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Sample records for kinetics mass transport

  1. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  2. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  3. Kinetics of bulk and surface mass transport in complex metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaydin, Hakan

    2009-03-01

    Metal hydrides can be used to store hydrogen in high gravimetric and volumetric densities. However, the kinetics of hydrogen release and uptake are slow in complex metal hydrides. Clarification of the mechanism of hydrogen release and uptake in complex metal hydrides can aid in a rational design of new hydrogen storage materials with fast kinetics or catalysts that will catalyze the rate of hydrogen release from the existing materials. The release of hydrogen in metal hydrides requires the transport of hydrogen and/or heavier species. The kinetics of such mass transport in metal hydrides can be the rate-limiting process for the release of hydrogen. For example, the rate-determining step for the release of hydrogen from NaAlH4 is the creation and diffusion of neutral AlH3 defects in NaAlH4. The release of hydrogen from LiH destabilized LiNH2 also proceeds via the creation of neutral point defects. The mechanism of mass transport in prototypical hydrogen storage materials such as NaAlH4 and LiNH2 and the mechanism of hydrogen diffusion in aluminum will be discussed.

  4. Mass transport kinetics of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst-33342 into bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Weisenfeld, Robert B

    2007-10-01

    The mass transport kinetics for the unmediated diffusion of Hoechst-33342 dye (HO-33342) into spermatozoa was established at varying pH and temperature. The mass transport diffusion coefficient k(diff) at 41.5 degrees C and pH 6.2 was determined to be 0.0435min(-1) [M sperm/mL](-1) and the energy of activation E(a) associated with the temperature dependency of k(diff) at 14.2kcal/gmoL. The relationship of k(diff) to pH was based mechanistically on the premise that the HO-33342 dye becomes more hydrophobic as the pH becomes more alkaline and therefore facilitates transport. The k(diff) dependency on pH was described mathematically using a form of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation in which the pKa of the HO-33342 dye was 6.6. Using the kinetic parameters, an Excel-based model was developed capable of predicting the time required for the HO-33342 dye to reach any specified level of saturation in the spermatozoa.

  5. MASS TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON THE KINETICS OF NITROBENZENE REDUCTION BY IRON METAL. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the importance of external mass transport on the overall rates of
    contaminant reduction by iron metal (Fe0), we have compared measured
    rates of surface reaction for nitrobenzene (ArNO2) to estimated rates
    of external mass transport...

  6. MASS TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON THE KINETICS OF NITROBENZENE REDUCTION BY IRON METAL. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the importance of external mass transport on the overall rates of
    contaminant reduction by iron metal (Fe0), we have compared measured
    rates of surface reaction for nitrobenzene (ArNO2) to estimated rates
    of external mass transport...

  7. Dynamics, kinetics, and transport properties of the one-dimensional mass-disordered harmonic lattice.

    PubMed

    Likhachev, Vladimir N; Vinogradov, George A; Astakhova, Tatyana Yu; Yakovenko, Andrey E

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we thoroughly investigated the dynamics, kinetics, and the transport properties of the one-dimensional (1D) mass-disordered lattice of harmonic oscillators with the number of particles N < or =5000. The thermostat is simulated by the Langevin sources. Our method is adequate to any 1D lattice with linear equations of motion. Two accurate methods to calculate the temporal behavior of pair correlation functions were developed. The feature of the considered disordered model is an existence of localized states with great relaxation times tau to their stationary states. The exponential growth tau proportional variant exp(N) is observed. A method which allows us to extend the range of computed relaxation times up to tau approximately =(10)300 is suggested. The stationary state is unique. The thermal conduction x has the nonmonotonic character versus N: for the number of particles N < 300 the thermal conduction increases as x proportional variant ln N and reaches the maximal value at N approximately =300. At larger values the decreasing asymptotic is observed: x proportional variant N -alpha, and alpha approximately 0.27. An influence of parameters on the calculated properties was analyzed. Mathematical problems associated with the computation of very large times of establishing the stationary states were extensively studied.

  8. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn Charles

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  9. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  10. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  11. Estimation of transport and degradation parameters for naphthalene and anthracene: influence of mass transfer on kinetics.

    PubMed

    Owabor, Chiedu N; Ogbeide, Samuel E; Susu, Alfred A

    2010-10-01

    The method of temporal moment solutions (MOM) for one-dimensional convective-dispersive solute transport involving linear equilibrium sorption and first-order degradation for time pulse sources has been applied to analyze experimental data from a soil microcosm reactor. Estimation of the pore water velocity V for a nonreactive solute was aided by the use of only the first normalized moment while the dispersion coefficient D, first-order degradation rate constant lambda, and the retardation factor R were estimated using both first and second normalized moments. These transport and degradation parameters were compared to those obtained by a transport model using a nonlinear least square curve-fitting program CXTFIT (version 2.0). Results obtained showed that the MOM fits the breakthrough curve with tailing better than the CXTFIT. The initial estimates of these parameters aided the reduction of the dimensionality of the search process of the non- steady-state model. A residual concentration of 1.12E-5 and 1.48 mg/l for naphthalene and 7.67E-4 and 1.61 mg/l for anthracene, in the axial and radial directions, respectively, suggests the preference of naphthalene during the biodegradation process. The surface concentration as depicted using three-dimensional plots showed that there is occlusion of the aromatics (naphthalene and anthracene) within the soil micropores, thereby limiting their bioavailability and in the long run increasing their toxicity.

  12. Pressure dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction at the platinum microelectrode/nafion interface - Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.; Martin, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen reduction kinetics at the platinum/Nafion interface is of great importance in the advancement of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel-cell technology. This study focuses on the dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics on oxygen pressure. Conventional Tafel analysis of the data shows that the reaction order with respect to oxygen is unity at both high and low current densities. Chronoamperometric measurements of the transport parameters for oxygen in Nafion show that oxygen dissolution follows Henry's isotherm. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen is invariant with pressure; however, the diffusion coefficient for oxygen is lower when air is used as the equilibrating gas as compared to when oxygen is used for equilibration. These results are of value in understanding the influence of O2 partial pressure on the performance of PEM fuel cells and also in elucidating the mechanism of oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface.

  13. A high-fidelity multiphysics model for the new solid oxide iron-air redox battery part I: Bridging mass transport and charge transfer with redox cycle kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, XF; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-04-15

    A high-fidelity two-dimensional axial symmetrical multi-physics model is described in this paper as an effort to simulate the cycle performance of a recently discovered solid oxide metal-air redox battery (SOMARB). The model collectively considers mass transport, charge transfer and chemical redox cycle kinetics occurring across the components of the battery, and is validated by experimental data obtained from independent research. In particular, the redox kinetics at the energy storage unit is well represented by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JIVIAK) and Shrinking Core models. The results explicitly show that the reduction of Fe3O4 during the charging cycle limits the overall performance. Distributions of electrode potential, overpotential, Nernst potential, and H-2/H2O-concentration across various components of the battery are also systematically investigated. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A high-fidelity multiphysics model for the new solid oxide iron-air redox battery. part I: Bridging mass transport and charge transfer with redox cycle kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xinfang; Zhao, Xuan; Huang, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    A high-fidelity two-dimensional axial symmetrical multi-physics model is described in this paper as an effort to simulate the cycle performance of a recently discovered solid oxide metal-air redox battery (SOMARB). The model collectively considers mass transport, charge transfer and chemical redox cycle kinetics occurring across the components of the battery, and is validated by experimental data obtained from independent research. In particular, the redox kinetics at the energy storage unit is well represented by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) and Shrinking Core models. The results explicitly show that the reduction of Fe3O4 during the charging cycle limits the overall performance. Distributions of electrode potential, overpotential, Nernst potential, and H2/H2O-concentration across various components of the battery are also systematically investigated.

  15. Subcontinuum mass transport of hydrocarbons in nanoporous media and long-time kinetics of recovery from unconventional reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-11-01

    In this talk I will discuss the transport of hydrocarbons across nanoporous media and analyze how this transport impacts at larger scales the long-time kinetics of hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs (the so-called shale gas). First I will establish, using molecular simulation and statistical mechanics, that the continuum description - the so-called Darcy law - fails to predict transport within a nanoscale organic matrix. The non-Darcy behavior arises from the strong adsorption of the alkanes in the nanoporous material and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradicts the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length, which can be described theoretically by a scaling law for the permeance. Then I will show that alkane recovery from such nanoporous reservoirs is dynamically retarded due to interfacial effects occuring at the material's interface. This occurs especially in the hydraulic fracking situation in which water is used to open fractures to reach the hydrocarbon reservoirs. Despite the pressure gradient used to trigger desorption, the alkanes remain trapped for long times until water desorbs from the external surface. The free energy barrier can be predicted in terms of an effective contact angle on the composite nanoporous surface. Using a statistical description of the alkane recovery, I will then demonstrate that this retarded dynamics leads to an overall slow - algebraic - decay of the hydrocarbon flux. Such a behavior is consistent with algebraic decays of shale gas flux from various wells reported in the literature. This work was performed in collaboration with B. Coasne, K. Falk, T. Lee, R. Pellenq and F. Ulm, at the UMI CNRS-MIT, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.

  16. Kinetic Transport in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklof, Jens

    2010-03-01

    One of the central challenges in kinetic theory is the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations--describing, for example, the dynamics of an electron gas--from the underlying fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. An iconic mathematical model in this research area is the Lorentz gas, which describes an ensemble of non-interacting point particles in an infinite array of spherical scatterers. In the case of a disordered scatterer configuration, the classical results by Gallavotti, Spohn and Boldrighini-Bunimovich-Sinai show that the time evolution of a macroscopic particle cloud is governed, in the limit of small scatterer density (Boltzmann-Grad limit), by the linear Boltzmann equation. In this lecture I will discuss the recent discovery that for a periodic configuration of scatterers the linear Boltzmann equation fails, and the random flight process that emerges in the Boltzmann-Grad limit is substantially more complicated. The key ingredient in the description of the limiting stochastic process is the renormalization dynamics on the space of lattices, a powerful technique that has recently been successfully applied also to other open problems in mathematical physics, including KAM theory and quantum chaos. This lecture is based on joint work with Andreas Strömbergsson, Uppsala.

  17. Mass Conservation and Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbara, Thomas M.; Corio, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a method for obtaining all mass conservation conditions implied by a given mechanism in which the conditions are used to simplify integration of the rate equations and to derive stoichiometric relations. Discusses possibilities of faulty inference of kinetic information from a given stoichiometry. (CS)

  18. Mass Conservation and Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbara, Thomas M.; Corio, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a method for obtaining all mass conservation conditions implied by a given mechanism in which the conditions are used to simplify integration of the rate equations and to derive stoichiometric relations. Discusses possibilities of faulty inference of kinetic information from a given stoichiometry. (CS)

  19. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  20. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone

  1. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollyky, L.J.; Beary, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Hanford Site to determine the most efficient pH and temperature levels for the destruction of complexants in Hanford high-level defense waste. These complexants enhance migration of radionuclides in the soil and inhibit the growth of crystals in the evaporator-crystallizer. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics tests have been outlined for the determination of critical mass transfer and kinetics parameters of the ozone-complexant reaction.

  2. Cellulose thermal decomposition kinetics: Global mass loss kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, I.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1995-04-01

    The kinetics of cellulose pyrolysis have received considerable attention during the past few decades. Despite intensive study, there remains controversy in the literature even on a topic as basic as the global kinetics of pyrolysis. The reported kinetics have been reconsidered in light of new experimental results that suggest a simple resolution to that part of the controversy concerning the activation energy of pyrolysis. It appears that the reported kinetics are sensitive to the heating rate employed in the experiments used to deduce them. Experiments in which the cellulose is rapidly heated to above 600 K give apparently ``low`` activation energies, mainly between about 140 and 155 kJ/mol, in the case of the material studied here. This applies to both ``isothermal`` and high heating rate temperature-ramp experiments. Alternatively, cellulose heated more slowly to temperatures below 600 K appears to lose mass with an activation energy that is about 218 kJ/mol, The mathematical modeling of processes involving pyrolysis of cellulosic materials (e.g., biomass conversion processes, fire phenomena) can be strongly influenced by which kinetics are assumed, since the kinetic constants from one regime will not accurately predict mass loss in the other.

  3. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  4. Urban Mass Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervine, K. E.

    This bibliography is part of a series of Environmental Resource Packets prepared under a grant from EXXON Education Foundation. The most authoritative and accessible references in the urban transportation field are reviewed. The authors, publisher, point of view, level, and summary are given for each reference. The references are categorized…

  5. Urban Mass Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervine, K. E.

    This bibliography is part of a series of Environmental Resource Packets prepared under a grant from EXXON Education Foundation. The most authoritative and accessible references in the urban transportation field are reviewed. The authors, publisher, point of view, level, and summary are given for each reference. The references are categorized…

  6. Mass transport contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was performed to determine the effects of outgassing and waste dumping on the contamination field around an orbiting spacecraft. The spacecraft was assumed to be spherical in shape with the mass flow emitting uniformly from the spherical surface at a constant rate and in a D'Lambertian spatial distribution. The outflow of gases were assumed to be neutrally charged and of a single species with a molecular weight characteristic of a composite of the actual species involved in the mass flow. The theoretical analysis showed that, for outgassing only, less than 1.5 percent of the outgas products will return to the Skylab spacecraft as a result of intermolecular collisions. When the total mass flow from the spacecraft, including waste dumps and reaction control motor firings, was considered, it was estimated that about 30 percent will return to the spacecraft.

  7. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  8. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  9. Ion kinetic transport in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, J. L.; Tarancon, A.; Castejon, F.; Fernandez, L. A.; Martin-Mayor, V.

    2008-11-02

    The ion Drift Kinetic Equation (DKE) which describes the ion collisional transport is solved for the TJ-II device plasmas. This non-linear equation is computed by performing a mean field iterative calculation. In each step of the calculation, a Fokker-Planck equation is solved by means of the Langevin approach: one million particles are followed in a realistic TJ-II magnetic configuration, taking into account collisions and electric field. This allows to avoid the assumptions made in the usual neoclassical approach, namely considering radially narrow particle trajectories, diffusive transport, energy conservation and infinite parallel transport. As a consequence, global features of transport, not present in the customary neoclassical models, appear: non-diffusive transport and asymmetries on the magnetic surfaces.

  10. Modelling reactive CAH transport using batch experiment degradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Haest, Pieter J; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2010-05-01

    Models describing transport of degradable organic substances in a porous medium require parameters of the biodegradation kinetics that can be obtained from batch degradation assays. It is rarely assessed if liquid batch biodegradation rates allow extrapolation to reactive transport in a porous medium, i.e. if the cell specific activity in a porous medium with flow-through is identical to that of pelagic cells in liquid cultures. Failure of model predictions can be used to identify the rate-limiting processes in the reactive transport. Column data of anaerobic trichloroethene (TCE) transport and degradation at three flow rates were predicted with a model using biodegradation kinetics derived from a liquid culture. The extent of dechlorination at the column outlet was very well predicted within a factor 1.4 if the specific microbial biomass in the columns was used as an input parameter. This suggests that potential mass transfer limitations in biofilms or differences in microbial ecology between batch and column had minor effects on dechlorination. The model was subsequently extended with Monod kinetics to predict both biomass growth and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon (CAH) degradation in the columns using liquid batch data. These models largely overestimated CAH dechlorination unless microbial transport with cell elution was included and unless a slight batch to column adjustment was made to better predict microbial biomass. With 4 adjustable parameters the model succeeded in predicting the microbial numbers within a factor 4.3 and the extent of dechlorination within a factor 1.2. Our analysis validates the batch to column extrapolation for this dedicated set-up provided that the microbial biomass in columns is well predicted. The sensitivity analysis shows that the extent of dechlorination in the reactive transport is most sensitive to the parameters of TCE degradation kinetics, including microbial growth followed by the residence time. Copyright (c) 2010

  11. Drift-Kinetic Simulations of Neoclassical Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2008-11-01

    We present results from numerical studies of neoclassical transport for multi-species plasmas. The code, NEO, provides a first-principles based calculation of the neoclassical transport coefficients directly from solution of the distribution function by solving a hierarchy of equations derived by expanding the fundamental drift-kinetic equation in powers of {rho}{sub *i}, the ratio of the ion gyroradius to system size. It extends previous studies by including the self-consistent coupling of electrons and multiple ion species and strong toroidal rotation effects. Systematic calculations of the second-order particle and energy fluxes and first-order plasma flows and bootstrap current and comparisons with existing theories are given for multi-species plasmas. The ambipolar relation {sigma}{sub a}z{sub a}{gamma}{sub a} = 0, which can only be maintained with complete cross-species collisional coupling, is confirmed. The effects of plasma shaping are also explored.

  12. Evaluation of the influence of methane and copper concentration and methane mass transport on the community structure and biodegradation kinetics of methanotrophic cultures.

    PubMed

    Cantera, Sara; Lebrero, Raquel; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl

    2016-04-15

    The environmental conditions during culture enrichment, which ultimately determine its maximum specific biodegradation rate (qmax) and affinity for the target pollutant (Ks), play a key role in the performance of bioreactors devoted to the treatment of methane emissions. This study assessed the influence of Cu(2+) and CH4 concentration and the effective CH4 supply rate during culture enrichment on the structure and biodegradation kinetics of methanotrophic communities. The results obtained demonstrated that an increase in Cu(2+) concentration from 0.05 to 25 μM increased the qmax and Ks of the communities enriched by a factor of ≈ 3, even if the Cu(2+) concentration did not seem to have an effect on the enzymatic "copper switch" and only pMMO was detected. In addition, high Cu(2+) concentrations supported lower diversity coefficients (Hs ≈ 1.5× lower) and apparently promoted the growth of more adapted methanotrophs such as Methylomonas. Despite no clear effect of CH4 concentration on the population structure or on the biodegradation kinetics of the communities enriched was recorded at the two low CH4 concentrations studied (1 and 8%), a higher agitation rate increased the qmax by a factor of ≈ 2.3 and Ks by a factor of ≈ 3.1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accounting for Mass Transfer Kinetics when Modeling the Impact of Low Permeability Layers in a Groundwater Source Zone on Dissolved Contaminant Fate and Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    disposal of chlorinated solvents like TCE have produced numerous DNAPL-contaminated sites that contribute to long term contamination of groundwater...Contaminant Fate and Transport 1. Introduction 1.1 Background Chlorinated solvents, like tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), have...groundwater contamination. Prior to the institution and enforcement of proper disposal methods, chlorinated solvents were dumped into unlined waste

  14. Diffuse mass transport in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, F. G.

    1981-08-01

    Variational methods are used to investigate the problems of diffusive mass transport in a porous medium. Calculations of the effective diffusivities are performed for a model pore structure generated by randomly placed, freely overlapping solid spheres all of the same radius. Effects of the tortuosity of the diffusion paths are considered. Numerical evaluations are used to test some approximate engineering models. For gaseous transition region diffusion the mean free path kinetic theory is used to derive a variational upper bound on the effective transition region diffusivity. For the simultaneous liquid or gas phase Fickian bulk diffusion in the void and Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface, an analytical expression for effective diffusion coefficient is obtained and compared with the usual engineering model of parallel surface and void diffusion. The simultaneous gaseous transition region diffusion in the void and the Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface are examined numerically.

  15. Direct Internal Reformation and Mass Transport in the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode: A Pore-Scale Lattice Boltzmann Study with Detailed Reaction Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Grew, Kyle N.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Chiu, W. K. S.

    2010-11-30

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) allows the conversion of chemical energy that is stored in a given fuel, including light hydrocarbons, to electrical power. Hydrocarbon fuels, such as methane, are logistically favourable and provide high energy densities. However, the use of these fuels often results in a decreased efficiency and life. An improved understanding of the reactive flow in the SOFC anode can help address these issues. In this study, the transport and heterogeneous internal reformation of a methane based fuel is addressed. The effect of the SOFC anode's complex structure on transport and reactions is shown to exhibit a complicated interplay between the local molar concentrations and the anode structure. Strong coupling between the phenomenological microstructures and local reformation reaction rates are recognised in this study, suggesting the extension to actual microstructures may provide new insights into the reformation processes.

  16. Transport direction determines the kinetics of substrate transport by the glutamate transporter EAAC1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhou; Tao, Zhen; Gameiro, Armanda; Barcelona, Stephanie; Braams, Simona; Rauen, Thomas; Grewer, Christof

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate transport by the excitatory amino acid carrier EAAC1 is known to be reversible. Thus, glutamate can either be taken up into cells, or it can be released from cells through reverse transport, depending on the electrochemical gradient of the co- and countertransported ions. However, it is unknown how fast and by which reverse transport mechanism glutamate can be released from cells. Here, we determined the steady- and pre-steady-state kinetics of reverse glutamate transport with submillisecond time resolution. First, our results suggest that glutamate and Na+ dissociate from their cytoplasmic binding sites sequentially, with glutamate dissociating first, followed by the three cotransported Na+ ions. Second, the kinetics of glutamate transport depend strongly on transport direction, with reverse transport being faster but less voltage-dependent than forward transport. Third, electrogenicity is distributed over several reverse transport steps, including intracellular Na+ binding, reverse translocation, and reverse relocation of the K+-bound EAAC1. We propose a kinetic model, which is based on a “first-in-first-out” mechanism, suggesting that glutamate association, with its extracellular binding site as well as dissociation from its intracellular binding site, precedes association and dissociation of at least one Na+ ion. Our model can be used to predict rates of glutamate release from neurons under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:17991780

  17. Kinetics and mass-transfer phenomena in anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, G; Seghezzo, L; Lettinga, G; Kleerebezem, R

    2001-04-20

    The kinetic properties of acetate-degrading methanogenic granular sludge of different mean diameters were assessed at different up-flow velocities (V(up)). Using this approach, the influence of internal and external mass transfer could be estimated. First, the apparent Monod constant (K(S)) for each data set was calculated by means of a curve-fitting procedure. The experimental results revealed that variations in the V(up) did not affect the apparent K(S)-value, indicating that external mass-transport resistance normally can be neglected. With regard to the granule size, a clear increase in K(S) was found at increasing granule diameters. The experimental data were further used to validate a dynamic mathematical biofilm model. The biofilm model was able to describe reaction-diffusion kinetics in anaerobic granules, using a single value for the effective diffusion coefficient in the granules. This suggests that biogas formation did not influence the diffusion-rates in the granular biomass. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Kinetics and transport at AMTEC electrodes. I - The interfacial impedance model. [alkali metal thermoelectric converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Loveland, M. E.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M. L.; Bankston, C. P.; Leduc, H.; Kummer, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    Mixed mass-transport and kinetic control of sodium ion reduction at porous inert electrodes on sodium beta-double-prime alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic in a high-temperature electrochemical cell has been observed and modeled. The high ionic conductivity of BASE and the reversibility of the liquid sodium/BASE anodic half-cell led to assignment of potential-dependent (nonohmic) resistances to kinetic and mass-transport processes associated with the porous electrode. The morphology of these electrodes and typical sodium gas pressures are consistent with Knudsen, or free-molecular, flow through the electrode.

  19. The security of mass transport ticketing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sel, Marc; Seys, Stefaan; Verheul, Eric

    Mass transport ticketing systems in most developed countries are making a rapid transition from ‘traditional’ paper or carton-based ticketing systems towards a contactless ‘smart card‘ based approach. This article discusses the main IT security aspects of mass transport ticketing systems (metro, bus, etc).

  20. Unstirred Water Layers and the Kinetics of Organic Cation Transport

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Takahiro; Morales, Mark; Zhang, Xiaohong; Martinez, Lucy; Berteloot, Alfred; Secomb, Timothy W.; Wright, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Unstirred water layers (UWLs) present an unavoidable complication in the measurement of transport kinetics in cultured cells and the high rates of transport achieved by overexpressing heterologous transporters exacerbate the UWL effect. This study examined the correlation between measured Jmax and Kt values and the effect of manipulating UWL thickness or transport Jmax on the accuracy of experimentally determined kinetics of the multidrug transporters, OCT2 and MATE1. Methods Transport of TEA and MPP was measured in CHO cells that stably expressed human OCT2 or MATE1. UWL thickness was manipulated by vigorous reciprocal shaking. Several methods were used to manipulate maximal transport rates. Results Vigorous stirring stimulated uptake of OCT2-mediated transport by decreasing apparent Kt (Ktapp) values. Systematic reduction in transport rates was correlated with reduction in Ktapp values. The slope of these relationships indicated a 1500 µm UWL in multiwell plates. Reducing the influence of UWLs (by decreasing either their thickness or the Jmax of substrate transport) reduced Ktapp by 2-fold to >10-fold. Conclusions Failure to take into account the presence of UWLs in experiments using cultured cells to measure transport kinetics can result in significant underestimates of the affinity of multidrug transporters for substrates. PMID:25791216

  1. Reactive Gas transport in soil: Kinetics versus Local Equilibrium Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Jia, Ruijan

    2010-05-01

    Gas transport through the unsaturated soil zone was studied using an analytical solution of the gas transport model that is mathematically equivalent to the Two-Region model. The gas transport model includes diffusive and convective gas fluxes, interphase mass transfer between the gas and water phase, and biodegradation. The influence of non-equilibrium phenomena, spatially variable initial conditions, and transient boundary conditions are studied. The objective of this paper is to compare the kinetic approach for interphase mass transfer with the standard local equilibrium approach and to find conditions and time-scales under which the local equilibrium approach is justified. The time-scale of investigation was limited to the day-scale, because this is the relevant scale for understanding gas emission from the soil zone with transient water saturation. For the first time a generalized mass transfer coefficient is proposed that justifies the often used steady-state Thin-Film mass transfer coefficient for small and medium water-saturated aggregates of about 10 mm. The main conclusion from this study is that non-equilibrium mass transfer depends strongly on the temporal and small-scale spatial distribution of water within the unsaturated soil zone. For regions with low water saturation and small water-saturated aggregates (radius about 1 mm) the local equilibrium approach can be used as a first approximation for diffusive gas transport. For higher water saturation and medium radii of water-saturated aggregates (radius about 10 mm) and for convective gas transport, the non-equilibrium effect becomes more and more important if the hydraulic residence time and the Damköhler number decrease. Relative errors can range up to 100% and more. While for medium radii the local equilibrium approach describes the main features both of the spatial concentration profile and the time-dependence of the emission rate, it fails completely for larger aggregates (radius about 100 mm

  2. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  3. Determinants of cation transport selectivity: Equilibrium binding and transport kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of channels and transporters reveal the chemical nature of ion-binding sites and, thereby, constrain mechanistic models for their transport processes. However, these structures, in and of themselves, do not reveal equilibrium selectivity or transport preferences, which can be discerned only from various functional assays. In this Review, I explore the relationship between cation transport protein structures, equilibrium binding measurements, and ion transport selectivity. The primary focus is on K+-selective channels and nonselective cation channels because they have been extensively studied both functionally and structurally, but the principles discussed are relevant to other transport proteins and molecules. PMID:26078056

  4. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-10-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms.

  5. Kinetic simulation of boundary plasma transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, W. M.; Bringa, E.; Cohen, B. I.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M.; Gilmer, G.; Kubota, A.; Hittinger, J.; Kerbel, G.; Mundy, C.; Rognlien, T. D.; Xu, X. Q.; Verboncoeur, J.

    2004-11-01

    Kinetic effects are important in the boundary plasma because the mean-free-path is often larger than the connection length, while the radial width of trapped particle orbits is similar in width to the H-mode pedestal. We are developing a hydrogen and electron continuum gyro-kinetic model of the boundary plasma over a region extending from inside the H-mode pedestal across the separatrix to the divertor plates in three stages: 1) a 3-D code in (θ, ɛ, μ) which will model parallel advection and collisions, 2) a 4-D code in (ψ, θ, ɛ, μ) which will include edge neoclassical effects, and 3) a 5-D code in (ψ, θ, ζ, ɛ, μ) which will include edge turbulence. The effort includes impurity modeling to predict radiation losses; data structures defined on disjoint unions of logically-rectangular blocks suitable for magnetic coordinates in a separatrix geometry; and a PYTHON-based user interface.

  6. Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, tides, hydrological water redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. With only a few exceptions on the Earth surface, the temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have the capability of monitoring certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. These techniques include the very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging and Doppler tracking, and the Global Positioning System, all entail global observational networks. While considerable advances have been made in observing and understanding of the dynamics of Earth's rotation, only the lowest-degree gravitational variations have been observed and limited knowledge of geocenter motion obtained. New space missions, projects and initiatives promise to further improve the measurements and hence our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding and modeling capability of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as the solid Earth's response to such changes in constraining the modeling of Earth's mechanical properties.

  7. Reciprocal Phosphorylation and Palmitoylation Control Dopamine Transporter Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Amy E.; Rastedt, Danielle E.; Stanislowski, Daniel J.; Shetty, Madhur; Smith, Margaret A.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Foster, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a neuronal protein that drives the presynaptic reuptake of dopamine (DA) and is the major determinant of transmitter availability in the brain. Dopamine transporter function is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and other signaling pathways through mechanisms that are complex and poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of Ser-7 phosphorylation and Cys-580 palmitoylation in mediating steady-state transport kinetics and PKC-stimulated transport down-regulation. Using both mutational and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that these post-translational modifications are reciprocally regulated, leading to transporter populations that display high phosphorylation-low palmitoylation or low phosphorylation-high palmitoylation. The balance between the modifications dictates transport capacity, as conditions that promote high phosphorylation or low palmitoylation reduce transport Vmax and enhance PKC-stimulated down-regulation, whereas conditions that promote low phosphorylation or high palmitoylation increase transport Vmax and suppress PKC-stimulated down-regulation. Transitions between these functional states occur when endocytosis is blocked or undetectable, indicating that the modifications kinetically regulate the velocity of surface transporters. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for control of DA reuptake that may represent a point of dysregulation in DA imbalance disorders. PMID:26424792

  8. Mass spectrometry imaging for in situ kinetic histochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Katherine B.; Bowen, Benjamin P.; McAlhany, Stephanie; Huang, Yurong; Price, John C.; Mao, Jian-hua; Hellerstein, Marc; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Tissues are composed of diverse cell subpopulations each with distinct metabolic characteristics that influence overall behavior. Unfortunately, traditional histopathology imaging techniques are ‘blind’ to the spatially ordered metabolic dynamics within tissue. While mass spectrometry imaging enables spatial mapping of molecular composition, resulting images are only a static snapshot in time of molecules involved in highly dynamic processes; kinetic information of flux through metabolic pathways is lacking. To address this limitation, we developed kinetic mass spectrometry imaging (kMSI), a novel technique integrating soft desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with clinically accepted in vivo metabolic labeling of tissue with deuterium to generate images of kinetic information of biological processes. Applied to a tumor, kMSI revealed heterogeneous spatial distributions of newly synthesized versus pre-existing lipids, with altered lipid synthesis patterns distinguishing region-specific intratumor subpopulations. Images also enabled identification and correlation of metabolic activity of specific lipids found in tumor regions of varying grade. PMID:23584513

  9. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  10. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  11. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  12. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations.

  13. Texture Mapping via Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the “earth-mover’s metric”). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  14. Impact of kinetic mass transfer on free convection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Shi, Liangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Xie, Yueqing; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate kinetic mass transfer effects on unstable density-driven flow and transport processes by numerical simulations of a modified Elder problem. The first-order dual-domain mass transfer model coupled with a variable-density-flow model is employed to describe transport behavior in porous media. Results show that in comparison to the no-mass-transfer case, a higher degree of instability and more unstable system is developed in the mass transfer case due to the reduced effective porosity and correspondingly a larger Rayleigh number (assuming permeability is independent on the mobile porosity). Given a constant total porosity, the magnitude of capacity ratio (i.e., immobile porosity/mobile porosity) controls the macroscopic plume profile in the mobile domain, while the magnitude of mass transfer timescale (i.e., the reciprocal of the mass transfer rate coefficient) dominates its evolution rate. The magnitude of capacity ratio plays an important role on the mechanism driving the mass flux into the aquifer system. Specifically, for a small capacity ratio, solute loading is dominated by the density-driven transport, while with increasing capacity ratio local mass transfer dominated solute loading may occur at later times. At significantly large times, however, both mechanisms contribute comparably to solute loading. Sherwood Number could be a nonmonotonic function of mass transfer timescale due to complicated interactions of solute between source zone, mobile zone and immobile zone in the top boundary layer, resulting in accordingly a similar behavior of the total mass. The initial assessment provides important insights into unstable density-driven flow and transport in the presence of kinetic mass transfer.

  15. Radiotracers for Cardiac Sympathetic Innervation: Transport Kinetics and Binding Affinities for the Human Norepinephrine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, David M.; Chen, Wei; Jung, Yong-Woon; Jang, Keun Sam; Gu, Guie; Cozzi, Nicholas V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Most radiotracers for imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation are substrates of the norepinephrine transporter (NET). The goal of this study was to characterize the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of several sympathetic nerve radiotracers, including [11C]-(−)-meta-hydroxyephedrine, [11C]-(−)-epinephrine, and a series of [11C]-labeled phenethylguanidines under development in our laboratory. For comparison, the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of some [3H]-labeled biogenic amines were also determined. Methods Transport kinetics studies were performed using rat C6 glioma cells stably transfected with the human norepinephrine transporter (C6-hNET cells). For each radiolabeled NET substrate, saturation transport assays with C6-hNET cells measured the Michaelis-Menten transport constants Km and Vmax for NET transport. Competitive inhibition binding assays with homogenized C6-hNET cells and [3H]mazindol provided estimates of binding affinities (KI) for NET. Results Km, Vmax and KI values were determined for each NET substrate with a high degree of reproducibility. Interestingly, C6-hNET transport rates for ‘tracer concentrations’ of substrate, given by the ratio Vmax/Km, were found to be highly correlated with neuronal transport rates measured previously in isolated rat hearts (r2 = 0.96). This suggests that the transport constants Km and Vmax measured using the C6-hNET cells accurately reflect in vivo transport kinetics. Conclusion The results of these studies show how structural changes in NET substrates influence NET binding and transport constants, providing valuable insights that can be used in the design of new tracers with more optimal kinetics for quantifying regional sympathetic nerve density. PMID:23306137

  16. Kinetic theory of transport in a hard sphere crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, T. R.; Das, Shankar P.; Ernst, M. H.; Piasecki, J.

    1990-03-01

    The revised Enskog kinetic theory (RET) is used to describe transport in a hard sphere crystal. The connection between the RET and the exact density functional theory (DFT) description of the solid state is established. The RET is used to derive the dissipative linear equations of elasticity. The elastic moduli in these equations are identical to those obtained from equilibrium like DFT. The expressions for the solid state transport coefficients (determining sound absorption and heat conduction in the hard sphere crystal) are new. As for the analogous calculation in the liquid state, the transport coefficients are determined by the (solid state) equilibrium two-particle distribution function at contact.

  17. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Roback, R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of axial and swirling coaxial jets is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently employed in a variety of computational procedures used throughout the propulsion community. Effort was directed toward the acquisition of length scale and dissipation rate data that will provide more accurate inlet boundary conditions for the computational procedures and a data base to evaluate the turbulent transport models in the near jet region where recirculation does not occur. Mass and momentum turbulent transport data with a blunt inner-jet inlet configuration will also be acquired.

  18. Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Bo

    2014-07-18

    Oceanic transports of heat, salt, fresh water, dissolved CO2, and other tracers regulate global climate change and the distribution of natural marine resources. The time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely by migrating mesoscale eddies. By combining available satellite altimetry and Argo profiling float data, we showed that the eddy-induced zonal mass transport can reach a total meridionally integrated value of up to 30 to 40 sverdrups (Sv) (1 Sv = 10(6) cubic meters per second), and it occurs mainly in subtropical regions, where the background flows are weak. This transport is comparable in magnitude to that of the large-scale wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Mass, Momentum and Kinetic Energy of a Relativistic Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanchini, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous definition of mass in special relativity, proposed in a recent paper, is recalled and employed to obtain simple and rigorous deductions of the expressions of momentum and kinetic energy for a relativistic particle. The whole logical framework appears as the natural extension of the classical one. Only the first, second and third laws of…

  20. Mass, Momentum and Kinetic Energy of a Relativistic Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanchini, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous definition of mass in special relativity, proposed in a recent paper, is recalled and employed to obtain simple and rigorous deductions of the expressions of momentum and kinetic energy for a relativistic particle. The whole logical framework appears as the natural extension of the classical one. Only the first, second and third laws of…

  1. Transport phenomena of crystal growth—heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Selected fundamentals of transport processes and their importance for crystal growth are given. First, principal parameters and equations of heat and mass transfer, like thermal flux, radiation and diffusion are introduced. The heat- and mass- balanced melt-solid and solution-solid interface velocities are derived, respectively. The today's significance of global numeric simulation for analysis of thermo-mechanical stress and related dislocation dynamics within the growing crystal is shown. The relation between diffusion and kinetic regime is discussed. Then, thermal and solutal buoyancy-driven and Marangoni convections are introduced. Their important interplay with the diffusion boundary layer, component and particle incorporation as well as morphological interface stability is demonstrated. Non-steady crystallization phenomena (striations) caused by convective fluctuations are considered. Selected results of global 3D numeric modeling are shown. Finally, advanced methods to control heat and mass transfer by external forces, such as accelerated container rotation, ultrasonic vibration and magnetic fields are discussed.

  2. A Kinetic and Mass Transfer Model for Glycerol Hydrogenolysis in a Trickle-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Yaoyan; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, John G.; Oberg, Aaron A.; Jackson, James E.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2010-11-15

    A detailed model of glycerol hydrogenolysis in a trickle-bed reactor is presented that includes a mechanistically based kinetic rate expression, energy transport, mass transport across the gas-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces, intraparticle catalyst mass transfer, and partial wetting of the bed. Optimal kinetic parameters for the glycerol hydrogenolysis rate expression were determined via nonlinear regression analysis on the basis of experiments conducted in a laboratory-scale trickle-bed reactor over a broad range of operating conditions. Model predictions agree well with experimental data and accurately predict trends in reactor performance with liquid flow rate, temperature, hydrogen pressure, and base promoter concentration. The model is thus a useful tool for predicting laboratory reactor performance and for design of commercial-scale trickle-bed systems.

  3. Efficient mass transport by optical advection

    PubMed Central

    Kajorndejnukul, Veerachart; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2015-01-01

    Advection is critical for efficient mass transport. For instance, bare diffusion cannot explain the spatial and temporal scales of some of the cellular processes. The regulation of intracellular functions is strongly influenced by the transport of mass at low Reynolds numbers where viscous drag dominates inertia. Mimicking the efficacy and specificity of the cellular machinery has been a long time pursuit and, due to inherent flexibility, optical manipulation is of particular interest. However, optical forces are relatively small and cannot significantly modify diffusion properties. Here we show that the effectiveness of microparticle transport can be dramatically enhanced by recycling the optical energy through an effective optical advection process. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this new advection mechanism permits an efficient control of collective and directional mass transport in colloidal systems. The cooperative long-range interaction between large numbers of particles can be optically manipulated to create complex flow patterns, enabling efficient and tunable transport in microfluidic lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:26440069

  4. A Note on Diffusive Mass Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Henry W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Current chemical engineering textbooks teach that the driving force for diffusive mass transport in ideal solutions is the gradient in mole fraction. This is only true for ideal solution liquids. Therefore, it is shown that the appropriate driving force for use with ideal gases is the gradient in partial pressure. (JN)

  5. Satellite measurements of aerosol mass and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, R. S.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Mahoney, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The aerosol optical thickness over land is derived from satellite measurements of the radiance of scattered sunlight. These data are used to estimate the columnar mass density of particulate sulfur on a day with a large amount of sulfur. The horizontal transport of the particulate sulfur is calculated using wind vectors measured with rawins.

  6. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2013-03-15

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  7. Kinetic neoclassical transport in the H-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B. A.

    2014-07-16

    Multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport through the QH-mode pedestal and scrapeoff layer on DIII-D is calculated using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. We achieved quantitative agreement between the fluxdriven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. Furthermore, we computed the radial electric field (Er) that maintains ambipolar transport across flux surfaces and to the wall self-consistently on closed and open magnetic field lines, and is in excellent agreement with experiment. The Er inside the separatrix is the unique solution that balances the outward flux of thermal tail deuterium ions against the outward neoclassical electron flux and inward pinch of impurity and colder deuterium ions. Particle transport in the pedestal is primarily due to anomalous transport, while the ion heat and momentum transport is primarily due to the neoclassical transport. The full-f treatment quantifies the non-Maxwellian energy distributions that describe a number of experimental observations in low-collisionallity pedestals on DIII-D, including intrinsic co-Ip parallel flows in the pedestal, ion temperature anisotropy and large impurity temperatures in the scrape-off layer.

  8. Kinetic neoclassical transport in the H-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Grassie, J. S. de

    2014-07-15

    Multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport through the QH-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D is calculated using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density, and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. The radial electric field (E{sub r}) that maintains ambipolar transport across flux surfaces and to the wall is computed self-consistently on closed and open magnetic field lines and is in excellent agreement with experiment. The E{sub r} inside the separatrix is the unique solution that balances the outward flux of thermal tail deuterium ions against the outward neoclassical electron flux and inward pinch of impurity and colder deuterium ions. Particle transport in the pedestal is primarily due to anomalous transport, while the ion heat and momentum transport are primarily due to the neoclassical transport. The full-f treatment quantifies the non-Maxwellian energy distributions that describe a number of experimental observations in low-collisionallity pedestals on DIII-D, including intrinsic co-I{sub p} parallel flows in the pedestal, ion temperature anisotropy, and large impurity temperatures in the scrape-off layer.

  9. Kinetic neoclassical transport in the H-mode pedestal

    DOE PAGES

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; ...

    2014-07-16

    Multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport through the QH-mode pedestal and scrapeoff layer on DIII-D is calculated using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. We achieved quantitative agreement between the fluxdriven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. Furthermore, we computed the radial electric field (Er) that maintains ambipolar transport across flux surfaces and to the wall self-consistently on closed and open magnetic field lines, and is in excellent agreement with experiment. The Ermore » inside the separatrix is the unique solution that balances the outward flux of thermal tail deuterium ions against the outward neoclassical electron flux and inward pinch of impurity and colder deuterium ions. Particle transport in the pedestal is primarily due to anomalous transport, while the ion heat and momentum transport is primarily due to the neoclassical transport. The full-f treatment quantifies the non-Maxwellian energy distributions that describe a number of experimental observations in low-collisionallity pedestals on DIII-D, including intrinsic co-Ip parallel flows in the pedestal, ion temperature anisotropy and large impurity temperatures in the scrape-off layer.« less

  10. Kinetic model of mass exchange with dynamic Arrhenius transition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Muradova, Aliki

    2016-02-01

    We study a nonlinear kinetic model of mass exchange between interacting grains. The transition rates follow the Arrhenius equation with an activation energy that depends dynamically on the grain mass. We show that the activation parameter can be absorbed in the initial conditions for the grain masses, and that the total mass is conserved. We obtain numerical solutions of the coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations of mass exchange for the two-grain system, and we compare them with approximate theoretical solutions in specific neighborhoods of the phase space. Using phase plane methods, we determine that the system exhibits regimes of diffusive and growth-decay (reverse diffusion) kinetics. The equilibrium states are determined by the mass equipartition and separation nullcline curves. If the transfer rates are perturbed by white noise, numerical simulations show that the system maintains the diffusive and growth-decay regimes; however, the noise can reverse the sign of equilibrium mass difference. Finally, we present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of a system with many interacting grains. Diffusive and growth-decay regimes are established as well, but the approach to equilibrium is considerably slower. Potential applications of the mass exchange model involve coarse-graining during sintering and wealth exchange in econophysics.

  11. Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin; Sun, Yu; Riva, Ricardo; Ran, Jiangjun

    2013-04-01

    Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has enormously extended our knowledge of the Earth's system by allowing natural mass transport of various origin to be quantified. This concerns, in particular, the depletion and replenishment of continental water stocks; shrinking of polar ice sheets; deformation of the Earth's crust triggered by large earthquakes, and isostatic adjustment processes. A number of research centers compute models of temporal gravity field variations and mass transport, using GRACE data as input. One of such models - Delft Mass Transport model - is being produced at the Delft University of Technology in collaboration with the GNSS Research Center of Wuhan University. A new release of this model, DMT-2, has been produced on the basis of a new (second) release of GRACE level-1b data. This model consists of a time-series of monthly solutions spanning a time interval of more than 8 years, starting from Feb. 2003. Each solution consists of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 120. Both unconstrained and optimally filtered solutions are obtained. The most essential improvements of the DMT-2 model, as compared to its predecessors (DMT-1 and DMT-1b), are as follows: (i) improved estimation and elimination of low-frequency noise in GRACE data, so that strong mass transport signals are not damped; (ii) computation of accurate stochastic models of data noise for each month individually with a subsequent application of frequency-dependent data weighting, which allows statistically optimal solutions to be compiled even if data noise is colored and gradually changes in time; (iii) optimized estimation of accelerometer calibration parameters; (iv) incorporation of degree 1 coefficients estimated with independent techniques; (v) usage of state-of-the-art background models to de-alias GRACE data from rapid mass transport signals (this includes the EOT11a model of ocean tides and the latest release of the AOD1B product describing

  12. Enzymatically driven transport: a kinetic theory for nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghyun; Elbaum, M

    2013-11-05

    Nuclear import and export are often considered inverse processes whereby transport receptors ferry protein cargo through the nuclear pore. In contrast to import, where the reversible binding of receptor to nuclear RanGTP leads to a balanced bidirectional exchange, termination of export by physiologically irreversible hydrolysis of the Ran-bound GTP leads to unidirectional transport. We present a concise mathematical model that predicts protein distributions and kinetic rates for receptor-mediated nuclear export, which further exhibit an unexpected pseudolinear relation one to the other. Predictions of the model are verified with permeabilized and live cell measurements. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxygen Mass Transport in Stented Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Eoin A; Dunne, Adrian S; Martin, David M; Boyle, Fergal J

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen deficiency, known as hypoxia, in arterial walls has been linked to increased intimal hyperplasia, which is the main adverse biological process causing in-stent restenosis. Stent implantation has significant effects on the oxygen transport into the arterial wall. Elucidating these effects is critical to optimizing future stent designs. In this study the most advanced oxygen transport model developed to date was assessed in two test cases and used to compare three coronary stent designs. Additionally, the predicted results from four simplified blood oxygen transport models are compared in the two test cases. The advanced model showed good agreement with experimental measurements within the mass-transfer boundary layer and at the luminal surface; however, more work is needed in predicting the oxygen transport within the arterial wall. Simplifying the oxygen transport model within the blood flow produces significant errors in predicting the oxygen transport in arteries. This study can be used as a guide for all future numerical studies in this area and the advanced model could provide a powerful tool in aiding design of stents and other cardiovascular devices.

  14. Photoinduced mass transport in azo compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klismeta, K.; Teteris, J.; Aleksejeva, J.

    2013-12-01

    The photoinduced changes of optical properties in azobenzene containing compound thin films were studied under influence of polarized and non-polarized 532 nm laser light. Under influence of light azo compounds experience trans-cis isomerisation process, that can be observed in the absorbance spectrum of the sample. If the light is linearly polarized, molecules align perpendicularly to the electric field vector and as a result photoinduced dichroism and birefringence is obtained. If a known lateral polarization modulation of the light beam is present, mass transport of the azobenzene containing compound occurs. By measuring the surface relief with a profilometer the direction of mass transport can be determined. The studies of this work show that direct holographic recording of surface relief gratings can be used in optoelectronics, telecommunications and data storage.

  15. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Hankel, Marlies; Zhang, Hong; Nguyen, Thanh X; Bhatia, Suresh K; Gray, Stephen K; Smith, Sean C

    2011-05-07

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H(2)/D(2) and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D(2) transport is dramatically favored over H(2). However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients-implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H(2)/D(2) in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage through the pore mouth, is also

  16. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, M.; Zhang, H.; Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Gray, S. K.; Smith, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D{sub 2} transport is dramatically favored over H{sub 2}. However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients - implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage

  17. Modeling transportation of efavirenz: inference on possibility of mixed modes of transportation and kinetic solubility.

    PubMed

    Nemaura, Tafireyi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding drug transportation mechanisms in the human body is of paramount importance in modeling Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic relationships. This work gives a novel general model of efavirenz transportation projections based on concentrations simulated from patients on a dose of 600 mg. The work puts forward a proposition that transportation can wholly be modeled by concentration and time in a uniform volumetric space. Furthermore, movement entities are used to inform the state of "kinetic solubility" of a solution. There is use of Ricker's model, and forms of the Hill's equation in modeling transportation. Characterization on the movement rates of solution particle are suggested in relation to advection rate of solution particle. At turning points on the transportation rate of solution particle vs. concentration curve, a suggestion of possibly change of dominance in the mode of transportation and saturation is made. There are four movement rates postulated at primary micro-level transportation, that are attributed to convection, diffusion [passive transportation (EI )] and energy dependent system transportation (ED ) in relation to advection. Furthermore, a new parameter is introduced which is defined as an advection rate constant of solution particle. It is postulated to be dependent on two rate constants of solution particle, that is a convection rate constant of solution particle and a saturable transportation rate constant of solution particle. At secondary micro-level transportation, the results show convection as sum of advection and saturable transportation. The kinetics of dissolution of efavirenz in the solution space is postulated. Relatively, a good level of kinetics of dissolution is projected in the concentration region 0 - 32.82 μg/ml.

  18. Kinetic Studies of Reactions in Solution Using Fast Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-13

    of Reactions in Solution Using Fast Mass Spectrometry Sb. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0235 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd . PROJECT...salt and detergent in electrokinetic separations using a spinning disk. We also applied this technique, we believe with great success, to study...chromatography to MS Salts and detergents used in the mobile phase for electro- kinetic separations suppress ionization efficiencies and con

  19. Kinetics of MDR Transport in Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koshkin, Vasilij; Yang, Burton B.; Krylov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) driven by ABC (ATP binding cassette) membrane transporters is one of the major causes of treatment failure in human malignancy. MDR capacity is thought to be unevenly distributed among tumor cells, with higher capacity residing in tumor-initiating cells (TIC) (though opposite finding are occasionally reported). Functional evidence for enhanced MDR of TICs was previously provided using a “side population” assay. This assay estimates MDR capacity by a single parameter - cell’s ability to retain fluorescent MDR substrate, so that cells with high MDR capacity (“side population”) demonstrate low substrate retention. In the present work MDR in TICs was investigated in greater detail using a kinetic approach, which monitors MDR efflux from single cells. Analysis of kinetic traces obtained allowed for the estimation of both the velocity (Vmax) and affinity (KM) of MDR transport in single cells. In this way it was shown that activation of MDR in TICs occurs in two ways: through the increase of Vmax in one fraction of cells, and through decrease of KM in another fraction. In addition, kinetic data showed that heterogeneity of MDR parameters in TICs significantly exceeds that of bulk cells. Potential consequences of these findings for chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:24223908

  20. Transport effects on the kinetics of protein-surface binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balgi, G; Leckband, D E; Nitsche, J M

    1995-01-01

    A detailed model is presented for protein binding to active surfaces, with application to the binding of avidin molecules to a biotin-functionalized fiber optic sensor in experiments reported by S. Zhao and W. M. Reichert (American Chemical Society Symposium Series 493, 1992). Kinetic data for binding in solution are used to assign an intrinsic catalytic rate coefficient k to the biotin-avidin pair, deconvoluted from transport and electrostatic factors via application of coagulation theory. This intrinsic chemical constant is built into a reaction-diffusion analysis of surface binding where activity is restricted to localized sites (representing immobilized biotin molecules). The analysis leads to an effective catalytic rate coefficient keff characterizing the active surface. Thereafter, solution of the transport problem describing absorption of avidin molecules by the macroscopic sensor surface leads to predictions of the avidin flux, which are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The analysis suggests the following conclusions. 1) Translational diffusion limitations are negligible for avidin-biotin binding in solution owing to the small (kinetically limiting) value k = 0.00045 m/s. 2) The sparse distribution of biotin molecules and the presence of a repulsive hydration force produce an effective surface-average catalytic rate coefficient keff of order 10(-7) m/s, much smaller than k. 3) Avidin binding to the fiber optic sensor occurs in an intermediate regime where the rate is influenced by both kinetics and diffusion. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7647232

  1. Localized Hydration in Lyophilized Myoglobin by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry. 2. Exchange Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state hydrogen deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX) is a promising method for characterizing proteins in amorphous solids. Though analysis of HDX kinetics is informative and well-established in solution, application of these methods to solid samples is complicated by possible heterogeneities in the solid. The studies reported here provide a detailed analysis of the kinetics of hydration and ssHDX for equine myoglobin (Mb) in solid matrices containing sucrose or mannitol. Water sorption was rapid relative to ssHDX, indicating that ssHDX kinetics was not limited by bulk water transport. Deuterium uptake in solids was well-characterized by a bi-exponential model; values for regression parameters provided insight into differences between the two solid matrices. Analysis of the widths of peptide mass envelopes revealed that in solution, an apparent EX2 mechanism prevails, consistent with native conformation of the protein. In contrast, in mannitol-containing samples, a smaller non-native subpopulation exchanges by an EX1-like mechanism. Together, the results indicate that the analysis of ssHDX kinetic data and the widths of peptide mass envelopes are useful in screening solid formulations of protein drugs for the presence of non-native species that cannot be detected by amide I FTIR. PMID:22352990

  2. Hydrodynamic transport functions from quantum kinetic field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E. A.; Hu, B. L.; Ramsey, S. A.

    2000-06-01

    Starting from the quantum kinetic field theory [E. Calzetta and B. L. Hu, Phys. Rev. D 37, 2878 (1988)] constructed from the closed-time-path (CTP), two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action we show how to compute from first principles the shear and bulk viscosity functions in the hydrodynamic-thermodynamic regime. For a real scalar field with λΦ4 self-interaction we need to include four-loop graphs in the equation of motion. This work provides a microscopic field-theoretical basis to the ``effective kinetic theory'' proposed by Jeon and Yaffe [S. Jeon and L. G. Yaffe, Phys. Rev. D 53, 5799 (1996)], while our result for the bulk viscosity reproduces their expression derived from linear-response theory and the imaginary-time formalism of thermal field theory. Though unavoidably involved in calculations of this sort, we feel that the approach using fundamental quantum kinetic field theory is conceptually clearer and methodically simpler than the effective kinetic theory approach, as the success of the latter requires a clever rendition of diagrammatic resummations which is neither straightforward nor fail-safe. Moreover, the method based on the CTP-2PI effective action illustrated here for a scalar field can be formulated entirely in terms of functional integral quantization, which makes it an appealing method for a first-principles calculation of transport functions of a thermal non-Abelian gauge theory, e.g., QCD quark-gluon plasma produced from heavy ion collisions.

  3. Thermal Transport in Crystals as a Kinetic Theory of Relaxons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity in dielectric crystals is the result of the relaxation of lattice vibrations described by the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. Remarkably, an exact microscopic definition of the heat carriers and their relaxation times is still missing: Phonons, typically regarded as the relevant excitations for thermal transport, cannot be identified as the heat carriers when most scattering events conserve momentum and do not dissipate heat flux. This is the case for two-dimensional or layered materials at room temperature, or three-dimensional crystals at cryogenic temperatures. In this work, we show that the eigenvectors of the scattering matrix in the Boltzmann equation define collective phonon excitations, which are termed here "relaxons". These excitations have well-defined relaxation times, directly related to heat-flux dissipation, and they provide an exact description of thermal transport as a kinetic theory of the relaxon gas. We show why Matthiessen's rule is violated, and we construct a procedure for obtaining the mean free paths and relaxation times of the relaxons. These considerations are general and would also apply to other semiclassical transport models, such as the electronic Boltzmann equation. For heat transport, they remain relevant even in conventional crystals like silicon, but they are of the utmost importance in the case of two-dimensional materials, where they can revise, by several orders of magnitude, the relevant time and length scales for thermal transport in the hydrodynamic regime.

  4. The effect of flow and mass transport in thrombogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, D

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical analysis of the contributions of flow and mass transport to a single reactive event at a blood vessel wall. The intent is to prepare the ground for a comprehensive study of the intertwining of these contributions with the reaction network of the coagulation cascade. We show that in all vessels with local mural activity, or in "large" vessels (d greater than 0.1 mm) with global reactivity, events at the tubular wall can be rigorously described by algebraic equations under steady conditions, or by ordinary differential forms (ODEs) during transient conditions. This opens up important ways for analyzing the combined roles of flow, transport, and coagulation reactions in thrombosis, a task hitherto considered to be completely intractable. We report extensively on the dependence of transport coefficient kL and mural coagulant concentration Cw on flow, vessel geometry, and reaction kinetics. It is shown that for protein transport, kL varies only weakly with shear rate gamma in large vessels, and not at all in the smaller tubes (d less than 10(-2) mm). For a typical protein, kL approximately 10(-3) cm s-1 within a factor of 3 in most geometries, irrespective of the mural reaction kinetics. Significant reductions in kL (1/10-1/1,000) leading to high-coagulant accumulation are seen mainly in stagnant zones vicinal to abrupt expansions and in small elliptical tubules. This is in accord with known physical observations. More unexpected are the dramatic increases in accumulation which can come about through the intervention of an autocatalytic reaction step, with Cw rising sharply toward infinity as the ratio of reaction to transport coefficient approaches unity. Such self-catalyzed reactions have the ability to act as powerful amplifiers of an otherwise modest influence of flow and transport on coagulant concentration. The paper considers as well the effect on mass transport of transient conditions occasioned by coagulation initiation or

  5. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Kim, Samuel; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the fusion of high-speed liquid droplets as a way to record the kinetics of liquid-phase chemical reactions on the order of microseconds. Two streams of micrometer-size droplets collide with one another. The droplets that fused (13 μm in diameter) at the intersection of the two streams entered the heated capillary inlet of a mass spectrometer. The mass spectrum was recorded as a function of the distance x between the mass spectrometer inlet and the droplet fusion center. Fused droplet trajectories were imaged with a high-speed camera, revealing that the droplet fusion occurred approximately within a 500-μm radius from the droplet fusion center and both the size and the speed of the fused droplets remained relatively constant as they traveled from the droplet fusion center to the mass spectrometer inlet. Evidence is presented that the reaction effectively stops upon entering the heated inlet of the mass spectrometer. Thus, the reaction time was proportional to x and could be measured and manipulated by controlling the distance x. Kinetic studies were carried out in fused water droplets for acid-induced unfolding of cytochrome c and hydrogen–deuterium exchange in bradykinin. The kinetics of the former revealed the slowing of the unfolding rates at the early stage of the reaction within 50 μs. The hydrogen–deuterium exchange revealed the existence of two distinct populations with fast and slow exchange rates. These studies demonstrated the power of this technique to detect reaction intermediates in fused liquid droplets with microsecond temporal resolution. PMID:25775573

  6. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Kim, Samuel; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2015-03-31

    We investigated the fusion of high-speed liquid droplets as a way to record the kinetics of liquid-phase chemical reactions on the order of microseconds. Two streams of micrometer-size droplets collide with one another. The droplets that fused (13 μm in diameter) at the intersection of the two streams entered the heated capillary inlet of a mass spectrometer. The mass spectrum was recorded as a function of the distance x between the mass spectrometer inlet and the droplet fusion center. Fused droplet trajectories were imaged with a high-speed camera, revealing that the droplet fusion occurred approximately within a 500-μm radius from the droplet fusion center and both the size and the speed of the fused droplets remained relatively constant as they traveled from the droplet fusion center to the mass spectrometer inlet. Evidence is presented that the reaction effectively stops upon entering the heated inlet of the mass spectrometer. Thus, the reaction time was proportional to x and could be measured and manipulated by controlling the distance x. Kinetic studies were carried out in fused water droplets for acid-induced unfolding of cytochrome c and hydrogen-deuterium exchange in bradykinin. The kinetics of the former revealed the slowing of the unfolding rates at the early stage of the reaction within 50 μs. The hydrogen-deuterium exchange revealed the existence of two distinct populations with fast and slow exchange rates. These studies demonstrated the power of this technique to detect reaction intermediates in fused liquid droplets with microsecond temporal resolution.

  7. Modeling transport kinetics in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. R.; Ming, D. W.; Hossner, L. R.; Henninger, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Nutrient release in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock (Cp-PR) systems occurs through dissolution and cation-exchange reactions. Investigating the kinetics of these reactions expands our understanding of nutrient release processes. Research was conducted to model transport kinetics of nutrient release in Cp-PR systems. The objectives were to identify empirical models that best describe NH4, K, and P release and define diffusion-controlling processes. Materials included a Texas clinoptilolite (Cp) and North Carolina phosphate rock (PR). A continuous-flow thin-disk technique was used. Models evaluated included zero order, first order, second order, parabolic diffusion, simplified Elovich, Elovich, and power function. The power-function, Elovich, and parabolic-diffusion models adequately described NH4, K, and P release. The power-function model was preferred because of its simplicity. Models indicated nutrient release was diffusion controlled. Primary transport processes controlling nutrient release for the time span observed were probably the result of a combination of several interacting transport mechanisms.

  8. Modeling transport kinetics in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. R.; Ming, D. W.; Hossner, L. R.; Henninger, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Nutrient release in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock (Cp-PR) systems occurs through dissolution and cation-exchange reactions. Investigating the kinetics of these reactions expands our understanding of nutrient release processes. Research was conducted to model transport kinetics of nutrient release in Cp-PR systems. The objectives were to identify empirical models that best describe NH4, K, and P release and define diffusion-controlling processes. Materials included a Texas clinoptilolite (Cp) and North Carolina phosphate rock (PR). A continuous-flow thin-disk technique was used. Models evaluated included zero order, first order, second order, parabolic diffusion, simplified Elovich, Elovich, and power function. The power-function, Elovich, and parabolic-diffusion models adequately described NH4, K, and P release. The power-function model was preferred because of its simplicity. Models indicated nutrient release was diffusion controlled. Primary transport processes controlling nutrient release for the time span observed were probably the result of a combination of several interacting transport mechanisms.

  9. Role of Transport and Kinetics in Growth of Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Iskovitz, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    Renal stone disease is not only a concern on earth but could conceivably pose as a serious risk to the astronauts health and safety in Space. In this paper, a combined transport-kinetics model for growth of calcium oxalate crystals is presented. The model is used to parametrically investigate the growth of renal calculi in urine with a focus on the coupled effects of transport and surface reaction on the ionic concentrations at the surface of the crystal and their impact on the resulting growth rates. It is shown that under nominal conditions of low solution supersaturation and low Damkohler number that typically exist on Earth, the surface concentrations of calcium and oxalate approach their bulk solution values in the urine and the growth rate is most likely limited by the surface reaction kinetics. But for higher solution supersaturations and larger Damkohler numbers that may be prevalent in the microgravity environment of Space, the calcium and oxalate surface concentrations tend to shift more towards their equilibrium or saturation values and thus the growth process may be limited by the transport through the medium. Furthermore, parametric numerical studies suggest that changes to the renal biochemistry of astronauts due in space may promote development of renal calculi during long duration space expeditions.

  10. Kinetic Analysis of Pasma Transport in a Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, O.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of the plasma transport and oscillation phenomena in the Xe-gas discharge of the SPT and TAL Hall effect thruster were subject of many theoretical-numerical and experimental studies [1-4]. Despite this fact, the origin of a so-called anomalous transport is not understood to this date. As a result, in the theoretical and numerical models [5-6] researches assume ad-hoc cross-field diffusion coefficients, which may differ by several times from the classical Bohm result. To study the transport phenomenon we develop a specialized kinetic model. Our model is 2-dimensional in space (for axial and azimuthal directions), but 3-dimensional in velocity. A similar geometry was adopted in references [1,3]. However, we try to push the simulation to the realistic scale (several centimeters), while keeping the minimum spatial resolution on the order of the local Debye length. New transport results will be compared to the results from the 2D3V axisymmetrical model [6], which is a further development of the fully kinetic model for plasma and neutral gas [5]. The PIC [7] code is applied to the realistic SPT thruster geometry. We add new elementary plasma-chemistry reaction and modify boundary conditions to capture self-consistent dynamics of high ionization states of xenon atoms. It is hoped that the numerical results will provide a better understanding of the anomalous transport in a Hall effect thruster due to the collective modes, and shed light on the nature of the experimentally observed high-frequency oscillations. [1] M.Hirakawa and Y.Arakawa, Particle simulation of plasma phenomena in Hall thrusters, IEPC-95-164 technical paper, 1995. [2] V. I. Baranov et al, "New Conceptions of Oscillation Mechanisms in the Accelerator with Closed Drift of Electrons". IEPC-95-44, 24thInternational Electric Propulsion Conference, Moscow, 1995. [3] M.Hirakawa, Electron transport mechanism in a Hall thruster, IEPC-97-021 technical paper, 1997. [4] N.B.Meerzan, W.A.Hargus, M

  11. Tycho 2: A Proxy Application for Kinetic Transport Sweeps

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Charles Kristopher; Warsa, James S.

    2016-09-14

    Tycho 2 is a proxy application that implements discrete ordinates (SN) kinetic transport sweeps on unstructured, 3D, tetrahedral meshes. It has been designed to be small and require minimal dependencies to make collaboration and experimentation as easy as possible. Tycho 2 has been released as open source software. The software is currently in a beta release with plans for a stable release (version 1.0) before the end of the year. The code is parallelized via MPI across spatial cells and OpenMP across angles. Currently, several parallelization algorithms are implemented.

  12. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  13. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2014-05-13

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  14. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  15. Microbially Mediated Kinetic Sulfur Isotope Fractionation: Reactive Transport Modeling Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Amos, R. T.; Steefel, C. I.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is a ubiquitous process in many subsurface systems. Isotopic fractionation is characteristic of this anaerobic process, since sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) favor the reduction of the lighter sulfate isotopologue (S32O42-) over the heavier isotopologue (S34O42-). Detection of isotopic shifts have been utilized as a proxy for the onset of sulfate reduction in subsurface systems such as oil reservoirs and aquifers undergoing uranium bioremediation. Reactive transport modeling (RTM) of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation has been applied to field and laboratory studies. These RTM approaches employ different mathematical formulations in the representation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation. In order to test the various formulations, we propose a benchmark problem set for the simulation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation during microbially mediated sulfate reduction. The benchmark problem set is comprised of four problem levels and is based on a recent laboratory column experimental study of sulfur isotope fractionation. Pertinent processes impacting sulfur isotopic composition such as microbial sulfate reduction and dispersion are included in the problem set. To date, participating RTM codes are: CRUNCHTOPE, TOUGHREACT, MIN3P and THE GEOCHEMIST'S WORKBENCH. Preliminary results from various codes show reasonable agreement for the problem levels simulating sulfur isotope fractionation in 1D.

  16. Heat and mass transfer in reacting mixtures: Molecular dynamics and kinetic theory approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustova, E.; Nabokova, M.; Kjelstrup, S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2016-11-01

    Transport properties of a binary H2-H mixture with strongly-non-equilibrium dissociation reaction are studied on the basis of two approaches: kinetic theory and molecular dynamics. The gas in the thermostat under the action of temperature gradient is considered. Mass diffusive and measurable heat flux are obtained in the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations; the transport coefficients are extracted from the fluxes using the constitutive equations given by irreversible thermodynamics. For the same conditions, the transport coefficients and the corresponding fluxes are calculated using the modified Chapman-Enskog method for the rarefied flows with non-equilibrium chemical reactions. While the qualitative agreement between the results obtained using the two approaches is found, quantitative differences are however noticeable. The discrepancy in the heat conductivity coefficient is not large but is significant for diffusion coefficients. Possible sources of discrepancies are discussed.

  17. Mass transfer and transport in salt repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-02-01

    Salt is a unique rock isolation of nuclear waste because it is dry'' and nearly impermeable. In this paper we summarize some mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. First we analyses brine migration. Heating by high-level waste can cause brine in grain boundaries to move due to pressure-gradients. We analyze brine migration treating salt as a thermoelastic solid and found that brine migration is transient and localized. We use previously developed techniques to estimate release rates from waste packages by diffusion. Interbeds exist in salt and may be conduits for radionuclide migration. We analyze steady-state migration due to brine flow in the interbed, as a function of the Peclet number. Then we analyze transient mass transfer, both into the interbed and directly to salt, due only to diffusion. Finally we compare mass transfer rates of a waste cylinder in granite facing a fracture and in salt facing an interbed. In all cases, numerical illustrations of the analytic solution are given. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Variable Charge State Impurities in Coupled Kinetic Plasma-Kinetic Neutral Transport Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Hager, R.; Kim, K.; Koskela, T.; Park, G.

    2015-11-01

    A previous version of the XGC0 neoclassical particle transport code with two fully stripped impurity species was used to study kinetic neoclassical transport in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal. To properly simulate impurities in the scrape-off layer and divertor and to account for radiative cooling, however, the impurity charge state distributions must evolve as the particles are transported into regions of different electron temperatures and densities. To do this, the charge state of each particle in XGC0 is included as a parameter in the list that represents the particle's location in phase space. Impurity ionizations and recombinations are handled with a dedicated collision routine. The associated radiative cooling is accumulated during the process and applied to the electron population later in the time step. The density profiles of the neutral impurities are simulated with the DEGAS 2 neutral transport code and then used as a background for electron impact ionization in XGC0 via a test particle Monte Carlo method analogous to that used for deuterium. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Kinetic modeling of virus transport at the field scale.

    PubMed

    Schijven, Jack F; Simůnek, Jirí

    2002-03-01

    Bacteriophage removal by soil passage in two field studies was re-analyzed with the goal to investigate differences between one- and two-dimensional modeling approaches, differences between one- and two-site kinetic sorption models, and the role of heterogeneities in the soil properties. The first study involved removal of bacteriophages MS2 and PRDI by dune recharge, while the second study represented removal of MS2 by deep well injection. In both studies, removal was higher during the first meters of soil passage than thereafter. The software packages HYDRUS-ID and HYDRUS-2D, which simulate water flow and solute transport in one- and two-dimensional variably saturated porous media, respectively, were used. The two codes were modified by incorporating reversible adsorption to two types of kinetic sites. Tracer concentrations were used first to calibrate flow and transport parameters of both models before analyzing transport of bacteriophages. The one-dimensional one-site model did not fully describe the tails of the measured breakthrough curves of MS2 and PRD1 from the dune recharge study. While the one-dimensional one-site model predicted a sudden decrease in virus concentrations immediately after the peaks, measured data displayed much smoother decline and tailing. The one-dimensional two-site model simulated the overall behavior of the breakthrough curves very well. The two-dimensional one-site model predicted a more gradual decrease in virus concentrations after the peaks than the one-dimensional one-site model, but not as good as the one-dimensional two-site model. The dimensionality of the problem hence can partly explain the smooth decrease in concentration after peak breakthrough. The two-dimensional two-site model provided the best results. Values for k(att2) and k(det2) could not be determined at the last two of four monitoring wells, thus suggesting that either a second type of kinetic sites is present in the first few meters of dune passage and not

  20. Resonance wave pumping: wave mass transport pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Violeau, Damien; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies a valveless pump (or Liebau pump) results in a strong pulsating flow. A free-surface version of the Liebau pump is presented. The experiment consists of a closed tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free-surface and a recirculation section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle is placed at an off-centre position at the free-surface and controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Near certain frequencies identified as resonance frequencies through a linear potential theory analysis, the system behaves like a pump. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is performed in the near free surface region and compared with simulations using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. The mean eulerian mass flux field (ρ) is extracted. It is observed that the flow is located in the vicinity of the surface layer suggesting Stokes Drift (or Wave Mass Transport) is the source of the pumping. A model is developped to extend the linear potential theory to the second order to take into account these observations. The authors would like to acknowledge the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for their generous support.

  1. The Multiplexed Chemical Kinetic Photoionization Mass Spectrometer: A New Approach To Isomer-resolved Chemical Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, David L.; Zou, Peng; Johnsen, Howard; Hayden, Carl C.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Knyazev, Vadim D.; North, Simon W.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-08-28

    We have developed a multiplexed time- and photon-energy?resolved photoionizationmass spectrometer for the study of the kinetics and isomeric product branching of gasphase, neutral chemical reactions. The instrument utilizes a side-sampled flow tubereactor, continuously tunable synchrotron radiation for photoionization, a multi-massdouble-focusing mass spectrometer with 100percent duty cycle, and a time- and positionsensitive detector for single ion counting. This approach enables multiplexed, universal detection of molecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition to measurement of rate coefficients as a function of temperature and pressure, different structural isomers can be distinguished based on their photoionization efficiency curves, providing a more detailed probe of reaction mechanisms. The multiplexed 3-dimensional data structure (intensity as a function of molecular mass, reaction time, and photoionization energy) provides insights that might not be available in serial acquisition, as well as additional constraints on data interpretation.

  2. Collective transport of weakly interacting molecular motors with Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Sameep; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2015-04-01

    Filament-based intracellular transport involves the collective action of molecular motor proteins. Experimental evidences suggest that microtubule (MT) filament bound motor proteins such as kinesins weakly interact among themselves during transport and with the surrounding cellular environment. Motivated by these observations we study a driven lattice gas model for collective unidirectional transport of molecular motors on open filament. This model incorporates short-range next-nearest-neighbour (NNN) interactions between the motors and couples the transport process on filament with surrounding cellular environment through adsorption-desorption Langmuir kinetics (LK) of the motors. We analyse this model within the framework of a mean-field (MF) theory in the limit of weak interactions between the motors. We point to the mapping of this model with the non-conserved version of the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn (KLS) model. The system exhibits rich phase behavior with a variety of inhomogeneous phases including localized shocks in the bulk of the filament. We obtain the steady-state density and current profiles, analyse their variation as a function of the strength of interaction and construct the non-equilibrium MF phase diagram. We compare these MF results with Monte Carlo simulations and find that the MF analysis shows reasonably good agreement with simulation results as long as the motors are weakly interacting. For sufficently strong NNN interaction between the motors, the mean-field results deviate significantly, and for very strong NNN interaction in the absence of LK, the current in the lattice is determined solely by the NNN interaction parameter and it becomes independent of entry and exit rates of motors at the filament boundaries.

  3. Improved kinetic neoclassical transport calculation for a low-collisionality QH-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Hager, R.

    2016-07-15

    The role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) structure in an ELM-free QH-mode discharge on DIII-D is explored using XGC0, a 5D full-f multi-species particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. The work in this paper builds on previous work aimed at achieving quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles. Improved quantitative agreement is achieved by performing the calculations with a more realistic electron mass, larger neutral density and including finite-Larmor-radius corrections self-consistently in the drift-kinetic motion of the particles. Consequently, the simulations provide stronger evidence that the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal is primarily established by the required balance between the loss of high-energy tail main ions against a pinch of colder main ions and impurities. The kinetic loss of a small population of ions carrying a large proportion of energy and momentum leads to a separation of the particle and energy transport rates and introduces a source of intrinsic edge torque. Ion orbit loss and finite orbit width effects drive the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describe the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile.

  4. Improved kinetic neoclassical transport calculation for a low-collisionality QH-mode pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Hager, R.

    2016-08-01

    The role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) structure in an ELM-free QH-mode discharge on DIII-D is explored using XGC0, a 5D full-f multi-species particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. The work in this paper builds on previous work aimed at achieving quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles. Improved quantitative agreement is achieved by performing the calculations with a more realistic electron mass, larger neutral density and including finite-Larmor-radius corrections self-consistently in the drift-kinetic motion of the particles. Consequently, the simulations provide stronger evidence that the radial electric field ({{E}\\text{r}} ) in the pedestal is primarily established by the required balance between the loss of high-energy tail main ions against a pinch of colder main ions and impurities. The kinetic loss of a small population of ions carrying a large proportion of energy and momentum leads to a separation of the particle and energy transport rates and introduces a source of intrinsic edge torque. Ion orbit loss and finite orbit width effects drive the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describe the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the {{T}i} profile.

  5. Improved kinetic neoclassical transport calculation for a low-collisionality QH-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Hager, R.

    2016-07-15

    The role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) structure in an ELM-free QH-mode discharge on DIII-D is explored using XGC0, a 5D full-f multi-species particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. The work in this paper builds on previous work aimed at achieving quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles. Improved quantitative agreement is achieved by performing the calculations with a more realistic electron mass, larger neutral density and including finite-Larmor-radius corrections self-consistently in the drift-kinetic motion of the particles. Consequently, the simulations provide stronger evidence that the radial electric field (E-r) in the pedestal is primarily established by the required balance between the loss of high-energy tail main ions against a pinch of colder main ions and impurities. The kinetic loss of a small population of ions carrying a large proportion of energy and momentum leads to a separation of the particle and energy transport rates and introduces a source of intrinsic edge torque. Ion orbit loss and finite orbit width effects drive the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describe the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the T-i profile.

  6. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; ...

    2017-06-08

    A thorough understanding of oxidation is important when considering the health and integrity of graphite components in graphite reactors. For the next generation of graphite reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress has been deemed significant enough to have made its way into the licensing applications of many international licensing bodies. While a substantial body of literature exists on nuclear graphite oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen and significant efforts have been made to characterize oxidation kinetics of various grades, the value of existing information is somewhat limited. Often, multiple competing processes, including reaction kinetics, mass transfer, and microstructuralmore » evolution, are lumped together into a single rate expression that limits the ability to translate this information to different conditions. This article reviews the reaction of graphite with molecular oxygen in terms of the reaction kinetics, gas transport, and microstructural evolution of graphite. It also presents the foundations of a model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system that is kinetically independent of graphite grade, and is capable of describing both the bulk and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.« less

  7. A second order kinetic approach for modeling solute retention and transport in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, H. M.; Amacher, M. C.

    1988-12-01

    We present a second-order kinetic approach for the description of solute retention during transport in soils. The basis for this approach is that it accounts for the sites on the soil matrix which are accessible for retention of the reactive solutes in solution. This approach was incorporated with the fully kinetic two-site model where the difference between the characteristics of the two types of sites is based on the rate of kinetic retention reactions. We also assume that the retention mechanisms are site-specific, e.g., the sorbed phase on type 1 sites may be characteristically different in their energy of reaction and/or the solute species from that on type 2 sites. The second-order two-site (SOTS) model was capable of describing the kinetic retention behavior of Cr(VI) batch data for Olivier, Windsor, and Cecil soils. Using independently measured parameters, the SOTS model was successful in predicting experimental Cr breakthrough curves (BTC's). The proposed second-order approach was also extended to the diffusion controlled mobile-immobile or two-region (SOMIM) model. The use of estimated parameters (e.g., the mobile water fraction and mass transfer coefficients) for the SOMIM model did not provide improved predictions of Cr BTC's in comparison to the SOTS model. The failure of the mobile-immobile model was attributed to the lack of nonequilibrium conditions for the two regions in these soils.

  8. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K{sub d} model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  9. A kinetic concepto of lipid transport in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, D L

    1976-03-01

    Summarization of the literature shows a strong correlation between dietary fatty acid intake and total lipid concentration in plasma in lactating cows whereas total milk fat secreted is related to neither of these. In the process of plasma triglyceride removal, chylomicra and very low density lipoproteins are converted to low density lipoproteins. Limited kinetic data indicate that the fractional removal rates for chulomicra and very low density lipoproteins are rapid in lactating cows whereas fractional removal of low density lipoproteins is slower, resulting in accumulation of the latter in plasma. Under such conditions, low density lipoprotein concentrations of plasma would not be expected to reflect quantitatively the transfer of plasma triglyceride fatty acids to milk fat. Quantitative analysis or triglyceride fatty acid turnover in density less than 1.006 lipoproteins should delineate the role of plasma lipid transport in milk fat synthesis. High fat diets protected from rumen biohydrogenation have proven to be a useful approach in studying ruminant fat metabolism and may be used more extensively to elucidate the role of cholesterol in plasma lipid transport and the metabolism of essential fatty acids in ruminants.

  10. Construction of reduced transport model by gyro-kinetic simulation with kinetic electrons in helical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Nakata, M.; Nunami, M.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.

    2016-10-01

    A reduced model of the turbulent ion heat diffusivity is proposed by the gyrokinetic simulation code (GKV-X) with the adiabatic electrons for the high-Ti Large Helical Device discharge. The plasma parameter region of the short poloidal wavelength is studied, where the ion temperature gradient mode becomes unstable. The ion heat diffusivity by the nonlinear simulation with the kinetic electrons is found to be several times larger than the simulation results using the adiabatic electrons in the radial region 0.46 <= r / a <= 0.80 . The electromagnetic contribution is about a several percent in the ion energy flux. The model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation and the squared zonal flow potential. Next, the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation is approximated with the mixing length estimate. The squared zonal flow potential fluctuation is shown as the linear zonal flow response function. The reduced model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the physical parameters by the linear GKV-X simulation with the kinetic electrons. This reduced model is applied to the transport code with the same procedure as.

  11. Mass accommodation of water: bridging the gap between molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic condensation models.

    PubMed

    Julin, Jan; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Pöschl, Ulrich; Riipinen, Ilona

    2013-01-17

    The condensational growth of submicrometer aerosol particles to climate relevant sizes is sensitive to their ability to accommodate vapor molecules, which is described by the mass accommodation coefficient. However, the underlying processes are not yet fully understood. We have simulated the mass accommodation and evaporation processes of water using molecular dynamics, and the results are compared to the condensation equations derived from the kinetic gas theory to shed light on the compatibility of the two. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a planar TIP4P-Ew water surface at four temperatures in the range 268-300 K as well as two droplets, with radii of 1.92 and 4.14 nm at T = 273.15 K. The evaporation flux from molecular dynamics was found to be in good qualitative agreement with that predicted by the simple kinetic condensation equations. Water droplet growth was also modeled with the kinetic multilayer model KM-GAP of Shiraiwa et al. [Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2012, 12, 2777]. It was found that, due to the fast transport across the interface, the growth of a pure water droplet is controlled by gas phase diffusion. These facts indicate that the simple kinetic treatment is sufficient in describing pure water condensation and evaporation. The droplet size was found to have minimal effect on the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. The mass accommodation coefficient was found to be unity (within 0.004) for all studied surfaces, which is in agreement with previous simulation work. Additionally, the simulated evaporation fluxes imply that the evaporation coefficient is also unity. Comparing the evaporation rates of the mass accommodation and evaporation simulations indicated that the high collision flux, corresponding to high supersaturation, present in typical molecular dynamics mass accommodation simulations can under certain conditions lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. Consequently, in such situations the mass accommodation coefficient

  12. Mass Accommodation of Water: Bridging the Gap Between Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Condensation Models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The condensational growth of submicrometer aerosol particles to climate relevant sizes is sensitive to their ability to accommodate vapor molecules, which is described by the mass accommodation coefficient. However, the underlying processes are not yet fully understood. We have simulated the mass accommodation and evaporation processes of water using molecular dynamics, and the results are compared to the condensation equations derived from the kinetic gas theory to shed light on the compatibility of the two. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a planar TIP4P-Ew water surface at four temperatures in the range 268–300 K as well as two droplets, with radii of 1.92 and 4.14 nm at T = 273.15 K. The evaporation flux from molecular dynamics was found to be in good qualitative agreement with that predicted by the simple kinetic condensation equations. Water droplet growth was also modeled with the kinetic multilayer model KM-GAP of Shiraiwa et al. [Atmos. Chem. Phys.2012, 117, 2777]. It was found that, due to the fast transport across the interface, the growth of a pure water droplet is controlled by gas phase diffusion. These facts indicate that the simple kinetic treatment is sufficient in describing pure water condensation and evaporation. The droplet size was found to have minimal effect on the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. The mass accommodation coefficient was found to be unity (within 0.004) for all studied surfaces, which is in agreement with previous simulation work. Additionally, the simulated evaporation fluxes imply that the evaporation coefficient is also unity. Comparing the evaporation rates of the mass accommodation and evaporation simulations indicated that the high collision flux, corresponding to high supersaturation, present in typical molecular dynamics mass accommodation simulations can under certain conditions lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. Consequently, in such situations the mass accommodation

  13. Estimation of Mass-Transport Overpotentials During Long-Term PEMFC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    WoodIII, David L; Borup, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive method for separating cathode catalyst-layer and GDL mass-transport overpotentials was derived utilizing kinetic and Ohmic analysis of high-humidified H2/O2 and low-humidified H2/air polarization data. A hybridized method was applied accounting for electrochemical surface area (ECSA), hydrogen crossover, and exchange current density. This method delineates separate cathode GDL and electrode mass-transport overpotentials as a function of current density and operating time. The methodology is systematic and generalized and can be applied to polarization data from any type of durability test. The derivation was applied to periodic polarization data from a steady-state 1050-hour durability test and is shown to provide an accurate breakdown of the sources of performance losses. Increases in mass-transport overpotential for the cathode GDL and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) overpotential were predominantly offset by improvements in the mass-transport overpotential of the cathode catalyst layer and reductions in the high-frequency resistance (HFR). Little increase in GDL mass-transport overpotential was observed during the first ~500 hour period, but a substantial increase was seen during the second ~500 hour period. The mass-transport overpotential of the cathode catalyst-layer was almost negligible at the end of ~1000 hours of operation, suggesting little O2 diffusion resistance through the ionomer and adjacent void volume.

  14. Kinetic simulation of neutral particle transport in sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Ries, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    For many physical vapor deposition applications using sputtering processes, knowledge about the detailed spatial and temporal evolution of the involved gas species is of great importance. Modeling of the involved gas dynamic and plasma processes is however challenging, because the operating pressure is typically below 1 Pa. In consequence, only kinetic descriptions are appropriate. In order to approach this problem, the dynamics of sputtered particle transport through a neutral gas background is simulated. For this study, a modified version of the three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is utilized. The impact of a transient sputtering wind is investigated in a generic reactor geometry, which may be used for dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS), High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS), as well as sputtering in capacitively coupled discharges. In the present work a rarefaction of the background gas is observed. Moreover in pulsed mode the temporal dynamics of the rarefaction and subsequent recovery of the background gas is investigated. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of TRR 87.

  15. ITC Recommendations for Transporter Kinetic Parameter Estimation and Translational Modeling of Transport-Mediated PK and DDIs in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zamek-Gliszczynski, MJ; Lee, CA; Poirier, A; Bentz, J; Chu, X; Ellens, H; Ishikawa, T; Jamei, M; Kalvass, JC; Nagar, S; Pang, KS; Korzekwa, K; Swaan, PW; Taub, ME; Zhao, P; Galetin, A

    2013-01-01

    This white paper provides a critical analysis of methods for estimating transporter kinetics and recommendations on proper parameter calculation in various experimental systems. Rational interpretation of transporter-knockout animal findings and application of static and dynamic physiologically based modeling approaches for prediction of human transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics and drug–drug interactions (DDIs) are presented. The objective is to provide appropriate guidance for the use of in vitro, in vivo, and modeling tools in translational transporter science. PMID:23588311

  16. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  17. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  18. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  19. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Mass Transport in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Dorado, Boris; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-06-26

    In this talk we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of U, O and fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2}. These processes all impact nuclear fuel performance. For example, the formation and retention of fission gas bubbles induce fuel swelling, which leads to mechanical interaction with the clad thereby increasing the probability for clad breach. Alternatively, fission gas can be released from the fuel to the plenum, which increases the pressure on the clad walls and decreases the gap thermal conductivity. The evolution of fuel microstructure features is strongly coupled to diffusion of U vacancies. Since both U and fission gas transport rates vary strongly with the O stoichiometry, it is also important to understand O diffusion. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using DFT techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface, which is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation. Surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting step for diffusion of such bubbles, which is an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials. As expected, the activation energy for surface diffusion is significantly lower than for bulk transport. These results are further discussed in terms of engineering-scale fission gas release models

  20. Kinetics of mass and DNA decomposition in tomato leaves.

    PubMed

    Poté, John; Rossé, Patrick; Rosselli, Walter; Van, Van Tran; Wildi, Walter

    2005-11-01

    This laboratory study investigated the kinetics of leaf and DNA content decomposition in two varieties of tomato (Palmiro and Admiro) after incubation in soil for 35 days. Results revealed that the decrease of dry matter in leaves in both varieties did not follow a single exponential function and was better described by a double exponential model. Composite half-decrease times were 3.4 and 2.4 days for Palmiro and Admiro respectively. The same pattern was observed for DNA mass loss, although this was closer to a single exponential model with composite half-decrease times of 1.5 and 1.4 days. Genomic analysis showed that DNA in dried leaves at room temperature (not inoculated in the soil), remains intact or presents a weak degradation, and DNA extracted from leaves inoculated in non-sterile soil showed degradation after two days. These results indicate that before release an important quantity of DNA may be degraded inside plant tissues during decomposition in soil.

  1. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  2. Micromodel investigation of transport effect on the kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changyong; Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhi

    2013-05-07

    Reductive dissolution of hematite in porous media was investigated using a micromodel (8.1 × 4.5 × 0.028 mm) with realistic pore network structures that include distinctive advection domain, macropores and micropores created in silicon substrate. The micromodel pore surface was sputter deposited with a thin layer (230 nm) of hematite. The hematite in the micromodel was reduced by injecting pH-varying solutions (pH 5.0, 6.0, 7.0) containing a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2, 100 μM), a biogenic soluble electron transfer mediator produced by Shewanella species. The reduction kinetics was determined by measuring effluent Fe(II) (aq) concentration and by spectroscopically monitoring the hematite dissolution front in the micromodel. Batch experiment was also performed to estimate the hematite reduction rate under the well-mixed condition. Results showed significant spatial variation in local redox reaction rate that was controlled by the coupled transport and reaction. The overall rate of the redox reaction in the micromodel required a three-domain numerical model to effectively describe reaction kinetics either with distinctive apparent rate parameters or mass transfer coefficients in different pore domains. Results from this study demonstrated the feasibility of a domain-based modeling approach for scaling reaction rates from batch to porous media systems where reactions may be significantly limited by transport.

  3. Computational methods for multiphase equilibrium and kinetics calculations for geochemical and reactive transport applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan; Saar, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Computational methods for geochemical and reactive transport modeling are essential for the understanding of many natural and industrial processes. Most of these processes involve several phases and components, and quite often requires chemical equilibrium and kinetics calculations. We present an overview of novel methods for multiphase equilibrium calculations, based on both the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) approach and on the solution of the law of mass-action (LMA) equations. We also employ kinetics calculations, assuming partial equilibrium (e.g., fluid species in equilibrium while minerals are in disequilibrium) using automatic time stepping to improve simulation efficiency and robustness. These methods are developed specifically for applications that are computationally expensive, such as reactive transport simulations. We show how efficient the new methods are, compared to other algorithms, and how easy it is to use them for geochemical modeling via a simple script language. All methods are available in Reaktoro, a unified open-source framework for modeling chemically reactive systems, which we also briefly describe.

  4. Computational implementation of interfacial kinetic transport theory for water vapour transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Hill, Reghan J

    2014-01-08

    A computational framework is developed for applying interfacial kinetic transport theory to predict water vapour permeability of porous media. Modified conservation equations furnish spatially periodic disturbances from which the average flux and, thus, the effective diffusivity is obtained. The equations are solved exactly for a model porous medium comprising parallel layers of gas and solid with arbitrary solid volume fraction. From the microscale effective diffusivity, a two-point boundary-value problem is solved at the macroscale to furnish the water vapour transport rate in membranes subjected to a finite RH differential. Then, the microscale model is implemented using a computational framework (extended finite-element method) to examine the role of particle size, aspect ratio and positioning for periodic arrays of aligned super-ellipses (model particles that pack with high density). We show that the transverse water vapour permeability can be reduced by an order of magnitude only when fibres with a high-aspect ratio cross section are packed in a periodic staggered configuration. Maximum permeability is achieved at intermediate micro-structural length scales, where gas-phase diffusion is enhanced by surface diffusion, but not limited by interfacial-exchange kinetics. The two-dimensional computations demonstrated here are intended to motivate further efforts to develop efficient computational solutions for realistic three-dimensional microstructures.

  5. Kinetic Isotope Effect on Transport Mediated by Clc-Type H+/CL- Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picollo, Alessandra; Malvezzi, Mattia; Accardi, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    CLC transporters mediate the stoichiometric exchange of 2 Cl- ions for 1 H+ across the membranes of cellular compartments, mostly endosomes and lysosomes. Despite intense biophysical, structural and electrophysiological scrutiny the H+ transfer mechanism of these exchangers remains largely unknown. Previous work showed that two conserved Glutamates define the extremities of the H+ pathway in CLC exchangers. However, we don't know whether H+ transfer between these residues takes place along a series of protonatable moieties, via a Grotthuss mechanism and by diffusion of an H3+O cation and if at any step H+ tunneling plays a role. To differentiate between these possible mechanisms we measured the deuterium kinetic isotope effect on the transport rate of CLC-ec1 and CLC-5, respectively a prokaryotic and a eukaryotic CLC exchanger. We found that transport mediated by both proteins is slowed by ˜20-40% when H2O is replaced by D2O. This result suggests that the rate limiting step for H+ transport takes place along a hydrogen-bonded pathway, possibly formed by water molecules. However, we found that the voltage dependence of CLC-5 inhibition by extracellular H+ is eliminated by this substitution. This suggests that the voltage dependence of this process arises from a mechanism that is exquisitely sensitive to particle mass such as proton tunneling.

  6. Terminology for mass transport and exchange

    PubMed Central

    BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, J. B.; CHINARD, F. P.; CRONE, C.; GORESKY, C. A.; LASSEN, N. A.; RENEMAN, R. S.; ZIERLER, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers in the physiological, engineering, and physical sciences. The goal is to provide a setting for quantitative descriptions of physiological transport phenomena. PMID:3963211

  7. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  8. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  9. First-principles calculations of mass transport in magnesium borohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2013-03-01

    Mg(BH4)2 is a hydrogen storage material which can decompose to release hydrogen in the following reaction: Mg(BH4)2(solid) -->1/6 MgB12H12(solid) + 5/6MgH2(solid) +13/6 H2(gas) --> MgH2(solid) + 2B(solid) + 4H2(gas). However, experiments show that hydrogen release only occurs at temperatures above 300 °C, which severely limits applications in mobile storage. Using density-functional theory calculations, we systematically study bulk diffusion of defects in the reactant Mg(BH4)2 and products MgB12H12 and MgH2 during the first step of the solid-state dehydrogenation reaction. The defect concentrations and concentration gradients are calculated for a variety of defects, including charged vacancies and interstitials. We find that neutral [BH3] vacancies have the highest bulk concentration and concentration gradient in Mg(BH4)2. The diffusion mechanism of [BH3] vacancy in Mg(BH4)2 is studied using the nudged elastic band method. Our results shows that the calculated diffusion barrier for [BH3] vacancies is ~ . 2 eV, suggesting that slow mass transport limits the kinetics of hydrogen desorption.

  10. The functioning neuronal transporter for dopamine: kinetic mechanisms and effects of amphetamines, cocaine and methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Schenk, James O

    2002-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a transmembrane spanning protein that catalyzes the transport of dopamine across the neuronal membrane to concentrate the neurotransmitter inside the cell. Although the uptake of dopamine has been studied since the 1960s, more recent advances in knowledge of the protein itself and in making kinetically resolved measurements of its action have led to more insights into its mechanism and pharmacology. The literature of the kinetics of transporters and kinetic measurements of DAT activity is reviewed to provide an overview of the multisubstrate mechanism of DAT activity, its pharmacology with regard to amphetamine, cocaine and methylphenidate, and correlations of DAT activity with some behavioral outputs.

  11. Improved kinetic neoclassical transport calculation for a low-collisionality QH-mode pedestal

    DOE PAGES

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; ...

    2016-07-15

    The role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) structure in an ELM-free QH-mode discharge on DIII-D is explored using XGC0, a 5D full-f multi-species particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. The work in this paper builds on previous work aimed at achieving quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles. Improved quantitative agreement is achieved by performing the calculations with a more realistic electron mass, larger neutral density and including finite-Larmor-radius corrections self-consistentlymore » in the drift-kinetic motion of the particles. Consequently, the simulations provide stronger evidence that the radial electric field (E-r) in the pedestal is primarily established by the required balance between the loss of high-energy tail main ions against a pinch of colder main ions and impurities. The kinetic loss of a small population of ions carrying a large proportion of energy and momentum leads to a separation of the particle and energy transport rates and introduces a source of intrinsic edge torque. Ion orbit loss and finite orbit width effects drive the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describe the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the T-i profile.« less

  12. Microbial respiration and dissolution precipitation reactions of minerals: thermo-kinetics and reactive transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaroual, M. M.; Parmentier, M.; Andre, L.; Croiset, N.; Pettenati, M.; Kremer, S.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial processes interact closely with abiotic geochemical reactions and mineralogical transformations in several hydrogeochemical systems. Reactive transport models are aimed to analyze these complex mechanisms integrating as well as the degradation of organic matter as the redox reactions involving successive terminal electron acceptors (TEAPs) mediated by microbes through the continuum of unsaturated zone (soil) - saturated zone (aquifer). The involvement of microbial processes in reactive transport in soil and subsurface geologic greatly complicates the mastery of the major mechanisms and the numerical modelling of these systems. The introduction of kinetic constraints of redox reactions in aqueous phase requires the decoupling of equilibrium reactions and the redefinition of mass balance of chemical elements including the concept of basis species and secondary species of thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modelling tools. An integrated methodology for modelling the reactive transport has been developed and implemented to simulate the transfer of arsenic, denitrification processes and the role of metastable aqueous sulfur species with pyrite and organic matter as electron donors entities. A mechanistic rate law of microbial respiration in various geochemical environments was used to simulate reactive transport of arsenic, nitrate and organic matter combined to the generalized rate law of mineral dissolution - precipitation reactions derived from the transition state theory was used for dissolution - precipitation of silica, aluminosilicate, carbonate, oxyhydroxide, and sulphide minerals. The kinetic parameters are compiled from the literature measurements based on laboratory constrained experiments and field observations. Numerical simulations, using the geochemical software PHREEQC, were performed aiming to identify the key reactions mediated by microbes in the framework of in the first hand the concept of the unsaturated - saturated zones of an

  13. Center of mass velocity during diffusion: Comparisons of fluid and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, Erik; Yin, Lin; Taitano, William; Molvig, Kim; Albright, B. J.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the diffusion process between two ideal gases mixing across an initial discontinuity by comparing fluid and kinetic model results and find several similarities between ideal gases and plasma transport. Binary diffusion requires a net zero species mass flux in the Lagrange frame to assure momentum conservation in collisions. Diffusion between ideal gases is often assumed to be isobaric and isothermal which requires constant molar density. We show this condition exists only in the lab frame at late times (many collision times) after a pressure transient relaxes. The sum of molar flux across an initial discontinuity is non-zero for species of differing atomic masses resulting in a pressure perturbation. The results show three phases of mixing: a pressure discontinuity forms across the initial interface (times of a few collisions), pressure perturbations propagate away from the mix region (time scales of an acoustic transit) and at late times characteristic of the diffusion process, the pressure relaxes leaving a non-zero center of mass flow velocity. The center of mass velocity associated with the outward propagating pressure waves is required to conserve momentum in the rest frame. Implications are considered in multi-species diffusion numerics and in applications. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program.

  14. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory`s site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone {sup 14}C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect {sup 14}C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies.

  15. Equilibrium, chemical kinetic, and transport limitations to diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Edward Anthony

    Because of their extreme properties, diamond films have found some industrial applications, i.e., heat sinks and tool coatings. However, to increase their economic attractiveness, the growth rate must be increased, the deposition temperature must be lowered, and single crystal films must be achieved. We have studied two types of chemical vapor deposition systems, hot-filament and microwave assisted, in order to understand the factors limiting diamond growth rate. From simultaneous microbalance growth rate measurements and mass spectrometer measurements, changes in growth rate are correlated with changes in gas phase composition. Measured reaction orders support the proposal that diamond growth occurs through a single-carbon-atom species, e.g., CHsb3. When a two-carbon atom source gas is used, it is likely that the dissociation to two, single-carbon atom species occurs on the substrate surface (dissociative adsorption). Furthermore, a shift to zero-order suggests that the diamond growth is a surface-site limited process at higher hydrocarbon concentrations. The diamond growth rate maximum with pressure is explained by transport limitations of species within the reaction zone. The reported diamond growth rates in the hot-filament reactor are several times higher than those reported by other research groups. These higher growth rates result from surrounding the substrate with the filament. We have used the measured growth rates, filament temperatures, and thermocouple measurements to calculate activation energies for diamond growth. When the filament temperature is used for the calculation, an activation energy of 73 kcal per mole is obtained; however, based on estimated substrate temperatures, an activation energy of 18 kcal per mole is determined. A dimensional analysis approach was developed to select the most important gas phase reactions occurring during diamond CVD. Steady-state analysis of these reactions and the application of mass transport equations lead to

  16. Microelectrode measurements of local mass transport rates in heterogeneous biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, K; Lewandowski, Z

    1998-08-05

    Microelectrodes were used to measure oxygen profiles and local mass transfer coefficient profiles in biofilm clusters and interstitial voids. Both profiles were measured at the same location in the biofilm. From the oxygen profile, the effective diffusive boundary layer thickness (DBL) was determined. The local mass transfer coefficient profiles provided information about the nature of mass transport near and within the biofilm. All profiles were measured at three different average flow velocities, 0.62, 1.53, and 2.60 cm sec-1, to determine the influence of flow velocity on mass transport. Convective mass transport was active near the biofilm/liquid interface and in the upper layers of the biofilm, independent of biofilm thickness and flow velocity. The DBL varied strongly between locations for the same flow velocities. Oxygen and local mass transfer coefficient profiles collected through a 70 micrometer thick cluster revealed that a cluster of that thickness did not present any significant mass transport resistance. In a 350 micrometer thick biofilm cluster, however, the local mass transfer coefficient decreased gradually to very low values near the substratum. This was hypothetically attributed to the decreasing effective diffusivity in deeper layers of biofilms. Interstitial voids between clusters did not seem to influence the local mass transfer coefficients significantly for flow velocities of 1.53 and 2.60 cm sec-1. At a flow velocity of 0.62 cm sec-1, interstitial voids visibly decreased the local mass transfer coefficient near the bottom. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  18. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  19. MODELLING SEDIMENT TRANSPORT FOR THE LAKE MICHIGAN MASS BALANCE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sediment transport model is one component of the overall ensemble of models being developed for the Lake Michigan Mass Balance. The SEDZL model is being applied to simulate the fine-grained sediment transport in Lake Michigan for the 1982-1983 and 1994-1995 periods. Model perf...

  20. Mass and momentum turbulent transport experiments with confined coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of coaxial jets discharging into an expanded circular duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two components of velocity data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two-color LV system. A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems.

  1. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    The downstream mixing of coaxial jets discharging in an expanded duct was studied to improve turbulent transport models which are used in computational procedures throughout the propulsion community for combustor flow modeling. Laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques were used to measure velocities and concentration and flow visualization techniques to determine the time dependent characteristics of the flow and the scale of the turbulent structure.

  2. Mass Transportation Operators' Beliefs about Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Pamela A.

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated 171 mass transit operators' beliefs about blindness and the factors that may influence their beliefs. There were statistically significant differences among transit operators' beliefs on the basis of the operators' ethnicity. White participants had significantly fewer irrational beliefs about blindness than Hispanic and…

  3. Mass Transportation Operators' Beliefs about Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Pamela A.

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated 171 mass transit operators' beliefs about blindness and the factors that may influence their beliefs. There were statistically significant differences among transit operators' beliefs on the basis of the operators' ethnicity. White participants had significantly fewer irrational beliefs about blindness than Hispanic and…

  4. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; Strydom, Gerhard; Windes, William E.

    2017-09-01

    For the next generation of nuclear reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress warrants inclusion in the license applications of many international regulators. Much research on oxidation rates of various graphite grades under a number of conditions has been undertaken to address such an event. However, consequences to the reactor result from the microstructural changes to the graphite rather than directly from oxidation. The microstructure is inherent to a graphite's properties and ultimately degradation to the graphite's performance must be determined to establish the safety of reactor design. To understand the oxidation induced microstructural change and its corresponding impact on performance, a thorough understanding of the reaction system is needed. This article provides a thorough review of the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction in terms of kinetics, mass and energy transport, and structural evolution: all three play a significant role in the observed rate of graphite oxidation. These provide the foundations of a microstructurally informed model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system, a model kinetically independent of graphite grade, and capable of describing both the observed and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

  5. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  6. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  7. Microvascular Materials for Mass and Energy Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    2D vs. 3D : Visualizing Reacivity! 2D 3D Nguyen, Leho, Esser-Kahn Lab Chip 2012 2.96 ± .35 mol/m2 hr 1.66 ± .17 mol/m2 hr Mass...Celery! Lithography Big Mac Assembly Celery Assembly 3D Techniques HRL AMS Fibers Can be Woven Into Composite Materials! Channel extends over...Structures Mammal Fish 3D Gas Exchange Unit Just how efficient are natural structures?! Merck – Lung Guide! Breathing Capacity of Lung 3 million

  8. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  9. A First Principles Study of Mass Transport in the Dehydrogenation of Lithium Amides and Lithium Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolih, Biljana

    The pursuit of competitive alternatives to energy derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, has led to a great variety of new technologies. Exceptional develop- ments in electrochemical storage and production promise to lead to clean burning passenger vehicles. The high chemical density of a hydrogen fuel cell enables it to meet current standards for driving range and weight required of vehicles, making it an excellent candidate for universal application in the automotive industry. One of the biggest obstacles the fuel cell industry has yet to overcome is the means of practical hydrogen storage. Solid state metal hydrides are a class of materials that show potential for both economic and practical hydrogen storage. The search for the ideal metal hydride is defined by thermodynamic and kinetic constraints, since the requirements for a viable system are a rapid release of hydrogen in the temperature range of -40°C, to 80°C. First-principles density functional theory is an excellent method for gaining insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of metal hydride solid state reactions. In the work presented here, density functional theory is used to explore formation energies, concentrations and migration barriers of metal hydrides. In particular, the following systems were analyzed: • Li - N - H It is well known that the reactive hydride composite LiNH 2 + LiH reversibly releases a large amount of hydrogen gas, with more favorable thermodynamics than LiNH2 alone. Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of LiNH2 + LiH are investigated. A model is developed for determining activation energies of native defects in bulk crystals. In order to establish whether mass transport is the rate-limiting step in the dehydrogenation reaction, results are compared to experimental values. • Li - Al - H Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of the metal hydride LiAlH2 are investigated. It is known that LiAlH4 endothermically decomposes via a two

  10. Kinetic and phylogenetic analysis of plant polyamine uptake transporters.

    PubMed

    Mulangi, Vaishali; Chibucos, Marcus C; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Morris, Paul F

    2012-10-01

    The rice gene Polyamine Uptake Transporter1 (PUT1) was originally identified based on its homology to the polyamine uptake transporters LmPOT1 and TcPAT12 in Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi, respectively. Here we show that five additional transporters from rice and Arabidopsis that cluster in the same clade as PUT1 all function as high affinity spermidine uptake transporters. Yeast expression assays of these genes confirmed that uptake of spermidine was minimally affected by 166 fold or greater concentrations of amino acids. Characterized polyamine transporters from both Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa along with the two polyamine transporters from L. major and T. cruzi were aligned and used to generate a hidden Markov model. This model was used to identify significant matches to proteins in other angiosperms, bryophytes, chlorophyta, discicristates, excavates, stramenopiles and amoebozoa. No significant matches were identified in fungal or metazoan genomes. Phylogenic analysis showed that some sequences from the haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi, as well as sequences from oomycetes and diatoms clustered closer to sequences from plant genomes than from a homologous sequence in the red algal genome Galdieria sulphuraria, consistent with the hypothesis that these polyamine transporters were acquired by horizontal transfer from green algae. Leishmania and Trypansosoma formed a separate cluster with genes from other Discicristates and two Entamoeba species. We surmise that the genes in Entamoeba species were acquired by phagotrophy of Discicristates. In summary, phylogenetic and functional analysis has identified two clades of genes that are predictive of polyamine transport activity.

  11. Platelet serotonin transporter (5HTt): physiological influences on kinetic characteristics in a large human population.

    PubMed

    Banović, Miroslav; Bordukalo-Niksić, Tatjana; Balija, Melita; Cicin-Sain, Lipa; Jernej, Branimir

    2010-01-01

    The present study had two goals: first, to give a detailed description of a reliable method for full kinetic analysis of serotonin transporter (5HTt) on the membrane of human platelets, and second, as a main issue, to report on physiological influences on kinetic characteristics of this transmembrane transport on a large population of healthy individuals. Full kinetic analyses of platelet serotonin uptake were performed on 334 blood donors of both sexes by the use of 14C-radioisotopic method, which was first optimized according to assumptions of enzyme kinetic analyses, with regard to platelet concentration, duration of uptake, concentration of substrate as well as important technical parameters (underpressure of filtration, blanks, incubating temperature, etc). Kinetic parameters of platelet serotonin uptake in the whole population were for V(max): 142 +/- 25.3 pmol 5HT/10(8) platelets/minute and for K(m): 0.404 +/- 0.089 microM 5HT. Besides the report on kinetic values of 5HT transporter protein, we have also described major physiological influences on the mentioned parameters, V(max), K(m) and their derivative, V(max)/K(m) (transporter efficiency): range and frequency distribution of normal values, intraindividual stability over time, lack of age influence, gender dependence and seasonal variations. The report on kinetic values and main physiological influences on platelet serotonin transport kinetics, obtained by the use of thoroughly reassessed methodology, and on by far the largest human population studied until now, offers a reliable frame of reference for pathophysiological studies of this parameter in various clinical fields.

  12. Mass transport limitation in implantable defibrillator batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.; Tam, G.; Scott, E.; Norton, J.; Chen, K.

    Using cells with lithium reference electrodes, the power-limiting behavior in the lithium-SVO cell was shown to be due to a rapid voltage transition at the anode. A novel test cell was developed to explore the influence of current density, bulk LiAsF 6 concentration, separator type and separator proximity to the anode on the time to onset ( τ) of the anode polarization. The results were found to follow a relationship, iτ1/2∝ Cbulk, consistent with the Sand equation. This relationship also predicts that the critical concentration of LiAsF 6, at which onset of the anode polarization occurs, is near the solubility limit of LiAsF 6 in our system (around 3.5-4.0 M). This general phenomenon was found to be quantitatively similar for two dissimilar separator types, and the anode polarization could also be induced in the absence of separator at high concentration and current density. However, it appears that τ decreases with closer proximity of the separator to the anode surface (i.e. cell stack pressure), suggesting that the effect of separator is to inhibit convective transport to and from the Li surface.

  13. Isotopic and trace element sensors for fluid flow, heat- and mass transport in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaolo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The flow of fluids through fractured rocks is critically important in hydrothermal systems associated with geothermal energy production, base metal ore deposits, and global geochemical cycles through the enormous volumes of fluids in mid-ocean ridge systems. The nature of heat and mass transport in hydrothermal systems is determined by the spacing and volume of fractures, the nature of chemical transport in matrix blocks between fractures, the dissolution and precipitation rates of minerals in the matrix blocks, and the rates of fluid flow. Directly measuring these properties in active systems is extremely difficult, but the chemical and isotopic composition of fluids, where they can be adequately sampled, provides this information in coded form. Deciphering the signals requires appropriate models for the mineral-fluid chemical reactions and transport in the inter-fracture rock matrix. Ultimately, numerical reactive transport models are required to properly account for coupling between mineral reaction kinetics and fluid phase transport, but it is surprisingly difficult to adequately represent isotopic exchange in these models. The difficulty comes partly from the additional bookkeeping that is necessary, but more fundamentally from limitations in the detailed molecular dynamics of the mineral-fluid interfaces and how they control isotopic exchange and partitioning. Nevertheless, relatively simple analytical models illustrate how the isotopic and trace element composition of fluids relates to fracture aperture and spacing, mineral dissolution kinetics, competition between diffusive and advective transport, and competition between chemical exchange and heat exchange. The large number of geochemical parameters that can be measured potentially allows for detailed characterization of the effective mass transport and system characteristics like average fracture spacing and mineral dissolution rates. Examples of useful analytical models and applications to available data

  14. Automated analysis of single and joint kinetic and morphologic features for non-masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2012-06-01

    The evaluation of kinetic and/or morphologic characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have not well-dened and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these diculties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphologic descriptors separately, and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions. We additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  15. The Role of Mass Transport Limitation and Surface Heterogeneity in the Biophysical Characterization of Macromolecular Binding Processes by SPR Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Peter; Zhao, Huaying

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to the kinetic analysis of SPR biosensor data for the determination of affinity and kinetic rate constants of biomolecular interactions between an immobilized and a soluble binding partner. The need to be aware of and critically tests the assumptions underlying the analysis models is emphasized and the consequences for the experimental design are discussed. The two most common sources of deviation in SPR surface binding kinetics from the ideal pseudo-first order binding kinetics of bimolecular reactions are mass transport limitations and the heterogeneity of the surface sites. These problems are intrinsic to the use of a biosensor surface for characterizing interactions. The effect of these factors on the observed binding kinetics, and strategies to account for them are reviewed, both in the context of mathematical data analysis, as well as the design of the experiments and controls. PMID:20217612

  16. Investigating Mass Transport Limitations on Xylan Hydrolysis During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heid M.; Parent, Yves; Chatterjee, Siddharth G.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Yarbrough, John M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-04-28

    Mass transport limitations could be an impediment to achieving high sugar yields during biomass pretreatment and thus be a critical factor in the economics of biofuels production. The objective of this work was to study the mass transfer restrictions imposed by the structure of biomass on the hydrolysis of xylan during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Mass transfer effects were studied by pretreating poplar wood at particle sizes ranging from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work showed a significant reduction in the rate of xylan hydrolysis in poplar when compared to the intrinsic rate of hydrolysis for isolated xylan that is possible in the absence of mass transfer. In poplar samples we observed no significant difference in the rates of xylan hydrolysis over more than two orders of magnitude in particle size. It appears that no additional mass transport restrictions are introduced by increasing particle size from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work suggests that the rates of xylan hydrolysis in biomass particles are limited primarily by the diffusion of hydrolysis products out of plant cell walls. A mathematical description is presented to describe the kinetics of xylan hydrolysis that includes transport of the hydrolysis products through biomass into the bulk solution. The modeling results show that the effective diffusion coefficient of the hydrolysis products in the cell wall is several orders of magnitude smaller than typical values in other applications signifying the role of plant cell walls in offering resistance to diffusion of the hydrolysis products.

  17. NO sub x -char reactions: Kinetics and transport aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    The present project is motivated by the need to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from combustors, especially coal combustors. Reactions with carbon are known to be effective at reducing No to N{sub 2}, and remain interesting candidates in a wide variety of possible applications. These reactions are known to be important in reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fluidized bed coal combustors, in which the coal char itself serves as the reducing agent. The principal goal of this project is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the processes by which carbons reduce NO to N{sub 2}. The carbon was a char derived from phenol-formaldehyde resin. This material has been noted to be a reasonable model for coal chars in most respects, expect that its gasification behavior is not complicated by catalytic processes due to minerals. In the first phases of the project, the global kinetics of the process were established. In more recent work, attention has been turned to the individual steps in the mechanism. Recent quarterly reports have detailed the role of both chemisorption and desorption processes in determining the course and kinetics of the process. This report continues the reporting of results obtained along these lines, and draws an important new conclusion concerning the number of separate processes involved in determining the kinetics. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Transport kinetics of ectoine, an osmolyte produced by Brevibacterium epidermis.

    PubMed

    Onraedt, A; De Mey, M; Walcarius, B; Soetaert, W; Vandamme, E J

    2006-11-01

    Brevibacterium epidermis DSM 20659 is a halotolerant Gram-positive bacterium which can synthesize the osmolyte, ectoine, but prefers to take it up from its environment. The present study revealed that B. epidermis is equipped with at least one transport system for ectoine, with a maximal transport velocity of 15.7 +/- 4.3 nmol/g CDW.min. The transport requires energy (ATP) and is completely inhibited by the proton uncoupler, CCCP. The ectoine uptake system is constitutively expressed at a basal level of activity and its activity is immediately 10-fold increased by hyper-osmotic stress. Initial uptake rates are not influenced by the intensity of the hyper-osmotic shock but the duration of the increased activity of the uptake system could be directly related to the osmotic strength of the assay solution. Competition assays indicate that betaine, but not proline, is also transported by the ectoine uptake system.

  19. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  20. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  1. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C; Jansen, A P J

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  2. Non-Fickian mass transport in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Chugunov, Vladimir A.; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    2011-02-01

    The paper provides an introduction to fundamental concepts of mathematical modeling of mass transport in fractured porous heterogeneous rocks. Keeping aside many important factors that can affect mass transport in subsurface, our main concern is the multi-scale character of the rock formation, which is constituted by porous domains dissected by the network of fractures. Taking into account the well-documented fact that porous rocks can be considered as a fractal medium and assuming that sizes of pores vary significantly (i.e. have different characteristic scales), the fractional-order differential equations that model the anomalous diffusive mass transport in such type of domains are derived and justified analytically. Analytical solutions of some particular problems of anomalous diffusion in the fractal media of various geometries are obtained. Extending this approach to more complex situation when diffusion is accompanied by advection, solute transport in a fractured porous medium is modeled by the advection-dispersion equation with fractional time derivative. In the case of confined fractured porous aquifer, accounting for anomalous non-Fickian diffusion in the surrounding rock mass, the adopted approach leads to introduction of an additional fractional time derivative in the equation for solute transport. The closed-form solutions for concentrations in the aquifer and surrounding rocks are obtained for the arbitrary time-dependent source of contamination located in the inlet of the aquifer. Based on these solutions, different regimes of contamination of the aquifers with different physical properties can be readily modeled and analyzed.

  3. Optical Field-Induced Mass Transport in Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teteris, J.; Reinfelde, M.; Aleksejeva, J.; Gertners, U.

    The dependence of the surface relief formation in amorphous chalcogenide (As2S3 and As-S-Se) and Disperse Red 1 dye grafted polyurethane polymer films on the polarization state of holographic recording light beams was studied. It is shown that the direction of lateral mass transport on the film surface is determined by the direction of light electric vector and photoinduced anisotropy in the film. We propose a photoinduced dielectropfhoretic model to explain the photoinduced mass transport in amorphous films. Model is based on the photoinduced softening of the matrix, formation of defects with enhanced or decreased polarizability, and their drift under the electrical field gradient of light.

  4. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments with Confined Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Downstream mixing of coaxial jets discharging in an expanded duct was studied to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the propulsion community for combustor flow modeling. Flow visualization studies showed four major shear regions occurring; a wake region immediately downstream of the inlet jet inlet duct; a shear region further downstream between the inner and annular jets; a recirculation zone; and a reattachment zone. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two velocity component data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two color laser velocimeter (LV) system. Axial, radial and azimuthal velocities and turbulent momentum transport rate measurements in the r-z and r-theta planes were used to determine the mean value, second central moment (or rms fluctuation from mean), skewness and kurtosis for each data set probability density function (p.d.f.). A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data were obtained system. Velocity and mass transport in all three directions as well as concentration distributions were used to obtain the mean, second central moments, skewness and kurtosis for each p.d.f. These LV/LIF measurements also exposed the existence of a large region of countergradient turbulent axial mass transport in the region where the annular jet fluid was accelerating the inner jet fluid.

  5. Kinetics of vertical transport and localization of electrons in strained semiconductor supperlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G. Mamaev, Yu. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.

    2015-08-15

    The kinetics of vertical electron transport in a semiconductor superlattice is considered taking into account partial localization of electrons. The time dependences of photoemission currents from samples based on a strained semiconductor superlattice calculated by numerically solving the kinetic equation are in good agreement with experimental data. Comparison of the theory with experiment makes it possible to determine the characteristic electron localization and thermoactivation times, the diffusion length, and losses of photoelectrons in the superlattice.

  6. Oscillatory kinetics of gene expression: Protein conversion and slow mRNA transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2009-06-15

    The negative feedback between mRNA and regulatory-protein production may result in oscillations in the kinetics of gene expression if the mRNA-protein interplay includes protein conversion. Using a mean-field kinetic model, we show that such oscillations can be amplified due to limitations of the mRNA transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm. This effect may be dramatic for the mRNA population in the nucleus.

  7. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  8. A Study of Ocean Mass and Transport with Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Wei

    We use GRACE data and estimates of ice sheet mass balance by the mass budget method to study regional ocean mass changes. Regional ocean mass varies because of ocean dynamics and gravitational attraction resulted from mass redistribution within the Earth system and associated crustal deformation. The effects combining gravitational attraction and crustal deformation are commonly called the sea level fingerprint (SLF). We focus on the SLF due to its large cumulative sea level potential and importance for accurate ocean mass estimates over regional scales. We conduct SLF sensitivity test with the mass estimate over the ice sheet regions from the mass budget method. Our tests show that the required accuracy of mass load estimates on land can be achieved by using GRACE data. We determine a set of improved scaling factors to restore the magnitude of the GRACE signal attenuated from a series of processing steps applied to remove systematic noise. We derive the SLF signals by accounting the mass load changes in the whole Earth system from GRACE. The SLF is validated with in-situ ocean bottom pressure measurements and sea level derived from steric-corrected altimetry. The validations show good agreement in the seasonal signal at the 1-degree resolution. We investigate the ocean transport error due to SLF signal in the North Atlantic. A spurious meridional geostrophic transport is created due to the SLF gradient across the Atlantic ocean. This spurious transport is equivalent to half of the seasonal variation in the upper mid-ocean geostrophic transport shown in the in-situ transport measurements. The work shows the importance of removing SLF in OBP measurements used to derive geostrophic flow. GRACE provides valuable constraints for extracting the ocean bottom pressure estimates. We introduced an improved ocean bottom pressure product from GRACE which can be used to study mass and current changes near coastal regions. This required removing the land mass change signal

  9. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  10. Influence of binder properties on kinetic and transport processes in polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Satheesh; Ramani, Vijay

    2010-06-21

    The objectives of this study are to estimate the contributions of kinetic, ohmic and mass transport overpotentials to the overall voltage loss in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrodes and to relate these overpotentials to electrode binder properties such as ionic conductivity, ion exchange capacity (IEC) and O(2) permeability. The model electrode binders studied were perfluorosulfonic acid ionomers (PFSA; of IECs 1.35 meq g(-1) and 0.95 meq g(-1)), sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK; of IECs 1.35, 1.75 and 2.1 meq g(-1)) and sulfonated poly sulfone (SPSU; of IEC 1.5 meq g(-1)). The O(2) permeability of these binders varied from 0.15 x 10(-12) mol cm(-1) s(-1) for SPSU to 6 x 10(-12) mol cm(-1) s(-1) for PFSA IEC 0.95 meq g(-1) at 80 degrees C and 75%RH. The electrodes prepared were characterized by cyclic voltammetry to estimate electrochemically active surface area (ECA) of platinum. Steady state polarization (V-I) experiments were performed with hydrogen as fuel and oxidants including O(2), 21% O(2)/N(2) (air), 21% O(2)/He (Helox) and 4% O(2)/N(2). The V-I data obtained was analyzed to determine the relative contributions of the different sources of polarization in the electrode. Electrodes prepared with PFSA binders had similar ECAs of 28 m(2) g(-1)-Pt, while those prepared using hydrocarbon binders had an ECA of 10 to 14 m(2) g(-1)-Pt at 80 degrees C and 75%RH. The same trend was seen in mass activity. At optimized binder loadings, a semi-quantitative relationship was obtained relating binder O(2) permeability to the mass transport losses within the electrode. Furthermore, a novel semi-quantitative method of plotting helox-air voltage gain against O(2)-air gain was employed to probe the O(2) transport limitations in the electrodes. Based on this analysis, it is suggested that the SPEEK and SPSU bound electrodes suffered from binder phase diffusion limitations in addition to gas phase diffusion limitation, while the PFSA bound

  11. Mass transfer and transport in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Ahn, J.; Kajiwara, S.; Kim, C.L.; Kimura, H.; Lung, H.; Williams, W.J.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report is in a continuing series of reports that present analytic solutions for the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides from geologic repositories of nuclear waste. Previous reports have dealt mainly with radionuclide transport in the far-field, away from the effects of the repository. In the present report, the emphasis is on near-field processes, the transfer and transport of radionuclides in the vicinity of the waste packages. The primary tool used in these analyses is mass transfer theory from chemical engineering. The thrust of our work is to develop methods for predicting the performance of geologic repositories. The subjects treated in the present report are: radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill; analysis of radionuclide transport through a backfill using a non-linear sorption isotherm; radionuclide transport from a prolate spheroid-equivalent waste form with a backfill; radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill, where the solubility, diffusivity and retardation coefficients are temperature dependent; a coupled near-field, far-field analysis where dissolution and migration rates are temperature dependent; transport of radionuclides from a point source in a three-dimensional flow field; and a general solution for the transport of radioactive chains in geologic media. There are several important results from the numerical evaluations. First, radioactive decay, higher sorption in the rock and the backfill steepens the gradient for mass transfer, and lead to higher dissolution rates. This is contrary to what was expected by some other workers, but is shown clearly in the analytical solutions. Second, the backfill serves to provide sorption sites so that there is a delay in the arrival of radionuclides in the rock, although this effect is not so important for the steady-state transport of long-lived radionuclides.

  12. Thermochemical conversion of biomass in smouldering combustion across scales: The roles of heterogeneous kinetics, oxygen and transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyan; Rein, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass in smouldering combustion is investigated here by combining experiments and modeling at two scales: matter (1mg) and bench (100g) scales. Emphasis is put on the effect of oxygen (0-33vol.%) and oxidation reactions because these are poorly studied in the literature in comparison to pyrolysis. The results are obtained for peat as a representative biomass for which there is high-quality experimental data published previously. Three kinetic schemes are explored, including various steps of drying, pyrolysis and oxidation. The kinetic parameters are found using the Kissinger-Genetic Algorithm method, and then implemented in a one-dimensional model of heat and mass transfer. The predictions are validated with thermogravimetric and bench-scale experiments and then analyzed to unravel the role of heterogeneous reaction. This is the first time that the influence of oxygen on biomass smouldering is explained in terms of both chemistry and transport phenomena across scales.

  13. Amino acid carryover in the subzonal space of mouse fertilized ova affects subsequent transport kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rudraraju, Nirmala; Baltz, Jay M

    2009-11-01

    SummaryWe have investigated whether culture in glycine-containing medium affects subsequent glycine transport by the specific transport system, GLYT1, which is the sole glycine transporter in fertilized mouse ova. When fertilized ova were maintained for 6 h in culture with a physiological level of glycine (1 mM), subsequent transport of radiolabelled glycine was decreased by 40% compared with fertilized ova that had been maintained in glycine-free medium. Kinetic measurements showed that the apparent glycine affinity was decreased after culture with glycine (Km increased from 0.20 to 0.41 mM), but maximal transport rate was unchanged (similar Vmax of 20 and 23 fmol/fertilized ovum/min). These findings could have reflected activation of GLYT1 by prolonged substrate starvation, similar to some other amino acid transport systems. However, our findings were instead consistent with the alteration in glycine transport being due to trapping of glycine within the zona pellucida resulting in competitive transport inhibition even after ova were removed from glycine-containing media. First, even very brief exposures to glycine resulted in decreased subsequent glycine transport rates, with a maximal effect apparent within ~6 min. Second, extensive washing (at least six) reversed the effect. Third, the effect was absent when zona-free fertilized ova were used. Thus, it appears that components of the external environment of preimplantation embryos may continue to affect transport kinetics for a period even after embryos are removed from environments that contain them.

  14. Electrodiffusion kinetics of ionic transport in a simple membrane channel.

    PubMed

    Valent, Ivan; Petrovič, Pavol; Neogrády, Pavel; Schreiber, Igor; Marek, Miloš

    2013-11-21

    We employ numerical techniques for solving time-dependent full Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations in 2D to analyze transient behavior of a simple ion channel subject to a sudden electric potential jump across the membrane (voltage clamp). Calculated spatiotemporal profiles of the ionic concentrations and electric potential show that two principal exponential processes can be distinguished in the electrodiffusion kinetics, in agreement with original Planck's predictions. The initial fast process corresponds to the dielectric relaxation, while the steady state is approached in a second slower exponential process attributed to the nonlinear ionic redistribution. Effects of the model parameters such as the channel length, height of the potential step, boundary concentrations, permittivity of the channel interior, and ionic mobilities on electrodiffusion kinetics are studied. Numerical solutions are used to determine spatiotemporal profiles of the electric field, ionic fluxes, and both the conductive and displacement currents. We demonstrate that the displacement current is a significant transient component of the total electric current through the channel. The presented results provide additional information about the classical voltage-clamp problem and offer further physical insights into the mechanism of electrodiffusion. The used numerical approach can be readily extended to multi-ionic models with a more structured domain geometry in 2D or 3D, and it is directly applicable to other systems, such as synthetic nanopores, nanofluidic channels, and nanopipettes.

  15. Kinetic ballooning modes at the tokamak transport barrier with negative magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagiwa, M.; Hirose, A.; Elia, M.

    1997-11-01

    Stability of the kinetic ballooning modes is investigated for plasma parameters at the internal transport barrier in tokamak discharges with negative magnetic shear employing a kinetic shooting code with long shooting distance. It is found that the second stability regime with respect to the pressure gradient parameter, which was predicted for negative shear [A. Hirose and M. Elia, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 76}, 628 (1996)], can possibly disappear. The mode with comparatively low toroidal mode number and mode frequency below 100 kHz is found to be destabilized marginally only around the transport barrier characterized by steep pressure and density gradients. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Impact of anomalous transport kinetics on the progress of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Javierre, E

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the transport kinetics of chemical and cellular species during wound healing. Anomalous transport kinetics, coupling sub- and superdiffusion with chemotaxis, and fractional viscoelasticity of soft tissues are analyzed from a modeling point of view. The paper presents a generalization of well stablished mechano-chemical models of wound contraction (Murphy et al., 2012; Valero et al., 2014) to include the previously mentioned anomalous effects by means of partial differential equations of fractional order. Results show the effect that anomalous dynamics have on the contraction rate and extension and on the distribution of biological species, and indicators of fibroproliferative disorders are identified.

  17. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients.more » The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.« less

  18. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients. The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.

  19. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients. The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.

  20. Degree-1 Surface Mass Transport and Geocenter Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The longest-wavelength and hemisphere asymmetric surface mass transport is characterized by three degree-one spherical harmonic components. Such mass transport modes cause geocenter motion between the center-of-mass of the total Earth system (CM) and the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface (CF), and deforms the solid Earth. GRACE's K-band ranging data system is not sensitive to these three variation modes. For a complete spherical harmonic spectral coverage of mass transport, degree-1 surface mass changes estimated through geocenter motion or degree-1 mass/deformation signatures from other space geodetic techniques should be combined with GRACE's time-variable gravity data. The degree-1 coefficients are critically important for mass variation assessments over large regions. For example, 1 mm error in geocenter motion can result in an error of 190 gigatons of global oceanic water mass change or, equivalently, an error of 0.5 mm of global mean sea level change when the geocenter motion is converted to degree-1 mass and combined with GRACE data. Yet, several different methods of geocenter motion estimation differ in results by more than 1 mm in annual amplitude. These differences have to be resolved after 13 years of successful GRACE operation. Recently, the difference between results from direct satellite laser ranging (SLR) determination and from a global inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) deformation measurements, GRACE, and an ocean bottom pressure (OBP) model has been largely reconciled as due to SLR's sparse station distribution. This result and our current efforts to examine possible systematic errors in GNSS data and the OBP model will be discussed along with a future perspective.

  1. Mass Transport Through Carbon Nanotube-Polystyrene Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Rongzhou; Tran, Tuan

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely used as test channels to study nanofluidic transport, which has been found to have distinctive properties compared to transport of fluids in macroscopic channels. A long-standing challenge in the study of mass transport through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is the determination of flow enhancement. Various experimental investigations have been conducted to measure the flow rate through CNTs, mainly based on either vertically aligned CNT membranes or individual CNTs. Here, we proposed an alternative approach that can be used to quantify the mass transport through CNTs. This is a simple method relying on the use of carbon nanotube-polystyrene bundles, which are made of CNTs pulled out from a vertically aligned CNT array and glued together by polystyrene. We experimentally showed by using fluorescent tagging that the composite bundles allowed measureable and selective mass transport through CNTs. This type of composite bundle may be useful in various CNT research areas as they are simple to fabricate, less likely to form macroscopic cracks, and offer a high density of CNT pores while maintaining the aligned morphology of CNTs.

  2. Kinetic Theory in Hot Plasmas and Neutral Gases Applications to the Computation of the transport coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    The conference is devoted to the study of systems consisting of a large number of particles by using the kinetic theory. In a first part, we present a general overview of the kinetic theory. In particular, the role of the correlations between particles is shown and discussed through the main models reported in the literature. In a second part, we present three applications to the transport properties in plasmas and neutral gases. The first application is devoted to the transport in hot plasmas perturbed with respect to the global equilibrium. The quasi-static and collisionless distribution function and transport coefficients are established. The influence of relativistic effects is also discussed. The second application deals with strongly inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas. The transport coefficients of Braginskii are calculated numerically in the local and the weakly nonlocal approximations. New nonlocal transport coefficients are emphasized. Finally, we apply the kinetic theory to the neutral gases by calculating the semi-collisional dispersion relation of acoustic waves. In particular, the dispersion and the damping of these waves in rarefied gases are highlighted. The method used to solve the kinetic equations is compared with the conventional method of Chapman-Enskog.

  3. Mass transport mechanism in porous fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, I.; Lindholm, I.

    1969-01-01

    Results of experiments on hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells show that higher current densities are obtained with cell anodes having a 100 micron thin active layer of porous nickel containing silver electrocatalyst. Increase in current density is attributed to a convective mass transport mechanism.

  4. Mass Transport by Second Mode Internal Solitary Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    published: Salloum, Knio & Brandt (2012). Preliminary experimental results have been presented at the APS DFD meeting: Brandt, et al. (2011) and...of Fluid Dynamics ( DFD ), 20-22 November 2011, Baltimore, MD. Salloum, M., Knio, O.M., Brandt, A., “Numerical Simulation of Mass Transport in

  5. Kinetic aspects of ion transport through neural membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, John R.; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    1984-02-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley model for the nerve membrane action potential is reviewed. The model can be described in terms of channels and gates. That is, ions permeate the nerve membrane through narrow ion specific pores, or channels, which are modulated by a voltage dependent gating process. The Hodgkin-Huxley model provides a detailed kinetic scheme for channel gating, but not for channel permeation. Radioactive tracer flux experiments suggest that permeation occurs via single file motion of ions through a channel. We have modeled this process as a random walk with internal states. The theory leads to expressions for one way fluxes which can be compared with experimental tracer flux data. Recent experiments on channel gating have indicated that the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the gating process requires certain modifications. We present a class of modifications involving temporal memory of gating and interactions between gating particles of any single channel. Thses models can also be described in terms of random walks.

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of the adsorption behavior and mass transfer kinetics of propranolol enantiomers on cellulase protein as the selector

    SciTech Connect

    Fornstedt, T.; Zhong, G.; Bensetiti, Z.; Guiochon, G. |

    1996-07-15

    The thermodynamics and mass transfer kinetics of the retention of the R and S enantiomers of propranolol were investigated on a system comprising an acetic acid buffer solution as mobile phase and the protein cellobiohydrolase I immobilized on silica as the stationary phase. The bi-Langmuir isotherm model fitted best to each set of single-component isotherm data. The monolayer capacity of the nonchiral type of adsorption sites was 22.9 mM. For the chiral type of sites, it was 0.24 mM for the R enantiomer and 0.64 nM for the S enantiomer. Peak tailing was observed, even at very low concentrations allowing operation of the low-capacity chiral sites under linear conditions. This tailing can be explained on the basis of heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. At higher concentrations, which are often used in analytical applications, the isotherms on the chiral sites no longer have a linear behavior, and peak tailing is consequently more pronounced. Under those conditions, peak tailing originates from the combined effect of heterogeneous thermodynamics and heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. These complex phenomena are explained and modeled using the transport-dispersive model with a solid film linear driving force model modified to account for heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. The rate coefficient of the mass transfer kinetics was found to be concentration dependent. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach.

  8. Optimal Mass Transport for Shape Matching and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n2) to O(n). For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  9. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimensional transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  10. Kinetic modeling of antimony(V) adsorption-desorption and transport in soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Lulu; Zhou, Shiwei

    2014-09-01

    Antimonate [Sb(V)] adsorption-desorption and transport in an acidic red soil (Yingtan) and a calcareous soil (Huanjiang) was investigated using kinetic batch and miscible displacement experiments. Different formulations of a multi-reaction model (MRM) were evaluated for their capabilities of describing the retention and transport mechanisms of Sb(V) in soils. The experimental results showed that adsorption of Sb(V) by two soils was kinetically controlled and largely irreversible. The Sb(V) adsorption capacity and kinetic rate of the acidic red soil was much higher than that of the calcareous soil. The asymmetrical breakthrough curves indicated the strong dominance of non-equilibrium retention of Sb(V). A four step sequential extraction procedure provided evidence that majority of applied Sb(V) was irreversibly retained. A formulation of MRM with two kinetic sorption sites (reversible and irreversible) successfully described Sb(V) adsorption-desorption data. The use of kinetic batch rate coefficients for predictions of breakthrough curves (BTCs) underestimated Sb(V) retention and overestimated its mobility. In an inverse mode with optimized rate coefficients, the MRM formulation was capable of simulating Sb(V) transport in soil columns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Momentum and eddy kinetic energy transports by a multiple microburst- producing storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yeong-Jer; Coover, John A.

    1990-05-01

    A comprehensive study of the structure and internal dynamics was made for a multiple microburst-producing storm for August 5, 1982, in Colorado during the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) Project at Denver's Stapleton International Airport. The analysis levels were contained between 0.25 and 2 km. The horizontal and vertical grid spacings were 0.5 and 0.25 km, respectively. These fields were subjected to internal consistency checks to determine the level of confidence before interpretation. Results show that the combined effects of misocyclone circulations, perturbation-pressure gradients, melting, buoyancy, and precipitation loading contribute to the maintenance of the microburst downdrafts in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). At low levels where the microbursts dominate, the presence of microburst gust fronts and diverging outflow enhances the vertical transport of horizontal momentum and eddy kinetic energy. The misocyclones located above the microbursts largely determine the transport of horizontal momentum and eddy kinetic energy there. In the microburst subdomain, a net transport of horizontal momentum and eddy kinetic energy is downward from the misocyclone to the surface. Its magnitude is directly proportional to the strength of a microburst at low levels and the misocyclone aloft. Budget studies of horizontal momentum flux and eddy kinetic energy within the storm domain and the microburst subdomain have added to a further understanding of the storm's structure and internal dynamics. The pressure and buoyancy effects are two main contributors to the generation/decay of horizontal momentum fluxes and eddy kinetic energy at the microburst levels.

  12. Electrochemical kinetic and mass transfer model for direct ethanol alkaline fuel cell (DEAFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, S.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Hasran, U. A.; Masdar, M. S.; Daud, W. R. W.

    2016-07-01

    A mathematical model is developed for a liquid-feed DEAFC incorporating an alkaline anion-exchange membrane. The one-dimensional mass transport of chemical species is modelled using isothermal, single-phase and steady-state assumptions. The anode and cathode electrochemical reactions use the Tafel kinetics approach, with two limiting cases, for the reaction order. The model fully accounts for the mixed potential effects of ethanol oxidation at the cathode due to ethanol crossover via an alkaline anion-exchange membrane. In contrast to a polymer electrolyte membrane model, the current model considers the flux of ethanol at the membrane as the difference between diffusive and electroosmotic effects. The model is used to investigate the effects of the ethanol and alkali inlet feed concentrations at the anode. The model predicts that the cell performance is almost identical for different ethanol concentrations at a low current density. Moreover, the model results show that feeding the DEAFC with 5 M NaOH and 3 M ethanol at specific operating conditions yields a better performance at a higher current density. Furthermore, the model indicates that crossover effects on the DEAFC performance are significant. The cell performance decrease from its theoretical value when a parasitic current is enabled in the model.

  13. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Multiphase Combustion Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    gases; (2) demonstration that thermophoresis dominates the capture of soot particles by ther S mocouples in laminar flames and that this phenomenon can...three sections below: 2.1 Particle Mass Transfer Experiments The dominant role of thermophoresis (particle drift down a temperature gradient) in...balar a and the TC bead’s thermal response to the growing deposit (Fig. 2). Our results have been compared to a theory of particle thermophoresis in

  14. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Multiphase Combustion Systems. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    the development of: RI1 rational correction factors to account for the effects of suspended particle morphology on convective - diffusion mass...aged" polydispersed aerosols of a particular morphology by the mechanisms of convective -diffusion and, especially, thermophoresis will be close to those...alone is not enough to accurately predict convective - diffusion deposition rates, with (Section 2.2) or without simultaneous inertial effects . The

  15. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Multiphase Combustion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Even for particles small enough to be characterized by small (subcritical) Stokes numbers (Stk<<l), large inertial effects on convective - phoretic mass...function of radiative/ convective energy flux ratio and carbonaceous particle size for laminar boundary layer flow past a cooled solid surface. Large effects ...the spheres are small. Conse- phoresis and photophoresis (9). The existence quently, energy and momentum convection of such effects has indeed been

  16. Development of a hybrid kinetic-fluid model for line radiation transport in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Reiter, D.; Stamm, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a transport model for the Lyman line radiation in optically thick divertor plasma conditions encountered in exhaust systems in magnetic fusion devices. The model is designed to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions and to the spectral range. A kinetic treatment is retained for photons with a large mean free path (line wings), whereas a continuum description of the radiation field is invoked in highly absorbing or scattering regions (core photons). Prototypical calculations of this so-called δf Monte Carlo type of the Lyman α photo-excitation rate in slab geometry are performed as an illustration. The hybrid method is suggested as a candidate for speeding up the kinetic transport codes currently involved in magnetic fusion research for ITER and DEMO divertor (power and particle exhaust system) design.

  17. Demonstrating the influence of compression on artery wall mass transport.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Barry M; Walsh, Michael T

    2010-04-01

    The development of restenosis within the coronary arteries after a stenting procedure has been addressed with the development of the drug eluting stent device. However, in recent times the superiority of the drug eluting stent over bare metal stents has been brought into question. A lack of knowledge regarding the behavior of drug transport from the drug eluting devices contributes to this uncertainty. Questions arise as to whether drug eluting stents deliver sufficient amounts of therapeutic agents into the artery wall to suppress restenosis. Published investigations in this area have focused primarily on trends associated with how variations in stenting conditions affect mass transport behavior. However, experimentally validated numerical models that simulate mass transport within the artery wall are lacking. A novel experimental model was developed to validate computational predictions of species diffusion into a porous medium and an investigation into how stent strut compression influences mass transport was conducted. The study revealed that increased compressive forces on a porous media reduced the ability of species to diffuse through that media, and in relation to drug eluting stents will contribute to a reduction in therapeutic levels of drugs within the wall.

  18. Area-preservation mapping using optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Su, Zhengyu; Gu, Xianfeng David; Kaufman, Arie; Sun, Jian; Gao, Jie; Luo, Feng

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel area-preservation mapping/flattening method using the optimal mass transport technique, based on the Monge-Brenier theory. Our optimal transport map approach is rigorous and solid in theory, efficient and parallel in computation, yet general for various applications. By comparison with the conventional Monge-Kantorovich approach, our method reduces the number of variables from O(n2) to O(n), and converts the optimal mass transport problem to a convex optimization problem, which can now be efficiently carried out by Newton's method. Furthermore, our framework includes the area weighting strategy that enables users to completely control and adjust the size of areas everywhere in an accurate and quantitative way. Our method significantly reduces the complexity of the problem, and improves the efficiency, flexibility and scalability during visualization. Our framework, by combining conformal mapping and optimal mass transport mapping, serves as a powerful tool for a broad range of applications in visualization and graphics, especially for medical imaging. We provide a variety of experimental results to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness and efficacy of our novel framework.

  19. Existence Result for the Kinetic Neutron Transport Problem with a General Albedo Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Bourhrara, Lahbib

    2011-09-01

    We present an existence result for the kinetic neutron transport equation with a general albedo boundary condition. The proof is constructive in the sense that we build a sequence that converges to the solution of the problem by iterating on the albedo term. Both nonhomogeneous and albedo boundary conditions are studied.

  20. Solvability of certain inverse problems for the nonstationary kinetic transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, N. P.

    2016-09-01

    Linear and nonlinear inverse problems for the nonstationary multispeed anisotropic kinetic transport equation are studied. Sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of weak solutions to these problems in various function spaces are found. The proofs of the corresponding theorems imply that solutions of the inverse problems under study can be obtained by applying the method of successive approximations.

  1. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S; Butler, James P

    2013-10-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. The particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic. Conversely, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drugs. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this article. A large portion of this article deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: (i) the physical characteristics of particles, (ii) particle behavior in gas flow, and (iii) gas-flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The article concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research.

  2. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S.; Butler, James P.

    2015-01-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. Whereas the particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drug. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this chapter. A large portion of this chapter deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: 1) the physical characteristics of particles, 2) particle behavior in gas flow, and 3) gas flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The chapter concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research. PMID:24265235

  3. Optimal Filtering in Mass Transport Modeling From Satellite Gravimetry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, P.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Klees, R.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring natural mass transport in the Earth's system, which has marked a new era in Earth observation, is largely based on the data collected by the GRACE satellite mission. Unfortunately, this mission is not free from certain limitations, two of which are especially critical. Firstly, its sensitivity is strongly anisotropic: it senses the north-south component of the mass re-distribution gradient much better than the east-west component. Secondly, it suffers from a trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution: a high (e.g., daily) temporal resolution is only possible if the spatial resolution is sacrificed. To make things even worse, the GRACE satellites enter occasionally a phase when their orbit is characterized by a short repeat period, which makes it impossible to reach a high spatial resolution at all. A way to mitigate limitations of GRACE measurements is to design optimal data processing procedures, so that all available information is fully exploited when modeling mass transport. This implies, in particular, that an unconstrained model directly derived from satellite gravimetry data needs to be optimally filtered. In principle, this can be realized with a Wiener filter, which is built on the basis of covariance matrices of noise and signal. In practice, however, a compilation of both matrices (and, therefore, of the filter itself) is not a trivial task. To build the covariance matrix of noise in a mass transport model, it is necessary to start from a realistic model of noise in the level-1B data. Furthermore, a routine satellite gravimetry data processing includes, in particular, the subtraction of nuisance signals (for instance, associated with atmosphere and ocean), for which appropriate background models are used. Such models are not error-free, which has to be taken into account when the noise covariance matrix is constructed. In addition, both signal and noise covariance matrices depend on the type of mass transport processes under

  4. The role of mass transport in protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Otálora, Fermín; García-Caballero, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Mass transport takes place within the mesoscopic to macroscopic scale range and plays a key role in crystal growth that may affect the result of the crystallization experiment. The influence of mass transport is different depending on the crystallization technique employed, essentially because each technique reaches supersaturation in its own unique way. In the case of batch experiments, there are some complex phenomena that take place at the interface between solutions upon mixing. These transport instabilities may drastically affect the reproducibility of crystallization experiments, and different outcomes may be obtained depending on whether or not the drop is homogenized. In diffusion experiments with aqueous solutions, evaporation leads to fascinating transport phenomena. When a drop starts to evaporate, there is an increase in concentration near the interface between the drop and the air until a nucleation event eventually takes place. Upon growth, the weight of the floating crystal overcomes the surface tension and the crystal falls to the bottom of the drop. The very growth of the crystal then triggers convective flow and inhomogeneities in supersaturation values in the drop owing to buoyancy of the lighter concentration-depleted solution surrounding the crystal. Finally, the counter-diffusion technique works if, and only if, diffusive mass transport is assured. The technique relies on the propagation of a supersaturation wave that moves across the elongated protein chamber and is the result of the coupling of reaction (crystallization) and diffusion. The goal of this review is to convince protein crystal growers that in spite of the small volume of the typical protein crystallization setup, transport plays a key role in the crystal quality, size and phase in both screening and optimization experiments.

  5. Constraints from Dust Mass and Mass Accretion Rate Measurements on Angular Momentum Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Manara, Carlo F.; Testi, Leonardo; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Henning, Thomas; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relation between disk mass and mass accretion rate to constrain the mechanism of angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks. We find a correlation between dust disk mass and mass accretion rate in Chamaeleon I with a slope that is close to linear, similar to the one recently identified in Lupus. We investigate the effect of stellar mass and find that the intrinsic scatter around the best-fit {M}{dust}–{M}\\star and {\\dot{M}}{acc}–{M}\\star relations is uncorrelated. We simulate synthetic observations of an ensemble of evolving disks using a Monte Carlo approach and find that disks with a constant α viscosity can fit the observed relations between dust mass, mass accretion rate, and stellar mass but overpredict the strength of the correlation between disk mass and mass accretion rate when using standard initial conditions. We find two possible solutions. In the first one, the observed scatter in {M}{dust} and {\\dot{M}}{acc} is not primordial, but arises from additional physical processes or uncertainties in estimating the disk gas mass. Most likely grain growth and radial drift affect the observable dust mass, while variability on large timescales affects the mass accretion rates. In the second scenario, the observed scatter is primordial, but disks have not evolved substantially at the age of Lupus and Chamaeleon I owing to a low viscosity or a large initial disk radius. More accurate estimates of the disk mass and gas disk sizes in a large sample of protoplanetary disks, through either direct observations of the gas or spatially resolved multiwavelength observations of the dust with ALMA, are needed to discriminate between both scenarios or to constrain alternative angular momentum transport mechanisms such as MHD disk winds.

  6. Summary of the LLNL one-dimensional transport-kinetics model of the troposphere and stratosphere: 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.

    1981-09-01

    Since the LLNL one-dimensional coupled transport and chemical kinetics model of the troposphere and stratosphere was originally developed in 1972 (Chang et al., 1974), there have been many changes to the model's representation of atmospheric physical and chemical processes. A brief description is given of the current LLNL one-dimensional coupled transport and chemical kinetics model of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  7. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  8. Mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao Bing; Sui, Yi; Lee, Heow Pueh; Bai, Hui Xing; Yu, Peng; Winoto, S H; Low, Hong Tong

    2010-06-01

    A two-dimensional flow model has been developed to simulate mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall. A two-domain approach, based on the finite volume method, was implemented. For the fluid part, the governing equation used was the Navier-Stokes equation; for the porous medium region, the generalized Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer extended model was used. For the porous-fluid interface, a stress jump condition was enforced with a continuity of normal stress, and the mass interfacial conditions were continuities of mass and mass flux. Two parameters were defined to characterize the mass transports in the fluid and porous regions. The porous Damkohler number is the ratio of consumption to diffusion of the substrates in the porous medium. The fluid Damkohler number is the ratio of the substrate consumption in the porous medium to the substrate convection in the fluid region. The concentration results were found to be well correlated by the use of a reaction-convection distance parameter, which incorporated the effects of axial distance, substrate consumption, and convection. The reactor efficiency reduced with reaction-convection distance parameter because of reduced reaction (or flux), and smaller local effectiveness factor due to the lower concentration in Michaelis-Menten type reactions. The reactor was more effective, and hence, more efficient with the smaller porous Damkohler number. The generalized results could find applications for the design of bioreactors with a porous wall.

  9. Role of Desorption Kinetics and Porous Medium Heterogeneity in Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cesium and Strontium: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Ryan, J. N.

    2008-12-01

    The presence of mobile colloids (particles between 1 nm and 1 μm in size) in natural soil and groundwater systems has been well established. Colloids generally have a high sorptive capacity resulting from their high surface area to mass ratio, which makes them effective sorbents of low solubility, strongly sorbing contaminants. Mobile colloids that sorb contaminants can increase the apparent solubility and rate of transport of the contaminants when desorption from the colloids is slow relative to the rate of flow. This process is known as colloid-facilitated transport (CFT). The additional transport of contaminants associated with mobile colloids should be accounted for to accurately predict transport rates of strongly-sorbing contaminants in the environment. Some examples of contaminants that have the potential for CFT are hydrophobic pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), actinide cations (e.g., Th, U, Pu, Am), and many metals (e.g, Pb, Cu, Hg). Many low solubility contaminants that have the potential for CFT are also harmful or toxic to humans, underscoring the importance of accurate modeling techniques to protect water sources from contamination. Contaminated Department of Energy (DOE) sites have been particularly valuable research opportunities for studying the transport of radionuclides in the natural environment. The DOE has conducted energy and weapons research and development in thirty-one states and Puerto Rico and has introduced many toxic and radioactive chemicals into surface waters, soils, and groundwater. Field experiments on DOE sites including the Nevada Test Site, the Hanford 200 Area tank farm, Rocky Flats CO, and Oak Ridge TN, have confirmed that metals and radionuclides have moved further than expected due to colloid-facilitated transport. The major goal of this research project is to identify and quantify the effects of sorption kinetics on colloid- facilitated transport in unsaturated porous media. This information will be used

  10. Efficient Algorithm for Modeling Mass Transport in Porous Media with Mass Exchange between Mobile Fluid and Stationary Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Cunningham, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    We compare two approaches to numerically solve the mathematical model of reactive mass transport in porous media with mass exchange between mobile fluid and stationary medium. The first approach, named the ``traditional method,'' solves a single system of differential equations that results from a standard finite-difference discretization of the governing equations. The second approach, named the ``direction-splitting method,'' solves two separate systems of differential equations: one for transport in the mobile fluid, and one for uptake and reaction in the stationary medium. The two systems are coupled by a boundary condition at the mobile-immobile interface, and are solved iteratively. The direction-splitting method is appealing because it involves the solution of two smaller systems compared to that of the traditional method; thus the computation time may be greatly reduced if the iterative method converges rapidly. Also, the direction-splitting method employs a modular code that can easily be modified to accommodate different mathematical representations of the physical phenomena (e.g., different models for biodegradation kinetics within the stationary medium). Each module of the code can employ a different numerical algorithm to optimize the solution. The main objectives of the present study are: (1) to quantitatively compare the two approaches in terms of computation time, and (2) to determine the conditions under which the direction-splitting method is superior to the traditional method.

  11. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

  12. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications. PMID:25622949

  13. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications.

  14. Miocene mass-transport sediments, Troodos Massif, Cyprus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lord, A.R.; Harrison, R.W.; BouDagher-Fadel, M.; Stone, B.D.; Varol, O.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment mass-transport layers of submarine origin on the northern and southern flanks of the Troodos ophiolitic massif are dated biostratigraphically as early Miocene and late Miocene, respectively and therefore represent different seismogenic events in the uplift and erosional history of the Troodos terrane. Analysis of such events has potential for documenting Miocene seismic and uplift events regionally in the context of changing stress field directions and plate vectors through time. ?? 2009 The Geologists' Association.

  15. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  16. STM tip-mediated mass transport on Cu surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. S. N.; Huang, R. Z.; Gao, T. F.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale simulations are performed to study atomic motion on Cu surfaces to illustrate the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on mass transport (MT) in the surfaces and on top of the Co island in heteroepitaxial Co/Cu(0 0 1) and Co/Cu(1 1 1) systems. First we investigate tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu(0 0 1) surface at zero bias voltage. With the help of the tip, the Co atom in the surface can freely diffuse toward its nearby vacancy site. So-called vacancy mechanism is used to interpret this phenomenon. Then tip-mediated atomic motion of Co adatoms on the Co islands supported by a Cu(1 1 1) surface is studied. It is revealed that the tip has a significant effect on the diffusion of adatoms on the islands and interlayer mass transport at the island edge. Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. By calculating the diffusion barriers, it is found that the jumping diffusion barrier on the island can be zero by the tip vertical manipulation while the Ehrlich-Schwoebel diffusion barrier at the island edge can be reduced by the tip lateral manipulation. Thus, the quality of thin films can be improved by controlling MT in and/or on the surface.

  17. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Orr H.; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Debaillon-Vesque, François P.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1–2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs. PMID:25192936

  18. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Orr H; Fernandez, Vicente I; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S; Debaillon-Vesque, François P; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-09-16

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1-2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs.

  19. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  20. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Begley, Cynthia M; Kleis, Stanley J

    2002-11-20

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels.

  1. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  2. Changes in sodium pool and kinetics of sodium transport in frog skin produced by amiloride

    PubMed Central

    Salako, L. A.; Smith, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    1. Amiloride produces a decrease in size of the active sodium transport pool of isolated frog skin. 2. Rate coefficients for sodium movement into and out of the transporting cells across the outside membrane are decreased by amiloride. The rate coefficient for sodium extrusion across the inside membrane is not significantly affected. 3. In the presence and in the absence of amiloride, the relation of sodium transport to outside sodium concentration exhibits similar saturation kinetics but amiloride reduces sodium transport rate at every sodium concentration of the outside solution. 4. Labelling of skin with 14C-amiloride from the outside solution is significantly greater than labelling with 14C-inulin. 5. The results of these studies suggest that amiloride reacts with sites on the outside membrane of the transporting cells as a result of which the rate of sodium movement across this membrane is diminished. PMID:5420148

  3. Experimental validation of convection-diffusion discretisation scheme employed for computational modelling of biological mass transport

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The finite volume solver Fluent (Lebanon, NH, USA) is a computational fluid dynamics software employed to analyse biological mass-transport in the vasculature. A principal consideration for computational modelling of blood-side mass-transport is convection-diffusion discretisation scheme selection. Due to numerous discretisation schemes available when developing a mass-transport numerical model, the results obtained should either be validated against benchmark theoretical solutions or experimentally obtained results. Methods An idealised aneurysm model was selected for the experimental and computational mass-transport analysis of species concentration due to its well-defined recirculation region within the aneurysmal sac, allowing species concentration to vary slowly with time. The experimental results were obtained from fluid samples extracted from a glass aneurysm model, using the direct spectrophometric concentration measurement technique. The computational analysis was conducted using the four convection-diffusion discretisation schemes available to the Fluent user, including the First-Order Upwind, the Power Law, the Second-Order Upwind and the Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinetics (QUICK) schemes. The fluid has a diffusivity of 3.125 × 10-10 m2/s in water, resulting in a Peclet number of 2,560,000, indicating strongly convection-dominated flow. Results The discretisation scheme applied to the solution of the convection-diffusion equation, for blood-side mass-transport within the vasculature, has a significant influence on the resultant species concentration field. The First-Order Upwind and the Power Law schemes produce similar results. The Second-Order Upwind and QUICK schemes also correlate well but differ considerably from the concentration contour plots of the First-Order Upwind and Power Law schemes. The computational results were then compared to the experimental findings. An average error of 140% and 116% was demonstrated

  4. Characterization of Bovine Glucose Transporter 1 Kinetics and Substrate Specificities in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, P. A.; Shao, Y.; Misra, Y.; Morielli, A. D.; Zhao, F.-Q.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is an essential substrate for lactose synthesis and an important energy source in milk production. Glucose uptake in the mammary gland therefore plays a critical role in milk synthesis. Facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) mediate glucose uptake in the mammary gland. GLUT1 is the major facilitative glucose transporter expressed in bovine mammary gland and has been shown to localize to the basolateral membrane of mammary epithelial cells. GLUT1 is therefore thought to play a major role in glucose uptake during lactation. The objective of this study was to determine the transport kinetic properties and substrate specificity of bovine GLUT1 using the Xenopus oocyte model. Bovine GLUT1 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by microinjection of in vitro transcribed cRNA and was found to be localized to the plasma membrane, which resulted in increased glucose uptake. This bGLUT1-mediated glucose uptake was dramatically inhibited by specific facilitative glucose transport inhibitors, cytochalasin B and phloretin. Kinetic analysis of bovine and human GLUT1 was conducted under zero-trans conditions using radio-labeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose and the principles of Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Bovine GLUT1 exhibited a KM of 9.8 ± 3.0 mM for 2-deoxy-D-glucose, similar to 11.7 ± 3.7 mM for human GLUT1. Transport by bovine GLUT1 was inhibited by mannose and galactose, but not fructose, indicating that bovine GLUT1 may also be able to transport mannose and galactose. Our data provides functional insight into the transport properties of bovine GLUT1 in taking up glucose across mammary epithelial cells for milk synthesis. PMID:22365203

  5. Kinematics of Mass Transport Deposits revealed by magnetic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, R.; Levi, T.; Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.

    2017-08-01

    The internal deformation and movement directions of Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) are key factors in understanding the kinematics and dynamics of their emplacement. Although these are relatively easy to recover from well-bedded sediments, they are more difficult to deduce from massive beds without visible strain markers. In order to test the applicability of using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to determine MTD movement, we compare AMS fabrics, with structural measurements of visible kinematic indicators. Our case study involves the structural analysis of slumped lake sediments extensively exposed in MTDs within the Dead Sea Basin. Structural analyses of MTDs outcropping for >100 km reveal radial transport directions toward the basin depocenter. We show that the AMS fabrics display the same transport directions as inferred from structural analyses. Based on this similarity, we outline a robust procedure to obtain the transport direction of slumped MTDs from AMS fabrics. Variations in the magnetic fabrics and anisotropies in fold-thrust systems within the slumps match the various structural domains. We therefore suggest that magnetic fabrics and anisotropy variations in drill cores may reflect internal deformation within the slumps rather than different slumps. Obtaining magnetic fabrics from MTDs provides a viable way to infer the transport directions and internal deformation of MTDs and reconstruct the basin depocenter in ancient settings. The present results also have implications beyond the kinematics of MTDs, as their geometry resembles fold-thrust systems in other geological settings, scales, and tectonic environments.

  6. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  7. Nonlinear Response of Layer Growth Dynamics in the Mixed Kinetics-Bulk-Transport Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1996-01-01

    In situ high-resolution interferometry on horizontal facets of the protein lysozyme reveal that the local growth rate R, vicinal slope p, and tangential (step) velocity v fluctuate by up to 80% of their average values. The time scale of these fluctuations, which occur under steady bulk transport conditions through the formation and decay of step bunches (macrosteps), is of the order of 10 min. The fluctuation amplitude of R increases with growth rate (supersaturation) and crystal size, while the amplitude of the v and p fluctuations changes relatively little. Based on a stability analysis for equidistant step trains in the mixed transport-interface-kinetics regime, we argue that the fluctuations originate from the coupling of bulk transport with nonlinear interface kinetics. Furthermore, step bunches moving across the interface in the direction of or opposite to the buoyancy-driven convective flow increase or decrease in height, respectively. This is in agreement with analytical treatments of the interaction of moving steps with solution flow. Major excursions in growth rate are associated with the formation of lattice defects (striations). We show that, in general, the system-dependent kinetic Peclet number, Pe(sub k) , i.e., the relative weight of bulk transport and interface kinetics in the control of the growth process, governs the step bunching dynamics. Since Pe(sub k) can be modified by either forced solution flow or suppression of buoyancy-driven convection under reduced gravity, this model provides a rationale for the choice of specific transport conditions to minimize the formation of compositional inhomogeneities under steady bulk nutrient crystallization conditions.

  8. Nitrate transport in the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2. Kinetic and energetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, R; Lara, C; Guerrero, M G

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate transport has been studied in the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2 by monitoring intracellular nitrate accumulation in intact cells of the mutant strain FM6, which lacks nitrate reductase activity and is therefore unable to reduce the transported nitrate. Kinetic analysis of nitrate transport as a function of external nitrate concentration revealed apparent substrate inhibition, with a peak velocity at 20-25 microM-nitrate. A Ks (NO3-) of 1 microM was calculated. Nitrate transport exhibited a stringent requirement for Na+. Neither Li+ nor K+ could substitute for Na+. Monensin depressed nitrate transport in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibition being more than 60% at 2 microM, indicating that the Na(+)-dependence of active nitrate transport relies on the maintenance of a Na+ electrochemical gradient. The operation of an Na+/NO3- symport system is suggested. Nitrite behaved as an effective competitive inhibitor of nitrate transport, with a Ki (NO2-) of 3 microM. The time course of nitrite inhibition of nitrate transport was consistent with competitive inhibition by mixed alternative substrates. Nitrate and nitrite might be transported by the same carrier. PMID:1554347

  9. Kinetic study of the mass transfer of bovine serum albumin in anion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, K; Guiochon, G

    2000-01-14

    A kinetic study was made on the mass transfer phenomena of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in two different anion-exchange columns (Resource-Q and TSK-GEL-DEAE-5PW). The analysis of the concentration dependence of the lumped mass transfer rate coefficient (km,L) provided the information about the kinetics of the several mass transfer processes in the columns and the anion exchangers, i.e., the axial dispersion, the fluid-to-particle mass transfer, the intraparticle diffusion, and the adsorption/desorption. In the Resource-Q column, the intraparticle diffusion had a dominant contribution to the band broadening compared with those of the other processes. The surface diffusion coefficient (Ds) of BSA showed a positive concentration dependence, by which the linear dependence of km,L on the BSA concentration seemed to be interpreted. On the other hand, in the TSK-GEL-DEAE-5PW column, the contribution of the adsorption/desorption was also important and almost same as that due to the intraparticle diffusion. There are some differences between the intrinsic properties of the mass transfer kinetics inside the two anion exchangers. It was likely that the positive concentration dependence of Ds was explained by the heterogeneous surface model.

  10. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule.

    PubMed

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-21

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H3(+).

  11. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-01

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H3+.

  12. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons in kinetic field-line resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaston, C. C.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Melrose, D. B.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2017-08-01

    A representative case study from the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm recovery phase reveals enhanced electron fluxes at intermediate pitch angles over energies from 100 keV to 5 MeV coincident with broadband low-frequency electromagnetic waves. The statistical properties of these waves are used to build a model for radial diffusion via drift-bounce resonances in kinetic Alfvén eigenmodes/kinetic field-line resonances. Estimated diffusion coefficients indicate timescales for radial transport on the order of hours in storm time events at energies from <100 keV to MeVs over equatorial pitch angles from the edge of the loss cone to nearly perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The correlation of kinetic resonances with electron depletions and enhancements during storm main phase and recovery, and the rapid diffusion these waves drive, suggests that they may modulate the outer radiation belt.

  13. A kinetic model for the transport of electrons in a graphene layer

    SciTech Connect

    Fermanian Kammerer, Clotilde; Méhats, Florian

    2016-12-15

    In this article, we propose a new numerical scheme for the computation of the transport of electrons in a graphene device. The underlying quantum model for graphene is a massless Dirac equation, whose eigenvalues display a conical singularity responsible for non-adiabatic transitions between the two modes. We first derive a kinetic model which takes the form of two Boltzmann equations coupled by a collision operator modeling the non-adiabatic transitions. This collision term includes a Landau–Zener transfer term and a jump operator whose presence is essential in order to ensure a good energy conservation during the transitions. We propose an algorithmic realization of the semi-group solving the kinetic model, by a particle method. We give analytic justification of the model and propose a series of numerical experiments studying the influences of the various sources of errors between the quantum and the kinetic models.

  14. Solute transport with multiple equilibrium-controlled or kinetically controlled chemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedly, John C.; Rubin, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    A new approach is applied to the problem of modeling solute transport accompanied by many chemical reactions. The approach, based on concepts of the concentration space and its stoichiometric subspaces, uses elements of the subspaces as primary dependent variables. It is shown that the resulting model equations are compact in form, isolate the chemical reaction expressions from flow expressions, and can be used for either equilibrium or kinetically controlled reactions. The implications of the results on numerical algorithms for solving the equations are discussed. The application of the theory is illustrated throughout with examples involving a simple but broadly representative set of reactions previously considered in the literature. Numerical results are presented for four interconnected reactions: a homogeneous complexation reaction, two sorption reactions, and a dissolution/precipitation reaction. Three cases are considered: (1) four kinetically controlled reactions, (2) four equilibrium-controlled reactions, and (3) a system with two kinetically controlled reactions and two equilibrium-controlled reactions.

  15. A kinetic model for the transport of electrons in a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermanian Kammerer, Clotilde; Méhats, Florian

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we propose a new numerical scheme for the computation of the transport of electrons in a graphene device. The underlying quantum model for graphene is a massless Dirac equation, whose eigenvalues display a conical singularity responsible for non-adiabatic transitions between the two modes. We first derive a kinetic model which takes the form of two Boltzmann equations coupled by a collision operator modeling the non-adiabatic transitions. This collision term includes a Landau-Zener transfer term and a jump operator whose presence is essential in order to ensure a good energy conservation during the transitions. We propose an algorithmic realization of the semi-group solving the kinetic model, by a particle method. We give analytic justification of the model and propose a series of numerical experiments studying the influences of the various sources of errors between the quantum and the kinetic models.

  16. Updated Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2: computation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Ditmar, Pavel; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Guo, Jing; Guo, Xiang; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Qile; Didova, Olga; Ran, Jiangjun; Sun, Yu; Tangdamrongsub, Natthachet; Gunter, Brian; Riva, Ricardo; Steele-Dunne, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A number of research centers compute models of mass transport in the Earth's system using primarily K-Band Ranging (KBR) data from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. These models typically consist of a time series of monthly solutions, each of which is defined in terms of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 60-120. One of such models, the Delft Mass Transport, release 2 (DMT-2), is computed at the Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) in collaboration with Wuhan University. An updated variant of this model has been produced recently. A unique feature of the computational scheme designed to compute DMT-2 is the preparation of an accurate stochastic description of data noise in the frequency domain using an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) model, which is derived for each particular month. The benefits of such an approach are a proper frequency-dependent data weighting in the data inversion and an accurate variance-covariance matrix of noise in the estimated spherical harmonic coefficients. Furthermore, the data prior to the inversion are subject to an advanced high-pass filtering, which makes use of a spatially-dependent weighting scheme, so that noise is primarily estimated on the basis of data collected over areas with minor mass transport signals (e.g., oceans). On the one hand, this procedure efficiently suppresses noise, which are caused by inaccuracies in satellite orbits and, on the other hand, preserves mass transport signals in the data. Finally, the unconstrained monthly solutions are filtered using a Wiener filter, which is based on estimates of the signal and noise variance-covariance matrices. In combination with a proper data weighting, this noticeably improves the spatial resolution of the monthly gravity models and the associated mass transport models.. For instance, the computed solutions allow long-term negative trends to be clearly seen in sufficiently small regions notorious

  17. Mass-transport processes at the steel-enamel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Jha, A.; Cochrane, R. C.; Ali, S.

    2006-02-01

    Mass-transport processes at the enamel-steel interface were investigated by studying the rheological properties of the enamel and the microstructure of the enamel-steel interface. The thermophysical properties, e.g., the viscosity and spreading behavior of enamel were measured using the rotating bob and the sessile drop techniques, respectively. The results show that the viscosity of the enamel decreases sharply as the FeO concentration increases from 0 to 25 wt pct, while the contact angle changes with the increasing thickness of the NiO precoat. Microstructural characterization also revealed evidence for the presence of an interfacial gradient force (more specifically referred to as the Marangoni convection) confined within the 0- to 80-µm thickness at the enamel-steel interface. This force is responsible for a convective flow, which determines the formation of flow striae at the interface. The striae act as a sink for evolved gases and provide transport away from the enamel-steel interface. In addition, experimental simulation of Marangoni convection (interfacial-gradient force) was carried out by selectively doping the steel surface with excess Fe2O3 powder. The presence of convection flow was confirmed by analyzing the pattern of iron oxide particles dispersed across the surrounding enamel layers. Based on the microstructural characterization and the thermophysical data, we propose a mechanism for mass transport at the glass-steel interface.

  18. Coupled effects of temperature and mass transport on the isotope fractionation of zinc during electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; John, Seth G.; Kavner, Abby

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of zinc metal electrodeposited on a rotating disc electrode from a Zn-citrate aqueous solution was investigated as a function of overpotential (electrochemical driving force), temperature, and rotation rate. Zn metal was measured to be isotopically light with respect to Zn+2 in solution, with observed fractionations varying from Δ66/64Znmetal-aqueous = -1.0‰ to -3.9‰. Fractionation varies continuously as a function of a dimensionless parameter described by the ratio of observed deposition rate to calculated mass-transport limiting rate, where larger fractionations are observed at lower deposition rates, lower temperature, and at faster electrode rotation rates. Thus, the large fractionation and its rate dependence is interpreted as a competition between the two kinetic processes with different effective activation energies: mass-transport-limited (diffusion limited) kinetics with a large activation energy, which creates small fractionations close to the predicted diffusive fractionation; and electrochemical deposition kinetics, with a smaller effective activation energy, which creates large fractionations at low deposition rates and high hydrodynamic fluxes of solute to the electrode. The results provide a framework for predicting isotope fractionation in processes controlled by two competing reactions with different kinetic isotope effects. Light isotopes are electroplated. In all cases light stable isotopes of the metals are preferentially electroplated, with mass-dependent behavior evident where three or more isotopes are measured. Fractionation is time-independent, meaning that the fractionation factor does not vary with the extent of reaction. In most of our experiments, we have controlled the extent of reaction such that only a small amount of metal is deposited from the stock solution, thus avoiding significant evolution of the reservoir composition. In such experiments, the observed isotope fractionation is constant as a

  19. Criterion for condensation in kinetically constrained one-dimensional transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miedema, D. M.; de Wijn, A. S.; Schall, P.

    2014-06-01

    We study condensation in one-dimensional transport models with a kinetic constraint. The kinetic constraint results in clustering of immobile vehicles; these clusters can grow to macroscopic condensates, indicating the onset of dynamic phase separation between free-flowing and arrested traffic. We investigate analytically the conditions under which this occurs and derive a necessary and sufficient criterion for phase separation. This criterion is applied to the well-known Nagel-Schreckenberg model of traffic flow to analytically investigate the existence of dynamic condensates. We find that true condensates occur only when acceleration out of jammed traffic happens in a single time step, in the limit of strong overbraking. Our predictions are further verified with simulation results on the growth of arrested clusters. These results provide analytic understanding of dynamic arrest and dynamic phase separation in one-dimensional traffic and transport models.

  20. The onset of sediment transport in vegetated channels predicted by turbulent kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. Q.; Chung, H.; Nepf, H. M.

    2016-11-01

    This laboratory study advances our understanding of sediment transport in vegetated regions, by describing the impact of stem density on the critical velocity, Ucrit, at which sediment motion is initiated. Sparse emergent vegetation was modeled with rigid cylinders arranged in staggered arrays of different stem densities. The sediment transport rate, Qs, was measured over a range of current speeds using digital imaging, and the critical velocity was selected as the condition at which the magnitude of Qs crossed the noise threshold. For both grain sizes considered here (0.6-0.85 mm and 1.7-2 mm), Ucrit decreased with increasing stem density. This dependence can be explained by a threshold condition based on turbulent kinetic energy, kt, suggesting that near-bed turbulence intensity may be a more important control than bed shear stress on the initiation of sediment motion. The turbulent kinetic energy model unified the bare bed and vegetated channel measurements.

  1. New Direction in Hydrogeochemical Transport Modeling: Incorporating Multiple Kinetic and Equilibrium Reaction Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, C.I.

    2000-02-02

    At least two distinct kinds of hydrogeochemical models have evolved historically for use in analyzing contaminant transport, but each has important limitations. One kind, focusing on organic contaminants, treats biodegradation reactions as parts of relatively simple kinetic reaction networks with no or limited coupling to aqueous and surface complexation and mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions. A second kind, evolving out of the speciation and reaction path codes, is capable of handling a comprehensive suite of multicomponent complexation (aqueous and surface) and mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, but has not been able to treat reaction networks characterized by partial redox disequilibrium and multiple kinetic pathways. More recently, various investigators have begun to consider biodegradation reactions in the context of comprehensive equilibrium and kinetic reaction networks (e.g. Hunter et al. 1998, Mayer 1999). Here we explore two examples of multiple equilibrium and kinetic reaction pathways using the reactive transport code GIMRT98 (Steefel, in prep.): (1) a computational example involving the generation of acid mine drainage due to oxidation of pyrite, and (2) a computational/field example where the rates of chlorinated VOC degradation are linked to the rates of major redox processes occurring in organic-rich wetland sediments overlying a contaminated aerobic aquifer.

  2. A criterion for condensation in kinetically constrained one-dimensional transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miedema, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In transport, increasing the number of transporting particles not necessarily results in an increase of the throughput. When the density of a complex system increases, the current can decrease rapidly due to jamming effects. Jammed particles can form many clusters or one big cluster: a condensate in real space. We study condensation in one-dimensional transport models with a kinetic constraint. We find the conditions under which the arrested clusters can grow to a macroscopic condensate of arrested particles. We apply our finding to the well-known Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic flow model to analytically proof the existence of a condensate in a deterministic limit of this model, and verify this result with simulations. These results provide insight into dynamic arrest and dynamic phase separation in one-dimensional traffic and transport.

  3. Maternal-fetal transport kinetics of manganese in perfused human placental lobule in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nandakumaran, Moorkath; Al-Sannan, Baydaa; Al-Sarraf, Hameed; Al-Shammari, Majed

    2016-01-01

    There have been no detailed reports relating to maternal-fetal transport kinetics of manganese, an essential trace element in the human pregnancies, and hence we have attempted to study the transport kinetics of this trace element in the human placenta in vitro. Human placentae from normal uncomplicated pregnancies were collected postpartum. Manganese chloride solution (GFS Chem Inc., Columbus, OH), 10 times the physiological concentrations, along with antipyrine (Sigma Chem Co., St. Louis, MO) as reference marker were then injected as a single bolus (100 µl) into the maternal arterial circulation of perfused placental lobules and perfusate samples collected from maternal and fetal circulations over a period of five minutes. National Culture and Tissue Collection medium, diluted with Earle's buffered salt solution was used as the perfusate and serial perfusate samples from fetal venous perfusate collected for a period of 30 min. Concentration of manganese in perfusate samples was assessed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, while that of antipyrine was assessed by spectrophotometry. Transport kinetics of substances studied were computed using established permeation parameters. Differential transport rates of manganese and antipyrine in 12 perfusions differed significantly for 25.75, 90% efflux fractions (ANOVA test, p < 0.05), while those of 10 and 50% efflux fractions were not significantly different between the study and reference substances. Transport fraction (TF) of manganese averaged 54.9% of bolus dose in 12 perfusions, whereas that of antipyrine averaged 89% of bolus dose, representing 61.80% of reference marker TF. The difference observed in TF values of manganese and antipyrine was statistically significant (Student's t-test, p < 0.05). Pharmacokinetic parameters such as area under the curve, clearance, absorption rate, elimination rate of manganese compared to reference marker were significantly different (ANOVA test, p < 0

  4. Transport Properties of a Kinetic Model for Chemical Reactions without Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-05-20

    A kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation for chemical reactions without energy barrier is considered here with the aim of evaluating the reaction rate and characterizing the transport coefficient of shear viscosity for the reactive system. The Chapman-Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to compute the chemical reaction effects, in a flow regime for which the reaction process is close to the final equilibrium state. Some numerical results are provided illustrating that the considered chemical reaction without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the reaction rate and on the transport coefficient of shear viscosity.

  5. Electrogenic Binding of Intracellular Cations Defines a Kinetic Decision Point in the Transport Cycle of the Human Serotonin Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The plasmalemmal monoamine transporters clear the extracellular space from their cognate substrates and sustain cellular monoamine stores even during neuronal activity. In some instances, however, the transporters enter a substrate-exchange mode, which results in release of intracellular substrate. Understanding what determines the switch between these two transport modes demands time-resolved measurements of intracellular (co-)substrate binding and release. Here, we report an electrophysiological investigation of intracellular solute-binding to the human serotonin transporter (SERT) expressed in HEK-293 cells. We measured currents induced by rapid application of serotonin employing varying intracellular (co-)substrate concentrations and interpreted the data using kinetic modeling. Our measurements revealed that the induction of the substrate-exchange mode depends on both voltage and intracellular Na+ concentrations because intracellular Na+ release occurs before serotonin release and is highly electrogenic. This voltage dependence was blunted by electrogenic binding of intracellular K+ and, notably, also H+. In addition, our data suggest that Cl− is bound to SERT during the entire catalytic cycle. Our experiments, therefore, document an essential role of electrogenic binding of K+ or of H+ to the inward-facing conformation of SERT in (i) cancelling out the electrogenic nature of intracellular Na+ release and (ii) in selecting the forward-transport over the substrate-exchange mode. Finally, the kinetics of intracellular Na+ release and K+ (or H+) binding result in a voltage-independent rate-limiting step where SERT may return to the outward-facing state in a KCl- or HCl-bound form. PMID:27756841

  6. Electrogenic Binding of Intracellular Cations Defines a Kinetic Decision Point in the Transport Cycle of the Human Serotonin Transporter.

    PubMed

    Hasenhuetl, Peter S; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2016-12-09

    The plasmalemmal monoamine transporters clear the extracellular space from their cognate substrates and sustain cellular monoamine stores even during neuronal activity. In some instances, however, the transporters enter a substrate-exchange mode, which results in release of intracellular substrate. Understanding what determines the switch between these two transport modes demands time-resolved measurements of intracellular (co-)substrate binding and release. Here, we report an electrophysiological investigation of intracellular solute-binding to the human serotonin transporter (SERT) expressed in HEK-293 cells. We measured currents induced by rapid application of serotonin employing varying intracellular (co-)substrate concentrations and interpreted the data using kinetic modeling. Our measurements revealed that the induction of the substrate-exchange mode depends on both voltage and intracellular Na(+) concentrations because intracellular Na(+) release occurs before serotonin release and is highly electrogenic. This voltage dependence was blunted by electrogenic binding of intracellular K(+) and, notably, also H(+) In addition, our data suggest that Cl(-) is bound to SERT during the entire catalytic cycle. Our experiments, therefore, document an essential role of electrogenic binding of K(+) or of H(+) to the inward-facing conformation of SERT in (i) cancelling out the electrogenic nature of intracellular Na(+) release and (ii) in selecting the forward-transport over the substrate-exchange mode. Finally, the kinetics of intracellular Na(+) release and K(+) (or H(+)) binding result in a voltage-independent rate-limiting step where SERT may return to the outward-facing state in a KCl- or HCl-bound form. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Initiation and Modification of Reaction by Energy Addition: Kinetic and Transport Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    MODIFICATION OF REACTION BY ENERGY ADDITION: KINETIC AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA by Francis E. Fendell and Mau-Song Chou Center for Propulsion Technology...TA - A2 L AUHOWAC - F49620-90-C-0070 Francis E. Fendell and Mau-Song Chou 7. PEMOS101IG ORGANIZATION NAME(S AND...a gaseous mixture is more pertinent for the supersonic-combustor applications of interest to the Air Force (compare Figs. 1 and 2) (Carrier, Fendell

  8. Model development and verification for mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondzo, Miki; Al-Homoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    Theoretical studies imply that fluid motion does not significantly increase the molecular diffusive mass flux toward and away from microscopic organisms. This study presents experimental and theoretical evidence that small-scale turbulence modulates enhanced mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow. Using the technique of inner region and outer region expansions, a model for dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake by E. coli was developed. The mass transport to the E. coli was modeled by the Sherwood (Sh)-Péclet (Pe) number relationship with redefined characteristic length and velocity scales. The model Sh = (1 + Pe1/2 + Pe) agreed with the laboratory measurements well. The Péclet number that quantifies the role and function of small-scale turbulence on E. coli metabolism is defined by Pe = (?) where Ezz is the root mean square of fluid extension in the direction of local vorticity, ηK is the Kolmogorov length scale, Lc is the length scale of E. coli, and D is the molecular diffusion coefficient. An alternative formulation for the redefined Pe is given by Pe = (?) where ? = 0.5(ɛν)1/4 is the Kolmogorov velocity averaged over the Kolmogorov length scale, ɛ is dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of fluid. The dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy was estimated directly from measured velocity gradients and was within the reported range in engineered and natural aquatic ecosytems. The specific growth of E. coli was up to 5 times larger in a turbulent flow in comparison to the still water controls. Dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake were enhanced with increased ɛ in the turbulent flow.

  9. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; ...

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  10. Estimation of kinetic rate coefficients for 2,4-D biodegradation during transport in soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, R.S.; Estrella, R.; Brusseau, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Monod model is used increasingly to simulate the kinetics of biodegradation in soil environments with distinctly different hydraulic properties than the well-mixed batch reactor environments for which the model is known to be appropriate. This paper investigates the use of a transport model with Monod kinetics to describe the fate of 2,4-D in soil columns. The research includes development of a mathematical model for the biodegradation of 2,4-D in the presence of an acclimated biological population and an optimization model to calibrate results of the mathematical model with experimental observations. The model is applied to experimental data from two independent soil column experiments to qualify the generality of the numerical results. Fitted kinetic parameters are compared with well-mixed batch reactor test data and goodness of fit is compared with a linear model of transport with first-order substrate decay. The fitted model is used to discuss strategies to minimize transport of 2,4-D into lower soil horizons and groundwater.

  11. Coprecipitation in the barite isostructural family: 2. Numerical simulations of reactions and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen

    2004-08-01

    Coprecipitation of barite with trace constituents was simulated with consideration of aqueous speciation and complexation, mixing properties for the binary solid solutions (Zhu, this issue), precipitation and dissolution kinetics, and advective-dispersive transport. Speciation-solubility modeling was used to reproduce BaSO 4-RaSO 4 coprecipitation experimental results, and to calculate CrO 42- aqueous concentrations in equilibrium with a Ba(SO 4,CrO 4) solid solution. Kinetic reaction path modeling was used to simulate the coprecipitation of barite with RaSO 4 to form an onion-like chemically zoned solid upon the cooling of oil field brine. A one-dimensional coupled reactive mass transport model shows a strikingly different transport pattern for the tracer Ra 2+, when the dominant attenuation reaction is with solid solution (Ba, Ra) SO 4 as compared to the case when it is controlled by pure RaSO 4 and barite solids under local equilibrium conditions. A self-enrichment of Ra 2+ in the groundwater and aquifer solid matrix—higher concentrations of Ra 2+ downstream from the reaction front—results from the coprecipitation reaction and advective-dispersive transport. This self-enrichment process generates a secondary tracer source, which has tracer concentrations higher than that of the original source. On the other hand, coprecipitation reactions can reduce Ra 2+ concentrations in groundwater to a much lower level (below ppb) than that of pure RaSO 4(c) solubility (near ppm), which has been used to establish the Ra 2+ concentration limits in groundwater, soil, and nuclear waste repositories.

  12. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, II: Electron transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The previously obtained in (Zhdanov and Stepanenko, 2016) general transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma are employed for analysis of electron transport properties in molecular and atomic plasmas. We account for both elastic and inelastic interaction channels of electrons with atoms and molecules of plasma and also the processes of electron impact ionization of neutral particles and three-body ion-electron recombination. The system of scalar transport equations for electrons is discussed and the expressions for non-equilibrium corrections to electron ionization and recombination rates and the diagonal part of the electron pressure tensor are derived. Special attention is paid to analysis of electron energy relaxation during collisions with plasma particles having internal degrees of freedom and the expression for the electron coefficient of inelastic energy losses is deduced. We also derive the expressions for electron vector and tensorial transport fluxes and the corresponding transport coefficients for partially ionized reactive plasma, which represent a generalization of the well-known results obtained by Devoto (1967). The results of numerical evaluation of contribution from electron inelastic collisions with neutral particles to electron transport properties are presented for a series of molecular and atomic gases.

  13. Mass Transport: Circulatory System with Emphasis on Nonendothermic Species.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Dane A; Burggren, Warren W; Reiber, Carl L; Altimiras, Jordi; Rodnick, Kenneth J

    2016-12-06

    Mass transport can be generally defined as movement of material matter. The circulatory system then is a biological example given its role in the movement in transporting gases, nutrients, wastes, and chemical signals. Comparative physiology has a long history of providing new insights and advancing our understanding of circulatory mass transport across a wide array of circulatory systems. Here we focus on circulatory function of nonmodel species. Invertebrates possess diverse convection systems; that at the most complex generate pressures and perform at a level comparable to vertebrates. Many invertebrates actively modulate cardiovascular function using neuronal, neurohormonal, and skeletal muscle activity. In vertebrates, our understanding of cardiac morphology, cardiomyocyte function, and contractile protein regulation by Ca2+ highlights a high degree of conservation, but differences between species exist and are coupled to variable environments and body temperatures. Key regulators of vertebrate cardiac function and systemic blood pressure include the autonomic nervous system, hormones, and ventricular filling. Further chemical factors regulating cardiovascular function include adenosine, natriuretic peptides, arginine vasotocin, endothelin 1, bradykinin, histamine, nitric oxide, and hydrogen sulfide, to name but a few. Diverse vascular morphologies and the regulation of blood flow in the coronary and cerebral circulations are also apparent in nonmammalian species. Dynamic adjustments of cardiovascular function are associated with exercise on land, flying at high altitude, prolonged dives by marine mammals, and unique morphology, such as the giraffe. Future studies should address limits of gas exchange and convective transport, the evolution of high arterial pressure across diverse taxa, and the importance of the cardiovascular system adaptations to extreme environments. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:17-66, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John

  14. Flow field design and optimization based on the mass transport polarization regulation in a flow-through type vanadium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiong; Xing, Feng; Li, Xianfeng; Ning, Guiling; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium flow battery holds great promise for use in large scale energy storage applications. However, the power density is relatively low, leading to significant increase in the system cost. Apart from the kinetic and electronic conductivity improvement, the mass transport enhancement is also necessary to further increase the power density and reduce the system cost. To better understand the mass transport limitations, in the research, the space-varying and time-varying characteristic of the mass transport polarization is investigated based on the analysis of the flow velocity and reactant concentration in the bulk electrolyte by modeling. The result demonstrates that the varying characteristic of mass transport polarization is more obvious at high SoC or high current densities. To soften the adverse impact of the mass transport polarization, a new rectangular plug flow battery with a plug flow and short flow path is designed and optimized based on the mass transport polarization regulation (reducing the mass transport polarization and improving its uniformity of distribution). The regulation strategy of mass transport polarization is practical for the performance improvement in VFBs, especially for high power density VFBs. The findings in the research are also applicable for other flow batteries and instructive for practical use.

  15. Mass transport of adsorbates near a discontinuous structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, E.; Ying, S. C.; Elder, K. R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the mass transport dynamics of an adsorbed layer near a discontinuous incommensurate striped-honeycomb phase transition via numerical simulations of a coarse-grained model focusing on the motion of domain walls rather than individual atoms. Following an initial step profile created in the incommensurate striped phase, an intermediate hexagonal incommensurate phase nucleates and grows, leading to a bifurcation into two sharp profiles propagating in opposite directions as opposed to broad profiles induced by atomic diffusive motion. Our results are in agreement with recent numerical simulations of a microscopic model as well as experimental observations for the Pb/Si(111) adsorbate system.

  16. Engineering Synergy: Energy and Mass Transport in Hybrid Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Seon; Coates, Nelson E; Forster, Jason D; Ruminski, Anne M; Russ, Boris; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Su, Norman C; Yang, Fan; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-14

    An emerging class of materials that are hybrid in nature is propelling a technological revolution in energy, touching many fundamental aspects of energy-generation, storage, and conservation. Hybrid materials combine classical inorganic and organic components to yield materials that manifest new functionalities unattainable in traditional composites or other related multicomponent materials, which have additive function only. This Research News article highlights the exciting materials design innovations that hybrid materials enable, with an eye toward energy-relevant applications involving charge, heat, and mass transport. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The effect of water temperature and flow on respiration in barnacles: patterns of mass transfer versus kinetic limitation.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Michael T; Carrington, Emily

    2014-06-15

    In aquatic systems, physiological processes such as respiration, photosynthesis and calcification are potentially limited by the exchange of dissolved materials between organisms and their environment. The nature and extent of physiological limitation is, therefore, likely to be dependent on environmental conditions. Here, we assessed the metabolic sensitivity of barnacles under a range of water temperatures and velocities, two factors that influence their distribution. Respiration rates increased in response to changes in temperature and flow, with an interaction where flow had less influence on respiration at low temperatures, and a much larger effect at high temperatures. Model analysis suggested that respiration is mass transfer limited under conditions of low velocity (<7.5 cm (-1)) and high temperature (20-25°C). In contrast, limitation by uptake reaction kinetics, when the biotic capacity of barnacles to absorb and process oxygen is slower than its physical delivery by mass transport, prevailed at high flows (40-150 cm s(-1)) and low temperatures (5-15°C). Moreover, there are intermediate flow-temperature conditions where both mass transfer and kinetic limitation are important. Behavioral monitoring revealed that barnacles fully extend their cirral appendages at low flows and display abbreviated 'testing' behaviors at high flows, suggesting some form of mechanical limitation. In low flow-high temperature treatments, however, barnacles displayed distinct 'pumping' behaviors that may serve to increase ventilation. Our results suggest that in slow-moving waters, respiration may become mass transfer limited as temperatures rise, whereas faster flows may serve to ameliorate the effects of elevated temperatures. Moreover, these results underscore the necessity for approaches that evaluate the combined effects of multiple environmental factors when examining physiological and behavioral performance.

  18. Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause--Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL

    SciTech Connect

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-05-31

    At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the

  19. Induction of Nitrate Transport in Maize Roots, and Kinetics of Influx, Measured with Nitrogen-13 1

    PubMed Central

    Hole, David J.; Emran, Ali M.; Fares, Youhanna; Drew, Malcolm C.

    1990-01-01

    Unlike phosphate or potassium transport, uptake of nitrate by roots is induced, in part, by contact with the substrate ion. Plasmalemma influx of 13N-labeled nitrate in maize roots was studied in relation to induction of the uptake system, and the influence of short-term N starvation. Maize (Zea mays) roots not previously exposed to nitrate had a constitutive transport system (state 1), but influx increased 250% during six hours of contact with 100 micromolar nitrate, by which time the transport mechanism appeared to be fully synthesized (state 2). A three-day period of N starvation prior to induction and measurement of nitrate influx resulted in a greater capacity to transport nitrate than in unstarved controls, but this was fully expressed only if roots were kept in contact with nitrate for the six hours needed for full induction (state 2E). A kinetic analysis indicated a 160% increase in maximum influx in N-starved, induced roots with a small decrease in Km. The inducible component to nitrate influx was induced only by contact with nitrate. Full expression of the nitrate inducible transport system was dependent upon mRNA synthesis. An inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis (cycloheximide) eliminated the formation of the transport system while inhibition by chloramphenicol of mitochondrial- or plastid-coded protein synthesis had no effect. Poisoning of membrane-bound proteins effectively disabled both the constitutive and induced transport systems. PMID:16667516

  20. Palmitoylation controls dopamine transporter kinetics, degradation, and protein kinase C-dependent regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2011-02-18

    Palmitoylation is a lipid modification that confers diverse functions to target proteins and is a contributing factor for many neuronal diseases. In this study, we demonstrate using [(3)H]palmitic acid labeling and acyl-biotinyl exchange that native and expressed dopamine transporters (DATs) are palmitoylated, and using the palmitoyl acyltransferase inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), we identify several associated functions. Treatment of rat striatal synaptosomes with 2BP using lower doses or shorter times caused robust inhibition of transport V(max) that occurred with no losses of DAT protein or changes in DAT surface levels, indicating that acute loss of palmitoylation leads to reduction of transport kinetics. Treatment of synaptosomes or cells with 2BP using higher doses or longer times resulted in DAT protein losses and production of transporter fragments, implicating palmitoylation in regulation of transporter degradation. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that palmitoylation of rat DAT occurs at Cys-580 at the intracellular end of transmembrane domain 12 and at one or more additional unidentified site(s). Cys-580 mutation also led to production of transporter degradation fragments and to increased phorbol ester-induced down-regulation, further supporting palmitoylation in opposing DAT turnover and in opposing protein kinase C-mediated regulation. These results identify S-palmitoylation as a major regulator of DAT properties that could significantly impact acute and long term dopamine transport capacity.

  1. Experimental Studies on Mass Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies on mass transport of ternary compound, Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te by physical vapor transport (PVT) for source compositions up to X = 0.21 are presented. The effect of thermochemical (temperatures, vapor composition) and other factors (preparation of the source, crystal growth rate, temperature gradient) on composition and composition profiles of the grown crystals were investigated. A steep decrease in the mass flux with an increase in X(crystal) for X less than 0.1, and a difference in composition between the source and the deposited material have been observed. The composition profiles of the crystals were found to depend on the density and pretreatment of the source, and on the temperature gradient in the source zone. The homogeneity of the crystals improves at low undercoolings and/or when an appropriate excess of metal constituents is present in the vapor phase. The experimental results are in good agreement with our thermochemical model of this system.

  2. Impedance Analysis of Ion Transport Through Supported Lipid Membranes Doped with Ionophores: A New Kinetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, P. E.; Vallejo, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Kinetics of facilitated ion transport through planar bilayer membranes are normally analyzed by electrical conductance methods. The additional use of electrical relaxation techniques, such as voltage jump, is necessary to evaluate individual rate constants. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is recognized as the most powerful of the available electric relaxation techniques, it has rarely been used in connection with these kinetic studies. According to the new approach presented in this work, three steps were followed. First, a kinetic model was proposed that has the distinct quality of being general, i.e., it properly describes both carrier and channel mechanisms of ion transport. Second, the state equations for steady-state and for impedance experiments were derived, exhibiting the input–output representation pertaining to the model’s structure. With the application of a method based on the similarity transformation approach, it was possible to check that the proposed mechanism is distinguishable, i.e., no other model with a different structure exhibits the same input–output behavior for any input as the original. Additionally, the method allowed us to check whether the proposed model is globally identifiable (i.e., whether there is a single set of fit parameters for the model) when analyzed in terms of its impedance response. Thus, our model does not represent a theoretical interpretation of the experimental impedance but rather constitutes the prerequisite to select this type of experiment in order to obtain optimal kinetic identification of the system. Finally, impedance measurements were performed and the results were fitted to the proposed theoretical model in order to obtain the kinetic parameters of the system. The successful application of this approach is exemplified with results obtained for valinomycin–K+ in lipid bilayers supported onto gold substrates, i.e., an arrangement capable of emulating biological membranes. PMID:19669528

  3. Drug Release Kinetics and Transport Mechanisms of Non-degradable and Degradable Polymeric Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yao; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field The advancement in material design and engineering has led to the rapid development of novel materials with increasing complexity and functions. Both non-degradable and degradable polymers have found wide applications in the controlled delivery field. Studies on drug release kinetics provide important information into the function of material systems. To elucidate the detailed transport mechanism and the structure-function relationship of a material system, it is critical to bridge the gap between the macroscopic data and the transport behavior at the molecular level. Areas covered in this review The structure and function information of selected non-degradable and degradable polymers have been collected and summarized from literatures published after 1990s. The release kinetics of selected drug compounds from various material systems will be discussed in case studies. Recent progresses in the mathematical models based on different transport mechanisms will be highlighted. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of structure-function relationships of selected non-degradable and degradable polymers as drug delivery matrices. Take home message Understanding the structure-function relationship of the material system is key to the successful design of a delivery system for a particular application. Moreover, developing complex polymeric matrices requires more robust mathematical models to elucidate the solute transport mechanisms. PMID:20331353

  4. Kinetic modelling for neoclassical transport of high-Z impurity particles using a binary collision method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Y.; Yamoto, S.; Sawada, Y.; Inoue, H.; Hatayama, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new kinetic model for neoclassical impurity particle transport simulation has been developed. Our model is able to simulate the following two effects, which have been theoretically predicted, but neglected in most of the existing kinetic impurity transport simulations in the SOL (scrape-off layer)/Divertor plasmas of tokamak; (1) the neoclassical inward pinch (NC IWP) due to the density gradient of background plasmas and (2) the neoclassical temperature screening effect (NC TSE, outward transport) caused by the plasma temperature gradient. The IWP and TSE, both proportional to the impurity charge number Z, become especially important for higher-Z impurities such as tungsten. In this paper we focus on the case where background plasmas are in the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime. The velocity distribution of background plasma ions is modelled by a distorted Maxwellian distribution, which includes the Pfirsch-Schlüter flow velocity and the Pfirsch-Schlüter heat flux density, in order to reproduce the NC IWP and NC TSE. A series of test simulations have been performed for a toroidal magnetic field geometry. Characteristics of the neoclassical transport, such as dependencies on the safety factor and on the impurity charge number, have been confirmed.

  5. Mass Flux of ZnSe by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sha, Yi-Gao; Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Brebrick, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Mass fluxes of ZnSe by physical vapor transport (PVT) were measured in the temperature range of 1050 to 1160 C using an in-situ dynamic technique. The starting materials were either baked out or distilled under vacuum to obtain near-congruently subliming compositions. Using an optical absorption technique Zn and Se, were found to be the dominant vapor species. Partial pressures of Zn and Se, over the starting materials at temperatures between 960 and 1140 C were obtained by measuring the optical densities of the vapor phase at the wavelengths of 2138, 3405, 3508, 3613, and 3792 A. The amount and composition of the residual gas inside the experimental ampoules were measured after the run using a total pressure gauge. For the first time, the experimentally determined partial pressures of Zn and Se, and the amount and composition of the residual gas were used in a one-dimensional diffusion limited analysis of the mass transport rates for a PVT system. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and theoretical results was observed.

  6. Angular momentum transport within evolved low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Mankovich, Christopher; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2014-06-10

    Asteroseismology of 1.0-2.0 M {sub ☉} red giants by the Kepler satellite has enabled the first definitive measurements of interior rotation in both first ascent red giant branch (RGB) stars and those on the helium burning clump. The inferred rotation rates are 10-30 days for the ≈0.2 M {sub ☉} He degenerate cores on the RGB and 30-100 days for the He burning core in a clump star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Evolution code, we calculate state-of-the-art stellar evolution models of low mass rotating stars from the zero-age main sequence to the cooling white dwarf (WD) stage. We include transport of angular momentum due to rotationally induced instabilities and circulations, as well as magnetic fields in radiative zones (generated by the Tayler-Spruit dynamo). We find that all models fail to predict core rotation as slow as observed on the RGB and during core He burning, implying that an unmodeled angular momentum transport process must be operating on the early RGB of low mass stars. Later evolution of the star from the He burning clump to the cooling WD phase appears to be at nearly constant core angular momentum. We also incorporate the adiabatic pulsation code, ADIPLS, to explicitly highlight this shortfall when applied to a specific Kepler asteroseismic target, KIC8366239.

  7. Kinetics of mass transfer during deep fat frying of yellow fleshed cassava root slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyedeji, A. B.; Sobukola, O. P.; Henshaw, F. O.; Adegunwa, M. O.; Sanni, L. O.; Tomlins, K. I.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetics of mass transfer [moisture content, oil uptake, total carotenoid (TC) and shrinkage] during frying of yellow fleshed cassava roots (TMS 01/1371) was investigated. Slices were divided into (i) fresh and (ii) pre-dried to 75 % moisture content before atmospheric frying and (iii) vacuum fried. Percentage TC and activation energies of vacuum, fresh and pre-dried fried samples were 76, 63 and 61 %; and 82, 469.7, 213.7 kJ/mol, respectively.

  8. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 34U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-12-01

    The kinetic energy distribution as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of $^{234}U$, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al. presents a peak around m=108 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number; and the second peak to the distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy. Nevertheless, the theoretical calculations related to primary distribution made by Faust et al. do not result in a peak around m = 122. In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without peaks on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on the standard deviation of the kinetic energy distribution around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as big as the measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass, the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass.

  9. Self-oscillating surface of gel for autonomous mass transport.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryo; Murase, Yoko

    2012-11-01

    As a novel biomimetic gels deffering from conventonal stimuli-responsive polymer gels, we have developed a "self-oscillating" gel that swells and deswells periodically under constant condition without on-off switching of external stimuli. The gel is composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to which the catalyst of the oscillating chemical reaction, called Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is covalently immobilized. The chemical oscillation is converted to the mechanical oscillation of the gel through the change in hydrophilicity of polymer chains with the redox changes of the immobilized catalyst. By utilizing the self-oscillating gel, several kinds of functional material systems such as biomimetic actuators, etc. are expected. Here we review a potential application to functional surface to realize autonomous mass-transport by utilizing the peristaltic motion of the gel. With the propagation of the chemical wave, the loaded cargo is autonomously transported on the surface. In order to fabricate the self-driven gel conveyer for a wider use including biomedical applications, the interactions between the self-oscillating gel and the loaded gel cargo were investigated and their influence on the transport phenomena were evaluated.

  10. Mass transfer kinetics in the chromatography of insulin variants under nonlinear conditions.

    PubMed

    Gubernak, Małgorzata; Liu, Xiaoda; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges

    2004-01-01

    Experimental data regarding the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption of lispro, an insulin variant, onto a YMC ODS-A column, from an aqueous solution of acetonitrile (31%) and TFA are reinterpreted, using a more complex model of the mass transfer kinetics. The adsorption behavior follows the Toth isotherm model, suggesting either a strongly heterogeneous surface or, rather, that when insulin molecules adsorb they contact the surface along different areas of the molecule. The lumped pore diffusion (POR) model of chromatography accounts well for the band profiles. The internal mass transfer resistances are higher than expected, which suggests that intraparticle diffusion is slower. Furthermore, the pore diffusion coefficient increases with decreasing sample size. That surface diffusion accounts for the mass transfer kinetics inside particles explains these results. Assuming that the gradient of the surface concentration is the driving force of surface diffusion, it is possible to account very well for the band profiles of samples of widely different sizes, using a single value of the surface diffusivity.

  11. Estimation of mass transfer and kinetics in operating biofilters for removal of VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.W.; Davison, B.H.; Gable, C.C.

    1997-11-18

    Long-term, stable operation of trickle-bed bioreactors remains desirable, but is difficult to achieve for industrial processes, which generate continuous streams of dilute gaseous hydrocarbons. Mass transfer and kinetic parameters are difficult to measure, complicating predictive estimates. Two methods are presented which were used to predict the importance of mass transfer versus kinetics limitations in operating trickle-bed biofilters. Both methods altered the overall kinetic activity of the biofilter and estimated the effective mass transfer coefficient (K{sub 1}a) by varying the VOC (volatile organic contaminant) loading rate and concentration. The first method, used with developing biofilters possessing low biomass, involved addition of cultured biomass to the recirculating liquid to effect an overall change in VOC removal capacity. The second method altered the total bed temperature of a well-established biofilter to effect a change. Results and modeling from these experiments are presented for a mixed culture biofilter which is capable of consuming sparingly soluble alkanes, such as pentane and isobutane. Methods to control overgrowth are discussed which were used to operate one reactor continuously for over 24 months with sustained degradation of VOC alkanes with a rate of 50 g/h/m{sup 3}.

  12. Kinetic modeling of pH-dependent antimony (V) sorption and transport in iron oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongbing; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics controlling the retention and transport of antimony (Sb) is prerequisite for evaluating the risk of groundwater contamination by the toxic element. In this study, kinetic batch and saturated miscible displacement experiments were performed to investigate effects of protonation-deprotonation reactions on sorption-desorption and transport of Sb(V) in iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS). Results clearly demonstrated that Sb(V) sorption was highly nonlinear and time dependent, where both sorption capacity and kinetic rates decreased with increasing solution pH. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained at different solution pH exhibited that mobility of Sb(V) were higher under neutral to alkaline condition than under acidic condition. Because of the nonlinear and non-equilibrium nature of Sb(V) retention and transport, multi-reaction models (MRM) with equilibrium and kinetic sorption expressions were utilized successfully to simulate the experiment data. Equilibrium distribution coefficient (Ke) and reversible kinetic retention parameters (k1 and k2) of both kinetic sorption and transport experiment showed marked decrease as pH increased from 4.0 to 7.5. Surface complexation is suggested as the dominant mechanism for the observed pH-dependent phenomena, which need to be incorporated into the kinetic models to accurately simulate the reactive transport of Sb(V) in vadose zone and aquifers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Comparison of CME masses and kinetic energies near the Sun and in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Howard, R. A.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    Masses have now been determined for many of the CMEs observed in the inner heliosphere by the HELIOS 1 and 2 zodiacal light photometers. The speed of the brightest material of each CME has also been measured so that, for events having both mass and speed determinations, the kinetic energies of the CMEs are estimated. We compare the masses and kinetic energies of the individual CMEs measured in the inner heliosphere by HELIOS and near the Sun from observations by the SOLWIND (1979-1983) and SMM coronagraphs (1980). Where feasible we also compare the speeds of the same CMEs. We find that the HELIOS masses and energies tend to be somewhat larger by factors of 2-5 than those derived from the coronagraph data. We also compare the distribution of the masses and energies of the HELIOS and coronagraph CMEs over the solar cycle. These results provide an important baseline for observations of CMEs from coronagraphs, from the ISEE-3/ICE, WIND and Ulysses spacecraft and in the future from SOHO.

  14. Carbon dioxide storage in marine sediments - dissolution, transport and hydrate formation kinetics from high-pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigalke, N. K.; Savy, J. P.; Pansegrau, M.; Aloisi, G.; Kossel, E.; Haeckel, M.

    2009-12-01

    By satisfying thermodynamic framework conditions for CO2 hydrate formation, pressures and temperatures of the deep marine environment are unique assets for sequestering CO2 in clathrates below the seabed. However, feasibility and safety of this storage option require an accurate knowledge of the rate constants governing the speed of physicochemical reactions following the injection of the liquefied gas into the sediments. High-pressure experiments designed to simulate the deep marine environment open the possibility to obtain the required parameters for a wide range of oceanic conditions. In an effort to constrain mass transfer coefficients and transport rates of CO2 in(to) the pore water of marine sediments first experiments were targeted at quantifying the rate of CO2 uptake by de-ionized water and seawater across a two-phase interface. The nature of the interface was controlled by selecting p and T to conditions within and outside the hydrate stability field (HSF) while considering both liquid and gaseous CO2. Concentration increase and hydrate growth were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. The experiments revealed anomalously fast transport rates of dissolved CO2 at conditions both inside and outside the HSF. While future experiments will further elucidate kinetics of CO2 transport and hydrate formation, these first results could have major significance to safety-related issues in the discussion of carbon storage in the marine environment.

  15. Reactive Transport in Porous Media: Pore-scale Mass Exchange between Aqueous Phase and Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanizadeh, S.; Qin, C.

    2013-12-01

    and biofilms is empirically introduced which lacks somewhat physical fundamentals. Therefore, to better characterize the mass exchange between aqueous phase and biofilms, in this work we start with the local descriptions of solute transport in porous media with biofilms. Then, the upscaled average equations of solute transport in both aqueous phase and biofilms are obtained by averaging the local equations over a domain of interest, like a pore throat or a typical REV of porous media. Based on some assumptions, we can reach a general form of first-order kinetic mass exchange model. As a first attempt, we limit investigates of solute mass exchange to the pore scale. The dependence of pore-scale mass exchange coefficient on a number of pore-scale parameters (such as pore structure, Damköhler number and volume fraction of biofilms) is investigated. Our studies show that this coefficient strongly depends on pore geometry, volume fraction of biofilms, Damköhler number and diffusivity ratio. Particularly, our results can be key inputs to the pore-network modeling of bioclogging.

  16. Kinetic Desorption and Sorption of U(VI) During Reactive Transport in a Contaminated Hanford Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Qafoku, Odeta; Smith, Steven C.

    2005-05-12

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, contaminated (22.7 µmol kg-1) capillary fringe sediment that had experienced long-term exposure to U(VI). The clay fraction mineralogy of the sediment was dominated by montmorillonite, muscovite, vermiculite, and chlorite. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl–carbonate and calcium–uranyl–carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI) free solution was used to study U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Uranium(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in the leaching solution. Strong kinetic behavior was observed for both U(VI) desorption and sorption. Although U(VI) is semi–mobile in mildly alkaline, calcareous subsurface environments, our results showed substantial U(VI) sorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of short-term U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled.

  17. TICKET-UWM: a coupled kinetic, equilibrium, and transport screening model for metals in lakes.

    PubMed

    Farley, Kevin J; Carbonaro, Richard F; Fanelli, Christopher J; Costanzo, Robert; Rader, Kevin J; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2011-06-01

    The tableau input coupled kinetic equilibrium transport-unit world model (TICKET-UWM) has been developed as a screening model for assessing potential environmental risks associated with the release of metals into lakes. The model is based on a fully implicit, one-step solution algorithm that allows for simultaneous consideration of dissolved and particulate phase transport; metal complexation to organic matter and inorganic ligands; precipitation of metal hydroxides, carbonates, and sulfides; competitive interactions of metals and major cations with biotic ligands; a simplified description of biogeochemical cycling of organic carbon and sulfur; and dissolution kinetics for metal powders, massives, and other solid forms. Application of TICKET-UWM to a generalized lake in the Sudbury area of the Canadian Shield is presented to demonstrate the overall cycling of metals in lakes and the nonlinear effects of chemical speciation on metal responses. In addition, the model is used to calculate critical loads for metals, with acute toxicity of Daphnia magna as the final endpoint. Model results show that the critical loads for Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn varied from 2.5 to 39.0 g metal/m(2) -year and were found to be one or more orders of magnitude higher than comparable loads for pesticides (lindane, 4,4'-DDT) and several polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. In sensitivity calculations, critical metal-loading rates were found to vary significantly as a function of the hydraulic detention time, water hardness, and metal dissolution kinetic rates.

  18. Extended Thomas-Fermi kinetic energy density functional with spatially varying effective mass in d=1,2,3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Berkane, K.; Bencheikh, K.

    2005-08-15

    For first-principles density functional theory of a many fermion system, the determination of the kinetic energy functional is important. We consider N independent fermions with spatially varying effective mass in two dimensions, we derive the corresponding kinetic energy density using the ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) semiclassical approach. Our result reduces, as expected, to the one obtained in the literature for a constant effective mass. We examine the analytical expressions of the position dependent effective mass terms in the kinetic energy density functional with respect to the dimensionality d=1,2,3 of the space.

  19. Dusty air masses transport between Amazon Basin and Caribbean Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euphrasie-Clotilde, Lovely; Molinie, Jack; Prospero, Joseph; Feuillard, Tony; Brute, Francenor; Jeannot, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Depend on the month, African desert dust affect different parts of the North Atlantic Ocean. From December to April, Saharan dust outbreaks are often reported over the amazon basin and from May to November over the Caribbean islands and the southern regions of USA. This annual oscillation of Saharan dust presence, related to the ITCZ position, is perturbed some time, during March. Indeed, over Guadeloupe, the air quality network observed between 2007 and 2012 several dust events during March. In this paper, using HISPLIT back trajectories, we analyzed air masses trajectories for March dust events observed in Guadeloupe, from 2007 to 2012.We observed that the high pressure positions over the Atlantic Ocean allow the transport of dusty air masses from southern region of West Africa to the Caribbean Sea with a path crossing close to coastal region of French Guyana. Complementary investigations including the relationship between PM10 concentrations recorded in two sites Pointe-a-Pitre in the Caribbean, and Cayenne in French Guyana, have been done. Moreover we focus on the mean delay observed between the times arrival. All the results show a link between pathway of dusty air masses present over amazon basin and over the Caribbean region during several event of March. The next step will be the comparison of mineral dust composition for this particular month.

  20. Mu2e Transport Solenoid Cold-Mass Alignment Issues

    DOE PAGES

    Lopes, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Badgley, K.; ...

    2017-01-05

    The Muon-to-electron conversion experiment (Mu2e) at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids: the Production Solenoid (PS), the Transport Solenoid (TS) and the Detector Solenoid (DS). The TS is formed by two magnets: TS upstream (TSu) and downstream (TSd). Each has its own cryostat and power supply. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the position and angular alignment of each coil in this magnet system were performed in the past with the objective to demonstrate that the magnet design meets all the field requirements. Furthermore, the alignment of the cold-masses is criticalmore » to maximize the transmission of muons and to avoid possible backgrounds that would reduce the sensitivity of the experiment. Each TS magnet cold-mass can be individually aligned. Here, we discuss implications of the alignment of the TS cold-masses in terms of the displacement of the magnetic center. Consideration of the practical mechanical limits are also presented.« less

  1. Retrograde axonal transport of VZV: kinetic studies in hESC-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Sergei; Kinchington, Paul R; Yang, In Hong; Selariu, Anca; Zhu, Hua; Yee, Michael; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2012-12-01

    Retrograde axonal transport of the neurotropic alphaherpesvirus Varicella zoster virus (VZV) from vesicles at the skin results in sensory neuron infection and establishment of latency. Reactivation from latency leads to painful herpes zoster. The lack of a suitable animal model of these processes for the highly human-restricted VZV has resulted in a dearth of knowledge regarding the axonal transport of VZV. We recently demonstrated VZV infection of distal axons, leading to subsequent capsid transport to the neuronal somata, and replication and release of infectious virus using a new model based on neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC). In the present study, we perform a kinetic analysis of the retrograde transport of green fluorescent protein-tagged ORF23 in VZV capsids using hESC-derived neurons compartmentalized microfluidic chambers and time-lapse video microscopy. The motion of the VZV was discontinuous, showing net retrograde movement with numerous short pauses and reversals in direction. Velocities measured were higher 1 h after infection than 6 h after infection, while run lengths were similar at both time points. The hESC-derived neuron model was also used to show that reduced neuronal spread by a VZV loss-of-function mutant for ORF7 is not due to the prevention of axonal infection and transport of the virus to the neuronal somata. hESC-derived neurons are, therefore, a powerful model for studying axonal transport of VZV and molecular characteristics of neuronal infection.

  2. Kinetics and extent of fusion between Sendai virus and erythrocyte ghosts: application of a mass action kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Nir, S; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D

    1986-04-22

    The kinetics and extent of fusion between Sendai virus and erythrocyte ghosts were investigated with an assay for lipid mixing based on the relief of self-quenching of fluorescence. The results were analyzed in terms of a mass action kinetic model, which views the overall fusion reaction as a sequence of a second-order process of virus-cell adhesion followed by the first-order fusion reaction itself. The fluorescence development during the course of the fusion process was calculated by numerical integration, employing separate rate constants for the adhesion step and for the subsequent fusion reaction. Dissociation of virus particles from the cells was found to be of minor importance when fusion was initiated by mixing the particles at 37 degrees C. However, besides the initiation of fusion, extensive dissociation does occur after a preincubation of a concentrated suspension of particles at 4 degrees C followed by a transfer of the sample to 37 degrees C. The conclusion drawn from the levels of fluorescence increase obtained after 20 h of incubation is that in principle most virus particles can fuse with the ghosts at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. However, the number of Sendai virus particles that actually fuse with a single ghost is limited to 100-200, despite the fact more than 1000 particles can bind to one cell. This finding may imply that 100-200 specific fusion sites for Sendai virus exist on the erythrocyte membrane. A simple equation can yield predictions for the final levels of fluorescence for a wide range of ratios of virus particles to ghosts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Effect of body mass and midsole hardness on kinetic and perceptual variables during basketball landing manoeuvres.

    PubMed

    Nin, Darren Z; Lam, Wing K; Kong, Pui W

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of body mass and shoe midsole hardness on kinetic and perceptual variables during the performance of three basketball movements: (1) the first and landing steps of layup, (2) shot-blocking landing and (3) drop landing. Thirty male basketball players, assigned into "heavy" (n = 15, mass 82.7 ± 4.3 kg) or "light" (n = 15, mass 63.1 ± 2.8 kg) groups, performed five trials of each movement in three identical shoes of varying midsole hardness (soft, medium, hard). Vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) during landing was sampled using multiple wooden-top force plates. Perceptual responses on five variables (forefoot cushioning, rearfoot cushioning, forefoot stability, rearfoot stability and overall comfort) were rated after each movement condition using a 150-mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A mixed factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (Body Mass × Shoe) was applied to all kinetic and perceptual variables. During the first step of the layup, the loading rate associated with rearfoot contact was 40.7% higher in the "heavy" than "light" groups (P = .014) and 12.4% higher in hard compared with soft shoes (P = .011). Forefoot peak VGRF in a soft shoe was higher (P = .011) than in a hard shoe during shot-block landing. Both "heavy" and "light" groups preferred softer to harder shoes. Overall, body mass had little effect on kinetic or perceptual variables.

  4. Solvent-Induced Crystallization in Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) during Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao

    2001-03-01

    The solvent transport in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and related phase transformation were investigated. The data of mass sorption were analyzed according to Harmon¡¦s model for Case I (Fickian), Case II (swelling) and anomalous transport. This transport process in PET is accompanied by the induced crystallization of the original amorphous state. The transformation was studied by wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), density gradient column, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). During this process, the matrix is under a compressive strain that causes different kinetic path of crystallization as compared to that by thermal annealing. This state of strain will assist the development of the solvent-induced crystallization. It also can be explained in terms of the principle of Le Chatelier if the local equilibrium is assumed. The model regarding the crystallization was proposed in terms of the study of long period L, the crystal thickness lc and the thickness of amorphous layer la, obtained from the linear correlation function and interface distribution function.

  5. Improved Predictions of Carbon Tetrachloride Contaminant Flow and Transport: Implementation of Kinetic Volatilization and Multicomponent NAPL Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2008-09-29

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was discharged to waste sites that are included in the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit in Hanford 200 West Area. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is conducting a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit. The RI/FS process and remedial investigations for the 200-PW-1, 200 PW-3, and 200-PW-6 Operable Units are described in the Plutonium/Organic-Rich Process Condensate/Process Waste Groups Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. As part of this overall effort, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to improve the STOMP simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006) by incorporating kinetic volatilization of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL) and multicomponent flow and transport. This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to characterize the nature and distribution of CT in the 200 West Area and subsequently select an appropriate final remedy. Previous numerical simulation results with the STOMP simulator have overestimated the effect of soil vapor extraction (SVE) on subsurface CT, showing rapid removal of considerably more CT than has actually been recovered so far. These previous multiphase simulations modeled CT mass transfer between phases based on equilibrium partitioning. Equilibrium volatilization can overestimate volatilization because mass transfer limitations present in the field are not considered. Previous simulations were also conducted by modeling the NAPL as a single component, CT. In reality, however, the NAPL mixture disposed of at the Hanford site contained several non-volatile and nearly insoluble organic components, resulting in time-variant fluid properties as the CT component volatilized or dissolved over time. Simulation of CT removal from a DNAPL mixture using single-component DNAPL properties typically leads to an overestimation of CT removal. Other possible reasons for the discrepancy between

  6. Second order kinetic theory of parallel momentum transport in collisionless drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale

    2016-08-15

    A second order kinetic model for turbulent ion parallel momentum transport is presented. A new nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux term is calculated. The resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the momentum source, while the nonresonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force compensates for that of the nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux. The resonant component of the kinetic momentum flux can be divided into three parts, including the pinch term, the diffusive term, and the residual stress. By reassembling the pinch term and the residual stress, the residual stress can be considered as a pinch term of parallel wave-particle resonant velocity, and, therefore, may be called as “resonant velocity pinch” term. Considering the resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the transfer rate between resonant ions and waves (or, equivalently, nonresonant ions), a conservation equation of the parallel momentum of resonant ions and waves is obtained.

  7. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  8. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C.; Pace, Molly N.; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M- NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  9. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  10. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill

  11. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    DOE PAGES

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; ...

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. Themore » colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long

  12. Platelet Transport Rates and Binding Kinetics at High Shear over a Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Bark, David L.; Ku, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombus formation over a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque cap can occlude an artery with fatal consequences. We describe a computational model of platelet transport and binding to interpret rate-limiting steps seen in experimental thrombus formation over a collagen-coated stenosis. The model is used to compute shear rates in stenoses with growing boundaries. In the model, moving erythrocytes influence platelet transport based on shear-dependent enhanced diffusivity and a nonuniform platelet distribution. Adhesion is modeled as platelet-platelet binding kinetics. The results indicate that observed thrombus growth rates are limited by platelet transport to the wall for shear rates up to 6000 s−1. Above 7000 s−1, the thrombus growth rate is likely limited by binding kinetics (10−4 m/s). Thrombus growth computed from these rate-limiting steps match the thrombus location and occlusion times for experimental conditions if a lag time for platelet activation is included. Using fitted parameters, the model is then used to predict thrombus size and shape at a higher Reynolds number flow consistent with coronary artery disease. PMID:23870271

  13. Platelet transport rates and binding kinetics at high shear over a thrombus.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Ku, David N

    2013-07-16

    Thrombus formation over a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque cap can occlude an artery with fatal consequences. We describe a computational model of platelet transport and binding to interpret rate-limiting steps seen in experimental thrombus formation over a collagen-coated stenosis. The model is used to compute shear rates in stenoses with growing boundaries. In the model, moving erythrocytes influence platelet transport based on shear-dependent enhanced diffusivity and a nonuniform platelet distribution. Adhesion is modeled as platelet-platelet binding kinetics. The results indicate that observed thrombus growth rates are limited by platelet transport to the wall for shear rates up to 6000 s(-1). Above 7000 s(-1), the thrombus growth rate is likely limited by binding kinetics (10(-4) m/s). Thrombus growth computed from these rate-limiting steps match the thrombus location and occlusion times for experimental conditions if a lag time for platelet activation is included. Using fitted parameters, the model is then used to predict thrombus size and shape at a higher Reynolds number flow consistent with coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo transport kinetics and distribution of taurocholate by rat ileum and jejunum

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.C.; Root, C. )

    1990-08-01

    The transport kinetics and distribution of taurocholate (TC) from the ileum and jejunum were evaluated in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Uptake and transport kinetics were determined after simultaneous administration of equimolar solutions of ({sup 3}H)taurocholic acid (({sup 3}H)TC) in the ileum and (24-{sup 14}C)taurocholic acid (({sup 14}C)TC) in the jejunum of anesthetized rats. At TC concentrations between 0.3 and 15 mM, total ileal absorption exceeded jejunal absorption 15- to 25-fold. The apparent Km and Vmax for ileal absorption of TC were 5.6 mM and 65.5 nmol.min-1.cm-1, respectively. Tissue distribution studies following uptake from the ileum and jejunum were done with {sup 75}Se-labeled homocholic acid taurine ({sup 75}Se-HCAT). In the ileum, 82% of the {sup 75}Se-HCAT removed from the lumen was found in the bile, 10.6% was found in the ileal wall, and 7.3% was found in the liver. In the jejunum, 24.1% was found in bile, 0.6% was found in the liver, and 75.3% remained in the jejunal wall. These data show that the ileum is much more efficient and better equipped than the jejunum to take up and transport TC at concentrations up to 15 mM.

  15. Chemistry and mass transport of iodine in containment

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Kress, T.S.; Shockley, W.E.; Daish, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    TRENDS is a computer code for modeling behavior of iodine in containment. It tracks both chemical and physical changes and features such as calculation of radiation dose rates in water pools , radiolysis effects, hydrolysis, and deposition/revaporization on aerosols and structural surfaces. Every attempt has been made to account for all significant processes. Reaction rate constants for iodine hydrolysis and radiolysis were obtained by a variable algorithm that gives values closely modeling experimental data. TRENDS output provides the distribution of iodine in containment and release from containment as a function of time during a severe accident sequence. Initial calculations with TRENDS have shown that the amount of volatile iodine released from containment is sensitive to the value of the liquid-gas (evaporation) mass transport coefficient for I/sub 2/. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  17. Materials with engineered mesoporosity for programmed mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Dara V.

    Transport in nanostructured materials is of great interest for scientists in various fields, including molecular sequestration, catalysis, artificial photosynthesis and energy storage. This thesis will present work on the transport of molecular and ionic species in mesoporous materials (materials with pore sizes between 2 and 50 nm). Initially, discussion will focus on the synthesis of mesoporous ZnS nanorattles and the size selected mass transport of small molecules through the mesopores. Discussion will then shift of exploration of cation exchange and electroless plating of metals to alter the mesoporous hollow sphere (MHS) materials and properties. The focus of discussion will then shift to the transport of ions into and out of a hierarchically structured gold electrode. Finally, a model gamma-bactiophage was developed to study the electromigration of charged molecules into and out of a confined geometry. A catalytically active biomolecular species was encapsulated within the central cavity of ZnS MHS. Both the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and the size-selective transport through the wall of the MHS were verified through the use of a common fluorogen, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium azide. Additionally, the protection of the enzyme was shown through size-selected blocking of a protease. The mesoporous hollow sphere system introduces size-selectivity to catalyzed chemical reactions; future work may include variations in pore sizes, and pore wall chemical functionalization. The pore size in ZnS mesoporous hollow spheres is controlled between 2.5 and 4.1 nm through swelling of the lyotropic liquid crystal template. The incorporation of a swelling agent is shown to linearly vary the hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase, which templates the mesopores, while allowing the high fidelity synthesis of mesoporous hollow spheres. Fluorescnently labeled ssDNA was utilized as a probe to explore the change in mesopore permeability afforded by the swollen template

  18. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Thomas, K.B.

    1994-09-01

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Ph, or {approx}DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 {degrees}C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  19. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F.; Thomas, K. B.

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors' laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane (approximately Ph(CH2)3Ph, or approximately DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  20. Triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry concept for thyroid transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Aqai, Payam; Fryganas, Christos; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2012-08-07

    For the analysis of thyroid transporter ligands, a triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry (BioMS) concept was developed, with the aim at three different analytical objectives: rapid screening of any ligand, confirmation of known ligands in accordance with legislative requirements, and identification of emerging yet unknown ligands. These three purposes share the same biorecognition element, recombinant thyroid transport protein transthyretin (rTTR), and dedicated modes of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). For screening, a rapid and radiolabel-free competitive inhibition MS binding assay was developed with fast ultrahigh performance-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple-quadrupole-MS (UPLC-QqQ-MS) as the readout system. It uses the nonradioactive stable isotopic thyroid hormone (13)C(6)-L-thyroxine as the label of which the binding to rTTR is inhibited by any ligand such as thyroid drugs and thyroid endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). To this end, rTTR is either used in solution or immobilized on paramagnetic microbeads. The concentration-dependent inhibition of the label by the natural thyroid hormone l-thyroxine (T4), as a model analyte, is demonstrated in water at part-per-trillion and in urine at part-per-billion level. For confirmation of identity of known ligands, rTTR was used for bioaffinity purification for confirmation of naturally present free T4 in urine. As a demonstrator for identification of unknown ligands, the same rTTR was used again but in combination with nano-UPLC-quadrupole time-of-flight-MS (nLC-Q-TOF-MS) and urine samples spiked with the model "unknown" EDCs triclosan and tetrabromobisphenol-A. This study highlights the potential of BioMS using one affinity system, both for rapid screening and for confirmation and identification of known and unknown emerging thyroid EDCs.

  1. Mass transfer kinetics on heterogeneous binding sites of molecularly imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    The mass transfer kinetics of the L- and D-Fmoc-Tryptophan (Fmoc-Trp) enantiomers on Fmoc-L-Trp imprinted polymer (MIP) and on its reference polymer (NIP), were measured using their elution peak profiles and the breakthrough curves recorded in frontal analysis for the determination of their equilibrium isotherms, at temperatures of 40, 50, 60, and 70 C. At all temperatures, the isotherm data of the Fmoc-Trp enantiomers on the MIP were best accounted for by the Tri-Langmuir isotherm model, while the isotherm data of Fmoc-Trp on the NIP were best accounted for by the Bi-Langmuir isotherm model. The profiles of the elution bands of various amounts of each enantiomer were acquired in the concentration range from 0.1 to 40 mM. These experimental profiles were compared with those calculated using the best values estimated for the isotherm parameters and the lumped pore diffusion model (POR), which made possible to calculate the intraparticle diffusion coefficients for each system. The results show that surface diffusion contributes predominantly to the overall mass transfer kinetics on both the MIP and the NIP, compared to external mass transfer and pore diffusion. The surface diffusion coefficients (D{sub s}) of Fmoc-L-Trp on the NIP does not depend on the amount bound (q) while the values of D{sub s} for the two Fmoc-Trp enantiomers on the MIP increase with increasing q at all temperatures. These positive dependencies of D{sub s} on q for Fmoc-Trp on the MIP were fairly well modeled by indirectly incorporating surface heterogeneity into the surface diffusion coefficient. The results obtained show that the mass transfer kinetics of the enantiomers on the imprinted polymers depend strongly on the surface heterogeneity.

  2. Mass and charge transport in arbitrarily shaped microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruus, Henrik; Asger Mortensen, Niels; Okkels, Fridolin; Hoejgaard Olesen, Laurits

    2006-11-01

    We consider laminar flow of incompressible electrolytes in long, straight channels driven by pressure and electro-osmosis. We use a Hilbert space eigenfunction expansion to address the problem of arbitrarily shaped cross sections and obtain general results in linear-response theory for the mass and charge transport coefficients which satisfy Onsager relations [1,2]. In the limit of non-overlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as half the hydraulic diameter R=2 A/P with A and P being the cross- sectional area and perimeter, respectively. In particular, we consider the limits of thin non-overlapping as well as strongly overlapping Debye layers, respectively, and calculate the corrections to the hydraulic resistance due to electro- hydrodynamic interactions.[1] N. A. Mortensen, F. Okkels, and H. Bruus, Phys. Rev. E 71, 057301 (2005) [2] N. A. Mortensen, L. H. Olesen, and H. Bruus, New J. Phys. 8, 37 (2006)

  3. Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Transport via the Glymphatic Pathway Modeled by Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-01-01

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4 min over ∼3 hrs in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins. PMID:28323163

  4. Cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid transport via the glymphatic pathway modeled by optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-03-18

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4min over ∼3h in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins.

  5. Kinetics and regulation of lactose transport and metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis JA6.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M; Silveira, W B; Fietto, L G; Brandão, R L; Castro, I M

    2014-07-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis strains are able to assimilate lactose. They have been used industrially to eliminate this sugar from cheese whey and in other industrial products. In this study, we investigated specific features and the kinetic parameters of the lactose transport system in K. lactis JA6. In lactose grown cells, lactose was transported by a system transport with a half-saturation constant (K s) of 1.49 ± 0.38 mM and a maximum velocity (V max) of 0.96 ± 0.12 mmol. (g dry weight)(-1) h(-1) for lactose. The transport system was constitutive and energy-dependent. Results obtained by different approaches showed that the lactose transport system was regulated by glucose at the transcriptional level and by glucose and other sugars at a post-translational level. In K. lactis JA6, galactose metabolization was under glucose control. These findings indicated that the regulation of lactose-galactose regulon in K. lactis was similar to the regulation of galactose regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Pulsatile flow and mass transport past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Fujioka, Hideki; Suresh, Vinod; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The mass transport of a pulsatile free-stream flow past a single circular cylinder is investigated as a building block for an artificial lung device. The free stream far from the cylinder is represented by a time-periodic (sinusoidal) component superimposed on a steady velocity. The dimensionless parameters of interest are the steady Reynolds number (Re), Womersley parameter (α), sinusoidal amplitude (A), and the Schmidt number (Sc). The ranges investigated in this study are 5⩽Re⩽40, 0.25⩽α⩽4, 0.25⩽A⩽0.75, and Sc =1000. A pair of vortices downstream of the cylinder is observed in almost all cases investigated. These vortices oscillate in size and strength as α and A are varied. For α <αc, where αc=0.005A-1.13Re1.33, the vortex is always attached to the cylinder (persistent); while for α >αc, the vortex is attached to the cylinder only during part of a time cycle (intermittent). The time-averaged Sherwood number, Sh̿, is found to be largely influenced by the steady Reynolds number, increasing approximately as Re1/2. For α =0.25, Sh̿ is less than the steady (α =0, A =0) value and decreases with increasing A. For α =2 and α =4, Sh̿ is greater than the steady value and increases with increasing A. These qualitatively opposite effects of pulsatility are discussed in terms of quasisteady versus unsteady transport. The maximum increase over steady transport due to pulsatility varies between 14.4% and 20.9% for Re =10-40, α =4, and A =0.75.

  7. Pesticide transport with runoff from creeping bentgrass turf: Relationship of pesticide properties to mass transport.

    PubMed

    Rice, Pamela J; Horgan, Brian P; Rittenhouse, Jennifer L

    2010-06-01

    The off-site transport of pesticides with runoff is both an agronomic and environmental concern, resulting from reduced control of target pests in the area of application and contamination of surrounding ecosystems. Experiments were designed to measure the quantity of pesticides in runoff from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris) turf managed as golf course fairway to gain a better understanding of factors that influence chemical availability and mass transport. Less than 1 to 23% of applied chloropyrifos, flutolanil, mecoprop-p (MCPP), dimethylamine salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), or dicamba was measured in edge-of-plot runoff when commercially available pesticide formulations were applied at label rates 23 +/- 9 h prior to simulated precipitation (62 +/- 13 mm). Time differential between hollow tine core cultivation and runoff did not significantly influence runoff volumes or the percentage of applied chemicals transported in the runoff. With the exception of chlorpyrifos, all chemicals of interest were detected in the initial runoff samples and throughout the runoff events. Chemographs of the five pesticides followed trends in agreement with mobility classifications associated with their soil organic carbon partition coefficient (K(OC).) Data collected from the present study provides information on the transport of chemicals with runoff from turf, which can be used in model simulations to predict nonpoint source pollution potentials and estimate ecological risks.

  8. Dynamic characterization of external and internal mass transport in heterotrophic biofilms from microsensors measurements.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, Xavier; Dorado, Antonio David; Bonsfills, Anna; Gabriel, Gemma; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of mass transport mechanisms in biofilm-based technologies such as biofilters is essential to improve bioreactors performance by preventing mass transport limitation. External and internal mass transport in biofilms was characterized in heterotrophic biofilms grown on a flat plate bioreactor. Mass transport resistance through the liquid-biofilm interphase and diffusion within biofilms were quantified by in situ measurements using microsensors with a high spatial resolution (<50 μm). Experimental conditions were selected using a mathematical procedure based on the Fisher Information Matrix to increase the reliability of experimental data and minimize confidence intervals of estimated mass transport coefficients. The sensitivity of external and internal mass transport resistances to flow conditions within the range of typical fluid velocities over biofilms (Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 7) was assessed. Estimated external mass transfer coefficients at different liquid phase flow velocities showed discrepancies with studies considering laminar conditions in the diffusive boundary layer near the liquid-biofilm interphase. The correlation of effective diffusivity with flow velocities showed that the heterogeneous structure of biofilms defines the transport mechanisms inside biofilms. Internal mass transport was driven by diffusion through cell clusters and aggregates at Re below 2.8. Conversely, mass transport was driven by advection within pores, voids and water channels at Re above 5.6. Between both flow velocities, mass transport occurred by a combination of advection and diffusion. Effective diffusivities estimated at different biofilm densities showed a linear increase of mass transport resistance due to a porosity decrease up to biofilm densities of 50 g VSS·L(-1). Mass transport was strongly limited at higher biofilm densities. Internal mass transport results were used to propose an empirical correlation to assess the effective diffusivity

  9. Mass and charge transport in IPMC actuators with fractal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Longfei; Wu, Yucheng; Zhu, Zicai; Li, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) actuators have been attracting a growing interest in extensive applications, which consequently raises the demands on the accuracy of its theoretical modeling. For the last few years, rough landscape of the interface between the electrode and the ionic membrane of IPMC has been well-documented as one of the key elements to ensure a satisfied performance. However, in most of the available work, the interface morphology of IPMC was simplified with structural idealization, which lead to perplexity in the physical interpretation on its interface mechanism. In this paper, the quasi-random rough interface of IPMC was described with fractal dimension and scaling parameters. And the electro-chemical field was modeled by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set. Then, by simulation with Finite Element Method, a comprehensive analysis on he inner mass and charge transportation in IPMC actuators with different fractal interfaces was provided, which may be further adopted to instruct the performance-oriented interface design for ionic electro-active actuators. The results also verified that rough interface can impact the electrical and mechanical response of IPMC, not only from the respect of the real surface increase, but also from mass distribution difference caused by the complexity of the micro profile.

  10. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  11. Sensitivity of benzene natural attenuation to variations in kinetic and transport parameters in Liwa Aquifer, UAE.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed M; Saleh, Nawal E; Sherif, Mohsen M

    2010-04-01

    Dissolved benzene was detected in the shallow unconfined Liwa aquifer (UAE). This aquifer represents the main freshwater source for a nearby residence camp area. A finite element model is used to simulate the fate, transport, and attenuation of the dissolved benzene plume to help decision makers assess natural attenuation as a viable remediation option. Sensitivity of benzene attenuation to uncertainties in the estimation of some of the kinetic and transport parameters is studied. It was found that natural attenuation is more sensitive to microbial growth rate and half saturation coefficients of both benzene and oxygen than initial biomass concentration and dispersivity coefficients. Increasing microbial growth rate by fourfold increased natural attenuation effectiveness after 40 years by 10%; while decreasing it by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 77%. On the other hand, increasing half saturation coefficient by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 46% in 40 years. Decreasing the same parameter fourfold caused natural attenuation effectiveness to increase by 9%.

  12. Turbulence and mass-transports in stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Virendra P.

    Boundary layer (BL) stratocumulus clouds are an important factor in the earth's radiation budget due to their high albedo and low cloud top heights. Continental BL stratocumulus clouds are closely coupled to the diurnal cycle and the turbulence in the BL affecting the surface energy and moisture budgets. In this study the turbulence and mass-transport structures in continental BL stratocumulus clouds are studied using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM)'s Southern Great Plains (SGP) observing facility located at Lamont, Oklahoma. High temporal (4 sec) and spatial (45 m) resolution observations from a vertically pointing 35 GHz cloud Doppler radar were used to obtain the in-cloud vertical velocity probability density function (pdf) in the absence of precipitation size hydrometeors. A total of 70 hours of radar data were analyzed to report half-hourly statistics of vertical velocity variance, skewness, updraft fraction, downdraft and velocity binned mass-flux at five cloud depth normalized levels. The variance showed a general decrease with increase in height in the cloud layer while the skewness is weakly positive in the cloud layer and negative near cloud top. The updraft fraction decreases with height with the decrease mainly occurring in the upper half of the cloud layer. The downdraft fraction increases with decrease in height with the increase being almost linear. The velocity of eddies responsible for maximum mass-transport decreases from of 0.4 ms-1 near cloud base to 0.2 ms-1 near cloud top. The half-hour periods were then classified based on the surface buoyancy flux as stable or unstable and it was found that the variance near cloud top is higher during the stable periods as compared to the unstable periods. Classification was also made based on the cloud depth to BL depth ratio (CBR) being greater or less than 0.3. The variance profile was similar for the classification while the skewness was almost zero during periods with CBR less 0

  13. Predictive mathematical modeling of trickling bed biofilters for elucidating mass transfer and kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.W.; Zhang, X.S.; Klasson, K.T.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-03-01

    Mathematical models of varying complexity have been proposed in the open literature for describing uptake of volatile organics in trickling bed biofilters. Many simpler descriptions yield relatively accurate solutions, but are limited as predictive tools by numerous assumptions which decrease the utility of the model. Trickle bed operation on the boundary between mass transfer and kinetic limitation regimes serves as one example in which these models may be insufficient. One-dimensional models may also fail to consider important effects/relationships in multiple directions, limiting their usefulness. This paper discusses the use of a predictive, two-dimensional mathematical model to describe microbial uptake, diffusion through a biofilm, and mass transfer of VOCs from gas to liquid. The model is validated by experimental data collected from operating trickle-bed bioreactors designed for removing sparingly soluble gaseous contaminants. Axial and radial (biofilm) concentration profiles are presented, along with validation results. Operation in regimes in which both mass transfer and kinetic factors play significant roles are discussed, along with predictive modeling implications.

  14. Transport in semiconductor nanowire superlattices described by coupled quantum mechanical and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, M; Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Melnik, R V N; Prabhakar, S

    2013-08-21

    In this paper we develop a kinetic model for the analysis of semiconductor superlattices, accounting for quantum effects. The model consists of a Boltzmann-Poisson type system of equations with simplified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisions, obtained from the general time-dependent Schrödinger-Poisson model using Wigner functions. This system for superlattice transport is supplemented by the quantum mechanical part of the model based on the Ben-Daniel-Duke form of the Schrödinger equation for a cylindrical superlattice of finite radius. The resulting energy spectrum is used to characterize the Fermi-Dirac distribution that appears in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision, thereby coupling the quantum mechanical and kinetic parts of the model. The kinetic model uses the dispersion relation obtained by the generalized Kronig-Penney method, and allows us to estimate radii of quantum wire superlattices that have the same miniband widths as in experiments. It also allows us to determine more accurately the time-dependent characteristics of superlattices, in particular their current density. Results, for several experimentally grown superlattices, are discussed in the context of self-sustained coherent oscillations of the current density which are important in an increasing range of current and potential applications.

  15. Kinetic and transport modeling of the metallorganic chemical vapor deposition of InP from trimethylindium and phosphine and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Theodoropoulos, C.; Ingle, N.K.; Montziaris, T.J.; Chen, Z.Y.; Liu, P.L.; Kioseoglou, G.; Petrou, A.

    1995-06-01

    Gas phase and surface kinetic models describing the growth of InP by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using trimethylindium and phosphine diluted in hydrogen have been developed. A realistic model of the process was obtained by incorporating the kinetics into a two-dimensional transport model of the flow, heat, and mass transfer in horizontal MOCVD reactors. The unknown rate parameters of two surface growth reactions were estimated by comparing predicted growth rates of InP with the ones obtained from an atmospheric-pressure horizontal MOCVD reactor during heteroepitaxy of InP on GaAs. Sensitivity analysis of the reactions led to a reduced kinetic scheme, which can be used for predicting film growth rates with the same accuracy as a more detailed kinetic model, but with smaller computational requirements. The reduced kinetic model was subsequently tested against three sets of InP growth data reported in the literature and it successfully predicted observed growth rates and trends. Finally, parametric studies were performed on the computer to investigate the effects of changing the inlet velocity of the carrier gas, the operating pressure, and the inlet mole fraction of trimethylindium on the growth rate of the films. The proposed model may become a useful tool for reactor design, optimization, and scale-up of InP MOCVD.

  16. Novel experimental design for steady-state processes: a systematic Bayesian approach for enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, continuous culture and cell transport kinetics.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, M James C; Murphy, Emma F; Gilmour, Steven G

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Bayesian approach (the use of prior knowledge) to the design of steady-state experiments can produce major gains quantifiable in terms of information, productivity and accuracy of each experiment. Developing the use of Bayesian utility functions, we have used a systematic method to identify the optimum experimental designs for a number of kinetic model data sets. This has enabled the identification of trends between kinetic model types, sets of design rules and the key conclusion that such designs should be based on some prior knowledge of the kinetic model. We suggest an optimal and iterative method for selecting features of the design such as the substrate range, number of measurements and choice of intermediate points. The final design collects data suitable for accurate modelling and analysis and minimises the error in the parameters estimated. It is equally applicable to enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, microbial culture and cell transport kinetics.

  17. A Mercury Transport and Fate Model for Mass Budget Assessment of Mercury Cycling in Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mercury mass balance model was developed to describe and evaluate the fate, transport, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. Coupling with total suspendable solids (TSS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the mercury transport and fate model simulates...

  18. Opinion dynamics: Kinetic modelling with mass media, application to the Scottish independence referendum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudin, Laurent; Salvarani, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    We consider a kinetic model describing some mechanisms of opinion formation in the framework of referendums, where the individuals, who can interact between themselves and modify their opinion by means of spontaneous self-thinking, are moreover under the influence of mass media. We study, at the numerical level, both the transient and the asymptotic regimes. In particular, we point out that a plurality of media, with different orientations, is a key ingredient to allow pluralism and prevent consensus. The forecasts of the model are compared to some surveys related to the Scottish independence referendum of 2014.

  19. Mass transfer kinetics during deep fat frying of wheat starch and gluten based snacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobukola, O. P.; Bouchon, P.

    2014-06-01

    Mass transfer (moisture loss and oil uptake) kinetics during deep fat frying of wheat starch and gluten based snacks was investigated. Both followed a modified first order reaction. Activation energies, z-value, and highest values of D and k for moisture loss and oil uptake were 28.608 kJ/mol, 129.88 °C, 490 and 0.0080 s-1; and 60.398 kJ/mol, 61.79 °C, 1,354.71 and 0.0052 s-1, respectively.

  20. Transport Kinetics and Metabolism of Exogenously Applied Putrescine in Roots of Intact Maize Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    DiTomaso, Joseph M.; Hart, Jonathan J.; Kochian, Leon V.

    1992-01-01

    Putrescine metabolism, uptake, and compartmentation were studied in roots of hydroponically grown intact maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. In vivo analysis of exogenously applied putrescine indicated that the diamine is primarily metabolized by a cell wall-localized diamine oxidase. Time-dependent kinetics for putrescine uptake could be resolved into a rapid phase of uptake and binding within the root apoplasm, followed by transport across the plasma membrane that was linear for 30 to 40 minutes. Concentration-dependent kinetics for putrescine uptake (between 0.05 and 1.0 millimolar putrescine) appeared to be nonsaturating but could be resolved into a saturable (Vmax 0.397 micromoles per gram fresh weight per hour; Km 120 micromolar) and a linear component. The linear component was determined to be cell wall-bound putrescine that was not removed during the desorption period following uptake of [3H]putrescine. These results suggest that a portion of the exogenously applied putrescine can be metabolized in maize root cell walls by diamine oxidase activity, but the bulk of the putrescine is transported across the plasmalemma by a carrier-mediated process, similar to that proposed for animal systems. PMID:16668685

  1. Towards a unified linear kinetic transport model with the trace ion module for EIRENE

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, J.; Kendl, A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear kinetic Monte Carlo particle transport models are frequently employed in fusion plasma simulations to quantify atomic and surface effects on the main plasma flow dynamics. Separate codes are used for transport of neutral particles (incl. radiation) and charged particles (trace impurity ions). Integration of both modules into main plasma fluid solvers provides then self-consistent solutions, in principle. The required interfaces are far from trivial, because rapid atomic processes in particular in the edge region of fusion plasmas require either smoothing and resampling, or frequent transfer of particles from one into the other Monte Carlo code. We propose a different scheme here, in which despite the inherently different mathematical form of kinetic equations for ions and neutrals (e.g. Fokker–Planck vs. Boltzmann collision integrals) both types of particle orbits can be integrated into one single code. We show that the approximations and shortcomings of this “single sourcing” concept (e.g., restriction to explicit ion drift orbit integration) can be fully tolerable in a wide range of typical fusion edge plasma conditions, and be overcompensated by the code-system simplicity, as well as by inherently ensured consistency in geometry (one single numerical grid only) and (the common) atomic and surface process modules. PMID:22474397

  2. Evaluating the Transport Kinetics of a Model Compound Released From Cellulosic Coacervate Compositions Into Artificial Sebum.

    PubMed

    Baalbaki, Nada H; Kasting, Gerald B

    2017-06-01

    Complex coacervates of cationic polymers and anionic surfactants, which are produced spontaneously during the use of rinse-off formulations, represent an important delivery vehicle for topical agents to the skin surface and appendages. In this study, an artificial sebum-loaded cell culture insert method for determining the sebum diffusion properties of topical agents was optimized for in vitro release testing. This method was subsequently used to evaluate the transport kinetics of a model compound, kinetin, released from semi-solid coacervate formulations into sebum. Coacervate compositions were prepared with cationic-hydroxyethyl cellulose dodecyl sulfate (cat-HECDS), sodium dodecyl sulfate (NaDS), and water. Tested compositions ranged from 90 to 50 wt% water and had a cat-HECDS to NaDS wt% ratio of 2:1, 1:1, or 1:2, mimicking the in vivo hydration range and relative excess surfactant content expected from commercial rinse-off formulations. Steady-state flux of the model compound from each coacervate composition was found to vary with water content of the composition. When flux was plotted versus [(cat-HECDS:NaDS) × (1 - weight fraction water)](-1), a strong linear correlation (R(2) = 0.89) emerged. The in vitro release testing method proved capable of discriminating between clinically relevant differences in transport kinetics from different coacervate formulations using a practical sample size. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Benchmark of the local drift-kinetic models for neoclassical transport simulation in helical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.; Satake, S.; Kanno, R.; Sugama, H.; Matsuoka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are zero orbit width (ZOW), zero magnetic drift, DKES-like, and global, as classified in Matsuoka et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of Helically Symmetric Experiment, Large Helical Device (LHD), and Wendelstein 7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of E ×B incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models when E ×B is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. For example, Mp≤0.4 where Mp is the poloidal Mach number. On the other hand, when E ×B and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at Er≃0 . In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works well to suppress such unphysical behavior of the radial transport caused in the simulations. It is demonstrated that the ZOW model has the advantage of mitigating the unphysical behavior in the several magnetic geometries, and that it also implements the evaluation of bootstrap current in LHD with the low computation cost compared to the global model.

  4. Kinetic Modeling of Biogeochemical Processes in Subsurface Environments: Coupling Transport, Microbial Metabolism and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial reactions play an important role in regulating pore water chemistry (e.g., pH and Eh) as well as secondary mineral distribution in many subsurface systems and therefore directly control trace metal migration and recycling in those systems. In this paper, we present a multicomponent kinetic model that explicitly accounts for the coupling of microbial metabolism, microbial population dynamics, advective/dispersive transport of chemical species, aqueous speciation, and mineral precipitation/dissolution in porous geologic media. A modification to the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation is proposed, to account for the likely achievement of quasi-steady state biomass accumulations in natural environments. A scale dependence of microbial reaction rates is derived based on both field observations and the scaling analysis of reactive transport equations. As an example, we use the model to simulate a subsurface contaminant migration scenario, in which a water flow containing both uranium and a complexing organic ligand is recharged into an oxic carbonate aquifer. The model simulation shows that Mn and Fe oxyhydroxides may vary significantly along a flow path. The simulation also shows that uranium (VI) can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release. PMID:28059145

  6. Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during magnetorotational instability in a kinetic accretion disk.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2015-02-13

    Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk are investigated using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. We show that the kinetic MRI can provide not only high-energy particle acceleration but also enhancement of angular momentum transport. We find that the plasma pressure anisotropy inside the channel flow with p(∥)>p(⊥) induced by active magnetic reconnection suppresses the onset of subsequent reconnection, which, in turn, leads to high-magnetic-field saturation and enhancement of the Maxwell stress tensor of angular momentum transport. Meanwhile, during the quiescent stage of reconnection, the plasma isotropization progresses in the channel flow and the anisotropic plasma with p(⊥)>p(∥) due to the dynamo action of MRI outside the channel flow contribute to rapid reconnection and strong particle acceleration. This efficient particle acceleration and enhanced angular momentum transport in a collisionless accretion disk may explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  7. Study of electron transport in a Hall thruster by axial–radial fully kinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Shinatora Kubota, Kenichi; Funaki, Ikkoh; Watanabe, Hiroki; Iihara, Shigeyasu; Fuchigami, Kenji; Uematsu, Kazuo

    2015-10-15

    Electron transport across a magnetic field in a magnetic-layer-type Hall thruster was numerically investigated for the future predictive modeling of Hall thrusters. The discharge of a 1-kW-class magnetic-layer-type Hall thruster designed for high-specific-impulse operation was modeled using an r-z two-dimensional fully kinetic particle code with and without artificial electron-diffusion models. The thruster performance results showed that both electron transport models captured the experimental result within discrepancies less than 20% in thrust and discharge current for all the simulated operation conditions. The electron cross-field transport mechanism of the so-called anomalous diffusion was self-consistently observed in the simulation without artificial diffusion models; the effective electron mobility was two orders of magnitude higher than the value obtained using the classical diffusion theory. To account for the self-consistently observed anomalous transport, the oscillation of plasma properties was speculated. It was suggested that the enhanced random-walk diffusion due to the velocity oscillation of low-frequency electron flow could explain the observed anomalous diffusion within an order of magnitude. The dominant oscillation mode of the electron flow velocity was found to be 20 kHz, which was coupled to electrostatic oscillation excited by global ionization instability.

  8. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release.

  9. A coupling kinetics model for pollutant release and transport in the process of landfill settlement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2012-09-27

    A coupling kinetics model is developed to simulate the release and transport of landfill leachate pollutants in a deformable municipal solid waste landfill by taking into account of landfill settlement, seepage of leachate water, hydrolyse of insoluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase, biodegradation of soluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase and aqueous one, growth of aerobic and anaerobic microorganism, and consumption of dissolved oxygen. The release and transport of organic pollutants and microorganisms in landfills in the process of landfill settlement was simulated by considering no hydraulic effect. Simulation results demonstrated that the interaction between landfill settlement and the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants was significant. Porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity were not constants because of the landfill settlement, which affected the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants, and furthermore acted on the landfill settlement. The simulation results accorded with the practical situation, which preliminarily verified the reliability of the mathematical model and the numerical program in this paper.

  10. A Coupling Kinetics Model for Pollutant Release and Transport in the Process of Landfill Settlement

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    A coupling kinetics model is developed to simulate the release and transport of landfill leachate pollutants in a deformable municipal solid waste landfill by taking into account of landfill settlement, seepage of leachate water, hydrolyse of insoluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase, biodegradation of soluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase and aqueous one, growth of aerobic and anaerobic microorganism, and consumption of dissolved oxygen. The release and transport of organic pollutants and microorganisms in landfills in the process of landfill settlement was simulated by considering no hydraulic effect. Simulation results demonstrated that the interaction between landfill settlement and the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants was significant. Porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity were not constants because of the landfill settlement, which affected the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants, and furthermore acted on the landfill settlement. The simulation results accorded with the practical situation, which preliminarily verified the reliability of the mathematical model and the numerical program in this paper. PMID:23202755

  11. Angular Momentum Transport and Particle Acceleration During Magnetorotational Instability in a Kinetic Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2015-02-01

    Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk are investigated using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. We show that the kinetic MRI can provide not only high-energy particle acceleration but also enhancement of angular momentum transport. We find that the plasma pressure anisotropy inside the channel flow with p∥>p⊥ induced by active magnetic reconnection suppresses the onset of subsequent reconnection, which, in turn, leads to high-magnetic-field saturation and enhancement of the Maxwell stress tensor of angular momentum transport. Meanwhile, during the quiescent stage of reconnection, the plasma isotropization progresses in the channel flow and the anisotropic plasma with p⊥>p∥ due to the dynamo action of MRI outside the channel flow contribute to rapid reconnection and strong particle acceleration. This efficient particle acceleration and enhanced angular momentum transport in a collisionless accretion disk may explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  12. Mass transport, faceting and behavior of dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, S.; Kashima, T.; Kariya, M.; Yukawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2000-07-01

    The behavior of threading dislocations during mass transport of GaN was investigated in detail by transmission electron microscopy. Mass transport occurred at the surface. Therefore, growing species are supplied from the in-plane direction. The behavior of threading dislocations was found to be strongly affected by the mass transport process as well as the high crystallographic anisotropy of the surface energy of the facets particular to GaN.

  13. The latent fingerprint in mass transport of polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2016-02-01

    Herein, a systematic investigation was carried out to reach a rational understanding and to provide information concerning the possible causes for a significant influence of pressure variation in the underlying processes of mass transport in polycrystalline materials. The authors focused their research in solid-state diffusion, a part of the subject "Mass Transport in Solids". Theories on diffusion are the subject by itself which exists as a latent fingerprint in every text of higher learning in interdisciplinary science. In this research, authors prepared sandwich samples of titanium alloy and stainless steel using nickel as an intermediate metal. The samples were processed at three different levels of bonding pressure (3, 4 and 5 MPa) while bonding temperature and bonding time was maintained at 750 °C and 1 h, respectively, throughout the experiments. It was observed that the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into Ti-alloy at TiA/Ni interface increased by ~63 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but decreased by ~40 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. At the same time, the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into stainless steel at Ni/SS interface increased by ~19 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but increased by ~17 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. Here authors showed that the pressure variations have different effects at the TiA/Ni interface and Ni/SS interface, and tried to explain the explicit mechanisms operating behind them. In general for sandwich samples processed irrespective of bonding pressure chosen, the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused into SS is greater than that of the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused in Ti-alloy matrix by four orders of magnitude. The calculated diffusivity of Ni-atoms into Ti-alloy reaches its highest value of ~5.083 × 10-19 m2/s for the sandwich sample processed using 4-MPa bonding-pressure, whereas the diffusivity of Ni

  14. Mass transport of small retained molecules in polymer-based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-10-03

    The mass transport properties of a non-retained (thiourea) and three retained low molecular weight compounds (acetophenone, valerophenone, and octanophenone) along a 4.6mm×45mm PROSWIFT™ RP-1S monolithic column made of rigid cross-linked poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) copolymer was investigated in depth. Accurate protocols (peak parking experiments, measurement of the first and second central moments of peak profiles by numerical integration) combined with the use of validated models of effective diffusion along monolithic structures were applied for the determination of the longitudinal diffusion, the eddy dispersion, and the skeleton-eluent mass transfer resistances due to the finite analyte diffusivity across the polymer skeleton and to the slow absorption kinetics into the polymer volume. Experimental results show by increasing order of importance evidence that the resolution performance of this short and wide polymer-based monolithic HPLC column is limited by the slow analyte diffusivity across the polymer skeleton (smaller than one tenth of the bulk diffusion coefficient for k'>1), its large eddy dispersion HETP (Heddy≃100μm), and the slow rate of absorption (≃10Hz only) in the polymer volume for retained analytes. The column performance could be improved by preparing a more homogeneous material with a rigid internal mesoporous structure. This would provide a column bed having a larger specific surface area, allowing faster analyte diffusion across the mesoporous skeleton, a smaller eddy dispersion HETP, and a faster absorption kinetics in the polymeric monolith than those observed for the currently available materials.

  15. Kinetic electron and ion instability of the lunar wake simulated at physical mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt Hutchinson, Ian H. Zhou, Chuteng

    2015-03-15

    The solar wind wake behind the moon is studied with 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using a physical ion to electron mass ratio (unlike prior investigations); the simulations also apply more generally to supersonic flow of dense magnetized plasma past non-magnetic objects. A hybrid electrostatic Boltzmann electron treatment is first used to investigate the ion stability in the absence of kinetic electron effects, showing that the ions are two-stream unstable for downstream wake distances (in lunar radii) greater than about three times the solar wind Mach number. Simulations with PIC electrons are then used to show that kinetic electron effects can lead to disruption of the ion beams at least three times closer to the moon than in the hybrid simulations. This disruption occurs as the result of a novel wake phenomenon: the non-linear growth of electron holes spawned from a narrow dimple in the electron velocity distribution. Most of the holes arising from the dimple are small and quickly leave the wake, approximately following the unperturbed electron phase-space trajectories, but some holes originating near the center of the wake remain and grow large enough to trigger disruption of the ion beams. Non-linear kinetic-electron effects are therefore essential to a comprehensive understanding of the 1D electrostatic stability of such wakes, and possible observational signatures in ARTEMIS data from the lunar wake are discussed.

  16. Role of preplasma for shortpulse laser-driven electron transport in mass-limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Sefkow, A. B.; Geissel, M.; Atherton, B.; Corwell, S. E.; Kimmel, M. W.; Rambo, P.; Schwarz, J.; Arefiev, A.; Breizman, B.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2012-10-01

    We report on experiments with the Z-Petawatt laser at Sandia National Labs using mm-sized foils and mass-limited targets of various thicknesses. Rear side accelerated proton beam measurements, in combination with simulation results, were used to infer hot electron transport in presence of preplasma. Full-scale, 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the ns to ps prepulse were performed. Preplasma properties (density profiles, temperatures, charge states) where then imported into a fully explicit and kinetic 2D particle-in-cell code to simulate, 10 ps of the main laser pulse interaction with the preplasma and target at full scale. A comparison of experimental data and numerical data shows outstanding agreement in all measured proton beam parameters, which gives confidence in the simulation results of hot electron transport. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Promising approaches to crystallization of macromolecules suppressing the convective mass transport to the growing crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, K. M.; Popov, V. O.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    Conditions of mass transport to growing crystals are important factors that have an impact on the size and quality of macromolecular crystals. The mass transport occurs via two mechanisms — by diffusion and convection. The crystal quality can be influenced by changing (either suppressing or enhancing) the convective mass transport. The review gives an overview and analysis of the published data on different methods of macromolecular crystallization providing the suppression of convective mass transport to growing crystals in order to improve the crystal quality. The bibliography includes 91 references.

  18. Mass transport growth and optical emission properties of hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paskova, T.; Goldys, E. M.; Paskov, P. P.; Wahab, Q.; Wilzen, L.; de Jong, M. P.; Monemar, B.

    2001-06-01

    The optical emission properties of mass-transport regions of GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy are studied by cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy. A strong donor-acceptor pair emission is observed from the mass-transport regions. Spatially resolved cathodoluminescence reveals a strong intensity contrast between the exciton and donor-acceptor bands from mass-transport and nontransport regions. Focused Auger electron and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were employed to investigate the impurity incorporation in the different regions. A preferential moderate increase of residual impurity incorporation or redistribution in mass-transport regions is suggested to be responsible for the observed change of the dominant radiative mechanism.

  19. Probing the Functional Heterogeneity of Surface Binding Sites by Analysis of Experimental Binding Traces and the Effect of Mass Transport Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Svitel, Juraj; Boukari, Hacène; Van Ryk, Donald; Willson, Richard C.; Schuck, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Many techniques rely on the binding activity of surface-immobilized proteins, including antibody-based affinity biosensors for the detection of analytes, immunoassays, protein arrays, and surface plasmon resonance biosensors for the study of thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein interactions. To study the functional homogeneity of the surface sites and to characterize their binding properties, we have recently proposed a computational tool to determine the distribution of affinity and kinetic rate constants from surface binding progress curves. It is based on modeling the experimentally measured binding signal as a superposition of signals from binding to sites spanning a range of rate and equilibrium constants, with regularization providing the most parsimonious distribution consistent with the data. In the present work, we have expanded the scope of this approach to include a compartment-like transport step, which can describe competitive binding to different surface sites in a zone of depleted analyte close to the sensor surface. This approach addresses a major difficulty in the analysis of surface binding where both transport limitation as well as unknown surface site heterogeneity may be present. In addition to the kinetic binding parameters of the ensemble of surface sites, it can provide estimates for effective transport rate constants. Using antibody-antigen interactions as experimental model systems, we studied the effects of the immobilization matrix and of the analyte flow-rate on the effective transport rate constant. Both were experimentally observed to influence mass transport. The approximate description of mass transport by a compartment model becomes critical when applied to strongly transport-controlled data, and we examined the limitations of this model. In the presence of only moderate mass transport limitation the compartment model provides a good description, but this approximation breaks down for strongly transport-limited surface

  20. Microbial synthesis gas utilization and ways to resolve kinetic and mass-transfer limitations.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Jeong, Yeseul; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Jiyeong; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lovitt, Robert W; Kim, Byung Hong; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2015-02-01

    Microbial conversion of syngas to energy-dense biofuels and valuable chemicals is a potential technology for the efficient utilization of fossils (e.g., coal) and renewable resources (e.g., lignocellulosic biomass) in an environmentally friendly manner. However, gas-liquid mass transfer and kinetic limitations are still major constraints that limit the widespread adoption and successful commercialization of the technology. This review paper provides rationales for syngas bioconversion and summarizes the reaction limited conditions along with the possible strategies to overcome these challenges. Mass transfer and economic performances of various reactor configurations are compared, and an ideal case for optimum bioreactor operation is presented. Overall, the challenges with the bioprocessing steps are highlighted, and potential solutions are suggested. Future research directions are provided and a conceptual design for a membrane-based syngas biorefinery is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simultaneous Quantification of Viral Antigen Expression Kinetics Using Data-Independent (DIA) Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Croft, Nathan P; de Verteuil, Danielle A; Smith, Stewart A; Wong, Yik Chun; Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Tscharke, David C; Purcell, Anthony W

    2015-05-01

    The generation of antigen-specific reagents is a significant bottleneck in the study of complex pathogens that express many hundreds to thousands of different proteins or to emerging or new strains of viruses that display potential pandemic qualities and therefore require rapid investigation. In these instances the development of antibodies for example can be prohibitively expensive to cover the full pathogen proteome, or the lead time may be unacceptably long in urgent cases where new highly pathogenic viral strains may emerge. Because genomic information on such pathogens can be rapidly acquired this opens up avenues using mass spectrometric approaches to study pathogen antigen expression, host responses and for screening the utility of therapeutics. In particular, data-independent acquisition (DIA) modalities on high-resolution mass spectrometers generate spectral information on all components of a complex sample providing depth of coverage hitherto only seen in genomic deep sequencing. The spectral information generated by DIA can be iteratively interrogated for potentially any protein of interest providing both evidence of protein expression and quantitation. Here we apply a solely DIA mass spectrometry based methodology to profile the viral antigen expression in cells infected with vaccinia virus up to 9 h post infection without the need for antigen specific antibodies or other reagents. We demonstrate deep coverage of the vaccinia virus proteome using a SWATH-MS acquisition approach, extracting quantitative kinetics of 100 virus proteins within a single experiment. The results highlight the complexity of vaccinia protein expression, complementing what is known at the transcriptomic level, and provide a valuable resource and technique for future studies of viral infection and replication kinetics. Furthermore, they highlight the utility of DIA and mass spectrometry in the dissection of host-pathogen interactions.

  2. Mass spectrometry assay for studying kinetic properties of dipeptidases: characterization of human and yeast dipeptidases.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Vaibhav; Ekka, Mary Krishna; Dutta, Rajesh Kumar; Kumaran, S

    2011-11-01

    Chemical modifications of substrate peptides are often necessary to monitor the hydrolysis of small bioactive peptides. We developed an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay for studying substrate distributions in reaction mixtures and determined steady-state kinetic parameters, the Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)), and catalytic turnover rate (V(max)/[E](t)) for three metallodipeptidases: two carnosinases (CN1 and CN2) from human and Dug1p from yeast. The turnover rate (V(max)/[E](t)) of CN1 and CN2 determined at pH 8.0 (112.3 and 19.5s(-1), respectively) suggested that CN1 is approximately 6-fold more efficient. The turnover rate of Dug1p for Cys-Gly dipeptide at pH 8.0 was found to be slightly lower (73.8s(-1)). In addition, we determined kinetic parameters of CN2 at pH 9.2 and found that the turnover rate was increased by 4-fold with no significant change in the K(m). Kinetic parameters obtained by the ESI-MS method are consistent with results of a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC)-based assay. Furthermore, we used tandem MS (MS/MS) analyses to characterize carnosine and measured its levels in CHO cell lines in a time-dependent manner. The ESI-MS method developed here obviates the need for substrate modification and provides a less laborious, accurate, and rapid assay for studying kinetic properties of dipeptidases in vitro as well as in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass Transport Phenomena in Lipid Oxidation and Antioxidation.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Mickaël; Bily, Antoine; Roller, Marc; Birtić, Simona

    2017-02-28

    In lipid dispersions, the ability of reactants to move from one lipid particle to another is an important, yet often ignored, determinant of lipid oxidation and its inhibition by antioxidants. This review describes three putative interparticle transfer mechanisms for oxidants and antioxidants: (a) diffusion, (b) collision-exchange-separation, and (c) micelle-assisted transfer. Mechanism a involves the diffusion of molecules from one particle to another through the intervening aqueous phase. Mechanism b involves the transfer of molecules from one particle to another when the particles collide with each other. Mechanism c involves the solubilization of molecules in micelles within the aqueous phase and then their transfer between particles. During lipid oxidation, the accumulation of surface-active lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs) beyond their critical micelle concentration may shift their mass transport from the collision-exchange-separation pathway (slow transfer) to the micelle-assisted mechanism (fast transfer), which may account for the transition from the initiation to the propagation phase. Similarly, the cut-off effect governing antioxidant activity in lipid dispersions may be due to the fact that above a certain hydrophobicity, the transfer mechanism for antioxidants changes from diffusion to collision-exchange-separation. This hypothesis provides a simple model to rationalize the design and formulation of antioxidants and dispersed lipids.

  4. Uncluttering graph layouts using anisotropic diffusion and mass transport.

    PubMed

    Frishman, Yaniv; Tal, Ayellet

    2009-01-01

    Many graph layouts include very dense areas, making the layout difficult to understand. In this paper, we propose a technique for modifying an existing layout in order to reduce the clutter in dense areas. A physically inspired evolution process based on a modified heat equation is used to create an improved layout density image, making better use of available screen space. Using results from optimal mass transport problems, a warp to the improved density image is computed. The graph nodes are displaced according to the warp. The warp maintains the overall structure of the graph, thus limiting disturbances to the mental map, while reducing the clutter in dense areas of the layout. The complexity of the algorithm depends mainly on the resolution of the image visualizing the graph and is linear in the size of the graph. This allows scaling the computation according to required running times. It is demonstrated how the algorithm can be significantly accelerated using a graphics processing unit (GPU), resulting in the ability to handle large graphs in a matter of seconds. Results on several layout algorithms and applications are demonstrated.

  5. Water mass structure and transport in the Tourbillon eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, John; Glynn, Simon

    1985-06-01

    CTD data collected during the Tourbillon Experiment have been used to identify the water masses present in a mesoscale eddy in the eastern North Atlantic, and their transports during the 50-day period of the Experiment. The core of the eddy was found to comprise North Atlantic Central Water within the temperature range 10 to 11°C, and evidence of downward movement of this water between 150 and 700 db and upward movement between 750 and 820 db is presented. Mediterranean Water (MW) was drawn around the eddy in a tongue which broke into separate patches during the Experiment. There is evidence of this MW having a dynamical role in the eddy: whilst it was present as a continuous tongue it did not progress around the eddy as fast as other water. There is also an indication of upward movement of this MW. The distribution of Labrador Sea Water showed some positive relationship to the location of the eddy centre, whilst low concentrations were noted beneath the MW tongue. Both θ-S analysis and charts of the planetary component of potential vorticity are used in an attempt to identify the source region of the eddy; it is concluded that the eddy had not moved far (perhaps 200 km) from its place of origin, and that the homogeneous water in its core may have been formed by deep winter convection somewhere between north and west of the area where the Experiment was conducted.

  6. Internal mass transport in heterogeneous biofilms: Recent advances

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Z.; Stoodley, P.; Roe, F.

    1995-12-01

    Aerobic biofilms were found to have a complex structure consisting of microbial cell clusters (discrete aggregates of densely packed cells) and interstitial voids. The authors used the Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM) in conjunction with dissolved oxygen microelectrodes to examine the structural and chemical heterogeneity of fully hydrated, living biofilms in real time under flow conditions. The oxygen distribution within the biofilm was strongly correlated with these structures. The voids facilitated oxygen transport from the bulk liquid through the biofilm. Water could freely move through the channels within the biofilm inducing convective mass transfer of dissolved and particulate substrates. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI), in which the phase of the nuclear spin depends on the spin velocity, was used to show how fluid velocity varied in a conduit colonized with biofilm. Spin-lattice relaxation time was used at the same time to obtain images of biofilm density. Structural and chemical heterogeneity may contribute to initiation of corrosion induce microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) on metal surfaces where biofilms have accumulated. The Scanning Vibrating Electrode (SVE) has been used to spatially and temporally map ion currents in solution above MIC anodic and cathodic sites.

  7. Mass transfer, kinetics and equilibrium studies for the biosorption of methylene blue using Paspalum notatum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Vasanth; Porkodi, K

    2007-07-19

    Batch experiments were carried out for the sorption of methylene blue onto Paspalum notatum. The operating variables studied were initial dye concentration, initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time. Experimental equilibrium data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms by non-linear regression method. Six error functions was used to determine the optimum isotherm by non-linear regression method. The present study shows r2 as the best error function to determine the parameters involved in both two- and three-parameter isotherms. Langmuir isotherm was found to be the optimum isotherm for methylene blue onto P. notatum. The monolayer methylene blue sorption capacity of P. notatum was found to be 31 mg/g. The kinetics of methylene blue onto P. notatum was found to follow a pseudo second order kinetics. A Boyd plot confirms the external mass transfer as the rate-limiting step in the dye sorption process. The influence of initial dye concentration on the dye sorption process was represented in the form of dimensionless mass transfer numbers (Sh/Sc0.33) and was found to vary as C(0)-5x10(-6).

  8. Xyloglucan gelation induced by enzymatic degalactosylation; kinetics and the effect of the molar mass.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Caroline Novak; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Chassenieux, Christophe; Nicolai, Taco; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2017-10-15

    Gelation kinetics of aqueous solutions of xyloglucan (XG) extracted from H. courbaril seeds were investigated, in-situ, during enzymatic removal of galactose units by oscillatory shear rheological measurements, at different XG and enzyme (β-galactosidase) concentrations. Increasing the enzyme concentration (Cenz) led to an increase of the gelation rate. Master curves of the evolution of the storage shear modulus at different Cenz could be formed by time-Cenz superposition showing that Cenz influenced the kinetics, but not the gelation process and the final gel stiffness. The behaviour of gels formed by XG with different molar mass (Mw), prepared by endoglucanase hydrolysis, was evaluated as a function of the temperature. It was found that cooling led to a decrease of the crosslink density causing a decrease of the gel stiffness. The decrease of the crosslink density was sufficient to depercolate the network formed by relatively small XG with Mw=10(5)gmol(-1), but gels formed by XG with Mw≥8×10(5)gmol(-1) persisted down to 10°C. It is shown that the melting temperature and the gel stiffness at high temperatures can be controlled independently by varying the molar mass and the concentration of XG chains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Feedback, Mass Conservation and Reaction Kinetics Impact the Robustness of Cellular Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Katharina; Kofahl, Bente; Steuer, Ralf; Wolf, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations occur in a wide variety of cellular processes, for example in calcium and p53 signaling responses, in metabolic pathways or within gene-regulatory networks, e.g. the circadian system. Since it is of central importance to understand the influence of perturbations on the dynamics of these systems a number of experimental and theoretical studies have examined their robustness. The period of circadian oscillations has been found to be very robust and to provide reliable timing. For intracellular calcium oscillations the period has been shown to be very sensitive and to allow for frequency-encoded signaling. We here apply a comprehensive computational approach to study the robustness of period and amplitude of oscillatory systems. We employ different prototype oscillator models and a large number of parameter sets obtained by random sampling. This framework is used to examine the effect of three design principles on the sensitivities towards perturbations of the kinetic parameters. We find that a prototype oscillator with negative feedback has lower period sensitivities than a prototype oscillator relying on positive feedback, but on average higher amplitude sensitivities. For both oscillator types, the use of Michaelis-Menten instead of mass action kinetics in all degradation and conversion reactions leads to an increase in period as well as amplitude sensitivities. We observe moderate changes in sensitivities if replacing mass conversion reactions by purely regulatory reactions. These insights are validated for a set of established models of various cellular rhythms. Overall, our work highlights the importance of reaction kinetics and feedback type for the variability of period and amplitude and therefore for the establishment of predictive models. PMID:28027301

  10. Feedback, Mass Conservation and Reaction Kinetics Impact the Robustness of Cellular Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Baum, Katharina; Politi, Antonio Z; Kofahl, Bente; Steuer, Ralf; Wolf, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Oscillations occur in a wide variety of cellular processes, for example in calcium and p53 signaling responses, in metabolic pathways or within gene-regulatory networks, e.g. the circadian system. Since it is of central importance to understand the influence of perturbations on the dynamics of these systems a number of experimental and theoretical studies have examined their robustness. The period of circadian oscillations has been found to be very robust and to provide reliable timing. For intracellular calcium oscillations the period has been shown to be very sensitive and to allow for frequency-encoded signaling. We here apply a comprehensive computational approach to study the robustness of period and amplitude of oscillatory systems. We employ different prototype oscillator models and a large number of parameter sets obtained by random sampling. This framework is used to examine the effect of three design principles on the sensitivities towards perturbations of the kinetic parameters. We find that a prototype oscillator with negative feedback has lower period sensitivities than a prototype oscillator relying on positive feedback, but on average higher amplitude sensitivities. For both oscillator types, the use of Michaelis-Menten instead of mass action kinetics in all degradation and conversion reactions leads to an increase in period as well as amplitude sensitivities. We observe moderate changes in sensitivities if replacing mass conversion reactions by purely regulatory reactions. These insights are validated for a set of established models of various cellular rhythms. Overall, our work highlights the importance of reaction kinetics and feedback type for the variability of period and amplitude and therefore for the establishment of predictive models.

  11. Statistical characteristics of velocity, concentration, mass transport, and momentum transport for coaxial jet mixing in a confined duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of coaxial jets discharging into an expanded circular duct was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used for combustor flow modeling. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two velocity component data was obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two-color LV system. A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data was obtained from simultaneous measurements with laser velocimeter (LV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems. These measurements were used to obtain mean, second central moment, skewness and kurtosis values for three velocity components and the concentration. These measurements showed the existence of countergradient turbulent axial mass transport where the annular jet fluid was accelerating the inner jet fluid. Results from the study are related to the assumptions employed in the current mass and momentum turbulent transport models.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of mass transport and structure inside a phototrophic biofilm.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Baheerathan; Holmes, William M; Sloan, William T; Phoenix, Vernon R

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image structural heterogeneity and mass transport inside a biofilm which was too thick for photon based imaging. MRI was used to map water diffusion and image the transport of the paramagnetically tagged macromolecule, Gd-DTPA, inside a 2.5 mm thick cyanobacterial biofilm. The structural heterogeneity of the biofilm was imaged at resolutions down to 22 × 22 μm, enabling the impact of biofilm architecture on the mass transport of both water and Gd-DTPA to be investigated. Higher density areas of the biofilm correlated with areas exhibiting lower relative water diffusion coefficients and slower transport of Gd-DTPA, highlighting the impact of biofilm structure on mass transport phenomena. This approach has potential for shedding light on heterogeneous mass transport of a range of molecular mass molecules in biofilms.

  13. The transport kinetics of lanthanide species in a single erythrocyte probed by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Huo, Q; Lu, J; Li, R; Wang, K

    1999-08-01

    A novel method has been developed to visualize and follow the temporal course of lanthanide transport across the membrane into a single living erythrocyte. By means of confocal scanning microscopy and the optical section technique, the entry of lanthanide ions was followed by the fluorescence quenching of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled membrane and cytosol. From the difference of the quenching kinetics of the whole section and the central area, the time for diffusion through the membrane and the diffusion in the extracellular and intracellular media can be deduced. To clarify the mechanism of lanthanide-induced fluorescence quenching of FITC-labeled erythrocytes and to ensure that this reaction can be used in this method, the reaction was investigated by steady-state fluorescence techniques. The results showed that the lanthanides strongly quenched the florescence emitted by FITC covalently bound to membrane proteins and cytosolic proteins. The static quenching mechanism is responsible for the fluorescence quenching of FITC-labeled proteins by Ln species. The quenching mechanism is discussed on the basis of complex formation. The dependence of fluorescence quenching on both ion size and the total orbital angular momentum L supports the complexation mechanism. The transport time across the membrane is strikingly correlated with Ln species and extracellular concentration. For a given concentration, the transport time of [Ln(cit)2]3- is much shorter than that of Ln3+, since they enter the cells via the anion channel. This is supported by the inhibition effect of 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-stilbenendisulfonate on the transport of [Ln(cit)2]3-. On the other hand, the transport of free Ln3+ might be attributed to the enhanced permeability of erythrocytes owing to Ln3+ binding. These findings strongly demonstrate the existence of the non-internalization mechanism of Ln species uptake by erythrocytes.

  14. MRP2 and the Transport Kinetics of Cysteine Conjugates of Inorganic Mercury.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cláudia; Joshee, Lucy; Bridges, Christy C

    2017-10-04

    Human exposure to mercuric species occurs regularly throughout the world. Mercuric ions may accumulate in target cells and subsequently lead to cellular intoxication and death. Therefore, it is important to have a thorough understanding of how transportable species of mercury are handled by specific membrane transporters. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the transport kinetics of cysteine (Cys)-S-conjugates of inorganic mercury (Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys) at the site of the multidrug resistance-associated transporter 2 (MRP2). In order to estimate the maximum velocity (V max) and Michaelis constant (K m) for the uptake of Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys mediated by MRP2, in vitro studies were carried out using radioactive Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys (5 μM) and inside-out membrane vesicles made from Sf9 cells transfected with MRP2. The V max was estimated to be 74.3 ± 10.1 nmol mg protein(-1) 30 s(-1) while the K m was calculated to be 63.4 ± 27.3 μM. In addition, in vivo studies were utilized to measure the disposition of inorganic mercury (administered dose 0.5 μmol kg(-1) in 2 mL normal saline) over time in Wistar and TR¯ (Mrp2-deficient) rats. These studies measured the disposition of mercuric ions in the kidney, liver, and blood. In general, the data suggest that the initial uptake of mercuric conjugates into select target cells is rapid followed by a period of slower uptake and accumulation. Overall, the data indicate that MRP2 transports Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys in a manner that is similar to that of other MRP2 substrates.

  15. Analysis of the apparent biphasic axonal transport kinetics of fucosylated glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrum, J.F.; Morell, P.

    1984-07-01

    Following intraocular injection of (/sup 3/H)fucose, the accumulation of transported radioactivity arriving at the superior colliculus peaks within a few hours and decays with a time course of hours. Then, over a period of several days, radioactivity again accumulates at the superior colliculus and then decays with a half-life of days. Such data have been interpreted as evidence for both a group of rapidly released, rapidly transported glycoproteins (first peak) and a group of slowly released but rapidly transported glycoproteins (second peak). This supposition was investigated by studying in more detail the metabolism of some individual fucosylated proteins in both the retina and superior colliculus. It was noted that much of the radioactivity incorporated in fucosylated glycoproteins at the retina was rapidly metabolized, while the remainder of the fucosylated moieties had a metabolic half-life on the order of days. In other experiments (/sup 35/S)methionine was injected intraocularly, the metabolism in the retina was examined and a study was made of the kinetics of transport to the superior colliculus of the peptide backbone of these same individual proteins. In contrast to the two waves of accumulation of radioactivity from (/sup 3/H)fucose, accumulation of radioactivity of the peptide backbone of the same glycoproteins was monophasic. The author's explanation of these data involves the presence of two types of fucose moieties on the peptides. One group of fucose moieties is labile and is lost from the peptide backbone over a period of hours. Other fucose moieties are approximately as metabolically stable as the peptide backbones to which they are attached. The actual peptide backbones of the glycoproteins are committed to rapid transport over a period of several days.

  16. Theoretical monochromatic-wave-induced currents in intermediate water with viscosity and nonzero mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Wave-induced mass-transport current theories with both zero and nonzero net mass (or volume) transport of the water column are reviewed. A relationship based on the Longuet-Higgens theory is derived for wave-induced, nonzero mass-transport currents in intermediate water depths for a viscous fluid. The relationship is in a form useful for experimental applications; therefore, some design criteria for experimental wave-tank tests are also presented. Sample parametric cases for typical wave-tank conditions and a typical ocean swell were assessed by using the relation in conjunction with an equation developed by Unluata and Mei for the maximum wave-induced volume transport. Calculations indicate that substantial changes in the wave-induced mass-transport current profiles may exist dependent upon the assumed net volume transport. A maximum volume transport, corresponding to an infinite channel or idealized ocean condition, produces the largest wave-induced mass-transport currents. These calculations suggest that wave-induced mass-transport currents may have considerable effects on pollution and suspended-sediments transport as well as buoy drift, the surface and midlayer water-column currents caused by waves increasing with increasing net volume transports. Some of these effects are discussed.

  17. Kinetics and microtextures formation during serpentinization: role of grain scale processes and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    malvoisin, B.; Brunet, F.; Carlut, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization of mantle rocks plays a key role on the physical properties of the lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and in subduction zones. This reaction is controlled by processes occurring at scales ranging from the grain to the lithosphere but the relative importance of these processes on the kinetics and microtextures formation has not been investigated. First, hydrothermal experiments on powders of San Carlos olivine at 500 bars in the 250 - 350 °C range were monitored with a magnetic method to study the kinetics and processes of the reaction at the grain scale. For an initial grain size (IGS) > 5 μm, lizardite, brucite, magnetite and hydrogen formed at a rate one to two orders of magnitude slower than the kinetics used to model serpentinization-related processes. Moreover, the serpentinization rate decreased linearly with the square of the IGS and reaction progress vs. time curves displayed a sigmoid form. The kinetics were controlled by the dissolution of olivine increasing with its reactive surface area which was generated with two cooperating processes (etch pits and grain fracturing) during the first stages of the reaction. Then, hydrothermal experiments were conducted on sintered San Carlos olivine to investigate the role of transport on the reaction. On sintered with a grain size of 1 to 5 μm, low reaction progresses of ~ 3 % in 10 months were obtained and the rate of serpentinization was one order of magnitude slower than on powders and one order of magnitude faster than on a single grain of the size of the sintered. Kinetics were controlled by a coupling between the reaction rate at the grain scale and the rate of fluid pathways formation at grain boundaries. Lizardite precipitated where olivine dissolved whereas magnetite and brucite segregated at the surface of the sintered. These results are in agreement with the observation of magnetite formation and segregation in fractures in naturally serpentinized peridotites and could explain the sparse

  18. Fundamental kinetics and innovative applications of nonequilibrium atomic vibration in thermal energy transport and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungha

    All energy conversion inefficiencies begin with emission of resonant atomic motions, e.g., vibrations, and are declared as waste heat once these motions thermalize to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium energy occupancy of the vibrational modes can be targeted as a harvestable, low entropy energy source for direct conversion to electric energy. Since the lifetime of these resonant vibrations is short, special nanostructures are required with the appropriate tuning of the kinetics. These in turn require multiscale, multiphysics treatments. Atomic vibration is described with quasiparticle phonon in solid, and the optical phonon emission is dominant relaxation channel in semiconductors. These optical modes become over-occupied when their emission rate becomes larger than their decay rate, thus hindering energy relaxation and transport in devices. Effective removal of these phonons by drifting electrons is investigated by manipulating the electron distribution to have higher population in the low-energy states, thus allowing favorable phonon absorption. This is done through introduction, design and analysis of a heterobarrier conducting current, where the band gap is controlled by alloying, thus creating a spatial variation which is abrupt followed by a linear gradient (to ensure directed current). Self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo simulations based on interaction kinetics between electron and phonon show that up to 19% of the phonon energy is converted to electric potential with an optimized GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier structure over a range of current and electron densities, and this system is also verified through statistical entropy analysis. This direct energy conversion improves the device performance with lower operation temperature and enhances overall energy conversion efficiency. Through this study, the paradigm for harvesting the resonant atomic vibration is proposed, reversing the general role of phonon as only causing electric potential drop. Fundamentals

  19. Electron transport parameters in CO2: scanning drift tube measurements and kinetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, M.; Korolov, I.; Loffhagen, D.; Pinhão, N.; Donkó, Z.

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the transport coefficients of electrons (bulk drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization frequency) in CO2 measured under time-of-flight conditions over a wide range of the reduced electric field, 15 {Td}≤slant E/N≤slant 2660 {Td}, in a scanning drift tube apparatus. The data obtained in the experiments are also applied to determine the effective steady-state Townsend ionization coefficient. These parameters are compared to the results of previous experimental studies, as well as to the results of various kinetic computations: solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation under different approximations (multiterm and density gradient expansions) and Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental data extend the range of E/N compared with previous measurements and are consistent with most of the transport parameters obtained in these earlier studies. The computational results point out the range of applicability of the respective approaches to determine the different measured transport properties of electrons in CO2. They also demonstrate the need for further improvement of the electron collision cross section data for CO2 taking into account the present experimental data.

  20. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  1. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  2. Effects of Convective Transport of Solute and Impurities on Defect-Causing Kinetics Instabilities in Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to obtain further insight into the onset and development of the defect-causing instabilities that anise due to the coupling of the bulk transport and nonlinear-interfacial kinetics during growth in the mixed regime, utilizing the reduction of the convective contribution to the bulk transport under microgravity. These studies will build upon the data on the effects of quantitative variations of the forced convection velocity on the averaged and time-dependent kinetic behavior of protein crystal growth systems that have recently been obtained in our laboratory.

  3. Massively parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of charge carrier transport in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kaap, N. J.; Koster, L. J. A.

    2016-02-01

    A parallel, lattice based Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is developed that runs on a GPGPU board and includes Coulomb like particle-particle interactions. The performance of this computationally expensive problem is improved by modifying the interaction potential due to nearby particle moves, instead of fully recalculating it. This modification is achieved by adding dipole correction terms that represent the particle move. Exact evaluation of these terms is guaranteed by representing all interactions as 32-bit floating numbers, where only the integers between -222 and 222 are used. We validate our method by modelling the charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors, including Coulomb interactions between charges. Performance is mainly governed by the particle density in the simulation volume, and improves for increasing densities. Our method allows calculations on large volumes including particle-particle interactions, which is important in the field of organic semiconductors.

  4. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. II. Kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    In Paper I [T. Lafleur et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053502 (2016)], we demonstrated (using particle-in-cell simulations) the definite correlation between an anomalously high cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs), and the presence of azimuthal electrostatic instabilities leading to enhanced electron scattering. Here, we present a kinetic theory that predicts the enhanced scattering rate and provides an electron cross-field mobility that is in good agreement with experiment. The large azimuthal electron drift velocity in HETs drives a strong instability that quickly saturates due to a combination of ion-wave trapping and wave-convection, leading to an enhanced mobility many orders of magnitude larger than that expected from classical diffusion theory. In addition to the magnetic field strength, B0, this enhanced mobility is a strong function of the plasma properties (such as the plasma density) and therefore does not, in general, follow simple 1 /B02 or 1 /B0 scaling laws.

  5. Ultracentrifugal crystallization of proteins: transport-kinetic modelling, and experimental behavior of catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhoff, A. M.; Pjura, P. E.; Dilmore, J. G.; Godlewski, T. S.

    1997-09-01

    Although ultracentrifugal crystallization (UC) of proteins has been demonstrated previously and its main advantages established, a clear quantitative understanding of the phenomena involved has not been presented. This issue is addressed here by development of a model accounting for the key transport (sedimentation, diffusion) and kinetic (nucleation, growth) effects in UC. Numerical solution of the governing equations shows how the protein concentration profile changes with time, and how it interacts with the crystallization kinetic phenomena near the bottom of the tube to give rise to protein crystals. It is shown that the centrifugal speed and the initial protein concentration represent the most convenient parameters to use in manipulating crystallization behavior. Some of the predicted features of UC behavior were explored experimentally using bovine liver catalase. Crystal size increased and optical activity improved as the initial protein concentration was reduced. Crystallization was very robust to the presence of appreciable quantities of impurities. UC appears to be an underused route to protein crystallization, and the availability of a quantitative model may aid in its application to novel protein systems.

  6. Phosphate-limited continuous culture of Rhodotorula rubra: kinetics of transport, leakage, and growth.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B R; Button, D K

    1979-01-01

    The phosphate-limited growth kinetics of Rhodotorula rubra, a small yeast of marine origin, were examined by analysis of 32P distributions in continuous cultures. Isotope relaxation procedures were used to identify unidirectional flows of Pi and organic phosphate among compartments modeled during growth. The concentrations of phosphates in these compartments at various growth rates were used, together with attendant flows, to produce a mathematical model of growth. Both Pi and phosphate-containing metabolic intermediates leaked from cells during growth. Total leakage ranged from 4 to 10% of influx and was comprised mostly of Pi. Transport capacity was at least 10 times that required for growth at saturating Pi concentrations, so that influx was linear with concentration during growth. This led to the realization that the curvature of Monod plots (Kmu = 12 nM mumax = 0.18/h, and the threshold At = 2.5 nM) is due to change in yield with growth rate. Growth rate related to Pi by the affinity, aA (= 0.43 liter/mg of cells.h) of cells for Pi and the growth rate-dependent yield. It was also specified by a series of kinetic constants that specified flow among the various compartments and equilibrium compartment concentrations as they were set by extracellular Pi. The importance of leakage by healthy cells to the organic chemistry of aquatic systems is noted. PMID:37231

  7. A new dynamic fluid-kinetic model for plasma transport in the plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Tu, J.; Song, P.

    2014-12-01

    A new dynamic fluid-kinetic (DyFK) model is developed for investigating the plasma transport along a closed flux tube in the plasmasphere by coupling a truncated version of the field line interhemispheric plasma (FLIP) model at altitudes below 800 km and a generalized semi-kinetic (GSK) model above it with an overlapped boundary region (800 km-1100 km) in both hemispheres. The flux tube is allowed to move both radially away from the Earth and azimuthally around the Earth. Ion species O+ and He+ are for the first time treated as simulation particles in a numerical model for the plasmasphere. The simulation particles are subjected to the parallel electric field, magnetic mirror force, gravity, centrifugal force and Coulomb collisions, as well as possible wave-particle interaction. The effects of ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling on the day-night evolution of the plasmasphere and the relative abundance of O+ and He+ are studied. Simulations are also conducted to investigate the influence of wave-particle interaction on the field-aligned density distributions of ions (O+/ H+/ He+) and their velocity distributions.

  8. Kinetically Controlled Coassembly of Multichromophoric Peptide Hydrogelators and the Impacts on Energy Transport.

    PubMed

    Ardoña, Herdeline Ann M; Draper, Emily R; Citossi, Francesca; Wallace, Matthew; Serpell, Louise C; Adams, Dave J; Tovar, John D

    2017-06-28

    We report a peptide-based multichromophoric hydrogelator system, wherein π-electron units with different inherent spectral energies are spatially controlled within peptidic 1-D nanostructures to create localized energy gradients in aqueous environments. This is accomplished by mixing different π-conjugated peptides prior to initiating self-assembly through solution acidification. We can vary the kinetics of the assembly and the degree of self-sorting through the choice of the assembly trigger, which changes the kinetics of acidification. The hydrolysis of glucono-δ-lactone (GdL) provides a slow pH drop that allows for stepwise triggering of peptide components into essentially self-sorted nanostructures based on subtle pKa differences, whereas HCl addition leads to a rapid formation of mixed components within a nanostructure. Using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and fiber X-ray diffraction, we determine the conditions and peptide mixtures that favor self-sorting or intimate comixing. Photophysical investigations in the solution phase provide insight into the correlation of energy-transport processes occurring within the assemblies to the structural organization of the π-systems.

  9. Electro-kinetically driven peristaltic transport of viscoelastic physiological fluids through a finite length capillary: Mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Yadav, Ashu; Bég, O Anwar

    2017-01-01

    Analytical solutions are developed for the electro-kinetic flow of a viscoelastic biological liquid in a finite length cylindrical capillary geometry under peristaltic waves. The Jefferys' non-Newtonian constitutive model is employed to characterize rheological properties of the fluid. The unsteady conservation equations for mass and momentum with electro-kinetic and Darcian porous medium drag force terms are reduced to a system of steady linearized conservation equations in an axisymmetric coordinate system. The long wavelength, creeping (low Reynolds number) and Debye-Hückel linearization approximations are utilized. The resulting boundary value problem is shown to be controlled by a number of parameters including the electro-osmotic parameter, Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity (maximum electro-osmotic velocity), and Jefferys' first parameter (ratio of relaxation and retardation time), wave amplitude. The influence of these parameters and also time on axial velocity, pressure difference, maximum volumetric flow rate and streamline distributions (for elucidating trapping phenomena) is visualized graphically and interpreted in detail. Pressure difference magnitudes are enhanced consistently with both increasing electro-osmotic parameter and Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity, whereas they are only elevated with increasing Jefferys' first parameter for positive volumetric flow rates. Maximum time averaged flow rate is enhanced with increasing electro-osmotic parameter, Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity and Jefferys' first parameter. Axial flow is accelerated in the core (plug) region of the conduit with greater values of electro-osmotic parameter and Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity whereas it is significantly decelerated with increasing Jefferys' first parameter. The simulations find applications in electro-osmotic (EO) transport processes in capillary physiology and also bio-inspired EO pump devices in chemical and aerospace engineering.

  10. [Kinetic properties of sodium transport pathways in the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T I; Sherstobitov, A O; Gusev, G P

    2007-01-01

    To activate Na+/H+ exchange, intracellular pH (pHi) of erythrocytes of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis were changed from 6 to 8 using nigericin. The Na+/H+ exchanger activity was estimated from the values of amiloride-sensitive components of Na+ (22Na) inflow or of H+ outflow from erythrocytes. Kinetic parameters of the carrier functioning were determined by using Hill equation. Dependence of Na+ and H+ transport on pHi value is described by hyperbolic function with the Hill coefficient value (n) close to 1. Maximal rate of ion transport was within the limits of 9-10 mmol/l cells/min, and the H+ concentration producing the exchanger 50% activation amounted to 0.6-1.0 microM. Stimulation of H+ outcome from acidified erythrocytes (pHi 5.9) with increase of H+ concentration in the incubation medium is described by Hill equation with n value of 1.6. Concentration of Na+: for the semimaximal stimulation of H+ outcome amounted to 19 mM. The obtained results indicate the presence in lamprey erythrocytes of only one binding site for H+ from the cytoplasm side and the presence of positive cooperativity in Na+ binding from the extracellular side of the Na+/H+ exchanger. Its efflux from cells in the Na+ -free medium did not change at a 10-fold increase of H+ concentration in the incubation medium. The presented data indicate differences of kinetic properties of the lamprey erythrocyte Na+/H+ exchanger and of this carrier isoforms in mammalian cells. In intact erythrocytes the dependence of the amiloride-sensitive Na+ inflow on its concentration in the medium is described by Hill equation with n 1.5. The Na+ concentration producing the 50% transport activation amounted to 39 mM and was essentially higher as compared with that in acidified erythrocytes. These data confirm the concept of the presence of two amiloride-sensitive pathways of Na+ transport in lamprey erythrocytes.

  11. Effects of solution mass transport on the ECC ozonesonde background current. [Electrochemical Concentration Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. C.; Niazy, N.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the effective mass transport parameter for the electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde in order to determine the mass transport rate constant for the ECC as a function of pressure. It is shown that a pressure dependent factor in the background current originates in a convective mass transport parameter. It is determined that for atmospheric pressures greater than 100 mb the mass transport parameter is a constant, while at pressures less than 100 mb it decreases logarithmically with pressure. It is suggested that the background current correction is directly correlated to the mass transport parameter pressure dependence. The presently used background current correction, which is based on the partial pressure of oxygen, is found to lead to an overestimation of the integrated ozone value in the troposphere for the ECC ozonesonde data.

  12. Relative contribution of set cathode potential and external mass transport on TCE dechlorination in a continuous-flow bioelectrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Verdini, Roberta; Aulenta, Federico; de Tora, Francesca; Lai, Agnese; Majone, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Microbial bioelectrochemical systems, which use solid-state cathodes to drive the reductive degradation of contaminants such as the chlorinated hydrocarbons, are recently attracting considerable attention for bioremediation applications. So far, most of the published research has focused on analyzing the influence of key (bio)electrochemical factors influencing contaminant degradation, such as the cathode potential, whereas only few studies have examined the potential impact of mass transport phenomena on process performance. Here we analyzed the performance of a flow-through bioelectrochemical reactor, continuously fed with a synthetic groundwater containing trichloroethene at three different linear fluid velocities (from 0.3 m d(-1) to 1.7 m d(-1)) and three different set cathode potentials (from -250 mV to -450 mV vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). The obtained results demonstrated that, in the range of fluid velocities which are characteristics for natural groundwater systems, mass transport phenomena may strongly influence the rate and extent of reductive dechlorination. Nonetheless, the relative importance of mass transport largely depends on the applied cathode potential which, in turn, controls the intrinsic kinetics of biological reactions and the underlying electron transfer mechanisms.

  13. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M.; Gwo, J.P.; Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E.

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  14. Convective kinetic energy equation under the mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2015-03-01

    The present paper originally derives the convective kinetic energy equation under mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization in a formal manner based on the segmentally-constant approximation (SCA). Though this equation is long since presented by Arakawa and Schubert (1974), a formal derivation is not known in the literature. The derivation of this formulation is of increasing interests in recent years due to the fact that it can explain basic aspects of the convective dynamics such as discharge-recharge and transition from shallow to deep convection. The derivation is presented in two manners: (i) for the case that only the vertical component of the velocity is considered and (ii) the case that both the horizontal and vertical components are considered. The equation reduces to the same form as originally presented by Arakwa and Schubert in both cases, but with the energy dissipation term defined differently. In both cases, nevertheless, the energy "dissipation" (loss) term consists of the three principal contributions: (i) entrainment-detrainment, (ii) outflow from top of convection, and (iii) pressure effects. Additionally, inflow from the bottom of convection contributing to a growth of convection is also formally counted as a part of the dissipation term. The eddy dissipation is also included for a completeness. The order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the convective kinetic energy "dissipation" is dominated by the pressure effects, and it may be approximately described by Rayleigh damping with a constant time scale of the order of 102-103 s. The conclusion is also supported by a supplementary analysis of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation. The Appendix discusses how the loss term ("dissipation") of the convective kinetic energy is qualitatively different from the conventional eddy-dissipation process found in turbulent flows.

  15. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis.

    PubMed

    Wittman, Richard S; Buck, Edgar C; Mausolf, Edward J; McNamara, Bruce K; Smith, Frances N; Soderquist, Chuck Z

    2014-12-26

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics have been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high-speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature-specifically, "jumps" in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for α radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for α radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique-both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported α radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for γ radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for α radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  16. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Smith, Frances N.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2014-11-25

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics has been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature – specifically, “jumps” in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for alpha radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique – both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists, from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported alpha radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for gamma radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  17. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Smith, Frances N.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2014-12-26

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics has been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature – specifically, “jumps” in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for alpha radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique – both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists, from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported alpha radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for gamma radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  18. Integrated mass transportation system study/definition/implementation program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Deptula, D. A.; Yorke, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Specific actions needed to plan and effect transportation system improvements are identified within the constraints of limited financial, energy and land use resources, and diverse community requirements. A specific program is described which would develop the necessary generalized methodology for devising improved transportation systems and evaluate them against specific criteria for intermodal and intramodal optimization. A consistent, generalized method is provided for study and evaluation of transportation system improvements.

  19. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage, AMD, results from the oxidation of metal sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite), producing ferrous iron and sulfuric acid. Acidophilic autotrophic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans obtain energy by oxidizing ferrous iron back to ferric iron, using oxygen as the electron acceptor. Most existing models of AMD do not account for microbial kinetics or iron geochemistry rigorously. Instead they assume that oxygen limitation controls pyrite oxidation and thus focus on oxygen transport. These models have been successfully used for simulating conditions where oxygen availability is a limiting factor (e.g. source prevention by capping), but have not been shown to effectively model acid generation and effluent chemistry under a wider range of conditions. The key reactions, oxidation of pyrite and oxidation of ferrous iron, are both slow kinetic processes. Despite being extensively studied for the last thirty years, there is still not a consensus in the literature about the basic mechanisms, limiting factors or rate expressions for microbially enhanced oxidation of metal sulfides. An indirect leaching mechanism (chemical oxidation of pyrite by ferric iron to produce ferrous iron, with regeneration of ferric iron by microbial oxidation of ferrous iron) is used as the foundation of a conceptual model for microbially enhanced oxidation of pyrite. Using literature data, a rate expression for microbial consumption of ferrous iron is developed that accounts for oxygen, ferrous iron and pH limitation. Reaction rate expressions for oxidation of pyrite and chemical oxidation of ferrous iron are selected from the literature. A completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is implemented coupling the kinetic rate expressions, speciation calculations and flow. The model simulates generation of AMD and effluent chemistry that qualitatively agrees with column reactor and single rock experiments. A one dimensional reaction

  20. [Mass Transfer Kinetics Model of Ultrasonic Extraction of Pomegranate Peel Polyphenols].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan-yi; Zhang, Li-hua; Wang, Yu-hai; Zhang, Yuan-hu; Ma, Li; Zheng, Dan-dan

    2015-05-01

    The dynamic mathematical model of ultrasonic extraction of polyphenols from pomegranate peel was constructed with the Fick's second law as the theoretical basis. The spherical model was selected, with mass concentrations of pomegranate peel polyphenols as the index, 50% ethanol as the extraction solvent and ultrasonic extraction as the extraction method. In different test conditions including the liquid ratio, extraction temperature and extraction time, a series of kinetic parameters were solved, such as the extraction process (k), relative raffinate rate, surface diffusion coefficient(D(S)), half life (t½) and the apparent activation energy (E(a)). With the extraction temperature increasing, k and D(S) were gradually increased with t½ decreasing,which indicated that the elevated temperature was favorable to the extraction of pomegranate peel polyphenols. The exponential equation of relative raffinate rate showed that the established numerical dynamics model fitted the extraction of pomegranate peel polyphenols, and the relationship between the reaction conditions and pomegranate peel polyphenols concentration was well reflected by the model. Based on the experimental results, a feasible and reliable kinetic model for ultrasonic extraction of polyphenols from pomegranate peel is established, which can be used for the optimization control of engineering magnifying production.

  1. A quantitative multiplexed mass spectrometry assay for studying the kinetic of residue-specific histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yin-Ming; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Histone acetylation is involved in gene regulation and, most importantly, aberrant regulation of histone acetylation is correlated with major human diseases. Although many lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) have been characterized as being capable of acetylating multiple lysine residues on histones, how different factors such as enzyme complexes or external stimuli (e.g. KAT activators or inhibitors) alter KAT specificity remains elusive. In order to comprehensively understand how the homeostasis of histone acetylation is maintained, a method that can quantitate acetylation levels of individual lysines on histones is needed. Here we demonstrate that our mass spectrometry (MS)-based method accomplishes this goal. In addition, the high throughput, high sensitivity, and high dynamic range of this method allows for effectively and accurately studying steady-state kinetics. Based on the kinetic parameters from in vitro enzymatic assays, we can determine the specificity and selectivity of a KAT and use this information to understand what factors influence histone acetylation. These approaches can be used to study the enzymatic mechanisms of histone acetylation as well as be adapted to other histone modifications. Understanding the post-translational modification of individual residues within the histones will provide a better picture of chromatin regulation in the cell.

  2. Enzyme kinetics by directly imaging a porous silicon microfluidic reactor using desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kevin P; Azoz, Seyla; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2008-11-01

    Enzyme kinetics were obtained in a porous silicon microfluidic channel by combining an enzyme and substrate droplet, allowing them to react and deposit a small amount of residue on the channel walls, and then analyzing this residue by directly ionizing the channel walls using a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) laser source. The porous silicon of the channel walls functions in a manner analogous to the matrix in MALDI-MS, and is referred to as a desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) target when used in this configuration. Mass spectrometry signal intensity of substrate residue correlates with relative concentration, and position in the microchannel correlates with time, thus allowing determination of kinetic parameters. The system is especially suitable for initial reaction velocity determination. This microreactor is broadly applicable to time-resolved kinetic assays as long as at least one substrate or product of the reaction is ionizable by DIOS-MS.

  3. Sugarcane bagasse pretreatment using three imidazolium-based ionic liquids; mass balances and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Karatzos, Sergios Kimon; Edye, Leslie Alan; Doherty, William Orlando Sinclair

    2012-08-24

    Effective pretreatment is key to achieving high enzymatic saccharification efficiency in processing lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars, biofuels and value-added products. Ionic liquids (ILs), still relatively new class of solvents, are attractive for biomass pretreatment because some demonstrate the rare ability to dissolve all components of lignocellulosic biomass including highly ordered (crystalline) cellulose. In the present study, three ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim]Cl), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) are used to dissolve/pretreat and fractionate sugarcane bagasse. In these IL-based pretreatments the biomass is completely or partially dissolved in ILs at temperatures greater than 130°C and then precipitated by the addition of an antisolvent to the IL biomass mixture. For the first time mass balances of IL-based pretreatments are reported. Such mass balances, along with kinetics data, can be used in process modelling and design. Lignin removals of 10% mass of lignin in bagasse with [C4mim]Cl, 50% mass with [C2mim]Cl and 60% mass with [C2mim]OAc, are achieved by limiting the amount of water added as antisolvent to 0.5 water:IL mass ratio thus minimising lignin precipitation. Enzyme saccharification (24 h, 15FPU) yields (% cellulose mass in starting bagasse) from the recovered solids rank as: [C2mim]OAc(83%) > >[C2mim]Cl(53%) = [C4mim]Cl(53%). Composition of [C2mim]OAc-treated solids such as low lignin, low acetyl group content and preservation of arabinosyl groups are characteristic of aqueous alkali pretreatments while those of chloride IL-treated solids resemble aqueous acid pretreatments. All ILs are fully recovered after use (100% mass as determined by ion chromatography). In all three ILs regulated addition of water as an antisolvent effected a polysaccharide enriched precipitate since some of the lignin remained dissolved in the aqueous IL solution. Of

  4. Sugarcane bagasse pretreatment using three imidazolium-based ionic liquids; mass balances and enzyme kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Effective pretreatment is key to achieving high enzymatic saccharification efficiency in processing lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars, biofuels and value-added products. Ionic liquids (ILs), still relatively new class of solvents, are attractive for biomass pretreatment because some demonstrate the rare ability to dissolve all components of lignocellulosic biomass including highly ordered (crystalline) cellulose. In the present study, three ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim]Cl), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) are used to dissolve/pretreat and fractionate sugarcane bagasse. In these IL-based pretreatments the biomass is completely or partially dissolved in ILs at temperatures greater than 130°C and then precipitated by the addition of an antisolvent to the IL biomass mixture. For the first time mass balances of IL-based pretreatments are reported. Such mass balances, along with kinetics data, can be used in process modelling and design. Results Lignin removals of 10% mass of lignin in bagasse with [C4mim]Cl, 50% mass with [C2mim]Cl and 60% mass with [C2mim]OAc, are achieved by limiting the amount of water added as antisolvent to 0.5 water:IL mass ratio thus minimising lignin precipitation. Enzyme saccharification (24 h, 15FPU) yields (% cellulose mass in starting bagasse) from the recovered solids rank as: [C2mim]OAc(83%) > >[C2mim]Cl(53%) = [C4mim]Cl(53%). Composition of [C2mim]OAc-treated solids such as low lignin, low acetyl group content and preservation of arabinosyl groups are characteristic of aqueous alkali pretreatments while those of chloride IL-treated solids resemble aqueous acid pretreatments. All ILs are fully recovered after use (100% mass as determined by ion chromatography). Conclusions In all three ILs regulated addition of water as an antisolvent effected a polysaccharide enriched precipitate since some of the lignin remained dissolved

  5. Modeling Coronal Mass Ejections with the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Borovikov, S. N.; Kryukov, I. A.; Wu, S. T.; Yalim, M. S.; Colella, P. C.; Van Straalen, B.

    2017-05-01

    The solar eruptions and interacting solar wind streams are key drivers of geomagnetic storms and various related space weather disturbances that may have hazardous effects on the space-borne and ground-based technological systems as well as on human health. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts, interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), belong to the strongest disturbances and therefore are of great importance for the space weather predictions. In this paper we show a few examples of how adaptive mesh refinement makes it possible to resolve the complex CME structure and its evolution in time while a CME propagates from the inner boundary to Earth. Simulations are performed with the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS).

  6. On the Upscaling of Reaction-Transport Processes in Porous Media with Fast Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kechagi, P.; Tsimpanogiannis, I.; Yortsos, Y.C.; Lichtner, P.

    2001-01-09

    This report is organized as follows: Provide a brief review of the upscaling constraints of the type (2) for a typical diffusion-reaction system. In this an analogy with two-phase flow in porous media was drawn. Then, using the methodology of QW a problem at the unit cell for the computation of the effective mass transfer coefficient, in processes where local thermodynamic equilibrium applies was derived. This problem is found to be different than in QW, as it depends on the gradients of the macroscale variable, and can be cast in terms of an eigenvalue problem. Two simple, examples, one involving advection-dissolution and another involving drying in a pore network, was presented to illustrate the coupling between scales and to show the quantitative effect in case this coupling was neglected. Finally, similar ideas and an illustrative example was applied to reaction-diffusion systems with fast kinetics, where an equilibrium state is approached.

  7. Thermodynamic Behavior and Mass Transfer Kinetics of Boron Between Ferrosilicon and CaO-SiO2 Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krystad, Egil; Jakobsson, Lars K.; Tang, Kai; Tranell, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Equilibrium distribution and transport kinetics of boron between ferrosilicon and calcium silicate slag were investigated through experimental study. A 50 pct CaO-50 pct SiO2 slag (by weight) was held for different durations at 1873 K (1600 °C) in a graphite tube furnace together with boron-doped ferrosilicon alloys in the range 50 to 85 wt pct Fe. The results indicate that the equilibrium partition ratio of boron between slag and metal is 2.4 ± 0.7 and largely independent of ferrosilicon alloy composition below 85 wt pct Fe. At 85 wt pct Fe, the equilibrium partition ratio is measured to be 6.2 ± 1.4. Although reported with a significant standard deviation, it is also found that the mass transfer rate of boron between ferrosilicon alloy and slag increases slightly with increasing iron content in ferrosilicon. These findings are discussed in terms of slag-metal bulk and interfacial properties.

  8. Thermodynamic Behavior and Mass Transfer Kinetics of Boron Between Ferrosilicon and CaO-SiO2 Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krystad, Egil; Jakobsson, Lars K.; Tang, Kai; Tranell, Gabriella

    2017-10-01

    Equilibrium distribution and transport kinetics of boron between ferrosilicon and calcium silicate slag were investigated through experimental study. A 50 pct CaO-50 pct SiO2 slag (by weight) was held for different durations at 1873 K (1600 °C) in a graphite tube furnace together with boron-doped ferrosilicon alloys in the range 50 to 85 wt pct Fe. The results indicate that the equilibrium partition ratio of boron between slag and metal is 2.4 ± 0.7 and largely independent of ferrosilicon alloy composition below 85 wt pct Fe. At 85 wt pct Fe, the equilibrium partition ratio is measured to be 6.2 ± 1.4. Although reported with a significant standard deviation, it is also found that the mass transfer rate of boron between ferrosilicon alloy and slag increases slightly with increasing iron content in ferrosilicon. These findings are discussed in terms of slag-metal bulk and interfacial properties.

  9. A Critical View on In Vitro Analysis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) Transport Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Saaby, Lasse; Brodin, Birger

    2017-09-01

    Transport proteins expressed in the different barriers of the human body can have great implications on absorption, distribution, and excretion of drug compounds. Inhibition or saturation of a transporter can potentially alter these absorbtion, distribution, metabolism and elimination properties and thereby also the pharmacokinetic profile and bioavailability of drug compounds. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is an efflux transporter which is present in most of the barriers of the body, including the small intestine, the blood-brain barrier, the liver, and the kidney. In all these tissues, P-gp may mediate efflux of drug compounds and may also be a potential site for drug-drug interactions. Consequently, there is a need to be able to predict the saturation and inhibition of P-gp and other transporters in vivo. For this purpose, Michaelis-Menten steady-state analysis has been applied to estimate kinetic parameters, such as Km and Vmax, for carrier-mediated transport, whereas half-maximal inhibitor concentration (IC50) and the disassociation constant for an inhibitor/P-gp complex (Ki) have been determined to estimate P-gp inhibition. This review addresses in vitro methods commonly used to study P-gp transport kinetics and aims at providing a critical evaluation of the application of steady-state Michaelis-Menten analysis of kinetic parameters for substrate/P-gp interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biotin Transport and Accumulation by Cells of Lactobacillus plantarum II. Kinetics of the System

    PubMed Central

    Waller, James R.; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1965-01-01

    Waller, James R. (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio), and Herman C. Lichstein. Biotin transport and accumulation by cells of Lactobacillus plantarum. II. Kinetics of the system. J. Bacteriol. 90:853–856. 1965.—Bound biotin-saturated cells of Lactobacillus plantarum accumulated free biotin by a time-dependent process exhibiting substrate saturation phenomena in the presence and absence of glucose. Apparent Km and Vmax values determined in the presence and absence of glucose, respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plots were found to be 31.5 and 7.72 mμm (Km) and 9.72 and 3.26 μμmoles per mg per min (Vmax). Free biotin transport per se appeared to be an energy-independent, mediated process, whereas the accumulation of large intracellular vitamin concentrations was energy-dependent. Internal free biotin was quantitatively converted to bound biotin. The rate and extent of bound biotin formation was slower than free biotin uptake, and dependent upon intracellular free biotin levels up to a saturating concentration. PMID:5847806

  11. Morphometric attributes to understand palaeogeomorphological controls on mass-transport deposits offshore Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedade, Aldina; Alves, Tiago; Luís Zêzere, José

    2017-04-01

    Mass-transport deposits form a significant part of the stratigraphic record of ancient and modern deep-water basins worldwide. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic data is used to analyse two different types of buried mass-transport deposits offshore Espírito Santo Basin (SE Brazil. Both types are developed within Early Miocene to Holocene stratigraphic units composed of sandstones, calcarenites, turbidite sands and marls. The high resolution images provided by the interpreted 3D seismic data allowed a detailed analysis of the seismic stratigraphy and internal structure of mass-transport deposits. In addition, improvements in visualisation techniques were used to compute simple morphometric attributes of buried mass-transport deposits in continental slopes. This study classifies the interpreted mass-transport deposits in two different types according to the relationship between the morphology of mass-transport deposits and the surrounding topography. Locally confined mass-transport deposits are laterally constrained by non-deformed strata that surrounds the mass-transport deposit and by the local topography of the depositional surface. Their dimensions are relatively small (area of 5.251 km2). Unconfined mass-transport deposits show a much larger volume compared to the previously type ( 87.180 km2), and local topography does not have control on their geometry. The analysis proves that local topography and geometry of the depositional surface are key controlling factors on the spatial distribution and dimensions of the two types of mass-transport deposits. However, the two types differ in size, geomorphological expression, local structural controls and run-out distance. This work importance is relate variations in the character of the depositional surface with the morphology mass-transport deposits and run-out distance. As a result of the methodology used, two different styles of mass-transport run-out are identified and local factors controlling their morphology are

  12. DURIP: Electrokinetic Injection and Separation System for Analysis of Protein and Peptide Transport, Adsorption and Kinetics Instrumentation Proposal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We requested equipment necessary to build an electrokinetic injection and separation system for the analysis of protein...Jul-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: DURIP: Electrokinetic Injection and Separation System for Analysis of...Injection and Separation System for Analysis of Protein and Peptide Transport, Adsorption and Kinetics Instrumentation Proposal Report Title We requested

  13. Kinetic parameter estimation in N. europaea biofilms using a 2-D reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Semprini, Lewis; Wood, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms of the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were cultivated to study microbial processes associated with ammonia oxidation in pure culture. We explored the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters of ammonia oxidation in N. europaea biofilms were in the range of those determined with batch suspended cells. Oxygen and pH microelectrodes were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH above and inside biofilms and reactive transport modeling was performed to simulate the measured DO and pH profiles. A two dimensional (2-D) model was used to simulate advection parallel to the biofilm surface and diffusion through the overlying fluid while reaction and diffusion were simulated in the biofilm. Three experimental studies of microsensor measurements were performed with biofilms: i) NH3 concentrations near the Ksn value of 40 μM determined in suspended cell tests ii) Limited buffering capacity which resulted in a pH gradient within the biofilms and iii) NH3 concentrations well below the Ksn value. Very good fits to the DO concentration profiles both in the fluid above and in the biofilms were achieved using the 2-D model. The modeling study revealed that the half-saturation coefficient for NH3 in N. europaea biofilms was close to the value measured in suspended cells. However, the third study of biofilms with low availability of NH3 deviated from the model prediction. The model also predicted shifts in the DO profiles and the gradient in pH that resulted for the case of limited buffering capacity. The results illustrate the importance of incorporating both key transport and chemical processes in a biofilm reactive transport model.

  14. Mass Transport in Surface Diffusion of van der Waals Bonded Systems: Boosted by Rotations?

    PubMed

    Hedgeland, Holly; Sacchi, Marco; Singh, Pratap; McIntosh, Andrew J; Jardine, Andrew P; Alexandrowicz, Gil; Ward, David J; Jenkins, Stephen J; Allison, William; Ellis, John

    2016-12-01

    Mass transport at a surface is a key factor in heterogeneous catalysis. The rate is determined by excitation across a translational barrier and depends on the energy landscape and the coupling to the thermal bath of the surface. Here we use helium spin-echo spectroscopy to track the microscopic motion of benzene adsorbed on Cu(001) at low coverage (θ ∼ 0.07 ML). Specifically, our combined experimental and computational data determine both the absolute rate and mechanism of the molecular motion. The observed rate is significantly higher by a factor of 3.0 ± 0.1 than is possible in a conventional, point-particle model and can be understood only by including additional molecular (rotational) coordinates. We argue that the effect can be described as an entropic contribution that enhances the population of molecules in the transition state. The process is generally relevant to molecular systems and illustrates the importance of the pre-exponential factor alongside the activation barrier in studies of surface kinetics.

  15. Kinetic Modeling of ABCG2 Transporter Heterogeneity: A Quantitative, Single-Cell Analysis of the Side Population Assay

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Adam F.; White, Douglas E.; Gran, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The side population (SP) assay, a technique used in cancer and stem cell research, assesses the activity of ABC transporters on Hoechst staining in the presence and absence of transporter inhibition, identifying SP and non-SP cell (NSP) subpopulations by differential staining intensity. The interpretation of the assay is complicated because the transporter-mediated mechanisms fail to account for cell-to-cell variability within a population or adequately control the direct role of transporter activity on staining intensity. We hypothesized that differences in dye kinetics at the single-cell level, such as ABCG2 transporter-mediated efflux and DNA binding, are responsible for the differential cell staining that demarcates SP/NSP identity. We report changes in A549 phenotype during time in culture and with TGFβ treatment that correlate with SP size. Clonal expansion of individually sorted cells re-established both SP and NSPs, indicating that SP membership is dynamic. To assess the validity of a purely kinetics-based interpretation of SP/NSP identity, we developed a computational approach that simulated cell staining within a heterogeneous cell population; this exercise allowed for the direct inference of the role of transporter activity and inhibition on cell staining. Our simulated SP assay yielded appropriate SP responses for kinetic scenarios in which high transporter activity existed in a portion of the cells and little differential staining occurred in the majority of the population. With our approach for single-cell analysis, we observed SP and NSP cells at both ends of a transporter activity continuum, demonstrating that features of transporter activity as well as DNA content are determinants of SP/NSP identity. PMID:27851764

  16. Kinetic Modeling of ABCG2 Transporter Heterogeneity: A Quantitative, Single-Cell Analysis of the Side Population Assay.

    PubMed

    Prasanphanich, Adam F; White, Douglas E; Gran, Margaret A; Kemp, Melissa L

    2016-11-01

    The side population (SP) assay, a technique used in cancer and stem cell research, assesses the activity of ABC transporters on Hoechst staining in the presence and absence of transporter inhibition, identifying SP and non-SP cell (NSP) subpopulations by differential staining intensity. The interpretation of the assay is complicated because the transporter-mediated mechanisms fail to account for cell-to-cell variability within a population or adequately control the direct role of transporter activity on staining intensity. We hypothesized that differences in dye kinetics at the single-cell level, such as ABCG2 transporter-mediated efflux and DNA binding, are responsible for the differential cell staining that demarcates SP/NSP identity. We report changes in A549 phenotype during time in culture and with TGFβ treatment that correlate with SP size. Clonal expansion of individually sorted cells re-established both SP and NSPs, indicating that SP membership is dynamic. To assess the validity of a purely kinetics-based interpretation of SP/NSP identity, we developed a computational approach that simulated cell staining within a heterogeneous cell population; this exercise allowed for the direct inference of the role of transporter activity and inhibition on cell staining. Our simulated SP assay yielded appropriate SP responses for kinetic scenarios in which high transporter activity existed in a portion of the cells and little differential staining occurred in the majority of the population. With our approach for single-cell analysis, we observed SP and NSP cells at both ends of a transporter activity continuum, demonstrating that features of transporter activity as well as DNA content are determinants of SP/NSP identity.

  17. CFD assessment of the effect of convective mass transport on the intracellular clearance of intracellular triglycerides in macrosteatotic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yarmush, Gabriel; Santos, Lucas; Yarmush, Joshua; Koundinyan, Srivathsan; Saleem, Mubasher; Nativ, Nir I; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois; Maguire, Timothy J; Guaghan, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Donor livers available to transplant for patients with end-stage liver disease are in severe shortage. One possible avenue to expand the donor pool is to recondition livers that would be otherwise discarded due to excessive fat content. Severely steatotic livers (also known as fatty livers) are highly susceptible to ischemia-reperfusion injury and as a result, primary liver non-function post-transplantation. Prior studies in isolated perfused rat livers suggest that "defatting" may be possible in a timeframe of a few hours; thus, it is conceivable that fatty liver grafts could be recovered by machine perfusion to clear stored fat from the organ prior to transplantation. However, studies using hepatoma cells and adult hepatocytes made fatty in culture report that defatting may take several days. Because cell culture studies were done in static conditions, we hypothesized that the defatting kinetics are highly sensitive to flow-mediated transport of metabolites. To investigate this question, we experimentally evaluated the effect of increasing flow rate on the defatting kinetics of cultured HepG2 cells and developed an in silico combined reaction-transport model to identify possible rate-limiting steps in the defatting process. We found that in cultured fatty HepG2 cells, the time required to clear stored fat down to lean control cells can be reduced from 48 to 4-6 h by switching from static to flow conditions. The flow required resulted in a fluid shear of .008 Pa, which did not adversely affect hepatic function. The reaction-transport model suggests that the transport of L-carnitine, which is the carrier responsible for taking free fatty acids into the mitochondria, is the key rate-limiting process in defatting that was modulated by flow. Therefore, we can ensure higher levels of L-carnitine uptake by the cells by choosing flow rates that minimize the limiting mass transport while minimizing shear stress.

  18. Efficient and cost-effective experimental determination of kinetic constants and data: the success of a Bayesian systematic approach to drug transport, receptor binding, continuous culture and cell transport kinetics.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Emma F; Gilmour, Steven G; Crabbe, M James C

    2004-01-02

    Details about the parameters of kinetic systems are crucial for progress in both medical and industrial research, including drug development, clinical diagnosis and biotechnology applications. Such details must be collected by a series of kinetic experiments and investigations. The correct design of the experiment is essential to collecting data suitable for analysis, modelling and deriving the correct information. We have developed a systematic and iterative Bayesian method and sets of rules for the design of enzyme kinetic experiments. Our method selects the optimum design to collect data suitable for accurate modelling and analysis and minimises the error in the parameters estimated. The rules select features of the design such as the substrate range and the number of measurements. We show here that this method can be directly applied to the study of other important kinetic systems, including drug transport, receptor binding, microbial culture and cell transport kinetics. It is possible to reduce the errors in the estimated parameters and, most importantly, increase the efficiency and cost-effectiveness by reducing the necessary amount of experiments and data points measured.

  19. Kinetics and reactive transport of N2O in a nitrate-contaminated shallow aquifer: How to transfer static Batch Experiments to highly-transient Field Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    ., Ruiyan Jia, D. Eisermann, and C.-F. Stange (2008): Spatial and temporal variability of dissolved nitrous oxide in near-surface groundwater and bubble-mediated mass transfer to the unsaturated zone, J. Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, in press. Geistlinger, H., G. Wriedt, D. Weymann, and R. Well (2009) Kinetics and reactive transport of N2O in a nitrate contaminated shallow aquifer: Development of a process-based reaction module for gas transport, Vadose Zone Journal, in review.

  20. Blood-brain barrier transport kinetics of the cyclic depsipeptide mycotoxins beauvericin and enniatins.

    PubMed

    Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; Veryser, Lieselotte; Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Peremans, Kathelijne; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-09-06

    The cyclic depsipeptide mycotoxins beauvericin and enniatins are capable of reaching the systemic circulation through various routes of exposure and are hence capable of exerting central nervous system (CNS) effects, if they are able to pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which was the main objective of this study. Quantification of the mycotoxins was performed using an in-house developed and validated bio-analytical UHPLC-MS/MS method. Prior to the BBB experiments, the metabolic stability of the mycotoxins was evaluated in vitro in mouse serum and brain homogenate. The BBB permeation kinetics of beauvericin and enniatins were studied using an in vivo mice model, applying multiple time regression for studying the blood-to-brain influx. Additionally, capillary depletion was applied to obtain the fraction of the peptides really entering the brain parenchyma and the fraction loosely adhered to the brain capillary wall. Finally, also the brain-to-blood efflux transport kinetics was studied. Metabolic stability data indicated that the investigated mycotoxins were stable during the duration of the in vivo study. The brain influx study showed that beauvericin and enniatins are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in mice: using the Gjedde-Patlak biphasic model, it was shown that all investigated mycotoxins exert a high initial influx rate into the brain (K1 ranging from 11 to 53μL/(g×min)), rapidly reaching a plateau. After penetration, the mycotoxins reached the brain parenchyma (95%) with only a limited amount residing in the capillaries (5%). Negligible efflux (<0.005min(-1)) from the brain was observed in the 15min post-intracerebroventricular injection.

  1. Kinetics of laser-pulse vaporization of uranium carbide by mass spectrometry. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Tehranian, F.

    1983-06-01

    The kinetics of uranium carbide vaporization in the temperature range 3000 K to 5200 K was studied using a Nd-glass laser with peak power densities from 1.6 x 10/sup 5/ to 4.0 x 10/sup 5/ watts/cm/sup 2/. The vapor species U, UC/sub 2/, C/sub 1/ and C/sub 3/ were detected and analyzed by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. From the mass spectrometer signals number densities of the various species in the ionizer were obtained as functions of time. The surface of the irradiated uranium carbide was examined by scanning electron microscope and the depth profile of the crater was obtained. In order to aid analysis of the data, the heat conduction and species diffusion equations for the solid (or liquid) were solved numerically by a computer code to obtain the temperature and composition transients during laser heating. A sensitivity analysis was used to study the effect of uncertainties in the input parameters on the computed surface temperatures.

  2. Intraparticle mass transfer kinetics on molecularly imprinted polymers of structural analogues of a template

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    The intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of the structural analogues of a template on a Fmoc-L-Tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer (MIP) and on the corresponding non-imprinted polymer (NIP) were quantitatively studied using the lumped pore diffusion model (POR) of chromatography. The best equilibrium isotherm models of these compounds were used to calculate the high-concentration band profiles of different substrates on the MIP and the NIP with the POR model. These profiles were compared to experimental band profiles. The numerical values of the intraparticle pore and surface diffusion coefficients were adjusted to determine those that minimized the differences between calculated and experimental profiles. The results of this exercise show that surface diffusion is the dominant intraparticle mass transfer process for the substrates on the polymers and that the energetic heterogeneity of the surface should be considered in accounting for the surface diffusion of the L-enantiomers on the MIP. The surface diffusion coefficient increases with decreasing overall affinity of each substrate for the polymers.

  3. Mass conserved elementary kinetics is sufficient for the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I

    2012-12-07

    Living systems are forced away from thermodynamic equilibrium by exchange of mass and energy with their environment. In order to model a biochemical reaction network in a non-equilibrium state one requires a mathematical formulation to mimic this forcing. We provide a general formulation to force an arbitrary large kinetic model in a manner that is still consistent with the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state. We can guarantee the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state assuming only two conditions; that every reaction is mass balanced and that continuous kinetic reaction rate laws never lead to a negative molecule concentration. These conditions can be verified in polynomial time and are flexible enough to permit one to force a system away from equilibrium. With expository biochemical examples we show how reversible, mass balanced perpetual reaction(s), with thermodynamically infeasible kinetic parameters, can be used to perpetually force various kinetic models in a manner consistent with the existence of a steady state. Easily testable existence conditions are foundational for efforts to reliably compute non-equilibrium steady states in genome-scale biochemical kinetic models.

  4. Kinetic Phenomena in Transport of Electrons and Positrons in Gases caused by the Properties of Scattering Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marjanović, Srdan; Dujko, Saša; Banković, Ana; Šašić, Olivera; Bošnjaković, Danko; Stojanović, Vladimir; Malović, Gordana; Buckman, Stephen; Garcia, Gustavo; White, Ron; Sullivan, James; Brunger, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Collisions of electrons, atoms, molecules, photons and ions are the basic processes in plasmas and ionized gases in general. This is especially valid for low temperature collisional plasmas. Kinetic phenomena in transport are very sensitivitive to the shape of the cross sections and may at the same time affect the macroscopic applications. We will show how transport theory or simulation codes, phenomenology, kinetic phenomena and transport data may be used to improve our knowledge of the cross sections, our understanding of the plasma models, application of the swarm physics in ionized gases and similar applications to model and improve gas filled traps of positrons. Swarm techniques could also be a starting point in applying atomic and molecular data in models of electron or positron therapy/diagnostics in radiation related medicine.

  5. A boundary element-Random walk model of mass transport in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemblowski, M.

    1986-01-01

    A boundary element solution to the convective mass transport in groundwater is presented. This solution produces a continuous velocity field and reduces the amount of data preparation time and bookkeeping. By combining this solution and the random walk procedure, a convective-dispersive mass transport model is obtained. This model may be easily used to simulate groundwater contamination problems. The accuracy of the boundary element model has been verified by reproducing the analytical solution to a two-dimensional convective mass transport problem. The method was also used to simulate a convective-dispersive problem. ?? 1986.

  6. Measurement and visualization of mass transport for the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ambient mass-spectrometry source.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  7. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  8. Cation-limited kinetic model for microbial extracellular electron transport via an outer membrane cytochrome C complex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Tokunou, Yoshihide; Saito, Junki

    2016-01-01

    Outer-membrane c-type cytochrome (OM c-Cyt) complexes in several genera of iron-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter, are capable of transporting electrons from the cell interior to extracellular solids as a terminal step of anaerobic respiration. The kinetics of this electron transport has implications for controlling the rate of microbial electron transport during bioenergy or biochemical production, iron corrosion, and natural mineral cycling. Herein, we review the findings from in-vivo and in-vitro studies examining electron transport kinetics through single OM c-Cyt complexes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In-vitro electron flux via a purified OM c-Cyt complex, comprised of MtrA, B, and C proteins from S. oneidensis MR-1, embedded in a proteoliposome system is reported to be 10- to 100-fold faster compared with in-vivo estimates based on measurements of electron flux per cell and OM c-Cyts density. As the proteoliposome system is estimated to have 10-fold higher cation flux via potassium channels than electrons, we speculate that the slower rate of electron-coupled cation transport across the OM is responsible for the significantly lower electron transport rate that is observed in-vivo. As most studies to date have primarily focused on the energetics or kinetics of interheme electron hopping in OM c-Cyts in this microbial electron transport mechanism, the proposed model involving cation transport provides new insight into the rate detemining step of EET, as well as the role of self-secreted flavin molecules bound to OM c-Cyt and proton management for energy conservation and production in S. oneidensis MR-1. PMID:27924259

  9. Fold and thrust systems in Mass Transport Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.; Levi, T.; Weinberger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in seismic reflection data from gravity-driven fold and thrust systems developed in offshore Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) reveal a number of significant features relating to displacement along thrusts. However, the data are still limited by the resolution of the seismic method, and are unable to provide detail of local fold and thrust processes. Investigation of exceptional gravity-driven contractional structures forming part of MTDs in lacustrine deposits of the Dead Sea Basin, enables us to present the first detailed outcrop analysis of fold and thrust systems cutting unlithified 'soft' sediments. We employ a range of established geometric techniques to our case study, including dip isogons, fault-propagation fold charts and displacement-distance diagrams previously developed for investigation of thrusts and folds in lithified rocks. Fault-propagation folds in unlithified sediments display tighter interlimb angles compared to models developed for lithified sequences. Values of stretch, which compares the relative thickness of equivalent hangingwall and footwall sequences measured along the fault plane, may be as low as only 0.3, which is significantly less than the minimum 0.5 values reported from thrusts cutting lithified rocks, and reflects the extreme variation in stratigraphic thickness around thrust-related folds. We suggest that the simple shear component of deformation in unlithified sediments may modify the forelimb thickness and interlimb angles to a greater extent than in lithified rocks. The average spacing of thrust ramps and the thickness of the thrust sequence display an approximate 5:1 ratio across a range of scales in MTDs. In general, thicker hangingwall and footwall sequences occur with larger thrust displacements, although displacement patterns on thrusts cutting unlithified (yet cohesive) sediments are more variable than those in lithified rocks. Line-length restoration of thrust systems in MTDs reveals 42% shortening, which

  10. A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Boiko; S.V. Pachkovskii

    2008-12-15

    A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pulverized state at different treatment conditions and different model parameters are presented. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of thermochemical conversion of solid organic fuels with allowance for complex physicochemical phenomena of heat-and-mass exchange between coal particles and the gaseous environment.

  11. Body mass index kinetics around adiposity rebound in Anorexia nervosa: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Rémi; Neveu, Dorine; Carrier, Edouard; Ourrad, Nadia; Perroud, Alain; Nicolas, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with parameters involved in body mass index (BMI) regulation. Contrary to obesity, BMI kinetics around the adiposity rebound is not documented in AN. This study aimed at investigating which characteristics of BMI kinetics around the adiposity rebound are associated with AN. Multicentre case-control study with 101 inpatient women with AN onset after 10 years of age, and 101 healthy women, all free of overweight history and matched for age, level of education and fathers' socio-professional status. Age at adiposity rebound, pre- and post-adiposity rebound BMI velocities and accelerations (change in velocity over time) were estimated with linear mixed models using data recorded between 2 and 10 years of age. Patients had an earlier adiposity rebound (mean (standard deviation (SD)): 5.3 (1.3) vs 5.7 (1.1) years), a larger BMI at adiposity rebound (mean (SD): 15.3 [1] vs 14.9 (0.9) kg/m(2)) and 29% lower BMI acceleration after adiposity rebound than controls. After adjustment, only BMI at adiposity rebound and BMI acceleration after adiposity rebound were associated with a higher risk of AN (Odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.15 [1.41-3.46] for an increase of 1 kg/m(2) and 2.44 [1.56-4.02] for an increase of 0.1 kg/(m(2)*years(2)) respectively). These two factors were not correlated in patients (r = 0.007, p = 0.96). A flattened evolution of BMI after adiposity rebound and higher BMI at adiposity rebound were associated with AN. Further prospective study is needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Voltammetric measurements of the transient and steady mass transport effects of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Evan Lloyd

    Ultrasound is useful in a variety of industrial and medical processes. Many studies have emphasized the phenomena of cavitation as the primary mechanism for the effects of ultrasound. Ultrasound gives rise to other effects such as acoustic streaming and field induced fluid motion, and these effects also create useful actions. This dissertation focuses upon understanding the basic nature of ultrasound as an interfacial mass transport mechanism. Electrochemistry provides an excellent set of methodologies for studying the interfacial effects of ultrasound. Electrochemical measurements are highly sensitive to mass transport effects at the solid electrode-liquid electrolyte interface. This study employs established techniques that probe mass transport in electrochemical systems, including dual electrode systems such as the ring-disk electrode and the interdigitated array electrode. A chemiluminescent probe molecule, luminol, 3- aminophthalhydrazide, is used to provide visual imaging of the ultrasonic field. This process has been previously used to examine the relative effects of ultrasonic cavitation in a reaction vessel, but the use of this probe molecule in a sonoelectrochemical reaction system is novel. The high transport rates possible with ultrasound enable precise electroanalytical measurements with limits of detection on the order of 10-7 mol/L. It is observed that the characteristically oscillating portion of the current signal in sonoelectrochemical measurements depends on the analyte concentration. This dependence arises from a modulated mass transport effect, and this study makes a heretofore unreported application of this modulation to an electroanalytical measurement. The effects of electrolyte viscosity, ultrasound intensity, and signal filtering on this modulated signal are reported. Cavitation is only one of the factors affecting interfacial mass transport by ultrasound. Collection efficiency and electrochemiluminescence studies show that acoustic

  13. Theoretical investigation of fission fragment kinetic energy distributions in the symmetric mass region for 233U(nth,f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebboubi, Abdelaziz; Serot, Olivier; Kessedjian, Grégoire; Litaize, Olivier; Blanc, Aurelien; Bernard, David; Faust, Herbert; Julien-Laferrière, Sylvain; Köster, Ulli; Letourneau, Alain; Materna, Thomas; Méplan, Olivier; Mutti, Paolo; Rapala, Michal; Sage, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    Fission yields are essential for nuclear reactor studies (decay heat, fuel inventory…) and constitute also one of the main observables needed to improve our understanding of the fission process. The symmetric mass region is of particular interest due to various intriguing properties of the fission fragments already reported in the literature : inversion of the nuclear charge polarization, large width of the fission fragment kinetic energy distribution, strong change of the prompt neutron multiplicity, etc. Recently, measurements of fission yields and kinetic energy distributions in the symmetric mass region were achieved at the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). This experimental work is challenging due to the low counting rate and the appearance of contaminant masses, leading to pronounced components in the fission fragment kinetic energy distribution. Despite removing the undesirable contributions, the fission fragment kinetic energy distributions still show two components, indicating that the fission process could be modal. To go further and better characterize these components a comparison between our experimental data and Monte Carlo calculations (FIFRELIN code) simulating the de-excitation of the fission fragments for different fission channels will be presented and discussed.

  14. Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239{sup Pu} induced by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2010-08-04

    The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons ({nu}(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation {sigma}{sub E}*(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass ({sigma}{sub E}(A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence {sigma}{sub E}*(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

  15. Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239Pu induced by thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2010-08-01

    The average of fragment kinetic energy (E*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons (ν) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of 239Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation σE*(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass (σE(A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence σE*(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

  16. Adsorption equilibrium and transport kinetics for a range of probe gases in Takeda 3A carbon molecular sieve.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, S W; Coons, J E

    2005-04-15

    Measurements of adsorption equilibria and transport kinetics for argon, oxygen and nitrogen at 20, 50, and 80 degrees C on commercially derived Takeda carbon molecular sieve (CMS) employed for air separation have been undertaken in an effort to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of transport. Results indicate that micropore diffusion which is modeled by a Fickian diffusion process, governs the transport of oxygen molecules and the pore mouth barrier controls argon and nitrogen transport which is characterized by a linear driving force (LDF) model. For the three temperatures studied, the pressure dependence of the diffusivity and the LDF rate constant appear to be well characterized by a formulation based on the chemical potential as the driving force for transport. Isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading and activation energy measurements are compared with predictions made from a previously proposed molecular model for characterizing CMS.

  17. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description—Darcy's law—fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media. PMID:25901931

  18. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media.

    PubMed

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-04-22

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description--Darcy's law--fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media.

  19. Subcontinuum mass transport of condensed hydrocarbons in nanoporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Kerstin; Coasne, Benoit; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-04-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional reservoirs, the so-called shale gas, has exploded recently, reliable predictions of resource availability and extraction are missing because conventional tools fail to account for their ultra-low permeability and complexity. Here, we use molecular simulation and statistical mechanics to show that continuum description--Darcy's law--fails to predict transport in shales nanoporous matrix (kerogen). The non-Darcy behaviour arises from strong adsorption in kerogen and the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale, which contradict the assumption of viscous flow. Despite this complexity, all permeances collapse on a master curve with an unexpected dependence on alkane length. We rationalize this non-hydrodynamic behaviour using a molecular description capturing the scaling of permeance with alkane length and density. These results, which stress the need for a change of paradigm from classical descriptions to nanofluidic transport, have implications for shale gas but more generally for transport in nanoporous media.

  20. Mass Transport Separation via Grace: Anthropogenic and Natural Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, J. O.; de Viron, O.

    2011-12-01

    The GRACE satellite has been monitoring the change in the mass distribution at the Earth surface for nearly 10 years. This becomes enough to study long-term mass change, and to separate interannual variations from trends. Up to now, many studies have shown a fast (and non-linear) loss of mass in many glaciers and ice sheets. They all have been attributed to global warming, though part of the mass variation is also associated with the classical long-term climate variation. Using climatic data as well as the GRACE mascon solution, we can separate the part associated to the anthropogenic part from the non-anthropogenic part, in order to better estimate those contributions. Results and implications from our analyses will be presented.

  1. Reactions and mass transport in high temperature co-electrolysis of steam/CO2 mixtures for syngas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si-Won; Kim, Hyoungchul; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Choi, Wonjoon; Lee, Jong-Heun; Hong, Jongsup

    2015-04-01

    High temperature co-electrolysis of steam/CO2 mixtures using solid oxide cells has been proposed as a promising technology to mitigate climate change and power fluctuation of renewable energy. To make it viable, it is essential to control the complex reacting environment in their fuel electrode. In this study, dominant reaction pathway and species transport taking place in the fuel electrode and their effect on the cell performance are elucidated. Results show that steam is a primary reactant in electrolysis, and CO2 contributes to the electrochemical performance subsequently in addition to the effect of steam. CO2 reduction is predominantly governed by thermochemical reactions, whose influence to the electrochemical performance is evident near limiting currents. Chemical kinetics and mass transport play a significant role in co-electrolysis, given that the reduction reactions and diffusion of steam/CO2 mixtures are slow. The characteristic time scales determined by the kinetics, diffusion and materials dictate the cell performance and product compositions. The fuel electrode design should account for microstructure and catalysts for steam electrolysis and thermochemical CO2 reduction in order to optimize syngas production and store electrical energy effectively and efficiently. Syngas yield and selectivity are discussed, showing that they are substantially influenced by operating conditions, fuel electrode materials and its microstructure.

  2. Micromodel Investigation of Transport Effect on the Kinetics of Reductive Dissolution of Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Changyong; Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhi

    2013-03-13

    Reductive dissolution of hematite in porous media was investigated using a micromodel with realistic pore network structures that include distinctive advection domain, macro-pores and micro-pores created in silicon substrate. The micromodel pore surface was sputter deposited with a thin layer (230 nm) of hematite. The hematite in the micromodel was reduced by injecting pH-varying solutions containing a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2), a biogenic soluble electron transfer mediator produced by Shewanella species. The reduction kinetics was determined by measuring effluent Fe(II) concentration and by spectroscopically monitoring the hematite dissolution front in the micromodel. Batch experiment was also performed to estimate the hematite reduction rate under the well-mixed condition. The results showed a significant spatial variation in local redox reaction rate that was controlled by the coupled diffusion and reaction. The overall rate of the redox reaction in the micromodel required a three-domain numerical model to effectively describe with distinctive rate parameters in different pore domains. Results from this study demonstrated the important scaling effect when extrapolating geochemical or biogeochemical reaction rate from batch reactor to porous media and indicated a significant control of physical transport mechanisms on the reaction rate scaling.

  3. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of fission product silver transport through TRISO fuel particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bellefon, G. M.; Wirth, B. D.

    2011-06-01

    A mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model developed to investigate the diffusion of silver through the pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide containment layers of a TRISO fuel particle is described. The release of radioactive silver from TRISO particles has been studied for nearly three decades, yet the mechanisms governing silver transport are not fully understood. This model atomically resolves Ag, but provides a mesoscale medium of carbon and silicon carbide, which can include a variety of defects including grain boundaries, reflective interfaces, cracks, and radiation-induced cavities that can either accelerate silver diffusion or slow diffusion by acting as traps for silver. The key input parameters to the model (diffusion coefficients, trap binding energies, interface characteristics) are determined from available experimental data, or parametrically varied, until more precise values become available from lower length scale modeling or experiment. The predicted results, in terms of the time/temperature dependence of silver release during post-irradiation annealing and the variability of silver release from particle to particle have been compared to available experimental data from the German HTR Fuel Program ( Gontard and Nabielek [1]) and Minato and co-workers ( Minato et al. [2]).

  4. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic fields. III. Kinetics of test-particle diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Kleva, R.G.

    1982-07-01

    A discussion is given of test particle transport in the presence of specified stochastic magnetic fields, with particular emphasis on the collisional limit. Certain paradoxes and inconsistencies in the literature regarding the form of the scaling laws are resolved by carefully distinguishing a number of physically distinct correlation lengths, and thus by identifying several collisional subregimes. The common procedure of averaging the conventional fluid equations over the statistics of a random field is shown to fail in some important cases because of breakdown of the Chapman-Enskog ordering in the presence of a stochastic field component with short autocorrelation length. A modified perturbation theory is introduced which leads to a Kubo-like formula valid in all collisionality regimes. The direct-interaction approximation is shown to fail in the interesting limit in which the orbit exponentiation length L/sub K/ appears explicitly. A higher order renormalized kinetic theory in which L/sub K/ appears naturally is discussed and used to rederive more systematically the results of the heuristic scaling arguments.

  5. Modeling and character analyzing of current-controlled memristors with fractional kinetic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Gangquan; Diao, Lijie; Zhu, Jianwei; Lei, Yuhang; Babajide, Oresanya; Zhang, Yanbin

    2017-07-01

    Memristors have come into limelight again after it was realized by HP researchers. This paper proposes a memristor model which can be called fractional-order current-controlled memristor, and it is more general and comprehensive. We introduce the fractional integral/differential to the current-controlled memristor model and model memristor with fractional kinetic of charge transport. An interesting phenomena found out is that the I-V characteristic is a triple-loop curve (0 < α < 1) and not the conventional double-loop I-V curve (α=1). Memristance (RM) is analyzed versus the fractional order α and time(t), and it reach saturation faster when 0 < α < 1. The saturation (Rmin → Rmax) time is given and analyzed versus different orders α and frequencies ω, which increase with α increasing and ω decreasing. More importantly, the memristors can't reach the Rmax in some cases. Energy loss of the model is analyzed, and the I-P curves isn't origin-symmetric when 0 < α < 1 which is very different with curves when α = 1 .

  6. Kinetics of coupling water and cryoprotectant transport across cell membranes and applications to cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Li, Weizhong; Chen, Cong; Zuo, Jianguo

    2011-12-15

    Thermodynamic and kinetic models can provide a wealth of information on the physical response of living cells and tissues experiencing cryopreservation procedures. Both isothermal and nonisothermal models have been proposed so far, accompanied by experimental verification and cryoapplications. But the cryoprotective solution is usually assumed to be dilute and ideal in the models proposed in the literature. Additionally, few nonisothermal models are able to couple the transmembrane transport of water and cryoprotectant during cooling and warming of cells. To overcome these limitations, this study develops a whole new set of equations that can quantify the cotransport of water and cryoprotectant across cell membranes in the nondilute and nonideal solution during the freezing and thawing protocols. The new models proposed here can be simplified into ones consistent with the classic models if some specific assumptions are included. For cryobiological practice, they are applied to predict the volumetric change for imprinting control region (ICR) mouse spermatozoa and human corneal keratocytes in the freezing protocol. The new models can determine the intracellular concentration of cryoprotectant more precisely than others by abandoning the assumptions such as dilute and ideal solutions and nonpermeability of membranes to cryoprotectant. Further, the findings in this study will offer new insights into the physical response of cells undergoing cryopreservation.

  7. Reaction kinetic model of a proposed plasma membrane two-cycle H(+)-transport system of Chara corallina.

    PubMed Central

    Fisahn, J; Hansen, U P; Lucas, W J

    1992-01-01

    Biophysical and numerical analysis methods were used to characterize and model the transport protein that gives rise to the acid and alkaline regions of Chara. A measuring system that permits the detection of area-specific current-voltage curves was used. These current-voltage curves, obtained from the inward current regions of Chara, underwent a parallel shift when the alkaline region was inverted by means of an acid pH treatment. In this situation the reversal potential of this area shifted from -120 mV to -340 mV. Together with data obtained from experiments using a divided chamber system, these results suggest that a common transport protein generates inward and outward current regions of Chara. On the basis of these experimental findings, a reaction kinetic model is proposed that assigns two operational modes to the proposed transport protein. Switching between these modes generates either acid or alkaline behavior. Since the observed pH dependence of the postulated transporter is rather complex, a reaction kinetic saturation mechanism had to be incorporated into the model. This final 10-state reaction kinetic model provides an appropriate set of mathematical relations to fit the measured current-voltage curves by computer. PMID:1373492

  8. Reaction kinetic model of a proposed plasma membrane two-cycle H(+)-transport system of Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, J; Hansen, U P; Lucas, W J

    1992-04-15

    Biophysical and numerical analysis methods were used to characterize and model the transport protein that gives rise to the acid and alkaline regions of Chara. A measuring system that permits the detection of area-specific current-voltage curves was used. These current-voltage curves, obtained from the inward current regions of Chara, underwent a parallel shift when the alkaline region was inverted by means of an acid pH treatment. In this situation the reversal potential of this area shifted from -120 mV to -340 mV. Together with data obtained from experiments using a divided chamber system, these results suggest that a common transport protein generates inward and outward current regions of Chara. On the basis of these experimental findings, a reaction kinetic model is proposed that assigns two operational modes to the proposed transport protein. Switching between these modes generates either acid or alkaline behavior. Since the observed pH dependence of the postulated transporter is rather complex, a reaction kinetic saturation mechanism had to be incorporated into the model. This final 10-state reaction kinetic model provides an appropriate set of mathematical relations to fit the measured current-voltage curves by computer.

  9. Mass transport in salt repositories: Steady-state transport through interbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-03-01

    Salt has long been a candidate for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Because salt is extremely soluble in water, the existence of rock salt in the ground atest to the long-term stability of the salt. Both bedded salt and salt domes have been considered for nuclear waste disposal in the United States and Europe. While the salt is known to be quite pure in salt domes, bedded salt is interlaced with beds of sediments. Traditionally rock salt has not been considered water-conducting, but sediments layers would be classical porous media, capable of conducting water. Therefore there is interest in determining whether interbeds in bedded salt constitute pathway for radionuclide migration. In this report we consider steady-state migration of radionuclides from a single waste cylinder into a single interbed. Two approaches are used. In 1982 Neretnieks proposed an approach for calculating the steady-state transport of oxidants to a copper container. We have adapted that approach for calculating steady-state radionuclide migration away from the waste package, as a first approximation. We have also analyzed the problem of time-dependent radionuclide diffusion from a container through a backfill layer into a fracture, and we used the steady-state solution from that problem for comparison. Section 2 gives a brief summary of the geology of interbeds in bedded salt. Section 3 presents the mass transfer resistances approach of Neretnieks, summarizing the formulation and giving numerical illustrations of the steady-state two-dimensional diffusion analysis. Section 4 gives a brief statement of the steady-state result from a related analysis. Conclusions are stated in Section 5. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Measurements of the transport efficiency of the fragment mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive calculations of the transport of reaction products were carried out during the design phase of the instrument using the computer code GIOS. These show that the energy acceptance depends strongly on the angular deviation from the optical axis of the instrument. In order to reliably measure cross sections using this instrument it is therefore necessary to verify these calculations empirically.

  11. Mass transfer and transport of radionuclides in fractured porous rock

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Joonhong

    1988-04-01

    Analytical studies are made to predict space-time dependent concentrations of radionuclides transported through water-saturated fractured porous rock. A basic model, which is expected to generate conservative results when used in long-term safety assessment of geologic repositories for radioactive waste, is established. Applicability and limitations of the model are investigated. 67 refs., 54 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Cable Connected Spinning Spacecraft, 1. the Canonical Equations, 2. Urban Mass Transportation, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitchin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Work on the dynamics of cable-connected spinning spacecraft was completed by formulating the equations of motion by both the canonical equations and Lagrange's equations and programming them for numerical solution on a digital computer. These energy-based formulations will permit future addition of the effect of cable mass. Comparative runs indicate that the canonical formulation requires less computer time. Available literature on urban mass transportation was surveyed. Areas of the private rapid transit concept of urban transportation are also studied.

  13. A kinetic model of inorganic phosphorus mass balance in hemodialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Gotch, Frank A; Panlilio, Froilan; Sergeyeva, Olga; Rosales, Laura; Folden, Tom; Kaysen, George; Levin, Nathan W

    2003-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inorganic phosphorus (iP) accumulation in tissues (dTiP/dt) is a risk factor for cardiac death in hemodialysis therapy (HD). The factors controlling iP mass balance in HD are dietary intake (GiP), removal by binders (JbiP) and removal by dialysis (JdiP). If iP accumulation is to be minimized, it will be necessary to regularly monitor and optimize GiP, JbiP and JdiP in individual patients. We have developed a kinetic model (iPKM) designed to monitor these three parameters of iP mass balance in individual patients and report here preliminary evaluation of the model in 23 HD patients. GiP was calculated from PCR measured with urea kinetics; JdiP was calculated from the product of dialyzer plasma water clearance (K(pwiP)) and time average plasma iP concentration (TACiP) and treatment time (t); a new iP concentration parameter (nTAC(iP), the TACiP normalized to predialysis CoiP) was devised and shown to be a highly predictable function of the form nTAC(iP) = 1 - alpha(1 - exp[-betaK(pwiP). t/ViP]), where the coefficients alpha and beta are calculated for each patient from 2 measure values for nTAC(iP), K(pwiP).t/ViP early and late in dialysis; we measured 8-10 serial values for nTAC(iP), K(pwiP). t/ViP over a single dialysis in 23 patients; the expression derived for iP mass balance is DeltaTiP = 12(PCR) - [K(pwiP)(t) (N/7)][CoiP(1 - alpha(1 - exp[-beta(Kt/ViP)]))] - k(b).Nb. Calculated nTAC(iP) = 1.01(measured nTAC(iP)), r = 0.98, n = 213; calculated JdiP = 0.66(measured total dialysate iP) + 358, n = 23, r = 0.88, p < 0.001. Evaluation of 10 daily HD patients (DD) and 13 3 times weekly patients with the model predicted the number of binders required very well and showed that the much higher binder requirement observed in these DD patients was due to much higher NPCR (1.3 vs. 0.96). These results are very encouraging that it may be possible to monitor the individual effects of diet, dialysis and binders in HD and thus optimize these

  14. Influence of Mass Transfer Kinetics on Interpretation of Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervin, R. E.; Boroumand, A.; Abriola, L. M.; Ramsburg, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    model containing a linear driving force expression to describe the tracer mass transfer. Mass transfer coefficients in all simulations were produced using available correlations for pool dissolution. Perfect knowledge of the DNAPL and permeability distributions, as well as relative permeability effects enabled the numerical model to better capture the asymmetry observed in the production curves. We then began to systematically simplify the numerical model to explore which assumptions associated with the analytical solution cause its poor performance. These assumptions include: uniform packing distribution, uniform DNAPL distribution, equilibrium partitioning, and no permeability reduction due to the presence of the DNAPL. Results suggest only limited degradation in model performance when the medium permeability and DNAPL saturation are assumed to be uniform, and relative permeability effects are neglected. In contrast, model performance was considerably poorer when mass transfer kinetics were neglected. These results highlight the importance of including mass transfer kinetics when characterizing local-scale DNAPL architecture.

  15. Structural design of a double-layered porous hydrogel for effective mass transport.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Hwang, Hyung Ju; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-03-01

    Mass transport in porous materials is universal in nature, and its worth attracts great attention in many engineering applications. Plant leaves, which work as natural hydraulic pumps for water uptake, have evolved to have the morphological structure for fast water transport to compensate large water loss by leaf transpiration. In this study, we tried to deduce the advantageous structural features of plant leaves for practical applications. Inspired by the tissue organization of the hydraulic pathways in plant leaves, analogous double-layered porous models were fabricated using agarose hydrogel. Solute transport through the hydrogel models with different thickness ratios of the two layers was experimentally observed. In addition, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis were carried out with varying porosity and thickness ratio to investigate the effect of structural factors on mass transport ability. A simple parametric study was also conducted to examine unveiled relations between structural factors. As a result, the porosity and thickness ratio of the two layers are found to govern the mass transport ability in double-layered porous materials. The hydrogel models with widely dispersed pores at a fixed porosity, i.e., close to a homogeneously porous structure, are mostly turned out to exhibit fast mass transport. The present results would provide a new framework for fundamental design of various porous structures for effective mass transport.

  16. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of acid tar waste from crude benzol refining: A thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Chihobo, Chido H; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Kuipa, Pardon K; Simbi, David J

    2016-12-01

    Pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical conversion technology that may be utilised as a safe disposal option for acid tar waste. The kinetics of acid tar pyrolysis were investigated using thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectrometry under a nitrogen atmosphere at different heating rates of 10, 15 and 20 K min(-1) The thermogravimetric analysis shows three major reaction peaks centred around 178 °C, 258 °C, and 336 °C corresponding to the successive degradation of water soluble lower molecular mass sulphonic acids, sulphonated high molecular mass hydrocarbons, and high molecular mass hydrocarbons. The kinetic parameters were evaluated using the iso-conversional Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method. A variation in the activation energy with conversion revealed that the pyrolysis of the acid tar waste progresses through complex multi-step kinetics. Mass spectrometry results revealed a predominance of gases such as hydrogen, methane and carbon monoxide, implying that the pyrolysis of acid tar waste is potentially an energy source. Thus the pyrolysis of acid tar waste may present a viable option for its environmental treatment. There are however, some limitations imposed by the co-evolution of corrosive gaseous components for which appropriate considerations must be provided in both pyrolysis reactor design and selection of construction materials. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate bacterium-substratum interactions, understanding of bacterial mass transport is necessary. Comparisons of experimentally observed initial deposition rates with mass transport rates in parallel-plate-flow-chambers (PPFC) predicted by convective-diffusion yielded deposition efficiencies above unity, despite electrostatic repulsion. It is hypothesized that sedimentation is the major mass transport mechanism in a PPFC. The contribution of sedimentation to the mass transport in a PPFC was experimentally investigated by introducing a novel microscopy-based method. First, height-dependent bacterial concentrations were measured at different times and flow rates and used to calculate bacterial sedimentation velocities. For Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600, a sedimentation velocity of 240 μm h(-1) was obtained. Therewith, sedimentation appeared as the predominant contribution to mass transport in a PPFC. Also in the current study, deposition efficiencies of S. aureus ATCC 12600 with respect to the Smoluchowski-Levich solution of the convective-diffusion equation were four-to-five fold higher than unity. However, calculation of deposition efficiencies with respect to sedimentation were below unity and decreased from 0.78 to 0.36 when flow rates increased from 0.017 to 0.33 cm(3) s(-1). The proposed analysis of bacterial mass transport processes is simple, does not require additional equipment and yields a more reasonable interpretation of bacterial deposition in a PPFC.

  18. Mass transport and electrode accessibility through periodic self-assembled nanoporous silica thin films.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chen; Hillhouse, Hugh W

    2007-05-08

    Ordered nanoporous silica films have attracted great interest for their potential use to template nanowires for photovoltaics and thermoelectrics. However, it is crucial to develop films such that an electrode under the nanoporous film is accessible to solution species via facile mass transport through well-defined pores. Here, we quantitatively measure the electrode accessibility and the effective species diffusivity for nearly all the known nanoporous silica film structures formed by evaporation-induced self-assembly upon dip-coating or spin-coating. Grazing-angle of incidence small-angle X-ray scattering was used to verify the nanoscale structure of the films and to ensure that all films were highly ordered and oriented. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was then used to assess the transport properties. A model has been developed that separates the electrode/film kinetics and the film transport properties from the film/solution interface and bulk solution effects. Accounting for this, the accessible area of the nanoporous film coated FTO electrode (1-theta) is obtained from the high-frequency data, while the effective diffusivity of the ferrocene dimethanol (D(FDM)) redox couple is obtained from intermediate frequencies. It was found that the degree of order and orientation in the film, in addition to the symmetry/topology, is a dominant factor that determines these two key parameters. The EIS data show that the (211) oriented double gyroid, (110) oriented distorted body center cubic, and (211) distorted primitive cubic silica films have significant accessibility (larger than 26% of geometric area). However, the double-gyroid films showed the highest diffusivity by over an order of magnitude. Both the (10) oriented 2D hexagonal and (111) oriented rhombohedral films were found to be highly blocking with only small accessibility due to microporosity. The impedance data were also collected to study the stability of the nanoporous silica films in aqueous

  19. Relationship between body fat mass and free fatty acid kinetics in men and women.

    PubMed

    Mittendorfer, Bettina; Magkos, Faidon; Fabbrini, Elisa; Mohammed, B Selma; Klein, Samuel

    2009-10-01

    An increased release of free fatty acids (FFAs) into plasma likely contributes to the metabolic complications associated with obesity. However, the relationship between body fat and FFA metabolism is unclear because of conflicting results from different studies. The goal of our study was to determine the inter-relationships between body fat, sex, and plasma FFA kinetics. We determined FFA rate of appearance (Ra) in plasma, by using stable isotopically labeled tracer techniques, during basal conditions in 106 lean, overweight, and obese, nondiabetic subjects (43 men and 63 women who had 7.0-56.0% body fat). Correlation analyses demonstrated: (i) no differences between men and women in the relationship between fat mass (FM) and total FFA Ra (micromol/min); (ii) total FFA Ra increased linearly with increasing FM (r=0.652, P<0.001); (iii) FFA Ra per kg FM decreased in a curvilinear fashion with increasing FM (r=-0.806; P<0.001); (iv) FFA Ra in relationship to fat-free mass (FFM) was greater in obese than lean subjects and greater in women than in men; and (v) abdominal fat itself was not an important determinant of total FFA Ra. We conclude that total body fat, not regional fat distribution or sex, is an important modulator of the rate of FFA release into plasma. Although increased adiposity is associated with a decrease in fatty acid release in relationship to FM, this downregulation is unable to completely compensate for the increase in FM, so total FFA Ra and FFA Ra with respect to FFM are greater in women than in men and in obese than in lean subjects.

  20. Smooth information flow in temperature climate network reflects mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2017-03-01

    A directed climate network is constructed by Granger causality analysis of air temperature time series from a regular grid covering the whole Earth. Using winner-takes-all network thresholding approach, a structure of a smooth information flow is revealed, hidden to previous studies. The relevance of this observation is confirmed by comparison with the air mass transfer defined by the wind field. Their close relation illustrates that although the information transferred due to the causal influence is not a physical quantity, the information transfer is tied to the transfer of mass and energy.

  1. Smooth information flow in temperature climate network reflects mass transport.

    PubMed

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2017-03-01

    A directed climate network is constructed by Granger causality analysis of air temperature time series from a regular grid covering the whole Earth. Using winner-takes-all network thresholding approach, a structure of a smooth information flow is revealed, hidden to previous studies. The relevance of this observation is confirmed by comparison with the air mass transfer defined by the wind field. Their close relation illustrates that although the information transferred due to the causal influence is not a physical quantity, the information transfer is tied to the transfer of mass and energy.

  2. A mechanistic modeling framework for gas-phase adsorption kinetics and fixed-bed transport

    DOE PAGES

    Ladshaw, Austin P.; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lin, Ronghong; ...

    2017-07-12

    Adsorption is a complex physicochemical process involving interparticle transport, interphase mass-transfer, intraparticle diffusion, and surface reactions. Although the exact description of the adsorption process will inevitably vary from system to system, it will always be governed by those primary mechanisms. Thus, by devising a model framework that can inherently include those mechanisms, it would be possible to create a modeling platform on which many different adsorption problems could be solved numerically. In order to accomplish this task, a generalized 1-D conservation law model was created to include the necessary mechanisms of adsorption on several different geometrical domains. Specific model applicationsmore » for adsorption were developed under that framework and validated using experimental data available in literature or obtained in this work. This modeling platform makes it easier to model various adsorption problems and develop new adsorption models because of the common treatment of the mathematics governing the physical processes.« less

  3. Shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for high temperature kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Tranter, Robert S; Giri, Binod R; Kiefer, John H

    2007-03-01

    A shock tube (ST) with online, time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection has been constructed for the study of elementary reactions at high temperature. The ST and TOF-MS are coupled by a differentially pumped molecular beam sampling interface, which ensures that the samples entering the TOF-MS are not contaminated by gases drawn from the cold end wall thermal boundary layer in the ST. Additionally, the interface allows a large range of postshock pressures to be used in the shock tube while maintaining high vacuum in the TOF-MS. The apparatus and the details of the sampling system are described along with an analysis in which cooling of the sampled gases and minimization of thermal boundary layer effects are discussed. The accuracy of kinetic measurements made with the apparatus has been tested by investigating the thermal unimolecular dissociation of cyclohexene to ethylene and 1,3-butadiene, a well characterized reaction for which considerable literature data that are in good agreement exist. The experiments were performed at nominal reflected shock wave pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr, and temperatures ranging from 1260 to 1430 K. The rate coefficients obtained are compared with the earlier shock tube studies and are found to be in very good agreement. As expected no significant difference is observed in the rate constant between pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr.

  4. Glucose kinetics and pregnancy outcome in Indian women with low and normal body mass indices.

    PubMed

    Dwarkanath, P; Kurpad, A V; Muthayya, S; Thomas, T; Mhaskar, A; Mhaskar, R; Thomas, A; Vaz, M; Jahoor, F

    2009-11-01

    Fetal energy demands are met from the oxidation of maternally supplied glucose and amino acids. During the fasted state, the glucose supply is thought to be met by gluconeogenesis. Underweight women with low body mass index (BMI) might be unable to adequately supply amino acids to satisfy the demands of gluconeogenesis. Glucose kinetics were measured during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy in 10 low-BMI and 10 normal-BMI pregnant women at the 12th hour of an overnight fast using a primed 6 h U-(13)C glucose infusion and was correlated to maternal dietary and anthropometric variables and birth weight. Low-BMI mothers consumed more energy, carbohydrates and protein, had faster glucose production (R (a)) and oxidation rates in the first trimester. In the same trimester, dietary energy and carbohydrate correlated with glucose production, glycogenolysis and glucose oxidation in all women. Both groups had similar rates of gluconeogenesis in the first and second trimesters. Glucose R (a) in the second trimester was weakly correlated with the birth weight (r=0.4, P=0.07). Maternal energy and carbohydrate intakes, not BMI, appear to influence glucose R (a) and oxidation in early and mid pregnancy.

  5. Mass Transport through Nanostructured Membranes: Towards a Predictive Tool

    PubMed Central

    Darvishmanesh, Siavash; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a new mechanism to understand the transport of solvents through nanostructured membranes from a fundamental point of view. The findings are used to develop readily applicable mathematical models to predict solvent fluxes and solute rejections through solvent resistant membranes used for nanofiltration. The new model was developed based on a pore-flow type of transport. New parameters found to be of fundamental importance were introduced to the equation, i.e., the affinity of the solute and the solvent for the membrane expressed as the hydrogen-bonding contribution of the solubility parameter for the solute, solvent and membrane. A graphical map was constructed to predict the solute rejection based on the hydrogen-bonding contribution of the solubility parameter. The model was evaluated with performance data from the literature. Both the solvent flux and the solute rejection calculated with the new approach were similar to values reported in the literature. PMID:27918434

  6. Universality of Poisson indicator and Fano factor of transport event statistics in ion channels and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cao, Jianshu; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A

    2013-01-17

    We consider a generic stochastic model of ion transport through a single channel with arbitrary internal structure and kinetic rates of transitions between internal states. This model is also applicable to describe kinetics of a class of enzymes in which turnover events correspond to conversion of substrate into product by a single enzyme molecule. We show that measurement of statistics of single molecule transition time through the channel contains only restricted information about internal structure of the channel. In particular, the most accessible flux fluctuation characteristics, such as the Poisson indicator (P) and the Fano factor (F) as function of solute concentration, depend only on three parameters in addition to the parameters of the Michaelis-Menten curve that characterizes average current through the channel. Nevertheless, measurement of Poisson indicator or Fano factor for such renewal processes can discriminate reactions with multiple intermediate steps as well as provide valuable information about the internal kinetic rates.

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo Model of Charge Transport in Hematite (α-Fe2O3)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2007-09-28

    The mobility of electrons injected into iron oxide minerals via abiotic and biotic electron-transfer processes is one of the key factors that control the reductive dissolution of such minerals. Building upon our previous work on the computational modeling of elementary electron transfer reactions in iron oxide minerals using ab initio electronic structure calculations and parameterized molecular dynamics simulations, we have developed and implemented a kinetic Monte Carlo model of charge transport in hematite that integrates previous findings. The model aims to simulate the interplay between electron transfer processes for extended periods of time in lattices of increasing complexity. The electron transfer reactions considered here involve the II/III valence interchange between nearest-neighbor iron atoms via a small polaron hopping mechanism. The temperature dependence and anisotropic behavior of the electrical conductivity as predicted by our model are in good agreement with experimental data on hematite single crystals. In addition, we characterize the effect of electron polaron concentration and that of a range of defects on the electron mobility. Interaction potentials between electron polarons and fixed defects (iron substitution by divalent, tetravalent, and isovalent ions and iron and oxygen vacancies) are determined from atomistic simulations, based on the same model used to derive the electron transfer parameters, and show little deviation from the Coulombic interaction energy. Integration of the interaction potentials in the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations allows the electron polaron diffusion coefficient and density and residence time around defect sites to be determined as a function of polaron concentration in the presence of repulsive and attractive defects. The decrease in diffusion coefficient with polaron concentration follows a logarithmic function up to the highest concentration considered, i.e., ~2% of iron(III) sites, whereas the presence of

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo model of charge transport in hematite (α-Fe2O3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2007-09-01

    The mobility of electrons injected into iron oxide minerals via abiotic and biotic electron transfer processes is one of the key factors that control the reductive dissolution of such minerals. Building upon our previous work on the computational modeling of elementary electron transfer reactions in iron oxide minerals using ab initio electronic structure calculations and parametrized molecular dynamics simulations, we have developed and implemented a kinetic Monte Carlo model of charge transport in hematite that integrates previous findings. The model aims to simulate the interplay between electron transfer processes for extended periods of time in lattices of increasing complexity. The electron transfer reactions considered here involve the II/III valence interchange between nearest-neighbor iron atoms via a small polaron hopping mechanism. The temperature dependence and anisotropic behavior of the electrical conductivity as predicted by our model are in good agreement with experimental data on hematite single crystals. In addition, we characterize the effect of electron polaron concentration and that of a range of defects on the electron mobility. Interaction potentials between electron polarons and fixed defects (iron substitution by divalent, tetravalent, and isovalent ions and iron and oxygen vacancies) are determined from atomistic simulations, based on the same model used to derive the electron transfer parameters, and show little deviation from the Coulombic interaction energy. Integration of the interaction potentials in the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations allows the electron polaron diffusion coefficient and density and residence time around defect sites to be determined as a function of polaron concentration in the presence of repulsive and attractive defects. The decrease in diffusion coefficient with polaron concentration follows a logarithmic function up to the highest concentration considered, i.e., ˜2% of iron(III) sites, whereas the presence of

  9. Managerial Resources and Personnel Practices in Urban Mass Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundy, Ray A.; Spychalski, John C.

    The primary purpose of this project was to identify and evaluate policies, practices, and other conditions relating to the supply of managerial personnel in the urban mass transit industry. The study, conducted during 1972-1973, sought to provide information concerning the following: an inventory of management, technical, and supervisory personnel…

  10. Identification and characterization of EX1 kinetics in H/D exchange mass spectrometry by peak width analysis.

    PubMed

    Weis, David D; Wales, Thomas E; Engen, John R; Hotchko, Matthew; Ten Eyck, Lynn F

    2006-11-01

    Proteins that undergo cooperative unfolding events display EX1 kinetic signatures in hydrogen exchange mass spectra. The hallmark bimodal isotope pattern observed for EX1 kinetics is distinct from the binomial isotope pattern for uncorrelated exchange (EX2), the normal exchange regime for folded proteins. Detection and characterization of EX1 kinetics is simple when the cooperative unit is large enough that the isotopic envelopes in the bimodal pattern are resolved in the m/z scale but become complicated in cases where the unit is small or there is a mixture of EX1 and EX2 kinetics. Here we describe a data interpretation method involving peak width analysis that makes characterization of EX1 kinetics simple and rapid. The theoretical basis for EX1 and EX2 isotopic signatures and the effects each have on peak width are described. Modeling of EX2 widening and analysis of empirical data for proteins and peptides containing purely EX2 kinetics showed that the amount of widening attributable to stochastic forward- and back exchange in a typical experiment is small and can be quantified. Proteins and peptides with both obvious and less obvious EX1 kinetics were analyzed with the peak width method. Such analyses provide the half-life for the cooperative unfolding event and the relative number of residues involved. Automated analysis of peak width was performed with custom Excel macros and the DEX software package. Peak width analysis is robust, capable of automation, and provides quick interpretation of the key information contained in EX1 kinetic events.

  11. Mechanism and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers by C. J. Barrett, A. Natansohn, and P. Rochon Submitted for publication in...DATE June 23, 1998 Tprhnjr.fil P^nnr I’: 4. TITLE AHO SU3TITLE Mechanism and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers...TRANSPORT IN THIN FILMS OF AZO POLYMERS Christopher J. Barrett’, Almeria L. Natansohn1, and Paul L. Rochon2. ’Dept. of Chemistry. Queen’s

  12. Mass spectrometer. [On Space Transportation System 2 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.; Carignan, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM) operates in the range from 2 to 150 amu. It is pointed out that the Mass Spectrometer on STS-2 performed very well. It was found that the column density of H2O effluent from the Shuttle reached a maximum of 1 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm at 7 hr, 30 min and decreased by a factor of 7.5 during the subsequent 40 hrs. The count rate response of H2O could be correlated with mission-related events, taking into account the dumping of supply water, the operation of the Flash Evaporator System, and the firing of a primary reaction control system engine.

  13. Mass spectrometer. [On Space Transportation System 2 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.; Carignan, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM) operates in the range from 2 to 150 amu. It is pointed out that the Mass Spectrometer on STS-2 performed very well. It was found that the column density of H2O effluent from the Shuttle reached a maximum of 1 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm at 7 hr, 30 min and decreased by a factor of 7.5 during the subsequent 40 hrs. The count rate response of H2O could be correlated with mission-related events, taking into account the dumping of supply water, the operation of the Flash Evaporator System, and the firing of a primary reaction control system engine.

  14. Mass and Momentum Transport Experiments with Swirling Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Roback, R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of mixing downstream of axial and swirling coaxial jets is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently employed in a variety of computational procedures used throughout the propulsion community. The axial coaxial jet study was completed under Phase 1. The swirling coaxial jet study, which is the subject of this paper, was conducted under Phase 2 of the contract. A TEACH code was acquired, checked out for several test cases, and is reported. A study to measure length scales and to obtain a limited number of measurements with a blunt trailing edge inlet is being conducted under Phase 3 of the contract.

  15. An analysis of three dimensional diffusion in a representative arterial wall mass transport model.

    PubMed

    Denny, William J; O'Connell, Barry M; Milroy, John; Walsh, Michael T

    2013-05-01

    The development and use of drug eluting stents has brought about significant improvements in reducing in-stent restenosis, however, their long term presence in the artery is still under examination due to restenosis reoccurring. Current studies focus mainly on stent design, coatings and deployment techniques but few studies address the issue of the physics of three dimensional mass transport in the artery wall. There is a dearth of adequate validated numerical mass transport models that simulate the physics of diffusion dominated drug transport in the artery wall whilst under compression. A novel experimental setup used in a previous study was adapted and an expansion of that research was carried out to validate the physics of three dimensional diffusive mass transport into a compressed porous media. This study developed a more sensitive method for measuring the concentration of the species of interest. It revalidated mass transport in the radial direction and presented results which highlight the need for an evaluation of the governing equation for transient diffusive mass transport in a porous media, in its current form, to be carried out.

  16. Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Qafoku, Odeta

    2004-07-01

    Millions of liters of high temperature, Al-rich, alkaline, and saline high-level waste (HLW) fluids were accidentally discharged onto the sediments at the Hanford Site, WA. Dissolution and precipitation are two processes that might occur when these fluids contact the sediments, but their occurrence and extent are not well studied under such extreme conditions. The objective, therefore, was to investigate the effects of geochemically stable, Al-rich, alkaline and saline solutions on the extent of soil mineral dissolution and precipitation during reactive transport through the sediments. Metal- and glass-free systems were used to conduct miscible-displacement experiments at 50 C under CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} free conditions. Results showed that soil liquid phase composition changed significantly because of base-induced soil mineral dissolution and the subsequent releases of Si, K, Al, Fe(III), Fe(II), Ca, Mg, and Ba, into the aqueous phase. Transport-controlled release of these elements was time-dependent as evidenced by its extent varying with the fluid residence time. Initial dissolution rates calculated based on Si release in the column effluents in the second pore volume (PV) varied between 6.085 x 10{sup -11} and 5.377 x 10{sup -13} mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. They increased with base concentration and decreased with Al concentration in the leaching solution and the fluid residence time. Al precipitation rates (normalized to 1 kg of solution) varied in the range 0.4374 x 10{sup -6} ({+-} 0.019 x 10{sup -6}) and 1.069 x 10{sup -6} ({+-} 0.278 x 10{sup -6}) mol s{sup -1}. Al precipitation followed a first-order kinetics with an initial rate constant of 0.0701 h{sup -1} (half-life of 9.9 h at about 3 PV), which increased to 0.13706 h{sup -1} (half-life of 5.1 h at about 20 PV). The precipitates identified with SEM and confirmed from the modeling results, were mainly NO{sub 3}-cancrinite. NO{sub 3}-sodalite formation in the presence of high OH concentrations and

  17. Sulfate transport kinetics and toxicity are modulated by sodium in aquatic insects.

    PubMed

    Scheibener, Shane; Conley, Justin M; Buchwalter, David

    2017-09-01

    The salinization of freshwater ecosystems is emerging as a major ecological issue. Several anthropogenic causes of salinization (e.g. surface coal mining, hydro-fracking, road de-icing, irrigation of arid lands, etc.) are associated with biodiversity losses in freshwater ecosystems. Because insects tend to dominate freshwater ecology, it is important that we develop a better understanding of how and why different species respond to salinity matrices dominated by different major ions. This study builds upon previous work demonstrating that major ion toxicity to the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer was apparently due to the ionic composition of water rather than specific conductance. Synthetic waters with low Ca:Mg ratios and high SO4:Na ratios produced toxicity, whereas waters with higher Ca:Mg ratios and lower SO4:Na ratios were not toxic to mayflies at comparable conductivities. Here we used a radiotracer approach to show that Mg did not competitively exclude Ca uptake at environmentally realistic ratios in 4 aquatic insect species. We characterized SO4 uptake kinetics in 5 mayflies and assessed the influence of different ions on SO4 uptake. Dual label experiments show an inverse relationship between SO4 and Na transport rates as SO4 was held constant and Na was increased, suggesting that Na (and not Cl or HCO3) is antagonistic to SO4 transport. Based on this observation, we tested the hypothesis that increasing Na would protect against SO4 induced toxicity in a Na-dependent manner. Increasing Na from 0.7 to 10.9mM improved 96-h survivorship associated with 20.8mM SO4 from 44% to 73% in a concentration dependent manner. However, when Na reached 21.8mM, survivorship decreased to 16%, suggesting that other interactive effects of major ions caused toxicity under those conditions. Thus, the combination of elevated sulfate and low sodium commonly observed in streams affected by mountaintop coal mining has the potential to cause toxicity in sensitive aquatic insects

  18. Kinetics of methionine transport and metabolism by Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, B; Rattendi, D; Lloyd, D; Yarlett, N; Bacchi, C J

    2000-05-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms; however, little is known concerning its utilization in African trypanosomes, protozoa of the Trypanosoma brucei group. This study explored the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants for transport and pool formation as well as metabolic utilization of methionine by two divergent strains of African trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei brucei (a veterinary pathogen), highly sensitive to trypanocidal agents, and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (a human pathogenic isolate), highly refractory to trypanocidal arsenicals. The Michaelis-Menten constants derived by Hanes-Woolf analysis for transport of methionine for T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, respectively, were as follows: K(M) values, 1. 15 and 1.75 mM; V(max) values, 3.97 x 10(-5) and 4.86 x 10(-5) mol/L/min. Very similar values were obtained by Lineweaver-Burk analysis (K(M), 0.25 and 1.0 mM; V(max), 1 x 10(-5) and 2.0 x 10(-5) mol/L/min, T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, respectively). Cooperativity analyses by Hill (log-log) plot gave Hill coefficients (n) of 6 and 2 for T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, respectively. Cytosolic accumulation of methionine after 10-min incubation with 25 mM exogenous methionine was 1.8-fold greater in T. b. rhodesiense than T. b. brucei (2.1 vs 1.1 mM, respectively). In African trypanosomes as in their mammalian host, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is the major product of methionine metabolism. Accumulation of AdoMet was measured by HPLC analysis of cytosolic extracts incubated in the presence of increasing cytosolic methionine. In trypanosomes incubated for 10 min with saturating methionine, both organisms accumulated similar amounts of AdoMet (approximately 23 microM), but the level of trans-sulfuration products (cystathionine and cysteine) in T. b. rhodesiense was double that of T. b. brucei. Methionine incorporation during protein synthesis in T. b. brucei was 2.5 times that of T. b. rhodesiense

  19. Comparison of gradient and flux driven gyro-kinetic turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, F.; Peeters, A. G.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Migliano, P.; Weikl, A.; Strintzi, D.

    2016-05-01

    Flux and gradient driven ion temperature gradient turbulence in tokamak geometry and for Cyclone base case parameters are compared in the local limit using the same underlying gyro-kinetic turbulence model. The gradient driven turbulence described using the flux tube model with periodic boundary conditions has a finite ion heat flux Qi≈10 n0T0ρ*2vth , where n0 (T0) is the background density (temperature), ρ*=ρ/R is the normalized Larmor radius, R is the major radius of the device, and vth is the ion thermal velocity at the nonlinear threshold of the temperature gradient length for turbulence generation. Consequently, the gradient driven local transport model is unable to accurately describe heat fluxes below Qi<10 n0T0ρ*2vt h , since no stationary fully developed turbulent state can be obtained. The turbulence in the flux driven case shows intermittent behaviour and avalanches for Qi<10 n0T0ρ*2vth . Isolated avalanches disappear for Qi>10 n0T0ρ*2vt h , and at higher heat fluxes, the statistics of the turbulence is the same for the flux and gradient driven case. The nonlinear upshift of the temperature gradient length threshold for turbulence generation (known as the Dimits shift) is larger in the case of flux driven turbulence. This higher nonlinear upshift is attributed to the generation of structures in the radial temperature profile, known as staircases [Dif-Pradalier, Phys. Rev. E 82, 025401 (2010)]. Avalanches are initiated at specific locations and have roughly the same radial extent of 50-70 ion Larmor radii. The staircases are obtained at low heating rates, and become unstable and break up at higher heating rates. At the heat fluxes for which staircase formation is observed, no stationary gradient driven simulations can be obtained.

  20. Mass yields and kinetic energy of fragments from fission of highly-excited nuclei with A≲220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Margitych, T. O.; Sedykh, I. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the potential energy surface of the two separated fragments has the saddle point, which takes place at small distance between the surfaces of well-deformed fragments. The height of this two-body saddle point is larger than the height of one-body fission barrier for nuclei with A ≲ 220. The mass yields of the fission fragments, which are appearing at the fission of nuclei with A ≲ 220, are related to the number of states of the two-fragment systems at the two-body saddle points. The characteristics of kinetic energy of fragments are described by using the trajectory motion equations with the dissipation terms. The Gaussian distribution of the final kinetic energy around the classical value of this energy induced by the stochastic fluctuations is taken into account at an evaluation of the total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments.

  1. A Global Assessment of Accelerations in Mass Transport of Surface Geophysical Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Heflin, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mass transport in the Earth's surface geophysical fluid layer has complex spatiotemporal patterns. The GRACE gravity mission provides an unprecedented global capability to monitor this important process with high accuracy and resolution. Accurate assessments of global mass transport patterns and budget also depend critically on changes in degree-1 coefficients (geocenter motion) and in Earth's dynamic oblateness coefficient J2. We combine GRACE measurements, time series of GNSS data, JPL's ECCO ocean bottom pressure model, and high-resolution loose a priori models of mass variation regimes to derive complete spherical harmonic spectra of detrended mass variations up to degree and order 180. Mass accelerations are estimated along with linear, annual, semiannual, and the 161-day tidal aliasing components from coefficient time series. The appropriateness of a priori information and estimate uncertainties are further evaluated by variance component estimation and residual statistics of fitting the time series. During the GRACE data period of 2002.2-2015.0, accelerations in mass transport are geographically uneven with significant positive or negative accelerations in various parts of the world. While Greenland and West Antarctica show strong accelerated mass losses, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean have significant positive accelerations with reversals of earlier mass loss trends. No evidence of non-Arctic global mean sea level acceleration due to mass has been found. Depending on region, some estimated accelerations are also not steady over time due to large irregular and interannual variations.

  2. Systematic characterization of porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Fu; Barrera, Carlos M; Dauer, Edward A; Gu, Weiyong; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Huang, C-Y Charles

    2017-01-01

    One of the key challenges in porous scaffold design is to create a porous structure with desired mechanical function and mass transport properties which support delivery of biofactors and development of function tissue substitute. In recent years, polyurethane (PU) has become one of the most popular biomaterials in various tissue engineering fields. However, there are no studies fully investigating the relations between porosity and both mass transport and mechanical properties of PU porous scaffolds. In this paper, we fabricated PU scaffolds by combining phase inversion and salt (sodium chloride) leaching methods. The tensile and compressive moduli were examined on PU scaffolds fabricated with different PU concentrations (25%, 20% and 15% w/v) and salt/PU weight ratios (9/1, 6/1, 3/1 and 0/1). The mass transport properties of PU scaffolds including hydraulic permeability and glucose diffusivity were also measured. Furthermore, the relationships between the porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold were systemically investigated. The results demonstrated that porosity is a key parameter which governs both mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffolds. With similar pore sizes, the mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold can be described as single functions of porosity regardless of initial PU concentration. The relationships between scaffold porosity and properties can be utilized to facilitate porous PU scaffold fabrication with specific mass transport and mechanical properties. The systematic approach established in this study can be applied to characterization of other biomaterials for scaffold design and fabrication.

  3. Prediction of kinetics and kinematics of running animals using an analytical approximation to the planar spring-mass system.

    PubMed

    Robilliard, Justine J; Wilson, Alan M

    2005-12-01

    The spring-mass model is often used to describe bouncing gaits. Although at first inspection the mechanical system appears simple, the solution to the motion cannot be derived easily. An analytical solution would provide a fast and intuitive method to determine the kinetic and kinematics of the centre of mass of terrestrial animals during over-ground steady state locomotion. Here, an analytical approximation using sine wave simplifications for the motion is presented. The analytical solution was almost indistinguishable from the numerical solution across initial leg angles of 17.5-30 degrees ; percentage differences between the analytical solution and the numerical solution were less than 1% for total mechanical energy, centre of mass position, total limb compression and centre of mass velocity and less than 2% different for resultant limb force and vertical acceleration of the centre of mass. The solution matched the relationship between stance time and speed collected from a trotting racehorse and accurately characterised previously published biological data. This study has shown that a simple analytical solution can predict the kinetics and kinematics of a spring-mass system over the range of biologically relevant sweep angles and horizontal velocities, and could be used to further understanding of limb deployment and gait selection. Using this analytical solution not only the force profile but also the changes in mechanical energy can be calculated from easily observed morphological and kinematic data.

  4. Lipid-assisted protein transport: A diffusion-reaction model supported by kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Carmelo; Scalisi, Silvia; Lolicato, Fabio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    The protein transport inside a cell is a complex phenomenon that goes through several difficult steps. The facilitated transport requires sophisticated machineries involving protein assemblies. In this work, we developed a diffusion-reaction model to simulate co-transport kinetics of proteins and lipids. We assume the following: (a) there is always a small lipid concentration of order of the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) in equilibrium with the membrane; (b) the binding of lipids to proteins modulates the hydrophobicity of the complexes and, therefore, their ability to interact and merge with the bilayer; and (c) some lipids leave the bilayer to replenish those bound to proteins. The model leads to a pair of integral equations for the time-evolution of the adsorbed proteins in the lipid bilayer. Relationships between transport kinetics, CMC, and lipid-protein binding constants were found. Under particular conditions, a perturbation analysis suggests the onset of kinks in the protein adsorption kinetics. To validate our model, we performed leakage measurements of vesicles composed by either high or low CMC lipids interacting with Islet Amyloid PolyPeptide (IAPP) and Aβ (1-40) used as sample proteins. Since the lipid-protein complex stoichiometry is not easily accessible, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using monomeric IAPP interacting with an increasing number of phospholipids. Main results are the following: (a) 1:1 lipid-protein complexes generally show a faster insertion rate proportional to the complex hydrophobicity and inversely related to lipid CMC; (b) on increasing the number of bound lipids, the protein insertion rate decreases; and (c) at slow lipids desorption rate, the lipid-assisted proteins transport might exhibit a discontinuous behavior and does non-linearly depend on protein concentration.

  5. Lipid-assisted protein transport: A diffusion-reaction model supported by kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, Carmelo; Scalisi, Silvia; Lolicato, Fabio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The protein transport inside a cell is a complex phenomenon that goes through several difficult steps. The facilitated transport requires sophisticated machineries involving protein assemblies. In this work, we developed a diffusion-reaction model to simulate co-transport kinetics of proteins and lipids. We assume the following: (a) there is always a small lipid concentration of order of the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) in equilibrium with the membrane; (b) the binding of lipids to proteins modulates the hydrophobicity of the complexes and, therefore, their ability to interact and merge with the bilayer; and (c) some lipids leave the bilayer to replenish those bound to proteins. The model leads to a pair of integral equations for the time-evolution of the adsorbed proteins in the lipid bilayer. Relationships between transport kinetics, CMC, and lipid-protein binding constants were found. Under particular conditions, a perturbation analysis suggests the onset of kinks in the protein adsorption kinetics. To validate our model, we performed leakage measurements of vesicles composed by either high or low CMC lipids interacting with Islet Amyloid PolyPeptide (IAPP) and Aβ (1-40) used as sample proteins. Since the lipid-protein complex stoichiometry is not easily accessible, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using monomeric IAPP interacting with an increasing number of phospholipids. Main results are the following: (a) 1:1 lipid-protein complexes generally show a faster insertion rate proportional to the complex hydrophobicity and inversely related to lipid CMC; (b) on increasing the number of bound lipids, the protein insertion rate decreases; and (c) at slow lipids desorption rate, the lipid-assisted proteins transport might exhibit a discontinuous behavior and does non-linearly depend on protein concentration.

  6. Heat- and mass-transport in aqueous silica nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turanov, A. N.; Tolmachev, Yuriy V.

    2009-10-01

    Using the transient hot wire and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods we determined the thermal conductivity and the solvent self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) in aqueous suspensions of quasi-monodisperse spherical silica nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity was found to increase at higher volume fraction of nanoparticles in accordance with the effective medium theory albeit with a smaller slope. On the other hand, the SDC was found to decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction faster than predicted by the effective medium theory. These deviations can be explained by the presence of an interfacial heat-transfer resistance and water retention by the nanoparticles, respectively. We found no evidence for anomalous enhancement in the transport properties of nanofluids reported earlier by other groups.

  7. Bacterial deposition in a parallel plate and a stagnation point flow chamber: microbial adhesion mechanisms depend on the mass transport conditions.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Dewi P; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2002-02-01

    Deposition onto glass in a parallel plate (PP) and in a stagnation point (SP) flow chamber of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica, suspended in artificial seawater, was compared in order to determine the influence of methodology on bacterial adhesion mechanisms. The three strains had different cell surface hydrophobicities, with water contact angles on bacterial lawns ranging from 18 to 85 degrees. Bacterial zeta potentials in artificial seawater were essentially zero. The three strains showed different adhesion kinetics and the hydrophilic bacterium H. pacifica had the greatest affinity for hydrophilic glass. On average, initial deposition rates were two- to threefold higher in the SP than in the PP flow chamber, possibly due to the convective fluid flow toward the substratum surface in the SP flow chamber causing more intimate contact between a substratum and a bacterial cell surface than the gentle collisions in the PP flow chamber. The ratios between the experimental deposition rates and theoretically calculated deposition rates based on mass transport equations not only differed among the strains, but were also different for the two flow chambers, indicating different mechanisms under the two modes of mass transport. The efficiencies of deposition were higher in the SP flow chamber than in the PP flow chamber: 62+/-4 and 114+/-28% respectively. Experiments in the SP flow chamber were more reproducible than those in the PP flow chamber, with standard deviations over triplicate runs of 8% in the SP and 23% in the PP flow chamber. This is probably due to better-controlled convective mass transport in the SP flow chamber, as compared with the diffusion-controlled mass transport in the PP flow chamber. In conclusion, this study shows that bacterial adhesion mechanisms depend on the prevailing mass transport conditions in the experimental set-up used, which makes it essential in the design of experiments that a methodology is

  8. Mechanism and kinetics of halogenated compound removal by metallic iron: Transport in solution, diffusion and reduction within corrosion films.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Liu, Shi-Ting; Yang, Hong-Wei; Xie, Yuefeng F; Yang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-03-06

    A detailed kinetic model comprised of mass transport (ktra), pore diffusion (kdif), adsorption and reduction reaction (krea), was developed to quantitatively evaluate the effect of corrosion films on the removal rate (kobs) of halogenated compounds by metallic iron. Different corrosion conditions were controlled by adjusting the iron aging time (0 or 1 yr) and dissolved oxygen concentration (0-7.09 mg/L DO). The kobs values for bromate, mono-, di- and tri-chloroacetic acids (BrO3(-), MCAA, DCAA and TCAA) were 0.41-7.06, 0-0.16, 0.01-0.53, 0.10-0.73 h(-1), with ktra values at 13.32, 12.12, 11.04 and 10.20 h(-1), kdif values at 0.42-5.82, 0.36-5.04, 0.30-4.50, 0.30-3.90 h(-1), and krea values at 14.94-421.18, 0-0.19, 0.01-1.30, 0.10-3.98 h(-1), respectively. The variation of kobs value with reaction conditions depended on the reactant species, while those of ktra, kdif and krea values were irrelevant to the species. The effects of corrosion films on kdif and krea values were responsible for the variation of kobs value for halogenated compounds. For a mass-transfer-limited halogenated compound such as BrO3(-), an often-neglected kdif value primarily determined its kobs value when pore diffusion was the rate-limiting step of its removal. In addition, the value of kdif might influence product composition during a consecutive dechlorination, such as for TCAA and DCAA. For a reaction-controlled compound such as MCAA, an increased krea value was achieved under low oxic conditions, which was favorable to improve its kobs value. The proposed model has a potential in predicting the removal rate of halogenated compounds by metallic iron under various conditions.

  9. Transport in the interplanetary medium of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgazzi, A.; Lara, A.; Romero-Salazar, L.; Ventura, A.

    2008-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale structures of plasma and magnetic field expelled from the Sun to the interplanetary medium and generally observed in white light coronagraphs. During their travel, in the interplanetary medium these structures named interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), suffer acceleration or deceleration due to the interaction with the ambient solar wind. This process can be understood as a transference of momentum between the interplanetary CME (ICME) and the solar wind. This process seems to be fundamentally different for `slow' and `fast' ICMEs (compared with the ambient solar wind velocity). In this work, we approach the problem from the fluid dynamics point of view and consider the ICMEs - solar wind system as two interacting fluids under the action of viscous forces. We note that this interaction is a special case of interaction between low density plasmas. Using these viscous forces in the Newtons Second Law, we obtained an analytical solution for the ICME velocity as a function of time. By comparing our analytic results with empirical models found in recent literature, we suggested values for the viscosity and drag parameters in this system. In this first approximation we have neglected the magnetic field.

  10. Modeling Transport of Secondary Ion Fragments into a Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmenhoven, J.; Demarche, J.; Palitsin, V.; Kirkby, K. J.; Webb, R. P.

    The Surrey Ion Beam Centre was awarded the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) grant for "Promoting Cross Disciplinary Research: Engineering and Physical Sciences and Social Sciences" allowing continued research into the characteristics of desorption of secondary ions by the impact of fast primary ions in the ambient pressure at the sub-micron scale. To carry out this research a new beamline has been constructed consisting of a time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer combined with the current 2MV Tandem accelerator. This research has already returned many significant results such as the first simultaneous SIMS, PIXE and RBS measurement preformed on an organic sample in vacuum. However, further optimization and validation of the new beamline is still being worked on. This work focuses on the optimization of the end station geometry to allow for high sensitivity ambient pressure measurements. It is concluded that a common geometry can be adopted for a wide variety of smooth samples to ensure optimum sensitivity provided a hard edge of the sample can be found to place the mass spectrometer capillary near.