of ultra intense laser pulses with cold collisional plasma using large scale kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2015-07-15

    We present a set of 2D collisional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense cold collisional plasmas. The size of these simulations is about 100 times as large as those previously published. This allows studying the transport of energetic particles on time scale of the order of 400 fs without perturbations due to the influence of boundary effects and performing a very detailed analysis of the physics of the transport. We confirm the existence of a threshold in intensity close to the relativistic threshold above which the beam of energetic particles diverges when it penetrates the cold plasma. We also study the applicability of Ohm's law to compute the electric field, which is the method commonly used in hybrid codes. The heating of the cold plasma is then studied and we show that half of the heating is anomalous, i.e., not given by standard Joule effect. We discuss the previously published results in the light of these new simulations.

  9. Implication of Kappa models in realistic parameterization of the kinetic anisotropy and the resulting instabilities in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, V.; Poedts, S.; Lazar, M.

    2014-12-01

    Direct in-situ measurements of the velocity distributions of plasma particles in the solar wind reveal two distinct components: a Maxwellian (thermal) core, and a less dense but hotter halo in the high-energy (suprathermal) tails of the distribution, which are well-described by Kappa power-laws. Despite these evidences, the present attempts to parameterize the observed anisotropy and the resulting plasma wave instabilities are limited to idealized models of the distributions. These are, for instance, simplified models which ignore the suprathermal populations, or minimize the role of the core, assuming this component is cold, and model only the suprathermal tails with a Kappa distribution function. It is worthwhile to asses to which extent these models are relevant in realistic situations. Here, we present a comparative analysis with more realistic approaches, which combine a Maxwellian core, and one or two Kappa distributed components (the halo and the field-aligned strahl in the fast wind). A comparison is provided for the particular case of the cyclotron instabilities, which enables us to emphasize the effects produced by the thermal spread of plasma particles from the core, and extend approaching complex situations frequently observed in the solar wind, when both the core and halo populations are anisotropic. Correlated with the radial profile of Kappa components in the heliosphere, these effects help us to build a realistic picture on the role played by these instabilities in major processes like heating and energy dissipation in the solar wind.

  10. POPULATION KINETICS MODELING FOR NON-LTE AND NON-MAXWELLIAN PLASMAS GENERATED IN FINITE TEMPERATURE DENSE MATTER EXPERIMENTS ARISING FROM SHORT PULSE X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H; Lee, R W; Morgan, W L

    2003-12-23

    The short pulse x-ray sources will provide a major advance in dense matter studies important to understand implosion physics for ICF as a generator of warm dense matter or a probe of finite temperature dense matter. The interaction of such a high-energy photon pulse with the initially solid matter creates highly transient states of plasmas initially whose relaxation processes are of interest to the equation of states or spectral properties of these matter. For these plasmas, assumptions such as LTE population distributions or Maxwellian electron energy distributions should be tested by employing a method that does not make these assumption a priori. Our goal is to present a model that can be used to simulate the electron distributions, the ionization balance and the spectral output of transient systems generated in the future ICF experiments. We report on the progress in developing a non-LTE atomic population kinetics code integrated with Boltzmann equation solver to provide a self-consistent time-dependent solution of the level populations and the particle energy distributions.

  11. Probability description of ligand-receptor interactions. Evaluation of reliability of events with small and supersmall doses. I. Kinetics of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, K G; Varfolomeev, S D

    1999-09-01

    We have developed mathematical methods for describing ligand-receptor interactions (LRI) using Markov chains. Under some conditions, the mean value of ligand-receptor complexes obtained using Markov chains coincides with that obtained from the law of mass action. Using the calculated ratio of standard deviation to mean number of ligand-receptor complexes, we show that with small concentrations of ligand-receptor complexes LRI must be described using probability methods. Using data from the literature, we show that LRI description using the mass-action law under these conditions can cause significant errors in interpretation of experimental data.

  12. Water bag modeling of a multispecies plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Gravier, E.; Besse, N.; Klein, R.; Ghizzo, A.; Bertrand, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.

    2011-03-15

    We report in the present paper a new modeling method to study multiple species dynamics in magnetized plasmas. Such a method is based on the gyrowater bag modeling, which consists in using a multistep-like distribution function along the velocity direction parallel to the magnetic field. The choice of a water bag representation allows an elegant link between kinetic and fluid descriptions of a plasma. The gyrowater bag model has been recently adapted to the context of strongly magnetized plasmas. We present its extension to the case of multi ion species magnetized plasmas: each ion species being modeled via a multiwater bag distribution function. The water bag modelization will be discussed in details, under the simplification of a cylindrical geometry that is convenient for linear plasma devices. As an illustration, results obtained in the linear framework for ion temperature gradient instabilities are presented, that are shown to agree qualitatively with older works.

  13. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation

    PubMed Central

    Orgaz, Felipe; Amat, Daniel; Szycht, Olga; Dzika, Aleksandra; Barba, Flora; Becerra, José; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16) and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG). Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication) were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973) [3] and (Nieto, 1984) [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented. PMID:26858981

  14. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation.

    PubMed

    Orgaz, Felipe; Amat, Daniel; Szycht, Olga; Dzika, Aleksandra; Barba, Flora; Becerra, José; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor

    2016-03-01

    A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16) and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG). Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication) were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973) [3] and (Nieto, 1984) [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented.

  15. Kinetic description of a free electron laser with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding by using the Einstein coefficient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdian, H.; AbasiRostami, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study of electron trajectories and gain in a free electron laser (FEL) with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding is presented based on the Einstein coefficient method. The laser gain in the low-gain regime is obtained for the case of a cold tenuous relativistic electron beam, where the beam plasma frequency is much less than the radiation frequency propagating in this configuration. The resulting gain equation is analyzed numerically over a wide range of system parameters.