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Sample records for kinetics parameters variations

  1. Kinetic parameters and structural variations in Cu-Al-Mn and Cu-Al-Mn-Mg shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canbay, Canan Aksu

    2017-02-01

    In this work polycrystalline Cu-Al-Mn and Cu-Al-Mn-Mg SMAs were fabricated by arc melting. The thermal analysis was made to determine the characteristic transformation temperatures of the samples and kinetic parameters. Also the effect of Mg on transformation temperatures and kinetic parameters detected. The structural analysis was made to designate the diffraction planes of martensite phase at room temperature and this was supported by optical measurement observations.

  2. Non-Isothermic Chemical Kinetics in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Arrhenius Parameters from Experiments with Hyperbolic Temperature Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvador, F.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a method which adapts itself to the characteristics of the kinetics of a chemical reaction in solution, enabling students to determine the Arrhenius parameters with satisfactory accuracy by means of a single non-isothermic experiment. Both activation energy and the preexponential factor values can be obtained by the method. (JN)

  3. Variational Approach to Molecular Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Nüske, Feliks; Keller, Bettina G; Pérez-Hernández, Guillermo; Mey, Antonia S J S; Noé, Frank

    2014-04-08

    The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the molecular dynamics propagator (or transfer operator) contain the essential information about the molecular thermodynamics and kinetics. This includes the stationary distribution, the metastable states, and state-to-state transition rates. Here, we present a variational approach for computing these dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors. This approach is analogous to the variational approach used for computing stationary states in quantum mechanics. A corresponding method of linear variation is formulated. It is shown that the matrices needed for the linear variation method are correlation matrices that can be estimated from simple MD simulations for a given basis set. The method proposed here is thus to first define a basis set able to capture the relevant conformational transitions, then compute the respective correlation matrices, and then to compute their dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors, thus obtaining the key ingredients of the slow kinetics.

  4. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  5. Determination of kinetic parameters for biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, A; Pizarro, C; García, R; Bueno, J L; Lavín, A G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a wide database of kinetic data for the most common biomass by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Due to the characteristic parameters of DTG curves, a two-stage reaction model is proposed and the kinetic parameters obtained from model-based methods with energy activation values for first and second stages in the range 1.75·10(4)-1.55·10(5)J/mol and 1.62·10(4)-2.37·10(5)J/mol, respectively. However, it has been found that Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose model-free methods are not suitable to determine the kinetic parameters of biomass combustion since the assumptions of these two methods were not accomplished in the full range of the combustion process.

  6. Kinetic parameters for source driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.; D'Angelo, A.

    2006-07-01

    The definition of the characteristic kinetic parameters of a subcritical source-driven system constitutes an interesting problem in reactor physics with important consequences for practical applications. Consistent and physically meaningful values of the parameters allow to obtain accurate results from kinetic simulation tools and to correctly interpret kinetic experiments. For subcritical systems a preliminary problem arises for the adoption of a suitable weighting function to be used in the projection procedure to derive a point model. The present work illustrates a consistent factorization-projection procedure which leads to the definition of the kinetic parameters in a straightforward manner. The reactivity term is introduced coherently with the generalized perturbation theory applied to the source multiplication factor ks, which is thus given a physical role in the kinetic model. The effective prompt lifetime is introduced on the assumption that a neutron generation can be initiated by both the fission process and the source emission. Results are presented for simplified configurations to fully comprehend the physical features and for a more complicated highly decoupled system treated in transport theory. (authors)

  7. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  8. Seasonal variations of haematological parameters in athletes.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lundby, Carsten; Robach, Paul; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The influence of training and competition workloads is crucial for evaluation of longitudinal haematological data in athletes. There are only a few papers on the variation of haematological parameters during long-lasting periods and, especially, during an entire competitive season. We summarized that some haematological parameters can be influenced by long-term training and competition periods. Haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Ht) are decreased during the more intense periods of training, throughout the season. In different sport disciplines, the decline of Hb ranges from 3 to 8% during the competition season, while the range of reticulocytes (Ret%) varies from 5 to 21%. Reticulocytes are also decreased after long periods of training and competitions, but their variation is not necessarily associated with that of Hb. The qualitative variations (trend of modifications) of haematological parameters are roughly independent of the sport discipline, but quantitatively (amount of modifications) dependent on sport discipline. The modifications are more evident in cycling, running, swimming than they are in football and rugby. The variations of haematological parameters within the same sport discipline are qualitatively concordant and quantitatively different among separate but consecutive competitive seasons. These findings are described in aerobic and team sports sportsmen. The definition of reliable reference ranges in sportsmen would only be possible by following the best laboratory practices. For antidoping purposes more studies investigating haematological modifications during the season are advisable.

  9. Obtaining and estimating kinetic parameters from the literature.

    PubMed

    Neves, Susana R

    2011-09-13

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a student assignment for a lecture on strategies for the development of mathematical models. Many biological processes can be represented mathematically as systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Simulations with these mathematical models can provide mechanistic insight into the underlying biology of the system. A prerequisite for running simulations, however, is the identification of kinetic parameters that correspond closely with the biological reality. This lecture presents an overview of the steps required for the development of kinetic ODE models and describes experimental methods that can yield kinetic parameters and concentrations of reactants, which are essential for the development of kinetic models. Strategies are provided to extract necessary parameters from published data. The homework assignment requires students to find parameters appropriate for a well-studied biological regulatory system, convert these parameters into appropriate units, and interpret how different values of these parameters may lead to different biological behaviors.

  10. Lunar Variation of Several Ionospheric Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    ALBERCA , J 0 CARDUS, E GALDON AFOSR-79-0114 UNCLASSIFIED SCIENTIFIC-Z EOARD-TR-212 ML 111a 11m I.8 II1JIL2 111.6__II MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART...X4 SCIENTIFIC REPORT No 2 LUNAR VARIATION OF SEVERAL IONOSPHERIC PARAMETERS L. F. Alberca S. I. J. 0. Card6s 5.1. * E. Gald6n S.I1. * LLCTE... Alberca , e.I. J.O. Cardds, s.1. E. Gald6n, 8., OBSERVATORIO DEL EBR0 IONOSPHERIC SECTION ROQUETES (Tarragona) Spain THE RESEARCH REPORTED IN THIS

  11. UPRE method for total variation parameter selection

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt; Lin, Youzuo

    2008-01-01

    Total Variation (TV) Regularization is an important method for solving a wide variety of inverse problems in image processing. In order to optimize the reconstructed image, it is important to choose the optimal regularization parameter. The Unbiased Predictive Risk Estimator (UPRE) has been shown to give a very good estimate of this parameter for Tikhonov Regularization. In this paper we propose an approach to extend UPRE method to the TV problem. However, applying the extended UPRE is impractical in the case of inverse problems such as de blurring, due to the large scale of the associated linear problem. We also propose an approach to reducing the large scale problem to a small problem, significantly reducing computational requirements while providing a good approximation to the original problem.

  12. Estimation of beech pyrolysis kinetic parameters by Shuffled Complex Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanming; Wang, Changjian; Chaos, Marcos; Chen, Ruiyu; Lu, Shouxiang

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis kinetics of a typical biomass energy feedstock, beech, was investigated based on thermogravimetric analysis over a wide heating rate range from 5K/min to 80K/min. A three-component (corresponding to hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) parallel decomposition reaction scheme was applied to describe the experimental data. The resulting kinetic reaction model was coupled to an evolutionary optimization algorithm (Shuffled Complex Evolution, SCE) to obtain model parameters. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study in which SCE has been used in the context of thermogravimetry. The kinetic parameters were simultaneously optimized against data for 10, 20 and 60K/min heating rates, providing excellent fits to experimental data. Furthermore, it was shown that the optimized parameters were applicable to heating rates (5 and 80K/min) beyond those used to generate them. Finally, the predicted results based on optimized parameters were contrasted with those based on the literature.

  13. Cell kinetics and biochemical parameters in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Becciolini, A; Porciani, S; Balzi, M; Lanini, A; Scubla, E; Pacini, P; Benucci, A; Distante, V

    1992-01-01

    The study analyzes biochemical and cell kinetic parameters to characterize solid tumor growth in humans. The concentrations of polyamines, CEA, the thymidine labeling index (T.L.I.) and the mitotic index (M.I.) were determined on fragments of neoplastic tissue from 18 patients with breast carcinoma. Urinary polyamines were evaluated in the same patients. Two groups of patients were distinguished according to the median value of the with high T.L.I., M.I. and tissue polyamines were significantly higher than in the group with low T.L.I., whereas tissue CEA was lower, though in a not statistically significant way. Urinary polyamines showed no variations between groups. These preliminary results showed that T.L.I. levels were higher in patients who relapsed during a 4-year follow-up than in patients achieving complete remission and remaining disease free. Results concerning polyamine concentration showed that the tissue polyamine level in breast carcinoma indicated proliferative activity, but this does not seem to be valuable for current prognostic purposes.

  14. Devolatilization kinetic parameters of beneficiated coal-based products

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.L.; Nsakala, N.Y.; Raymond, D.R.; Hargrove, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    A comprehensive program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is being carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), to assess the performance and economic impacts of firing beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs) in pre-NSPS coal-fired boilers and existing oil and gas fired boilers. The BCFs are produced from several advanced coal cleaning processes developed by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. CE`s laminar-flow Drop Tube Furnace System-1 (DTFS-1) was used to test six BCFs produced from three Eastern bituminous coals (from Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh 18 and Upper Freeport seams) in two advanced coal cleaning processes (microbubble Flotation Process and Selective Oil Agglomeration Process). Testing consisted of thermally decomposing size-graded BCF products in nitrogen atmosphere in the 1900-2650{degrees}F temperature range and residence times of up to about 0.8 sec. These data were used to derive the devolatilization kinetic parameters of the BCF products. Oxidation kinetic parameters also had been derived in the DTFS-1 from these six fuels. Test conditions under all circumstances were designed to simulate some of the conditions prevailing in suspension firing of pulverized coal. This paper summarizes the devolatilization kinetic parameter results obtained from this study. The results are compared with those obtained previously in this laboratory and with some of the results presented in the open literature. These devolatilization kinetic parameters are of generic nature and, as such, can be used by anyone engaged in mathematical modeling of combustion processes.

  15. Kinetic analysis of several variations of push-ups.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Wurm, Bradley; VanderZanden, Tyler L; Spadavecchia, Mark L; Durocher, John J; Bickham, Curtis T; Petushek, Erich J

    2011-10-01

    Push-ups are a common and practical exercise that is used to enhance fitness, including upper body strength or endurance. The kinetic characteristics of push-ups and its variations are yet to be quantified. Kinetic quantification is necessary to accurately evaluate the training load, and thus the nature of the training stimulus, for these exercise variations. This study assessed the peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRFs) of push-up variations including the regular push-up and those performed with flexed knee, feet elevated on a 30.48-cm box, and a 60.96-cm box, and hands elevated on a 30.48-cm box and a 60.96-cm box. Twenty-three recreationally fit individuals (14 men, 9 women) performed each of the 6 push-up variations in a randomized order. Peak GRF and peak GRF expressed as a coefficient of subject body mass were obtained with a force platform. Push-ups with the feet elevated produced a higher GRF than all other push-up variations (p ≤ 0.05). Push-ups with hands elevated and push-ups from the flexed knee position produced a lower GRF than all other push-up variations (p ≤ 0.05). No gender differences in response to these push-up variations were found (p > 0.05). Additionally, subject height was not related to the GRF for any of the push-up conditions (p > 0.05) other than the condition where hands were elevated on a 60.96-cm box (p ≤ 0.05; r = 0.63). These data can be used to progress the intensity of push-ups in a program and to quantify the training load as a percentage of body mass.

  16. Reconstruction of linear kinetic parameters directly from projection PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelis, G. I.; Tziortzi, A. C.; Tsoumpas, C.

    2011-09-01

    Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data provide functional information. Usually, this is measured in the form of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from the temporal response of each region. Recent trends have shown that when pharmacokinetic parameters are estimated directly from the projection data, they are less affected by noise. This work investigates an existing parametric maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm applied to [18F]DOPA data using reference-tissue input function. The study reveals how direct reconstruction of pharmacokinetic parameters from the measured data can be performed optimally. It explains how to optimize the speed of the standard iterative algorithm and it compares the results with the existing FBP method. The improvement of the quality of the parametric images preserving quantification suggests the usefulness of direct estimation of the kinetic parameters. This algorithm is freely available within the open-source library STIR 2.1.

  17. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 1: First and second variations of total kinetic action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The case of a cold gas in the absence of external force fields is considered. Since the only energy involved is kinetic energy, the total kinetic action (i.e., the space-time integral of the kinetic energy density) should serve as the total free-energy functional in this case, and as such should be a local minimum for all possible fluctuations about stable flow. This conjecture is tested by calculating explicit, manifestly covariant expressions for the first and second variations of the total kinetic action in the context of Lagrangian kinematics. The general question of the correlation between physical stability and the convexity of any action integral that can be interpreted as the total free-energy functional of the flow is discussed and illustrated for the cases of rectillinear and rotating shearing flows.

  18. Effect of experimental and sample factors on dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate: mechanism of dehydration and determination of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Actiņš, Andris

    2014-06-01

    The dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate [3-(1,1,1-trimethylhydrazin-1-ium-2-yl)propionate dihydrate] was analyzed in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The particle size, sample preparation and storage, sample weight, nitrogen flow rate, relative humidity, and sample history were varied in order to evaluate the effect of these factors and to more accurately interpret the data obtained from such analysis. It was determined that comparable kinetic parameters can be obtained in both isothermal and nonisothermal mode. However, dehydration activation energy values obtained in nonisothermal mode showed variation with conversion degree because of different rate-limiting step energy at higher temperature. Moreover, carrying out experiments in this mode required consideration of additional experimental complications. Our study of the different sample and experimental factor effect revealed information about changes of the dehydration rate-limiting step energy, variable contribution from different rate limiting steps, as well as clarified the dehydration mechanism. Procedures for convenient and fast determination of dehydration kinetic parameters were offered.

  19. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-07

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  20. Thermodynamic criteria for estimating the kinetic parameters of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrichev, I. I.; Zhensa, A. V.; Kol'tsova, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic parameters are estimated using two criteria in addition to the traditional criterion that considers the consistency between experimental and modeled conversion data: thermodynamic consistency and the consistency with entropy production (i.e., the absolute rate of the change in entropy due to exchange with the environment is consistent with the rate of entropy production in the steady state). A special procedure is developed and executed on a computer to achieve the thermodynamic consistency of a set of kinetic parameters with respect to both the standard entropy of a reaction and the standard enthalpy of a reaction. A problem of multi-criterion optimization, reduced to a single-criterion problem by summing weighted values of the three criteria listed above, is solved. Using the reaction of NO reduction with CO on a platinum catalyst as an example, it is shown that the set of parameters proposed by D.B. Mantri and P. Aghalayam gives much worse agreement with experimental values than the set obtained on the basis of three criteria: the sum of the squares of deviations for conversion, the thermodynamic consistency, and the consistency with entropy production.

  1. Vibroacoustic test plan evaluation: Parameter variation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloef, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical decision models are shown to provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology developed provides a major step toward the development of a realistic tool to quantitatively tailor test programs to specific payloads. Testing is considered at the no test, component, subassembly, or system level of assembly. Component redundancy and partial loss of flight data are considered. Most and probabilistic costs are considered, and incipient failures resulting from ground tests are treated. Optimums defining both component and assembly test levels are indicated for the modified test plans considered. modeling simplifications must be considered in interpreting the results relative to a particular payload. New parameters introduced were a no test option, flight by flight failure probabilities, and a cost to design components for higher vibration requirements. Parameters varied were the shuttle payload bay internal acoustic environment, the STS launch cost, the component retest/repair cost, and the amount of redundancy in the housekeeping section of the payload reliability model.

  2. [Photosynthetic Parameters Inversion Algorithm Study Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence Induction Kinetics Curve].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-han; Zhang, Yu-jun; Yin, Gao-fang; Shi, Chao-yi; Yu, Xiao-ya; Zhao, Nan-jing; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-08-01

    The fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve contains rich information of photosynthesis. It can reflect various information of vegetation, such as, the survival status, the pathological condition and the physiology trends under the stress state. Through the acquisition of algae fluorescence and induced optical signal, the fast phase of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve was fitted. Based on least square fitting method, we introduced adaptive minimum error approaching method for fast multivariate nonlinear regression fitting toward chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve. We realized Fo (fixedfluorescent), Fm (maximum fluorescence yield), σPSII (PSII functional absorption cross section) details parameters inversion and the photosynthetic parameters inversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. And we also studied physiological variation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa under the stress of Cu(2+).

  3. Parameter Optimization of Nitriding Process Using Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, İ. Bedii; Akar, Firat; Lippmann, Nils

    2016-12-01

    Using the dynamics of chemical kinetics, an investigation to search for an optimum condition for a gas nitriding process is performed over the solution space spanned by the initial temperature and gas composition of the furnace. For a two-component furnace atmosphere, the results are presented in temporal variations of gas concentrations and the nitrogen coverage on the surface. It seems that the exploitation of the nitriding kinetics can provide important feedback for setting the model-based control algorithms. The present work shows that when the nitrogen gas concentration is not allowed to exceed 6 pct, the Nad coverage can attain maximum values as high as 0.97. The time evolution of the Nad coverage also reveals that, as long as the temperature is above the value where nitrogen poisoning of the surface due to the low-temperature adsorption of excess nitrogen occurs, the initial ammonia content in the furnace atmosphere is much more important in the nitriding process than is the initial temperature.

  4. Identification of hydrological model parameter variation using ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chao; Liu, Pan; Guo, Shenglian; Li, Zejun; Wang, Dingbao

    2016-12-01

    Hydrological model parameters play an important role in the ability of model prediction. In a stationary context, parameters of hydrological models are treated as constants; however, model parameters may vary with time under climate change and anthropogenic activities. The technique of ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is proposed to identify the temporal variation of parameters for a two-parameter monthly water balance model (TWBM) by assimilating the runoff observations. Through a synthetic experiment, the proposed method is evaluated with time-invariant (i.e., constant) parameters and different types of parameter variations, including trend, abrupt change and periodicity. Various levels of observation uncertainty are designed to examine the performance of the EnKF. The results show that the EnKF can successfully capture the temporal variations of the model parameters. The application to the Wudinghe basin shows that the water storage capacity (SC) of the TWBM model has an apparent increasing trend during the period from 1958 to 2000. The identified temporal variation of SC is explained by land use and land cover changes due to soil and water conservation measures. In contrast, the application to the Tongtianhe basin shows that the estimated SC has no significant variation during the simulation period of 1982-2013, corresponding to the relatively stationary catchment properties. The evapotranspiration parameter (C) has temporal variations while no obvious change patterns exist. The proposed method provides an effective tool for quantifying the temporal variations of the model parameters, thereby improving the accuracy and reliability of model simulations and forecasts.

  5. Parameter estimation for models of ligninolytic and cellulolytic enzyme kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gangsheng; Post, Wilfred M; Mayes, Melanie; Frerichs, Joshua T; Jagadamma, Sindhu

    2012-01-01

    While soil enzymes have been explicitly included in the soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition models, there is a serious lack of suitable data for model parameterization. This study provides well-documented enzymatic parameters for application in enzyme-driven SOC decomposition models from a compilation and analysis of published measurements. In particular, we developed appropriate kinetic parameters for five typical ligninolytic and cellulolytic enzymes ( -glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, endo-glucanase, peroxidase, and phenol oxidase). The kinetic parameters included the maximum specific enzyme activity (Vmax) and half-saturation constant (Km) in the Michaelis-Menten equation. The activation energy (Ea) and the pH optimum and sensitivity (pHopt and pHsen) were also analyzed. pHsen was estimated by fitting an exponential-quadratic function. The Vmax values, often presented in different units under various measurement conditions, were converted into the same units at a reference temperature (20 C) and pHopt. Major conclusions are: (i) Both Vmax and Km were log-normal distributed, with no significant difference in Vmax exhibited between enzymes originating from bacteria or fungi. (ii) No significant difference in Vmax was found between cellulases and ligninases; however, there was significant difference in Km between them. (iii) Ligninases had higher Ea values and lower pHopt than cellulases; average ratio of pHsen to pHopt ranged 0.3 0.4 for the five enzymes, which means that an increase or decrease of 1.1 1.7 pH units from pHopt would reduce Vmax by 50%. (iv) Our analysis indicated that the Vmax values from lab measurements with purified enzymes were 1 2 orders of magnitude higher than those for use in SOC decomposition models under field conditions.

  6. On a variational approach to some parameter estimation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.

    1985-01-01

    Examples (1-D seismic, large flexible structures, bioturbation, nonlinear population dispersal) in which a variation setting can provide a convenient framework for convergence and stability arguments in parameter estimation problems are considered. Some of these examples are 1-D seismic, large flexible structures, bioturbation, and nonlinear population dispersal. Arguments for convergence and stability via a variational approach of least squares formulations of parameter estimation problems for partial differential equations is one aspect of the problem considered.

  7. Pyrolysis of Sawdust, Rice Husk and Sugarcane Bagasse: Kinetic Modeling and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters using Different Optimization Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonde, Ruta Dhanram; Chaurasia, Ashish Subhash

    2015-04-01

    The present study provides the kinetic model to describe the pyrolysis of sawdust, rice-husk and sugarcane bagasse as biomass. The kinetic scheme used for modelling of primary pyrolysis consisting of the two parallel reactions giving gaseous volatiles and solid char. Estimation of kinetic parameters for pyrolysis process has been carried out for temperature range of 773-1,173 K. As there are serious issues regarding non-convergence of some of the methods or solutions converging to local-optima, the proposed kinetic model is optimized to predict the best values of kinetic parameters for the system using three approaches—Two-dimensional surface fitting non-linear regression technique, MS-Excel Solver Tool and COMSOL software. The model predictions are in agreement with experimental data over a wide range of pyrolysis conditions. The estimated value of kinetic parameters are compared with earlier researchers and found to be matching well.

  8. A Theoretical Analysis for Assessing the Variability of Secondary Model Thermal Inactivation Kinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Giannakourou, Maria C.; Stoforos, Nikolaos G.

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, for the determination of the kinetic parameters of thermal inactivation of a heat labile substance, an appropriate index is selected and its change is measured over time at a series of constant temperatures. The rate of this change is described through an appropriate primary model and a secondary model is applied to assess the impact of temperature. By this approach, the confidence intervals of the estimates of the rate constants are not taken into account. Consequently, the calculated variability of the secondary model parameters can be significantly lower than the actual variability. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the influence of the variability of the primary model parameters in establishing the confidence intervals of the secondary model parameters. Using a Monte Carlo technique and assuming normally distributed DT values (parameter associated with a primary inactivation model), the error propagating on the DTref and z-values (secondary model parameters) was assessed. When DT confidence intervals were broad, the secondary model’s parameter variability was appreciably high and could not be adequately estimated through the traditional deterministic approach that does not take into account the variation on the DT values. In such cases, the proposed methodology was essential for realistic estimations. PMID:28231086

  9. Kinetic comparisons during variations of the power clean.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; Allen, Mark; Graham-Smith, Phillip

    2011-12-01

    Comfort, P, Allen, M, and Graham-Smith, P. Kinetic comparisons during variations of the power clean. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3269-3273, 2011-The aim of this investigation was to determine the differences in peak power, peak vertical ground reaction forces, and rate of force development (RFD) during variations of the power clean. Elite rugby league players (n = 16; age 22 ± 1.58 years; height 182.25 ± 2.81 cm; body mass 98.65 ± 7.52 kg) performed 1 set of 3 repetitions of the power clean, hang power clean, midthigh power clean, or midthigh clean pull, using 60% of 1 repetition maximum power clean, in a randomized order, while standing on a force platform. One-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed a significantly (p < 0.001) greater peak power output during the midthigh power clean (3,565.7 ± 410.6 W) and the midthigh clean pull (3,686.8 ± 386.5 W) compared with both the power clean (2,591.2 ± 645.5 W) and the hang power clean (3,183.6 ± 309.1 W), along with a significantly (p < 0.001) greater peak Fz during the midthigh power clean (2,813.8 ± 200.5 N) and the midthigh clean pull (2,901.3 ± 226.1 N) compared with both the power clean (2,264.1 ± 199.6 N) and the hang power clean (2,479.3 ± 267.6 N). The midthigh power clean (15,049.8 ± 4,415.7 N·s) and the midthigh clean pull (15,623.6 ± 3,114.4 N·s) also demonstrated significantly (p < 0.001) greater instantaneous RFD when compared with both the power clean (8,657.9 ± 2,746.6 N·s) and the hang power clean (10,314.4 ± 4,238.2 N·s). From the findings of this study, when training to maximize power, Fz, and RFD, the midthigh power clean and midthigh clean pull appear to be the most advantageous variations of the power clean to perform.

  10. A design method for minimizing sensitivity to plant parameter variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadass, Z.; Powell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for minimizing the sensitivity of multivariable systems to parameter variations. The variable parameters are considered as random variables and their effect is included in a quadratic performance index. The performance index is a weighted sum of the state and control covariances that stem from both the random system disturbances and the parameter uncertainties. The numerical solution of the problem is described and application of the method to several initially sensitive tracking systems is discussed. The sensitivity factor of reduction was typically 2 or 3 over a system based on random system noise only, and yet resulted in state RMS increases of only about a factor of two.

  11. Investigating Molecular Kinetics by Variationally Optimized Diffusion Maps.

    PubMed

    Boninsegna, Lorenzo; Gobbo, Gianpaolo; Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-12-08

    Identification of the collective coordinates that describe rare events in complex molecular transitions such as protein folding has been a key challenge in the theoretical molecular sciences. In the Diffusion Map approach, one assumes that the molecular configurations sampled have been generated by a diffusion process, and one uses the eigenfunctions of the corresponding diffusion operator as reaction coordinates. While diffusion coordinates (DCs) appear to provide a good approximation to the true dynamical reaction coordinates, they are not parametrized using dynamical information. Thus, their approximation quality could not, as yet, be validated, nor could the diffusion map eigenvalues be used to compute relaxation rate constants of the system. Here we combine the Diffusion Map approach with the recently proposed Variational Approach for Conformation Dynamics (VAC). Diffusion Map coordinates are used as a basis set, and their optimal linear combination is sought using the VAC, which employs time-correlation information on the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. We have applied this approach to ultra-long MD simulations of the Fip35 WW domain and found that the first DCs are indeed a good approximation to the true reaction coordinates of the system, but they could be further improved using the VAC. Using the Diffusion Map basis, excellent approximations to the relaxation rates of the system are obtained. Finally, we evaluate the quality of different metric spaces and find that pairwise minimal root-mean-square deviation performs poorly, while operating in the recently introduced kinetic maps based on the time-lagged independent component analysis gives the best performance.

  12. A variational approach to parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ordinary differential equations are widely-used in the field of systems biology and chemical engineering to model chemical reaction networks. Numerous techniques have been developed to estimate parameters like rate constants, initial conditions or steady state concentrations from time-resolved data. In contrast to this countable set of parameters, the estimation of entire courses of network components corresponds to an innumerable set of parameters. Results The approach presented in this work is able to deal with course estimation for extrinsic system inputs or intrinsic reactants, both not being constrained by the reaction network itself. Our method is based on variational calculus which is carried out analytically to derive an augmented system of differential equations including the unconstrained components as ordinary state variables. Finally, conventional parameter estimation is applied to the augmented system resulting in a combined estimation of courses and parameters. Conclusions The combined estimation approach takes the uncertainty in input courses correctly into account. This leads to precise parameter estimates and correct confidence intervals. In particular this implies that small motifs of large reaction networks can be analysed independently of the rest. By the use of variational methods, elements from control theory and statistics are combined allowing for future transfer of methods between the two fields. PMID:22892133

  13. Rod outer segment structure influences the apparent kinetic parameters of cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic GMP hydrolysis by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) of retinal rod outer segments (ROS) is a key amplification step in phototransduction. Definitive estimates of the turnover number, kcat, and of the Km are crucial to quantifying the amplification contributed by the PDE. Published estimates for these kinetic parameters vary widely; moreover, light-dependent changes in the Km of PDE have been reported. The experiments and analyses reported here account for most observed variations in apparent Km, and they lead to definitive estimates of the intrinsic kinetic parameters in amphibian rods. We first obtained a new and highly accurate estimate of the ratio of holo-PDE to rhodopsin in the amphibian ROS, 1:270. We then estimated the apparent kinetic parameters of light-activated PDE of suspensions of disrupted frog ROS whose structural integrity was systematically varied. In the most severely disrupted ROS preparation, we found Km = 95 microM and kcat = 4,400 cGMP.s-1. In suspensions of disc-stack fragments of greater integrity, the apparent Km increased to approximately 600 microM, though kcat remained unchanged. In contrast, the Km for cAMP was not shifted in the disc stack preparations. A theoretical analysis shows that the elevated apparent Km of suspensions of disc stacks can be explained as a consequence of diffusion with hydrolysis in the disc stack, which causes active PDEs nearer the center of the stack to be exposed to a lower concentration of cyclic GMP than PDEs at the disc stack rim. The analysis predicts our observation that the apparent Km for cGMP is elevated with no accompanying decrease in kcat. The analysis also predicts the lack of a Km shift for cAMP and the previously reported light dependence of the apparent Km for cGMP. We conclude that the intrinsic kinetic parameters of the PDE do not vary with light or structural integrity, and are those of the most severely disrupted disc stacks. PMID:7931138

  14. Additional Investigations of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2006-01-01

    A second parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this work was to further investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD and appendix C icing conditions. A previous study concluded that it was feasible to use changes in ice shape features (e.g., ice horn angle, ice horn thickness, and ice shape mass) to detect relatively small variations in icing spray condition parameters (LWC, MVD, and temperature). The subject of this current investigation extends the scope of this previous work, by also examining the effect of icing tunnel spray-bar parameter variations (water pressure, air pressure) on ice shape feature changes. The approach was to vary spray-bar water pressure and air pressure, and then evaluate the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes. This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results.

  15. Simulation of the interannual variations of aerosols in China: role of variations in meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Q.; Liao, H.

    2014-05-01

    We used the nested grid version of the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to examine the interannual variations (IAVs) of aerosols over heavily polluted regions in China for years 2004-2012. The role of variations in meteorological parameters was quantified by a simulation with fixed anthropogenic emissions at year 2006 levels and changes in meteorological parameters over 2004-2012. Simulated PM2.5 (particles with a diameter of 2.5 μm or less) aerosol concentrations exhibited large IAVs in North China (NC, 32-42° N, 110-120° E), with regionally averaged absolute percent departure from the mean (APDM) values of 17, 14, 14, and 11% in December-January-February (DJF), March-April-May (MAM), June-July-August (JJA), and September-October-November (SON), respectively. Over South China (SC, 22-32° N, 110-120° E), the IAVs in PM2.5 were found to be the largest in JJA, with the regional mean APDM values of 14% in JJA and of about 9% in other seasons. Concentrations of PM2.5 over the Sichuan Basin (SCB, 27-33° N, 102-110° E) were simulated to have the smallest IAVs among the polluted regions examined in this work, with the APDM values of 8-9% in all seasons. All aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon) were simulated to have the largest IAVs over NC in DJF, corresponding to the large variations in meteorological parameters over NC in this season. Process analyses were performed to identify the key meteorological parameters that determined the IAVs of different aerosol species in different regions. While the variations in temperature and specific humidity, which influenced the gas-phase formation of sulfate, jointly determined the IAVs of sulfate over NC in both DJF and JJA, wind (or convergence of wind) in DJF and precipitation in JJA were the dominant meteorological factors to influence IAVs of sulfate over SC and the SCB. The IAVs in temperature and specific humidity

  16. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the need for devoting time in differential equations courses to modelling and the completion of the modelling process with efforts to estimate the parameters in the models using data. We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of chemical reactions of order n, where n = 0, 1, 2, and apply more general…

  17. Quantification of morphologic, cytologic, and kinetic parameters of unirradiated swine skin: a histologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, J.O.; Bennett, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    This study determines multiple histologic and cell kinetic parameters of unirradiated swine skin. The prickle cell layer exists as a shell three to six cells thick. The proliferative basal layer exists as a confluent monolayer with 2031 +/- 48 cells/cm; it has delta growth fraction of 1, an average cell generation time of 12 days, a T/sub s/ of 9 hr, and a T/sub s/ + T/sub G2/ + T/sub 1/2M/ of 17 to 19 hr. The labeling index is 3.9% with a diurnal variation having a 5% peak at 1800 hr and a 2.5% nadir at 0900-1100 hr. The mitotic index varies from 1.7 to 3.2% and has no clear-cut diurnal variation. These values are similar to those available for man. These data and those published previously are utilized to define a histologic model of the irradiated epidermal cell renewal system. These measured values are compared with those derived from analysis of available time-dose isoeffect data using a single-hit multitarget and a linear-quadratic model.

  18. Kinetic parameter estimation model for anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunyoung; Cumberbatch, Jewel; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Qiong

    2017-03-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion has a potential to improve biogas production, but limited kinetic information is available for co-digestion. This study introduced regression-based models to estimate the kinetic parameters for the co-digestion of microalgae and Waste Activated Sludge (WAS). The models were developed using the ratios of co-substrates and the kinetic parameters for the single substrate as indicators. The models were applied to the modified first-order kinetics and Monod model to determine the rate of hydrolysis and methanogenesis for the co-digestion. The results showed that the model using a hyperbola function was better for the estimation of the first-order kinetic coefficients, while the model using inverse tangent function closely estimated the Monod kinetic parameters. The models can be used for estimating kinetic parameters for not only microalgae-WAS co-digestion but also other substrates' co-digestion such as microalgae-swine manure and WAS-aquatic plants.

  19. Anisotropic parameter estimation using velocity variation with offset analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Herawati, I.; Saladin, M.; Pranowo, W.; Winardhie, S.; Priyono, A.

    2013-09-09

    Seismic anisotropy is defined as velocity dependent upon angle or offset. Knowledge about anisotropy effect on seismic data is important in amplitude analysis, stacking process and time to depth conversion. Due to this anisotropic effect, reflector can not be flattened using single velocity based on hyperbolic moveout equation. Therefore, after normal moveout correction, there will still be residual moveout that relates to velocity information. This research aims to obtain anisotropic parameters, ε and δ, using two proposed methods. The first method is called velocity variation with offset (VVO) which is based on simplification of weak anisotropy equation. In VVO method, velocity at each offset is calculated and plotted to obtain vertical velocity and parameter δ. The second method is inversion method using linear approach where vertical velocity, δ, and ε is estimated simultaneously. Both methods are tested on synthetic models using ray-tracing forward modelling. Results show that δ value can be estimated appropriately using both methods. Meanwhile, inversion based method give better estimation for obtaining ε value. This study shows that estimation on anisotropic parameters rely on the accuracy of normal moveout velocity, residual moveout and offset to angle transformation.

  20. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Paula; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity towards H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underline the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  1. Estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-binding parameters using computational strategies.

    PubMed

    Deganutti, Giuseppe; Moro, Stefano

    2017-03-31

    Kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-protein binding parameters are gaining growing importance as key information to consider in drug discovery. The determination of the molecular structures, using particularly x-ray and NMR techniques, is crucial for understanding how a ligand recognizes its target in the final binding complex. However, for a better understanding of the recognition processes, experimental studies of ligand-protein interactions are needed. Even though several techniques can be used to investigate both thermodynamic and kinetic profiles for a ligand-protein complex, these procedures are very often laborious, time consuming and expensive. In the last 10 years, computational approaches have enormous potential in providing insights into each of the above effects and in parsing their contributions to the changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic binding parameters. The main purpose of this review is to summarize the state of the art of computational strategies for estimating the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of a ligand-protein binding.

  2. Determining the Kinetic Parameters Characteristic of Microalgal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez Sancho, Maria Eugenie; And Others

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students obtain a growth curve for algae, identify the exponential and linear growth phases, and calculate the parameters which characterize both phases is described. The procedure, a list of required materials, experimental conditions, analytical technique, and a discussion of the interpretations of individual results are…

  3. Seasonal variations of grounding parameters by field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.G.

    1992-07-01

    The past fifteen years have seen considerable research in the area of substation grounding design, analysis and testing. These research include the revision of the IEEE Std.-80, the development of PC based computer programs, the in depth analysis of grounding parameters and the development of new field testing methods and devices. In spite of these advances, several questions were often asked, primarily due to safety concerns. The questions were related to the seasonal variation of critical grounding parameters such as the soil and gravel resistivities and their influence on the body current in an accidental circuit. There was also a need to study the total behavior of a substation ground grid with respect to different weather conditions by performing field tests. In response to the above needs, a comprehensive field test program was developed and implemented. The field test consisted of flowing approximately 150 amperes through the Texas Valley ground grid from a remote substation. The parameters investigated in this project were the grid impedance, the grid potential rise (GPR) , the fault current distribution, the touch/step voltages, the body current on different gravel beds and the soil/gravel resistivities. The measurements were performed in the rainy, winter and summer weather conditions during 1989--1990. The field test results, overall, indicate that the rainy weather is the worst condition for the substation safety because of the substantial reduction in the protective characteristics of the gravel. Among the gravel types, the washed gravel has much superior protective characteristics compared to the crusher run type of gravel. A comparison of SGSYS computed grounding parameters with measured results indicates that the grid resistance and GPR compare well but the computed touch voltage and body current are substantially higher than the measured values.

  4. Validity of repeated initial rise thermoluminescence kinetic parameter determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of thermoluminescence (TL) analysis by repeated initial rise measurements has been studied by computer simulation. Thermoluminescence described by 1st Order, 2nd Order, General One Trap and Interactive TL Kinetics was investigated. In the simulation each of the repeated temperature increase and decrease cycles contains a linear temperature increase followed by a decrease appropriate for radiative cooling, i.e. the latter is approximated by a decreasing exponential. The activation energies computed from the simulated emission are readily compared with those used to compute the TL emission. In all cases studied, the repeated initial rise technique provides reliable results only for single peak glow curves or for glow curves containing peaks that do not overlap and, if sufficiently separated, the lowest temperature peak in multipeak curves. Also the temperatures, or temperature cycles corresponding to correct activation energies occur on the low temperature side of the normal glow curve, often well below the peak temperature. A variety of misleading and/or incorrect results an be obtained when the repeated initial rise technique is applied to TL systems that produce overlapping peaks in the usual glow curve. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Variational approach to low-frequency kinetic-MHD in the current-coupling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronci, Cesare; Burby, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid kinetic-MHD models describe the interaction of an MHD bulk fluid with an ensemble of hot particles, which is described by a kinetic equation. When the Vlasov description is adopted for the energetic particles, different Vlasov-MHD models have been shown to lack an exact energy balance, unless non-inertial force terms are inserted in the kinetic equation. These force terms arise from fundamental approaches based on Hamiltonian and variational methods. In this work we apply Hamilton's variational principle to formulate new current-coupling kinetic-MHD models in the low-frequency approximation (i.e. large Larmor frequency limit). More particularly, we formulate current-coupling hybrid schemes, in which energetic particle dynamics are expressed in either guiding-center or gyrocenter coordinates. Financial support by the Leverhulme Trust Research Project Grant No. 2014-112 is greatly acknowledged.

  6. Determination of Kinetic Parameters from Steady-State Microdisk Voltammograms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    characteristic parameters of voltammetric curves (i.e., constants without special expertise, instruments, or mathematical limiting current, half -wave...was then used to calculate based and subjects suitable data to alternative ways of analysis. the reversible half -wave potential (eq 14) assuming DR/Do...apparent half -wave potential to more positive values (for oxidations) and decreases the slope and lineant, Irk 0of the plot. Equation II may be used in two

  7. Calculation of statistic estimates of kinetic parameters from substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation using the median method.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro L; Astudillo-Castro, Carolina; Gajardo, Diego; Flores, Sebastián

    2017-04-01

    We provide initial rate data from enzymatic reaction experiments and tis processing to estimate the kinetic parameters from the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation using the median method published by Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden (Cornish-Bowden and Eisenthal, 1974; Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden, 1974). The method was denominated the direct linear plot and consists in the calculation of the median from a dataset of kinetic parameters Vmax and Km from the Michaelis-Menten equation. In this opportunity we present the procedure to applicate the direct linear plot to the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation; a three-parameter equation. The median method is characterized for its robustness and its insensibility to outlier. The calculations are presented in an Excel datasheet and a computational algorithm was developed in the free software Python. The kinetic parameters of the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation Vmax , Km and Ks were calculated using three experimental points from the dataset formed by 13 experimental points. All the 286 combinations were calculated. The dataset of kinetic parameters resulting from this combinatorial was used to calculate the median which corresponds to the statistic estimator of the real kinetic parameters. A comparative statistical analyses between the median method and the least squares was published in Valencia et al. [3].

  8. Simulation of the interannual variations of aerosols in China: role of variations in meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Q.; Liao, H.

    2014-09-01

    We used the nested grid version of the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to examine the interannual variations (IAVs) of aerosols over heavily polluted regions in China for years 2004-2012. The role of variations in meteorological parameters was quantified by a simulation with fixed anthropogenic emissions at year 2006 levels and changes in meteorological parameters over 2004-2012. Simulated PM2.5 (particles with a diameter of 2.5 μm or less) aerosol concentrations exhibited large IAVs in North China (NC; 32-42° N, 110-120° E), with regionally averaged absolute percent departure from the mean (APDM) values of 17, 14, 14, and 11% in December-January-February (DJF), March-April-May (MAM), June-July-August (JJA), and September-October-November (SON), respectively. Over South China (SC; 22-32° N, 110-120° E), the IAVs in PM2.5 were found to be the largest in JJA, with the regional mean APDM values of 14% in JJA and of about 9% in other seasons. The concentrations of PM2.5 over the Sichuan Basin (SCB; 27-33° N, 102-110° E) were simulated to have the smallest IAVs among the polluted regions examined in this work, with APDM values of 8-9% in all seasons. All aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon) were simulated to have the largest IAVs over NC in DJF, corresponding to the large variations in meteorological parameters over NC in this season. Process analyses were performed to identify the key meteorological parameters that determined the IAVs of different aerosol species in different regions. While the variations in temperature and specific humidity, which influenced the gas-phase formation of sulfate, jointly determined the IAVs of sulfate over NC in both DJF and JJA, wind (or convergence of wind) in DJF and precipitation in JJA were the dominant meteorological factors to influence IAVs of sulfate over SC and the SCB. The IAVs in temperature and specific humidity

  9. Methods for Calibration of Prout-Tompkins Kinetics Parameters Using EZM Iteration and GLO

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Burnham, A K; de Supinski, B; Sexton, J; Gunnels, J

    2006-11-07

    This document contains information regarding the standard procedures used to calibrate chemical kinetics parameters for the extended Prout-Tompkins model to match experimental data. Two methods for calibration are mentioned: EZM calibration and GLO calibration. EZM calibration matches kinetics parameters to three data points, while GLO calibration slightly adjusts kinetic parameters to match multiple points. Information is provided regarding the theoretical approach and application procedure for both of these calibration algorithms. It is recommended that for the calibration process, the user begin with EZM calibration to provide a good estimate, and then fine-tune the parameters using GLO. Two examples have been provided to guide the reader through a general calibrating process.

  10. Estimation of kinetic model parameters in fluorescence optical diffusion tomography.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Adam B; Webb, Kevin J; Bouman, Charles A

    2005-07-01

    We present a technique for reconstructing the spatially dependent dynamics of a fluorescent contrast agent in turbid media. The dynamic behavior is described by linear and nonlinear parameters of a compartmental model or some other model with a deterministic functional form. The method extends our previous work in fluorescence optical diffusion tomography by parametrically reconstructing the time-dependent fluorescent yield. The reconstruction uses a Bayesian framework and parametric iterative coordinate descent optimization, which is closely related to Gauss-Seidel methods. We demonstrate the method with a simulation study.

  11. Reliability and Validity of Kinetic and Kinematic Parameters Determined With Force Plates Embedded Under Soil-Filled Baseball Mound.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Toshimasa; Matsuo, Akifumi; Maeda, Akira; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Mizutani, Mirai; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2017-01-13

    We developed a force measurement system in a soil-filled mound for measuring ground reaction forces (GRFs) acting on baseball pitchers and examined the reliability and validity of kinetic and kinematic parameters determined from the GRFs. Three soil-filled trays of dimensions that satisfied the official baseball rules were fixed onto three force platforms. Eight collegiate pitchers wearing baseball shoes with metal cleats were asked to throw 5 fastballs with maximum effort from the mound toward a catcher. The reliability of each parameter was determined for each subject as the coefficient of variation across the 5 pitches. The validity of the measurements was tested by comparing the outcomes either with the true values or the corresponding values computed from a motion capture system. The coefficients of variation in the repeated measurements of the peak forces ranged from 0.00 to 0.17, and were smaller for the pivot foot than the stride foot. The mean absolute errors in the impulses determined over entire duration of pitching motion were 5.3 N·s, 1.9 N·s, and 8.2 N·s for the X-, Y-, and Z-directions, respectively. These results suggest that the present method is reliable and valid for determining selected kinetic and kinematic parameters for analyzing pitching performance.

  12. Kinetic parameters for the thermal inactivation of quality-related enzymes in carrots and potatoes.

    PubMed

    Anthon, Gordon E; Barrett, Diane M

    2002-07-03

    Kinetic parameters for the thermal inactivation of several enzymes in carrot and potato homogenates have been determined. In carrots the most heat-resistant activity was polygalacturonase, followed by peroxidase and pectinmethylesterase. In potatoes peroxidase was the most resistant, followed by pectin methylesterase, polyphenol oxidase, and lipoxygenase. There were several notable similarities between the inactivation kinetics in the two vegetables. In both cases peroxidase activity gave simple first-order inactivation kinetics but yielded a curved Arrhenius plot for the temperature dependence. Pectin methylesterase in both commodities consisted of a labile and a resistant form. The relative amounts of the two forms and the temperature dependences for their inactivation were also similar.

  13. Active region moss. Basic physical parameters and their temporal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, D.; Mason, H. E.; Del Zanna, G.; Young, P. R.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Active region moss are transition region phenomena, first noted in the images recorded by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in λ171. Moss regions are thought to be the footpoints of hot loops (3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions. These hot loops appear “fuzzy” (unresolved). Therefore, it is difficult to study the physical plasma parameters in individual hot core loops and hence their heating mechanisms. Moss regions provide an excellent opportunity to study the physics of hot loops. In addition, they allow us to study the transition region dynamics in the footpoint regions. Aims: To derive the physical plasma parameters such as temperature, electron density, and filling factors in moss regions and to study their variation over a short (an hour) and a long time period (5 consecutive days). Methods: Primarily, we have analyzed spectroscopic observations recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard Hinode. In addition we have used supplementary observations taken from TRACE and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode. Results: The moss emission is strongest in the Fe XII and Fe XIII lines. Based on analyses using line ratios and emission measure we found that moss regions have a characteristic temperature of log T[K] = 6.2. The temperature structure in moss region remains almost identical from one region to another and it does not change with time. The electron densities measured at different locations in the moss regions using Fe XII ratios are about 1-3 × 1010 cm-3 and about 2-4 × 109 cm-3 using Fe XIII and Fe XIV. The densities in the moss regions are similar in different places and show very little variation over short and long time scales. The derived electron density substantially increased (by a factor of about 3-4 or even more in some cases) when a background subtraction was performed. The filling factor of the moss plasma can vary between 0.1-1 and the path length along which the emission

  14. A robust methodology for kinetic model parameter estimation for biocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Al-Haque, Naweed; Santacoloma, Paloma A; Neto, Watson; Tufvesson, Pär; Gani, Rafiqul; Woodley, John M

    2012-01-01

    Effective estimation of parameters in biocatalytic reaction kinetic expressions are very important when building process models to enable evaluation of process technology options and alternative biocatalysts. The kinetic models used to describe enzyme-catalyzed reactions generally include several parameters, which are strongly correlated with each other. State-of-the-art methodologies such as nonlinear regression (using progress curves) or graphical analysis (using initial rate data, for example, the Lineweaver-Burke plot, Hanes plot or Dixon plot) often incorporate errors in the estimates and rarely lead to globally optimized parameter values. In this article, a robust methodology to estimate parameters for biocatalytic reaction kinetic expressions is proposed. The methodology determines the parameters in a systematic manner by exploiting the best features of several of the current approaches. The parameter estimation problem is decomposed into five hierarchical steps, where the solution of each of the steps becomes the input for the subsequent step to achieve the final model with the corresponding regressed parameters. The model is further used for validating its performance and determining the correlation of the parameters. The final model with the fitted parameters is able to describe both initial rate and dynamic experiments. Application of the methodology is illustrated with a case study using the ω-transaminase catalyzed synthesis of 1-phenylethylamine from acetophenone and 2-propylamine.

  15. Respirometric assays of two different MBR (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) to obtain kinetic and stoichiometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, L M; Arévalo, J; Parada, J; González, D; Moreno, B; Pérez, J; Gómez, M A

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of two different medium scale MBRs (ultrafiltration and microfiltration) using respirometric methods has been achieved. The ultrafiltration membrane plant (0.034 microm pore size) maintained recirculation sludge flow at seven times the influent flow, and membranes were backwashed every 5 min and chemically cleaned weekly. The microfiltration membrane plant (0.4 microm pore size) maintained recirculation sludge flow at four times the influent flow, membrane-relax was applied after the production phase and membranes were chemically cleaned in the event of high trans-membrane pressure. Both technologies showed a similar performance with regard to heterotrophic kinetic and stoichiometric parameters and organic matter effluent concentrations. The influent was characterized by means of its COD fractions and the average removal percentages for COD concentrations were around 97% for both plants in spite of influent COD fluctuation, temperature variations and sludge retention time (SRT) evolution. Both SRT evolution and temperature affect the heterotrophic yield (Y(H)) and the decay coefficient (bH) in the same range for both plants. Y(H) values of over 0.8 mg COD/mg COD were obtained during the unsteady periods, while under steady state conditions these values fell to less than 0.4 mg COD/mg COD. bH by contrast reached values of less than 0.05 d(-1).

  16. Solid State Kinetic Parameters and Chemical Mechanism of the Dehydration of CoCl2.6H2O.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribas, Joan; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents an experimental example illustrating the most common methods for the determination of kinetic parameters. Discusses the different theories and equations to be applied and the mechanism derived from the kinetic results. (CW)

  17. Determination of electron transfer kinetic parameters by fourier transform electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Byoung-Yong; Hong, Sung-Young; Yoo, Jung-Suk; Park, Su-Moon

    2006-10-05

    A new attempt to obtain electron transfer kinetic parameters at an electrified electrode/electrolyte interface using Fourier transform electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (FTEIS) analyses of small potential step chronoamperometric currents is presented. The kinetic parameters thus obtained allowed mass transport free voltammograms to be constructed in an overpotential region, where the diffusion limits the electron transfer reaction, using the Butler-Volmer (B-V) relation. The B-V voltammograms clearly distinguish electrode reactions that are not much different in their electron transfer kinetic parameters, thus showing very similar normal linear sweep voltammetric (SCV) behaviors. Electrochemical reduction of p-benzoquinone, which displays nearly the same SCV responses at a gold electrode regardless whether the electrode is covered by a thiolated beta-cyclodextrin self-assembled monolayer, was taken as an example for the demonstration. The results show that the two voltametrically similar systems display very different electron transfer characteristics.

  18. Fuzzy Stochastic Petri Nets for Modeling Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic Petri nets (SPNs) have been widely used to model randomness which is an inherent feature of biological systems. However, for many biological systems, some kinetic parameters may be uncertain due to incomplete, vague or missing kinetic data (often called fuzzy uncertainty), or naturally vary, e.g., between different individuals, experimental conditions, etc. (often called variability), which has prevented a wider application of SPNs that require accurate parameters. Considering the strength of fuzzy sets to deal with uncertain information, we apply a specific type of stochastic Petri nets, fuzzy stochastic Petri nets (FSPNs), to model and analyze biological systems with uncertain kinetic parameters. FSPNs combine SPNs and fuzzy sets, thereby taking into account both randomness and fuzziness of biological systems. For a biological system, SPNs model the randomness, while fuzzy sets model kinetic parameters with fuzzy uncertainty or variability by associating each parameter with a fuzzy number instead of a crisp real value. We introduce a simulation-based analysis method for FSPNs to explore the uncertainties of outputs resulting from the uncertainties associated with input parameters, which works equally well for bounded and unbounded models. We illustrate our approach using a yeast polarization model having an infinite state space, which shows the appropriateness of FSPNs in combination with simulation-based analysis for modeling and analyzing biological systems with uncertain information. PMID:26910830

  19. Fuzzy Stochastic Petri Nets for Modeling Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic Petri nets (SPNs) have been widely used to model randomness which is an inherent feature of biological systems. However, for many biological systems, some kinetic parameters may be uncertain due to incomplete, vague or missing kinetic data (often called fuzzy uncertainty), or naturally vary, e.g., between different individuals, experimental conditions, etc. (often called variability), which has prevented a wider application of SPNs that require accurate parameters. Considering the strength of fuzzy sets to deal with uncertain information, we apply a specific type of stochastic Petri nets, fuzzy stochastic Petri nets (FSPNs), to model and analyze biological systems with uncertain kinetic parameters. FSPNs combine SPNs and fuzzy sets, thereby taking into account both randomness and fuzziness of biological systems. For a biological system, SPNs model the randomness, while fuzzy sets model kinetic parameters with fuzzy uncertainty or variability by associating each parameter with a fuzzy number instead of a crisp real value. We introduce a simulation-based analysis method for FSPNs to explore the uncertainties of outputs resulting from the uncertainties associated with input parameters, which works equally well for bounded and unbounded models. We illustrate our approach using a yeast polarization model having an infinite state space, which shows the appropriateness of FSPNs in combination with simulation-based analysis for modeling and analyzing biological systems with uncertain information.

  20. Variational approach to low-frequency kinetic-MHD in the current coupling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burby, Joshua W.; Tronci, Cesare

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid kinetic-MHD models describe the interaction of an MHD bulk fluid with an ensemble of hot particles, which obeys a kinetic equation. In this work we apply Hamilton’s variational principle to formulate new current-coupling kinetic-MHD models in the low-frequency approximation (i.e. large Larmor frequency limit). More particularly, we formulate current-coupling schemes, in which energetic particle dynamics are expressed in either guiding center or gyrocenter coordinates. When guiding center theory is used to model the hot particles, we show how energy conservation requires corrections to the standard magnetization term. On the other hand, charge and momentum conservation in gyrokinetic-MHD lead to extra terms in the usual definition of the hot current density as well as modifications to conventional gyrocenter dynamics. All these new features arise naturally from the underlying variational structure of the proposed models.

  1. Between-species variation in the kinetic stability of TIM proteins linked to solvation-barrier free energies.

    PubMed

    Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Larrea, David; De Maria, Leonardo; Borchert, Torben V; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2009-01-23

    Theoretical, computational, and experimental studies have suggested the existence of solvation barriers in protein unfolding and denaturation processes. These barriers are related to the finite size of water molecules and can be envisioned as arising from the asynchrony between water penetration and breakup of internal interactions. Solvation barriers have been proposed to play roles in protein cooperativity and kinetic stability; therefore, they may be expected to be subject to natural selection. We study the thermal denaturation, in the presence and in the absence of chemical denaturants, of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs) from three different species: Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania mexicana. In all cases, denaturation was irreversible and kinetically controlled. Surprisingly, however, we found large differences between the kinetic denaturation parameters, with T. cruzi TIM showing a much larger activation energy value (and, consequently, much lower room-temperature, extrapolated denaturation rates). This disparity cannot be accounted for by variations in the degree of exposure to solvent in transition states (as measured by kinetic urea m values) and is, therefore, to be attributed mainly to differences in solvation-barrier contributions. This was supported by structure-energetics analyses of the transition states and by application of a novel procedure to estimate from experimental data the solvation-barrier impact at the entropy and free-energy levels. These analyses were actually performed with an extended protein set (including six small proteins plus seven variants of lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus and spanning a wide range of activation parameters), allowing us to delineate the general trends of the solvation-barrier contributions. Overall, this work supports that proteins sharing the same structure and function but belonging to different organisms may show widely different solvation barriers, possibly as a result of different

  2. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    PubMed

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-09-01

    Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors.

  3. Thermodynamic Characterization of Five Key Kinetic Parameters that Define Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Tejero, Jesús; Bayachou, Mekki; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Fadlalla, Mohammed; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    NO synthase (NOS) enzymes convert L-arginine to NO in two sequential reactions whose rates (kcat1 and kcat2) are both limited by the rate of ferric heme reduction (kr). An enzyme ferric heme-NO complex forms as an immediate product complex and then undergoes either dissociation (at a rate that we denote as kd) to release NO in a productive manner, or reduction (kr) to form a ferrous heme-NO complex (FeIINO) that must react with O2 (at a rate that we denote as kox) in a NO dioxygenase reaction that regenerates the ferric enzyme. The interplay of these five kinetic parameters (kcat1, kcat2, kr, kd, and kox) determine NOS specific activity, O2 concentration response, and pulsatile versus steady-state NO generation. Here we utilized stopped-flow spectroscopy and single catalytic turnover methods to characterize the individual temperature dependencies of the five kinetic parameters of rat neuronal NOS (nNOS). We then incorporated the measured kinetic values into computer simulations of the nNOS reaction using a global kinetic model to comprehensively model its temperature-dependent catalytic behaviors. Our results provide new mechanistic insights and also reveal that the different temperature dependencies of the five kinetic parameters significantly alter nNOS catalytic behaviors and NO release efficiency as a function of temperature. PMID:23789902

  4. Variational methods to estimate terrestrial ecosystem model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaies, Sylvain; Roulstone, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Carbon is at the basis of the chemistry of life. Its ubiquity in the Earth system is the result of complex recycling processes. Present in the atmosphere in the form of carbon dioxide it is adsorbed by marine and terrestrial ecosystems and stored within living biomass and decaying organic matter. Then soil chemistry and a non negligible amount of time transform the dead matter into fossil fuels. Throughout this cycle, carbon dioxide is released in the atmosphere through respiration and combustion of fossils fuels. Model-data fusion techniques allow us to combine our understanding of these complex processes with an ever-growing amount of observational data to help improving models and predictions. The data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) model is a simple box model simulating the carbon budget allocation for terrestrial ecosystems. Over the last decade several studies have demonstrated the relative merit of various inverse modelling strategies (MCMC, ENKF, 4DVAR) to estimate model parameters and initial carbon stocks for DALEC and to quantify the uncertainty in the predictions. Despite its simplicity, DALEC represents the basic processes at the heart of more sophisticated models of the carbon cycle. Using adjoint based methods we study inverse problems for DALEC with various data streams (8 days MODIS LAI, monthly MODIS LAI, NEE). The framework of constraint optimization allows us to incorporate ecological common sense into the variational framework. We use resolution matrices to study the nature of the inverse problems and to obtain data importance and information content for the different type of data. We study how varying the time step affect the solutions, and we show how "spin up" naturally improves the conditioning of the inverse problems.

  5. Longitudinal variations in fitting parameters for adult cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mosca, F; Grassia, R; Leone, C A

    2014-04-01

    In patients with a cochlear implant (CI), the first critical point in processing auditory information from sound stimuli that leads to comprehension is the interface between the electrode and the cochlear nerve, which is dependent on providing appropriate current input. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the longitudinal differences in psychoacoustic fitting parameters in CI users. We studied 26 profoundly deaf adults, aged between 18 and 58 years, who had been implanted in our department between 2009 and 2011. The lowest current levels that evoked an auditory sensation (T-level) and the highest current levels that did not elicit an uncomfortable loud sensation (C-level) were recorded at the time of activation, approximately 30 days after implantation (mean 28.5 days) (T0), after one month (T1), 3 months (T3), 6 months (T6) and one year (T12). Impedance values were calculated for electrode groups: basal, middle and apical. In all cases, the same model of perimodiolar implant (Cochlear™ Nucleus(®) CI24RE) and the same surgical technique (cochleostomy) were used. The values of T-level and C-level showed significant incremental changes between T0 and T1 and between T1 and T3. T-levels in the basal regions of the cochlea were higher than in other sites. T-levels in the basal turn exhibited higher values consistent with a greater amount of fibrosis, as reported in other studies. Our findings suggest that fitting sessions should be scheduled more frequently during the first three months as indicated by the greater slope of T- and C- level variations during that time frame.

  6. Variational Effect and Anharmonic Torsion on Kinetic Modeling for Initiation Reaction of Dimethyl Ether Combustion.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yulei; Gao, Jing; Song, Yiming; Li, Yang; Ma, Haixia; Song, Jirong

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of dimethyl ether (DME) with molecular oxygen has been considered to be the dominant initiation pathway for DME combustion compared to the C-O bond fission. This work presents a detailed mechanism and kinetics investigation for the O2 + DME reaction with theoretical approaches. Using the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(2df,2pd) potential energy surface with the M06-2X/MG3S gradient, Hessian, and geometries, rate constants are evaluated by multistructural canonical variational transition-state theory (MS-CVT) including contributions from hindered rotation and multidimensional tunneling over the temperature range 200-2800 K. The CCSD(T) and QCISD(T) with 6-311+G(2df,2pd) calculations predict a barrier of 190-194 kJ mol(-1) for the O2 + DME reaction based on the optimized structures at various levels. It is proposed that there exists a weakly interacting adducts on the product side with subsequent dissociation to the separate HO2 and CH3OCH2 radicals. Torsions in transition state are found to be significantly coupled to generate four conformations whose contributions do influence the rate constant predictions. Variational effects are observed to be significant at high temperatures, while tunneling effect quickly becomes insignificant with temperature. Finally, four-parameter Arrhenius expression 9.14 × 10(13)(T/300)(-3.15) exp[-184.52(T + 110.23)/(T(2) + 110.23(2))] cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) describes the temperature dependence of MS-CVT rate constants with small-curvature tunneling correction.

  7. Dynamic identification of growth and survival kinetic parameters of microorganisms in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inverse analysis is a mathematical method used in predictive microbiology to determine the kinetic parameters of microbial growth and survival in foods. The traditional approach in inverse analysis relies on isothermal experiments that are time-consuming and labor-intensive, and errors are accumula...

  8. Kinetic Parameters for the Noncatalyzed and Enzyme-Catalyzed Mutarotation of Glucose Using a Blood Glucometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardee, John R.; Delgado, Bryan; Jones, Wray

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic parameters for the conversion of alpha-D-glucose to beta-D-glucose were measured using a blood glucometer. The reaction order, rate constant, and Arrhenius activation energy are reported for the noncatalyzed reaction and turnover number and Michaelis constant are reported for the reaction catalyzed by porcine kidney mutarotase. The…

  9. Accurate kinetic parameter estimation during progress curve analysis of systems with endogenous substrate production.

    PubMed

    Goudar, Chetan T

    2011-10-01

    We have identified an error in the published integral form of the modified Michaelis-Menten equation that accounts for endogenous substrate production. The correct solution is presented and the error in both the substrate concentration, S, and the kinetic parameters Vm , Km , and R resulting from the incorrect solution was characterized. The incorrect integral form resulted in substrate concentration errors as high as 50% resulting in 7-50% error in kinetic parameter estimates. To better reflect experimental scenarios, noise containing substrate depletion data were analyzed by both the incorrect and correct integral equations. While both equations resulted in identical fits to substrate depletion data, the final estimates of Vm , Km , and R were different and Km and R estimates from the incorrect integral equation deviated substantially from the actual values. Another observation was that at R = 0, the incorrect integral equation reduced to the correct form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. We believe this combination of excellent fits to experimental data, albeit with incorrect kinetic parameter estimates, and the reduction to the Michaelis-Menten equation at R = 0 is primarily responsible for the incorrectness to go unnoticed. However, the resulting error in kinetic parameter estimates will lead to incorrect biological interpretation and we urge the use of the correct integral form presented in this study.

  10. Curcumin and kaempferol prevent lysozyme fibril formation by modulating aggregation kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Borana, Mohanish S; Mishra, Pushpa; Pissurlenkar, Raghuvir R S; Hosur, Ramakrishna V; Ahmad, Basir

    2014-03-01

    Interaction of small molecule inhibitors with protein aggregates has been studied extensively, but how these inhibitors modulate aggregation kinetic parameters is little understood. In this work, we investigated the ability of two potential aggregation inhibiting drugs, curcumin and kaempferol, to control the kinetic parameters of aggregation reaction. Using thioflavin T fluorescence and static light scattering, the kinetic parameters such as amplitude, elongation rate constant and lag time of guanidine hydrochloride-induced aggregation reactions of hen egg white lysozyme were studied. We observed a contrasting effect of inhibitors on the kinetic parameters when aggregation reactions were measured by these two probes. The interactions of these inhibitors with hen egg white lysozyme were investigated using fluorescence quench titration method and molecular dynamics simulations coupled with binding free energy calculations. We conclude that both the inhibitors prolong nucleation of amyloid aggregation through binding to region of the protein which is known to form the core of the protein fibril, but once the nucleus is formed the rate of elongation is not affected by the inhibitors. This work would provide insight into the mechanism of aggregation inhibition by these potential drug molecules.

  11. Combined Yamamoto approach for simultaneous estimation of adsorption isotherm and kinetic parameters in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rüdt, Matthias; Gillet, Florian; Heege, Stefanie; Hitzler, Julian; Kalbfuss, Bernd; Guélat, Bertrand

    2015-09-25

    Application of model-based design is appealing to support the development of protein chromatography in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, the required efforts for parameter estimation are frequently perceived as time-consuming and expensive. In order to speed-up this work, a new parameter estimation approach for modelling ion-exchange chromatography in linear conditions was developed. It aims at reducing the time and protein demand for the model calibration. The method combines the estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters based on the simultaneous variation of the gradient slope and the residence time in a set of five linear gradient elutions. The parameters are estimated from a Yamamoto plot and a gradient-adjusted Van Deemter plot. The combined approach increases the information extracted per experiment compared to the individual methods. As a proof of concept, the combined approach was successfully applied for a monoclonal antibody on a cation-exchanger and for a Fc-fusion protein on an anion-exchange resin. The individual parameter estimations for the mAb confirmed that the new approach maintained the accuracy of the usual Yamamoto and Van Deemter plots. In the second case, offline size-exclusion chromatography was performed in order to estimate the thermodynamic parameters of an impurity (high molecular weight species) simultaneously with the main product. Finally, the parameters obtained from the combined approach were used in a lumped kinetic model to simulate the chromatography runs. The simulated chromatograms obtained for a wide range of gradient lengths and residence times showed only small deviations compared to the experimental data.

  12. Identification of regulatory structure and kinetic parameters of biochemical networks via mixed-integer dynamic optimization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recovering the network topology and associated kinetic parameter values from time-series data are central topics in systems biology. Nevertheless, methods that simultaneously do both are few and lack generality. Results Here, we present a rigorous approach for simultaneously estimating the parameters and regulatory topology of biochemical networks from time-series data. The parameter estimation task is formulated as a mixed-integer dynamic optimization problem with: (i) binary variables, used to model the existence of regulatory interactions and kinetic effects of metabolites in the network processes; and (ii) continuous variables, denoting metabolites concentrations and kinetic parameters values. The approach simultaneously optimizes the Akaike criterion, which captures the trade-off between complexity (measured by the number of parameters), and accuracy of the fitting. This simultaneous optimization mitigates a possible overfitting that could result from addition of spurious regulatory interactions. Conclusion The capabilities of our approach were tested in one benchmark problem. Our algorithm is able to identify a set of plausible network topologies with their associated parameters. PMID:24176044

  13. Kinetic parameters estimation in an anaerobic digestion process using successive quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Lara, C A; Aguilar-Garnica, E; Alcaraz-González, V; González-Reynoso, O; Steyer, J P; Dominguez-Beltran, J L; González-Alvarez, V

    2005-01-01

    In this work, an optimization method is implemented in an anaerobic digestion model to estimate its kinetic parameters and yield coefficients. This method combines the use of advanced state estimation schemes and powerful nonlinear programming techniques to yield fast and accurate estimates of the aforementioned parameters. In this method, we first implement an asymptotic observer to provide estimates of the non-measured variables (such as biomass concentration) and good guesses for the initial conditions of the parameter estimation algorithm. These results are then used by the successive quadratic programming (SQP) technique to calculate the kinetic parameters and yield coefficients of the anaerobic digestion process. The model, provided with the estimated parameters, is tested with experimental data from a pilot-scale fixed bed reactor treating raw industrial wine distillery wastewater. It is shown that SQP reaches a fast and accurate estimation of the kinetic parameters despite highly noise corrupted experimental data and time varying inputs variables. A statistical analysis is also performed to validate the combined estimation method. Finally, a comparison between the proposed method and the traditional Marquardt technique shows that both yield similar results; however, the calculation time of the traditional technique is considerable higher than that of the proposed method.

  14. Modeling Subducting Slabs: Structural Variations due to Thermal Models, Latent Heat Feedback, and Thermal Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, F. C.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal, mineralogical, and buoyancy structures of thermal-kinetic models of subducting slabs are highly dependent upon a number of parameters, especially if the metastable persistence of olivine in the transition zone is investigated. The choice of starting thermal model for the lithosphere, whether a cooling halfspace (HS) or plate model, can have a significant effect, resulting in metastable wedges of olivine that differ in size by up to two to three times for high values of the thermal parameter (ǎrphi). Moreover, as ǎrphi is the product of the age of the lithosphere at the trench, convergence rate, and dip angle, slabs with similar ǎrphis can show great variations in structures as these constituents change. This is especially true for old lithosphere, as the lithosphere continually cools and thickens with age for HS models, but plate models, with parameters from Parson and Sclater [1977] (PS) or Stein and Stein [1992] (GDH1), achieve a thermal steady-state and constant thickness in about 70 My. In addition, the latent heats (q) of the phase transformations of the Mg2SiO4 polymorphs can also have significant effects in the slabs. Including q feedback in models raises the temperature and reduces the extent of metastable olivine, causing the sizes of the metastable wedges to vary by factors of up to two times. The effects of the choice of thermal model, inclusion and non-inclusion of q feedback, and variations in the constituents of ǎrphi are investigated for several model slabs.

  15. The geomagnetic secular variation S parameter: A mathematical artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, J. M.; Gilder, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Secular variation, the change in the Earth's magnetic field through time, reflects the energy state of the geodynamo. Secular variation is commonly quantified by the standard deviation of the angular distances of the virtual geomagnetic poles to their mean pole, known as the S value. The S value has long been thought to exhibit latitude dependence [S(λ)] whose origin is widely attributed to a combination of time-varying dipole and non-dipole components. The slope, magnitude and uncertainty of S(λ) are taken as a basis to model the geomagnetic field and understand its evolution. Here we show that variations in S stem from a mathematical aberration of the conversion from directions to poles. A new method to quantify secular variation is proposed.

  16. Thermal kinetic and dielectric parameters of acenaphthene crystal grown by vertical Bridgman technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppusamy, S.; Dinesh Babu, K.; Nirmal Kumar, V.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2016-05-01

    The bulk acenaphthene crystal was grown in a single-wall ampoule by vertical Bridgman technique. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the orthorhombic crystal system of title compound with space group Pcm21. Thermal behavior of compound was studied using thermogravimetry—differential scanning calorimetry analysis. Thermal kinetic parameters like activation energy, frequency factor, Avrami exponent, reaction rate and degree of conversion were calculated using Kissingers and Ozawa methods under non-isothermal condition for acenaphthene crystal and reported for the first time. The calculated thermal kinetic parameters are presented. Dielectric studies were performed to calculate the dielectric parameters such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss, AC conductivity, and activation energy from Arrhenius plot.

  17. No kinetic differences during variations of the power clean in inexperienced female collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; McMahon, John J; Fletcher, Caroline

    2013-02-01

    Previous research has identified that the second pull phase of the clean generates the greatest power output and that the midthigh variations of the power clean also result in the greatest force and power output in male athletes; however, no research has compared the kinetics of the variations of the power clean in women. The aim of this investigation was to identify any differences between variations of the clean, across a range of loads, in inexperienced female collegiate athletes. Sixteen healthy female collegiate athletes (age 19 ± 2.3 years; height 166.5 ± 3.22 cm; body mass 62.25 ± 4.52 kg; 1 repetition maximum [1RM] power clean 51.5 ± 2.65 kg) performed 3 repetitions of 3 variations (power clean, hang power clean, midthigh power clean) of the power clean at 60, 70, and 80% of their predetermined 1RM power clean, in a randomized and counterbalanced order. A 2-way analysis of variance (3 × 3; load × variation) revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in peak power, peak vertical force (Fz) or rate of force development (RFD) between loads or variations of the power clean. There appears to be no advantage in terms of peak power, Fz, or RFD between variations of the clean, in inexperienced female athletes, it is suggested, therefore, that inexperienced athletes intermittently perform different variations of the clean to ensure all round development and technical competence in each variation of the exercise.

  18. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, James L.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical reaction path modeling is useful for rapidly assessing the extent of water-aqueous-gas interactions both in natural systems and in industrial processes. Modeling of some systems, such as those at low temperature with relatively high hydrologic flow rates, or those perturbed by the subsurface injection of industrial waste such as CO2 or H2S, must account for the relatively slow kinetics of mineral-gas-water interactions. We have therefore compiled parameters conforming to a general Arrhenius-type rate equation, for over 70 minerals, including phases from all the major classes of silicates, most carbonates, and many other non-silicates. The compiled dissolution rate constants range from -0.21 log moles m-2 s-1 for halite, to -17.44 log moles m-2 s-1 for kyanite, for conditions far from equilibrium, at 25 ?C, and pH near neutral. These data have been added to a computer code that simulates an infinitely well-stirred batch reactor, allowing computation of mass transfer as a function of time. Actual equilibration rates are expected to be much slower than those predicted by the selected computer code, primarily because actual geochemical processes commonly involve flow through porous or fractured media, wherein the development of concentration gradients in the aqueous phase near mineral surfaces, which results in decreased absolute chemical affinity and slower reaction rates. Further differences between observed and computed reaction rates may occur because of variables beyond the scope of most geochemical simulators, such as variation in grain size, aquifer heterogeneity, preferred fluid flow paths, primary and secondary mineral coatings, and secondary minerals that may lead to decreased porosity and clogged pore throats.

  19. Combustion of pistachio shell: physicochemical characterization and evaluation of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jean Constantino Gomes; Alves, José Luiz Francisco; Galdino, Wendell Venicio de Araujo; Moreira, Regina de Fátima Peralta Muniz; José, Humberto Jorge; de Sena, Rennio Felix; Andersen, Silvia Layara Floriani

    2017-04-06

    The study of different renewable energy sources has been intensifying due to the current climate changes; therefore, the present work had the objective to characterize physicochemically the pistachio shell waste and evaluate kinetic parameters of its combustion. The pistachio shell was characterized through proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, SEM, and FTIR. The thermal and kinetic behaviors were evaluated by a thermogravimetric analyzer under oxidant atmosphere between room temperature and 1000 °C, in which the process was performed in three different heating rates (20, 30, and 40 °C min(-1)). The combustion of the pistachio shell presented two regions in the derivative thermogravimetric curves, where the first represents the devolatilization of volatile matter compounds and the second one is associated to the biochar oxidation. These zones were considered for the evaluation of the kinetic parameters E a , A, and f(α) by the modified method of Coats-Redfern, compensation effect, and master plot, respectively. The kinetic parameters for zone 1 were E a1 = 84.11 kJ mol(-1), A 1 = 6.39 × 10(6) min(-1), and f(α)1 = 3(1 - α)(2/3), while for zone 2, the kinetic parameters were E a2 = 37.47 kJ mol(-1), A 2 = 57.14 min(-1), and f(α)2 = 2(1 - α)(1/2).

  20. Kinetics of 12-Hydroxyoctadecanoic Acid SAFiN Crystallization Rationalized Using Hansen Solubility Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Michael A; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2016-12-06

    Changes in solvent chemistry influenced kinetics of both nucleation and crystallization of 12-hydroxyoctadecenoic, as determined using differential scanning calorimetry and applying a modified Avrami model to the calorimetric data. Altering solvent properties influenced solvent-gelator compatibility, which in turn altered the chemical potential of the system at the onset of crystallization, the kinetics of gelation, and the resulting 12HOA crystal fiber length. The chemical potential at the onset of crystallization was linearly correlated to both the hydrogen-bonding Hansen solubility parameter and the solvent-gelator vectorial distance in Hansen space, Ra. Our work suggests that solvent properties can be modulated to affect the solubility of 12HOA, which in turn influences the kinetics of crystallization and the self-assembly of this organogelator into supramolecular crystalline structures. Therefore, modulation of solvent properties during organogelation can be used to control fiber length and thus engineer the physical properties of the gel.

  1. Effects of various process parameters on struvite precipitation kinetics and subsequent determination of rate constants.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, M S; Ellis, N; Mavinic, D S

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O) precipitation kinetics were studied with different operating conditions (varying supersaturation, pH, Mg:P ratio, degree of mixing and seeding conditions) and relevant rate constants were determined by fitting a slightly modified first-order kinetic model to the experimental data obtained. The rate of change of ortho-P concentration in the bulk solutions increases with increasing supersaturation ratio. The estimated rate constants are 2.034, 1.716 and 0.690 hr(-1) for the supersaturation ratio of 9.64, 4.83, and 2.44, respectively. Kinetic parameters were also evaluated for the Mg:P ratio between the ranges of 1.0 and 1.6, indicating higher phosphorus removal efficiency with increasing Mg:P ratio. The rate constants were found to be 0.942, 2.034 and 2.712 hr(-1) for Mg:P ratios of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.6, respectively. The experimental observations for kinetic study of struvite precipitation with different stirrer speeds clearly show that the mixing intensity used had little effect on the intrinsic rate constants. K values found to be 2.034 and 1.902 h(-1) for 100 and 70 rpm, respectively. Seeding, with 250-500 microm of seed crystals during the struvite precipitation kinetics test, was found to have very little effect on the ortho-P removal.

  2. Calcium-binding parameter of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase determined by inactivation kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Hoshino, Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    The irreversible thermal inactivation and the thermodynamics of calcium ion binding of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase in the absence of substrates were studied. The enzyme inactivation on heating was apparently followed by first-order kinetics. The enzyme was stabilized with an increased concentration of calcium ion and thus the inactivation was highly dependent on the state of calcium binding. The activation parameter for the inactivation suggests an unfolding of the enzyme protein upon heating. Values of both the activation enthalpy and entropy were increased with a higher calcium ion concentration. An inactivation kinetic model is based on the assumption of a two-stage unfolding transition in which the bivalent ion dissociation occurs in the first step followed by the secondary structural unfolding. This simple kinetic model provides both a qualitative and quantitative interpretation of calcium ion binding to the enzyme and its effect on the inactivation properties. The specific approximations of the kinetic model were strictly followed in the analysis to calculate the apparent inactivation rate at each calcium ion concentration in terms of the calcium-binding parameters. The enthalpy and entropy changes for the calcium ion binding were calculated to be -149 kJ/mol and -360 J.mol(-1).K(-1) respectively and these values suggest a strong enthalpic affinity for the bivalent ion binding to the enzyme protein. The thermodynamical interpretation attempts to provide clear relations between the terms of an apparent inactivation rate and the calcium binding. PMID:12049626

  3. A methodology for modeling photocatalytic reactors for indoor pollution control using previously estimated kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Passalía, Claudio; Alfano, Orlando M; Brandi, Rodolfo J

    2012-04-15

    A methodology for modeling photocatalytic reactors for their application in indoor air pollution control is carried out. The methodology implies, firstly, the determination of intrinsic reaction kinetics for the removal of formaldehyde. This is achieved by means of a simple geometry, continuous reactor operating under kinetic control regime and steady state. The kinetic parameters were estimated from experimental data by means of a nonlinear optimization algorithm. The second step was the application of the obtained kinetic parameters to a very different photoreactor configuration. In this case, the reactor is a corrugated wall type using nanosize TiO(2) as catalyst irradiated by UV lamps that provided a spatially uniform radiation field. The radiative transfer within the reactor was modeled through a superficial emission model for the lamps, the ray tracing method and the computation of view factors. The velocity and concentration fields were evaluated by means of a commercial CFD tool (Fluent 12) where the radiation model was introduced externally. The results of the model were compared experimentally in a corrugated wall, bench scale reactor constructed in the laboratory. The overall pollutant conversion showed good agreement between model predictions and experiments, with a root mean square error less than 4%.

  4. An investigation on the catalytic capacity of dolomite in transesterification and the calculation of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Niu, Sheng-Li; Huo, Meng-Jia; Lu, Chun-Mei; Liu, Meng-Qi; Li, Hui

    2014-04-01

    The catalytic capacity of dolomite in transesterification was investigated and the kinetic parameters were calculated. The activated dolomites as transesterification catalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption and desorption and Hammett indicator method, where the original dolomite was analyzed by thermogravimetric and X-ray fluorescence in advance. Its potential catalytic capacity was validated from aspects of the activated temperature and the reused property, where the reliability of the experimental system was also examined. Then, influences of the catalyst added amount, the mole ratio of methanol to oil, the transesterification temperature and the transesterification time on the catalytic capacity were investigated. Finally, kinetic parameters of the transesterification catalyzed by the activated dolomite were calculated.

  5. Spatial variations of seismic parameters and seismic properties in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Jackson, D. D.

    2008-12-01

    The b value in Gutenberg-Richer relationship is critical for both hazard analysis and physical understanding of earthquakes. In California, people usually assume that the magnitude distribution is independent of location, but it might not be apply to other regions such as creeping zone, geothermal and volcanic regions. We divide California into 1x1 degrees grid and calculate the b value in each cell and estimation the variation of b value caused by magnitude errors using simulated earthquakes. The spatial variation of p value in Omori law will help people to find the whether and how the stress field, geographical condition and temperature influence the aftershock sequences. We use ETAS model to estimate the p value in each cell and find the statistical spatial correlations. We explore the relationship between b, p values and heat flow in California to find whether there are more small earthquakes in high temperature area and whether the high temperature shortens the stress relaxation time. We explore the background rate in California. We find the stationarity of background rates in southern and northern California are significant different. And we also explore the variation of the ratio of background events to total events across different stress regimes to discuss how stress influences the earthquake physicics.

  6. Systematic variational method for statistical nonlinear state and parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingxin; Rey, Daniel; Kadakia, Nirag; Eldridge, Michael; Morone, Uriel I.; Rozdeba, Paul; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Quinn, John C.

    2015-11-01

    In statistical data assimilation one evaluates the conditional expected values, conditioned on measurements, of interesting quantities on the path of a model through observation and prediction windows. This often requires working with very high dimensional integrals in the discrete time descriptions of the observations and model dynamics, which become functional integrals in the continuous-time limit. Two familiar methods for performing these integrals include (1) Monte Carlo calculations and (2) variational approximations using the method of Laplace plus perturbative corrections to the dominant contributions. We attend here to aspects of the Laplace approximation and develop an annealing method for locating the variational path satisfying the Euler-Lagrange equations that comprises the major contribution to the integrals. This begins with the identification of the minimum action path starting with a situation where the model dynamics is totally unresolved in state space, and the consistent minimum of the variational problem is known. We then proceed to slowly increase the model resolution, seeking to remain in the basin of the minimum action path, until a path that gives the dominant contribution to the integral is identified. After a discussion of some general issues, we give examples of the assimilation process for some simple, instructive models from the geophysical literature. Then we explore a slightly richer model of the same type with two distinct time scales. This is followed by a model characterizing the biophysics of individual neurons.

  7. Classical nucleation theory of immersion freezing: sensitivity of contact angle schemes to thermodynamic and kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Luisa; Welti, André; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice formation by immersion freezing in mixed-phase clouds can be parameterized in general circulation models (GCMs) by classical nucleation theory (CNT). CNT parameterization schemes describe immersion freezing as a stochastic process, including the properties of insoluble aerosol particles in the droplets. There are different ways to parameterize the properties of aerosol particles (i.e., contact angle schemes), which are compiled and tested in this paper. The goal of this study is to find a parameterization scheme for GCMs to describe immersion freezing with the ability to shift and adjust the slope of the freezing curve compared to homogeneous freezing to match experimental data. We showed in a previous publication that the resulting freezing curves from CNT are very sensitive to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in the case of homogeneous freezing. Here we investigate how sensitive the outcome of a parameter estimation for contact angle schemes from experimental data is to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. We demonstrate that the parameters describing the contact angle schemes can mask the uncertainty in thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. Different CNT formulations are fitted to an extensive immersion freezing dataset consisting of size-selected measurements as a function of temperature and time for different mineral dust types, namely kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, microcline (K-feldspar), and Arizona test dust. We investigated how accurate different CNT formulations (with estimated fit parameters for different contact angle schemes) reproduce the measured freezing data, especially the time and particle size dependence of the freezing process. The results are compared to a simplified deterministic freezing scheme. In this context, we evaluated which CNT-based parameterization scheme able to represent particle properties is the best choice to describe immersion freezing in a GCM.

  8. Effects of J couplings and unobservable minor states on kinetics parameters extracted from CEST data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; Yang, Daiwen

    2014-12-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiments have emerged as a powerful tool for characterizing dynamics and sparse populated conformers of protein in slow exchanging systems. We show that J couplings and 'invisible' minor states can cause systematic errors in kinetics parameters and chemical shifts extracted from CEST data. For weakly coupled spin systems, the J coupling effect can be removed using an approximation method. This method is warranted through detailed theoretical derivation, supported by results from simulations and experiments on an acyl carrier protein domain. Simulations demonstrate that the effect of 'invisible' minor states on the extracted kinetics parameters depends on the chemical shifts, populations, exchange rates of the 'invisible' states to the observed major or minor state and exchange models. Moreover, the extracted chemical shifts of the observed minor state can also be influenced by the "invisible" minor states. The presence of an off-pathway folding intermediate in the acyl carrier protein domain explains why the exchange rates obtained with a two-state model from individual residues that displayed only two obvious CEST dips varied significantly and the extracted exchange rates for 15N and 13CO spins located in the same peptide bond could be very different. The approximation method described here simplifies CEST data analysis in many situations where the coupling effect cannot be ignored and decoupling techniques are not desirable. In addition, this study also raises alerts for 'invisible' minor states which can cause errors in not only kinetics parameters but also chemical shifts of the observed minor state.

  9. Nonlocal, kinetic stimulated Raman scattering in nonuniform plasmas: Averaged variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, P.; Friedland, L.; Shagalov, A. G.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2012-07-15

    Excitation of continuously phase-locked (autoresonant) plasma waves in a nonuniform plasma via stimulated Raman backscattering is analyzed with a focus on the kinetic regime (k{lambda}{sub D}{approx}1). The dominant nonlinear effect in this regime is that of resonant particles, and the plasma wave excitation is a nonlocal process involving formation and transport of the electron phase space holes. Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied in studying the coupled plasma, laser pump, and seed waves dynamics. A flat-top electron velocity distribution is used as the simplest model allowing a variational formulation within the water bag theory. The corresponding Lagrangian, averaged over the fast phase variable, yields evolution equations for the slow field variables. The adiabatic multiple water bag extension of the theory for application to autoresonant plasma waves in nonuniform plasmas with more realistic initial distributions is also discussed. Numerical solutions of the system of slow variational equations are compared with Vlasov-Ampere simulations.

  10. Kinetic parameters of thermally stimulated light emission phenomenon in CaF2 doped with Tm(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    González, P R; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Furetta, C

    2016-11-01

    The characterization of new materials thermoluminescent used in radiation dosimetry, require the determination of kinetic parameters, which are associated with the number and shape of the peaks which presents its glow curve, among the most important are: the activation energy, E, or depth of the traps, the frequency factor, s, and the kinetics order, b. These parameters are necessary to predict the stability of thermoluminescent information after irradiation of the material. In this work, we present the results obtained for the determination of kinetic parameters of Tm(3+)-doped CaF2, the methods used for the determination of kinetic parameters were; initial growth signal TL, General order Chen method, and Deconvolution of glow curve. The results showed that the glow curve of CaF2 presents three glow peaks, 492K main peak and two smaller peaks, one at 430K and another to 566K. The dosimetric glow peak fits to the general-order kinetics model.

  11. Narrow-track wheeled agricultural tractor parameter variation.

    PubMed

    Guzzomi, A; Rondelli, V

    2013-10-01

    Despite a general consensus among farmers, manufacturers, and researchers that wheeled agricultural tractor design has changed over time, there is little published evidence. There is debate as to whether the standardized rollover protective structure (ROPS) energy and force requirements, based on a tractor reference mass and pertaining to studies conducted more than 40 years ago, are appropriate for modern tractors. This article investigated the physical parameters of 326 modern narrow-track tractors, measured according to OECD Code 6 over 16 years (1993 to 2008 inclusive): 252 (-77%) were fixed-chassis tractors and 74 (-23%) were articulated. To understand the significance of design changes, the data were analyzed with respect to time and as a function of tractor mass. Articulated and fixed-chassis data were treated separately. The time data allowed qualitative analysis, while the mass data allowed quantitative analysis. The parameters show some changes over time and clearly indicate differences between articulated and fixed-chassis types. The parameter changes, along with the differences between types, may have important safety ramifications for ROPS energy absorption requirements, and these aspects are discussed. Regression lines with R2 values were fitted to the mass-related data for fixed-chassis and articulated tractors to determine the suitability of fit. The mass relations also displayed differences between fixed-chassis and articulated tractors. Thus, the most significant recommendation from this study is that the standardized testing procedure for narrow-track wheeled agricultural tractor category should be split into two groups: fixed-chassis and articulated.

  12. Thermoluminescence kinetic parameters of different amount La-doped ZnB₂O₄.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Gozel, Aziz Halit; Yüksel, Mehmet; Dogan, Tamer; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% La-doped ZnB2O4 phosphors (i.e. ZnB2O4:0.01La, ZnB2O4:0.02La, ZnB2O4:0.03La and ZnB2O4:0.04La) synthesized by nitric acid method have been calculated. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of ZnB2O4:La phosphors after beta-irradiation showed a very well defined main peak having the maximum temperature at around 200°C and a shoulder peak at around 315°C with a constant heating rate of 5°C/s. The kinetic parameters of ZnB2O4:La phosphors TL glow peaks (i.e. order of kinetics (b), activation energies (Ea) and frequency factors (s)) have been determined and evaluated by Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD), and Peak Shape (PS) methods using the glow curve data. From the results, it can conclude that the values of Ea obtained with these methods for ZnB2O4:La phosphors are consistent with each other, but the s values differ considerably.

  13. Determination of thermoluminescence kinetic parameters of terbium-doped zirconium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T.; Azorín, J.; Falcony, C.; Martínez, E.; García, M.

    2001-06-01

    In recent years considerable importance has been attached to zirconium oxide doped with rare earth (ZrO 2 : RE) thin films due to their desirable characteristics for use in UV dosimetry. In our laboratories we have developed a method to prepare ZrO 2 : RE thin films. Dosimetric characteristics of these materials have been reported previously (Azorin et al., Radiat. Meas. 29 (1998) 315; Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 85 (1999) 317) and results of these have stimulated continued development and analysis of the thermoluminescence mechanism. Two important parameters to be determined in TL studies are the activation energy ( E) and the frequency factor ( s). This paper presents the results of determining kinetic parameters of terbium-doped zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 : Tb) thin films, exposed to 260 nm UV light, using the Lushchik (Sov. Phys. JETF 3 (1956) 390) and Chen (J. Appl. Phys. 40 (1969) 570; J. Electrochem. Soc. 166 (1969) 1254) methods. Kinetic analysis of the glow curve shows second order kinetics for both the first and second glow peaks.

  14. Evaluating kinetic models for preferential CO-oxidation catalysts using optimization-based parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, Adam C.; Huang, Xinqun; Martin, Lealon L.

    2012-07-01

    We adapt a general-purpose optimization-based parameter estimation technique previously described in the literature [1] to evaluate the suitability of a number of common kinetic models for the representation of key performance characteristics (conversion and selectivity) of catalysts used for the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of H2. We find that, for process engineering applications, there is no clear practical advantage to using mechanistically based kinetic models (e.g. Langmuir-Hinshelwood) unless the precise chemical mechanism is known. Empirical rate models are found generally to provide equivalent or better simulations of key performance variables for a diverse group of catalyst formulations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction is relevant within PROX reaction systems under conditons containing high fractions of CO2 and H2, confirming the expectations of Choi and Stenger (2004) [2]. Finally, we attempt to identify any emergent trends in kinetic parameters among catalysts sharing similar active metal or metal oxide components. Unfortunately, apart from confirming that the activation barrier for CO oxidation is generally less than the barrier for H2 oxidation (an expected relationship for PROX catalysts), no such trends are found.

  15. Analysis of the variation of range parameters of thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareła, Jarosław; Kastek, Mariusz; Firmanty, Krzysztof; Krupiński, Michał

    2016-10-01

    Measured range characteristics may vary considerably (up to several dozen percent) between different samples of the same camera type. The question is whether the manufacturing process somehow lacks repeatability or the commonly used measurement procedures themselves need improvement. The presented paper attempts to deal with the aforementioned question. The measurement method has been thoroughly analyzed as well as the measurement test bed. Camera components (such as detector and optics) have also been analyzed and their key parameters have been measured, including noise figures of the entire system. Laboratory measurements are the most precise method used to determine range parameters of a thermal camera. However, in order to obtain reliable results several important conditions have to be fulfilled. One must have the test equipment capable of measurement accuracy (uncertainty) significantly better than the magnitudes of measured quantities. The measurements must be performed in a controlled environment thus excluding the influence of varying environmental conditions. The personnel must be well-trained, experienced in testing the thermal imaging devices and familiar with the applied measurement procedures. The measurement data recorded for several dozen of cooled thermal cameras (from one of leading camera manufacturers) have been the basis of the presented analysis. The measurements were conducted in the accredited research laboratory of Institute of Optoelectronics (Military University of Technology).

  16. Inferring Mechanistic Parameters from Amyloid Formation Kinetics by Approximate Bayesian Computation.

    PubMed

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri; Nath, Abhinav

    2017-03-14

    Amyloid formation is implicated in a number of human diseases, and is thought to proceed via a nucleation-dependent polymerization mechanism. Experimenters often wish to relate changes in amyloid formation kinetics, for example, in response to small molecules to specific mechanistic steps along this pathway. However, fitting kinetic fibril formation data to a complex model including explicit rate constants results in an ill-posed problem with a vast number of potential solutions. The levels of uncertainty remaining in parameters calculated from these models, arising both from experimental noise and high levels of degeneracy or codependency in parameters, is often unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a combination of explicit mathematical models with an approximate Bayesian computation approach can be used to assign the mechanistic effects of modulators on amyloid fibril formation. We show that even when exact rate constants cannot be extracted, parameters derived from these rate constants can be recovered and used to assign mechanistic effects and their relative magnitudes with a great deal of confidence. Furthermore, approximate Bayesian computation provides a robust method for visualizing uncertainty remaining in the model parameters, regardless of its origin. We apply these methods to the problem of heparin-mediated tau polymerization, which displays complex kinetic behavior not amenable to analysis by more traditional methods. Our analysis indicates that the role of heparin cannot be explained by enhancement of nucleation alone, as has been previously proposed. The methods described here are applicable to a wide range of systems, as models can be easily adapted to account for new reactions and reversibility.

  17. The influence of energy migration on luminescence kinetics parameters in upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyatkin, Sergey; Asharchuk, Ilya; Khaydukov, Kirill; Nechaev, Andrey; Lebedev, Oleg; Vainer, Yuri; Semchishen, Vladimir; Khaydukov, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of upconversion at the nanoscale is still under discussion. In this paper, we report on the experimental results of anti-Stokes luminescence kinetics in the upconversion nanoparticles of β-NaYF4: 20%Yb3+; 0.6%Tm3+. The parameters of the luminescence kinetics were found to be unambiguously dependent on the number of excitation quanta n, which are necessary for certain transitions between the energy states of thulium ions. The observed correlation has been explained by means of the long-lasting energy migration between the ytterbium ions. The spread in time between the luminescent maxima of the corresponding thulium transitions not only shows the nonlinear character of upconversion, but also reveals the time scale of energy migration as well. From these, we derive that the conventional Förster formalism applied to the estimation of energy transfer efficiency in UCNP-fluorophore pairs can provide misleading results.

  18. ULYSSES plasma parameters: latitudinal, radial, and temporal variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Phillips, J. L.; Bame, S.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Suess, S. T.

    1996-12-01

    Observations by the Ulysses SWOOPS plasma experiment are used to investigate spatial and temporal gradients during the mission, with emphasis on more recent high latitude observations including the recent South Pole to North Pole passage during solar minimum. Compared to lower latitudes, the high latitude solar wind had higher average speed, proton temperature, and momentum flux, and lower number flux density. As the average momentum flux observed in the high speed wind was 21% greater than at the equator, during solar minimum the distance to the heliopause will be comparatively less in the solar equatorial plane than over the poles. The long term temporal gradients of momentum flux over the life of the mission are considerably larger than the latitudinal gradient observed by Ulysses during solar minimum. A modest North-South high latitude asymmetry is observed in the plasma parameters; the velocity is on the average 13km/s to 24km/s greater at Northern latitudes than at Southern, and temperature is also higher. The North-South temperature asymmetry is greater than can be explained by the North-South velocity difference and the dependence of solar wind temperature upon speed. The power law dependence of temperature on heliocentric distance, r, at high latitudes is in range r^-0.81^ to r^-1.03^, where r^-0.81^ is the Southern latitude result and r^-1.03^ the Northern. The parameter T/n^1/2^, where T is temperature and n is proton number density, can be better predicted from speed than can temperature alone. Comparison with calculations based on source models and magnetograph data indicate that the expansion of open coronal field lines close to the Sun was greater in the Southern hemisphere than in the Northern; this anticorrelation with the expansion factor is consistent with previous observational and theoretical work.

  19. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  20. Order Parameter and Kinetics of Non-Equilibrium Phase Transition Stimulated by the Impact of Volumetric Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyadnikov, E. E.; Turchanovskii, I. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The authors formulated an understanding of the order parameter and built a kinetic model for the nonequilibrium first-order "solid body - liquid" phase transition stimulated by the impact of the volumetric heat source. Analytical solutions for kinetic equations were found, and it was demonstrated that depending on the phase transition rate "surface" and "bulk" melting mechanisms are implemented.

  1. Plyometric Long Jump Training With Progressive Loading Improves Kinetic and Kinematic Swimming Start Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rebutini, Vanessa Z; Pereira, Gleber; Bohrer, Roberta C D; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-09-01

    Rebutini, VZ, Pereira, G, Bohrer, RCD, Ugrinowitsch, C, and Rodacki, ALF. Plyometric long jump training with progressive loading improves kinetic and kinematic swimming start parameters. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2392-2398, 2016-This study was aimed to determine the effects of a plyometric long jump training program on torque around the lower limb joints and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start. Ten swimmers performed 3 identical assessment sessions, measuring hip and knee muscle extensors during maximal voluntary isometric contraction and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start, at 3 instants: INI (2 weeks before the training program, control period), PRE (2 weeks after INI measurements), and POST (24-48 hours after 9 weeks of training). There were no significant changes from INI to PRE measurements. However, the peak torque and rate of torque development increased significantly from PRE to POST measurements for both hip (47 and 108%) and knee (24 and 41%) joints. There were significant improvements to the horizontal force (7%), impulse (9%), and angle of resultant force (19%). In addition, there were significant improvements to the center of mass displacement (5%), horizontal takeoff velocity (16%), horizontal velocity at water entrance (22%), and peak angle velocity for the knee (15%) and hip joints (16%). Therefore, the plyometric long jump training protocol was effective to enhance torque around the lower limb joints and to control the resultant vector direction, to increase the swimming jump start performance. These findings suggest that coaches should use long jump training instead of vertical jump training to improve swimming start performance.

  2. Gas phase NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine. Environmental effects on kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; Leung, Doris Y.; True, Nancy S.

    1984-04-01

    Gas phase 1H NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine are consistent with first order chemical exchange rate constants which are ca. 25 times faster than those observed in neat liquids at corresponding temperatures. The associated kinetic parameters: Eact(∞), 20.5(1.1) kcal mol -1, Δ H‡, 19.7(1.0) kcal mol -1 and Δ G‡, 21.1(0.4) kcal mol -1 are approximately 2.5 kcal mol -1 lower than the most recently reported values for the neat liquid. The observed phase dependence is consistent with a process proceeding via a freely rotating transition state.

  3. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  4. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction of Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W K; Ougouag, A M; Rahnema, F; Mckinley, M S

    2003-06-11

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fission density distribution.

  5. Parameter Identification and On-line Estimation of a Reduced Kinetic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dellorco, P.C.; Flesner, R.L.; Le, L.A.; Littell, J.D.; Muske, K.R.

    1999-02-01

    In this work, we present the estimation techniques used to update the model parameters in a reduced kinetic model describing the oxidation-reduction re- actions in a hydrothermal oxidation reactor. The model is used in a nonlinear model-based controller that minimizes the total aqueous nitrogen in the reac- tor effluent. Model reduction is accomplished by com- bining similar reacting compounds into one of four component groups and considering the global reac- tion pathways for each of these groups. The reduced kinetic model developed for thk reaction system pro- vides a means to characterize the complex chemical reaction system without considering each chemicaJ species present and the reaction kinetics of every pos- sible reaction pathway. For the reaction system under study, model reduction is essential in order to reduce the computational requirement so that on-line imple- mentation of the nonlinear model-based controller is possible and also to reduce the amount of a priori information required for the model.

  6. Direct determination of enzyme kinetic parameters from single reactions using a new progress curve analysis tool.

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, Felix; Zotter, Agnes; Schreiber, Gideon

    2016-10-15

    With computer-based data-fitting methods becoming a standard tool in biochemistry, progress curve analysis of enzyme kinetics is a feasible, yet seldom used tool. Here we present a versatile Matlab-based tool (PCAT) to analyze catalysis progress curves with three complementary model approaches. The first two models are based on the known closed-form solution for this problem: the first describes the required Lambert W function with an analytical approximation and the second provides a numerical solution of the Lambert W function. The third model is a direct simulation of the enzyme kinetics. Depending on the chosen model, the tools excel in speed, accuracy or initial value requirements. Using simulated and experimental data, we show the strengths and pitfalls of the different fitting models. Direct simulation proves to have the highest level of accuracy, but it also requires reasonable initial values to converge. Finally, we propose a standard procedure to obtain optimized enzyme kinetic parameters from single progress curves.

  7. Design of noninteracting flight control systems in the presence of large parameter variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, F. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of system parameter variations on the over-all system stability were considered. Results from the application of numerical minimization to reduce system coupling are given and some future research directions are outlined.

  8. Variations of geophysical and biological parameters observed at a solar eclipse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predeanu, I.

    A total solar eclipse is accompanied by specific changes in the terrestrial magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere. Certain effects also appear in several terrestrial parameters at ground level: air temperature, geomagnetic field and radio wave propagation all exhibit clear variations at the occurrence of the eclipse. At the same time, during a total solar eclipse, variations have been noticed in certain vital activities and physiological parameters of different organisms (insects, marine animals, sheep, humans).

  9. Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

  10. Nutrient Uptake by Microorganisms according to Kinetic Parameters from Theory as Related to Cytoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Button, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The abilities of organisms to sequester substrate are described by the two kinetic constants specific affinity, a°, and maximal velocity Vmax. Specific affinity is derived from the frequency of substrate-molecule collisions with permease sites on the cell surface at subsaturating concentrations of substrates. Vmax is derived from the number of permeases and the effective residence time, τ, of the transported molecule on the permease. The results may be analyzed with affinity plots (v/S versus v, where v is the rate of substrate uptake), which extrapolate to the specific affinity and are usually concave up. A third derived parameter, the affinity constant KA, is similar to KM but is compared to the specific affinity rather than Vmax  and is defined as the concentration of substrate necessary to reduce the specific affinity by half. It can be determined in the absence of a maximal velocity measurement and is equal to the Michaelis constant for a system with hyperbolic kinetics. Both are taken as a measure of τ, with departure of KM from KA being affected by permease/enzyme ratios. Compilation of kinetic data indicates a 108-fold range in specific affinities and a smaller (103-fold) range in Vmax values. Data suggest that both specific affinities and maximal velocities can be underestimated by protocols which interrupt nutrient flow prior to kinetic analysis. A previously reported inverse relationship between specific affinity and saturation constants was confirmed. Comparisons of affinities with ambient concentrations of substrates indicated that only the largest a°S values are compatible with growth in natural systems. PMID:9729603

  11. Variational perturbation and extended Plefka approaches to dynamics on random networks: the case of the kinetic Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachschmid-Romano, L.; Battistin, C.; Opper, M.; Roudi, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We describe and analyze some novel approaches for studying the dynamics of Ising spin glass models. We first briefly consider the variational approach based on minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between independent trajectories and the real ones and note that this approach only coincides with the mean field equations from the saddle point approximation to the generating functional when the dynamics is defined through a logistic link function, which is the case for the kinetic Ising model with parallel update. We then spend the rest of the paper developing two ways of going beyond the saddle point approximation to the generating functional. In the first one, we develop a variational perturbative approximation to the generating functional by expanding the action around a quadratic function of the local fields and conjugate local fields whose parameters are optimized. We derive analytical expressions for the optimal parameters and show that when the optimization is suitably restricted, we recover the mean field equations that are exact for the fully asymmetric random couplings (Mézard and Sakellariou 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 L07001). However, without this restriction the results are different. We also describe an extended Plefka expansion in which in addition to the magnetization, we also fix the correlation and response functions. Finally, we numerically study the performance of these approximations for Sherrington-Kirkpatrick type couplings for various coupling strengths and the degrees of coupling symmetry, for both temporally constant but random, as well as time varying external fields. We show that the dynamical equations derived from the extended Plefka expansion outperform the others in all regimes, although it is computationally more demanding. The unconstrained variational approach does not perform well in the small coupling regime, while it approaches dynamical TAP equations of (Roudi and Hertz 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 P03031) for strong couplings.

  12. Determination of the kinetic parameters of BeO using isothermal decay method.

    PubMed

    Azorin Nieto, Juan; Vega, Claudia Azorin; Montalvo, Teodoro Rivera; Cabrera, Eugenio Torijano

    2016-02-01

    Most of the existing methods for obtaining the frequency factors make use of the trap depth (activation energy) making some assumptions about the order of the kinetics. This causes inconsistencies in the reported values of trapping parameters due that the values of the activation energy obtained by different methods differ appreciably among them. Then, it is necessary to use a method independent of the trap depth making use of the isothermal luminescence decay (ILD) method. The trapping parameters associated with the prominent glow peak of BeO (280°C) are reported using ILD method. As a check, the trap parameters are also calculated by glow curve shape (Chen's) method after isolating the prominent glow peak by thermal cleaning technique. Our results show a very good agreement between the trapping parameters calculated by the two methods. ILD method was used for determining the trapping parameters of BeO. Results obtained applying this method are in good agreement with those obtained using other methods, except in the value of the frequency factor.

  13. Accounting for the kinetics in order parameter analysis: Lessons from theoretical models and a disordered peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovska, Ganna; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Molecular simulations as well as single molecule experiments have been widely analyzed in terms of order parameters, the latter representing candidate probes for the relevant degrees of freedom. Notwithstanding this approach is very intuitive, mounting evidence showed that such descriptions are inaccurate, leading to ambiguous definitions of states and wrong kinetics. To overcome these limitations a framework making use of order parameter fluctuations in conjunction with complex network analysis is investigated. Derived from recent advances in the analysis of single molecule time traces, this approach takes into account the fluctuations around each time point to distinguish between states that have similar values of the order parameter but different dynamics. Snapshots with similar fluctuations are used as nodes of a transition network, the clusterization of which into states provides accurate Markov-state-models of the system under study. Application of the methodology to theoretical models with a noisy order parameter as well as the dynamics of a disordered peptide illustrates the possibility to build accurate descriptions of molecular processes on the sole basis of order parameter time series without using any supplementary information.

  14. Respirometric measurement of kinetic parameters: effect of activated sludge floc size.

    PubMed

    Chu, K H; van Veldhuizen, H M; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2003-01-01

    The variation of activated sludge floc size with the mixing intensity of a mechanically stirred respirometer, expressed in terms of the mean energy dissipation rate, was characterized using a photometric dispersion analyzer. The floc size decreased rapidly when the energy dissipation rate was increased from 1.33 x 10(-3) to 2.68 x 10(-3) W/kg. Experiments were performed to investigate the effect of floc size on the oxygen saturation coefficient measured under the condition of acetate oxidation. The respirometric data were interpreted by considering only the kinetics of biochemical reactions. The variation of the oxygen saturation coefficient with mixing intensity was found to correlate with the variation of floc size with mixing intensity. The oxygen saturation coefficient was found to decrease from 0.23 to 0.08 mg/L when the mean energy dissipation rate was increased from 1.33 x 10(-3) to 2.68 x 10(-3) W/kg. The dependence of the oxygen saturation coefficient on floc size or mixing intensity suggests the presence of mass transfer resistances in large flocs.

  15. Local field potentials in primate motor cortex encode grasp kinetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Milekovic, Tomislav; Truccolo, Wilson; Grün, Sonja; Riehle, Alexa; Brochier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reach and grasp kinematics are known to be encoded in the spiking activity of neuronal ensembles and in local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from primate motor cortex during movement planning and execution. However, little is known, especially in LFPs, about the encoding of kinetic parameters, such as forces exerted on the object during the same actions. We implanted two monkeys with microelectrode arrays in the motor cortical areas MI and PMd to investigate encoding of grasp-related parameters in motor cortical LFPs during planning and execution of reach-and-grasp movements. We identified three components of the LFP that modulated during grasps corresponding to low (0.3 - 7Hz), intermediate (∼10 - ∼40Hz) and high (∼80 - 250Hz) frequency bands. We show that all three components can be used to classify not only grip types but also object loads during planning and execution of a grasping movement. In addition, we demonstrate that all three components recorded during planning or execution can be used to continuously decode finger pressure forces and hand position related to the grasping movement. Low and high frequency components provide similar classification and decoding accuracies, which were substantially higher than those obtained from the intermediate frequency component. Our results demonstrate that intended reach and grasp kinetic parameters are encoded in multiple LFP bands during both movement planning and execution. These findings also suggest that the LFP is a reliable signal for the control of parameters related to object load and applied pressure forces in brain-machine interfaces. PMID:25869861

  16. Maximum likelihood estimation of protein kinetic parameters under weak assumptions from unfolding force spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aioanei, Daniel; Samorì, Bruno; Brucale, Marco

    2009-12-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is extensively used to characterize the mechanical unfolding behavior of individual protein domains under applied force by pulling chimeric polyproteins consisting of identical tandem repeats. Constant velocity unfolding SMFS data can be employed to reconstruct the protein unfolding energy landscape and kinetics. The methods applied so far require the specification of a single stretching force increase function, either theoretically derived or experimentally inferred, which must then be assumed to accurately describe the entirety of the experimental data. The very existence of a suitable optimal force model, even in the context of a single experimental data set, is still questioned. Herein, we propose a maximum likelihood (ML) framework for the estimation of protein kinetic parameters which can accommodate all the established theoretical force increase models. Our framework does not presuppose the existence of a single force characteristic function. Rather, it can be used with a heterogeneous set of functions, each describing the protein behavior in the stretching time range leading to one rupture event. We propose a simple way of constructing such a set of functions via piecewise linear approximation of the SMFS force vs time data and we prove the suitability of the approach both with synthetic data and experimentally. Additionally, when the spontaneous unfolding rate is the only unknown parameter, we find a correction factor that eliminates the bias of the ML estimator while also reducing its variance. Finally, we investigate which of several time-constrained experiment designs leads to better estimators.

  17. Optimization of glycerol fed-batch fermentation in different reactor states: a variable kinetic parameter approach.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dongming; Liu, Dehua; Zhu, Haoli; Zhang, Jianan

    2002-05-01

    To optimize the fed-batch processes of glycerol fermentation in different reactor states, typical bioreactors including 500-mL shaking flask, 600-mL and 15-L airlift loop reactor, and 5-L stirred vessel were investigated. It was found that by reestimating the values of only two variable kinetic parameters associated with physical transport phenomena in a reactor, the macrokinetic model of glycerol fermentation proposed in previous work could describe well the batch processes in different reactor states. This variable kinetic parameter (VKP) approach was further applied to model-based optimization of discrete-pulse feed (DPF) strategies of both glucose and corn steep slurry for glycerol fed-batch fermentation. The experimental results showed that, compared with the feed strategies determined just by limited experimental optimization in previous work, the DPF strategies with VKPs adjusted could improve glycerol productivity at least by 27% in the scale-down and scale-up reactor states. The approach proposed appeared promising for further modeling and optimization of glycerol fermentation or the similar bioprocesses in larger scales.

  18. A computer program for enzyme kinetics that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, R; Gavaldà, M T; Canela, E I

    1986-01-01

    A method of model discrimination and parameter estimation in enzyme kinetics is proposed. The experimental design and analysis of the model are carried out simultaneously and the stopping rule for experimentation is deduced by the experimenter when the probabilities a posteriori indicate that one model is clearly superior to the rest. A FORTRAN77 program specifically developed for joint designs is given. The method is very powerful, as indicated by its usefulness in the discrimination between models. For example, it has been successfully applied to three cases of enzyme kinetics (a single-substrate Michaelian reaction with product inhibition, a single-substrate complex reaction and a two-substrate reaction). By using this method the most probable model and the estimates of the parameters can be obtained in one experimental session. The FORTRAN77 program is deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50134 (19 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. PMID:3800965

  19. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jodi N.; Heureux, Ana M.C.; Sharwood, Robert E.; Rickaby, Rosalind E.M.; Morel, François M.M.; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat c), oxygenation (k cat o), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23–68 µM), SC/O (57–116mol mol−1), and K O (413–2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat c for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1–3.7s−1), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat c for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  20. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  1. Chemical kinetics parameters and model validation for the gasification of PCEA nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; Contescu, Cristian I.

    2014-01-01

    A series of gasification experiments, using two right cylinder specimens (∼12.7 × 25.4 mm and 25.4 × 25.4 mm) of PCEA nuclear graphite in ambient airflow, measured the total gasification flux at weight losses up to 41.5% and temperatures (893-1015 K) characteristics of those for in-pores gasification Mode (a) and in-pores diffusion-limited Mode (b). The chemical kinetics parameters for the gasification of PCEA graphite are determined using a multi-parameters optimization algorithm from the measurements of the total gasification rate and transient weight loss in experiments. These parameters are: (i) the pre-exponential rate coefficients and the Gaussian distributions and values of specific activation energies for adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO gas; (ii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential rate coefficient for the breakup of stable un-dissociated C(O2) oxygen radicals to form stable (CO) complexes; (iii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential coefficient for desorption of CO2 gas and; (iv) the initial surface area of reactive free sites per unit mass. This area is consistently 13.5% higher than that for nuclear graphite grades of NBG-25 and IG-110 and decreases inversely proportional with the square root of the initial mass of the graphite specimens in the experiments. Experimental measurements successfully validate the chemical-reactions kinetics model that calculates continuous Arrhenius curves of the total gasification flux and the production rates of CO and CO2 gases. The model results at different total weight losses agree well with measurements and expand beyond the temperatures in the experiments to the diffusion-limited mode of gasification. Also calculated are the production rates of CO and CO2 gases and their relative contributions to the total gasification rate in the experiments as functions of temperature, for total weight losses of 5% and 10%.

  2. Chemical kinetics parameters and model validation for the gasification of PCEA nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S; Tournier, Jean-Michel; Contescu, Cristian I

    2014-01-01

    A series of gasification experiments, using two right cylinder specimens (~ 12.7 x 25.4 mm and 25.4 x 25.4 mm) of PCEA nuclear graphite in ambient airflow, measured the total gasification flux at weight losses up to 41.5% and temperatures (893-1015 K) characteristics of those for in-pores gasification Mode (a) and in-pores diffusion-limited Mode (b). The chemical kinetics parameters for the gasification of PCEA graphite are determined using a multi-parameters optimization algorithm from the measurements of the total gasification rate and transient weight loss in experiments. These parameters are: (i) the pre-exponential rate coefficients and the Gaussian distributions and values of specific activation energies for adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO gas; (ii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential rate coefficient for the breakup of stable un-dissociated C(O2) oxygen radicals to form stable (CO) complexes; (iii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential coefficient for desorption of CO2 gas and; (iv) the initial surface area of reactive free sites per unit mass. This area is consistently 13.5% higher than that for nuclear graphite grades of NBG-25 and IG-110 and decreases inversely proportional with the square root of the initial mass of the graphite specimens in the experiments. Experimental measurements successfully validate the chemical-reactions kinetics model that calculates continuous Arrhenius curves of the total gasification flux and the production rates of CO and CO2 gases. The model results at different total weight losses agree well with measurements and expand beyond the temperatures in the experiments to the diffusion-limited mode of gasification. Also calculated are the production rates of CO and CO2 gases and their relative contributions to the total gasification rate in the experiments as functions of temperature, for total weight losses of 5% and 10%.

  3. {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter variability due to depth of anesthesia in the anesthetized canine

    SciTech Connect

    Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Yang, L.

    1995-05-01

    The effect of {open_quotes}depth of anesthesia{close_quotes} on {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter estimates in the myocardium was tested in a series of replicated studies on six dogs using the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. A single lateral slice through the myocardium was imaged following each of four successive injections of {sup 82}Rb. For three of the injections the animals were lightly anesthetized (mean blood pressure about 90 mmHg). For the second injection, the amount of anesthetic was increased until blood pressure dipped to about 70 mHg. The fourth injection was preceded by an infusion of dipyridamole to induce a stress-state. The entire sequence was repeated at least twice with each of the six animals. A two compartment model with parameters k{sub 1} (uptake rate), k{sub 2} (wash-out rate), and f{sub v} (vascular fraction) was fit to the data. There was a consistent finding of a 20% to 30% decrease in k{sub 1} during the deeply anesthetized state compared with the two lightly anesthetized rest states. Analysis of variance showed that the difference observed is significant, though small in comparison with the difference between the rest and stress states (60% to 160% increase). The difference between the two lightly anesthetized states was not significant. Kinetic PET studies using dogs are routinely carried out with the animal anesthetized. Depth of anesthesia has been suspected as as source of variability in parameter estimates, but this conjecture has not previously been systematically investigated. These studies at extremes in the depth of anesthesia show a small but predictable effect on the uptake k{sub 1} of {sup 82}Rb.

  4. Automatic regularization parameter selection by generalized cross-validation for total variational Poisson noise removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiongjun; Javidi, Bahram; Ng, Michael K

    2017-03-20

    In this paper, we propose an alternating minimization algorithm with an automatic selection of the regularization parameter for image reconstruction of photon-counted images. By using the generalized cross-validation technique, the regularization parameter can be updated in the iterations of the alternating minimization algorithm. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the two existing methods, the maximum likelihood expectation maximization estimator with total variation regularization and the primal dual method, where the parameters must be set in advance.

  5. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Al-Subeihi, Ala A A; Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment.

  6. Does Vibration Warm-up Enhance Kinetic and Temporal Sprint Parameters?

    PubMed

    Cochrane, D J; Cronin, M J; Fink, P W

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of vibration warm-up to enhance sprint performance. 12 males involved in representative team sports performed 4 warm-up conditions in a randomised order performed at least 24 h apart; VbX warm-up (VbX-WU); Neural activation warm-up (Neu-WU); Dynamic warm-up (Dyn-WU) and Control (No VbX). Participants completed 5 m sprint at 30 s, 2:30 min and 5 min post warm-up where sprint time, kinetics, and temporal components were recorded. There was no significant (p>0.05) main effect or interaction effect between the split sprint times of 1 m, 2.5 m, and 5 m. There was a condition effect where vertical mean force was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Dyn-WU and Control compared to Neu-WU. No other significant (p>0.05) main and interaction effects in sprint kinetic and temporal parameters existed. Overall, all 4 warm-up conditions produced comparable results for sprint performance, and there was no detrimental effect on short-duration sprint performance using VbX-WU. Therefore, VbX could be useful for adding variety to the training warm-up or be included into the main warm-up routine as a supplementary modality.

  7. Kinetic parameters of lithium and aluminium doped quartz from thermoluminescence glow curves.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ros, J M; Correcher, V; García-Guinea, J; Delgado, A

    2002-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of irradiated annealed and non-annealed synthetic beta-quartz (Li0.73Al0.73Si1.27O4) synthesised using the ceramic method have been studied. Annealed samples (1200 degrees C for 12 h) exhibit some changes of shape and intensity in the TL glow curves when compared to non-annealed samples in the range of 0.1-5 Gy. These changes can be attributed mainly to thermal alkali self-diffusion through the lattice interfaces involving modifications in the components of the luminescent traps. In non-annealed samples six groups of components at about 100 degrees C, 130 degrees C, 160 degrees C, 210 degrees C, 330 degrees C and 450 degrees C can be found, whereas annealed samples only display one very intense peak at a lower temperature (deconvoluted into three peaks at 90 degrees C, 105 degrees C and 130 degrees C) and a lower intensity second wide broad emission at approximately 240 degrees C. In this paper, a computerised curve-fitting based on general order kinetics has been used to characterise the glow curve structure resolving trapping parameters for each glow peak: trap depth (E), frequency factor (s) and the order of the kinetics (b). The dose dependence of the individual components of the glow curve has been also studied. These data allow us to select the most stable component for use in dosimetric purposes.

  8. Determination of kinetic parameters of Phlomis bovei de Noé using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Meriem; Hadoun, Hocine; Toumert, Idir; Hassani, Aicha

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports the pyrolysis study of Phlomis bovei biomass by thermogravimetric experiments in order to determine the thermal degradation behavior and kinetic parameters. The weight losses were found to occur in three stages. In the DTG thermograms, an increase of the heating rate tended to delay thermal degradation processes towards higher temperatures. The average values of activation energy and pre-exponential factor calculated from Ozawa-Flynn-Wall, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Kissinger methods are 134.83, 134.06, 223.31kJ/mol and 4.1610(13), 1.1810(10), 2.8110(11)/s, respectively. The three-pseudo-component method shows that the activation energy increases with increasing the heating rate for hemicellulose and cellulose while the activation energy of the lignin decreased with an increase of the heating rate. Predicted results and experimental data exhibit similar tendencies and the three pseudo-components model with n different from unity 1 is recommended as the most suitable for prediction of kinetic behavior of Phlomis bovei de Noé.

  9. Integrated modeling methodology for microtubule dynamics and Taxol kinetics with experimentally identifiable parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Sokhansanj, Bahrad A

    2007-10-01

    Microtubule dynamics play a critical role in cell function and stress response, modulating mitosis, morphology, signaling, and transport. Drugs such as paclitaxel (Taxol) can impact tubulin polymerization and affect microtubule dynamics. While theoretical methods have been previously proposed to simulate microtubule dynamics, we develop a methodology here that can be used to compare model predictions with experimental data. Our model is a hybrid of (1) a simple two-state stochastic formulation of tubulin polymerization kinetics and (2) an equilibrium approximation for the chemical kinetics of Taxol drug binding to microtubule ends. Model parameters are biologically realistic, with values taken directly from experimental measurements. Model validation is conducted against published experimental data comparing optical measurements of microtubule dynamics in cultured cells under normal and Taxol-treated conditions. To compare model predictions with experimental data requires applying a "windowing" strategy on the spatiotemporal resolution of the simulation. From a biological perspective, this is consistent with interpreting the microtubule "pause" phenomenon as at least partially an artifact of spatiotemporal resolution limits on experimental measurement.

  10. A new multi-wavelength model-based method for determination of enzyme kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Sorouraddin, Mohammad-Hossein; Amini, Kaveh; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Vallipour, Javad; Hanaee, Jalal; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2010-09-01

    Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis is the most widely used method to determine enzyme kinetic parameters. In the spectrophotometric determination of enzyme activity using the Lineweaver-Burk plot, it is necessary to find a wavelength at which only the substrate or the product has absorbance without any spectroscopic interference of the other reaction components. Moreover, in this method, different initial concentrations of the substrate should be used to obtain the initial velocities required for Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. In the present work, a multi-wavelength model-based method has been developed and validated to determine Michaelis-Menten constants for some enzyme reactions. In this method, a selective wavelength region and several experiments with different initial concentrations of the substrate are not required. The absorbance data of the kinetic assays are fitted by non-linear regression coupled to the numeric integration of the related differential equation. To indicate the applicability of the proposed method, the Michaelis-Menten constants for the oxidation of phenanthridine, 6-deoxypenciclovir and xanthine by molybdenum hydroxylases were determined using only a single initial concentration of the substrate, regardless of any spectral overlap.

  11. Kinetic study of the anaerobic biodegradation of alkyl polyglucosides and the influence of their structural parameters.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Francisco; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro; Lechuga, Manuela; Jurado, Encarnación; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a study of the anaerobic biodegradation of non-ionic surfactants alkyl polyglucosides applying the method by measurement of the biogas production in digested sludge. Three alkyl polyglucosides with different length alkyl chain and degree of polymerization of the glucose units were tested. The influence of their structural parameters was evaluated, and the characteristics parameters of the anaerobic biodegradation were determined. Results show that alkyl polyglucosides, at the standard initial concentration of 100 mgC L(-1), are not completely biodegradable in anaerobic conditions because they inhibit the biogas production. The alkyl polyglucoside having the shortest alkyl chain showed the fastest biodegradability and reached the higher percentage of final mineralization. The anaerobic process was well adjusted to a pseudo first-order equation using the carbon produced as gas during the test; also, kinetics parameters and a global rate constant for all the involved metabolic process were determined. This modeling is helpful to evaluate the biodegradation or the persistence of alkyl polyglucosides under anaerobic conditions in the environment and in the wastewater treatment.

  12. Kinetics of surface segregation in metallic alloys with first-principles interaction parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, L.T. |; Ouannasser, S.; Dreysse, H.

    1996-12-31

    The authors report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the kinetics of surface segregation at the (001) face of CuNi and MoW alloys. These two systems were selected because they are based on different lattice structures and show contrasting segregation behavior: CuNi exhibits a monotonic profile, while that of MoW is oscillatory. To describe the energetics they have determined a set of effective cluster interactions (ECI) which govern the ordering or clustering tendencies of these alloys. The ECI were obtained by means of tight-binding electronic structure calculations in which no adjustable or experimentally determined parameters were used. Equilibrium segregation profiles are calculated and a series of quenches are performed. The layer concentrations are studied as a function of time and the existence of metastable phases in the surface region is investigated.

  13. Determination of μd chemistry kinetic parameters for the MuSun Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raha, Nandita

    2014-09-01

    The MuSun experiment at PSI will measure the muon doublet capture rate Λd in ultra pure deuterium gas to 1.5% precision from the measured decay-electron time distribution. This reaction cleanly determines the strength of the two-nucleon weak axial current interaction. The kinetic parameters of the μd chemistry are essential for extracting Λd, which in turn are determined from the process of muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium. This process yields 3 He recoils and 2.45 MeV monoenergetic neutrons from the reaction ddμ -->3 He + n + μ . Encoded in the time dependence of the fusion products are the ddμ molecular formation rates from the F = 1 / 2 , 3 / 2 hyperfine states (λd and λq) and the hyperfine transition rate (λqd) from the higher-energy F = 3 / 2 state to the lower-energy F = 1 / 2 state. This work concentrates on the analysis of the fusion neutrons, which are detected by an array of eight neutron detectors. Pulse shape discrimination was used to distinguish neutrons from background gamma rays. A least squared fit to the time spectrum of the fusion neutrons determines the μd chemistry kinetic parameters λqd and the ratio λq / λd. The MuSun experiment at PSI will measure the muon doublet capture rate Λd in ultra pure deuterium gas to 1.5% precision from the measured decay-electron time distribution. This reaction cleanly determines the strength of the two-nucleon weak axial current interaction. The kinetic parameters of the μd chemistry are essential for extracting Λd, which in turn are determined from the process of muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium. This process yields 3 He recoils and 2.45 MeV monoenergetic neutrons from the reaction ddμ -->3 He + n + μ . Encoded in the time dependence of the fusion products are the ddμ molecular formation rates from the F = 1 / 2 , 3 / 2 hyperfine states (λd and λq) and the hyperfine transition rate (λqd) from the higher-energy F = 3 / 2 state to the lower-energy F = 1 / 2 state. This work concentrates

  14. Parameter identification and on-line estimation for reduced kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Littel, J.D.; Muske, K.R.; Del`Orco, P.C.; Le, L.A.; Flesner, R.L.

    1998-08-07

    The base hydrolysis process for the destruction of energetic or explosive materials results is a high pH hydrolysate solution with reaction products that include a series of carboxylic acid salts, glycolates, amines, and nitrates. The hydrolysate solutions obtained from this process contain from two to ten wt% of organic carbon and nitrogen compounds that must be further treated before disposal. Hydrothermal oxidation at elevated temperatures (450 C) and pressure (14,000 psi) was selected as the treatment process for the hydrolysate solutions obtained from hydrolysis of the high explosive PBX 9404 at the Department of Energy Pantex facility in Amarillo, Texas. In this work, the authors describe the use of receding horizon identification and estimation techniques to determine the model parameters for a reduced kinetic model describing the oxidation-reduction reactions in a hydrothermal oxidation reactor. This model is used in a model predictive controller that minimizes the total aqueous nitrogen in the hydrothermal oxidation reactor effluent.

  15. Optimization of Process Parameters and Kinetic Model of Enzymatic Extraction of Polyphenols from Lonicerae Flos

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fansheng; Yu, Shujuan; Bi, Yongguang; Huang, Xiaojun; Huang, Mengqian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To optimize and verify the cellulase extraction of polyphenols from honeysuckle and provide a reference for enzymatic extracting polyphenols from honeysuckle. Materials and Methods: The uniform design was used According to Fick's first law and kinetic model, fitting analysis of the dynamic process of enzymatic extracting polyphenols was conducted. Results: The optimum enzymatic extraction parameters for polyphenols from honeysuckle are found to be 80% (v/v) of alcohol, 35:1 (mL/g) of liquid-solid ratio, 80°C of extraction temperature, 8.5 of pH, 6.0 mg of enzyme levels, and 130 min of extraction time. Under the optimal conditions, the extraction rate of polyphenols was 3.03%. The kinetic experiments indicated kinetic equation had a good linear relationship with t even under the conditions of different levels of enzyme and temperature, which means fitting curve tallies well with the experimental values. Conclusion: The results of quantification showed that the results provide a reference for enzymatic extracting polyphenols from honeysuckle. SUMMARY Lonicerae flos (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) is a material of traditional Chinese medicine and healthy drinks, of which active compounds mainly is polyphenols. At present, plant polyphenols are the hotspots centents of food, cosmetic and medicine, because it has strong bioactivity. Several traditional methods are available for the extraction of plant polyphenols including impregnation, solvent extraction, ultrasonic extraction, hot-water extraction, alkaline dilute alcohol or alkaline water extraction, microwave extraction and Supercritical CO2 extraction. But now, an increasing number of research on using cellulase to extract active ingredients from plants. Enzymatic method is widely used for enzyme have excellent properties of high reaction efficiency and specificity, moderate reaction conditions, shorter extraction time and easier to control, less damage to the active ingredient. At present, the enzymatic

  16. Synergistic improvement of gas sensing performance by micro-gravimetrically extracted kinetic/thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuanbao; Xu, Pengcheng; Yu, Haitao; Cheng, Zhenxing; Li, Xinxin

    2015-03-10

    A novel method is explored for comprehensive design/optimization of organophosphorus sensing material, which is loaded on mass-type microcantilever sensor. Conventionally, by directly observing the gas sensing response, it is difficult to build quantitative relationship with the intrinsic structure of the material. To break through this difficulty, resonant cantilever is employed as gravimetric tool to implement molecule adsorption experiment. Based on the sensing data, key kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of the material to the molecule, including adsorption heat -ΔH°, adsorption/desorption rate constants Ka and Kd, active-site number per unit mass N' and surface coverage θ, can be quantitatively extracted according to physical-chemistry theories. With gaseous DMMP (simulant of organophosphorus agents) as sensing target, the optimization route for three sensing materials is successfully demonstrated. Firstly, a hyper-branched polymer is evaluated. Though suffering low sensitivity due to insufficient N', the bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-hexafluoropropane (BHPF) sensing-group exhibits satisfactory reproducibility due to appropriate -ΔH°. To achieve more sensing-sites, KIT-5 mesoporous-silica with higher surface-area is assessed, resulting in good sensitivity but too high -ΔH° that brings poor repeatability. After comprehensive consideration, the confirmed BHPF sensing-group is grafted on the KIT-5 carrier to form an optimized DMMP sensing nanomaterial. Experimental results indicate that, featuring appropriate kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of -ΔH°, Ka, Kd, N' and θ, the BHPF-functionalized KIT-5 mesoporous silica exhibits synergistic improvement among reproducibility, sensitivity and response/recovery speed. The optimized material shows complete signal recovery, 55% sensitivity improvement than the hyper-branched polymer and 2∼3 folds faster response/recovery speed than the KIT-5 mesoporous silica.

  17. Ammonium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Clinoptilolite: Determination of Isotherm and Thermodynamic Parameters and Comparison of Kinetics by the Double Exponential Model and Conventional Kinetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, İsmail

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption isotherm, the adsorption kinetics, and the thermodynamic parameters of ammonium removal from aqueous solution by using clinoptilolite in aqueous solution was investigated in this study. Experimental data obtained from batch equilibrium tests have been analyzed by four two-parameter (Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R)) and four three-parameter (Redlich-Peterson (R-P), Sips, Toth and Khan) isotherm models. D-R and R-P isotherms were the models that best fitted to experimental data over the other two- and three-parameter models applied. The adsorption energy (E) from the D-R isotherm was found to be approximately 7 kJ/mol for the ammonium-clinoptilolite system, thereby indicating that ammonium is adsorbed on clinoptilolite by physisorption. Kinetic parameters were determined by analyzing the nth-order kinetic model, the modified second-order model and the double exponential model, and each model resulted in a coefficient of determination (R2) of above 0.989 with an average relative error lower than 5%. A Double Exponential Model (DEM) showed that the adsorption process develops in two stages as rapid and slow phase. Changes in standard free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) of ammonium-clinoptilolite system were estimated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients. PMID:22690177

  18. Ammonium removal from aqueous solutions by clinoptilolite: determination of isotherm and thermodynamic parameters and comparison of kinetics by the double exponential model and conventional kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Ismail

    2012-03-01

    The adsorption isotherm, the adsorption kinetics, and the thermodynamic parameters of ammonium removal from aqueous solution by using clinoptilolite in aqueous solution was investigated in this study. Experimental data obtained from batch equilibrium tests have been analyzed by four two-parameter (Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R)) and four three-parameter (Redlich-Peterson (R-P), Sips, Toth and Khan) isotherm models. D-R and R-P isotherms were the models that best fitted to experimental data over the other two- and three-parameter models applied. The adsorption energy (E) from the D-R isotherm was found to be approximately 7 kJ/mol for the ammonium-clinoptilolite system, thereby indicating that ammonium is adsorbed on clinoptilolite by physisorption. Kinetic parameters were determined by analyzing the nth-order kinetic model, the modified second-order model and the double exponential model, and each model resulted in a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of above 0.989 with an average relative error lower than 5%. A Double Exponential Model (DEM) showed that the adsorption process develops in two stages as rapid and slow phase. Changes in standard free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) of ammonium-clinoptilolite system were estimated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients.

  19. Generalized variational calculus in terms of multi-parameters fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Om P.; Muslih, Sami I.; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we briefly introduce two generalizations of work presented a few years ago on fractional variational formulations. In the first generalization, we consider the Hilfer's generalized fractional derivative that in some sense interpolates between Riemann-Liouville and Caputo fractional derivatives. In the second generalization, we develop a fractional variational formulation in terms of a three parameter fractional derivative. We develop integration by parts formulas for the generalized fractional derivatives which are key to developing fractional variational calculus. It is shown that many derivatives used recently and their variational formulations can be obtained by setting different parameters to different values. We also define fractional generalized momenta and provide fractional Hamiltonian formulations in terms of the new generalized derivatives. An example is presented to show applications of the formulations presented here. Some possible extensions of this research are also discussed.

  20. Modeling photo-bleaching kinetics to map local variations in rod rhodopsin density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, M.; Dobrosotskaya, J.; King, E. J.; Czaja, W.; Bonner, R. F.

    2011-03-01

    Localized rod photoreceptor and rhodopsin losses have been observed in post mortem histology both in normal aging and in age-related maculopathy. We propose to noninvasively map local rod rhodopsin density through analysis of the brightening of the underlying lipofuscin autofluorescence (LAF) in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) imaging sequences starting in the dark adapted eye. The detected LAF increases as rhodopsin is bleached (time constant ~ 25sec) by the average retinal irradiance of the cSLO 488nm laser beam. We fit parameters of analytical expressions for the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching that Lamb validated using electroretinogram recordings in human. By performing localized (~ 100μm) kinetic analysis, we create high resolution maps of the rhodopsin density. This new noninvasive imaging and analysis approach appears well-suited for measuring localized changes in the rod photoreceptors and correlating them at high spatial resolution with localized pathological changes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) seen in steady-state LAF images.

  1. Kinetic parameters for the oxidation of pulverised coal as measured from drop tube tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, J.; Jimenez, S.

    2005-08-01

    The methodology for measuring the oxidation parameters for pulverised coal combustion from drop-tube tests is reviewed, and some modifications to the traditional procedure (based on Arrhenius plots) are proposed. The work includes the experimental characterisation of an anthracite's combustion in a drop-tube furnace, which will be used as the reference data. One of the main points in the discussion is the consideration of a particle-size distribution instead of a single representative diameter. Since a true monosized sample cannot be obtained by sieving, the particles injected always display a size distribution and, therefore, the experimental results are the outcome of a range of oxidation rates. As a result, the assumption of a single particle size cannot explain some aspects of the experimental results (e.g., the 'curvature' of the burnoff curve) and may lead to significant deviations in the calculated parameters. On the other hand, an alternative method for deriving the parameters, based on calculating the particle's full combustion history, is proposed. The analysis presented here enables a more systematic and unambiguous approach for deriving the kinetic parameters for oxidation from experimental measurements. If the actual particle-size distribution is taken into account, the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results and, in particular, reproduce the progressive decay in apparent oxidation rate while the fuel burns. Even though the deviations might still be reduced by using a more sophisticated model (e.g., accounting for heterogeneity in the particles' properties, or deactivation phenomena), the results obtained suggest that such corrections should be relatively small, the correct treatment of the size distribution of the particles being more important in this case.

  2. Sensitivity of tire response to variations in material and geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Tanner, John A.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1992-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for evaluating the analytic sensitivity derivatives of the tire response with respect to material and geometric parameters of the tire. The tire is modeled by using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in material and geometric parameters included. The computational procedure is applied to the case of uniform inflation pressure on the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire when subjected to uniform inflation pressure. Numerical results are presented showing the sensitivity of the different response quantities to variations in the material characteristics of both the cord and the rubber.

  3. A new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for one- and two-step chemical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, T.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Bowman, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for simple chemical models and simple transport properties classically used in DNS of premixed combustion is presented. First, a one-dimensional code is utilized to performed steady unstrained laminar methane-air flame in order to verify intrinsic features of laminar flames such as burning velocity and temperature and concentration profiles. Second, the flame response to steady and unsteady strain in the opposed jet configuration is numerically investigated. It appears that for a well determined set of parameters, one- and two-step mechanisms reproduce the extinction limit of a laminar flame submitted to a steady strain. Computations with the GRI-mech mechanism (177 reactions, 39 species) and multicomponent transport properties are used to validate these simplified models. A sensitivity analysis of the preferential diffusion of heat and reactants when the Lewis number is close to unity indicates that the response of the flame to an oscillating strain is very sensitive to this number. As an application of this methodology, the interaction between a two-dimensional vortex pair and a premixed laminar flame is performed by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) using the one- and two-step mechanisms. Comparison with the experimental results of Samaniego et al. (1994) shows a significant improvement in the description of the interaction when the two-step model is used.

  4. Estimation of the growth kinetic parameters of Bacillus cereus spores as affected by pulsed light treatment.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; de Fernando, Gonzalo García; Hierro, Eva; Hospital, Xavier F; Ordóñez, Juan A; Fernández, Manuela

    2015-06-02

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment requires the knowledge of the effect of food preservation technologies on the growth parameters of the survivors of the treatment. This is of special interest in the case of the new non-thermal technologies that are being investigated for minimal processing of foods. This is a study on the effect of pulsed light technology (PL) on the lag phase of Bacillus cereus spores surviving the treatment and the maximum growth rate (μmax) of the survivors after germination. The D value was estimated as 0.35 J/cm(2) and our findings showed that PL affected the kinetic parameters of the microorganism. A log linear relationship was observed between the lag phase and the intensity of the treatment. Increasing the lethality lengthened the mean lag phase and proportionally increased its variability. A polynomial regression was fitted between the μmax of the survivors and the inactivation achieved. The μmax decreased as intensity increased. From these data, and their comparison to published results on the effect of heat and e-beam irradiation on B. cereus spores, it was observed that the shelf-life of PL treated foods would be longer than those treated with heat and similar to irradiated ones. These findings offer information of interest for the implementation of PL for microbial decontamination in the food industry.

  5. Functional imaging of kinetic parameters from the time dependent linear response function by dynamic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Stritzke, P.; Knop, J.; Spielmann, R.P.; Montz, R.; Schneider, C.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the locally differing time dependent linear response function h(r,t) of a radioactive tracer injected into a patients blood pool B(t) by mathematical analysis of a dynamic scintigraphic study A(r,t). Transit times, uptake rates and clearance rates of different tracers are calculated from the linear response function at every matrix point by one computer program. The parameters are presented in functional images on a standard computer display. Thus the whole information from a dynamic study can be condensed within a few images. The integral equation A=h+B +c(r)*B (+ means convolution, c(r)*B(t)=nontarget activity) derived from tracer theory is deconvoluted by mathematical methods, which are unsensitive against noise contamination of the input data. The numerical technique is successfully applied in Iodide-123-Hippuran and Tc-99m-DMSA kidney studies, in Tc-99m-MDP and -DPD bone studies, in Tl-201 myocardial studies and in Iodide-123 thyroid studies. Because the regional blood pool-or nontarget activity is calculated and subtracted, the kinetic parameters are considered to be free from nontarget contributions in all dynamic scintigraphic studies. Examples are demonstrated and the usefulness for clinical application is discussed.

  6. Simulation of the interannual variations of tropospheric ozone over China: Roles of variations in meteorological parameters and anthropogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Sijia; Liao, Hong; Yang, Yang; Mu, Qing

    2015-12-01

    We quantify the interannual variations (IAVs) of tropospheric O3 over China for the years 2004-2012 by using the one-way nested-grid version of the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The roles of variations in meteorological fields and anthropogenic emissions of O3 precursors are examined separately and together through sensitivity simulations. With variations in both meteorological parameters and emissions, simulated seasonal mean surface-layer O3 concentrations over North China (NC, 110-120°E, 32-42°N) exhibit the largest IAVs in June-July-August (JJA). The regionally averaged absolute percent departure from the mean (APDM) values over NC are 0.7%, 3.2%, 3.9%, and 2.1% in December-January-February (DJF), March-April-May (MAM), and September-October-November (SON), respectively. Over South China (SC, 110-120°E, 22-32°N), the IAVs of O3 are found maximum in MAM, and minimum in JJA; the APDM values are 2.7%, 3.7%, 1.4%, and 2.6% in DJF, MAM, JJA, and SON, respectively. With respect to the IAVs of O3 over the Sichuan Basin (SCB, 102-110°E, 27-33°N), the APDM values are simulated to be 2.7-3.8% throughout the year. The IAVs in surface-layer O3 by variations in meteorological fields are simulated to be larger than those by variations in anthropogenic emissions throughout the year in NC and SC except for JJA in SC. The relatively more important role of variations in anthropogenic emissions is simulated in SCB in all seasons. Process analyses are performed to identify key meteorological parameters that influence the IAVs of O3 over NC, SC, and SCB. Over all of these regions, variations in winds are found to have the largest impact on the IAVs of O3, followed by those in temperature and specific humidity. Considering that the APDM values represent the IAVs averaged over 2004-2012, the magnitudes of IAVs of O3 for specific years can be more significant than the numbers reported here. Our results have

  7. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Subeihi, Ala' A.A.; Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert; Bladeren, Peter J. van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Punt, Ans

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Interindividual human differences in methyleugenol bioactivation were simulated. • This was done using in vitro incubations, PBK modeling

  8. Variability of kinetic parameters due to biomass acclimation: case of para-nitrophenol biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Rezouga, Fériel; Hamdi, Moktar; Sperandio, Mathieu

    2009-11-01

    The study regards para-nitrophenol (p-NP) removal by a mixed culture in a batch reactor under aerobic conditions performed at low ratio substrate (p-NP) to p-NP degrading microorganisms (0.09 < I(0)/(X(B,PNP))(0) < 0.80 g COD(PNP)g VSS(-1)). p-NP biodegradation was modelled with a dual-biomass kinetic including Haldane formalism. The purpose was to examine the effect of operating conditions of acclimation phases in the kinetic parameters estimated by respirometric measurements. The experiments were conducted with a series of successive additions of p-NP and a biogenic substrate (Ss) in different proportions (0 < R = Ss/I < 6.6). To place emphasis on decisive role played by frequency and amount of p-NP supply, a parallel was drawn with continuous processes, characterising acclimation cycles by different organic loading rate (207 < OLR < 1490 mg COD(PNP) l(-1) d(-1)). During acclimation, results showed progressively decreasing half saturation constant (K(s)(PNP)) values (11.4-1.21 mg CODl(-1)) whereas inhibition coefficient K(I)(PNP) increased (72.4-289 mg CODl(-1)), as the specific degradation rate increased. The inverse behaviour was observed during starvation periods. At the end of acclimation, higher values of growth yield (0.39 < Y(PNP) < 0.63 mg COD(X) mg COD(PNP)(-1)) and maximum growth rate (1.09 < mu(max)(PNP) < 2.01 d(-1)) were obtained for cycles with low R.

  9. Diurnal variation of oxygen and carbonate system parameters in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Dufore, C.; Smiley, N.; Jackson, C.; Halley, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen and carbonate system parameters were measured, in situ, over diurnal cycles in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay, Florida. All system parameters showed distinct diurnal trends in Tampa Bay with an average range of diurnal variation of 39.1 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 165.1 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.22 for pH, 0.093 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 218.1 μatm for pCO2. Average range of diurnal variation for system parameters in Tampa Bay was 73% to 93% of the seasonal range of variability for dissolved oxygen and pH. All system parameters measured in Florida Bay showed distinct variation over diurnal time-scales. However, clear diurnal trends were less evident. The average range of diurnal variability in Florida Bay was 62.8 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 130.4 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.13 for pH, 0.053 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 139.8 μatm for pCO2. The average range of diurnal variation was 14% to 102% of the seasonal ranges for these parameters. Diurnal variability in system parameters was most influenced by primary productivity and respiration of benthic communities in Tampa Bay, and by precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate in Florida Bay. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability may impart significant error in calculations of annual carbon and oxygen budgets. These observations reinforce the need for higher temporal resolution measurements of oxygen and carbon system parameters in coastal ecosystems.

  10. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [effects of measurable plant parameters on multispectral signal variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reflectance of crop residues, that are important in reducing wind and water erosion, was more often different from bare soil in band 4 than in bands 5, 6, or 7. The plant parameters leaf area index, plant population, plant cover, and plant height explained 95.9 percent of the variation in band 7 (reflective infrared) digital counts for cotton and 78.2 percent of the variation in digital counts for the combined crops sorghum and corn; hence, measurable plant parameters explain most of the signal variation recorded for corpland. Leaf area index and plant population are both highly correlated with crop yields; since plant population can be readily measured (or possibly inferred from seeding rates), it is useful measurement for calibrating ERTS-type MSS digital data in terms of yield.

  11. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, and Equilibrium Parameters for the Removal of Lead and Cadmium from Aqueous Solutions with Calcium Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Cuevas-Villanueva, Ruth; Hidalgo-Vázquez, Aura Roxana; Cortés Penagos, Consuelo de Jesús; Cortés-Martínez, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    The sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by calcium alginate beads (CAB) from aqueous solutions in batch systems was investigated. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, as well as the sorption capacities of CAB in each system at different temperatures, were evaluated. The rate of sorption for both metals was rapid in the first 10 minutes and reached a maximum in 50 minutes. Sorption kinetic data were fitted to Lagergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models and it was found that the second-order kinetic model describes these data for the two metals; comparing kinetic parameters for Cd and Pb sorption a higher kinetic rate (K2) for Pb was observed, indicating that the interaction between lead cations and alginate beads was faster than for cadmium. Similarly, isotherm data were fitted to different models reported in literature and it was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich (L-F) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models describe the isotherms in all cases. CAB sorption capacity for cadmium was 27.4 mg/g and 150.4 mg/g for lead, at 25°C. Sorption capacities of Cd and Pb increase as temperature rises. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the cadmium and lead adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that pH has an important effect on the adsorption of these metals by CAB, as more were removed at pH values between 6 and 7. PMID:24587740

  12. Thermospheric parameters long-term variations retrieved from ionospheric observations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Perrone, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recently developed method to retrieve thermospheric parameters (Tex, O, O2, and N2) and the total solar EUV flux with λ < 1050 Å from routine foF1 ionosonde observations has been applied to monthly median foF1 data on Rome, Slough/Chilton, and Juliusruh stations to analyze long-term trends in the thermospheric parameters. For the first time exospheric temperature and neutral composition were obtained for June noontime conditions over the period of 5 solar cycles. The retrieved parameter manifested solar cycle and long-term (some solar cycles) variations with a rising phase in 1965-1985 and falling phase in 1985-2008. The retrieved thermospheric parameters were shown to be close to the MSIS-86 model ones exhibiting very small (<1% per decade) and statistically insignificant linear trends estimated either over all 56 years or only over the years of solar minimum. No peculiarities in long-term variations in relation with the last deep solar minimum have been revealed. The source of the thermospheric parameter long-term trends is the Sun, i.e., they have a natural (not anthropogenic) origin and are mainly controlled by long-term variations of solar and geomagnetic activity.

  13. Monte Carlo evaluation of biological variation: Random generation of correlated non-Gaussian model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Maarten L. A. T. M.; Scheerlinck, Nico; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2009-01-01

    When modelling the behaviour of horticultural products, demonstrating large sources of biological variation, we often run into the issue of non-Gaussian distributed model parameters. This work presents an algorithm to reproduce such correlated non-Gaussian model parameters for use with Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm works around the problem of non-Gaussian distributions by transforming the observed non-Gaussian probability distributions using a proposed SKN-distribution function before applying the covariance decomposition algorithm to generate Gaussian random co-varying parameter sets. The proposed SKN-distribution function is based on the standard Gaussian distribution function and can exhibit different degrees of both skewness and kurtosis. This technique is demonstrated using a case study on modelling the ripening of tomato fruit evaluating the propagation of biological variation with time.

  14. The Expanding Family of Natural Anion Channelrhodopsins Reveals Large Variations in Kinetics, Conductance, and Spectral Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Rodarte, Elsa M.; Janz, Roger; Morelle, Olivier; Melkonian, Michael; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Spudich, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Natural anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) discovered in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta generate large hyperpolarizing currents at membrane potentials above the Nernst equilibrium potential for Cl− and thus can be used as efficient inhibitory tools for optogenetics. We have identified and characterized new ACR homologs in different cryptophyte species, showing that all of them are anion-selective, and thus expanded this protein family to 20 functionally confirmed members. Sequence comparison of natural ACRs and engineered Cl−-conducting mutants of cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs) showed radical differences in their anion selectivity filters. In particular, the Glu90 residue in channelrhodopsin 2, which needed to be mutated to a neutral or alkaline residue to confer anion selectivity to CCRs, is nevertheless conserved in all of the ACRs identified. The new ACRs showed a large variation of the amplitude, kinetics, and spectral sensitivity of their photocurrents. A notable variant, designated “ZipACR”, is particularly promising for inhibitory optogenetics because of its combination of larger current amplitudes than those of previously reported ACRs and an unprecedentedly fast conductance cycle (current half-decay time 2–4 ms depending on voltage). ZipACR expressed in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons enabled precise photoinhibition of individual spikes in trains of up to 50 Hz frequency. PMID:28256618

  15. Variational cross-validation of slow dynamical modes in molecular kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Markov state models are a widely used method for approximating the eigenspectrum of the molecular dynamics propagator, yielding insight into the long-timescale statistical kinetics and slow dynamical modes of biomolecular systems. However, the lack of a unified theoretical framework for choosing between alternative models has hampered progress, especially for non-experts applying these methods to novel biological systems. Here, we consider cross-validation with a new objective function for estimators of these slow dynamical modes, a generalized matrix Rayleigh quotient (GMRQ), which measures the ability of a rank-m projection operator to capture the slow subspace of the system. It is shown that a variational theorem bounds the GMRQ from above by the sum of the first m eigenvalues of the system’s propagator, but that this bound can be violated when the requisite matrix elements are estimated subject to statistical uncertainty. This overfitting can be detected and avoided through cross-validation. These result make it possible to construct Markov state models for protein dynamics in a way that appropriately captures the tradeoff between systematic and statistical errors. PMID:25833563

  16. Predicting heavy metals' adsorption edges and adsorption isotherms on MnO2 with the parameters determined from Langmuir kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghai; Xiao, Zhongjin; Xiong, Xinmei; Zhou, Gongming; Guan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Although surface complexation models have been widely used to describe the adsorption of heavy metals, few studies have verified the feasibility of modeling the adsorption kinetics, edge, and isotherm data with one pH-independent parameter. A close inspection of the derivation process of Langmuir isotherm revealed that the equilibrium constant derived from the Langmuir kinetic model, KS-kinetic, is theoretically equivalent to the adsorption constant in Langmuir isotherm, KS-Langmuir. The modified Langmuir kinetic model (MLK model) and modified Langmuir isotherm model (MLI model) incorporating pH factor were developed. The MLK model was employed to simulate the adsorption kinetics of Cu(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) on MnO2 at pH3.2 or 3.3 to get the values of KS-kinetic. The adsorption edges of heavy metals could be modeled with the modified metal partitioning model (MMP model), and the values of KS-Langmuir were obtained. The values of KS-kinetic and KS-Langmuir are very close to each other, validating that the constants obtained by these two methods are basically the same. The MMP model with KS-kinetic constants could predict the adsorption edges of heavy metals on MnO2 very well at different adsorbent/adsorbate concentrations. Moreover, the adsorption isotherms of heavy metals on MnO2 at various pH levels could be predicted reasonably well by the MLI model with the KS-kinetic constants.

  17. Re-examination of safety parameters using kinetic theory of nano-granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillard, Jacques Xavier; Marchal, Philippe; Henry, François; Vignes, Alexis; Dufaud, Olivier; Perrin, Laurent; Plasari, Edouard

    2011-07-01

    The origin of the kinetic theory of granular flow was originally credited to Bagnold [1]. By using a very primitive expression of the particle collision frequency, he derived an expression for the repulsive pressure of the particles in uniform shear flows. His repulsive pressure was proportional to the square of the velocity gradient and the particle diameter and directly proportional to the particle density. This theory was later extended by Savage [2] and Gidaspow [3]. Such theories provide insight on the dependence of the viscosity, and various moduli (elastic, non elastic, viscous...) in terms of the granular temperature and the associated shear-rates. Until recently, such parameters were difficult to measure because of the lack of specifically designed equipment. This challenge was successfully taken up and resolved by P. Marchal of ENSIC who designed a new rheometer for powders (figure 1). This equipment can put in evidence the importance of the granular temperature on the elastic and viscous behaviors of the granular flows. Such rheological behavior is important in risk analysis for nanopowders, because as the nanopowder may be subjected to process shear rates and stresses, its structural and topological changes, in terms of the transformation of agglomerates into primary nanoparticles, have strong impacts on emission factors of nanosized particles that can be released in the environment or into a workplace from such dense-phase nanopowder processes. Such transformation can be analyzed by studying the nano-granular rheological signature of the system. Such risk assessment approach using these new fundamental rheological safety parameters is described in this paper.

  18. Methane oxidation in a landfill cover soil reactor: Changing of kinetic parameters and microorganism community structure.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhi L; Zhao, Tian T; Gao, Yan H; Yang, Xu; Liu, Shuai; Peng, Xu Y

    2017-02-23

    Changing of CH4 oxidation potential and biological characteristics with CH4 concentration was studied in a landfill cover soil reactor (LCSR). The maximum rate of CH4 oxidation reached 32.40 mol d(-1) m(-2) by providing sufficient O2 in the LCSR. The kinetic parameters of methane oxidation in landfill cover soil were obtained by fitting substrate diffusion and consumption model based on the concentration profile of CH4 and O2. The values of [Formula: see text] (0.93-2.29%) and [Formula: see text] (140-524 nmol kgsoil-DW(-1)·s(-1)) increased with CH4 concentration (9.25-20.30%), while the values of [Formula: see text] (312.9-2.6%) and [Formula: see text] (1.3 × 10(-5) to 9.0 × 10(-3) nmol mL(-1) h(-1)) were just the opposite. MiSeq pyrosequencing data revealed that Methylobacter (the relative abundance was decreased with height of LCSR) and Methylococcales_unclassified (the relative abundance was increased expect in H 80) became the key players after incubation with increasing CH4 concentration. These findings provide information for assessing CH4 oxidation potential and changing of biological characteristics in landfill cover soil.

  19. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough.

  20. Purification of lactoperoxidase from bovine whey and investigation of kinetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Borzouee, Fatemeh; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Samsam Shariat, Seyed Ziyae Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is related to mammalian peroxidase family which contains a wide spectrum of biological activities. Despite the wide studies on the LPO, there is little study has been performed to simplify and shorten the procedure of enzyme purification. The aim of this project was to purify the enzyme through a simple method, and investigating enzyme kinetic parameters. Materials and Methods: LPO was purified from bovine whey through modified method of Yoshida (1990) using two steps of ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography. The purity of isolated enzyme was monitored by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results: The enzyme was purified 59.13-fold with a recovery of 10.26 having a specific activity of 5.78 U/mg protein and an Rz value of 0.8. The enzyme activity was measured using guaiacol as a chromogenic substrate in phosphate buffer pH 6. SDS-PAGE showed a single bond with molecular weight of 78 kDa. The purified enzyme displayed optimum activity at pH 6 in 30 mM phosphate buffer and at a temperature of 50°C, with a Km value of 178 mM and Vmax 0.63 U/ml.min for guaiacol. Conclusion: Using only one step ion-exchange chromatography, LPO was isolated from bovine whey in high purity. PMID:28028529

  1. Laser beam micro-milling of nickel alloy: dimensional variations and RSM optimization of laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M.; Darwish, Saied; Naveed, Madiha

    2016-12-01

    Micro-channels are considered as the integral part of several engineering devices such as micro-channel heat exchangers, micro-coolers, micro-pulsating heat pipes and micro-channels used in gas turbine blades for aerospace applications. In such applications, a fluid flow is required to pass through certain micro-passages such as micro-grooves and micro-channels. The fluid flow characteristics (flow rate, turbulence, pressure drop and fluid dynamics) are mainly established based on the size and accuracy of micro-passages. Variations (oversizing and undersizing) in micro-passage's geometry directly affect the fluid flow characteristics. In this study, the micro-channels of several sizes are fabricated in well-known aerospace nickel alloy (Inconel 718) through laser beam micro-milling. The variations in geometrical characteristics of different-sized micro-channels are studied under the influences of different parameters of Nd:YAG laser. In order to have a minimum variation in the machined geometries of each size of micro-channel, the multi-objective optimization of laser parameters has been carried out utilizing the response surface methodology approach. The objective was set to achieve the targeted top widths and depths of micro-channels with minimum degree of taperness associated with the micro-channel's sidewalls. The optimized sets of laser parameters proposed for each size of micro-channel can be used to fabricate the micro-channels in Inconel 718 with minimum amount of geometrical variations.

  2. Effect of adaptive threshold filtering on ultrasonic nakagami parameter to detect variation in scatterer concentration.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wan, Yung-Liang; Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Ming-Chen

    2010-10-01

    The Nakagami parameter is associated with the Nakagami distribution estimated from ultrasonic backscattered signals and closely reflects the scatterer concentrations in tissues. There is an interest in exploring the possibility of enhancing the ability of the Nakagami parameter to characterize tissues. In this paper, we explore the effect of adaptive thresholdfiltering based on the noise-assisted empirical mode decomposition of the ultrasonic backscattered signals on the Nakagami parameter as a function of scatterer concentration for improving the Nakagami parameter performance. We carried out phantom experiments using 5 MHz focused and nonfocused transducers. Before filtering, the dynamic ranges of the Nakagami parameter, estimated using focused and nonfocused transducers between the scatterer concentrations of 2 and 32 scatterers/mm3, were 0.44 and 0.1, respectively. After filtering, the dynamic ranges of the Nakagami parameter, using the focused and nonfocused transducers, were 0.71 and 0.79, respectively. The experimental results showed that the adaptive threshold filter makes the Nakagami parameter measured by a focused transducer more sensitive to the variation in the scatterer concentration. The proposed method also endows the Nakagami parameter measured by a nonfocused transducer with the ability to differentiate various scatterer concentrations. However, the Nakagami parameters estimated by focused and nonfocused transducers after adaptive threshold filtering have different physical meanings: the former represents the statistics of signals backscattered from unresolvable scatterers while the latter is associated with stronger resolvable scatterers or local inhomogeneity due to scatterer aggregation.

  3. Reconstructing the evolution of dark energy with variations of fundamental parameters .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, N. J.; Dent, T.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Robbers, G.

    Under the assumption that the variations of parameters of nature and the current acceleration of the universe are related and governed by the evolution of a single scalar field, we show how information can be obtained on the nature of dark energy from observational detection of (or constraints on) cosmological variations of the fine structure constant and the proton-to-electron mass ratio. We also comment on the current observational status, and on the prospects for improvements with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  4. Respirometric kinetic parameter calculations of a batch jet loop bioreactor treating leachate and oxygen uptake rate estimation by DTM.

    PubMed

    Ince, M; Yildiz, F; Engin, G Onkal; Engin, S N; Keskinler, B

    2008-05-30

    A novel circulating jet loop bioreactor adapted for organic matter oxidation has been designed and constructed. In this study, the input was leachate samples collected from Kemerburgaz Odayeri waste landfill site located on the European side of Istanbul. Controlling the jet loop bioreactor to realize high rates of purification depends on maintaining the appropriate loadings and operating conditions. This requires collecting various system data to estimate the dynamics of the system satisfactorily with the aim of keeping certain parameters within the specified range. The differential transform method (DTM) based solution of the state equations reveals the current state of the process so that any deviation in the system parameters can be immediately detected and regulated accordingly. The respirometric method for kinetic parameter calculations for biodegradation has been used for some time. In many studies, the respirometer was designed separately, usually in bench-scale. However, when a separate respirometer is used, the scale effect and parameters that affect the hydrodynamic structure of the system should be taken into consideration. In this study, therefore, the jet loop reactor itself was used as a respirometer. Thus, the kinetic parameters found reflecting the characteristics of microorganisms used for biodegradation would be more realistic. If the main reactor, here the jet loop reactor, would be used as the respirometer, the kinetic parameter changes can easily be monitored in the long run. Using the bioreactor as a respirometer, the most important kinetic parameters, Ks, kd and micromax were found to be 11,000 mg L(-1), 0.019 day(-1), and 0.21 day(-1), respectively. The stoichiometric coefficient, Y, was found to be 0.28 gr gr(-1) for the present system.

  5. High Frequency Variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future. PMID:25635416

  6. High frequency variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS observations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-28

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future.

  7. Silica coating and photocatalytic activities of ZnO nanoparticles: effect of operational parameters and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ismail, L F M; Emara, M M; El-Moselhy, M M; Maziad, N A; Hussein, O K

    2014-10-15

    Silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using the hydrothermal method. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). It was found that ultrafine core/shell structured silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were successfully obtained. TEM analysis revealed a continuous and uniform silica coating layer of about 8nm in thickness on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance of silica-coating ZnO core/shell nanoparticles in methylene blue aqueous solution was investigated. The effects of some operational parameters such as pH value, nanocatalyst loading and initial MB concentration on the degradation efficiency were discussed. Kinetic parameters were experimentally determined and a pseudo-first-order kinetic was observed. Thus, the main advantage of the coating is the stability of the photocatalysts and the better performance in acidic or alkaline solutions. Compared to ZnO the maximum apparent rate constant is obtained at pH 8.5 (pH 11.5 in case of bare ZnO). Moreover, the Langmuir adsorption model was applied to describe the equilibrium isotherm at different MB concentration. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm suggests monolayer coverage of the MB onto surface of silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles. The kinetics of the adsorption with respect to the initial dye concentration, were also investigated. The pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated. The kinetic studies revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model better represented the adsorption kinetics, suggesting that the adsorption process may be chemisorption.

  8. The Effect of Kinetic Properties on Statistical Variations of Ultrasound Signals Backscattered from Flowing Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2009-02-01

    Yet very little is known about the effect of “black hole” (BH) phenomenon on backscattering signal statistics under the laminar flow. To further explore this issue, measurements were performed from the porcine blood (with hematocrits of 20 and 50%) circulating in a mock flow loop under various steady flows at velocities ranged from 15 to 122 mm/s using a 10 MHz ultrasonic transducer. Results showed that the BH was apparent for the 50% blood flowing at a low velocity. The BH tended to be decreased with the increase of flow velocity and that it was hardly observed from the 20% blood. The probability density function of signals backscattered from blood tended to distribute as pre-Rayleigh statistics and the Nakagami parameter was less than 1. The spatial distribution of red cell aggregation in the flow tube is a predominant factor leading to statistical variations of ultrasonic backscattering in the flowing blood.

  9. The influence of tomograph sensitivity on kinetic parameter estimation in positron emission tomography imaging studies of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Meikle, S R; Eberl, S; Fulton, R R; Kassiou, M; Fulham, M J

    2000-08-01

    We investigated the influence of tomograph sensitivity on reliability of parameter estimation in positron emission tomography studies of the rat brain. The kinetics of two tracers in rat striatum and cerebellum were simulated. A typical injected dose of 10 MBq and a reduced dose of 1 MBq were assumed. Kinetic parameters were estimated using a region of interest (ROI) analysis and two pixel-by-pixel analyses. Striatal binding potential was estimated as a function of effective tomograph sensitivity (S(eff)) using a simplified reference tissue model. A S(eff) value of > or =1% was required to ensure reliable parameter estimation for ROI analysis and a S(eff) of 3-6% was required for pixel-by-pixel analysis. We conclude that effective tomograph sensitivity of 3% may be an appropriate design goal for rat brain imaging.

  10. Estimation of fundamental kinetic parameters of polyhydroxybutyrate fermentation process of Azohydromonas australica using statistical approach of media optimization.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, Geeta; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2012-11-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate or PHB is a biodegradable and biocompatible thermoplastic with many interesting applications in medicine, food packaging, and tissue engineering materials. The present study deals with the enhanced production of PHB by Azohydromonas australica using sucrose and the estimation of fundamental kinetic parameters of PHB fermentation process. The preliminary culture growth inhibition studies were followed by statistical optimization of medium recipe using response surface methodology to increase the PHB production. Later on batch cultivation in a 7-L bioreactor was attempted using optimum concentration of medium components (process variables) obtained from statistical design to identify the batch growth and product kinetics parameters of PHB fermentation. A. australica exhibited a maximum biomass and PHB concentration of 8.71 and 6.24 g/L, respectively in bioreactor with an overall PHB production rate of 0.75 g/h. Bioreactor cultivation studies demonstrated that the specific biomass and PHB yield on sucrose was 0.37 and 0.29 g/g, respectively. The kinetic parameters obtained in the present investigation would be used in the development of a batch kinetic mathematical model for PHB production which will serve as launching pad for further process optimization studies, e.g., design of several bioreactor cultivation strategies to further enhance the biopolymer production.

  11. Kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation in intertidal marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvind K.; Sherry, Angela; Gray, Neil D.; Jones, D. Martin; Bowler, Bernard F. J.; Head, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Availability of inorganic nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorous, is often a primary control on crude oil hydrocarbon degradation in marine systems. Many studies have empirically determined optimum levels of inorganic N and P for stimulation of hydrocarbon degradation. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information on fundamental kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation that can be used to model the fate of crude oil in bioremediation programmes that use inorganic nutrient addition to stimulate oil biodegradation. Here we report fundamental kinetic parameters (Ks and qmax) for nitrate- and phosphate-stimulated crude oil biodegradation under nutrient limited conditions and with respect to crude oil, under conditions where N and P are not limiting. In the marine sediments studied, crude oil degradation was limited by both N and P availability. In sediments treated with 12.5 mg/g of oil but with no addition of N and P, hydrocarbon degradation rates, assessed on the basis of CO2 production, were 1.10 ± 0.03 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day which were comparable to rates of CO2 production in sediments to which no oil was added (1.05 ± 0.27 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day). When inorganic nitrogen was added alone maximum rates of CO2 production measured were 4.25 ± 0.91 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. However, when the same levels of inorganic nitrogen were added in the presence of 0.5% P w/w of oil (1.6 μmol P/g wet sediment) maximum rates of measured CO2 production increased more than four-fold to 18.40 ± 1.04 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. Ks and qmax estimates for inorganic N (in the form of sodium nitrate) when P was not limiting were 1.99 ± 0.86 μmol/g wet sediment and 16.16 ± 1.28 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day respectively. The corresponding values for P were 63 ± 95 nmol/g wet sediment and 12.05 ± 1.31 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. The qmax values with respect to N and P were not significantly different (P < 0.05). When N and P

  12. Kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation in intertidal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arvind K; Sherry, Angela; Gray, Neil D; Jones, D Martin; Bowler, Bernard F J; Head, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    Availability of inorganic nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorous, is often a primary control on crude oil hydrocarbon degradation in marine systems. Many studies have empirically determined optimum levels of inorganic N and P for stimulation of hydrocarbon degradation. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information on fundamental kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation that can be used to model the fate of crude oil in bioremediation programmes that use inorganic nutrient addition to stimulate oil biodegradation. Here we report fundamental kinetic parameters (Ks and qmax) for nitrate- and phosphate-stimulated crude oil biodegradation under nutrient limited conditions and with respect to crude oil, under conditions where N and P are not limiting. In the marine sediments studied, crude oil degradation was limited by both N and P availability. In sediments treated with 12.5 mg/g of oil but with no addition of N and P, hydrocarbon degradation rates, assessed on the basis of CO2 production, were 1.10 ± 0.03 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day which were comparable to rates of CO2 production in sediments to which no oil was added (1.05 ± 0.27 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day). When inorganic nitrogen was added alone maximum rates of CO2 production measured were 4.25 ± 0.91 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. However, when the same levels of inorganic nitrogen were added in the presence of 0.5% P w/w of oil (1.6 μmol P/g wet sediment) maximum rates of measured CO2 production increased more than four-fold to 18.40 ± 1.04 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. Ks and qmax estimates for inorganic N (in the form of sodium nitrate) when P was not limiting were 1.99 ± 0.86 μmol/g wet sediment and 16.16 ± 1.28 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day respectively. The corresponding values for P were 63 ± 95 nmol/g wet sediment and 12.05 ± 1.31 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. The qmax values with respect to N and P were not significantly different (P < 0.05). When N and P

  13. Interaction between chitosan and uranyl ions. Role of physical and physicochemical parameters on the kinetics of sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Piron, E. |; Accominotti, M.; Domard, A.

    1997-03-19

    This work corresponds to the first part of our studies on the interactions between chitosan particles dispersed in water and uranyl ions. The measurements were obtained by ICP, and we considered the role of various physical and physicochemical parameters related to chitosan. We showed that the crystallinity, the particle dimensions, and the swelling in water of chitosan are parameters which are connected together and govern the kinetic laws of metal diffusion and sorption. The molecular mobility of the polymer chains is then essential parameter. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Kinetic parameter estimation in N. europaea biofilms using a 2-D reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Semprini, Lewis; Wood, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms of the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were cultivated to study microbial processes associated with ammonia oxidation in pure culture. We explored the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters of ammonia oxidation in N. europaea biofilms were in the range of those determined with batch suspended cells. Oxygen and pH microelectrodes were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH above and inside biofilms and reactive transport modeling was performed to simulate the measured DO and pH profiles. A two dimensional (2-D) model was used to simulate advection parallel to the biofilm surface and diffusion through the overlying fluid while reaction and diffusion were simulated in the biofilm. Three experimental studies of microsensor measurements were performed with biofilms: i) NH3 concentrations near the Ksn value of 40 μM determined in suspended cell tests ii) Limited buffering capacity which resulted in a pH gradient within the biofilms and iii) NH3 concentrations well below the Ksn value. Very good fits to the DO concentration profiles both in the fluid above and in the biofilms were achieved using the 2-D model. The modeling study revealed that the half-saturation coefficient for NH3 in N. europaea biofilms was close to the value measured in suspended cells. However, the third study of biofilms with low availability of NH3 deviated from the model prediction. The model also predicted shifts in the DO profiles and the gradient in pH that resulted for the case of limited buffering capacity. The results illustrate the importance of incorporating both key transport and chemical processes in a biofilm reactive transport model.

  15. [Periodical changes of various hematological parameters of the human body adaptation and gravitation fields variations].

    PubMed

    Gederim, V V; Sokolovskiĭ, V V; Gorshkov, E S; Shapovalov, S N; Troshichev, O A

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring the content of lymphocytes and nucleated neutrophils (observation period 10.5 months) and the determination of the values of leucocytes coefficient and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in chronic patients revealed rhythms of oscillations of these parameters (from 3-5 to 33 days). The coincidence of these rhythms with the rhythms of variations of gravitational field indicates that gravitational field affects the quantitative blood cell composition and the rheological properties of blood.

  16. Haematology and Serum Biochemistry Parameters and Variations in the Eurasian Beaver (Castor fiber)

    PubMed Central

    Girling, Simon J.; Campbell-Palmer, Roisin; Pizzi, Romain; Fraser, Mary A.; Cracknell, Jonathan; Arnemo, Jon; Rosell, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Haematology parameters (N = 24) and serum biochemistry parameters (N = 35) were determined for wild Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber), between 6 months – 12 years old. Of the population tested in this study, N = 18 Eurasian beavers were from Norway and N = 17 originating from Bavaria but now living extensively in a reserve in England. All blood samples were collected from beavers via the ventral tail vein. All beavers were chemically restrained using inhalant isoflurane in 100% oxygen prior to blood sampling. Results were determined for haematological and serum biochemical parameters for the species and were compared between the two different populations with differences in means estimated and significant differences being noted. Standard blood parameters for the Eurasian beaver were determined and their ranges characterised using percentiles. Whilst the majority of blood parameters between the two populations showed no significant variation, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin and white blood cell counts showed significantly greater values (p<0.01) in the Bavarian origin population than the Norwegian; neutrophil counts, alpha 2 globulins, cholesterol, sodium: potassium ratios and phosphorus levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Bavarian versus Norwegian; and potassium, bile acids, gamma globulins, urea, creatinine and total calcium values levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Norwegian versus Bavarian relict populations. No significant differences were noted between male and female beavers or between sexually immature (<3 years old) and sexually mature (≥3 years old) beavers in the animals sampled. With Eurasian beaver reintroduction encouraged by legislation throughout Europe, knowledge of baseline blood values for the species and any variations therein is essential when assessing their health and welfare and the success or failure of any reintroduction program. This is the first study to produce base

  17. Haematology and Serum Biochemistry Parameters and Variations in the Eurasian Beaver (Castor fiber).

    PubMed

    Girling, Simon J; Campbell-Palmer, Roisin; Pizzi, Romain; Fraser, Mary A; Cracknell, Jonathan; Arnemo, Jon; Rosell, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Haematology parameters (N = 24) and serum biochemistry parameters (N = 35) were determined for wild Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber), between 6 months - 12 years old. Of the population tested in this study, N = 18 Eurasian beavers were from Norway and N = 17 originating from Bavaria but now living extensively in a reserve in England. All blood samples were collected from beavers via the ventral tail vein. All beavers were chemically restrained using inhalant isoflurane in 100% oxygen prior to blood sampling. Results were determined for haematological and serum biochemical parameters for the species and were compared between the two different populations with differences in means estimated and significant differences being noted. Standard blood parameters for the Eurasian beaver were determined and their ranges characterised using percentiles. Whilst the majority of blood parameters between the two populations showed no significant variation, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin and white blood cell counts showed significantly greater values (p<0.01) in the Bavarian origin population than the Norwegian; neutrophil counts, alpha 2 globulins, cholesterol, sodium: potassium ratios and phosphorus levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Bavarian versus Norwegian; and potassium, bile acids, gamma globulins, urea, creatinine and total calcium values levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Norwegian versus Bavarian relict populations. No significant differences were noted between male and female beavers or between sexually immature (<3 years old) and sexually mature (≥3 years old) beavers in the animals sampled. With Eurasian beaver reintroduction encouraged by legislation throughout Europe, knowledge of baseline blood values for the species and any variations therein is essential when assessing their health and welfare and the success or failure of any reintroduction program. This is the first study to produce base

  18. Determination of char combustion kinetics parameters: comparison of point detector and imaging-based particle-sizing pyrometry.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Martin; Geier, Manfred; Shaddix, Christopher R; Vorobiev, Nikita; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the char burnout characteristics of two German coals (a lignite and a high-volatile bituminous coal) were investigated using two different experimental configurations and optical techniques in two distinct laboratories for measurement of temperature and size of burning particles. The optical diagnostic hardware is quite different in the two systems, but both perform two-color pyrometry and optical sizing measurements on individual particles burning in isolation from each other in high-temperature laminar flows to characterize the char consumption kinetics. The performance of the specialized systems is compared for two different combustion atmospheres (with 6.6 and 12 vol.% O2) and gas temperatures between 1700 and 1800 K. The measured particle temperatures and diameters are converted to char burning rate parameters for several residence times during the course of the particles' burnout. The results confirm that comparable results are obtained with the two configurations, although higher levels of variability in the measured data were observed in the imaging-based pyrometer setup. Corresponding uncertainties in kinetics parameters were larger, and appear to be more sensitive to systematic measurement errors when lower oxygen contents are used in the experiments. Consequently, burnout experiments in environments with sufficiently high O2 contents may be used to measure reliable char burning kinetics rates. Based on simulation results for the two coals, O2 concentrations in the range 10%-30% are recommended for kinetic rate measurements on 100 μm particles.

  19. Determination of char combustion kinetics parameters: Comparison of point detector and imaging-based particle-sizing pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemann, Martin; Geier, Manfred; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Vorobiev, Nikita; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the char burnout characteristics of two German coals (a lignite and a high-volatile bituminous coal) were investigated using two different experimental configurations and optical techniques in two distinct laboratories for measurement of temperature and size of burning particles. The optical diagnostic hardware is quite different in the two systems, but both perform two-color pyrometry and optical sizing measurements on individual particles burning in isolation from each other in high-temperature laminar flows to characterize the char consumption kinetics. The performance of the specialized systems is compared for two different combustion atmospheres (with 6.6 and 12 vol.% O2) and gas temperatures between 1700 and 1800 K. The measured particle temperatures and diameters are converted to char burning rate parameters for several residence times during the course of the particles' burnout. The results confirm that comparable results are obtained with the two configurations, although higher levels of variability in the measured data were observed in the imaging-based pyrometer setup. Corresponding uncertainties in kinetics parameters were larger, and appear to be more sensitive to systematic measurement errors when lower oxygen contents are used in the experiments. Consequently, burnout experiments in environments with sufficiently high O2 contents may be used to measure reliable char burning kinetics rates. Based on simulation results for the two coals, O2 concentrations in the range 10%-30% are recommended for kinetic rate measurements on 100 μm particles.

  20. Tolerable Variation in Item Parameter Estimates for Linear and Adaptive Computer-Based Testing. Research Report No. 04-28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizavi, Saba; Way, Walter D.; Davey, Tim; Herbert, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Item parameter estimates vary for a variety of reasons, including estimation error, characteristics of the examinee samples, and context effects (e.g., item location effects, section location effects, etc.). Although we expect variation based on theory, there is reason to believe that observed variation in item parameter estimates exceeds what…

  1. Variations of cosmic large-scale structure covariance matrices across parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Kiessling, Alina; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-03-01

    The likelihood function for cosmological parameters, given by e.g. weak lensing shear measurements, depends on contributions to the covariance induced by the non-linear evolution of the cosmic web. As highly non-linear clustering to date has only been described by numerical N-body simulations in a reliable and sufficiently precise way, the necessary computational costs for estimating those covariances at different points in parameter space are tremendous. In this work, we describe the change of the matter covariance and the weak lensing covariance matrix as a function of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis, where we model the contribution to the covariance from non-linear structure formation using Eulerian perturbation theory at third order. We show that our formalism is capable of dealing with large matrices and reproduces expected degeneracies and scaling with cosmological parameters in a reliable way. Comparing our analytical results to numerical simulations, we find that the method describes the variation of the covariance matrix found in the SUNGLASS weak lensing simulation pipeline within the errors at one-loop and tree-level for the spectrum and the trispectrum, respectively, for multipoles up to ℓ ≤ 1300. We show that it is possible to optimize the sampling of parameter space where numerical simulations should be carried out by minimizing interpolation errors and propose a corresponding method to distribute points in parameter space in an economical way.

  2. Variation of ice crystal size, shape, and asymmetry parameter in tops of tropical deep convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.

    2014-10-01

    The variation of ice crystal properties in the tops of deep convective clouds off the north coast of Australia is analyzed. Cloud optical thickness, ice effective radius, aspect ratio of ice crystal components, crystal distortion parameter and asymmetry parameter are simultaneously retrieved from combined measurements of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) satellite instruments. The data are divided into periods with alternating weak and strong convection. Mostly plate-like particle components with aspect ratios closer to unity and lower asymmetry parameters characterize strongly convective periods, while weakly convective periods generally show lower aspect ratios, relatively more column-like shapes and somewhat greater asymmetry parameters. Results for strongly convective periods show that, with increasing cloud top temperature, the distortion parameter generally decreases, while the asymmetry parameter and effective radius increase. For one of the strongly convective periods, the rate at which effective radii increase with cloud top temperature is more than double that of the other periods, while the temperature dependence of the other microphysical quantities for this period is substantially weaker. Atmospheric state analysis indicates that these differences are concurrent with differences in middle-to-upper tropospheric zonal wind shear. The observed variation of microphysical properties may have significant effects on the shortwave radiative fluxes and cloud absorption associated with deep convection. Additionally, MODIS collection 5 effective radii are estimated to be biased small with an artificially narrow range. Collection 6 products are expected to have less severe biases that depend on cloud top temperature and atmospheric conditions.

  3. Pile noise experiment in MINERVE reactor to estimate kinetic parameters using various data processing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, Benoit; Gruel, Adrien; Pepino, Alexandra; Di Salvo, Jacques; Izarra, Gregoire de; Jammes, Christian; Destouches, Christophe; Blaise, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    MINERVE is a two-zone pool type zero power reactor operated by CEA (Cadarache, France). Kinetic parameters of the core (prompt neutron decay constant, delayed neutron fraction, generation time) have been recently measured using various pile noise experimental techniques, namely Feynman-α, Rossi-α and Cohn-α. Results are discussed and compared to each other's. The measurement campaign has been conducted in the framework of a tri-partite collaboration between CEA, SCK.CEN and PSI. Results presented in this paper were obtained thanks to a time-stamping acquisition system developed by CEA. PSI performed simultaneous measurements which are presented in a companion paper. Signals come from two high efficiency fission chambers located in the graphite reflector next to the core driver zone. Experiments were conducted at critical state with a reactor power of 0.2 W. The core integral fission rate is obtained from a calibrated miniature fission chamber located at the center of the core. Other results obtained in two sub-critical configurations will be presented elsewhere. Best estimate delayed neutron fraction comes from the Cohn-α method: 747 ± 15 pcm (1σ). In this case, the prompt decay constant is 79 ± 0.5 s{sup -1} and the generation time is 94.5 ± 0.7 μs. Other methods give consistent results within the confidence intervals. Experimental results are compared to calculated values obtained from a full 3D core modeling with the CEA-developed Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4.9 associated with its continuous energy JEFF3.1.1-based library. A very good agreement is observed for the calculated delayed neutron fraction (748.7 ± 0.4 pcm at 1σ), that is a difference of -0.3% with the experiment. On the contrary, a 10% discrepancy is observed for the calculated generation time (104.4 ± 0.1 μs at 1σ). (authors)

  4. A parameter-free variational coupling approach for trimmed isogeometric thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yujie; Ruess, Martin; Schillinger, Dominik

    2016-12-01

    The non-symmetric variant of Nitsche's method was recently applied successfully for variationally enforcing boundary and interface conditions in non-boundary-fitted discretizations. In contrast to its symmetric variant, it does not require stabilization terms and therefore does not depend on the appropriate estimation of stabilization parameters. In this paper, we further consolidate the non-symmetric Nitsche approach by establishing its application in isogeometric thin shell analysis, where variational coupling techniques are of particular interest for enforcing interface conditions along trimming curves. To this end, we extend its variational formulation within Kirchhoff-Love shell theory, combine it with the finite cell method, and apply the resulting framework to a range of representative shell problems based on trimmed NURBS surfaces. We demonstrate that the non-symmetric variant applied in this context is stable and can lead to the same accuracy in terms of displacements and stresses as its symmetric counterpart. Based on our numerical evidence, the non-symmetric Nitsche method is a viable parameter-free alternative to the symmetric variant in elastostatic shell analysis.

  5. A parameter-free variational coupling approach for trimmed isogeometric thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yujie; Ruess, Martin; Schillinger, Dominik

    2017-04-01

    The non-symmetric variant of Nitsche's method was recently applied successfully for variationally enforcing boundary and interface conditions in non-boundary-fitted discretizations. In contrast to its symmetric variant, it does not require stabilization terms and therefore does not depend on the appropriate estimation of stabilization parameters. In this paper, we further consolidate the non-symmetric Nitsche approach by establishing its application in isogeometric thin shell analysis, where variational coupling techniques are of particular interest for enforcing interface conditions along trimming curves. To this end, we extend its variational formulation within Kirchhoff-Love shell theory, combine it with the finite cell method, and apply the resulting framework to a range of representative shell problems based on trimmed NURBS surfaces. We demonstrate that the non-symmetric variant applied in this context is stable and can lead to the same accuracy in terms of displacements and stresses as its symmetric counterpart. Based on our numerical evidence, the non-symmetric Nitsche method is a viable parameter-free alternative to the symmetric variant in elastostatic shell analysis.

  6. Arsenic Species in Chicken Breast: Temporal Variations of Metabolites, Elimination Kinetics, and Residual Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingqing; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Zuidhof, Martin J.; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chicken meat has the highest per capita consumption among all meat types in North America. The practice of feeding 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, Rox) to chickens lasted for more than 60 years. However, the fate of Rox and arsenic metabolites remaining in chicken are poorly understood. Objectives: We aimed to determine the elimination of Rox and metabolites from chickens and quantify the remaining arsenic species in chicken meat, providing necessary information for meaningful exposure assessment. Methods: We have conducted a 35-day feeding experiment involving 1,600 chickens, of which half were control and the other half were fed a Rox-supplemented diet for the first 28 days and then a Rox-free diet for the final 7 days. We quantified the concentrations of individual arsenic species in the breast meat of 229 chickens. Results: Rox, arsenobetaine, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, and a new arsenic metabolite, were detected in breast meat from chickens fed Rox. The concentrations of arsenic species, except arsenobetaine, were significantly higher in the Rox-fed than in the control chickens. The half-lives of elimination of these arsenic species were 0.4–1 day. Seven days after termination of Rox feeding, the concentrations of arsenite (3.1 μg/kg), Rox (0.4 μg/kg), and a new arsenic metabolite (0.8 μg/kg) were significantly higher in the Rox-fed chickens than in the control. Conclusion: Feeding of Rox to chickens increased the concentrations of five arsenic species in breast meat. Although most arsenic species were excreted rapidly when the feeding of Rox stopped, arsenic species remaining in the Rox-fed chickens were higher than the background levels. Citation: Liu Q, Peng H, Lu X, Zuidhof MJ, Li XF, Le XC. 2016. Arsenic species in chicken breast: temporal variations of metabolites, elimination kinetics, and residual concentrations. Environ Health Perspect 124:1174–1181; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp

  7. An automated image-based method of 3D subject-specific body segment parameter estimation for kinetic analyses of rapid movements.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Alison L; Corazza, Stefano; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Accurate subject-specific body segment parameters (BSPs) are necessary to perform kinetic analyses of human movements with large accelerations, or no external contact forces or moments. A new automated topographical image-based method of estimating segment mass, center of mass (CM) position, and moments of inertia is presented. Body geometry and volume were measured using a laser scanner, then an automated pose and shape registration algorithm segmented the scanned body surface, and identified joint center (JC) positions. Assuming the constant segment densities of Dempster, thigh and shank masses, CM locations, and moments of inertia were estimated for four male subjects with body mass indexes (BMIs) of 19.7-38.2. The subject-specific BSP were compared with those determined using Dempster and Clauser regression equations. The influence of BSP and BMI differences on knee and hip net forces and moments during a running swing phase were quantified for the subjects with the smallest and largest BMIs. Subject-specific BSP for 15 body segments were quickly calculated using the image-based method, and total subject masses were overestimated by 1.7-2.9%.When compared with the Dempster and Clauser methods, image-based and regression estimated thigh BSP varied more than the shank parameters. Thigh masses and hip JC to thigh CM distances were consistently larger, and each transverse moment of inertia was smaller using the image-based method. Because the shank had larger linear and angular accelerations than the thigh during the running swing phase, shank BSP differences had a larger effect on calculated intersegmental forces and moments at the knee joint than thigh BSP differences did at the hip. It was the net knee kinetic differences caused by the shank BSP differences that were the largest contributors to the hip variations. Finally, BSP differences produced larger kinetic differences for the subject with larger segment masses, suggesting that parameter accuracy is more

  8. Monoculture parameters successfully predict coculture growth kinetics of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and two Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Van Wey, A S; Cookson, A L; Roy, N C; McNabb, W C; Soboleva, T K; Shorten, P R

    2014-11-17

    Microorganisms rarely live in isolation but are most often found in a consortium. This provides the potential for cross-feeding and nutrient competition among the microbial species, which make it challenging to predict the growth kinetics in coculture. In this paper we developed a mathematical model to describe substrate consumption and subsequent microbial growth and metabolite production for bacteria grown in monoculture. The model characterized substrate utilization kinetics of 18 Bifidobacterium strains. Some bifidobacterial strains demonstrated preferential degradation of oligofructose in that sugars with low degree of polymerization (DP) (DP≤3 or 4) were metabolized before sugars of higher DP, or vice versa. Thus, we expanded the model to describe the preferential degradation of oligofructose. In addition, we adapted the model to describe the competition between human colonic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 or Bifidobacterium breve Yakult for inulin as well as cross-feeding of breakdown products from the extracellular hydrolysis of inulin by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. We found that the coculture growth kinetics could be predicted based on the respective monoculture growth kinetics. Using growth kinetics from monoculture experiments to predict coculture dynamics will reduce the number of in vitro experiments required to parameterize multi-culture models.

  9. Experimental Study of Axial Plasma Parameter Variations in the Cylindrical Magnetron Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrna, P.; Holik, M.; Bilyk, O.; Porokhova, I. A.; Golubovskii, Yu. B.; Tichy, M.; Behnke, J. F.

    2003-06-01

    In the cylindrical magnetron the electric field is applied in radial direction and the magnetic field in axial direction. In this paper we present a study of the variations of plasma parameters in both the axial as well as in radial directions in the novel construction of cylindrical magnetron developed in the University of Greifswald, FRG. Six evenly distributed coils create the axial magnetic field. The homogeneity of the magnetic field ±0.2 % has been achieved over the whole discharge vessel length 300 mm (vessel diameter 58 mm). The system is equipped with three cylindrical Langmuir probes movable in radial direction, placed in ports located in between each couple of coils in distance 60 mm from each other. In order to measure the axial variations of the discharge current, one half of the cathode length is segmented into 14 segments, i.e. one segment has a length of about 10 mm. This enables the measurement of the axial variations of the discharge current. We present measurements of the axial distribution of the discharge current at different magnetic fields. We also demonstrate measurements of the axial and radial variations of the plasma density.

  10. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for distributed hydrological modeling: potential of variational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaings, W.; Dartus, D.; Le Dimet, F.-X.; Saulnier, G.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Variational methods are widely used for the analysis and control of computationally intensive spatially distributed systems. In particular, the adjoint state method enables a very efficient calculation of the derivatives of an objective function (response function to be analysed or cost function to be optimised) with respect to model inputs. In this contribution, it is shown that the potential of variational methods for distributed catchment scale hydrology should be considered. A distributed flash flood model, coupling kinematic wave overland flow and Green Ampt infiltration, is applied to a small catchment of the Thoré basin and used as a relatively simple (synthetic observations) but didactic application case. It is shown that forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis provide a local but extensive insight on the relation between the assigned model parameters and the simulated hydrological response. Spatially distributed parameter sensitivities can be obtained for a very modest calculation effort (~6 times the computing time of a single model run) and the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Jacobian matrix provides an interesting perspective for the analysis of the rainfall-runoff relation. For the estimation of model parameters, adjoint-based derivatives were found exceedingly efficient in driving a bound-constrained quasi-Newton algorithm. The reference parameter set is retrieved independently from the optimization initial condition when the very common dimension reduction strategy (i.e. scalar multipliers) is adopted. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis results suggest that most of the variability in this high-dimensional parameter space can be captured with a few orthogonal directions. A parametrization based on the SVD leading singular vectors was found very promising but should be combined with another regularization strategy in order to prevent overfitting.

  11. Simulations of a epidemic model with parameters variation analysis for the dengue fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardim, C. L. T. F.; Prates, D. B.; Silva, J. M.; Ferreira, L. A. F.; Kritz, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical models can be widely found in the literature for describing and analyzing epidemics. The models that use differential equations to represent mathematically such description are specially sensible to parameters involved in the modelling. In this work, an already developed model, called SIR, is analyzed when applied to a scenario of a dengue fever epidemic. Such choice is powered by the existence of useful tools presented by a variation of this original model, which allow an inclusion of different aspects of the dengue fever disease, as its seasonal characteristics, the presence of more than one strain of the vector and of the biological factor of cross-immunity. The analysis and results interpretation are performed through numerical solutions of the model in question, and a special attention is given to the different solutions generated by the use of different values for the parameters present in this model. Slight variations are performed either dynamically or statically in those parameters, mimicking hypothesized changes in the biological scenario of this simulation and providing a source of evaluation of how those changes would affect the outcomes of the epidemic in a population.

  12. Long-period variations of wind parameters in the mesopause region and the solar cycle dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greisiger, K. M.; Schminder, R.; Kuerschner, D.

    1987-01-01

    The solar cycle dependence of wind parameters below 100 km on the basis of long term continuous ionospheric drift measurements in the low frequency range is discussed. For the meridional prevailing wind no significant variation was found. The same comparison as for winter was done for summer where the previous investigations gave no correlation. Now the radar meteor wind measurement values, too, showed a significant negative correlation of the zonal prevailing wind with solar activity for the years 1976 to 1983. The ionospheric drift measurement results of Collm have the same tendency but a larger dispersion due to the lower accuracy of the harmonic analysis because of the shorter daily measuring interval in summer. Continuous wind observations in the upper mesopause region over more than 20 years revealed distinct long term variations, the origin of which cannot be explained with the present knowledge.

  13. Variations of Strength, Resistivity and Thermal Parameters of Clay after High Temperature Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Weiqiang; Zhang, Yuliang; Yang, Lining

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports the variations of strength, resistivity and thermal parameters of clay after high-temperature heating. Experiments were carried out to test the physical properties of clay heated at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 800°C in a furnace. The experiment results show that below 400°C the uniaxial compressive strength and resistivity change very little. However, above 400°C, both increase rapidly. At a temperature under 400°C, the thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity decrease significantly. The thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test indicate that a series of changes occur in kaolinite at temperatures from 400 to 600°C, which is considered the primary cause of the variation of physical and mechanical properties of clay under high temperatures.

  14. Diurnal and seasonal variation of coastal carbonate system parameters in South Florida and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, K.; Smiley, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    Assessing the impact of climate change and ocean acidification on coastal and marine ecosystems requires accurate characterization of its chemical and physical effects on the carbonate system in seawater. Very few data exist that characterize natural variations in coastal carbonate chemistry, limiting the development and validation of coastal climate change and ocean acidification models. We measured carbonate system parameters over diurnal cycles in shallow, coastal ecosystems of Florida Bay, Tampa Bay, Biscayne National Park, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Tobago, and the Bahamas. Salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured continuously, and seawater samples were collected every 4 hours throughout multiple 24-hour time periods. Total alkalinity and pH were measured using spectrophotometric techniques, dissolved inorganic carbon was measured via carbon coulometry, and remaining carbonate system parameters were calculated using CO2SYS. Seasonal variability was either determined from existing data sets, or modeled using salinity and temperature data collected from CTDs deployed at study locations or long-term monitoring sites. Results indicate that all carbonate system parameters showed distinct variation over diurnal timescales primarily due to productivity, respiration, and precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate. The average range of diurnal variation was up to 102% of the seasonal range of variability in carbonate chemistry. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability (or vice versa) may impart significant error in calculation of annual carbon budgets and modeling carbon cycling in coastal ecosystems. Implications for modeling long-term impacts of ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems will be discussed.

  15. A normalized wave number variation parameter for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of the Acoustic Black Hole has been developed as an efficient passive, lightweight absorber of bending waves in plates and beams. Theory predicts greater absorption for a higher thickness taper power. However, a higher taper power also increases the violation of an underlying theory smoothness assumption. This paper explores the effects of high taper power on the reflection coefficient and spatial change in wave number and discusses the normalized wave number variation as a spatial design parameter for performance, assessment, and optimization.

  16. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Tejbir Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-28

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  17. A multiscale variational approach to the kinetics of viscous classical liquids: The coarse-grained mean field approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-04-07

    A closed kinetic equation for the single-particle density of a viscous simple liquid is derived using a variational method for the Liouville equation and a coarse-grained mean-field (CGMF) ansatz. The CGMF ansatz is based on the notion that during the characteristic time of deformation a given particle interacts with many others so that it experiences an average interaction. A trial function for the N-particle probability density is constructed using a multiscale perturbation method and the CGMF ansatz is applied to it. The multiscale perturbation scheme is based on the ratio of the average nearest-neighbor atom distance to the total size of the assembly. A constraint on the initial condition is discovered which guarantees that the kinetic equation is mass-conserving and closed in the single-particle density. The kinetic equation has much of the character of the Vlasov equation except that true viscous, and not Landau, damping is accounted for. The theory captures condensation kinetics and takes much of the character of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the weak-gradient short-range force limit.

  18. Resilience of a beef cow-calf farming system to variations in demographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Viet, A-F; Ezanno, P; Petit, E; Devun, J; Vermesse, R; Fourichon, C

    2013-01-01

    Beef cow-calf farming systems are assumed to be resilient to biological disturbances that induce variations in herd demography; however, this hypothesis has not been fully investigated to date. Modeling is an interesting approach to study farming system resilience and to evaluate the impact of biological disturbances, taking into account interactions between system components, including biological variability and management practices. Our objective was to evaluate the resilience of beef cow-calf farming systems to variations in fertility and mortality using a modeling approach. We studied the direct effect of variations in demographic parameters on production objectives without explicitly representing the causes of the variations. We developed a stochastic model to represent the population dynamics of a beef cow-calf herd with breeding by natural service and biological processes occurring at the animal level. The model was validated by comparing observed and simulated distributions of the calving-to-calving interval, which were found to be consistent. Resistance was evaluated by the proportion of simulations where the objective in terms of number of weaned calves is reached even when there is a disturbance that persists for 10 yr. Reversibility was evaluated by the time needed to return to the predisturbance production level. Beef cow-calf farming systems did not appear to be resistant to variations in mortality and infertility rates except when increases in the infertility rates were low (0.02 for cows and 0.03 for heifers). Critical situations, consequently, may emerge with regard to farm production if management practices are not adapted. Reversibility was observed for disturbances that persist for up to 5 yr. However, the system needed 2 to 3 yr to recover its predisturbance production level and up to 4 yr after an increase in cow infertility of 0.12.

  19. Anthropometric Indices Associated with Variation in Cardiovascular Parameters among Primary School Pupils in Ile-Ife.

    PubMed

    Abiodun, Adedeji G; Egwu, Michael O; Adedoyin, Rufus A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the anthropometric indices associated with variations in cardiovascular parameters among primary school pupils in Ile-Ife. Method. One thousand and twenty-six pupils (age range 6-14 years, mean age 10.12 years) from ten schools were recruited with parents' informed consent. Anthropometric (Height (Ht), Weight (Wt), Abdominal Circumference (AC)) and cardiovascular (Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP), Heart Rate (HR)) parameters were measured using standard instruments and procedures. Blood pressure (BP) was measured after ten minutes of quiet sitting. Body Mass Index (BMI), Rate Pressure Product (RPP) and Pulse Pressure (PP) were estimated. Results. Age, Ht, Wt, BMI, and AC correlated significantly (P < .01) with BP and PP. AC and BMI were predictors of BP, HR, RPP, and PP. Conclusion. Significant correlations exist between age, Ht, Wt, BMI, AC, and BP with weight being a more viable predictor of SBP and age a more viable predictor of DBP.

  20. Long-term variations of the solar wind parameters and their geoeffciency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, Liudmila; Shirochkov, Alexander

    One of the contradictory problems of the contemporary state of the solar-terrestrial physics is impact of the solar activity of different kinds on the near-Earth space. For a long time solar activity having cyclical variations of sunspots and solar flares were considered as a main factor in the study of the solar - terrestrial links. State of the solar wind, which depends on the processes occurring in the Sun, is an important indicator of the solar - terrestrial links. Right now geoeffeciency of the solar wind influence on the processes in the near-Earth space is commonly accepted fact. In this paper we study the long-term variations in the solar wind parameters using satellite data from 1966 to 2013. So, sporadic variability associated with casual short-term disturbances in the solar wind were excluded from consideration. We analyzed annual values of such parameters as the solar wind interplanetary field full magnetic vector (B), speed (V) and density (n), as well as its dynamic pressure (nV2). It was confirmed that in the long term variations of the total magnetic field vector B coincides with cyclic variability of the number of sunspots. The long-term variations in the solar wind velocity clearly demonstrated maximum at decreasing phase of solar activity cycle. Solar wind density values were minimal at the maxima of solar activity cycles and they increased in the decay phase of the cyclic activity. These results were mentioned in the previous literature. The new fact was that the density of the solar wind has increased from cycle to cycle from 1966 to 1993, and it began to decrease values after 1996. Dynamic pressure of the solar wind from 1966 to 1993 increased in proportion to the density of the solar wind. It was also found that since 1998 the dynamic pressure is determined of the total magnetic field vector IMF and the solar wind velocity. Analysis of long-term variations of ionospheric parameters at F region showed a high correlation with the values of

  1. Variational estimation of process parameters in a simplified atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guokun; Koehl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    Parameterizations are used to simulate effects of unresolved sub-grid-scale processes in current state-of-the-art climate model. The values of the process parameters, which determine the model's climatology, are usually manually adjusted to reduce the difference of model mean state to the observed climatology. This process requires detailed knowledge of the model and its parameterizations. In this work, a variational method was used to estimate process parameters in the Planet Simulator (PlaSim). The adjoint code was generated using automatic differentiation of the source code. Some hydrological processes were switched off to remove the influence of zero-order discontinuities. In addition, the nonlinearity of the model limits the feasible assimilation window to about 1day, which is too short to tune the model's climatology. To extend the feasible assimilation window, nudging terms for all state variables were added to the model's equations, which essentially suppress all unstable directions. In identical twin experiments, we found that the feasible assimilation window could be extended to over 1-year and accurate parameters could be retrieved. Although the nudging terms transform to a damping of the adjoint variables and therefore tend to erases the information of the data over time, assimilating climatological information is shown to provide sufficient information on the parameters. Moreover, the mechanism of this regularization is discussed.

  2. Quantifying the performance of in vivo portal dosimetry in detecting four types of treatment parameter variations

    SciTech Connect

    Bojechko, C.; Ford, E. C.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To quantify the ability of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry used during treatment (in vivo) in detecting variations that can occur in the course of patient treatment. Methods: Images of transmitted radiation from in vivo EPID measurements were converted to a 2D planar dose at isocenter and compared to the treatment planning dose using a prototype software system. Using the treatment planning system (TPS), four different types of variability were modeled: overall dose scaling, shifting the positions of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves, shifting of the patient position, and changes in the patient body contour. The gamma pass rate was calculated for the modified and unmodified plans and used to construct a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve to assess the detectability of the different parameter variations. The detectability is given by the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The TPS was also used to calculate the impact of the variations on the target dose–volume histogram. Results: Nine intensity modulation radiation therapy plans were measured for four different anatomical sites consisting of 70 separate fields. Results show that in vivo EPID dosimetry was most sensitive to variations in the machine output, AUC = 0.70 − 0.94, changes in patient body habitus, AUC = 0.67 − 0.88, and systematic shifts in the MLC bank positions, AUC = 0.59 − 0.82. These deviations are expected to have a relatively small clinical impact [planning target volume (PTV) D{sub 99} change <7%]. Larger variations have even higher detectability. Displacements in the patient’s position and random variations in MLC leaf positions were not readily detectable, AUC < 0.64. The D{sub 99} of the PTV changed by up to 57% for the patient position shifts considered here. Conclusions: In vivo EPID dosimetry is able to detect relatively small variations in overall dose, systematic shifts of the MLC’s, and changes in the patient habitus. Shifts in the

  3. A Sensitivity Test of the Ozone Solar Cycle Response with Respect to Chemical Kinetics and Model Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Li, K.; Li, C.; Liang, M.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed O3 solar cycle (SC) responses in upper and middle stratosphere are very different from those predicted by models. It is argued whether the differences are within the uncertainties of measurements and chemical kinetic rates. To answer this question, a simple one-dimensional (1-D) Caltech/JPL photochemical model is employed to study the discrepancies between observed and model O3 solar cycle responses. A simplified list of reactions is developed including Chapman, HOx, NOx and ClOx chemistry. We perform sensitivity tests on a significant portion of the kinetic rates to investigate whether the observed O3 SC response can be modeled using standard chemistry. Other model parameters such as eddy diffusivity are included in the tests. Finally, the optimal estimation method (OEM) is employed to derive a set of kinetic rate coefficients and model parameters that would minimize the difference between the observed and the model SC responses in O3. The outcome of retrieval represents the best-fit O3 response under the constraints of standard chemistry and measurement uncertainties.

  4. Time of erythema onset after application of methyl nicotinate ointments as response parameter: influence of penetration kinetics and enhancing agents.

    PubMed

    Remane, Y; Leopold, C S

    2006-01-01

    The time of erythema onset may be used as a response parameter for quantification of the cutaneous erythema response induced by methyl nicotinate. The vehicles light mineral oil (LMO; test) and medium chain triglycerides (MCT; standard) were compared with regard to the pharmacodynamic response. Moreover, the influence of penetration enhancers on the time of erythema onset was investigated under zero order penetration kinetics. The enhancers dimethyl sulfoxide, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether and three different glycerides in different concentrations were added to MCT as a standard vehicle. All preparations were applied to the forearms of volunteers under infinite dose conditions at different thermodynamic drug activity levels (0.2-3.2% of the saturation level) and different drug concentrations (0.051-0.816%), respectively. Different penetration kinetics do not influence data of erythema onset, as these data are comparable to those obtained under finite dose conditions (first order penetration kinetics). With regard to the penetration enhancers, a significantly enhanced penetration of methyl nicotinate could be observed only for diethylene glycol monoethyl ether and dimethyl sulfoxide. However, no significant difference between light mineral oil and MCT could be found with regard to penetration enhancement. The time of erythema onset is an easy and efficient parameter for quantification of the pharmacodynamic response caused by nicotinates.

  5. Controls on ostracod valve geochemistry, Part 1: Variations of environmental parameters in ostracod (micro-)habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten Walter; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The variations of environmental conditions ( T°, pH, δ 13C DIC, [DIC], δ 18O, Mg/Ca, and Sr/Ca) of ostracod habitats were examined to determine the controls of environmental parameters on the chemical and isotopic composition of ostracod valves. Results of a one-year monitoring of environmental parameters at five sites, with depths of between 2 and 70 m, in Lake Geneva indicate that in littoral to sub-littoral zones (2, 5, and 13 m), the chemical composition of bottom water varies seasonally in concert with changes in temperature and photosynthetic activity. An increase of temperature and photosynthetic activity leads to an increase in δ 13C values of DIC and to precipitation of authigenic calcite, which results in a concomitant increase of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of water. In deeper sites (33 and 70 m), the composition of bottom water remains constant throughout the year and isotopic values and trace element contents are similar to those of deep water within the lake. The chemical composition of interstitial pore water also does not reflect seasonal variations but is controlled by calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration with reduction of sulphate and/or nitrate, and methanogenesis that may occur in the sediment pores. Relative influence of each of these factors on the pore water geochemistry depends on sediment thickness and texture, oxygen content in bottom as well as pore water. Variations of chemical compositions of the ostracod valves of this study vary according to the specific ecology of the ostracod species analysed, that is its life-cycle and its (micro-)habitat. Littoral species have compositions that are related to the seasonal variations of temperature, δ 13C values of DIC, and of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of water. In contrast, the compositions of profundal species are largely controlled by variations of pore fluids along sediment depth profiles according to the specific depth preference of the species. The control on the

  6. Variations of the ionospheric parameters obtained from ground based measurements of ULF magnetic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Elena; Kotik, Dmitry; Bösinger, Tilmann

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of the amplitude spectra and polarization parameter (epsilon)[1] of magnetic ULF noise were investigated during different seasons and high geomagnetic activity time using the data on the horizontal magnetic components monitoring at mid-latitude (New Life, Russia, 56 N, 46 E) and low-latitude stations (Crete, 35.15 N, 25.20 E). It was found that abrupt changes in the spectral polarization parameters can be linked as with variation of height of maximum and the electron density of the F-layer, and with a change in ionospheric parameters profiles at lower altitudes, for example, with the appearance of sporadic Es-layers and intermediate layers, located between the E and F-layers. It was detected the peculiarities in the daily dynamics of the epsilon parameter at low latitudes: a) the appearance in some cases more complicated than in the mid-latitudes, epsilon structure of the spectrum associated with the presence of two different values of the boundary frequency fB [2]; b) a decreasing of fB near local midnight observed in 70% of cases; c) observation of typical for dark time epsilon spectra after sunrise in the winter season. The numerical calculations of epsilon parameter were made using the IRI-2012 model with setting the models of sporadic and intermediate layers. The results revealed the dependence of the polarization spectra of the intensity and height of such thin layers. The specific changes in the electron density at altitudes of 80-350 km during the recovery phase of strong magnetic storms were defined basing on a comparative analysis of the experimental spectra and the results of the numerical calculations. References. 1. E. N. Ermakova, D. S. Kotik, A. V.Ryabov, A. V.Pershin, T. B.osinger, and Q. Zhou, Studying the variation of the broadband spectral maximum parameters in the natural ULF fields, Radiophysics and Quantum Electronics, Vol. 55, No. 10-11, March, 2013 p. 605-615. 2. T. Bosinger, A. G. Demekhov, E. N. Ermakova, C. Haldoupis and Q

  7. Dry mechanochemical synthesis of hydroxyapatites from DCPD and CaO: influence of instrumental parameters on the reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mochales, Carolina; El Briak-BenAbdeslam, Hassane; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Terol, Alain; Planell, Josep A; Boudeville, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Mechanochemistry is a possible route to synthesize calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) with an expected molar calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) ratio +/-0.01. To optimize the experimental conditions of CDHA preparation from dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and calcium oxide by dry mechanosynthesis reaction, we performed the kinetic study varying some experimental parameters. This kinetic study was carried out with two different planetary ball mills (Retsch or Fritsch Instuments). Results obtained with the two mills led to the same conclusions although the values of the rate constants of DCPD disappearance and times for complete reaction were very different. Certainly, the origin of these differences was from the mills used, thus we investigated the influence of instrumental parameters such as the mass and the surface area of the balls or the rotation velocity on the mechanochemical reaction kinetics of DCPD with CaO. Results show that the DCPD reaction rate constant and the inverse of the time for complete disappearance of CaO both vary linearly with (i) the square of the rotation velocity, (ii) the square of eccentricity of the vial on the rotating disc and (iii) the product of the mass by the surface area of the balls. These observations comply with theoretical models developed for mechanical alloying. The consideration of these four parameters allows the transposition of experimental conditions from one mill to another or the comparison between results obtained with different planetary ball mills. These instrumental parameters have to be well described in papers concerning mechanochemistry or when grinding is an important stage in a process.

  8. Estimation of kinetic parameters for enzyme-inhibition reaction models using direct time-dependent equations for reactant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Goličnik, Marko

    2012-03-01

    To facilitate the determination of a reaction type and its kinetics constants for reversible inhibitors of Michaelis-Menten-type enzymes using progress-curve analysis, I present here an explicit equation for direct curve fitting to full time-course data of inhibited enzyme-catalyzed reactions. This algebraic expression involves certain elementary functions where their values are readily available using any standard nonlinear regression program. Hence this allows easy analysis of experimentally observed kinetics without any data conversion prior to fitting. Its implementation gives correct parameter estimates that are in very good agreement with results obtained using both the numerically integrated Michaelis-Menten rate equation or its exact closed-form solution which is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function.

  9. Enzymatic kinetic parameters for polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate hydrolysis by alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Derek A; Mabury, Scott A

    2012-09-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of three polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate monoesters (monoPAPs), differing in fluorinated chain length, were measured using bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase to catalyze the reaction. Kinetic values were also measured for analogous hydrogenated phosphate monoesters to elucidate the effects of the fluorinated chain on the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis. Michaelis constants (K(m)) were obtained by a competition kinetics technique in the presence of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP) using UV-vis spectroscopy. Compared with K(m) (PNPP), Michaelis constants for monoPAPs ranged from 0.9 to 2.1 compared with hydrogenated phosphates, which ranged from 4.0 to 13.0. Apparent bimolecular rate constants (k(cat)/K(m)) were determined by monitoring rates of product alcohol formation at low substrate concentrations using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The experimental values for k(cat)/K(m) averaged as 1.1 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) for monoPAPs compared with 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for hexyl phosphate. This suggests that the electron-withdrawing nature of the fluorinated chain enhanced the alcohol leaving group ability. The results were used in a simple model to suggest that monoPAPs in a typical mammalian digestive tract would hydrolyze in approximately 100 s, supporting a previous study that showed its absence after a dosing study in rats.

  10. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Physico-chemical Parameters in the Merbok Estuary, Kedah, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Fatema, Kaniz; Wan Maznah, WO; Isa, Mansor Mat

    2014-01-01

    In this study, factor analysis (FA) was applied to extract the hidden factors responsible for water quality variations during both wet and dry seasons. Water samples were collected from six sampling stations (St. 1 Lalang River, St. 2 Semeling River, St. 3 Jagung River, St. 4 Teluk Wang River, St. 5 Gelam River and St. 6 Derhaka River) in the Merbok estuary, Malaysia from January to December 2011; the samples were further analysed in the laboratory. Correlation analysis of the data sets showed strong correlations between the parameters. Nutrients such as nitrate (NO3−), nitrite (NO2−), ammonia (NH3) and phosphate (PO43−) were determined to be critical indicators of water quality throughout the year. Influential water quality parameters during the wet season were conductivity, salinity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), dissolved oxygen (DO) and chlorophyll a (Chla), whereas total suspended solid (TSS) and pH were critical water quality indicators during the dry season. The Kruskal-Wallis H test showed that water quality parameters were significantly different among the sampling months and stations (p<0.05), and Mann-Whitney U tests further revealed that the significantly different parameters were temperature, pH, DO, TSS, NO2− and BOD (p<0.01), whereas salinity, conductivity, NO3−, PO43−, NH3 and Chla were not significantly different (p>0.05). Water quality parameters in the estuary varied on both temporal and spatial scales and these results may serve as baseline information for estuary management, specifically for the Merbok estuary. PMID:27073596

  11. Colocalization Estimation Using Graphical Modeling and Variational Bayesian Expectation Maximization: Towards a Parameter-Free Approach.

    PubMed

    Awate, Suyash P; Radhakrishnan, Thyagarajan

    2015-01-01

    In microscopy imaging, colocalization between two biological entities (e.g., protein-protein or protein-cell) refers to the (stochastic) dependencies between the spatial locations of the two entities in the biological specimen. Measuring colocalization between two entities relies on fluorescence imaging of the specimen using two fluorescent chemicals, each of which indicates the presence/absence of one of the entities at any pixel location. State-of-the-art methods for estimating colocalization rely on post-processing image data using an adhoc sequence of algorithms with many free parameters that are tuned visually. This leads to loss of reproducibility of the results. This paper proposes a brand-new framework for estimating the nature and strength of colocalization directly from corrupted image data by solving a single unified optimization problem that automatically deals with noise, object labeling, and parameter tuning. The proposed framework relies on probabilistic graphical image modeling and a novel inference scheme using variational Bayesian expectation maximization for estimating all model parameters, including colocalization, from data. Results on simulated and real-world data demonstrate improved performance over the state of the art.

  12. Vertical variation in leaf gas exchange parameters for a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Yoshiko; Takanashi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Naoto; Philip, Elizabeth; Kamakura, Mai

    2012-11-01

    Vertical variation in leaf gas exchange characteristics of trees grown in a lowland dipterocarp forest in Peninsular Malaysia was investigated. Maximum net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and electron transport rate of leaves at the upper canopy, lower canopy, and forest floor were studied in situ with saturated condition photosynthetic photon flux density. The dark respiration rate of leaves at the various heights was also studied. Relationships among gas exchange characteristics, and also with nitrogen content per unit leaf area and leaf dry matter per area were clearly detected, forming general equations representing the vertical profile of several important parameters related to gas exchange. Numerical analysis revealed that the vertical distribution of gas exchange parameters was well determined showing both larger carbon gain for the whole canopy and at the same time positive carbon gain for the leaves of the lowest layer. For correct estimation of gas exchange at both leaf and canopy scales using multi-layer models, it is essential to consider the vertical distribution of gas exchange parameters with proper scaling coefficients.

  13. Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; de Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia ( wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered.

  14. A comparison of region-based and pixel-based CEUS kinetics parameters in the assessment of arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisan, E.; Raffeiner, B.; Coran, A.; Rizzo, G.; Ciprian, L.; Stramare, R.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are leading causes of disability and constitute a frequent medical disorder, leading to inability to work, high comorbidity and increased mortality. The gold-standard for diagnosing and differentiating arthritis is based on patient conditions and radiographic findings, as joint erosions or decalcification. However, early signs of arthritis are joint effusion, hypervascularization and synovial hypertrophy. In particular, vascularization has been shown to correlate with arthritis' destructive behavior, more than clinical assessment. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) examination of the small joints is emerging as a sensitive tool for assessing vascularization and disease activity. The evaluation of perfusion pattern rely on subjective semi-quantitative scales, that are able to capture the macroscopic degree of vascularization, but are unable to detect the subtler differences in kinetics perfusion parameters that might lead to a deeper understanding of disease progression and a better management of patients. Quantitative assessment is mostly performed by means of the Qontrast software package, that requires the user to define a region of interest, whose mean intensity curve is fitted with an exponential function. We show that using a more physiologically motivated perfusion curve, and by estimating the kinetics parameters separately pixel per pixel, the quantitative information gathered is able to differentiate more effectively different perfusion patterns. In particular, we will show that a pixel-based analysis is able to provide significant markers differentiating rheumatoid arthritis from simil-rheumatoid psoriatic arthritis, that have non-significant differences in clinical evaluation (DAS28), serological markers, or region-based parameters.

  15. Effect of the label of oligosaccharide acceptors on the kinetic parameters of nasturtium seed xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET).

    PubMed

    Kosík, Ondřej; Garajová, Soňa; Matulová, Mária; Rehulka, Pavel; Stratilová, Eva; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescently labeled derivatives of a xyloglucan (XG) nonasaccharide Glc(4)Xyl(3)Gal(2) (XLLG) were used as glycosyl acceptors in assays of xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) from germinated nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) seeds. We have investigated how the type of the oligosaccharide label influences the kinetic parameters of the reaction. The fluorescent probes used to label XLLG were anthranilic acid (AA), 8-aminonaphtalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (ANTS), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and sulforhodamine (SR), respectively. The obtained data were compared with those of the reactions where aldose and/or alditol forms of tritium-labeled xyloglucan-derived nonasaccharide served as the respective acceptors. Modification at C-1 of the reducing-end glucose in XLLG by substitution with the fluorophore markedly affected the kinetic parameters of the reaction. The Michaelis constants K(m) for individual acceptors increased in the order [1-(3)H]XLLGXLLG-SR>XLLG-ANTS>[1-(3)H]XLLGol>[1-(3)H]XLLG>XLLG-AA. Catalytic efficiency (expressed as k(cat)/K(m)) with XLLG labeled with SR or FITC was 15 and 28 times, respectively, higher than with the tritium-labeled natural substrate [1-(3)H]XLLG. Comparison of the kinetic parameters found with acceptors labeled with different types of labels enables to select the most effective substrates for the high-throughput assays of XET.

  16. Photodegradation of naproxen in water under simulated solar radiation: mechanism, kinetics, and toxicity variation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dujuan; Liu, Guoguang; Lv, Wenying; Yao, Kun; Zhang, Xiangdan; Xiao, Huahua

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the degradation mechanism, the reaction kinetics, and the evolution of toxicity of naproxen in waters under simulated solar radiation. These criteria were investigated by conducting quenching experiments with reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxygen concentration experiments, and toxicity evaluations with Vibrio fischeri bacteria. The results indicated that the degradation of naproxen proceeds via pseudo first-order kinetics in all cases and that photodegradation included degradation by direct photolysis and by self-sensitization via ROS; the contribution rates of self-sensitized photodegradation were 1.4%, 65.8%, and 31.7% via ·OH, (1)O₂ and O₂(•-), respectively. Furthermore, the oxygen concentration experiments indicated that dissolved oxygen inhibited the direct photodegradation of naproxen, and the higher the oxygen content, the more pronounced the inhibitory effect. The toxicity evaluation illustrated that some of the intermediate products formed were more toxic than naproxen.

  17. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  18. Using the computerized glow curve deconvolution method and the R package tgcd to determination of thermoluminescence kinetic parameters of chilli powder samples by GOK model and OTOR one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Nguyen Duy; Van Hung, Nguyen; Van Hung, Tran; Hien, Nguyen Quoc

    2017-03-01

    The kinetic parameters of thermoluminescence (TL) glow peaks of chilli powder irradiated by gamma rays with the different doses of 0, 4 and 8 kGy have been calculated and estimate by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) method and the R package tgcd by using the TL glow curve data. The kinetic parameters of TL glow peaks (i.e. activation energies (E), order of kinetics (b), trapping and recombination probability coefficients (R) and frequency factors (s)) are fitted by modeled general-orders of kinetics (GOK) and one trap-one recombination (OTOR). The kinetic parameters of the chilli powder are different toward the difference of the sample time-storage, radiation doses, GOK model and OTOR one. The samples spending the shorter period of storage time have the smaller the kinetic parameters values than the samples spending the longer period of storage. The results obtained as comparing the kinetic parameters values of the three samples show that the value of non-irradiated samples are lowest whereas the 4 kGy irradiated-samples' value are greater than the 8 kGy irradiated-samples' one time.

  19. Influence of donor substrate on kinetic parameters of thiamine diphosphate binding to transketolase.

    PubMed

    Ospanov, R V; Kochetov, G A; Kurganov, B I

    2007-01-01

    The two-step mechanism of interaction of thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) with transketolase (TK) has been studied: TK + ThDP <--> TK...ThDP <--> TK*-ThDP. The scheme involves the formation of inactive intermediate complex TK...ThDP followed by its transformation into catalytically active holoenzyme, TK*-ThDP. The dissociation and kinetic constants for individual stages of this process have been determined. The values of forward and backward rate constants change in the presence of the donor substrate hydroxypyruvate. This finally leads to an increase in the overall affinity of the coenzyme to TK.

  20. Effect of malathion on kinetic parameters of acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kamal, M A

    1997-09-01

    Kinetic analysis of the interaction of malathion with camel erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase was investigated in the present study. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) for the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine iodide (ASCh) was found to be 53.15 microM and the Vmax was 0.287 mumol/min/mg protein. The Kmapp and Vmaxapp were both decreased by increased malathion concentration. Dixon as well as Lineweaver-Burk plots and their secondary replots indicated that the nature of the inhibition was of the pure uncompetitive type with Ki value estimated as 102.1 ppm. The Kiapp decreased while Vmaxiapp increased by an increased concentration in ASCh.

  1. Improving simulated Amazon forest biomass and productivity by including spatial variation in biophysical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanho, A. D. A.; Coe, M. T.; Costa, M. H.; Malhi, Y.; Galbraith, D.; Quesada, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic vegetation models forced with spatially homogeneous biophysical parameters are capable of producing average productivity and biomass values for the Amazon basin forest biome that are close to the observed estimates, but these models are unable to reproduce observed spatial variability. Recent observational studies have shown substantial regional spatial variability of above-ground productivity and biomass across the Amazon basin, which is believed to be primarily driven by a combination of soil physical and chemical properties. In this study, spatial heterogeneity of vegetation properties is added to the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) land surface model, and the simulated productivity and biomass of the Amazon basin are compared to observations from undisturbed forest. The maximum RuBiCo carboxylation capacity (Vcmax) and the woody biomass residence time (τw) were found to be the most important properties determining the modeled spatial variation of above-ground woody net primary productivity and biomass, respectively. Spatial heterogeneity of these properties may lead to simulated spatial variability of 1.8 times in the woody net primary productivity (NPPw) and 2.8 times in the woody above-ground biomass (AGBw). The coefficient of correlation between the modeled and observed woody productivity improved from 0.10 with homogeneous parameters to 0.73 with spatially heterogeneous parameters, while the coefficient of correlation between the simulated and observed woody above-ground biomass improved from 0.33 to 0.88. The results from our analyses with the IBIS dynamic vegetation model demonstrated that using single values for key ecological parameters in the tropical forest biome severely limits simulation accuracy. Clearer understanding of the biophysical mechanisms that drive the spatial variability of carbon allocation, τw and Vcmax is necessary to achieve further improvements to simulation accuracy.

  2. Choosing parameters of kernel subspace LDA for recognition of face images under pose and illumination variations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Yuen, Pong C; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Lai, Jian Huang

    2007-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatically tuning multiple kernel parameters for the kernel-based linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method. The kernel approach has been proposed to solve face recognition problems under complex distribution by mapping the input space to a high-dimensional feature space. Some recognition algorithms such as the kernel principal components analysis, kernel Fisher discriminant, generalized discriminant analysis, and kernel direct LDA have been developed in the last five years. The experimental results show that the kernel-based method is a good and feasible approach to tackle the pose and illumination variations. One of the crucial factors in the kernel approach is the selection of kernel parameters, which highly affects the generalization capability and stability of the kernel-based learning methods. In view of this, we propose an eigenvalue-stability-bounded margin maximization (ESBMM) algorithm to automatically tune the multiple parameters of the Gaussian radial basis function kernel for the kernel subspace LDA (KSLDA) method, which is developed based on our previously developed subspace LDA method. The ESBMM algorithm improves the generalization capability of the kernel-based LDA method by maximizing the margin maximization criterion while maintaining the eigenvalue stability of the kernel-based LDA method. An in-depth investigation on the generalization performance on pose and illumination dimensions is performed using the YaleB and CMU PIE databases. The FERET database is also used for benchmark evaluation. Compared with the existing PCA-based and LDA-based methods, our proposed KSLDA method, with the ESBMM kernel parameter estimation algorithm, gives superior performance.

  3. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  4. Effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Metallorganic chemical-vapor-deposited heteroepitaxial indium phosphide (InP) solar cell experimental results were simulated by using a PC-1D computer model. The effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of n(+)/p/p(+) heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs solar cell was presented. The thinner and lighter doped emitters were observed to offer higher cell efficiencies. The influence of emitter thickness and minority carrier diffusion length on the cell efficiency with respect to dislocation density was studied. Heteroepitaxial cells with efficiencies similar to present day homojunction InP efficiencies (greater than 16 percent AMO) were shown to be attainable if a dislocation density lower than 10(exp 6)/sq cm could be achieved. A realistic optimized design study yielded InP solar cells of over 22 percent AMO efficiency at 25 C.

  5. Effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Metalorganic chemical-vapor-deposited heteroepitaxial indium phosphide (InP) solar cell experimental results were simulated by using a PC-1D computer model. The effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of n(+)/p/p(+) heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs solar cell was presented. The thinner and lighter doped emitters were observed to offer higher cell efficiencies. The influence of emitter thickness and minority carrier diffusion length on the cell efficiency with respect to dislocation density was studied. Heteroepitaxial cells with efficiencies similar to present day homojunction InP efficiencies (greaater than 16 percent AM0) were shown to be attainable if a dislocation density lower than 10(exp 6)/sq cm could be achieved. A realistic optimized design study yielded InP solar cells of over 22 percent AM0 efficiency at 25 C.

  6. The effects of parameter variation on MSET models of the Crystal River-3 feedwater flow system.

    SciTech Connect

    Miron, A.

    1998-04-01

    In this paper we develop further the results reported in Reference 1 to include a systematic study of the effects of varying MSET models and model parameters for the Crystal River-3 (CR) feedwater flow system The study used archived CR process computer files from November 1-December 15, 1993 that were provided by Florida Power Corporation engineers Fairman Bockhorst and Brook Julias. The results support the conclusion that an optimal MSET model, properly trained and deriving its inputs in real-time from no more than 25 of the sensor signals normally provided to a PWR plant process computer, should be able to reliably detect anomalous variations in the feedwater flow venturis of less than 0.1% and in the absence of a venturi sensor signal should be able to generate a virtual signal that will be within 0.1% of the correct value of the missing signal.

  7. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  8. FAST INVERSION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF PLANETARY PARAMETERS FROM TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Beauge, Cristian

    2010-01-20

    The transit timing variation (TTV) method relies on monitoring changes in timing of transits of known exoplanets. Non-transiting planets in the system can be inferred from TTVs by their gravitational interaction with the transiting planet. The TTV method is sensitive to low-mass planets that cannot be detected by other means. Here we describe a fast algorithm that can be used to determine the mass and orbit of the non-transiting planets from the TTV data. We apply our code, ttvim.f, to a wide variety of planetary systems to test the uniqueness of the TTV inversion problem and its dependence on the precision of TTV observations. We find that planetary parameters, including the mass and mutual orbital inclination of planets, can be determined from the TTV data sets that should become available in near future. Unlike the radial velocity technique, the TTV method can therefore be used to characterize the inclination distribution of multi-planet systems.

  9. Study of reaction parameters and kinetics of esterification of lauric acid with butanol by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sini; Agarwal, Madhu; Chaurasia, S P

    2013-12-01

    Esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol, catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase (CAL) in aqueous-organic biphasic solvent system was studied. Effects of various reaction parameters on esterification were investigated, such as type and amount of solvent, amount of buffer, pH, temperature, speed of agitation, amount of enzyme, butanol and lauric acid. The most suitable reaction conditions for esterification were observed at 50 degrees C and pH 7.0 using 5000 micromoles of lauric acid, 7000 pmoles of butanol, 0.25 ml phosphate buffer, 1 ml of isooctane as the solvent and 50 mg of immobilized enzyme in the reaction medium at agitation speed of 150 rpm. Maximum esterification of 96.36% was acheived in 600 min of reaction time at n-butanol to lauric acid molar ratio of 1: 0.7. Kinetic study for the esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol using immobilized CAL was carried out and the kinetic constants were estimated by using non-linear regression method. The estimated value of Michaelis kinetic constants for butanol (KmBt) and acid (KmAc) were 451.56 (M) and 4.7 x 10(-7)(M), respectively and the value of dissociation constant (KBt) of the butanol-lipase complex was 9.41 x 10(7)(M). The estimated constants agreed fairly well with literature data.

  10. Non-isothermal kinetic parameters and models of crystallization for amorphous Fe-Co-Nb-Cu-B alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Deng, Longjiang; Xie, Jianliang; Liang, Difei

    2013-02-01

    The non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements are often used to study kinetics of amorphous alloys. However non-isothermal kinetic parameters and models of amorphous alloy crystallization process were unclear. In our research, amorphous (FexCo1-x)NbCuB (x=0.33, 0.5 and 0.75) alloys were produced in the form of ribbon by a single roller melt-spinning method. DSC curves at heating rate 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 K/min were obtained. Kissinger, Ozawa and model-free methods obtain identical activation energies at each exothermic peak of all compositions. We conclude that first exothermic reaction is determined by the migration activation energy of Fe or Co atom; second reaction determined by the energy between parent and product boride phases; and the third reaction determined by the energy between parent α-FeCo phase and product bcc-Fe/fcc-Co phases. We hypothesized a non-isothermal kinetic modelf(α)=α(1, which fit our experiment results well. In this model, m depends on nucleus shape and growth dimension, and n are determined by lattice positions participated in new phase formation.

  11. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  12. The influence of estimated body segment parameters on predicted joint kinetics during diplegic cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Walsh, M; O'Sullivan, R; O'Brien, T; Simms, C K

    2014-01-03

    Inverse Dynamic calculations are routinely used in joint moment and power estimates during gait with anthropometric data often taken from published sources. Many biomechanical analyses have highlighted the need to obtain subject-specific anthropometric data (e.g. Mass, Centre of Mass, Moments of Inertia) yet the types of imaging techniques required to achieve this are not always available in the clinical setting. Differences in anthropometric sets have been shown to affect the reactive force and moment calculations in normal subjects but the effect on a paediatric diplegic cerebral palsy group has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using different anthropometric sets on predicted sagittal plane moments during normal and diplegic cerebral palsy gait. Three published anthropometric sets were applied to the reactive force and moment calculations of 14 Cerebral Palsy and 14 Control subjects. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the different anthropometric sets but variability in the resulting sagittal plane moment calculations between sets was low (0.01-0.07 Nm/kg). In addition, the GDI-Kinetic, used as an outcome variable to assess whether differences were clinically meaningful, indicated no clinically meaningful difference between sets. The results suggest that the effects of using different anthropometric sets on the kinetic profiles of normal and diplegic cerebral palsy subjects are clinically insignificant.

  13. Enzyme immobilization in porous silicon: quantitative analysis of the kinetic parameters for glutathione-S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Delouise, Lisa A; Miller, Benjamin L

    2005-04-01

    Porous silicon matrixes are attractive materials for the construction of biosensors and may also have utility for the production of immobilized enzyme bioreactors. In an effort to gain a quantitative understanding of the effects of immobilization on enzyme activity, we compared the activity of glutathione-S-transferase immobilized in electrochemically etched porous silicon films (approximately 6.5 microm thick) with the enzyme in solution. Kinetic measurements were made by varying the glutathione concentration while maintaining a fixed saturating concentration of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. The reaction kinetics follow steady-state equilibrium behavior. The specific activity of the free enzyme in solution is approximately 4x higher than the immobilized enzyme, for which we measured an apparent K'(m)(GSH) value of 1.0 +/- 0.3. The maximum velocity, V'(max), is linearly proportional to immobilized enzyme concentration, but the magnitude is approximately 20 times lower than that in solution. Results suggest approximately 25% of the enzyme is bound with the catalytic site in an inactive conformation or in a hindered orientation. Finally, the effects of hydration and exposure to denaturants on the immobilized enzyme activity are presented.

  14. Effects of hydraulic parameter cleaning variations on rate of penetration of soft formation insert bits

    SciTech Connect

    Doiron, H.H.; Deane, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    Effects of hydraulic cleaning parameter variations on rate of penetration response of 7 7/8 inch diameter soft formation insert bits have been measured in laboratory drilling tests. Tests were conducted in Mancos Shale rock samples at 700 psi and 4000 psi simulated overbalance pressure conditions using a 9.1 pound per gallon bentonite-barite water base drilling fluid. Bit hydraulic horsepower was varied from 0.72 to 9.5 HHP/in/sup 2/ using two or three nozzles in sizes ranging from 9/32 to 14/32 inches in diameter. Some improvements in ROP at constant bit hydraulic horsepower and impact force levels were obtained with two nozzle configurations vs. three nozzle configurations, but improvements were not consistently out of the range of normal test to test variations. Reduction in drilling costs due to the measured response of ROP to improved hydraulic cleaning is compared to increased operating costs required to provide additional hydraulics. Results indicate that bit hydraulic horsepower levels in excess of popular rules of thumb are cost effective in slow drilling due to high overbalance pressure.

  15. Orbital parameter estimation of extrasolar multi-planet systems by Transit Time Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, J.; Grziwa, S.; Pätzold, M.

    2014-04-01

    Transit Time Variation (TTV) is the earlier or later occurrence of a planetary transit relative to the time of a reference transit. TTV may be dominantly caused by the gravitational perturbation of the orbit of the transiting planet by another still unknown planet(s) inside or outside of the orbit of the known transiting planet. Gravitational interactions perturb the velocity of the transiting planet in its orbit which manifests in the periodical perturbation of the revolution period. Measurements of the transit times and the identification of differences from a mean transit period may then indicate the presence of another unknown planet and is therefore proof for the existence of further planets. The estimation of the mass of the transiting planet and the orbital parameters of the undetected planet(s) are constrained by the amplitude of the periodical variation of the transit times. Simulations of known multi-planet systems which show TTV shall be presented. The resulting TTV amplitude is analyzed with regard to the main dependencies: mass of the perturbing planet and the orbit eccentricities.

  16. Effects of Spectral and Temporal Variations in Gamma Ray Burst Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejzak, L. M.; Melott, A. L.; Thomas, B. C.; Medvedev, M. V.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been shown that a typical gamma ray burst could have significant effects on the Earth, including such considerations as ozone depletion and production of odd nitrogen compounds. These effects in turn contribute to processes such as DNA damage in organisms, increasing opacity of the atmosphere, and nitric acid rain. Our interest lies in the role that these processes may play in mass extinction events, in particular the Ordovician mass extinction 443 Mya. Here we investigate variations in certain burst parameters and the resulting variation in the severity of effect that the burst radiation has on the Earth's atmosphere. We extend the range of photon energies used in the model beyond the range used in previous studies, and model bursts with a number of different peak energies. We also alter the temporal profile of the radiation during the burst itself. This research is conducted with support from NASA's Astrobiology: Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology Program and in collaboration with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and with supercomputer support from NCSA.

  17. Variation in available cesium concentration with parameters during temperature induced extraction of cesium from soil.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Durga; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Hisashi; Sato, Mutsuto; Fukuda, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Ryuichi; Kawamoto, Tohru

    2015-02-01

    Cesium extraction behavior of brown forest type soil collected from paddy fields in Fukushima nuclear accident affected areas was studied. In nitric acid or sulfuric acid solutions at elevated temperature, the concentration of Cs in soil available for extraction, m0, has been estimated on the basis of modified canonical equation and the equations derived from assumed equilibria. With the variation in temperature, mixing time, and soil to solvent ratio, the observed m0 values in 0.5 M acid solution ranged between 1.5 and 2.9 mg cesium per kilogram of soil. By increasing the acid concentration to 3 M, the value of m0 could be sharply increased to 5.1 mg/kg even at 95 °C. This variation in the extractable concentration of cesium with the parameters signifies the existence of different binding sites in the soil matrix. The results observed for uncontaminated sample could be reproduced with the radioactive cesium contaminated sample belonging to the same soil group.

  18. Isotherm parameters and intraparticle mass transfer kinetics on molecularly imprinted polymers in acetonitrile/buffer mobile phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    The equilibrium isotherm and the intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of the enantiomers of the template were investigated on an Fmoc-L-tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer at different pHs and water concentrations in acetonitrile/aqueous buffer mobile phases. The equilibrium isotherm data were measured using frontal analysis at 25 {+-} 2 C. The adsorption energy distribution was found to be trimodal, with narrow modes. Consistent with this distribution, the adsorption data were modeled using a tri-Langmuir isotherm equation and the best estimates of the isotherm parameters were determined. The intraparticle mass transfer parameters were derived by comparing the profiles of experimental overloaded bands and the profiles calculated using the isotherm model and the lumped pore diffusion (POR) model of chromatography. These results showed that different adsorption and mass transfer mechanisms exist in mobile phases made of acetonitrile/aqueous buffer and of acetonitrile/acetic acid solutions.

  19. Material properties of evolutionary diverse spider silks described by variation in a single structural parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, Rodrigo; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Blackledge, Todd A.; Guinea, Gustavo. V.; Elices, Manuel; Pérez-Rigueiro, José

    2016-01-01

    Spider major ampullate gland silks (MAS) vary greatly in material properties among species but, this variation is shown here to be confined to evolutionary shifts along a single universal performance trajectory. This reveals an underlying design principle that is maintained across large changes in both spider ecology and silk chemistry. Persistence of this design principle becomes apparent after the material properties are defined relative to the true alignment parameter, which describes the orientation and stretching of the protein chains in the silk fiber. Our results show that the mechanical behavior of all Entelegynae major ampullate silk fibers, under any conditions, are described by this single parameter that connects the sequential action of three deformation micromechanisms during stretching: stressing of protein-protein hydrogen bonds, rotation of the β-nanocrystals and growth of the ordered fraction. Conservation of these traits for over 230 million years is an indication of the optimal design of the material and gives valuable clues for the production of biomimetic counterparts based on major ampullate spider silk.

  20. Material properties of evolutionary diverse spider silks described by variation in a single structural parameter

    PubMed Central

    Madurga, Rodrigo; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Blackledge, Todd A.; Guinea, Gustavo.V.; Elices, Manuel; Pérez-Rigueiro, José

    2016-01-01

    Spider major ampullate gland silks (MAS) vary greatly in material properties among species but, this variation is shown here to be confined to evolutionary shifts along a single universal performance trajectory. This reveals an underlying design principle that is maintained across large changes in both spider ecology and silk chemistry. Persistence of this design principle becomes apparent after the material properties are defined relative to the true alignment parameter, which describes the orientation and stretching of the protein chains in the silk fiber. Our results show that the mechanical behavior of all Entelegynae major ampullate silk fibers, under any conditions, are described by this single parameter that connects the sequential action of three deformation micromechanisms during stretching: stressing of protein-protein hydrogen bonds, rotation of the β-nanocrystals and growth of the ordered fraction. Conservation of these traits for over 230 million years is an indication of the optimal design of the material and gives valuable clues for the production of biomimetic counterparts based on major ampullate spider silk. PMID:26755434

  1. Parameter study and optimization for piezoelectric energy harvester for TPMS considering speed variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghi Eshghi, Amin; Lee, Soobum; Lee, Hanmin; Kim, Young-Cheol

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we perform design parameter study and design optimization for a piezoelectric energy harvester considering vehicle speed variation. Initially, a FEM model using ANSYS is developed to appraise the performance of a piezoelectric harvester in a rotating tire. The energy harvester proposed here uses the vertical deformation at contact patch area from the car weight and centrifugal acceleration. This harvester is composed of a beam which is clamped at both ends and a piezoelectric material is attached on the top of that. The piezoelectric material possesses the 31 mode of transduction in which the direction of applied field is perpendicular to that of the electric field. To optimize the harvester performance, we would change the geometrical parameters of the harvester to obtain the maximum power. One of the main challenges in the design process is obtaining the required power while considering the constraints for harvester weight and volume. These two concerns are addressed in this paper. Since the final goal of this study is the development of an energy harvester with a wireless sensor system installed in a real car, the real time data for varied velocity of a vehicle are taken into account for power measurements. This study concludes that the proposed design is applicable to wireless tire sensor systems.

  2. Seasonal variation of selected performance parameters in épée fencers.

    PubMed

    Koutedakis, Y; Ridgeon, A; Sharp, N C; Boreham, C

    1993-09-01

    In this study, anthropometric measurements were carried out on seven British international male épée fencers, using a maximal treadmill running test, a 20-s Wingate-type test, and isokinetic dynamometry. Testing was conducted on two occasions, 5 to 6 months apart, during mid-off-season (preparation) and mid-in-season (competition) periods. Maximal oxygen intake (VO2max) and maximal respiratory exchange ratio (Rmax) were among the parameters obtained from the treadmill test, while peak and mean anaerobic power outputs were measured during a 20-s maximal effort. Knee extensor and flexor muscle forces from both dominant (leading) and non-dominant (trailing) legs were assessed at 1.04, 3.14 and 4.19 rad sec-1. Statistical analyses revealed lower mean VO2max (P < 0.05) and mean Rmax values (P < 0.02) at the in-season assessments compared with off-season. In-season testing also demonstrated significantly lower peak torques for both dominant and non-dominant knee extensors compared with off-season assessments at all velocities (P < 0.05 to P < 0.004). Furthermore, in-season peak torque for the non-dominant leg flexors was lower (P < 0.03) at 4.19 rad sec-1 than off-season. We conclude that current training practices may account for the observed seasonal variations in performance related physiological parameters in fencers.

  3. Spatial Variation of the Relationship between PM2.5 Concentrations and Meteorological Parameters in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gang; Fu, Jingying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Qiao; Dong, Donglin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies around the world have reported that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is closely associated with human health. The distribution of PM2.5 concentrations is influenced by multiple geographic and socioeconomic factors. Using a remote-sensing-derived PM2.5 dataset, this paper explores the relationship between PM2.5 concentrations and meteorological parameters and their spatial variance in China for the period 2001–2010. The spatial variations of the relationships between the annual average PM2.5, the annual average precipitation (AAP), and the annual average temperature (AAT) were evaluated using the Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that PM2.5 had a strong and stable correlation with meteorological parameters. In particular, PM2.5 had a negative correlation with precipitation and a positive correlation with temperature. In addition, the relationship between the variables changed over space, and the strong negative correlation between PM2.5 and the AAP mainly appeared in the warm temperate semihumid region and northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010, with some localized differences. The strong positive correlation between the PM2.5 and the AAT mainly occurred in the mid-temperate semiarid region, the humid, semihumid, and semiarid warm temperate regions, and the northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010. PMID:26295046

  4. Effects of rotor parameter variations on handling qualities of unaugmented helicopters in simulated terrain flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, P. D.; Dugan, D. D.; Chen, R. T. N.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    A coordinated analysis and ground simulator experiment was performed to investigate the effects on single rotor helicopter handling qualities of systematic variations in the main rotor hinge restraint, hub hinge offset, pitch-flap coupling, and blade lock number. Teetering rotor, articulated rotor, and hingeless rotor helicopters were evaluated by research pilots in special low level flying tasks involving obstacle avoidance at 60 to 100 knots airspeed. The results of the experiment are in the form of pilot ratings, pilot commentary, and some objective performance measures. Criteria for damping and sensitivity are reexamined when combined with the additional factors of cross coupling due to pitch and roll rates, pitch coupling with collective pitch, and longitudinal static stability. Ratings obtained with and without motion are compared. Acceptable flying qualities were obtained within each rotor type by suitable adjustment of the hub parameters, however, pure teetering rotors were found to lack control power for the tasks. A limit for the coupling parameter L sub q/L sub p of 0.35 is suggested.

  5. Performance Analysis of SISFCL with the Variation of Circuit Parameters using Jiles Atherton Hysteresis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debraj; Roy, Debabrata; Choudhury, Amalendu Bikash; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2016-08-01

    In modern day power systems, fault current limiters (FCL) are used to provide protection from high fault currents in the event of electrical faults and thus help to deliver uninterrupted electric supply to the consumers. Several technologies of FCLs are available for practical usage. However, the saturated iron-core superconducting fault current limiter (SISFCL) has gained a lot of attention in recent years in view of its ability to offer very low impedance during normal operation and high impedance during faulted condition. Previous mathematical models defining the performance of the device employs a simple BH curve. But as the change in mathematical state of saturation and unsaturation is important for the operation of the device, the paper investigates the responses considering the effects of magnetic hysteresis utilising the Jiles Atherton hysteresis model. Further the performance of the device is analysed with the variations of different parameters viz., the fault resistance magnitude, DC bias current, number of turns of the AC winding and number of turns of the DC winding that portray the effectiveness of the parameters encouraging an optimal design of the limiter.

  6. Seasonal variation of selected performance parameters in épée fencers.

    PubMed Central

    Koutedakis, Y; Ridgeon, A; Sharp, N C; Boreham, C

    1993-01-01

    In this study, anthropometric measurements were carried out on seven British international male épée fencers, using a maximal treadmill running test, a 20-s Wingate-type test, and isokinetic dynamometry. Testing was conducted on two occasions, 5 to 6 months apart, during mid-off-season (preparation) and mid-in-season (competition) periods. Maximal oxygen intake (VO2max) and maximal respiratory exchange ratio (Rmax) were among the parameters obtained from the treadmill test, while peak and mean anaerobic power outputs were measured during a 20-s maximal effort. Knee extensor and flexor muscle forces from both dominant (leading) and non-dominant (trailing) legs were assessed at 1.04, 3.14 and 4.19 rad sec-1. Statistical analyses revealed lower mean VO2max (P < 0.05) and mean Rmax values (P < 0.02) at the in-season assessments compared with off-season. In-season testing also demonstrated significantly lower peak torques for both dominant and non-dominant knee extensors compared with off-season assessments at all velocities (P < 0.05 to P < 0.004). Furthermore, in-season peak torque for the non-dominant leg flexors was lower (P < 0.03) at 4.19 rad sec-1 than off-season. We conclude that current training practices may account for the observed seasonal variations in performance related physiological parameters in fencers. PMID:8242273

  7. Comparison of variational real-space representations of the kinetic energy operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Diéguez, Oswaldo; Haynes, Peter D.; Payne, Mike C.

    2002-08-01

    We present a comparison of real-space methods based on regular grids for electronic structure calculations that are designed to have basis set variational properties, using as a reference the conventional method of finite differences (a real-space method that is not variational) and the reciprocal-space plane-wave method which is fully variational. We find that a definition of the finite-difference method [P. Maragakis, J. Soler, and E. Kaxiras, Phys. Rev. B 64, 193101 (2001)] satisfies one of the two properties of variational behavior at the cost of larger errors than the conventional finite-difference method. On the other hand, a technique which represents functions in a number of plane waves which is independent of system size closely follows the plane-wave method and therefore also the criteria for variational behavior. Its application is only limited by the requirement of having functions strictly localized in regions of real space, but this is a characteristic of an increasing number of modern real-space methods, as they are designed to have a computational cost that scales linearly with system size.

  8. On the optimal use of fictitious time in variation of parameters methods with application to BG14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    The optimal way to use fictitious time in variation of parameter methods is presented. Setting fictitious time to zero at the end of each step is shown to cure the instability associated with some types of problems. Only some parameters are reinitialized, thereby retaining redundant information.

  9. Degradation of ciprofloxacin in water by advanced oxidation process: kinetics study, influencing parameters and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Murtaza; Ismail, M; Khan, Sanaullah; Tabassum, Safia; Khan, Hasan M

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced degradation of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in aqueous solution and the factors affecting the degradation process have been investigated. The results showed that CIP (4.6 mg/L) was almost completely degraded at an absorbed dose of 870 Gy. The kinetic studies of aqueous solutions containing 4.6, 10, 15 and 17.9 mg/L indicated that the decomposition of CIP by gamma irradiation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics and the decay constant (k) decreased from 5.9  ×  10(-3) to 1.6  ×  10(-3) Gy(-1) with an increase in CIP initial concentration from 4.6 to 17.9 mg/L. The effect of saturation of CIP solution with N2, N2O or air on radiation-induced degradation of CIP was also investigated. The effects of radical scavengers, such as t-BuOH and i-PrOH, showed the role of reactive radicals towards degradation of CIP in the order of OH > e(aq)- . H. The apparent second-order rate constant of [Formula: see text] with CIP was calculated to be 2.64 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The effects of solution pH as well as natural water contaminants, such as [HCO3-, CO3(2-), and NO2-, on CIP degradation by gamma-irradiation were also investigated. Major degradation products, including organic acids, were identified using UPLC-MS/MS and IC, and degradation pathways have been proposed.

  10. Variations in the elemental ratio of organic matter in the central Baltic Sea: Part II - Sensitivities of annual mass flux estimates to model parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreus, Markus; Schartau, Markus

    2015-06-01

    This study describes a sensitivity analysis that allows the parameters of a one-dimensional ecosystem model to be ranked according to their specificity in determining biochemical key fluxes. Key fluxes of interest are annual (a) total production (TP), (b) remineralization above the halocline (RM), and (c) export at 50 m (EX) at the Baltic Sea monitoring site BY15 located in the Gotland Deep basin. The model resolves mass flux of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorous (P), while considering nitrogen fixation explicitly. Our first null hypothesis is that the variation of the value of every single model parameter affects each annual C, N, and P budget simultaneously. Our second null hypothesis states that the variation of every parameter value induces changes at least in either of the annual C, N or P budgets. Our analyses falsify both null hypotheses and reveal that 8 out of 36 parameters must be regarded redundant, as their variation neither alter annual key fluxes nor produce considerable time-shifts in model trajectories at the respective site. Seven parameters were found to induce substantial changes in annual C, N, and P flux estimates simultaneously. The assimilation efficiency of zooplankton turned out to be of vital importance. This parameter discriminates between the assimilation and destruction of algal prey during grazing. The fraction of unassimilated dead algal cells is critical for the amount of organic matter exported out of the euphotic zone. The maximum cellular N:C quota of diazotrophs and the degradation/hydrolysis rate of detrital carbon are two parameters that will likely remain unconstrained by time series data, but both affect the annual C budget considerably. Overall, our detailed specification of model sensitivities to parameter variations will facilitate the formulation of a well-posed inverse problem for the estimation of C, N and P fluxes from stock observations at the Gotland Deep.

  11. A Compilation of Rate Parameters of Water-Mineral Interaction Kinetics for Application to Geochemical Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    35 3.3.1 Cordierite and Tourmaline ...Cyclosilicates 3.3.1 Cordierite and Tourmaline Rate parameters for the acidic and neutral mechanisms (data are absent for the basic mechanism) for cordierite...and tourmaline were compiled from Sverdrup (1990; Table 24), with activation energies calculated herein from reported rate constants at 8 and 25 °C

  12. Sensitivity analysis of large system of chemical kinetic parameters for engine combustion simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, H; Sanz-Argent, J; Petitpas, G; Havstad, M; Flowers, D

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the authors applied the state-of-the art sensitivity methods to downselect system parameters from 4000+ to 8, (23000+ -> 4000+ -> 84 -> 8). This analysis procedure paves the way for future works: (1) calibrate the system response using existed experimental observations, and (2) predict future experiment results, using the calibrated system.

  13. Kinetic modeling and parameter estimation in a tower bioreactor for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ccopa Rivera, Elmer; da Costa, Aline Carvalho; Lunelli, Betânia Hoss; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Maciel Filho, Rubens

    2008-03-01

    In this work, a systematic method to support the building of bioprocess models through the use of different optimization techniques is presented. The method was applied to a tower bioreactor for bioethanol production with immobilized cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, a step-by-step procedure to the estimation problem is proposed. As the first step, the potential of global searching of real-coded genetic algorithm (RGA) was applied for simultaneous estimation of the parameters. Subsequently, the most significant parameters were identified using the Placket-Burman (PB) design. Finally, the quasi-Newton algorithm (QN) was used for optimization of the most significant parameters, near the global optimum region, as the initial values were already determined by the RGA global-searching algorithm. The results have shown that the performance of the estimation procedure applied in a deterministic detailed model to describe the experimental data is improved using the proposed method (RGA-PB-QN) in comparison with a model whose parameters were only optimized by RGA.

  14. Physical parameters and orbital period variation of a newly discovered cataclysmic variable GSC 4560-02157

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhong-Tao; Qian, Sheng-Bang; Voloshina, Irina; Metlov, Vladimir G.; Zhu, Li-Ying; Li, Lin-Jia

    2016-10-01

    GSC 4560-02157 is a new eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 0.265359 days. By using the published V - and R - band data together with our observations, we discovered that the O - C curve of GSC 4560-02157 may show a cyclic variation with a period of 3.51 years and an amplitude of 1.40 min. If this variation is caused by a light travel-time effect via the existence of a third body, then its mass can be derived as M 3 sin i' ≈ 91.08 M Jup, and it should be a low-mass star. In addition, several physical parameters were measured. The color of the secondary star was determined to be V - R = 0.77(±0.03) which corresponds to a spectral type of K2-3. The secondary star's mass was estimated as M 2 = 0.73(±0.02) M ⊙ by combing the derived V - R value around phase 0 with the assumption that it obeys the mass-luminosity relation for main sequence stars. This mass is consistent with the mass—period relation for CV donor stars. For the white dwarf, the eclipse durations and contacts of the white dwarf yield an upper limit on the white dwarf's radius corresponding to a lower limit on mass of M 1 ≈ 0.501 M ⊙. The overestimated radius and previously published spectral data indicate that the boundary layer may have a very high temperature.

  15. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  16. Boron Combustion Model Development with Kinetic Sensitivity Analysis and Measurement of Key Chemical Rate Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    radius) spherical particle. This code uses a non-linear, implicit partial differential equation solver with fully automatic time step/ mode control... avk aa. as. at at ~ at-1 ) , (2-36)I j=1 I 2-15 I which implies that the approximate solution v is a function of both the amplitudes, akj, and the...nodal positions sj. The basis functions aj and Okj are defined by Ia -av k (2-37) avk I k _avk k - 8v (2-38) j as. With the temporal variation of v

  17. Optimization of urease immobilization onto non-porous HEMA incorporated poly(EGDMA) microbeads and estimation of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, F; Ayhan, H; Pişkin, E; Tanyolaç, A

    2002-01-01

    Jack bean urease (urea aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.1.5) was immobilized onto modified non-porous poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate/2-hydroxy ethylene methacrylate), (poly(EGDMA/HEMA)), microbeads prepared by suspension copolymerization for the potential use in hemoperfusion columns, not previously reported. The conditions of immobilization; enzyme concentration, medium pH, substrate and ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) presence in the immobilization medium in different concentrations, enzyme loading ratio, processing time and immobilization temperature were investigated for highest apparent activity. Immobilized enzyme retained 73% of its original activity for 75 days of repeated use with a deactivation constant kd = 3.72 x 10(-3) day(-1). A canned non-linear regression program was used to estimate the intrinsic kinetic parameters of immobilized enzyme with a low value of observable Thiele modulus (phi < 0.3) and these parameters were compared with those of free urease. The best-fit kinetic parameters of a Michaelis-Menten model were estimated as Vm = 3.318 x 10(-4) micromol/s mg bound enzyme protein, Km = 15.94 mM for immobilized, and Vm = 1.074 micromol NH3/s mg enzyme protein, Km = 14.49 mM for free urease. The drastic decrease in Vm value was attributed to steric effects, conformational changes in enzyme structure or denaturation of the enzyme during immobilization. Nevertheless, the change in Km value was insignificant for the unchanged affinity of the substrate with immobilization. For higher immobilized urease activity, smaller particle size and concentrated urease with higher specific activity could be used in the immobilization process.

  18. Batch Tests To Determine Activity Distribution and Kinetic Parameters for Acetate Utilization in Expanded-Bed Anaerobic Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Peter; Suidan, Makram T.

    1990-01-01

    Batch tests to measure maximum acetate utilization rates were used to determine the distribution of acetate utilizers in expanded-bed sand and expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) reactors. The reactors were fed a mixture of acetate and 3-ethylphenol, and they contained the same predominant aceticlastic methanogen, Methanothrix sp. Batch tests were performed both on the entire reactor contents and with media removed from the reactors. Results indicated that activity was evenly distributed within the GAC reactors, whereas in the sand reactor a sludge blanket on top of the sand bed contained approximately 50% of the activity. The Monod half-velocity constant (Ks) for the acetate-utilizing methanogens in two expanded-bed GAC reactors was searched for by combining steady-state results with batch test data. All parameters necessary to develop a model with Monod kinetics were experimentally determined except for Ks. However, Ks was a function of the effluent 3-ethylphenol concentration, and batch test results demonstrated that maximum acetate utilization rates were not a function of the effluent 3-ethylphenol concentration. Addition of a competitive inhibition term into the Monod expression predicted the dependence of Ks on the effluent 3-ethylphenol concentration. A two-parameter search determined a Ks of 8.99 mg of acetate per liter and a Ki of 2.41 mg of 3-ethylphenol per liter. Model predictions were in agreement with experimental observations for all effluent 3-ethylphenol concentrations. Batch tests measured the activity for a specific substrate and determined the distribution of activity in the reactor. The use of steady-state data in conjunction with batch test results reduced the number of unknown kinetic parameters and thereby reduced the uncertainty in the results and the assumptions made. PMID:16348175

  19. Kinetics Parameters of VVER-1000 Core with 3 MOX Lead Test Assemblies To Be Used for Accident Analysis Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2000-03-08

    The present work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactor and presents the neutronics calculations of kinetics parameters of VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs. MOX LTA design has been studied in [1] for two options of MOX LTA: 100% plutonium and of ''island'' type. As a result, zoning i.e. fissile plutonium enrichments in different plutonium zones, has been defined. VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs of chosen design has been calculated in [2]. In present work, the neutronics data for transient analysis codes (RELAP [3]) has been obtained using the codes chain of RRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' [5] that is to be used for exploitation neutronics calculations of VVER. Nowadays the 3D assembly-by-assembly code BIPR-7A and 2D pin-by-pin code PERMAK-A, both with the neutronics constants prepared by the cell code TVS-M, are the base elements of this chain. It should be reminded that in [6] TVS-M was used only for the constants calculations of MOX FAs. In current calculations the code TVS-M has been used both for UOX and MOX fuel constants. Besides, the volume of presented information has been increased and additional explications have been included. The results for the reference uranium core [4] are presented in Chapter 2. The results for the core with 3 MOX LTAs are presented in Chapter 3. The conservatism that is connected with neutronics parameters and that must be taken into account during transient analysis calculations, is discussed in Chapter 4. The conservative parameters values are considered to be used in 1-point core kinetics models of accident analysis codes.

  20. Phenol biodegradation in a batch jet loop bioreactor (JLB): kinetics study and pH variation.

    PubMed

    Ucun, Handan; Yildiz, Ergun; Nuhoglu, Alper

    2010-05-01

    Phenol biodegradation in a batch jet loop bioreactor (JLB) using activated sludge was investigated. The biodegradation experiments were conducted at different phenol concentrations (S(0)) from 50 to 1000 mg/l. The results of the biodegradation of phenol by JLB show that a good phenol removal of 100%. The biodegradation capacity of the JLB was higher than that of the stirred tank reactor reported in literatures. The Haldane equation was adopted in order to describe the relation between the specific growth rates (micro) and S(0). Kinetic constants of Haldane equation were micro(m) = 0.119 1/h, K(s) = 11.13 mg/l and K(i) = 250.88 mg/l. Model equations were simulated using the MATHCAD 7.0 software's ordinary differential equation solver. Simulations were performed at each experiment with different initial phenol concentrations.

  1. Immobilization of denatured DNA to macroporous supports: II. Steric and kinetic parameters of heterogeneous hybridization reactions.

    PubMed

    Bünemann, H

    1982-11-25

    The accessibility of immobilized DNA has been shown to depend more crucially on the method of immobilization than on the type of support used for fixation. When sonicated denatured DNA is coupled via diazotization or via cyanogen bromide reaction to solid Sephadex G-25 and Cellex 410 or to macroporous Sephacryl S-500 and Sepharose C1-6B its accessibility varies from 100 to 24 percent. Generally the loss of accessibility is linked to a depression of the melting temperature of DNA helices formed on the support. This correlation shows a characteristic course for a particular coupling method. DNA coupled under denaturing conditions may become totally inaccessible when only 3 percent of its bases are involved in the covalent linkage. Kinetic experiments with sonicated E.coli DNA have shown that the rate constants for renaturation or hybridization reactions are very similar for DNA immobilized by different methods to solid or macroporous supports. Generally the second order rate constant for a heterogeneous reaction (between mobile and immobilized DNA) is about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the analogous homogeneous reaction (in solution).

  2. Ethylene vinyl acetate based radiation grafted hydrophilic matrices: Process parameter standardization, grafting kinetics and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Mondal, R. K.; Dubey, K. A.; Grover, V.; Panicker, L.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Varshney, L.

    2016-08-01

    A transparent, elastomeric, grafted matrix for several potential applications was synthesized by single-step simultaneous radiation grafting of methacrylic acid onto ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). CuSO4 was found to be the most suitable homo-polymerization inhibitor among different inhibitors tried. The grafting kinetics was found to be a strong function of dose rate (D) and monomer content (M) and an equation relating grafting rate Rg=Kg [M]1.13D0.23 was deduced. Crystallinity of the grafted matrices as assessed from XRD and DSC measurements indicated decrease in crystalline content with increase in grafting yield, suggesting crystalline domain of EVA get disrupted on grafting. Elastic modulus increased linearly with the increase in grafting yield, though elongation at break decreased precipitously from 900% to 30% at even ~9% grafting. Thermo-gravimetric analysis showed three step weight loss of the grafted EVA matrix. The grafting of MAA resulted in increase in surface energy mainly due to enhanced polar component.

  3. Immobilization of denatured DNA to macroporous supports: II. Steric and kinetic parameters of heterogeneous hybridization reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Bünemann, H

    1982-01-01

    The accessibility of immobilized DNA has been shown to depend more crucially on the method of immobilization than on the type of support used for fixation. When sonicated denatured DNA is coupled via diazotization or via cyanogen bromide reaction to solid Sephadex G-25 and Cellex 410 or to macroporous Sephacryl S-500 and Sepharose C1-6B its accessibility varies from 100 to 24 percent. Generally the loss of accessibility is linked to a depression of the melting temperature of DNA helices formed on the support. This correlation shows a characteristic course for a particular coupling method. DNA coupled under denaturing conditions may become totally inaccessible when only 3 percent of its bases are involved in the covalent linkage. Kinetic experiments with sonicated E.coli DNA have shown that the rate constants for renaturation or hybridization reactions are very similar for DNA immobilized by different methods to solid or macroporous supports. Generally the second order rate constant for a heterogeneous reaction (between mobile and immobilized DNA) is about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the analogous homogeneous reaction (in solution). PMID:6185922

  4. Temperature Effects on Kinetic Parameters and Substrate Affinity of Cel7A Cellobiohydrolases*

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Badino, Silke Flindt; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We measured hydrolytic rates of four purified cellulases in small increments of temperature (10–50 °C) and substrate loads (0–100 g/liter) and analyzed the data by a steady state kinetic model that accounts for the processive mechanism. We used wild type cellobiohydrolases (Cel7A) from mesophilic Hypocrea jecorina and thermophilic Rasamsonia emersonii and two variants of these enzymes designed to elucidate the role of the carbohydrate binding module (CBM). We consistently found that the maximal rate increased strongly with temperature, whereas the affinity for the insoluble substrate decreased, and as a result, the effect of temperature depended strongly on the substrate load. Thus, temperature had little or no effect on the hydrolytic rate in dilute substrate suspensions, whereas strong temperature activation (Q10 values up to 2.6) was observed at saturating substrate loads. The CBM had a dual effect on the activity. On one hand, it diminished the tendency of heat-induced desorption, but on the other hand, it had a pronounced negative effect on the maximal rate, which was 2-fold larger in variants without CBM throughout the investigated temperature range. We conclude that although the CBM is beneficial for affinity it slows down the catalytic process. Cel7A from the thermophilic organism was moderately more activated by temperature than the mesophilic analog. This is in accord with general theories on enzyme temperature adaptation and possibly relevant information for the selection of technical cellulases. PMID:26183777

  5. Chemical mechanism of lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. pH-dependence of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gil, J; Martín, J; Acebal, C; Arche, R

    1990-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyses two reactions: hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine and transacylation between two molecules of lysophosphatidylcholine to give disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Following the kinetic model previously proposed for this enzyme [Martín, Pérez-Gil, Acebal & Arche (1990) Biochem. J. 266, 47-53], the values of essential pK values in free enzyme and substrate-enzyme complexes have now been determined. The chemical mechanism of catalysis was dependent on the deprotonation of a histidine residue with pK about 5.7. This result was supported by the perturbation of pK values by addition of organic solvent. Very high and exothermic enthalpy of ionization was measured, indicating that a conformational re-arrangement in the enzyme accompanies the ionization of the essential histidine residue. These results, as well as the results from previous studies, enabled the proposal of a chemical mechanism for the enzymic reactions catalysed by lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. PMID:2241908

  6. Electrochemical oxidation of an azo dye in aqueous media investigation of operational parameters and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Parsa, J Basiri; Rezaei, M; Soleymani, A R

    2009-09-15

    In this research two types of electrochemical reactors for the treatment of simulated wastewaters containing Direct blue 71 azo dye (DB71) were used: (1) Laboratory scale undivided electrolysis cell system (450 mL volume) with one 2 cm x 2 cm platinum plate as the anode placed in the middle of the cell and two 2 cm x 8 cm steel plates (SS-304) as cathodes placed in the sides of the cell 2 cm from the central anode. (2) Pilot scale reactor (9L volume), equipped with two 3 cm x 23 cm stainless steel plates as anode and cathode, with distance of 3 cm apart. The influence of supporting electrolyte, applied voltage and pH were studied. The UV-vis spectra of samples during the electrochemical oxidation showed the rapid decolorization of the dye solution. During the process, the COD and current were measured in order to evaluate the degree of mineralization, energy consumption, current and anode efficiencies. The optimum supporting electrolyte and applied voltage were NaCl (5 g L(-1)) and 15 V. Using the lab scale reactor resulted in complete decolorization and mineralization of the dye solutions after ca. 90 and 120 min, respectively. Similar results were obtained using the pilot plant reactor under the same conditions. The good fit of the data to pseudo-first-order kinetics for COD removal at all applied voltages (except 20 V) was taken as proof of the involvement of indirect oxidation pathways in the process.

  7. Non-Linear Problems in NMR: Application of the DFM Variation of Parameters Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erker, Jay Charles

    This Dissertation introduces, develops, and applies the Dirac-McLachlan-Frenkel (DFM) time dependent variation of parameters approach to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) problems. Although never explicitly used in the treatment of time domain NMR problems to date, the DFM approach has successfully predicted the dynamics of optically prepared wave packets on excited state molecular energy surfaces. Unlike the Floquet, average Hamiltonian, and Van Vleck transformation methods, the DFM approach is not restricted by either the size or symmetry of the time domain perturbation. A particularly attractive feature of the DFM method is that measured data can be used to motivate a parameterized trial function choice and that the DFM theory provides the machinery to provide the optimum, minimum error choices for these parameters. Indeed a poor parameterized trial function choice will lead to a poor match with real experiments, even with optimized parameters. Although there are many NMR problems available to demonstrate the application of the DFM variation of parameters, five separate cases that have escaped analytical solution and thus require numerical methods are considered here: molecular diffusion in a magnetic field gradient, radiation damping in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening, multi-site chemical exchange, and the combination of molecular diffusion in a magnetic field gradient with chemical exchange. The application to diffusion in a gradient is used as an example to develop the DFM method for application to NMR. The existence of a known analytical solution and experimental results allows for direct comparison between the theoretical results of the DFM method and Torrey's solution to the Bloch equations corrected for molecular diffusion. The framework of writing classical Bloch equations in matrix notation is then applied to problems without analytical solution. The second example includes the generation of a semi-analytical functional form for the free

  8. Visualization and Curve-Parameter Estimation Strategies for Efficient Exploration of Phenotype Microarray Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vaas, Lea A. I.; Sikorski, Johannes; Michael, Victoria; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background The Phenotype MicroArray (OmniLog® PM) system is able to simultaneously capture a large number of phenotypes by recording an organism's respiration over time on distinct substrates. This technique targets the object of natural selection itself, the phenotype, whereas previously addressed ‘-omics’ techniques merely study components that finally contribute to it. The recording of respiration over time, however, adds a longitudinal dimension to the data. To optimally exploit this information, it must be extracted from the shapes of the recorded curves and displayed in analogy to conventional growth curves. Methodology The free software environment R was explored for both visualizing and fitting of PM respiration curves. Approaches using either a model fit (and commonly applied growth models) or a smoothing spline were evaluated. Their reliability in inferring curve parameters and confidence intervals was compared to the native OmniLog® PM analysis software. We consider the post-processing of the estimated parameters, the optimal classification of curve shapes and the detection of significant differences between them, as well as practically relevant questions such as detecting the impact of cultivation times and the minimum required number of experimental repeats. Conclusions We provide a comprehensive framework for data visualization and parameter estimation according to user choices. A flexible graphical representation strategy for displaying the results is proposed, including 95% confidence intervals for the estimated parameters. The spline approach is less prone to irregular curve shapes than fitting any of the considered models or using the native PM software for calculating both point estimates and confidence intervals. These can serve as a starting point for the automated post-processing of PM data, providing much more information than the strict dichotomization into positive and negative reactions. Our results form the basis for a freely

  9. Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM): description and sensitivity to some estimated kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraborrelli, Domenico; Cabrera Perez, David; Sander, Rolf; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Despite decades of reasearch, global atmospheric chemistry models still have significant biases compared to the estimated distribution and evolution of tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical. The gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is acknowledged to play an important role among the processes affecting tropospheric ozone, methane lifetime and aerosol evolution. Thus, chemical mechanisms of very diverse complexity have been developed for the major VOCs. However, all mechanisms present shortcomings such as neglection or lumping of intermediates and estimate of many rate constants and product distributions. Here, we present a VOC oxidation mechanism of intermediate complexity called the Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM). With about 400 species and 1500 reactions, it represents the oxidation of about 20 primarily emitted VOCs comprising small alkanes and alkenes, isoprene, pinenes and monocyclic aromatic compounds. The development protocol significantly borrows from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). However, MOM distinguishes itself for a number of features. First, the structure activity relationship for estimating the rate constants involving hydroxyl radical is site-specific and dependent on temperature. Second, the alkyl nitrate yields are considered to be dependent on temperature, pressure and molecular structure. RO2 + HO2 reaction kinetics is consistent with the recent direct studies of \\chem{OH}-reformation. Isoprene chemistry includes the latest experimental advancements with respect to OH-recycling and alkyl nitrate chemistry. Pinenes chemistry is largely the one by the MCM but with some modifications according to the work of the Leuven's group. Finally, the chemistry of the aromatics is also borrowed from the MCM but with additional photolysis of ortho-nitrophenols leading to \\chem{HONO} formation. The sensitivity of the model to the temperature and pressure dependence of estimated \\chem{OH} rate constants and alkyl nitrate yields will

  10. Deciphering the impact of parameters influencing transgene expression kinetics after repeated cell transduction with integration-deficient retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Jaeschke, Nico M; Hoffmann, Dirk; Maetzig, Tobias; Ballmaier, Matthias; Godinho, Tamaryin; Cathomen, Toni; Schambach, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors are state-of-the-art tools for transgene expression within target cells. The integration of these vectors can be deliberately suppressed to derive a transient gene expression system based on extrachromosomal circular episomes with intact coding regions. These episomes can be used to deliver DNA templates and to express RNA or protein. Importantly, transient gene transfer avoids the genotoxic side effects of integrating vectors. Restricting their applicability, episomes are rapidly lost upon dilution in dividing target cells. Addressing this limitation, we could establish comparably stable percentages of transgene-positive cells over prolonged time periods in proliferating cells by repeated transductions. Flow cytometry was applied for kinetic analyses to decipher the impact of individual parameters on the kinetics of fluoroprotein expression after episomal retransduction and to visualize sequential and simultaneous transfer of heterologous fluoroproteins. Expression windows could be exactly timed by the number of transduction steps. The kinetics of signal loss was affected by the cell proliferation rate. The transfer of genes encoding fluoroproteins with different half-lives revealed a major impact of protein stability on temporal signal distribution and accumulation, determining optimal retransduction intervals. In addition, sequential transductions proved broad applicability in different cell types and using different envelope pseudotypes without receptor overload. Stable percentages of cells coexpressing multiple transgenes could be generated upon repeated coadministration of different episomal vectors. Alternatively, defined patterns of transgene expression could be recapitulated by sequential transductions. Altogether, we established a methodology to control and adjust a temporally defined window of transgene expression using retroviral episomal vectors. Combined with the highly efficient cell entry of these vectors while

  11. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) < or = [MA]0 < or = 4.30 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)) in the presence of bromate (6.20 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)), bromide (1.50 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3)), sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  12. Generalized total variation-based MRI Rician denoising model with spatially adaptive regularization parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ryan Wen; Shi, Lin; Huang, Wenhua; Xu, Jing; Yu, Simon Chun Ho; Wang, Defeng

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an outstanding medical imaging modality but the quality often suffers from noise pollution during image acquisition and transmission. The purpose of this study is to enhance image quality using feature-preserving denoising method. In current literature, most existing MRI denoising methods did not simultaneously take the global image prior and local image features into account. The denoising method proposed in this paper is implemented based on an assumption of spatially varying Rician noise map. A two-step wavelet-domain estimation method is developed to extract the noise map. Following a Bayesian modeling approach, a generalized total variation-based MRI denoising model is proposed based on global hyper-Laplacian prior and Rician noise assumption. The proposed model has the properties of backward diffusion in local normal directions and forward diffusion in local tangent directions. To further improve the denoising performance, a local variance estimator-based method is introduced to calculate the spatially adaptive regularization parameters related to local image features and spatially varying noise map. The main benefit of the proposed method is that it takes full advantage of the global MR image prior and local image features. Numerous experiments have been conducted on both synthetic and real MR data sets to compare our proposed model with some state-of-the-art denoising methods. The experimental results have demonstrated the superior performance of our proposed model in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality evaluations.

  13. Variation of the Moyer Model Parameter, H/sub 0/, with primary proton energy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.L.; Stevenson, G.R.; Thomas, R.H.; Thomas, S.V.

    1982-08-01

    Experimental values of the Moyer Model Parameter H/sub 0/ were summarized and presented as a function of proton energy, E/sub p/. The variation of H/sub 0/(E/sup p/) with E/sup p/ was studied by regression analysis. Regression Analysis of the data under log-log transformation gave a best value for the exponent m of 0.77 +- 0.26, but a t-test did not reject m = 1 (p +- 20%). Since m = 1 was not excluded, and a Fisher's F-test did not exclude linearity, a linear regression analysis was performed. A line passing through the origin was not rejected (Student's t-test, p = 30%) and has the equation: H/sub 0/(E/sup p/ = (1.61 +- 0.19) x 10/sup -13/ Sv.m/sup 2//GeV to be compared with a value of (1.65 +- 0.21) x 10/sup -13/ Sv.m/sup 2//GeV published by Stevenson et al. (St 82).

  14. Simple Penalties on Maximum-Likelihood Estimates of Genetic Parameters to Reduce Sampling Variation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Multivariate estimates of genetic parameters are subject to substantial sampling variation, especially for smaller data sets and more than a few traits. A simple modification of standard, maximum-likelihood procedures for multivariate analyses to estimate genetic covariances is described, which can improve estimates by substantially reducing their sampling variances. This is achieved by maximizing the likelihood subject to a penalty. Borrowing from Bayesian principles, we propose a mild, default penalty-derived assuming a Beta distribution of scale-free functions of the covariance components to be estimated-rather than laboriously attempting to determine the stringency of penalization from the data. An extensive simulation study is presented, demonstrating that such penalties can yield very worthwhile reductions in loss, i.e., the difference from population values, for a wide range of scenarios and without distorting estimates of phenotypic covariances. Moreover, mild default penalties tend not to increase loss in difficult cases and, on average, achieve reductions in loss of similar magnitude to computationally demanding schemes to optimize the degree of penalization. Pertinent details required for the adaptation of standard algorithms to locate the maximum of the likelihood function are outlined.

  15. Effect of soil parameters on the kinetics of the displacement of Fe from FeEDDHA chelates by Cu.

    PubMed

    Schenkeveld, Walter D C; Reichwein, Arjen M; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2012-06-28

    In soil application, o,o-FeEDDHA (iron (3+) ethylene diamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy phenyl acetic acid) complex) is the active ingredient of FeEDDHA chelate-based Fe fertilizers. The effectiveness of o,o-FeEDDHA is potentially compromised by the displacement of Fe from FeEDDHA by Cu. The actual impact of Cu competition is codetermined by the kinetics of the displacement reaction. In this study, the influence of soil parameters on the displacement kinetics has been examined in goethite suspensions. The displacement reaction predominantly takes place on the reactive surface rather than in solution. The rate at which the o,o-FeEDDHA concentration declined depended on the available reactive surface area, the Cu loading, and the FeEDDHA loading. Soil factors reducing FeEDDHA adsorption (high ionic strength, humic acid adsorption onto the goethite surface, and monovalent instead of divalent cations in the electrolyte) decreased the displacement rate. For meso o,o-FeEDDHA, the displacement rate equation was derived, which is first order in FeEDDHA loading and half order in Cu loading. For soil conditions, the equation can be simplified to an exponential decay function in meso o,o-FeEDDHA solution concentration.

  16. Oxidation pathways for ozonation of azo dyes in a semi-batch reactor: a kinetic parameters approach.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Benbelkacem, H; Pic, J S; Debellefontaine, H

    2004-03-01

    In this study ozone and the H2O2/O3 oxidation system are used to decolorize aqueous solutions of Orange II (Or-II) and Acid Red 27 (AR-27). Investigations are carried out in a semi-batch bubble column reactor. A system of series-parallel reactions is proposed to describe the mechanism of dye oxidation. The stoichiometric ratio for the first reaction is found to be 1 mol dye per mol O3, while the overall ozone demand for both reactions one and two is found to be 5 and 6 moles for Or-II and AR-27 respectively. Molecular and radical kinetics are compared: a radical scavenger, t-butanol, can be added to ensure only the molecular reaction of ozone, or hydrogen peroxide can be supplied through a peristaltic pump, to initiate radical reactivity. Results reveal that colour removal is ensured by direct ozone attack. For both dyes, TOC removal efficiencies of 50 - 60 % are obtained by the action of the hydroxyl free radical. However, this is not improved by addition of H2O2, thus demonstrating that organic species alone ensure HO degrees radical production during ozonation. Both the mass transfer and the ozone reactivity with the dyes are considered to evaluate the kinetic parameters for the molecular pathway.

  17. Enhanced heat stability and kinetic parameters of maize endosperm ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase by alteration of phylogenetically identified amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Georgelis, Nikolaos; Hannah, L Curtis

    2014-02-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) controls the rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis and is regulated at various levels. Cereal endosperm enzymes, in contrast to other plant AGPases, are particularly heat labile and transgenic studies highlight the importance of temperature for cereal yield. Previously, a phylogenetic approach identified Type II and positively selected amino acid positions in the large subunit of maize endosperm AGPase. Glycogen content, kinetic parameters and heat stability were measured in AGPases having mutations in these sites and interesting differences were observed. This study expands on our earlier evolutionary work by determining how all Type II and positively selected sites affect kinetic constants, heat stability and catalytic rates at increased temperatures. Variants with enhanced properties were identified and combined into one gene, designated Sh2-E. Enhanced properties include: heat stability, enhanced activity at 37 °C, activity at 55 °C, reduced Ka and activity in the absence of activator. The resulting enzyme exhibited all improved properties of the various individual changes. Additionally, Sh2-E was expressed with a small subunit variant with enhanced enzyme properties resulting in an enzyme that has exceptional heat stability, a high catalytic rate at increased temperatures and significantly decreased Km values for both substrates in the absence of the activator.

  18. A stochastic formulation of the gompertzian growth model for in vitro bactericidal kinetics: parameter estimation and extinction probability.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, L; Bompadre, S; Leone, L; Montanari, M P

    2005-06-01

    Time-kill curves have frequently been employed to study the antimicrobial effects of antibiotics. The relevance of pharmacodynamic modeling to these investigations has been emphasized in many studies of bactericidal kinetics. Stochastic models are needed that take into account the randomness of the mechanisms of both bacterial growth and bacteria-drug interactions. However, most of the models currently used to describe antibiotic activity against microorganisms are deterministic. In this paper we examine a stochastic differential equation representing a stochastic version of a pharmacodynamic model of bacterial growth undergoing random fluctuations, and derive its solution, mean value and covariance structure. An explicit likelihood function is obtained both when the process is observed continuously over a period of time and when data is sampled at time points, as is the custom in these experimental conditions. Some asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood estimators for the model parameters are discussed. The model is applied to analyze in vitro time-kill data and to estimate model parameters; the probability of the bacterial population size dropping below some critical threshold is also evaluated. Finally, the relationship between bacterial extinction probability and the pharmacodynamic parameters estimated is discussed.

  19. Estimation of transport and degradation parameters for naphthalene and anthracene: influence of mass transfer on kinetics.

    PubMed

    Owabor, Chiedu N; Ogbeide, Samuel E; Susu, Alfred A

    2010-10-01

    The method of temporal moment solutions (MOM) for one-dimensional convective-dispersive solute transport involving linear equilibrium sorption and first-order degradation for time pulse sources has been applied to analyze experimental data from a soil microcosm reactor. Estimation of the pore water velocity V for a nonreactive solute was aided by the use of only the first normalized moment while the dispersion coefficient D, first-order degradation rate constant lambda, and the retardation factor R were estimated using both first and second normalized moments. These transport and degradation parameters were compared to those obtained by a transport model using a nonlinear least square curve-fitting program CXTFIT (version 2.0). Results obtained showed that the MOM fits the breakthrough curve with tailing better than the CXTFIT. The initial estimates of these parameters aided the reduction of the dimensionality of the search process of the non- steady-state model. A residual concentration of 1.12E-5 and 1.48 mg/l for naphthalene and 7.67E-4 and 1.61 mg/l for anthracene, in the axial and radial directions, respectively, suggests the preference of naphthalene during the biodegradation process. The surface concentration as depicted using three-dimensional plots showed that there is occlusion of the aromatics (naphthalene and anthracene) within the soil micropores, thereby limiting their bioavailability and in the long run increasing their toxicity.

  20. Determination of kinetic parameters of crystal growth rate of borax in aqueous solution by using the rotating disc technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Omer; Aslan, Fevzi; Ozdemir, Mustafa; Durgun, Mustafa

    2004-10-01

    Growth rate of polycrystalline disc of borax compressed at different pressure and rotated at various speed has been measured in a rotating disc crystallizer under well-defined conditions of supersaturation. It was found that the mass transfer coefficient, K, increased while overall growth rate constant, Kg, and surface reaction constant, kr, decreased with increasing smoothness of the disc. It was also determined that kinetic parameters (kr , r , K , g) of crystal growth rate of borax decreased with increasing rotating speed of the polycrystalline disc. The effectiveness factor was calculated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitude of the steps in series bulk diffusion through the mass transfer boundary layer and the surface integration. At low rotating speed of disc, the crystal growth rate of borax is mainly controlled by integration. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth rate of borax at higher rotating speed of polycrystalline disc.

  1. Application of artificial neural networks and DFT-based parameters for prediction of reaction kinetics of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaleniec, Maciej; Witko, Małgorzata; Tadeusiewicz, Ryszard; Goclon, Jakub

    2006-03-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used for classification and prediction of enzymatic activity of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase from EbN1 Azoarcus sp. bacterium. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EBDH) catalyzes stereo-specific oxidation of ethylbenzene and its derivates to alcohols, which find its application as building blocks in pharmaceutical industry. ANN systems are trained based on theoretical variables derived from Density Functional Theory (DFT) modeling, topological descriptors, and kinetic parameters measured with developed spectrophotometric assay. Obtained models exhibit high degree of accuracy (100% of correct classifications, correlation between predicted and experimental values of reaction rates on the 0.97 level). The applicability of ANNs is demonstrated as useful tool for the prediction of biochemical enzyme activity of new substrates basing only on quantum chemical calculations and simple structural characteristics. Multi Linear Regression and Molecular Field Analysis (MFA) are used in order to compare robustness of ANN and both classical and 3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approaches.

  2. Thermoluminescence dosimetry properties and kinetic parameters of lithium potassium borate glass co-doped with titanium and magnesium oxides.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Alajerami, Y S M; Ramli, A T; Ghoshal, S K; Saleh, M A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Saripan, M I; Alzimami, K; Bradley, D A; Mhareb, M H A

    2014-09-01

    Lithium potassium borate (LKB) glasses co-doped with TiO2 and MgO were prepared using the melt quenching technique. The glasses were cut into transparent chips and exposed to gamma rays of (60)Co to study their thermoluminescence (TL) properties. The TL glow curve of the Ti-doped material featured a single prominent peak at 230 °C. Additional incorporation of MgO as a co-activator enhanced the TL intensity threefold. LKB:Ti,Mg is a low-Z material (Z(eff)=8.89) with slow signal fading. Its radiation sensitivity is 12 times lower that the sensitivity of TLD-100. The dose response is linear at doses up to 10(3) Gy. The trap parameters, such as the kinetics order, activation energy, and frequency factor, which are related to the glow peak, were determined using TolAnal software.

  3. The influence of dose on the kinetic parameters and dosimetric features of the main thermoluminescence glow peak in α-Al2O3:C,Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Chithambo, M. L.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of dose (0.1-100 Gy) on the kinetic parameters and the dosimetric features of the main glow peak of α-Al2O3:C,Mg have been investigated. Thermoluminescence (TL) measured at 1 °C/s shows a very high intensity glow peak at 161 °C and six secondary peaks at 42, 72, 193, 279, 330, 370 °C respectively. Analysis shows that the main peak follows first order kinetics irrespective of the irradiation dose. The activation energy is found to be consistent at 1.37 eV and the frequency factor is of the order of 1014 s-1 for any dose between 0.1 and 100 Gy. Further, the analysis for thermal quenching of the main peak of 0.1 Gy irradiated sample shows that the activation energy for thermal quenching is (0.94 ± 0.04) eV. Regarding the dosimetric features of α-Al2O3:C,Mg, the dose response of the main peak is superlinear within 0.1 to 30 Gy of beta dose and then it becomes sublinear up to 100 Gy. Fading analysis shows that the intensity of the main peak drops to ∼22% of its initial value within 2400 s after irradiation and thereafter to ∼14% within 64,800 s. Analysis of the reproducibility shows that the coefficient of variation in the results for 10 identical TL measurements show that reproducibility improves with increase in dose.

  4. Esterase in Imported Fire Ants, Solenopsis invicta and S. richteri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): Activity, Kinetics and Variation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Rashid, T.; Feng, G.

    2014-01-01

    Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis richteri are two closely related invasive ants native to South America. Despite their similarity in biology and behavior, S. invicta is a more successful invasive species. Toxic tolerance has been found to be important to the success of some invasive species. Esterases play a crucial role in toxic tolerance of insects. Hence, we hypothesized that the more invasive S. invicta would have a higher esterase activity than S. richteri. Esterase activities were measured for workers and male and female alates of both ant species using α-naphthyl acetate and β-naphthyl acetate as substrates. Esterase activities in S. invicta were always significantly higher than those in S. richteri supporting our hypothesis. In S. invicta, male alates had the highest esterase activities followed by workers then female alates for both substrates. In S. richetri, for α-naphthyl acetate, male alates had the highest activity followed by female alates then workers, while for β-naphthyl acetate, female alates had the highest activity followed by male alates then workers. For workers, S. richteri showed significantly higher levels of variation about the mean esterase activity than S. invicta. However, S. invicta showed significantly higher levels of variation in both female and male alates. PMID:25408118

  5. Variations in Kinetic Properties of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylases among Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Badger, Murray R.; Watson, Leslie

    1981-01-01

    Studies of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase from taxonomically diverse plants show that the enzyme from C3 and crassulacean acid metabolism pathway species exhibits lower Km(CO2) values (12-25 micromolar) than does that from C4 species (28-34 micromolar). RuBP carboxylase from aquatic angiosperms, an aquatic bryophyte, fresh water and marine algae has yielded consistently high Km(CO2) values (30-70 micromolar), similar in range to that of the enzyme from C4 terrestrial plants. This variation in Km(CO2) is discussed in relation to the correlation between the existence of CO2-concentrating mechanisms for photosynthesis and the affinity of the enzyme for CO2. The Km(RuBP) of the enzyme from various sources ranges from 10 to 136 micromolar; mean ± sd = 36 ± 20 micromolar. This variation in Km(RuBP) does not correlate with different photosynthetic pathways, but shows taxonomic patterns. Among the dicotyledons, the enzyme from crassinucellate species exhibits lower Km(RuBP) (18 ± 4 micromolar) than does that from tenuinucellate species (25 ± 7 micromolar). Among the Poaceae, RuBP carboxylase from Triticeae, chloridoids, andropogonoids, Microlaena, and Tetrarrhena has yielded lower Km(RuBP) values (29 ± 11 micromolar) than has that from other members of the grass family (46 ± 10 micromolar). PMID:16661826

  6. Dynamic determination of kinetic parameters, computer simulation, and probabilistic analysis of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef during cooling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan

    2015-02-16

    The objective of this research was to develop a new one-step methodology that uses a dynamic approach to directly construct a tertiary model for prediction of the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef. This methodology was based on simultaneous numerical analysis and optimization of both primary and secondary models using multiple dynamic growth curves obtained under different conditions. Once the models were constructed, the bootstrap method was used to calculate the 95% confidence intervals of kinetic parameters, and a Monte Carlo simulation method was developed to validate the models using the growth curves not previously used in model development. The results showed that the kinetic parameters obtained from this study accurately matched the common characteristics of C. perfringens, with the optimum temperature being 45.3°C. The results also showed that the predicted growth curves matched accurately with experimental observations used in validation. The mean of residuals of the predictions is -0.02logCFU/g, with a standard deviation of only 0.23logCFU/g. For relative growths <1logCFU/g, the residuals of predictions are <0.4logCFU/g. Overall, 74% of the residuals of predictions are <0.2logCFU/g, 7.7% are >0.4logCFU/g, while only 1.5% are >0.8logCFU/g. In addition, the dynamic model also accurately predicted four isothermal growth curves arbitrarily chosen from the literature. Finally, the Monte Carlo simulation was used to provide the probability of >1 and 2logCFU/g relative growths at the end of cooling. The results of this study will provide a new and accurate tool to the food industry and regulatory agencies to assess the safety of cooked beef in the event of cooling deviation.

  7. On the design of optimal dynamic experiments for parameter estimation of a Ratkowsky-type growth kinetics at suboptimal temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bernaerts, K; Versyck, K J; Van Impe, J F

    2000-03-10

    It is generally known that accurate model building, i.e., proper model structure selection and reliable parameter estimation, constitutes an essential matter in the field of predictive microbiology, in particular, when integrating these predictive models in food safety systems. In this context, Versyck et al. (1999) have introduced the methodology of optimal experimental design techniques for parameter estimation within the field. Optimal experimental design focuses on the development of optimal input profiles such that the resulting rich (i.e., highly informative) experimental data enable unique model parameter estimation. As a case study, Versyck et al. (1999) [Versyck, K., Bernaerts, K., Geeraerd, A.H., Van Impe, J.F., 1999. Introducing optimal experimental design in predictive modeling: a motivating example. Int. J. Food Microbiol., 51(1), 39-51] have elaborated the estimation of Bigelow inactivation kinetics parameters (in a numerical way). Opposed to the classic (static) experimental approach in predictive modelling, an optimal dynamic experimental setup is presented. In this paper, the methodology of optimal experimental design or parameter estimation is applied to obtain uncorrelated estimates of the square root model parameters [Ratkowsky, D.A., Olley, J., McMeekin, T.A., Ball, A., 1982. Relationship between temperature and growth rate of bacterial cultures. J. Bacteriol. 149, 1-5] describing the effect of suboptimal growth temperatures on the maximum specific growth rate of microorganisms. These estimates are the direct result of fitting a primary growth model to cell density measurements as a function of time. Apart from the design of an optimal time-varying temperature profile based on a sensitivity study of the model output, an important contribution of this publication is a first experimental validation of this innovative dynamic experimental approach for uncorrelated parameter identification. An optimal step temperature profile, within the range of

  8. Optimizing Photosynthetic and Respiratory Parameters Based on the Seasonal Variation Pattern in Regional Net Ecosystem Productivity Obtained from Atmospheric Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Chen, J.; Zheng, X.; Jiang, F.; Zhang, S.; Ju, W.; Yuan, W.; Mo, G.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we explore the feasibility of optimizing ecosystem photosynthetic and respiratory parameters from the seasonal variation pattern of the net carbon flux. An optimization scheme is proposed to estimate two key parameters (Vcmax and Q10) by exploiting the seasonal variation in the net ecosystem carbon flux retrieved by an atmospheric inversion system. This scheme is implemented to estimate Vcmax and Q10 of the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) to improve its NEP simulation in the Boreal North America (BNA) region. Simultaneously, in-situ NEE observations at six eddy covariance sites are used to evaluate the NEE simulations. The results show that the performance of the optimized BEPS is superior to that of the BEPS with the default parameter values. These results have the implication on using atmospheric CO2 data for optimizing ecosystem parameters through atmospheric inversion or data assimilation techniques.

  9. Kinetic study of ferronickel slag grinding at variation of ball filling and ratio of feed to grinding balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanwani, Edy; Ikhwanto, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of ball filling and ratio of feed to grinding balls on the kinetic of grinding of ferronickel slag in a laboratory scale ball mill. The experiments were started by crushing the ferronickel slag samples using a roll crusher to produce -3 mesh (-6.7 mm) product. This product, after sampling and sample dividing processes, was then used as feed for grinding process. The grinding was performed with variations of ball filling and ratio of feed to grinding balls for 150 minutes. At every certain time interval, particle size analysis was carried out on the grinding product. The results of the experiments were also used to develop linear regression model of the effect of grinding variables on the P80 of the product. Based on this study, it was shown that P80 values of the grinding products declined sharply until 70 minutes of grinding time due to the dominant mechanism of impact breakage and then decreased slowly after 70 minutes until 150 minutes of grinding time due to dominant mechanism of attrition breakage. Kinetics study of the grinding process on variations of grinding ball filling showed that the optimum rate of formation of fine particles for 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% mill volume was achieved at a particle size of 400 µm in which the best initial rate of formation occurred at 50% volume of mill. At the variations of ratio of feed to grinding balls it was shown that the optimum rate of grinding for the ratio of 1:10, 1: 8 and 1: 6 was achieved at a particle size of 400 µm and for the ratio of 1: 4 was at 841 µm in which the best initial rate of formation occurred at a 1:10 ratio. In this study, it was also produced two regression models that can predict the P80 value of the grinding product as a function of the variables of grinding time, ball filling and the ratio of the feed to grinding balls.

  10. Relationship Between Human Physiological Parameters And Geomagnetic Variations Of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    This study attempts to assess the influence of increased geomagnetic activity on some human physiological parameters. The blood pressure, heart rate and general well-being of 86 volunteers were measured (the latter by means of a standardized questionnaire) on work days in autumn 2001 (01/10 to 09/11) and in spring 2002 (08/04 to 28/05). These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. Altogether, 2799 recordings were obtained and analysed. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The three factors were the following: 1) planetary geomagnetic activity level estimated by Ap-index and divided into five levels; 2) gender - males and females; 3) blood pressure degree - persons in the group examined were divided into hypotensive, normotensive and hypertensive. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors' levels. The average arterial blood pressure of the group was found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity level. The average increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure reached 9%, which deserves attention from a medical point of view. This effect was present irrespectively of gender. Results obtained suppose that hypertensive persons have the highest sensitivity and the hypotensive persons have the lowest sensitivity of the arterial blood pressure to increase of geomagnetic activity. The results did not show significant changes in the heart rate. The percentage of the persons who reported subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also found to increase significantly with the geomagnetic activity increase. During severe geomagnetic storms 30% of the persons examined reported subjective complaints and the highest sensitivity was revealed for the hypertensive females. The results obtained add further evidence that blood pressure seems to be affected by geomagnetic

  11. The effect of sustained static kneeling on kinetic and kinematic knee joint gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Kajaks, Tara; Costigan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Despite epidemiological evidence for kneeling as an occupational risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, biomechanical evidence is lacking. Gait knee joint mechanics, a common measure used to study knee osteoarthritis initiation, were used in the present study to investigate the effect of sustained static kneeling on the knee. Ten healthy male subjects (24.1 years ± 3.5) performed ten baseline walking trials, followed by a 30-min kneeling protocol and a second set of walking trials. Knee joint moments and angles were calculated during the stance phase. Within-subject root mean squared differences were compared within and between the pre- and post-kneeling gait trials. Differences were observed between the pre-kneeling and post-kneeling walking trails for flexion and adduction knee moments (0.12 Nm/kg ± 0.03, 0.07 Nm/kg ± 0.02) and angles (3.18° ± 1.22 and 1.64° ± 1.15), indicating that sustained static deep-knee flexion kneeling does acutely alter knee joint gait parameters.

  12. Degradation of atenolol by UV/peroxymonosulfate: kinetics, effect of operational parameters and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Tuqiao; Zhou, Yongchao; Fang, Lei; Shao, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Photoactivation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) with UV (254nm) irradiation was used to generate the SO4(-)-based advanced oxidation process, which was adopted to degrade atenolol (ATL) in water. The second-order reaction rate constants of ATL with HO and SO4(-) were determined, and the effects of operational parameters (dose of PMS, solution pH, HCO3(-), humic acids (HA), and N2 bubbling) were evaluated as well. Finally the main transformation intermediates were identified and possible degradation pathways were proposed. The results showed that there was a linear positive correlation between the degradation rate of ATL and specific dose of PMS (1-16M PMS/M ATL). Increasing solution pH from 3 to 9 promoted elimination of ATL due to the pH-dependent effect of PMS photodecomposition, while further pH increase from 9 to 11 caused slowing down of degradation because of apparent conversion of HO to SO4(-). 1-8mM HCO3(-) exerted no more than 5.3% inhibition effect on ATL destruction, suggesting HCO3(-) was a weak inhibitor. Absorption (or complexation) and photosensitized oxidation induced by HA improved ATL degradation during the first minute of degradation process, whereas photon competition and radical scavenging effects became the leading role afterward. Bubbling with nitrogen enhanced the degradation rate due to the stripping of dissolved oxygen. Hydroxylation of aromatic ring, cleavage of ether bond, oxidation of primary and secondary amine moieties, and dimerization were involved in the degradation mechanism of ATL by UV/PMS.

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics parameters of co-combustion between sewage sludge and water hyacinth in CO2/O2 atmosphere as biomass to solid biofuel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Limao; Liu, Jingyong; He, Yao; Sun, Shuiyu; Chen, Jiacong; Sun, Jian; Chang, KenLin; Kuo, Jiahong; Ning, Xun'an

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of sewage sludge (SS) and water hyacinth (WH) co-combustion as a blend fuel (SW) for bioenergy production were studied through thermogravimetric analysis. In CO2/O2 atmosphere, the combustion performance of SS added with 10-40wt.% WH was improved 1-1.97 times as revealed by the comprehensive combustion characteristic index (CCI). The conversion of SW in different atmospheres was identified and their thermodynamic parameters (ΔH,ΔS,ΔG) were obtained. As the oxygen concentration increased from 20% to 70%, the ignition temperature of SW decreased from 243.1°C to 240.3°C, and the maximum weight loss rate and CCI increased from 5.70%·min(-1) to 7.26%·min(-1) and from 4.913%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2) to 6.327%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2), respectively, which corresponded to the variation in ΔS and ΔG. The lowest activation energy (Ea) of SW was obtained in CO2/O2=7/3 atmosphere.

  14. Efficient method for calculating kinetic parameters using T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya

    2004-04-01

    It has become increasingly important to quantitatively estimate tissue physiological parameters such as perfusion, capillary permeability, and the volume of extravascular-extracellular space (EES) using T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). A linear equation was derived by integrating the differential equation describing the kinetic behavior of contrast agent (CA) in tissue, from which K(1) (rate constant for the transfer of CA from plasma to EES), k(2) (rate constant for the transfer from EES to plasma), and V(p) (plasma volume) can be easily obtained by the linear least-squares (LLSQ) method. The usefulness of this method was investigated by means of computer simulations, in comparison with the nonlinear least-squares (NLSQ) method. The new method calculated the above parameters faster than the NLSQ method by a factor of approximately 6, and estimated them more accurately than the NLSQ method at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of < approximately 10. This method will be useful for generating functional images of K(1), k(2), and V(p) from DCE-MRI data.

  15. Kinetic approach to the formation of 3D electromagnetic structures in flows of expanding plasma coronas. II. flow anisotropy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of magnetic structures in moving hot solar coronal plasma and hot collisionless laser-produced plasma, as determined by nonlinear criteria for weak and strong magnetization on the basis of the friction parameter Γ B and Alfven number M A, is considered within the Vlasov and Maxwell equations in the second part of the work. The flow velocities are lower then the thermal electron velocity. The energy and pulse anisotropy parameters of a flow, which determine its electromagnetic properties in the Cherenkov resonance line, are calculated by shape of particle distribution function (PDF). The ratio of these parameters is the Q-factor G V ; it characterizes the electromagnetic properties of a plasma flow and is expressed via the ratio of diamagnetic and resistive current densities or via the ratio of irregular and diamagnetic plasma scales. A particle flow is similar to a conductive medium at G V ≪ 1 and a diamagnetic medium at G V ≫ 1. The following cases are considered. (1) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF and interacts with distributed magnetization. Expressions for anisotropy parameters are derived, 3D field structures in the tail wake are found, and a possibility of topological reconstruction into a compact state under variation in the parameter G V is shown. (2) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF; a steady-state diamagnetic current layer, characterized by an anisotropic PDF, is immersed inside it. The system is in the diamagnetic state G ≫ 1. The generalized anisotropy parameter is calculated and a possibility of the excitation of three types of diamagnetic structures with low resistive currents is shown. (3) The nonlinear dynamics of anisotropic quasi-current-free plasma ( G =-1), in which the diamagnetic and resistive current densities locally compensate each other in the phase space of particle velocities, is studied. This dynamics is implemented in the long wavelength limit in plasma with an anisotropic PDF.

  16. Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G

    2012-10-01

    The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

  17. Contribution of counterions and degree of ionization for birefringence creation and relaxation kinetics parameters of PAH/PAZO films

    SciTech Connect

    Raposo, Maria Monteiro Timóteo, Ana Rita; Ribeiro, Paulo A.; Ferreira, Quirina; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria

    2015-09-21

    Photo induced birefringent materials can be used to develop optical and conversion energy devices, and consequently, the study of the variables that influences the creation and relaxation of birefringence should be carefully analyzed. In this work, the parameters of birefringence creation and relaxation kinetics curves obtained on layer-by-layer (LBL) films, prepared from azo-polyectrolyte poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo) benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride)(PAH), are related with the presence of counterions and the degree of ionization of the polyelectrolytes. Those kinetics curves obtained on PAH/PAZO LBL films, prepared from PAH solutions with different pHs and maintaining the pH of PAZO solution constant at pH = 9, were analyzed taking into account the films composition which was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The creation and relaxation birefringence curves are justified by two processes: one associated to local mobility of the azobenzene with a characteristic time 30 s and intensity constant and other associated with polymeric chains mobility with the characteristic time and intensity decreasing with pH. These results allow us to conclude that the birefringence creation process, associated to local mobility of azobenzenes is independent of the degree of ionization and of number of counterions or co-ions present while the birefringence creation process associated to mobility of chains have its characteristic time and intensity dependent of both degree of ionization and number of counterions. The birefringence relaxation processes are dependent of the degree of ionization. The analysis of the films composition revealed, in addition, the presence of a protonated secondary or tertiary amine revealing that PAZO may have positive charges and consequently a zwitterionic behavior.

  18. Joint estimation of subject motion and tracer kinetic parameters of dynamic PET data in an EM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jieqing; Salinas, Cristian A.; Searle, Graham E.; Gunn, Roger N.; Schnabel, Julia A.

    2012-02-01

    Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography is a powerful tool for quantitative imaging of in vivo biological processes. The long scan durations necessitate motion correction, to maintain the validity of the dynamic measurements, which can be particularly challenging due to the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution, as well as the complex tracer behaviour in the dynamic PET data. In this paper we develop a novel automated expectation-maximisation image registration framework that incorporates temporal tracer kinetic information to correct for inter-frame subject motion during dynamic PET scans. We employ the Zubal human brain phantom to simulate dynamic PET data using SORTEO (a Monte Carlo-based simulator), in order to validate the proposed method for its ability to recover imposed rigid motion. We have conducted a range of simulations using different noise levels, and corrupted the data with a range of rigid motion artefacts. The performance of our motion correction method is compared with pairwise registration using normalised mutual information as a voxel similarity measure (an approach conventionally used to correct for dynamic PET inter-frame motion based solely on intensity information). To quantify registration accuracy, we calculate the target registration error across the images. The results show that our new dynamic image registration method based on tracer kinetics yields better realignment of the simulated datasets, halving the target registration error when compared to the conventional method at small motion levels, as well as yielding smaller residuals in translation and rotation parameters. We also show that our new method is less affected by the low signal in the first few frames, which the conventional method based on normalised mutual information fails to realign.

  19. Contribution of counterions and degree of ionization for birefringence creation and relaxation kinetics parameters of PAH/PAZO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raposo, Maria; Ferreira, Quirina; Monteiro Timóteo, Ana Rita; Ribeiro, Paulo A.; do Rego, Ana Maria Botelho

    2015-09-01

    Photo induced birefringent materials can be used to develop optical and conversion energy devices, and consequently, the study of the variables that influences the creation and relaxation of birefringence should be carefully analyzed. In this work, the parameters of birefringence creation and relaxation kinetics curves obtained on layer-by-layer (LBL) films, prepared from azo-polyectrolyte poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo) benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride)(PAH), are related with the presence of counterions and the degree of ionization of the polyelectrolytes. Those kinetics curves obtained on PAH/PAZO LBL films, prepared from PAH solutions with different pHs and maintaining the pH of PAZO solution constant at pH = 9, were analyzed taking into account the films composition which was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The creation and relaxation birefringence curves are justified by two processes: one associated to local mobility of the azobenzene with a characteristic time 30 s and intensity constant and other associated with polymeric chains mobility with the characteristic time and intensity decreasing with pH. These results allow us to conclude that the birefringence creation process, associated to local mobility of azobenzenes is independent of the degree of ionization and of number of counterions or co-ions present while the birefringence creation process associated to mobility of chains have its characteristic time and intensity dependent of both degree of ionization and number of counterions. The birefringence relaxation processes are dependent of the degree of ionization. The analysis of the films composition revealed, in addition, the presence of a protonated secondary or tertiary amine revealing that PAZO may have positive charges and consequently a zwitterionic behavior.

  20. Determination of bacterial and viral transport parameters in a gravel aquifer assuming linear kinetic sorption and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallén, G.; Maloszewski, P.; Flynn, R.; Rossi, P.; Engel, M.; Seiler, K.-P.

    2005-05-01

    The bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida, and the bacteriophage virus H40/1 are examined both for their transport behaviour relative to inert solute tracers and for their modelability under natural flow conditions in a gravel aquifer. The microbes are attenuated in the following sequence: H40/1≥ P. putida≫ E. coli. The latter is desorbed almost completely within a few days. Breakthrough and recovery curves of the simultaneously injected non-reactive tracers are simulated with the 2D and 1D dispersion equation, in order to ascertain longitudinal dispersivity ( αL) and mean flow time ( T0). Mathematical modelling is difficult due to the aquifer heterogeneity, which results in preferential flow paths between injection and observation wells. Therefore, any attempt of fitting the dispersion model (DM) to the entire inert-tracer breakthrough curve (BTC) fails. Adequate fitting of the model to measured data only succeeds using a DM consisting of a superposition of several BTCs, each representing another set of flow paths. This gives rise to a multimodal, rather than a Gaussian groundwater velocity distribution. Only hydraulic parameters derived from the fastest partial curve, which is fitted to the rising part of the Uranine BTC, are suitable to model microbial breakthroughs. The hydraulic parameters found using 2D and 1D models were nearly identical. Their values were put into an analytical solution of 1D advective-dispersive transport combined with two-site reaction model introduced by Cameron and Klute [Cameron, D.R., Klute, A., 1977. Convective-dispersive solute transport with a combined equilibrium and kinetic adsorption model. Water Resour. Res. 13, 183-189], in order to identify reactive transport parameters (sorption/desorption) and attenuation mechanisms for the microbes migration. This shows that the microbes are almost entirely transported through preferential flow paths, which are represented by the first partial curve. Inert tracers, however

  1. Geostatistical characteristic of space-time variation in quality parameters in Klodzko water supply system (SW part of Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namysłowska-Wilczyńska, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Selected results of research connected with the development of a (3D) geostatistical hydrogeochemical model of the Klodzko city area, dedicated to the spatial and time variation in the quality parameters in the Klodzko water supply system (SW part of Poland) will be presented. The research covers the period 2007 ÷ 2011. Spatial analyses of the variation in three different quality parameters, i.e. Fe iron [g/m3] content, Mn manganese [g/m3] content and NH4+ ammonium ion [g/m3] content, were carried out. Spatial and time variation in the parameters was analyzed on the basis of the data (2007 ÷ 2011). Thematic databases, containing original data on coordinates X, Y (latitude and longitude) and Z (time - years) and on regionalized variables, i.e. the water quality parameters in the Klodzko water supply system, were created. The input for the studies were the chemical determinations of the quality parameters of water samples taken in the Klodzko water supply system area in different periods of time. These data were subjected to spatial analyses using geostatistical methods. The geostatistical parameters of the assumed theoretical models of directional semivariograms functions of the studied water quality parameters, calculated for the time (years) interval, were used in the ordinary (block) kriging estimation. Generally, the behaviour of the quality parameters in the Klodzko water supply system has been found to vary in space and time. Thanks to the multidirectional spatial analyses some regularities in the variation in the water supply system in the Klodzko city area have been identified. In the considered time interval, the shapes of the directional Fe iron content semivariogram show a tendency to vary periodically. The courses of the directional semivariograms of Mn manganese content and NH4+ ammonium ion content show some tendencies towards directional variation over the passing years: distinctly expressed trends of variability for Mn content and stronger for NH4

  2. Analysis of Changes of Cardiological Parameters at Middle Latitude Region in Relation to Geomagnetic Disturbances and Cosmic Ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papailiou, M.; Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    2010-01-01

    Collaborating scientific groups from Athens (Greece), Baku (Azerbaijan) and Sofia (Bulgaria) have conducted a research work on the possible effects of geomagnetic field disturbances (GMF) and cosmic ray intensity (CRI) variations on human homeostasis, particularly, the cardio-health state. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) of seven functionally healthy persons were digitally registered at the joint Laboratory of Heliobiology located in the Medical Centre INAM, Baku, on working days and Saturdays. Heart rate values, estimated from ECGs, were analysed in relation to daily values of CRI, as measured by the Neutron Monitor of the University of Athens and daily variations of Dst and Ap geomagnetic indices and some significant results had been revealed in previous studies. Researches were continued by study of additional cardiologic parameters estimated from the same ECG data. In this study digital data of RR interval (the time elapsing between two consecutive R waves in the ECG), namely RRminimum, RRmaximum and RRaverage were analyzed taking into consideration different levels of GMF disturbances (estimated through variations of Dst and Ap indices) and cosmic ray activity (through CRI variations). The data refer to the time period 15 July 2006-31 March 2008. Variations of RR intervals show connection to GMF disturbances and CRI variations. The revealed effects are more pronounced for high levels of geomagnetic activity (when geomagnetic storms occur) and large CRI decreases as well as on the days before and after these variations.

  3. TU-C-12A-11: Comparisons Between Cu-ATSM PET and DCE-CT Kinetic Parameters in Canine Sinonasal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, M; Bradshaw, T; Kubicek, L; Forrest, L; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Regions of poor perfusion within tumors may be associated with higher hypoxic levels. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing measurements of hypoxia from Cu-ATSM PET to vasculature kinetic parameters from DCE-CT kinetic analysis. Methods: Ten canine patients with sinonasal tumors received one Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan and three DCE-CT scans prior to treatment. Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were registered and resampled to matching voxel dimensions. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans and for each patient, the resulting kinetic parameter values from the three DCE-CT scans were averaged together. Cu-ATSM SUVs were spatially correlated (r{sub spatial}) on a voxel-to-voxel basis against the following DCE-CT kinetic parameters: transit time (t{sub 1}), blood flow (F), vasculature fraction (v{sub 1}), and permeability (PS). In addition, whole-tumor comparisons were performed by correlating (r{sub ROI}) the mean Cu-ATSM SUV (SUV{sub mean}) with median kinetic parameter values. Results: The spatial correlations (r{sub spatial}) were poor and ranged from -0.04 to 0.21 for all kinetic parameters. These low spatial correlations may be due to high variability in the DCE-CT kinetic parameter voxel values between scans. In our hypothesis, t{sub 1} was expected to have a positive correlation, while F was expected to have a negative correlation to hypoxia. However, in wholetumor analysis the opposite was found for both t{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = -0.25) and F (r{sub ROI} = 0.56). PS and v{sub 1} may depict angiogenic responses to hypoxia and found positive correlations to Cu-ATSM SUV for PS (r{sub ROI} = 0.41), and v{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = 0.57). Conclusion: Low spatial correlations were found between Cu-ATSM uptake and DCE-CT vasculature parameters, implying that poor perfusion is not associated with higher hypoxic regions. Across patients, the most hypoxic tumors tended to have higher blood flow values, which is contrary to our initial hypothesis. Funding

  4. Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Suggestions for studying the topic of variation of individuals and objects (balls) to help develop elementary school students' measurement, comparison, classification, evaluation, and data collection and recording skills are made. General suggestions of variables that can be investigated are made for the study of human variation. Twelve specific…

  5. Carbon reaction and diffusion on Ni(111), Ni(100), and Fe(110): Kinetic parameters from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltner, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Jacob, T.

    2008-08-28

    This paper investigates the reactivity of elemental carbon films deposited from the vapor phase with Fe and Ni substrates at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are presented as a method for evaluating kinetic reaction data. Carbon films are deposited on different surface orientations representing geometries from a dense atom packing as in fcc (111) to an open surface structure as in fcc (100). During annealing experiments several reactions are observed (carbon subsurface diffusion, carbide formation, carbide decomposition, and graphite ordering). These reactions and the respective kinetic parameters are analyzed and quantified by XPS measurements performed while annealing at elevated temperatures (620-820 K). The resulting activation barriers for carbon subsurface diffusion are compared with calculated values using the density functional theory. The determined kinetic parameters are used to reproduce the thermal behavior of carbon films on nickel surfaces.

  6. Effect of Simultaneous Inoculation with Yeast and Bacteria on Fermentation Kinetics and Key Wine Parameters of Cool-Climate Chardonnay

    PubMed Central

    Jussier, Delphine; Dubé Morneau, Amélie; Mira de Orduña, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Inoculating grape musts with wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) concurrently in order to induce simultaneous alcoholic fermentation (AF) and malolactic fermentation (MLF) can be an efficient alternative to overcome potential inhibition of LAB in wines because of high ethanol concentrations and reduced nutrient content. In this study, the simultaneous inoculation of yeast and LAB into must was compared with a traditional vinification protocol, where MLF was induced after completion of AF. For this, two suitable commercial yeast-bacterium combinations were tested in cool-climate Chardonnay must. The time courses of glucose and fructose, acetaldehyde, several organic acids, and nitrogenous compounds were measured along with the final values of other key wine parameters. Sensory evaluation was done after 12 months of storage. The current study could not confirm a negative impact of simultaneous AF/MLF on fermentation success and kinetics or on final wine parameters. While acetic acid concentrations were slightly increased in wines after simultaneous AF/MLF, the differences were of neither practical nor legal significance. No statistically significant differences were found with regard to the final values of pH or total acidity and the concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, glycerol, citric and lactic acids, and the nitrogen compounds arginine, ammonia, urea, citrulline, and ornithine. Sensory evaluation by a semiexpert panel confirmed the similarity of the wines. However, simultaneous inoculation led to considerable reductions in overall fermentation durations. Furthermore, differences of physiological and microbiological relevance were found. Specifically, we report the vinification of “super-dry” wines devoid of glucose and fructose after simultaneous inoculation of yeast and bacteria. PMID:16391046

  7. Effect of simultaneous inoculation with yeast and bacteria on fermentation kinetics and key wine parameters of cool-climate chardonnay.

    PubMed

    Jussier, Delphine; Dubé Morneau, Amélie; Mira de Orduña, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Inoculating grape musts with wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) concurrently in order to induce simultaneous alcoholic fermentation (AF) and malolactic fermentation (MLF) can be an efficient alternative to overcome potential inhibition of LAB in wines because of high ethanol concentrations and reduced nutrient content. In this study, the simultaneous inoculation of yeast and LAB into must was compared with a traditional vinification protocol, where MLF was induced after completion of AF. For this, two suitable commercial yeast-bacterium combinations were tested in cool-climate Chardonnay must. The time courses of glucose and fructose, acetaldehyde, several organic acids, and nitrogenous compounds were measured along with the final values of other key wine parameters. Sensory evaluation was done after 12 months of storage. The current study could not confirm a negative impact of simultaneous AF/MLF on fermentation success and kinetics or on final wine parameters. While acetic acid concentrations were slightly increased in wines after simultaneous AF/MLF, the differences were of neither practical nor legal significance. No statistically significant differences were found with regard to the final values of pH or total acidity and the concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, glycerol, citric and lactic acids, and the nitrogen compounds arginine, ammonia, urea, citrulline, and ornithine. Sensory evaluation by a semiexpert panel confirmed the similarity of the wines. However, simultaneous inoculation led to considerable reductions in overall fermentation durations. Furthermore, differences of physiological and microbiological relevance were found. Specifically, we report the vinification of "super-dry" wines devoid of glucose and fructose after simultaneous inoculation of yeast and bacteria.

  8. Theoretical estimation of kinetic parameters for nucleophilic substitution reactions in solution: an application of a solution translational entropy model.

    PubMed

    Han, Ling-Li; Li, Shi-Jun; Fang, De-Cai

    2016-02-17

    The kinetic parameters, such as activation entropy, activation enthalpy, activation free-energy, and reaction rate constant, for a series of nucleophilic substitution (SN) reactions in solution, are investigated using both a solution-phase translational entropy model and an ideal gas-phase translational entropy model. The results obtained from the solution translational entropy model are in excellent agreement with the experimental values, while the overestimation of activation free-energy from the ideal gas-phase translational entropy model is as large as 6.9 kcal mol(-1). For some of the reactions studied, such as and in methanol, and and in aqueous solution, the explicit + implicit model, namely, a cluster-continuum type model, should be employed to account for the strong solvent-solute interactions. In addition, the explicit + implicit models have also been applied to the DMSO-H2O mixtures, which would open up a door to investigate the reactions in a mixed solvent using density functional theory (DFT) methods.

  9. Optimization of laccase fermentation and evaluation of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of a partially purified laccase produced by Daedalea flavida.

    PubMed

    Singha, Siddhartha; Panda, Tapobrata

    2015-01-01

    Studies on laccase production by Daedalea flavida were carried out in static and low-speed shake cultures. The enzyme production was reduced drastically at a high speed of shaking. Optimal production conditions are necessary to assess the quality of laccase suitable for a specific application. Thus, the production of laccase was optimized by the application of response surface methodology. Laccase production was 8-fold and 7.5-fold more in static and low-speed shake conditions, respectively, in an optimal medium composition than in an unoptimized medium. Laccase obtained using the optimal culture medium of D. flavida was tested for its stability at different temperatures and pH conditions. The partially purified enzyme was most stable at 30°C and pH 5. The half-life of laccase is 87 min at 60°C and at pH 6. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated for the inactivation of the partially purified laccase. The entropy change of inactivation of the enzyme is least at pH 4.

  10. Comparison of dual-echo DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived contrast agent kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Quarles, C Chad; Gore, John C; Xu, Lei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-09-01

    The application of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess brain tumors is often confounded by the extravasation of contrast agent (CA). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier allows CA to leak out of the vasculature leading to additional T(1), T(2) and T(2) relaxation effects in the extravascular space, thereby affecting the signal intensity time course in a complex manner. The goal of this study was to validate a dual-echo DSC-MRI approach that separates and quantifies the T(1) and T(2) contributions to the acquired signal and enables the estimation of the volume transfer constant, K(trans), and the volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space, v(e). To test the validity of this approach, DSC-MRI- and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived K(trans) and v(e) estimates were spatially compared in both 9L and C6 rat brain tumor models. A high degree of correlation (concordance correlation coefficients >0.83, Pearson's r>0.84) and agreement was found between the DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived measurements. These results indicate that dual-echo DSC-MRI can be used to simultaneously extract reliable DCE-MRI kinetic parameters in brain tumors in addition to conventional blood volume and blood flow metrics.

  11. Methane from cattle waste: effects of temperature, hydraulic retention time, and influent substrate concentration on kinetic parameter (k)

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, A.G.

    1982-09-01

    The effects of temperature (35 and 55 degrees C), influent volatile solids (VS) concentration (So equal to 43, 64, 82, 100, 128 kg VS/cu.m) and hydraulic retention time (HRT equal to 4, 5, 8, 10, 15, and 25 days) on methane (CH/sub 4/) production from cattle waste were evaluated using 3-d cu.m laboratory scale fermentors. The highest CH/sub 4/ production rate achieved was 6.11 cu.m CH/sub 4//cu.m fermentor/day at 55 degrees C, four days HRT, and So equal to 100 kg VS/cu.m. Batch fermentations showed an ultimate CH/sub 4/ yield (Bo) of 0.42 cu.m CH/sub 4//kg VS fed. The maximum loading rates for unstressed fermentation were 7 kg VS/cu.m/day at 35 degrees C and 20 kg VS/cu.m/day at 55 degrees C. The kinetic parameter (K, an increasing K indicates inhibition of fermentation) increased exponentially as So increased, and was described by : K equal to 0.8 plus 0.0016e 0.06So. Temperature had no significant effect on K for So between 40 and 100 kg VS/cu.m. The above equation predicted published K values for cattle waste within a mean standard error of 7%. (Refs. 11).

  12. Estimation of kinetic parameters of anthocyanins and color degradation in vitamin C fortified cranberry juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Roidoung, Sunisa; Dolan, Kirk D; Siddiq, Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    Color degradation in cranberry juice during storage is the most common consumer complaint. To enhance nutritional quality, juice is typically fortified with vitamin C. This study determined effect of gallic acid, a natural antioxidant, for the preservation of anthocyanins (ACYs) and color, and estimated kinetics of ACYs and color degradation. Juice, fortified with 40-80mg/100mL vitamin C and 0-320mg/100mL gallic acid, was pasteurized at 85°C for 1min and stored at 23°C for 16days. Total monomeric anthocyanins and red color intensity were evaluated spectrophotometrically and data were used to determine degradation rate constants (k values) and order of reaction (n) of ACYs and color. Due to high correlation, k and n could not be estimated simultaneously. To overcome this difficulty, both n and k were held at different constant values in separate analyses to allow accurate estimation of each. Parameters n and k were modeled empirically as functions of vitamin C, and of vitamin C and gallic acid, respectively. Reaction order n ranged from 1.2 to 4.4, and decreased with increasing vitamin C concentration. The final model offers an effective tool that could be used for predicting ACYs and color retention in cranberry juice during storage.

  13. A New General Method for Simultaneous Fitting of Temperature- and Concentration-Dependence of Reaction Rates Yields Kinetic and Thermodynamic Parameters for HIV Reverse Transcriptase Specificity.

    PubMed

    Li, An; Ziehr, Jessica L; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2017-03-02

    Recent studies have demonstrated the dominant role of induced-fit in enzyme specificity of HIV reverse transcriptase and many other enzymes. However, relevant thermodynamic parameters are lacking and equilibrium thermodynamic methods are of no avail because the key parameters can only determined by kinetic measurement. By modifying KinTek Explorer software, we present a new general method for globally fitting data collected over a range of substrate concentrations and temperatures and apply it to HIV reverse transcriptase. Fluorescence stopped-flow methods were used to record the kinetics of enzyme conformational changes that monitor nucleotide binding and incorporation. The nucleotide concentration dependence was measured at temperatures ranging from 5 to 37C and the raw data were fit globally to derive a single set of rate constants at 37C and a set of activation enthalpy terms to account for the kinetics at all other temperatures. This comprehensive analysis afforded thermodynamic parameters for nucleotide binding (Kd, ΔG, ΔH, ΔS at 37C), and kinetic parameters for enzyme conformational changes and chemistry (rate constants and activation enthalpy). Comparisons between wild-type enzyme and a mutant resistant to nucleoside analogs used to treat HIV infections reveal that the ground state binding is weaker and the activation enthalpy for the conformational change step is significantly larger for the mutant. Further studies to explore the structural underpinnings of the observed thermodynamics and kinetics of the conformational change step may help to design better analogs to treat HIV infections and other diseases. Our new method is generally applicable to enzyme and chemical kinetics.

  14. Measurement of diurnal and semidiurnal rotational variations and tidal parameters of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the determination of diurnal and semidiurnal variations in the rotation rate and the direction of rotation axis of Earth from the analysis of 8 years of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data. This analysis clearly show that these variations are largely periodic and tidally driven; that is, the periods of the variations correspond to the periods of the largest lunar and solar tides. For rotation rate variations, expressed in terms of changes in universal time (UT), the tidal lines with the largest observed signals are O1 (amplitude 23.5 microseconds in time (microseconds), period 25.82 solar hours); KL (18.9 microseconds, 23.93 hours); M2 (17.9 microseconds, 12.54 hours); and S2 (8.6 microseconds, 12.00 hours). For variations in the direction of the rotation axis (polar motion), significant signals exist in the retrograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and S2 tides (amplitudes 265 and 119 microarc seconds (microarc seconds, respectively); the prograde diurnal band at the O1, K1, and P1 tides (amplitudes 199, 152, and 60 microarc seconds, respectively); and the prograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and K2 tides (amplitudes 58 and 39 microarc seconds, respectively). Variations in the retrograde diurnal band are represented by corrections with previous estimates except that a previously noted discrepancy in the 13.66-day nutation (corresponding to the O1 tide) is largely removed in this new analysis. We estimate that the standard deviations of these estimates are 1.0 microseconds for the UT1 variations and 14-16 microarc seconds for the polar motion terms. These uncertainties correspond to surface displacements of approximately 0.5 mm. From the analysis of atmospheric angular momentum data we conclude that variations in UT1 excited by the atmosphere with subdaily periods are small (approximately 1 microsecond). We find that the average radial tidal displacements of the VLBI sites in the diurnal band are largely consistent with known deficiencies in current

  15. Patterns of variation in reproductive parameters in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Erlend B; Linnell, John D C; Odden, John; Samelius, Gustaf; Andrén, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of the variation in demographic rates is central for our ability to understand the evolution of life history strategies and population dynamics, and to plan for the conservation of endangered species. We studied variation in reproductive output of 61 radio-collared Eurasian lynx females in four Scandinavian study sites spanning a total of 223 lynx-years. Specifically, we examined how the breeding proportion and litter size varied among study areas and age classes (2-year-old vs. >2-year-old females). In general, the breeding proportion varied between age classes and study sites, whereas we did not detect such variation in litter size. The lack of differences in litter sizes among age classes is at odds with most findings in large mammals, and we argue that this is because the level of prenatal investment is relatively low in felids compared to their substantial levels of postnatal care.

  16. Hill-type muscle model parameters determined from experiments on single muscles show large animal-to-animal variation.

    PubMed

    Blümel, Marcus; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Hooper, Scott L; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Models built using mean data can represent only a very small percentage, or none, of the population being modeled, and produce different activity than any member of it. Overcoming this "averaging" pitfall requires measuring, in single individuals in single experiments, all of the system's defining characteristics. We have developed protocols that allow all the parameters in the curves used in typical Hill-type models (passive and active force-length, series elasticity, force-activation, force-velocity) to be determined from experiments on individual stick insect muscles (Blümel et al. 2012a). A requirement for means to not well represent the population is that the population shows large variation in its defining characteristics. We therefore used these protocols to measure extensor muscle defining parameters in multiple animals. Across-animal variability in these parameters can be very large, ranging from 1.3- to 17-fold. This large variation is consistent with earlier data in which extensor muscle responses to identical motor neuron driving showed large animal-to-animal variability (Hooper et al. 2006), and suggests accurate modeling of extensor muscles requires modeling individual-by-individual. These complete characterizations of individual muscles also allowed us to test for parameter correlations. Two parameter pairs significantly co-varied, suggesting that a simpler model could as well reproduce muscle response.

  17. Sensitivity of the stability of a waste emplacement drift to variation in assumed rock joint parameters in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, M.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents the results of a numerical analysis to determine the effects of variation of rock joint parameters on stability of waste disposal rooms for vertical emplacement. Conditions and parameters used were taken from the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design report (MacDougall et al., 1987). Mechanical results are presented which illustrate the predicted distribution of stress, joint slip, and room deformations for times of initial excavation and after 50 years heating. 82 refs., 93 figs.

  18. Electron holography study of the temperature variation of the magnetic order parameter within circularly chained nickel nanoparticle rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Akira; Fukunaga, Kei-ichi; Scheinfein, M. R.; Kobayashi, H.; Kitagawa, H.; Tonomura, A.

    2007-12-24

    The magnetic structure within circular chains composed of 30-nm-diameter, polymer-coated nickel particles was studied by electron holography. The magnetic flux closure due to dipolar coupling was confirmed at zero external magnetic field. Its long-range order parameter was determined from the magnitude of the electron phase shift, and it was found to decrease more rapidly than that of bulk nickel as a function of temperature. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the temperature variation of the order-parameter was explained in terms of weakened dipolar coupling field ascribed to the decay of the bulk magnetization and enhanced thermal fluctuations.

  19. Electrical Characterization of 4H-SiC JFET Wafer: DC Parameter Variations for Extreme Temperature IC Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liangyu; Spry, David J.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Chang, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports DC electrical characterization of a 76 mm diameter 4H-SiC JFET test wafer fabricated as part of NASA's on-going efforts to realize medium-scale ICs with prolonged and stable circuit operation at temperatures as high as 500 degC. In particular, these measurements provide quantitative parameter ranges for use in JFET IC design and simulation. Larger than expected parameter variations were observed both as a function of position across the wafer as well as a function of ambient testing temperature from 23 degC to 500 degC.

  20. Variations in environmental tritium doses due to meteorological data averaging and uncertainties in pathway model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kock, A.

    1996-05-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to calculate and compare off site doses from atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site using monthly versus 5 year meteorological data and annual source terms, including additional seasonal and site specific parameters not included in present annual assessments; and (2) to calculate the range of the above dose estimates based on distributions in model parameters given by uncertainty estimates found in the literature. Consideration will be given to the sensitivity of parameters given in former studies.

  1. Net thrust calculation sensitivity of an afterburning turbofan engine to variations in input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Ray, R. J.; Walton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The calculated value of net thrust of an aircraft powered by a General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine was evaluated for its sensitivity to various input parameters. The effects of a 1.0-percent change in each input parameter on the calculated value of net thrust with two calculation methods are compared. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and also gives the estimated accuracy of the overall net thrust calculation as determined from the influence coefficients and estimated parameter measurement accuracies.

  2. Influence of Analogy Instruction for Pitch Variation on Perceptual Ratings of Other Speech Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Andy C. Y.; Wong, Andus W-K.; Ma, Estella P-M.; Whitehill, Tara L.; Masters, Rich S. W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: "Analogy" is the similarity of different concepts on which a comparison can be based. Recently, an analogy of "waves at sea" was shown to be effective in modulating fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) variation. Perceptions of intonation were not examined, as the primary aim of the work was to determine whether…

  3. Estimation of Staphylococcus aureus growth parameters from turbidity data: characterization of strain variation and comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, R

    2006-07-01

    Turbidity methods offer possibilities for generating data required for addressing microorganism variability in risk modeling given that the results of these methods correspond to those of viable count methods. The objectives of this study were to identify the best approach for determining growth parameters based on turbidity data and use of a Bioscreen instrument and to characterize variability in growth parameters of 34 Staphylococcus aureus strains of different biotypes isolated from broiler carcasses. Growth parameters were estimated by fitting primary growth models to turbidity growth curves or to detection times of serially diluted cultures either directly or by using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) approach. The maximum specific growth rates in chicken broth at 17 degrees C estimated by time to detection methods were in good agreement with viable count estimates, whereas growth models (exponential and Richards) underestimated growth rates. Time to detection methods were selected for strain characterization. The variation of growth parameters among strains was best described by either the logistic or lognormal distribution, but definitive conclusions require a larger data set. The distribution of the physiological state parameter ranged from 0.01 to 0.92 and was not significantly different from a normal distribution. Strain variability was important, and the coefficient of variation of growth parameters was up to six times larger among strains than within strains. It is suggested to apply a time to detection (ANOVA) approach using turbidity measurements for convenient and accurate estimation of growth parameters. The results emphasize the need to consider implications of strain variability for predictive modeling and risk assessment.

  4. 'Fractional heating' differential scanning calorimetry: a tool to study energetics and kinetics of solid-state reactions in photoactive systems with distributed parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sworakowski, Juliusz; Nešpůrek, Stanislav

    1998-11-01

    The technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), used in measurements of thermal effects accompanying solid-state chemical reactions, can be regarded as a thermally stimulated method. Model calculations demonstrate the applicability of the DSC technique in determining parameters controlling the kinetics of solid-state reactions. In particular, it has been shown that the fractional heating technique can be successfully used to analyse DSC curves in case of distributions of kinetic parameters. The method was employed to obtain information about the parameters controlling a thermally driven reaction following UV illumination of photoactive 1-methyl-2,4,4,6-tetraphenyl-1,4-dihydropyridine. Two peaks on DSC curves were distinguished, probably corresponding to different processes associated with reactions responsible for the bleaching of the coloured material. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of at least one of them were determined.

  5. Maximising diagnostic information by relating temporal variations in parameter sensitivity to different segments of the flow duration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Strauch, Michael; Reusser, Dominik; Volk, Martin; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Parameter sensitivity analysis is a well-known method to detect the most relevant parameters to reproduce the modelled discharge. In contrast to classical approaches, a temporally resolved analysis provides daily sensitivities and detects dominant model parameters for each time step. Relating the dominant parameters to the corresponding processes enables the investigation of the process relevance in a high temporal resolution and thus, improves the understanding of the dominant processes in the model structure. For this, we used a Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) which is efficient compared to other sensitivity test by requiring only a small number of 315 model runs for nine model parameters. In order to maximize the diagnostically relevant information with low computational demand, the interpretation of the temporal resolved parameter analysis is extended by extracting additional information. We present a model framework consisting of three steps, which was applied to a lowland and a upland catchment in Germany to check its plausibility in two hydrological contrasting catchments. The results of one temporal sensitivity analysis are used in an efficient way to provide three different visualization types with a different focus and aggregation levels. In a first step, the temporal dynamic is analysed in a high resolution with daily time series of parameter sensitivities (TEDPAS). TEDPAS detects the temporal variations in dominant model parameters. Secondly, these results are related to the flow duration curve (FDC) (TEDPAS-FDC) to identify parameter dominances in relation to discharge magnitudes. TEDPAS-FDC emphasizes that high sensitivities of model parameters are related to certain discharges. These relationships are explained by looking at the role of the parameters in the model concept. Thirdly, the parameter sensitivities are monthly averaged and investigated separately for five segments of the FDC (TEDPAS-FDC PATTERN) to detect typical monthly process

  6. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    SciTech Connect

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  7. Signal intensities derived from different NMR probes and parameters contribute to variations in quantification of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Paige; McKay, Ryan T; Finkel, Michael; Karnovsky, Alla; Woehler, Scott; Lewis, Michael J; Chang, David; Stringer, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    We discovered that serious issues could arise that may complicate interpretation of metabolomic data when identical samples are analyzed at more than one NMR facility, or using slightly different NMR parameters on the same instrument. This is important because cross-center validation metabolomics studies are essential for the reliable application of metabolomics to clinical biomarker discovery. To test the reproducibility of quantified metabolite data at multiple sites, technical replicates of urine samples were assayed by 1D-(1)H-NMR at the University of Alberta and the University of Michigan. Urine samples were obtained from healthy controls under a standard operating procedure for collection and processing. Subsequent analysis using standard statistical techniques revealed that quantitative data across sites can be achieved, but also that previously unrecognized NMR parameter differences can dramatically and widely perturb results. We present here a confirmed validation of NMR analysis at two sites, and report the range and magnitude that common NMR parameters involved in solvent suppression can have on quantitated metabolomics data. Specifically, saturation power levels greatly influenced peak height intensities in a frequency-dependent manner for a number of metabolites, which markedly impacted the quantification of metabolites. We also investigated other NMR parameters to determine their effects on further quantitative accuracy and precision. Collectively, these findings highlight the importance of and need for consistent use of NMR parameter settings within and across centers in order to generate reliable, reproducible quantified NMR metabolomics data.

  8. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  9. Using DRS during breast conserving surgery: identifying robust optical parameters and influence of inter-patient variation

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Lisanne L.; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; van Duijnhoven, Frederieke; Peeters-Baas, Marie-Jeanne T. F. D. Vrancken; Van de Vijver, Koen; Loo, Claudette E.; Jóźwiak, Katarzyna; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Successful breast conserving surgery consists of complete removal of the tumor while sparing healthy surrounding tissue. Despite currently available imaging and margin assessment tools, recognizing tumor tissue at a resection margin during surgery is challenging. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), which uses light for tissue characterization, can potentially guide surgeons to prevent tumor positive margins. However, inter-patient variation and changes in tissue physiology occurring during the resection might hamper this light-based technology. Here we investigate how inter-patient variation and tissue status (in vivo vs ex vivo) affect the performance of the DRS optical parameters. In vivo and ex vivo measurements of 45 breast cancer patients were obtained and quantified with an analytical model to acquire the optical parameters. The optical parameter representing the ratio between fat and water provided the best discrimination between normal and tumor tissue, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.94. There was no substantial influence of other patient factors such as menopausal status on optical measurements. Contrary to expectations, normalization of the optical parameters did not improve the discriminative power. Furthermore, measurements taken in vivo were not significantly different from the measurements taken ex vivo. These findings indicate that DRS is a robust technology for the detection of tumor tissue during breast conserving surgery. PMID:28018735

  10. Variation of plasma parameters of vacuum arc column with gap distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic model, we studied long-gap-distance vacuum arcs in a uniform axial magnetic field and determined the effect of gap distance varying in a large range on plasma parameters. Simulation results showed that with increasing gap distance, the parameters of the plasma near the cathode are almost invariant, except for ion number density, but the parameters of the plasma in front of the anode clearly vary; meanwhile, joule heat gradually becomes the main source of energy for the arc column. In a short gap, a clear current constriction can be found in the entire arc column. Whereas when the gap distance exceeds a certain value, a sharp contraction of the current only arises in front of the anode.

  11. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence of K2 Mg(SO4 )2 :Eu and evaluation of its kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Archana; Dhoble, N S; Gedam, S C; Dhoble, S J

    2016-12-02

    The K2 Mg(SO4 )2 :Eu phosphor, synthesized by a solid-state diffusion method, was studied for its photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the material was matched with the standard JCPDF No. 36-1499. For PL characteristics, K2 Mg(SO4 )2 :Eu(2)(+) showed an emission peak at 474 nm when excited at 340 nm, while it showed Eu(3)(+) emission at 580 nm, and 594 nm splitting at 613 nm and 618 nm for an excitation of 396 nm wavelength due to radiative transitions from (5) D0 to (7) Fj (j = 0, 1, 2, 3). The Commission International de I' Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates were also calculated for the K2 Mg(SO4 )2 :Eu phosphor, and were close to the NTSC standard values. For the TL study, the prepared sample was irradiated using a (60) Co source of γ-irradiation at the dose rate of 0.322 kGy/h for 2 min. The formation of traps in K2 Mg (SO4 )2 :Eu and the effects of γ-radiation dose on the glow curve are discussed. Well defined broad glow peaks were obtained at 186°C. With increasing γ-ray dose, the sample showed linearity in intensity. The presence of a single glow peak indicated that there was only one set of traps being activated within the particular temperature range. The presented phosphors were also studied for their fading, reusability and trapping parameters. There was just 2% fading during a period of 30 days, indicating no serious fading problem. Kinetic parameters were calculated using the initial rise method and Chen's half-width method. Activation energy and frequency factor were found to be 0.77 eV and 1.41 × 10(6)  sec(-1) .

  12. Solar cycle variation of the statistical distribution of the solar wind ɛ parameter and its constituent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindale, E.; Chapman, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    We use 20 years of Wind solar wind observations to investigate the solar cycle variation of the solar wind driving of the magnetosphere. For the first time, we use generalized quantile-quantile plots to compare the statistical distribution of four commonly used solar wind coupling parameters, Poynting flux, B2, the ɛ parameter, and vB, between the maxima and minima of solar cycles 23 and 24. We find the distribution is multicomponent and has the same functional form at all solar cycle phases; the change in distribution is captured by a simple transformation of variables for each component. The ɛ parameter is less sensitive than its constituent variables to changes in the distribution of extreme values between successive solar maxima. The quiet minimum of cycle 23 manifests only in lower extreme values, while cycle 24 was less active across the full distribution range.

  13. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED: 2. Estimations of auroral parameters and magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; André, Nicolas; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Jupiter's auroral parameters are estimated from observations by a spectrometer EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) on board Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. EXCEED provides continuous auroral spectra covering the wavelength range over 80-148 nm from the whole northern polar region. The auroral electron energy is estimated using a hydrocarbon color ratio adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED, and the emission power in the long wavelength range 138.5-144.8 nm is used as an indicator of total emitted power before hydrocarbon absorption and auroral electron energy flux. The quasi-continuous observations by Hisaki provide the auroral electron parameters and their relation under different auroral activity levels. Short- (within < one planetary rotation) and long-term (> one planetary rotation) enhancements of auroral power accompany increases of the electron number flux rather than the electron energy variations. The relationships between the auroral electron energy (~70-400 keV) and flux (1026-1027/s, 0.08-0.9 μA/m2) estimated from the observations over a 40 day interval are in agreement with field-aligned acceleration theory when incorporating probable magnetospheric parameters. Applying the electron acceleration theory to each observation point, we explore the magnetospheric source plasma variation during these power-enhanced events. Possible scenarios to explain the derived variations are (i) an adiabatic variation of the magnetospheric plasma under a magnetospheric compression and/or plasma injection, and (ii) a change of the dominant auroral component from the main emission (main aurora) to the emission at the open-closed boundary.

  14. Variations of solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic parameters with solar magnetic multipole fields during Solar Cycles 21-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bogyeong; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study we compare the temporal variations of the solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic (SIG) parameters with that of open solar magnetic flux from 1976 to 2012 (from Solar Cycle 21 to the early phase of Cycle 24) for a purpose of identifying their possible relationships. By the open flux, we mean the average magnetic field over the source surface (2.5 solar radii) times the source area as defined by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model of the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO). In our result, most SIG parameters except the solar wind dynamic pressure show rather poor correlations with the open solar magnetic field. Good correlations are recovered when the contributions from individual multipole components are counted separately. As expected, solar activity indices such as sunspot number, total solar irradiance, 10.7 cm radio flux, and solar flare occurrence are highly correlated with the flux of magnetic quadrupole component. The dynamic pressure of solar wind is strongly correlated with the dipole flux, which is in anti-phase with Solar Cycle (SC). The geomagnetic activity represented by the Ap index is correlated with higher order multipole components, which show relatively a slow time variation with SC. We also found that the unusually low geomagnetic activity during SC 23 is accompanied by the weak open solar fields compared with those in other SCs. It is argued that such dependences of the SIG parameters on the individual multipole components of the open solar magnetic flux may clarify why some SIG parameters vary in phase with SC and others show seemingly delayed responses to SC variation.

  15. Neutron diffraction measurements and micromechanical modelling of temperature-dependent variations in TATB lattice parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, John D.; Luscher, Darby J.; Vogel, Sven C.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W.

    2016-02-02

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. TATB-based explosives exhibit irreversible volume expansion (“ratchet growth”) when thermally cycled. A theoretical understanding of the relationship between anisotropy of the crystal, crystal orientation distribution (texture) of polycrystalline aggregates, and the intergranular interactions leading to this irreversible growth is necessary to accurately develop physics-based predictive models for TATB-based PBXs under various thermal environments. In this work, TATB lattice parameters were measured using neutron diffraction during thermal cycling of loose powder and a pressed pellet. The measured lattice parameters help clarify conflicting reports in the literature as these new results are more consistent with one set of previous results than another. The lattice parameters of pressed TATB were also measured as a function of temperature, showing some differences from the powder. This data is used along with anisotropic single-crystal stiffness moduli reported in the literature to model the nominal stresses associated with intergranular constraints during thermal expansion. The texture of both specimens were characterized and the pressed pellet exhibits preferential orientation of (001) poles along the pressing direction, whereas no preferred orientation was found for the loose powder. Lastly, thermal strains for single-crystal TATB computed from lattice parameter data for the powder is input to a self-consistent micromechanical model, which predicts the lattice parameters of the constrained TATB crystals within the pellet. The agreement of these model results with the diffraction data obtained from the pellet is discussed along with future directions of research.

  16. Neutron diffraction measurements and micromechanical modelling of temperature-dependent variations in TATB lattice parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Yeager, John D.; Luscher, Darby J.; Vogel, Sven C.; ...

    2016-02-02

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. TATB-based explosives exhibit irreversible volume expansion (“ratchet growth”) when thermally cycled. A theoretical understanding of the relationship between anisotropy of the crystal, crystal orientation distribution (texture) of polycrystalline aggregates, and the intergranular interactions leading to this irreversible growth is necessary to accurately develop physics-based predictive models for TATB-based PBXs under various thermal environments. In this work, TATB lattice parameters were measured using neutron diffraction during thermal cycling of loose powder and a pressed pellet. The measured lattice parameters help clarify conflicting reports in the literaturemore » as these new results are more consistent with one set of previous results than another. The lattice parameters of pressed TATB were also measured as a function of temperature, showing some differences from the powder. This data is used along with anisotropic single-crystal stiffness moduli reported in the literature to model the nominal stresses associated with intergranular constraints during thermal expansion. The texture of both specimens were characterized and the pressed pellet exhibits preferential orientation of (001) poles along the pressing direction, whereas no preferred orientation was found for the loose powder. Lastly, thermal strains for single-crystal TATB computed from lattice parameter data for the powder is input to a self-consistent micromechanical model, which predicts the lattice parameters of the constrained TATB crystals within the pellet. The agreement of these model results with the diffraction data obtained from the pellet is discussed along with future directions of research.« less

  17. The effects of the variations of turbulence parameters on the observable turbulence statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2016-06-01

    In order to study how the statistical properties of the observational quantities of the turbulent molecular cloud models vary with different turbulence parameters, I use the artificially generated random numerical models based on Gaussian fields created by the code PYFC with different values of the 1D density Fourier spectral index βn, the turbulence driving parameter, i.e. the b parameter and the 1D Fourier velocity power spectral index βv. Then I calculate the line profiles of 13CO emission on every sight line. I derive the statistical properties of column density N, line intensity W, peak intensity Tpeak and velocity dispersion Vrms on every sight line. I discover that as βn increases, (1) the standard deviations σln (N/) and σln (W/) of the logarithmic column density ln (N/) and the logarithmic integrated intensity ln (W/) increase; (2) the number of the low Tpeak values becomes larger; (3) the probability distribution function (PDF) of Vrms inclines to left a little. As the b parameter increases, (1) the values of both σln (N/) and σln (W/) increase; (2) the numbers of both the low Tpeak values and the saturated Tpeak values become larger; (3) the PDF of Vrms inclines to left obviously. As βv increases, (1) the PDF of ln (W/) remains generally unchanged; (2) the PDF of Tpeak remains generally unchanged; (3) the PDF of Vrms inclines to left obviously. I also discuss the relationship among σN/, Mach number, the b parameter and βn.

  18. Latitudinal variations of cloud base height and lightning parameters in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E. R.; Boccippio, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed reduction in cloud-to-ground lightning in the new-equational zone is examined from the perspective of the width of the main negative charge region. Thermodynamic observations of cloud base height also show a climatological minimum value in the near-equatorial region. The association of low cloud base with both narrow updrafts and narrow changing zones may impede the bridging of the large air gap to ground, and thereby suppress cloud-to-ground lightning activity. This width dependence may be more important than the approx. 10% variation in height of the freezing level in the encouraging flashes to ground.

  19. Multivariate statistical analysis of diffusion imaging parameters using partial least squares: Application to white matter variations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Konukoglu, Ender; Coutu, Jean-Philippe; Salat, David H; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is a unique technology that allows the noninvasive quantification of microstructural tissue properties of the human brain in healthy subjects as well as the probing of disease-induced variations. Population studies of dMRI data have been essential in identifying pathological structural changes in various conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases (Salat et al., 2010; Rosas et al., 2006). The most common form of dMRI involves fitting a tensor to the underlying imaging data (known as diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI), then deriving parametric maps, each quantifying a different aspect of the underlying microstructure, e.g. fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity. To date, the statistical methods utilized in most DTI population studies either analyzed only one such map or analyzed several of them, each in isolation. However, it is most likely that variations in the microstructure due to pathology or normal variability would affect several parameters simultaneously, with differing variations modulating the various parameters to differing degrees. Therefore, joint analysis of the available diffusion maps can be more powerful in characterizing histopathology and distinguishing between conditions than the widely used univariate analysis. In this article, we propose a multivariate approach for statistical analysis of diffusion parameters that uses partial least squares correlation (PLSC) analysis and permutation testing as building blocks in a voxel-wise fashion. Stemming from the common formulation, we present three different multivariate procedures for group analysis, regressing-out nuisance parameters and comparing effects of different conditions. We used the proposed procedures to study the effects of non-demented aging, Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment on the white matter. Here, we present results demonstrating that the proposed PLSC-based approach can differentiate between effects of

  20. A size-based emphysema severity index: robust to the breath-hold-level variations and correlated with clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Lee, Minho; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the power-law exponents (D) of emphysema hole-size distributions as a competent emphysema index. Robustness to extreme breath-hold-level variations and correlations with clinical parameters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were investigated and compared to a conventional emphysema index (EI%). Patients and methods A total of 100 patients with COPD (97 males and three females of mean age 67±7.9 years) underwent multidetector row computed tomography scanning at full inspiration and full expiration. The diameters of the emphysematous holes were estimated and quantified with a fully automated algorithm. Power-law exponents (D) of emphysematous hole-size distribution were evaluated. Results The diameters followed a power-law distribution in all cases, suggesting the scale-free nature of emphysema. D of inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography of patients showed intraclass correlation coefficients >0.8, indicating statistically absolute agreement of different breath-hold levels. By contrast, the EI% failed to agree. Bland–Altman analysis also revealed the superior robustness of D to EI%. D also significantly correlated with clinical parameters such as airflow limitation, diffusion capacity, exercise capacity, and quality of life. Conclusion The D of emphysematous hole-size distribution is robust to breath-hold-level variations and sensitive to the severity of emphysema. This measurement may help rule out the confounding effects of variations in breath-hold levels. PMID:27536095

  1. Tumor response parameters for head and neck cancer derived from tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.

    2013-03-15

    -and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is equal to 3.8 mean potential doubling times, which agrees with 4.0 mean potential doubling times obtained previously for lung SCC. Conclusions: The distribution of cell survival fractions obtained in this study support the hypothesis that the tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer can be described by the two-level cell population tumor-volume model. This model can be used for in vivo evaluation of patient-specific radiobiological parameters that are needed for tumor-control probability evaluation.

  2. An optimal output feedback gain variation scheme for the control of plants exhibiting gross parameter changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, Daniel D.

    1987-01-01

    A concept for optimally designing output feedback controllers for plants whose dynamics exhibit gross changes over their operating regimes was developed. This was to formulate the design problem in such a way that the implemented feedback gains vary as the output of a dynamical system whose independent variable is a scalar parameterization of the plant operating point. The results of this effort include derivation of necessary conditions for optimality for the general problem formulation, and for several simplified cases. The question of existence of a solution to the design problem was also examined, and it was shown that the class of gain variation schemes developed are capable of achieving gain variation histories which are arbitrarily close to the unconstrained gain solution for each point in the plant operating range. The theory was implemented in a feedback design algorithm, which was exercised in a numerical example. The results are applicable to the design of practical high-performance feedback controllers for plants whose dynamics vary significanly during operation. Many aerospace systems fall into this category.

  3. Uniform Invariance Principle and Synchronization. Robustness with Respect to Parameter Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, H. M.; Alberto, L. F. C.; Bretas, N. G.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain uniform estimates, with respect to parameters, of the attractor and of the basin of attraction of a dynamical system and to apply these results to analyze the roughness of the synchronization of two subsystems. These estimates are obtained through a uniform version of the invariance principle of La Salle which is stated and proved in this work.

  4. Horizontal Scale Variations in Satellite Estimates of Weather Erosion Parameters for Reentry Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-26

    Bo Dt ntered)_________________ TOO READ INSTRUCTIONS="r’nT 00C9, IN PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM -. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3- RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER s...WORDS (Continue o fde aIn ice.ay ei fdenrily by block nuibeF) Weather satellites Environmental severity index Infrared sensors Liquid water content...weather erosion parameter known as the Environmental Severity Index (ESI) has been estimated-using infrared and visible data from satellites. Cloud

  5. Variational optimization of sub-grid scale convection parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zivkovic-Rothman, M.

    1997-11-25

    Under the DOE CHAMMP/CLIMATE Program, a convective scheme was developed for use in climate models. The purpose of the present study was to develop an adjoint model of its tangent-linear model. the convective scheme was integrated within a single column model which provides radiative-convective equilibrium solutions applicable to climate models. The main goal of this part of the project was to develop an adjoint of the scheme to facilitate the optimization of its convective parameters. For that purpose, adjoint sensitivities were calculated with the adjoint code. Parameter optimization was based on TOGA COARE data which were also used in this study to obtain integrations of the nonlinear and tangent-linear models as well as the integrations of the adjoint model. Some inadequacies of the inner IFA data array were found, and did not permit a single numerical integration during the entire 4 months of data. However, reliable monthly radiative-convective equilibrium solutions and associated adjoint sensitivities were obtained and used to bring about the parameter optimization.

  6. Variation in Immune Parameters and Disease Prevalence among Lesser Black-Backed Gulls (Larus fuscus sp.) with Different Migratory Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Arriero, Elena; Müller, Inge; Juvaste, Risto; Martínez, Francisco Javier; Bertolero, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control infections is a key trait for migrants that must be balanced against other costly features of the migratory life. In this study we explored the links between migration and disease ecology by examining natural variation in parasite exposure and immunity in several populations of Lesser Black-backed Gulls (Larus fuscus) with different migratory strategies. We found higher activity of natural antibodies in long distance migrants from the nominate subspecies L.f.fuscus. Circulating levels of IgY showed large variation at the population level, while immune parameters associated with antimicrobial activity showed extensive variation at the individual level irrespective of population or migratory strategy. Pathogen prevalence showed large geographical variation. However, the seroprevalence of one of the gull-specific subtypes of avian influenza (H16) was associated to the migratory strategy, with lower prevalence among the long-distance migrants, suggesting that migration may play a role in disease dynamics of certain pathogens at the population level. PMID:25679797

  7. Spatial variation of sea surface temperature and flux-related parameters measured from aircraft in the JASIN experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Katsaros, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    Spatial variation of some parameters measured on two aircraft flying 100-km box and 200-km triangular patterns at low levels in the atmospheric boundary layer during the Joint Air Sea Interaction Experiment in the North Atlantic was studied. The variation should be representative of summer conditions in mid-latitude oceans. The variance density of remotely sensed sea surface temperature, corrected for sky reflection, is found to depend on the one-dimensional wave number raised to the power of approximately -5/3. Nonuniform clouds add low-frequency variance to observations of a downward looking radiometer and result in steeper slope of the spectra of uncorrected sea surface temperature. Turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and moisture were determined with the bulk formulae from the parameters (wind speed, temperature, specific humidity, and sea surface temperature) measured from the aircraft. The averages of these fluxes over each flight leg were compared with the fluxes determined from the parameters averaged over the same leg. The difference is negligible, showing that spatially averaged observations, such as those from spaceborne sensors, can be used in the bulk formulae to evaluate the fluxes.

  8. Variation in plasmonic (electronic) spectral parameters of Pr (III) and Nd (III) with varied concentration of moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Shubha; Limaye, S. N.

    2015-07-31

    It is said that the -4f shells behave as core and are least perturbed by changes around metal ion surrounding. However, there are evidences that-4f shells partially involved in direct moderator interaction. A systematic investigation on the plasmonic (electronic) spectral studies of some Rare Earths[RE(III).Mod] where, RE(III) = Pr(III),Nd(III) and Mod(moderator) = Y(III),La(III),Gd(III) and Lu(III), increased moderator concentration from 0.01 mol dm{sup −3} to 0.025 mol dm{sup −3} keeping the metal ion concentration at 0.01mol dm{sup −3} have been carried out. Variations in oscillator strengths (f), Judd-Ofelt parameters (T{sub λ}),inter-electronic repulsion Racah parameters (δE{sup k}),nephelauxetic ratio (β), radiative parameters (S{sub ED},A{sub T},β{sub R},T{sub R}). The values of oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters have been discussed in the light of coordination number of RE(III) metal ions, denticity and basicity of the moderators. The [RE(III).Mod] bonding pattern has been studies in the light of the change in Racah parameters and nephelauxetic ratio.

  9. Retention-temperature and endurance characteristics of the MNOS capacitor with processing variations as parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. M.; Li, S. S.

    1987-09-01

    The p+-gridded MNOS capacitor, which enables us to simulate the operational characteristics of the MNOS FET, was used to study the effects of temperature on the retention characteristics and of endurance stress on the Si/SiO 2 interface-state density and retention characteristics of the MNOS capacitors fabricated under four different processing conditions. The differences in the retention characteristics of these devices were interpreted in terms of the chemical compositions and structures arising from the different processing conditions and were used to infer relative nitride trap depths in these devices. The increase in the Si/SiO 2 interface-state density and the deterioration in the retention characteristics resulting from endurance stress were explained in terms of variations in chemical composition and structure.

  10. Variation of Linear and Nonlinear Parameters in the Swim Strokes According to the Level of Expertise.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Goh, Wan Xiu; Morais, Jorge E; Costa, Mário J

    2016-08-19

    The aim was to examine the variation of linear and nonlinear proprieties of the behaviour in participants with different levels of swimming expertise among the four swim strokes. Seventy-five swimmers were split into three groups (highly qualified experts, experts and non-experts) and performed a maximal 25m trial for each of the four competitive swim strokes. A speed-meter cable was attached to the swimmer's hip to measure hip speed; from which speed fluctuation (dv), approximate entropy (ApEn) and fractal dimension (D) variables were derived. Although simple main effects of expertise and swim stroke were obtained for dv and D, no significant interaction of expertise and stroke were found except in ApEn. The ApEn and D were prone to decrease with increasing expertise. As a conclusion, swimming does exhibit nonlinear properties but its magnitude differs according to the swim stroke and level of expertise of the performer.

  11. Studies on the seasonal variation of atmospheric electricity parameters at a tropical station in Kolkata, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, S. S.; Paul, Suman; Barui, S.; Pal, Pinaki; Bandyopadhyay, B.; Kala, D.; Ghosh, A.

    2013-12-01

    The paper deals with the analyses of the atmospheric vertical potential gradient (PG) from the ground for 90 fair weather days during 2006-2009 measured at Kolkata (Lat: 22.56°N). The variations of PG have been studied extensively to investigate their values during monsoon and winter seasons. Higher values of PG at Kolkata are observed due to higher abundance of pollutant particles. The observed PG are compared with the results of Potsdam station (Lat: 52°N) and Johannesburg station (Lat: 26°S), with 9 years data and 2 years data respectively. The correlations studies are carried out among PG, PDC (Point Discharge Current) as well as negative and positive carrier conductivities. The corresponding correlation coefficients are obtained as 0.93, -0.842 and -0.844.

  12. Robust evaluation of statistical surface topography parameters using focus-variation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, E. N.; Gould, M.; Mujica-Schwann, N. P.

    2016-09-01

    Spatial bandwidth limitations frequently introduce large biases into the estimated values of rms roughness and autocorrelation length that are extracted from topography data on random rough surfaces. The biases can be particularly severe for focus-variation microscopy data because of the reduced lateral resolution (and therefore dynamic range) inherent in the technique. In this paper, we describe a measurement protocol—something similar to a deconvolution algorithm—that greatly reduces these biases. The measurement protocol is developed for the case of surfaces that are isotropic, and whose topography displays an autocovariance function that is exponential, with a single autocorrelation length. The protocol is first validated against Monte Carlo-generated mock surfaces of this form that have been filtered so as to simulate the lateral resolution and field-of-view limits of a particular commercial focus-variation microscope. It is found that accurate values of roughness and autocorrelation length can be extracted over a four octave range in autocorrelation length by applying the protocol, whereas errors without applying the protocol are a minimum of 30% even at the absolute optimum autocorrelation length. Then, microscopy data on eleven examples of rough, outdoor building materials are analyzed using the protocol. Even though the samples were not in any way selected to conform to the model’s assumptions, we find that applying the protocol yields extracted values of roughness and autocorrelation length for each surface that are highly consistent among datasets obtained at different magnifications (i.e. datasets obtained with different spatial bandpass limits). Publication of the US Government, not subject to copyright.

  13. Towards noninvasive method for the detection of pathological tissue variations by mapping different blood parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Omar; Qananwah, Qasem; Abo Alam, Kawther; Bolz, Armin

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the development of an early detection method for probing pathological tissue variations. The method could be used for classifying various tissue alteration namely tumors tissue or skin disorders. The used approach is based on light scattering and absorption spectroscopy. Spectral content of the scattered light provides diagnostic information about the tissue contents. The importance of this method is using a safe light that has less power than the used in the imaging methods that will enable the frequent examination of tissue, while the exiting modalities have drawbacks like ionization, high cost, time-consuming, and agents' usage. A modality for mapping the oxygen saturation distribution in tissues noninvasively is new in this area of research, since this study focuses on the oxygen molecule in the tissue which supposed to be homogenously distributed through the tissues. Cancers may cause greater vascularization and greater oxygen consumption than in normal tissue. Therefore, oxygen existence and homogeneity will be alternated depending on the tissue state. In the proposed system, the signal was extracted after illuminating the tissue by light emitting diodes (LED's) that emits light in two wavelengths, red (660 nm) and infrared (880 nm). The absorption in these wavelengths is mainly due to oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) while other blood and tissue contents nearly have low effect on the signal. The backscattered signal which is received by a photodiodes array (128 PDs) was measured and processed using LabVIEW. Photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals have been measured at different locations. These signals will be used to differentiate between the normal and the pathological tissues. Variations in hemoglobin concentration and blood perfusion will also be used as an important indication feature for this purpose.

  14. Breed variation and genetic parameters for growth and body development in diverse beef cattle genotypes.

    PubMed

    Afolayan, R A; Pitchford, W S; Deland, M P B; McKiernan, W A

    2007-02-01

    Conformation scores can account for more than 20% of cattle price variation at Australian livestock sales. However, there are limited available references which define genetic factors relating objective live developmental traits to carcass composition. Weaning and post-weaning weight, height, length, girth, muscle (ratio of stifle to hip width) and fat depth of 1202 progeny from mature Hereford cows (637) mated to seven sire breeds (Jersey, Wagyu, Angus, Hereford, South Devon, Limousin and Belgian Blue) were examined for growth and development across ages. Crossbred Wagyu and Jersey were both lighter in weight and smaller in size (height, length and girth) than purebred Hereford and crossbred Angus, South Devon, Limousin and Belgian Blue. Within the five larger crossbreds, there were significant changes in relative weight from weaning to 600 days. Sire breeds differed in fat depth, with Angus being the fattest (9% on average fatter than Hereford and Wagyu), and Jersey 5% less fat than Hereford, followed by South Devon and Limousin (19% lower than Hereford) and Belgian Blue (39% lower than Hereford). Direct heritability ranged from 19 to 42% and was higher than the proportion of total phenotypic variance accounted for by maternal effects (which ranged from 0 to 17%) for most body measurement traits except for weight (38 v. 18%) and girth (36 v. 9%) traits at weaning, an indication of maternal effect on some body conformation traits at early ages. Muscularity (19 to 44%) and fat depth (26 to 43%) were moderately to highly heritable across ages. There were large differences for growth and the objective measures of body development between crossbreds with a degree of overlap among the progeny of the seven sire breeds. The variation between genetic (positive) and environmental (negative) correlations for dry versus wet season average daily gains in weight and fat, suggested the potential use of live-animal conformation traits for within breed selection of genetically

  15. Reproductive parameters of tropical lesser noddies respond to local variations in oceanographic conditions and weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticelli, David; Ramos, Jaime A.; Catry, Teresa; Pedro, Patricia; Paiva, Vitor H.

    2014-02-01

    Most attempts to link seabirds and climate/oceanographic effects have concerned the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with comparatively few studies in the tropical Indian Ocean. This paper examines the reproductive response of the lesser noddy Anous tenuirostris to temporal fluctuations in oceanographic and climatic conditions using 8 years of monitoring data from Aride Island (Seychelles), tropical Western Indian Ocean. We tested the hypothesis that breeding parameters (mean hatching date, mean egg size, hatching and fledging successes) and chick growth are influenced by local, seasonal oceanographic conditions as expressed by ocean primary productivity (surface chlorophyll-a concentrations; CC), sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed. We also examined the relationship between lesser noddy breeding parameters and climate conditions recorded at the basin-wide scale of the Indian Ocean (Indian Ocean Dipole Mode Index, DMI). Our findings suggest that birds had a tendency to lay slightly larger eggs during breeding seasons (years) with higher CC during April-June (pre-laying, laying and incubation periods). Hatching date was positively related to SST in April-June, with the regression parameters suggesting that each 0.5 °C increase in SST meant a delay of approx.10 days in hatching date. A negative linear relationship was also apparent between hatching success and SST in June-August (hatching and chick-rearing periods), while the quadratic regression models detected a significant effect of wind speed in June-August on fledging success. Body mass increments of growing chicks averaged over 7-day periods were positively related with (2-week) lagged CC values and negatively related with (2-week) lagged SST values. No significant relationship between DMI and lesser noddy breeding parameters was found, but DMI indices were strongly correlated with local SST. Altogether, our results indicate that the reproduction of this top marine predator is dictated by fluctuations in

  16. Analysis of the Intra-City Variation of Urban Heat Island and its Relation to Land Surface/cover Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerçek, D.; Güven, İ. T.; Oktay, İ. Ç.

    2016-06-01

    Along with urbanization, sealing of vegetated land and evaporation surfaces by impermeable materials, lead to changes in urban climate. This phenomenon is observed as temperatures several degrees higher in densely urbanized areas compared to the rural land at the urban fringe particularly at nights, so-called Urban Heat Island. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect is related with urban form, pattern and building materials so far as it is associated with meteorological conditions, air pollution, excess heat from cooling. UHI effect has negative influences on human health, as well as other environmental problems such as higher energy demand, air pollution, and water shortage. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect has long been studied by observations of air temperature from thermometers. However, with the advent and proliferation of remote sensing technology, synoptic coverage and better representations of spatial variation of surface temperature became possible. This has opened new avenues for the observation capabilities and research of UHIs. In this study, "UHI effect and its relation to factors that cause it" is explored for İzmit city which has been subject to excess urbanization and industrialization during the past decades. Spatial distribution and variation of UHI effect in İzmit is analysed using Landsat 8 and ASTER day & night images of 2015 summer. Surface temperature data derived from thermal bands of the images were analysed for UHI effect. Higher temperatures were classified into 4 grades of UHIs and mapped both for day and night. Inadequate urban form, pattern, density, high buildings and paved surfaces at the expanse of soil ground and vegetation cover are the main factors that cause microclimates giving rise to spatial variations in temperatures across cities. These factors quantified as land surface/cover parameters for the study include vegetation index (NDVI), imperviousness (NDISI), albedo, solar insolation, Sky View Factor (SVF), building envelope

  17. Variation of the Earth Tide-Seismicity Compliance Parameter the Last 50 Years for the South Himalaya Fault, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Arabelos, D. N.; Vergos, G.; Scordilis, E. M.; Spatalas, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the results of our studies for the tidal triggering effect on the seismicity of the Hellenic area, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance p as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence. In this paper, by the occasion of the recent catastrophic earthquake of Nepal, we investigate the variation of the index p for the South Himalaya Fault area. The preliminary results indicate positive correlation of the index p with seismicity, for all the tidal periods. We suggest that this compliance parameter p may be used as an additional element for the seismic risk assessment.

  18. Robustness properties of apoptosis models with respect to parameter variations and intrinsic noise.

    PubMed

    Eissing, T; Allgöwer, F; Bullinger, E

    2005-12-01

    Analyses of different robustness aspects for models of the direct signal transduction pathway of receptor-induced apoptosis is presented. Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death, removing unwanted cells within multicellular organisms to maintain a proper balance between cell reproduction and death. Its signalling pathway includes an activation feedback loop that generates bistable behaviour, where the two steady states can be seen as 'life' and 'death'. Inherent robustness, widely recognised in biological systems, is of major importance in apoptosis signalling, as it guarantees the same cell fate for similar conditions. First, the influence of the stochastic nature of reactions indicating a role for inhibition reactions as noise filters and justifying a deterministic approach in the further analyses is evaluated. Second, the robustness of the bistable threshold with respect to parameter changes is evaluated by statistical methods, showing the need to balance both the forward and the back part of the activation loop. These analyses can also discriminate between the models favouring the model consistent with novel biological findings. The parameter robustness analyses are also applicable to other signal transduction networks, as several have been shown to display bistable behaviour. These methods therefore have a range of possible applications in systems biology not only to measure robustness, but also for model discrimination.

  19. Geographic variation on biological parameters of Meccus picturatus (Usinger), 1939 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ibarra, José Alejandro; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; del Toro-González, Ana Karen; Ventura-Anacleto, Luis Ángel; Montañez-Valdez, Oziel D

    2015-06-01

    The biological parameters related to the life cycles of three populations of Meccus picturatus (Usinger) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), one of the main vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas (Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae), were evaluated. A cohort of each of three populations from geographically isolated localities in western Mexico was maintained under similar laboratory conditions, after which all three populations were compared to each other. In each cohort, 50.9 to 72.1% of nymphs completed the cycle. The average time from N1 to adult was approximately 175 days and different for the three studied cohorts. The number of blood meals between molts varied from one to three. The hatching rates as well as the fecundity per female per day were different among the three studied populations. Our results show that the three isolated populations are statistically different in some parameters from each other, which points to the importance of studying the biological characteristics of local populations of triatomines for estimating their capacity of transmitting T. cruzi to reservoir hosts.

  20. Anomalous Variation in GPS TEC, Land and Ocean Parameters Prior to 3 Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Kunvar; Karia, Sheetal P.; Pathak, Kamlesh N.

    2016-02-01

    The present study reports the analysis of GPS TEC prior to 3 earthquakes ( M > 6.0). The earthquakes are: (1) Loyalty Island (22°36'S, 170°54'E) on 19 January 2009 ( M = 6.6), (2) Samoa Island (15°29'S, 172°5'W) on 30 August 2009 ( M = 6.6), and (3) Tohoku (38°19'N, 142°22'E) on 11 March 2011 ( M = 9.0). In an effort to search for a precursory signature we analysed the land and ocean parameters prior to the earthquakes, namely SLHF (Land) and SST (Ocean). The GPS TEC data indicate an anomalous behaviour from 1-13 days prior to earthquakes. The main purpose of this study was to explore and demonstrate the possibility of any changes in TEC, SST, and SLHF before, during and after the earthquakes which occurred near or beneath an ocean. This study may lead to better understanding of response of land, ocean, and ionosphere parameters prior to seismic activities.

  1. Parameter variation and scenario analysis in impact assessments of emerging energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hanna Marie

    There is a global need for energy technologies that reduce the adverse impacts of societal progress and that address today's challenges without creating tomorrow's problems. Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) can support technology developers in achieving these prerequisites of sustainability by providing a systems perspective. However, modeling the early-stage scale up and impacts of technology systems may lead to unreliable or incomplete results due to a lack of representative technical, spatial, and temporal data. The goal of this dissertation is to support the acceleration of clean energy technology development by providing information about the regional variation of impacts and benefits resulting from plausible deployment scenarios. Three emerging energy technologies are selected as case studies: (1) brine management for carbon dioxide sequestration; (2) carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and sequestration; (3) stationary fuel cells for combined heat and power in commercial buildings. In all three case studies, priority areas are identified where more reliable data and models are necessary for reducing uncertainty, and vital information is revealed on how impacts vary spatially and temporally. Importantly, moving away from default technology and waste management hierarchies as a source of data fosters goal-driven systems thinking which in turn leads to the discovery of technology improvement potentials.

  2. Spatial variation of physicochemical and bacteriological parameters elucidation with GIS in Rangat Bay, Middle Andaman, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dheenan, P. S.; Jha, Dilip Kumar; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Ponmalar, A. Angelin; Venkateshwaran, P.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration, distribution of bacteria and physicochemical property of surface seawater in Rangat Bay, Middle Andaman, Andaman Islands (India). The bay experiences tidal variations. Perhaps physicochemical properties of seawater in Rangat Bay were found not to vary significantly. The concentration of faecal streptococci was high (2.2 × 103 CFU/100 mL) at creek and harbour area, whereas total coliforms were high (7.0 × 102 CFU/100 mL) at mangrove area. Similarly, total heterotrophic bacterial concentration was high (5.92 × 104 CFU/100 mL) in mangrove and harbour area. The Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus concentration was high (4.2 × 104 CFU/100 mL and 9 × 103 CFU/100 mL) at open sea. Cluster analysis showed grouping of stations in different tidal periods. The spatial maps clearly depicted the bacterial concentration pattern in the bay. The combined approach of multivariate analysis and spatial mapping techniques was proved to be useful in the current study.

  3. Impact of Parameter Variation in Fabrication of Nanostructure by Atomic Force Microscopy Nanolithography

    PubMed Central

    Dehzangi, Arash; Larki, Farhad; Hutagalung, Sabar D.; Goodarz Naseri, Mahmood; Majlis, Burhanuddin Y.; Navasery, Manizheh; Hamid, Norihan Abdul; Noor, Mimiwaty Mohd

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the fabrication of Silicon nanostructure patterned on lightly doped (1015 cm−3) p-type silicon-on-insulator by atomic force microscope nanolithography technique. The local anodic oxidation followed by two wet etching steps, potassium hydroxide etching for silicon removal and hydrofluoric etching for oxide removal, are implemented to reach the structures. The impact of contributing parameters in oxidation such as tip materials, applying voltage on the tip, relative humidity and exposure time are studied. The effect of the etchant concentration (10% to 30% wt) of potassium hydroxide and its mixture with isopropyl alcohol (10%vol. IPA ) at different temperatures on silicon surface are expressed. For different KOH concentrations, the effect of etching with the IPA admixture and the effect of the immersing time in the etching process on the structure are investigated. The etching processes are accurately optimized by 30%wt. KOH +10%vol. IPA in appropriate time, temperature, and humidity. PMID:23776479

  4. Variation in water chemistry parameters in the Clayburn Creek watershed, British Columbia during fall 2015.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Janmaat, A.; Clemence, E.; Faber, A.; Yakemchuk, A.; McCabe, M.; Toner, A.; Strangway, A.; Turner, S.; Sidhu, D.; Sidhu, B.; Sekhton, J.; Puri, K.; Paulson, D.; Mahil, G.; Leffers, R.; Kanda, S.; Gaultier, M.; Dhaliwal, H.

    2015-12-01

    faculty and students from the University of the Fraser Valley have conducted the time series sampling of water chemistry of the Fraser River at Fort Langley and five Fraser Valley tributaries as a member of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) organized by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. Clayburn Creek and Willband Creek in Abbotsford, British Columbiahave been part of this project and have been sampled for nutrient and major ion concentrations and parameters such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH and turbidity. This watershed is being threatened by increasing anthropogenic activity (agricultural, industrial and residential development) that may threaten the salmon that spawn in this watershed. Documenting the change in the water chemistry in this watershed as the seasons progress from a dry summer to a wet fall will yield a greater understanding of our impact on this watershed and may assist our attempts to protect this watershed.

  5. Relationship between human physiological parameters and geomagnetic variations of solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    Results presented concern influence of increased geomagnetic activity on some human physiological parameters. The blood pressure and heart rate of 86 volunteers were measured on working days in autumn 2001 (01/10 09/11) and in spring 2002 (08/04 28/05). These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained and analysed. Questionnaire information about subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also gathered. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The factors were the following: (1) planetary geomagnetic activity level estimated by Ap-index and divided into five levels; (2) gender males and females; (3) blood pressure degree persons in the group examined were divided into hypotensive, normotensive and hypertensive. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors’ levels. The average arterial blood pressure of the group was found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity level. The average increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure of the group examined reached 9%. This effect was present irrespectively of gender. Results obtained suppose that hypertensive persons have the highest sensitivity and the hypotensive persons have the lowest sensitivity of the arterial blood pressure to increase of geomagnetic activity. The results did not show significant changes in the heart rate. The percentage of the persons who reported subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also found to increase significantly with the geomagnetic activity increase and the highest sensitivity was revealed for the hypertensive females.

  6. Seasonal variation in physicochemical parameters and heavy metals in water of Upper Lake of Bhopal.

    PubMed

    Virha, Rachna; Biswas, A K; Kakaria, V K; Qureshi, T A; Borana, K; Malik, Neetu

    2011-02-01

    Heavy metal pollution of fresh water is the single most important environmental threat to the future. Upper Lake is a freshwater lake, which is the major source of drinking water in the city of Bhopal, the capital city of M.P., the central province of India, but due to anthropogenic activities this lake is being polluted. During the investigation heavy metals and physicochemical parameters were analyzed to determine the water quality seasonally in the year of 2006 and 2007. All the physicochemical parameters except DO (6.50-6.97 mg l⁻¹), Free CO₂ (0.8-1.6 mg l⁻¹) and BOD (5.47-6.85 mg l⁻¹) were below the prescribed limit as recommended by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) for drinking water standards. In case of heavy metals, Ni (0.173-0.253 mg l⁻¹) and Cr (0.047-0.087 mg l⁻¹) were found beyond the prescribed limits (0.02 and 0.05 mg l⁻¹, respectively), whereas Pb (0.057-0.087 mg l⁻¹), Cu (0.016-0.020 mg l⁻¹) and Hg (0.0006-0.0011 mg l⁻¹) were within the safe limit. This study reveals that water of upper lake is partially polluted with heavy metals. It is recommended that strict vigilance and constant monitoring are needed to maintain water quality of the lake, which is a major source of potable water for the Bhopal city.

  7. Displacement cascades and defect annealing in tungsten, Part III: The sensitivity of cascade annealing in tungsten to the values of kinetic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-07-01

    Object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations have been performed to investigate various aspects of cascade aging in bulk tungsten and to determine the sensitivity of the results to the kinetic parameters. The primary focus is on how the kinetic parameters affect the initial recombination of defects in the first few ns of a simulation. The simulations were carried out using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) code KSOME (kinetic simulations of microstructure evolution), using a database of cascades obtained from results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at various primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies and directions at temperatures of 300, 1025 and 2050 K. The OKMC model was parameterized using defect migration barriers and binding energies from ab initio calculations. Results indicate that, due to the disparate mobilities of SIA and vacancy clusters in tungsten, annealing is dominated by SIA migration even at temperatures as high as 2050 K. For 100 keV cascades initiated at 300 K recombination is dominated by annihilation of large defect clusters. But for all other PKA energies and temperatures most of the recombination is due to the migration and rotation of small SIA clusters, while all the large SIA clusters escape the cubic simulation cell. The inverse U-shape behavior exhibited by the annealing efficiency as a function of temperature curve, especially for cascades of large PKA energies, is due to asymmetry in SIA and vacancy clustering assisted by the large difference in mobilities of SIAs and vacancies. This annealing behavior is unaffected by the dimensionality of SIA migration persists over a broad range of relative mobilities of SIAs and vacancies.

  8. A method for the deductive and unique determination of the values of three parameters involved in fractional functions applicable to relaxation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sakoda, M; Hiromi, K

    1976-12-01

    A novel method is proposed to determine deductively and uniquely the values of three parameters, a, b, and c in a fractional function of the form, y=a+bx/(c+x) where x and y are experimentally obtainable variables. This type of equation is frequently encountered in chemistry and biochemistry involving relaxation kinetics. The method of least squares with the Taylor expansion is employed for direct curve fitting of observed data to the fractional function. Approximate values of the parameters, which are always necessary prior to commending the above procedure, can be obtained by the method of rearrangement after canceling the denominator of fractional functions. This procedure is very simple, but very effective for estimating provisional values of the parameters. Deductive and unique determination of the parameters involved in the fractional function shown above can be accomplished for the first time by the combination of these two procedures. This method is extended to include the analysis of relaxation kinetic data such as those of temperature-jump method where the determination of equilibrium concentrations of reactants in addition to the three parameters is also necessary.

  9. A novel population balance model to investigate the kinetics of in vitro cell proliferation: part II. Numerical solution, parameters' determination, and model outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Sarah; Cincotti, Alberto; Cao, Giacomo

    2012-03-01

    Based on the general theoretical model developed in Part I of this work, a series of numerical simulations related to the in vitro proliferation kinetics of adherent cells is here presented. First the complex task of assigning a specific value to all the parameters of the proposed population balance (PB) model is addressed, by also highlighting the difficulties arising when performing proper comparisons with experimental data. Then, a parametric sensitivity analysis is performed, thus identifying the more relevant parameters from a kinetics perspective. The proposed PB model can be adapted to describe cell growth under various conditions, by properly changing the value of the adjustable parameters. For this reason, model parameters able to mimic cell culture behavior under microgravity conditions are identified by means of a suitable parametric sensitivity analysis. Specifically, it is found that, as the volume growth parameter is reduced, proliferation slows down while cells arrest in G0/G1 or G2/M depending on the initial distribution of cell population. On the basis of this result, model capabilities have been tested by means of a proper comparison with literature experimental data related to the behavior of synchronized and not-synchronized cells under micro- and standard gravity levels.

  10. Variation of thermal parameters in two different color morphs of a diurnal poison toad, Melanophryniscus rubriventris (Anura: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Eduardo A; Vaira, Marcos; Quiroga, Lorena B; Akmentins, Mauricio S; Pereyra, Laura C

    2014-04-01

    We study the variation in thermal parameters in two contrasting populations Yungas Redbelly Toads (Melanophryniscus rubriventris) with different discrete color phenotypes comparing field body temperatures, critical thermal maximum and heating rates. We found significant differences in field body temperatures of the different morphs. Temperatures were higher in toads with a high extent of dorsal melanization. No variation was registered in operative temperatures between the study locations at the moment of capture and processing. Critical thermal maximum of toads was positively related with the extent of dorsal melanization. Furthermore, we founded significant differences in heating rates between morphs, where individuals with a high extent of dorsal melanization showed greater heating rates than toads with lower dorsal melanization. The color pattern-thermal parameter relationship observed may influence the activity patterns and body size of individuals. Body temperature is a modulator of physiological and behavioral functions in amphibians, influencing daily and seasonal activity, locomotor performance, digestion rate and growth rate. It is possible that some growth constraints may arise due to the relationship of color pattern-metabolism allowing different morphs to attain similar sizes at different locations instead of body-size clines.

  11. The Social Network of Tracer Variations and O(100) Uncertain Photochemical Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, D. D.; Labute, M.; Chowdhary, K.; Debusschere, B.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Simulating the atmospheric cycles of ozone, methane, and other radiatively important trace gases in global climate models is computationally demanding and requires the use of 100's of photochemical parameters with uncertain values. Quantitative analysis of the effects of these uncertainties on tracer distributions, radiative forcing, and other model responses is hindered by the "curse of dimensionality." We describe efforts to overcome this curse using ensemble simulations and advanced statistical methods. Uncertainties from 95 photochemical parameters in the trop-MOZART scheme were sampled using a Monte Carlo method and propagated through 10,000 simulations of the single column version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The variance of the ensemble was represented as a network with nodes and edges, and the topology and connections in the network were analyzed using lasso regression, Bayesian compressive sensing, and centrality measures from the field of social network theory. Despite the limited sample size for this high dimensional problem, our methods determined the key sources of variation and co-variation in the ensemble and identified important clusters in the network topology. Our results can be used to better understand the flow of photochemical uncertainty in simulations using CAM and other climate models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the DOE Office of Science through the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC).

  12. Impact of process parameters on the breakage kinetics of poorly water-soluble drugs during wet stirred media milling: a microhydrodynamic view.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Afolawemi; Akinlabi, Olakemi; Bilgili, Ecevit

    2014-01-23

    Wet stirred media milling has proven to be a robust process for producing nanoparticle suspensions of poorly water-soluble drugs. As the process is expensive and energy-intensive, it is important to study the breakage kinetics, which determines the cycle time and production rate for a desired fineness. Although the impact of process parameters on the properties of final product suspensions has been investigated, scant information is available regarding their impact on the breakage kinetics. Here, we elucidate the impact of stirrer speed, bead concentration, and drug loading on the breakage kinetics via a microhydrodynamic model for the bead-bead collisions. Suspensions of griseofulvin, a model poorly water-soluble drug, were prepared in the presence of two stabilizers: hydroxypropyl cellulose and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and rheometry were used to characterize them. Various microhydrodynamic parameters including a newly defined milling intensity factor was calculated. An increase in either the stirrer speed or the bead concentration led to an increase in the specific energy and the milling intensity factor, consequently faster breakage. On the other hand, an increase in the drug loading led to a decrease in these parameters and consequently slower breakage. While all microhydrodynamic parameters provided significant physical insight, only the milling intensity factor was capable of explaining the influence of all parameters directly through its strong correlation with the process time constant. Besides guiding process optimization, the analysis rationalizes the preparation of a single high drug-loaded batch (20% or higher) instead of multiple dilute batches.

  13. Radiative heating and cooling in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus and responses to atmospheric and spectroscopic parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2015-11-01

    A sophisticated radiative transfer model that considers absorption, emission, and multiple scattering by gaseous and particulate constituents over the broad spectral range 0.125-1000 μm is applied to calculate radiative fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km). Responses of these quantities to spectroscopic and atmospheric parameter variations are examined in great detail. Spectroscopic parameter studies include the definition of an optimum spectral grid for monochromatic calculations as well as comparisons for different input data with respect to spectral line databases, continuum absorption, line shape factors, and solar irradiance spectra. Atmospheric parameter studies are based on distinct variations of an initial model data set. Analyses of actual variations of the radiative energy budget using atmospheric features that have been recently retrieved from Venus Express data will be subject of a subsequent paper. The calculated cooling (heating) rates are very reliable at altitudes below 95 (85) km with maximum uncertainties of about 0.25 K/day. Heating uncertainties may reach 3-5 K/day at 100 km. Using equivalent Planck radiation as solar insolation source in place of measured spectra is not recommended. Cooling rates strongly respond to variations of atmospheric thermal structure, while heating rates are less sensitive. The influence of mesospheric minor gas variations is small, but may become more important near the cloud base and in case of episodic SO2 boosts. Responses to cloud mode 1 particle abundance changes are weak, but variations of other mode parameters (abundances, cloud top and base altitudes) may significantly alter radiative temperature change rates up to 50% in Venus' lower mesosphere and upper troposphere. A new model for the unknown UV absorber for two altitude domains is proposed. It is not directly linked to cloud particle modes and permits an investigation of radiative effects regardless of

  14. Meta-analysis of magnitudes, differences and variation in evolutionary parameters.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, M B

    2016-10-01

    Meta-analysis is increasingly used to synthesize major patterns in the large literatures within ecology and evolution. Meta-analytic methods that do not account for the process of observing data, which we may refer to as 'informal meta-analyses', may have undesirable properties. In some cases, informal meta-analyses may produce results that are unbiased, but do not necessarily make the best possible use of available data. In other cases, unbiased statistical noise in individual reports in the literature can potentially be converted into severe systematic biases in informal meta-analyses. I first present a general description of how failure to account for noise in individual inferences should be expected to lead to biases in some kinds of meta-analysis. In particular, informal meta-analyses of quantities that reflect the dispersion of parameters in nature, for example, the mean absolute value of a quantity, are likely to be generally highly misleading. I then re-analyse three previously published informal meta-analyses, where key inferences were of aspects of the dispersion of values in nature, for example, the mean absolute value of selection gradients. Major biological conclusions in each original informal meta-analysis closely match those that could arise as artefacts due to statistical noise. I present alternative mixed-model-based analyses that are specifically tailored to each situation, but where all analyses may be implemented with widely available open-source software. In each example meta-re-analysis, major conclusions change substantially.

  15. [Study of variations in hematologic parameters in rugby players undergoing physical training at a high altitude].

    PubMed

    Bizzaro, N

    1989-05-01

    Thirty-three well-trained rugby players, ranging in age from 18 to 30 years, were studied during basal training for one year. Peripheral blood parameters and iron metabolism indices were investigated before, during and at the end of the season. The hematologic status showed no substantial changes with respect to physical activity even if considered by age and team-role. However, a significant reduction (P less than 0.001) in RBC count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum iron, plasma transferrin and ferritin, was observed when compared with those obtained from a group of healthy untrained controls. Since the decrease in serum iron and ferritin concentrations was significant so as to justify a similar reduction in Hb and Ht values, two pathogenic mechanisms must be considered: e.g., a moderate hemodilution secondary to plasma expansion combined with a decrease in iron stores caused by chronic iron loss through feces, profound sweat and urine. The present study demonstrates that mild anemia (sports anemia) may develop in well-trained rugby players with heavy physical work load, due to increased plasma volume with a relative thinning of RBCs. This pseudo-anemic condition is associated with a reduction in iron stores which can lead to a true iron-deficiency anemia. A yearly blood test and, if necessary, iron supplementation could prevent this condition.

  16. Variation of Biophysical Parameters of the Skin with Age, Gender, and Body Region

    PubMed Central

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Babakoohi, Shahab; Sarraf-Yazdy, Maryam; Fanian, Ferial; Kazerouni-Timsar, Ali; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Dowlati, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Understanding the physiological, chemical, and biophysical characteristics of the skin helps us to arrange a proper approach to the management of skin diseases. Objective. The aim of this study was to measure 6 biophysical characteristics of normal skin (sebum content, hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity) in a normal population and assess the effect of sex, age, and body location on them. Methods. Fifty healthy volunteers in 5 age groups (5 males and females in each) were enrolled in this study. A multifunctional skin physiology monitor (Courage & Khazaka electronic GmbH, Germany) was used to measure skin sebum content, hydration, TEWL, erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity in 8 different locations of the body. Results. There were significant differences between the hydration, melanin index, and elasticity of different age groups. Regarding the locations, forehead had the highest melanin index, where as palm had the lowest value. The mean values of erythema index and melanin index and TEWL were significantly higher in males and anatomic location was a significant independent factor for all of 6 measured parameters. Conclusion. Several biophysical properties of the skin vary among different gender, age groups, and body locations. PMID:22536139

  17. The first orbital parameters and period variation of the short-period eclipsing binary AQ Boo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Liyun; Pi, Qingfeng; Han, Xianming L.; Zhang, Xiliang; Lu, Hongpeng; Wang, Daimei; Li, TongAn

    2016-10-01

    We obtained the first VRI CCD light curves of the short-period contact eclipsing binary AQ Boo, which was observed on March 22 and April 19 in 2014 at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, and on January 20, 21 and February 28 in 2015 at Kunming station of Yunnan Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. Using our six newly obtained minima and the minima that other authors obtained previously, we revised the ephemeris of AQ Boo. By fitting the O-C (observed minus calculated) values of the minima, the orbital period of AQ Boo shows a decreasing tendency P˙ = - 1.47(0.17) ×10-7 days/year. We interpret the phenomenon by mass transfer from the secondary (more massive) component to the primary (less massive) one. By using the updated Wilson & Devinney program, we also derived the photometric orbital parameters of AQ Boo for the first time. We conclude that AQ Boo is a near contact binary with a low contact factor of 14.43%, and will become an over-contact system as the mass transfer continues.

  18. Variations of magnetic and electrostatic atmospheric parameters and dynamics of the heart rate in mHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagorskiy, Petr; Zenchenko, Tatiana; Breus, Tamara; Smirnov, Sergey

    The objective of this work was to study the degree of synchronization of heart rate (HR) of healthy volunteers with magnetic variations and various weather conditions in mHz - frequency range. Experimental results for synchronic registration of physiological variations, atmospheric electrical and meteorological parameters with a time resolution of 0.5-1 min are presented. The experiment was conducted in a building of IMCES SB RAS (Tomsk). 15 experiments of 60 minutes each were conducted, and four volunteers of all ages in a state of rest were examined. Meteorological parameters (atmospheric pressure, relative air humidity and temperatureas well as a wind speed) were measured using standard meteorological devices located on the roof of the same building and also on the open area. Data on geomagnetic activity on the nearest magnetic station Klyichi were obtained from the site http://ottawa.intermagnet.org/apps/download/index-eng.php # view. The electric field intensity was recorded the following way: in the room (5-storey panel ferroconcrete building) by the autonomous fluxmeter CS110 at a distance of 1.5 meters from the investigated volunteers, and on the open test - area by the stationary electric fluxmeter "Field 2". Data analysis techniques were: cross-correlation analysis, spectral analysis (Fourier transform and the calculation of the coherence function) and wavelet analysis. It was found that the dependence of the heart rate variation dynamics from the X-component of the Earth magnetic field magnitude was observed in 53% of cases, from the relative humidity - in 33%, from the atmospheric pressure, the wind speed and intensity of the electric field in an open area - in 20%, from the intensity the electric field in the room of the experiment - in 7% of cases. It was found not only coincidence of observed values of oscillation periods in physiological and geophysical series lasting 5-30 minutes, but also moments of approximate synchronicity in their appearance

  19. Diurnal variation in Wingate-test performance and associated electromyographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, Hamdi; Zarrouk, Nidhal; Chaouachi, Anis; Dogui, Mohamed; Behm, David G; Chamari, Karim; Hug, François; Souissi, Nizar

    2011-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate time-of-day effects on electromyographic (EMG) activity changes during a short-term intense cycling exercise. In a randomized order, 22 male subjects were asked to perform a 30-s Wingate test against a constant braking load of 0.087 kg·kg(-1) body mass during two experimental sessions, which were set up either at 07:00 or 17:00 h. During the test, peak power (P(peak)), mean power (P(mean)), fatigue index (FI; % of decrease in power output throughout the 30 s), and evolution of power output (5-s span) throughout the exercise were analyzed. Surface EMG activity was recorded in both the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles throughout the test and analyzed over a 5-s span. The root mean square (RMS) and mean power frequency (MPF) of EMG were calculated. Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) was estimated from the ratio of power to RMS. Resting core temperature, P(peak), P(mean), and FI were significantly higher (p < .05) in the evening than morning test (e.g., P(peak): 11.6 ± 0.8 vs. 11.9 ± 1 W·kg(-1)). The results showed that power output decreased following two phases. During the first phase (first 20s), power output decreased rapidly and values were higher (p < .05) in the evening than in the morning. During the second phase (last 10s), power decreased slightly and appeared independent of the time of day of testing. This power output decrease was paralleled by evolution of the MPF and NME. During the first phase, NME and MPF were higher (p < .05) in the evening. During the second phase, NME and MPF were independent of time of day. In addition, no significant differences were noticed between 7:00 and 17:00 h for EMG RMS during the whole 30 s. Taken together, these results suggest that peripheral mechanisms (i.e., muscle power and fatigue) are more likely the cause of the diurnal variation of the Wingate-test performance rather than central mechanisms.

  20. Variation of plasma protein parameters in four free-ranging reindeer herds and in captive reindeer under defined feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    Säkkinen, H; Tverdal, A; Eloranta, E; Dahl, E; Holand, Ø; Saarela, S; Ropstad, E

    2005-12-01

    Plasma total protein (TP), albumin (ALB) and globulin (GLOB) concentrations and albumin/globulin ratio (A/G) were analysed from blood samples collected from free-ranging reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) herds at varying times of year. The same parameters were followed in nine captive reindeer with varying protein and energy intake. Variation in the blood constituents of free-ranging reindeer was analysed in relation to different extrinsic and intrinsic factors and compared to findings from captive animals, allowing the analysis of effects of protein and energy intake. There was large overall variation in TP, ALB, GLOB and A/G ratio in the free-ranging animals, ranging between 36-110 g/L, 18-59 g/L, 17-59 g/L and 0.5-2.1. The variation between months and years was significant for all variables except the A/G ratio, where no year effect was noted. Increase in live body mass was associated with a small significant increase and pregnancy with a small significant decrease in all dependent variables, except for the A/G ratio. Age did not have a significant effect on any of the blood constituents when body mass was included in the same model. In captive animals, feeding lichens with low protein content was related to a significant decline in TP, ALB and GLOB, but not in the A/G ratio, whereas feeding commercial ration increased plasma TP, ALB and GLOB significantly. Extrinsic factors such as season and year explained majority of variation in the blood constituents of free-ranging reindeer, whereas body mass, pregnancy and age had only a minor influence. It is concluded that plasma TP and ALB, and to a lesser extent GLOB and A/G ratio may serve as nutritional biomarkers of reindeer.

  1. A review on zinc and nickel adsorption on natural and modified zeolite, bentonite and vermiculite: examination of process parameters, kinetics and isotherms.

    PubMed

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E

    2013-05-15

    Adsorption and ion exchange can be effectively employed for the treatment of metal-contaminated wastewater streams. The use of low-cost materials as sorbents increases the competitive advantage of the process. Natural and modified minerals have been extensively employed for the removal of nickel and zinc from water and wastewater. This work critically reviews existing knowledge and research on the uptake of nickel and zinc by natural and modified zeolite, bentonite and vermiculite. It focuses on the examination of different parameters affecting the process, system kinetics and equilibrium conditions. The process parameters under investigation are the initial metal concentration, ionic strength, solution pH, adsorbent type, grain size and concentration, temperature, agitation speed, presence of competing ions in the solution and type of adsorbate. The system's performance is evaluated with respect to the overall metal removal and the adsorption capacity. Furthermore, research works comparing the process kinetics with existing reaction kinetic and diffusion models are reviewed as well as works examining the performance of isotherm models against the experimental equilibrium data.

  2. Temporal variations in parameters reflecting terminal-electron-accepting processes in an aquifer contaminated with waste fuel and chlorinated solvents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Jennifer T.; Smith, Erik W.; Long, David T.; Hyndman, David W.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Klug, Michael J.; Velbel, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    A fundamental issue in aquifer biogeochemistry is the means by which solute transport, geochemical processes, and microbiological activity combine to produce spatial and temporal variations in redox zonation. In this paper, we describe the temporal variability of TEAP conditions in shallow groundwater contaminated with both waste fuel and chlorinated solvents. TEAP parameters (including methane, dissolved iron, and dissolved hydrogen) were measured to characterize the contaminant plume over a 3-year period. We observed that concentrations of TEAP parameters changed on different time scales and appear to be related, in part, to recharge events. Changes in all TEAP parameters were observed on short time scales (months), and over a longer 3-year period. The results indicate that (1) interpretations of TEAP conditions in aquifers contaminated with a variety of organic chemicals, such as those with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, must consider additional hydrogen-consuming reactions (e.g., dehalogenation); (2) interpretations must consider the roles of both in situ (at the sampling point) biogeochemical and solute transport processes; and (3) determinations of microbial communities are often necessary to confirm the interpretations made from geochemical and hydrogeological measurements on these processes.

  3. Variability of OH rotational temperatures on time scales from hours to 15 years by kinetic temperature variations, emission layer changes, and non-LTE effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Rotational temperatures derived from hydroxyl (OH) line emission are frequently used to study atmospheric temperatures at altitudes of about 87 km. While the measurement only requires intensities of a few bright lines of an OH band, the interpretation can be complicated. Ground-based temperatures are averages for the entire, typically 8 km wide emission layer. Variations in the rotational temperature are then caused by changes of the kinetic temperature and the OH emission profile. The latter can also be accompanied by differences in the layer-averaged efficiency of the thermalisation of the OH rotational level populations. Since this especially depends on the frequency of collisions with O_2, which is low at high altitudes, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) contribution to the measured temperatures can be significant and variable. In order to understand the impact of the different sources of OH rotational temperature variations from time scales of hours to a solar cycle, we have studied spectra from the astronomical echelle spectrographs X-shooter and UVES located at Cerro Paranal in Chile. While the X-shooter data spanning 3.5 years allowed us to measure temperatures for 25 OH and two O_2 bands, the UVES spectra cover no more than 10 OH bands simultaneously but a period of about 15 years. These data have been complemented by kinetic temperature and OH and O_2 emission profiles from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. Taking the O_2 and SABER kinetic temperatures as reference and considering the different band-dependent emission profiles, we could evaluate the contribution of non-LTE effects to the measured OH rotational temperatures depending on line set, band, and time. Non-LTE contributions are significant for most bands and can exceed 10 K. The amplitudes of their average nocturnal and seasonal variation are of the order of 1 to 2 K.

  4. [Diurnal variation of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of cotton functional leaves under effects of soil salinity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-wei; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Ming-xing; Zhou, Ling-ling; Chen, Bing-lin; Zhou, Zhi-guo

    2011-07-01

    A two-year (2007-2008) pot experiment with cotton varieties Sumian 12 (salinity-sensitive) and Zhongmiansuo 44 (salinity-tolerance) was conducted at the Pailou experimental station of Nanjing Agricultural University to study the diurnal variation of the gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of cotton functional leaves under five levels (0, 0.35%, 0.60% , 0.85%, and 1.00%) of soil salinity. With the increase of soil salinity, the concentrations of Na+, Cl-, and Mg2+ in functional leaves increased, whereas the concentrations of K+ and Ca2+ decreased. The salinity level <0. 35% had little effects on the gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, but that >0.35% depressed the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) dramatically. At the salinity level >0.35%, the sensitivity of functional leaves to daytime photon flux density (PFD) and air temperature (Ta) enhanced, which in turn resulted in more severe photo- and temperature inhibition, and changed the diurnal variation patterns of Pn and stomatal conductance (Gs) from a one-peak curve to a constantly decreasing one. Along with the variations of daytime PED and Ta, the diurnal variation patterns of the maximum photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)), quantum yield of electron transport (phi(PS II), and photochemical quenching coefficient (q(P)) of functional leaves presented a V-shaped curve, with the minimum value appeared at 12:00-13:00, while the non-photochemical quenching coefficient (q(N)) showed a single-peak curve. Soil salinity decreased the F(v)/F(m), phi(PS II), and q(P) significantly, but increased the q(N) and enlarged its change trend. The comparatively low concentrations of Na+ and Cl- and the relatively high concentrations of K+ and Ca2+ in salt-tolerant Zhongmiansuo 44 functional leaves benefited the relative stability of PS II, and the maintenance of a relatively high thermal dissipation capacity could be one of the reasons for a high level of Pn at high salinity level.

  5. Plasma parameters and active species kinetics in CF4/O2/Ar gas mixture: effects of CF4/O2 and O2/Ar mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmyung; Kwon, Kwang-Ho; Efremov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of both CF4/O2 and O2/Ar mixing ratios in three-component CF4/O2/Ar mixture on plasma parameters, densities and fluxes of active species determining the dry etching kinetics were analyzed. The investigation combined plasma diagnostics by Langmuir probes and zero-dimensional plasma modeling. It was found that the substitution of CF4 for O2 at constant fraction of Ar in a feed gas produces the non-monotonic change in F atom density, as it was repeatedly reported for the binary CF4/O2 gas mixtures. At the same time, the substitution of Ar for O2 at constant fraction of CF4 results in the monotonic increase in F atom density toward more oxygenated plasmas. The natures of these phenomena as well as theirs possible impacts on the etching/polymerization kinetics were discussed in details.

  6. Parameter identifiability and Extended Multiple Studies Analysis of a compartmental model for human vitamin A kinetics: fixing fractional transfer coefficients for the initial steps in the absorptive process.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjin; Green, Michael H

    2014-03-28

    In the existing compartmental models of human vitamin A metabolism, parameters related to the absorption of the isotopic oral dose have not been well identified. We hypothesised that fixing some poorly identified parameters related to vitamin A absorption would improve parameter identifiability and add statistical certainty to such models. In the present study, data for serum vitamin A kinetics in nine subjects given [2H8]retinyl acetate orally and a model with absorption fixed at 75 % were used to test this hypothesis. In addition to absorption efficiency, we fixed two other fractional transfer coefficients: one representing the initial processing of the ingested dose and the other representing the direct secretion of retinol bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP) from enterocytes into the plasma. The Windows version of Simulation, Analysis and Modeling software (WinSAAM) was used to fit serum tracer data v. time for each subject. Then, a population model was generated by WinSAAM's Extended Multiple Studies Analysis. All the parameters had fractional standard deviations < 0·5, and none of the pairs of parameters had a correlation coefficient >0·8 (accepted criteria for well-identified parameters). Similar to the values predicted by the original model, total traced mass for retinol was 1160 (sd 468) μmol, and the time for retinol to appear in the plasma bound to RBP was 31·3 (sd 4·4) h. In conclusion, we suggest that this approach holds promise for advancing compartmental modelling of vitamin A kinetics in humans when the dose must be administered orally.

  7. Variation of the pinning force with microstructure and with the Ginzburg-Landau parameter in Type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Javier, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    The variation of the pinning force with microstructure and with the Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied for 53 vanadium and vanadium alloy specimens. Vanadium-carbide precipitates are used as pinning centers. The Ginzburg-Landau parameter is varied by alloying the vanadium with small quantities of gallium or niobium. Alloy compositions of V-0.20a/oGa, V-1.05a/oGa, V-2.96a/oGa, and V-4.01a/oNb are used. These yield a range of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter from less than 2 for the pure vanadium specimens, to more than 20 for the V-2.96a/oGa specimens. The pinning force is not described by a universal scaling law for all specimens. The pinning force for a specific reduced magnetic field is determined by the depinning mechanism active at that field. There are at least three depinning mechanisms. Two of these can be identified with the plastic-deformation mechanism and the line-pinning mechanism, which are predicted by Kramer. A previously unidentified depinning mechanism is the prevailing factor in specimens with large pinning centers. The empirical line-pinning force of the specimens varies with the individual precipitate volume cubed times the density of precipitates. The pinning force in the plastic-deformation region varies as the cube-root of the density of precipitates. A dependence on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter squared can be observed for the magnitude of the pinning force for most of the reduced field regions.

  8. Variations of immune parameters in the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus after infection with enteritis pathogen of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Xiao, Dongxue

    2016-03-01

    Enteritis has been increasingly recognized as one of the major obstacles for the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus mass culture success. In the present study, the intestinal bacteria strains of the lined seahorses H. erectus suffered from enteritis were isolated, then their pathogenicities were confirmed by artificial infection, and one pathogenic bacteria strain named DS3 was obtained. The median lethal dose (LD50) of strain DS3 for 10 days was determined. The seahorses with different infection levels of uninfected (control), early stage of infection (ESI) and late stage of infection (LSI) were respectively sampled at 0, 3, 6 and 9 days post infection, and 12 immune parameters in the plasma were analyzed. The strain DS3 identified with a biochemical test combined with a molecular method was Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and its LD50 for 10 days was 1.3 × 10(3) cfu/fish. Six parameters including monocytes/leucocytes, leucocytes phagocytic rate, interleukin-2, interferon-α, lysozyme and immunoglobulin M exhibited a generally similar variation trend: highest in the control, second in the ESI and lowest in the LSI throughout the entire experiment. In view of the infection level of V. parahaemolyticus to H. erectus is largely decided by the seahorse's own immune capacity, therefore, these immune parameters were high in the non- or slightly infected seahorses, and low in the severely infected individuals may be an indicator for immune level. These immune parameters may be reliable indicators for the juvenile and broodstock quality assessment. Moreover, clarification of the enteritis pathogen also provides guidances for targeted medicine choice for the lined seahorse.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of free vibration characteristics of an in situ railway concrete sleeper to variations of rail pad parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Remennikov, Alex M.

    2006-11-01

    The vibration of in situ concrete sleepers in a railway track structure is a major factor causing cracking of prestressed concrete sleepers and excessive railway track maintenance cost. Not only does the ballast interact with the sleepers, but the rail pads also take part in affecting their free vibration characteristics. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of free vibration behaviors of an in situ railway concrete sleeper (standard gauge sleeper), incorporating sleeper/ballast interaction, subjected to the variations of rail pad properties. Through finite element analysis, Timoshenko-beam and spring elements were used in the in situ railway concrete sleeper modeling. This model highlights the influence of rail pad parameters on the free vibration characteristics of in situ sleepers. In addition, information on the first five flexural vibration modes indicates the dynamic performance of railway track when using different types of rail pads, as it plays a vital role in the cracking deterioration of concrete sleepers.

  10. Stratification based on reproductive state reveals contrasting patterns of age-related variation in demographic parameters in the kittiwake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Monnat, J.-Y.

    2000-01-01

    Heterogeneity in individual quality can be a major obstacle when interpreting age-specific variation in life-history traits. Heterogeneity is likely to lead to within-generation selection, and patterns observed at the population level may result from the combination of hidden patterns specific to subpopulations. Population-level patterns are not relevant to hypotheses concerning the evolution of age-specific reproductive strategies if they differ from patterns at the individual level. We addressed the influence of age and a variable used as a surrogate of quality (yearly reproductive state) on survival and breeding probability in the kittiwake. We found evidence of an effect of age and quality on both demographic parameters. Patterns observed in breeders are consistent with the selection hypothesis, which predicts age-related increases in survival and traits positively correlated with survival. Our results also reveal unexpected age effects specific to subgroups: the influence of age on survival and future breeding probability is not the same in nonbreeders and breeders. These patterns are observed in higher-quality breeding habitats, where the influence of extrinsic factors on breeding state is the weakest. Moreover, there is slight evidence of an influence of sex on breeding probability (not on survival), but the same overall pattern is observed in both sexes. Our results support the hypothesis that age-related variation in demographic parameters observed at the population level is partly shaped by heterogeneity among individuals. They also suggest processes specific to subpopulations. Recent theoreticaI developments lay emphasis on integration of sources of heterogeneity in optimization models to account for apparently 'sub-optimal' empirical patterns. Incorporation of sources of heterogeneity is also the key to investigation of age-related reproductive strategies in heterogeneous populations. Thwarting 'heterogeneity's ruses' has become a major challenge: for

  11. Variations in Quercus sp. pollen seasons (1996-2011) in Poznań, Poland, in relation to meteorological parameters.

    PubMed

    Grewling, Lukasz; Jackowiak, Bogdan; Smith, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to supply detailed information about oak (Quercus sp.) pollen seasons in Poznań, Poland, based on a 16-year aerobiological data series (1996-2011). The pollen data were collected using a volumetric spore trap of the Hirst design located in Poznań city center. The limits of the pollen seasons were calculated using the 95 % method. The influence of meteorological parameters on temporal variations in airborne pollen was examined using correlation analysis. Start and end dates of oak pollen seasons in Poznań varied markedly from year-to-year (14 and 17 days, respectively). Most of the pollen grains (around 75 % of the seasonal pollen index) were recorded within the first 2 weeks of the pollen season. The tenfold variation was observed between the least and the most intensive pollen seasons. These fluctuations were significantly related to the variation in the sum of rain during the period second fortnight of March to first fortnight of April the year before pollination (r = 0.799; p < 0.001). During the analyzing period, a significant advance in oak pollen season start dates was observed (-0.55 day/year; p = 0.021), which was linked with an increase in the mean temperature during the second half of March and first half of April (+0.2 °C; p = 0.014). Daily average oak pollen counts correlated positively with mean and maximum daily temperatures, and negatively with daily rainfall and daily mean relative humidity.

  12. The time variations in the parameters of the volumetric strain response to the tidal and baric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepantsev, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters describing the state of the geological medium include its response to the continuous external impacts, which characterizes the structure of the medium and the stresses accumulated in it. In the present paper, through analyzing the long time series of the volumetric strain monitoring data in the nearsurface crustal layer, which were obtained by the American geophysicists under the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) project within the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault, the time behavior of the volumetric strain response to the separate components of the tides and the air pressure impacts is considered. The analysis of the response regime at the different observational stations suggests a significant influence of the local structural features and tectonic processes at the considered sites of the volumetric strain observations. The estimate of the variations in the partial information from the individual observations (values) is used for improving the reliability of identifying the amplitude peculiarities of the response when synchronizing the variations of the set of the tidal components. It is established that at the PKDLT observation point, a synchronous increase in the transfer coefficient of the tidal impact of the M 2, O 1, and L 2 components two years before the Parkfield earthquake of 2004 took place.

  13. Assessment and parameter identification of simplified models to describe the kinetics of semi-continuous biomethane production from anaerobic digestion of green and food waste.

    PubMed

    Owhondah, Raymond O; Walker, Mark; Ma, Lin; Nimmo, Bill; Ingham, Derek B; Poggio, Davide; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical reactions occurring during anaerobic digestion have been modelled using reaction kinetic equations such as first-order, Contois and Monod which are then combined to form mechanistic models. This work considers models which include between one and three biochemical reactions to investigate if the choice of the reaction rate equation, complexity of the model structure as well as the inclusion of inhibition plays a key role in the ability of the model to describe the methane production from the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of green waste (GW) and food waste (FW). A parameter estimation method was used to investigate the most important phenomena influencing the biogas production process. Experimental data were used to numerically estimate the model parameters and the quality of fit was quantified. Results obtained reveal that the model structure (i.e. number of reactions, inhibition) has a much stronger influence on the quality of fit compared with the choice of kinetic rate equations. In the case of GW there was only a marginal improvement when moving from a one to two reaction model, and none with inclusion of inhibition or three reactions. However, the behaviour of FW digestion was more complex and required either a two or three reaction model with inhibition functions for both ammonia and volatile fatty acids. Parameter values for the best fitting models are given for use by other authors.

  14. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter the last 50 years for the seismic area of Evoikos, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael E.; Arabelos, Demetrious N.; Vergos, George; Spatalas, Spyrous

    2015-04-01

    The results of the analysis of the last 50 years earthquakes series in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ), indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations. The same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1, O1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) and solar (S2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identification of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake frequency of occurrence - tidal period accordance, p, as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence. A test on posterior of this idea, (i.e. the value of the confidence level index, p, indicate the fault matureness) in the case of the recent seismic activity at Fthiotida, was positive (Contadakis et al 2014). In this paper we present the results of a second test by the occasion of the recent seismic activity of Central Evoikos. The results also are positive. We suggest that this compliance parameter may be used as an additional element for the seismic risk assessment. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M and Zhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the

  15. Site and age class variation of hematologic parameters for female Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) of Northern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kathryn J; Perryman, Barry L; Holcombe, Dale W

    2010-01-01

    Decreases in Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) numbers throughout the western United States have been attributed to declining habitat quantity and quality. Improving our understanding of how interannual ecologic site variability affects nutritional status and fitness of different bird age classes will lead to improved land management and conservation strategies. Greater Sage Grouse were sampled from two Population Management Units located in northern Nevada, United States: Tuscarora (TU) and Lone Willow (LW) during 15 March-11 April 2004 and 14-20 March 2005. Twenty (16 yearlings, four adults) and 17 (7 yearlings, 10 adults) female Sage Grouse were captured and bled during 2004, and 12 (four yearlings, eight adults) and 14 (10 yearlings, four adults) were sampled during 2005 in TU and LW, respectively. Samples were evaluated to examine the effect of site, age, and year on specific hematologic and serum chemistry parameters. Several differences between age classes, sites, and years were detected for a number of fitness indicators; however, actual values fell within normal ranges of variation for Sage Grouse or other avian species. Differences were also detected for several parameters more closely related to reproductive fitness, including total plasma and serum proteins, and serum calcium and phosphorus. Yearlings had lower plasma protein (P<0.0001) and lower serum protein than did adults (P=0.0003). In 2004, TU yearlings had lower serum calcium levels than the adults, and in 2005, LW yearlings had lower levels than adults (P=0.008). Females on the TU site had lower serum phosphorus than the LW females (P<0.0001). Overall, adult females weighed more than yearlings (P=0.0004). Lower values found in yearlings, and on the TU management unit, indicate a lower production potential, particularly in unfavorable years. A lower intrinsic ability of yearlings to reproduce, combined with lower nutrition potentials and associated annual variations on certain types

  16. Sorption of SO(2) and NO from simulated flue gas over rice husk ash (RHA)/CaO/CeO(2) sorbent: evaluation of deactivation kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Dahlan, Irvan; Lee, Keat Teong; Kamaruddin, Azlina Harun; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the kinetic parameters of rice husk ash (RHA)/CaO/CeO(2) sorbent for SO(2) and NO sorptions were investigated in a laboratory-scale stainless steel fixed-bed reactor. Data experiments were obtained from our previous results and additional independent experiments were carried out at different conditions. The initial sorption rate constant (k(0)) and deactivation rate constant (k(d)) for SO(2)/NO sorptions were obtained from the nonlinear regression analysis of the experimental breakthrough data using deactivation kinetic model. Both the initial sorption rate constants and deactivation rate constants increased with increasing temperature, except at operating temperature of 170 °C. The activation energy and frequency factor for the SO(2) sorption were found to be 18.0 kJ/mol and 7.37 × 10(5)cm(3)/(g min), respectively. Whereas the activation energy and frequency factor for the NO sorption, were estimated to be 5.64 kJ/mol and 2.19 × 10(4)cm(3)/(g min), respectively. The deactivation kinetic model was found to give a very good agreement with the experimental data of the SO(2)/NO sorptions.

  17. Is it possible to study the kinetic parameters of interaction between PNA and parallel and antiparallel DNA by stopped-flow fluorescence?

    PubMed

    Barbero, N; Cauteruccio, S; Thakare, P; Licandro, E; Viscardi, G; Visentin, S

    2016-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are among the most interesting and versatile artificial structural mimics of nucleic acids and exhibit peculiar and important properties (i.e. high chemical stability, and a high resistance to cellular enzymes and nucleases). Despite their unnatural structure, they are able to recognize and bind DNA and RNA in a very high, specific and selective manner. One of the most popular, easy and reliable method to measure the stability of PNA-DNA hybrid systems is the melting temperature but the thermodynamic data are obtained using a big quantity of materials failing to provide information on the kinetics of the interaction. In the present work, the PNA decamer 6, with the TCACTAGATG sequence of nucleobases, and the corresponding fluorescent PNA-FITU (fluorescein isothiourea) decamer 8 were synthesized with standard manual Boc-based chemistry. The interaction of the PNA-FITU with parallel and antiparallel DNA has been studied by stopped-flow fluorescence, which is proposed as an alternative technique to obtain the kinetic parameters of the binding. The great advantage of using the stopped-flow technique is the possibility of studying the kinetics of the PNA-DNA duplex formation in a physiological environment. In particular, fluorescence stopped-flow technique has been exploited to compare the affinity of two PNA-DNA duplexes since it can discriminate between parallel and antiparallel DNA binding.

  18. Prostate-specific Antigen Density Variation Rate as a Potential Guideline Parameter for Second Prostate Cancer Detection Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gan-Sheng; Lyv, Jin-Xing; Li, Gang; Yan, Chun-Yin; Hou, Jian-Quan; Pu, Jin-Xian; Ding, Xiang; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic value of current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests is challenged by the poor detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) in repeat prostate biopsy. In this study, we proposed a novel PSA-related parameter named PSA density variation rate (PSADVR) and designed a clinical trial to evaluate its potential diagnostic value for detecting PCa on a second prostate biopsy. Methods: Data from 184 males who underwent second ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy 6 months after the first biopsy were included in the study. The subjects were divided into PCa and non-PCa groups according to the second biopsy pathological results. Prostate volume, PSA density (PSAD), free-total PSA ratio, and PSADVR were calculated according to corresponding formulas at the second biopsy. These parameters were compared using t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test between PCa and non-PCa groups, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate their predictability on PCa detection. Results: PCa was detected in 24 patients on the second biopsy. Mean values of PSA, PSAD, and PSADVR were greater in the PCa group than in the non-PCa group (8.39 μg/L vs. 7.16 μg/L, 0.20 vs. 0.16, 14.15% vs. −1.36%, respectively). PSADVR had the largest area under the curve, with 0.667 sensitivity and 0.824 specificity when the cutoff was 10%. The PCa detection rate was significantly greater in subjects with PSADVR >10% than PSADVR ≤10% (28.6% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.001). In addition, PSADVR was the only parameter in this study that showed a significant correlation with mid-to-high-risk PCa (r = 0.63, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that PSADVR improved the PCa detection rate on second biopsies, especially for mid-to-high-risk cancers requiring prompt treatment. PMID:27453228

  19. Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of Coal/Corn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Huffman, Gerald; Shah, Naresh; ...

    2014-01-01

    The thermal evolution profiles and kinetic parameters for the pyrolysis of two Montana coals (DECS-38 subbituminous coal and DECS-25 lignite coal), one biomass sample (corn stover), and their blends (10%, 20%, and 30% by weight of corn stover) have been investigated at a heating rate of 5°C/min in an inert nitrogen atmosphere, using thermogravimetric analysis. The thermal evolution profiles of subbituminous coal and lignite coal display only one major peak over a wide temperature distribution, ~152–814°C and ~175–818°C, respectively, whereas the thermal decomposition profile for corn stover falls in a much narrower band than that of the coals, ~226–608°C. Themore » nonlinearity in the evolution of volatile matter with increasing percentage of corn stover in the blends verifies the possibility of synergistic behavior in the blends with subbituminous coal where deviations from the predicted yield ranging between 2% and 7% were observed whereas very little deviations (1%–3%) from predicted yield were observed in blends with lignite indicating no significant interactions with corn stover. In addition, a single first-order reaction model using the Coats-Redfern approximation was utilized to predict the kinetic parameters of the pyrolysis reaction. The kinetic analysis indicated that each thermal evolution profile may be represented as a single first-order reaction. Three temperature regimes were identified for each of the coals while corn stover and the blends were analyzed using two and four temperature regimes, respectively.« less

  20. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  1. New insights on timing of oil and gas generation in the central Gulf Coast interior zone based on hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, Michael D.; Dutton, Shirley P.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Hentz, Tucker F.

    2002-01-01

    Timing of oil and gas generation from Turonian and Smackover source rocks in the central Gulf CoastInterior Zone was determined in one-dimensional burial-history curves (BHCs) using hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters. The results predict that basal Smackover source-rock intervals with Type-IIS kerogen completed oil generation between 121 and 99 Ma, and Turonian source-rocks with Type-II kerogen remain immature over most of the same area. The only exception to the latter occurs in the northwestern part of the Mississippi salt basin, where initial stages of oil generation have started as a result of higher thermal gradients. This maturity difference between Turonian and Smackover source rocks is predicted with present-day thermal gradients. Predicted oil generation prior to the Sabine and Monroe uplifts suggests that a significant amount of the oil emplaced in Cretaceous reservoirs of these uplifts would have been lost during periods of erosion. Hydrous-pyrolysis kineticparameters predict that cracking of Smackover oil to gas started 52 Ma, which postdates major uplift and erosional events of the Sabine and Monroe uplifts. This generated gas would accumulate and persist in these uplift areas as currently observed. The predicted timing of oil and gas generation with hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters is in accordance with the observed scarcity of oil from Turonian source rocks, predominance of gas accumulations on the Sabine and Monroe uplifts, and predominance of oil accumulations along the northern rim of the Interior Zone.

  2. Network topology and parameter estimation: from experimental design methods to gene regulatory network kinetics using a community based approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate estimation of parameters of biochemical models is required to characterize the dynamics of molecular processes. This problem is intimately linked to identifying the most informative experiments for accomplishing such tasks. While significant progress has been made, effective experimental strategies for parameter identification and for distinguishing among alternative network topologies remain unclear. We approached these questions in an unbiased manner using a unique community-based approach in the context of the DREAM initiative (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessment of Methods). We created an in silico test framework under which participants could probe a network with hidden parameters by requesting a range of experimental assays; results of these experiments were simulated according to a model of network dynamics only partially revealed to participants. Results We proposed two challenges; in the first, participants were given the topology and underlying biochemical structure of a 9-gene regulatory network and were asked to determine its parameter values. In the second challenge, participants were given an incomplete topology with 11 genes and asked to find three missing links in the model. In both challenges, a budget was provided to buy experimental data generated in silico with the model and mimicking the features of different common experimental techniques, such as microarrays and fluorescence microscopy. Data could be bought at any stage, allowing participants to implement an iterative loop of experiments and computation. Conclusions A total of 19 teams participated in this competition. The results suggest that the combination of state-of-the-art parameter estimation and a varied set of experimental methods using a few datasets, mostly fluorescence imaging data, can accurately determine parameters of biochemical models of gene regulation. However, the task is considerably more difficult if the gene network topology is not completely

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic background underlying variations in fatty acid composition and sensory parameters in European bovine breeds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Consuming moderate amounts of lean red meat as part of a balanced diet valuably contributes to intakes of essential nutrients. In this study, we merged phenotypic and genotypic information to characterize the variation in lipid profile and sensory parameters and to represent the diversity among 15 cattle populations. Correlations between fat content, organoleptic characteristics and lipid profiles were also investigated. Methods A sample of 436 largely unrelated purebred bulls belonging to 15 breeds and reared under comparable management conditions was analyzed. Phenotypic data -including fatness score, fat percentage, individual fatty acids (FA) profiles and sensory panel tests- and genotypic information from 11 polymorphisms was used. Results The correlation coefficients between muscle total lipid measurements and absolute vs. relative amounts of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) were in opposite directions. Increasing carcass fat leads to an increasing amount of FAs in triglycerides, but at the same time the relative amount of PUFAs is decreasing, which is in concordance with the negative correlation obtained here between the percentage of PUFA and fat measurements, as well as the weaker correlation between total phospholipids and total lipid muscle content compared with neutral lipids. Concerning organoleptic characteristics, a negative correlation between flavour scores and the percentage of total PUFA, particularly to n-6 fraction, was found. The correlation between juiciness and texture is higher than with flavour scores. The distribution of SNPs plotted by principal components analysis (PCA) mainly reflects their known trait associations, although influenced by their specific breed allele frequencies. Conclusions The results presented here help to understand the phenotypic and genotypic background underlying variations in FA composition and sensory parameters between breeds. The wide range of traits and breeds studied, along with the genotypic

  4. Crystal Growth Simulations To Establish Physically Relevant Kinetic Parameters from the Empirical Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, Eric D.; Folmer, Jacob C.W.; Martin, James D.

    2013-12-05

    A series of simulations was performed to enable interpretation of the material and physical significance of the parameters defined in the Kolmogorov, Johnson and Mehl, and Avrami (KJMA) rate expression commonly used to describe phase boundary controlled reactions of condensed matter. The parameters k, n, and t0 are shown to be highly correlated, which if unaccounted for seriously challenge mechanistic interpretation. It is demonstrated that rate measurements exhibit an intrinsic uncertainty without precise knowledge of the location and orientation of nucleation with respect to the free volume into which it grows. More significantly, it is demonstrated that the KJMA rate constant k is highly dependent on sample size. However, under the simulated conditions of slow nucleation relative to crystal growth, sample volume and sample anisotropy correction affords a means to eliminate the experimental condition dependence of the KJMA rate constant, k, producing the material-specific parameter, the velocity of the phase boundary, vpb.

  5. Use of physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modeling to study interindividual human variation and species differences in plasma concentrations of quercetin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Boonpawa, Rungnapa; Moradi, Nooshin; Spenkelink, Albertus; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2015-12-15

    Biological activities of flavonoids in vivo ultimately depend on the systemic bioavailability of the aglycones and their metabolites. We aimed to develop physiologically based kinetic (PBK) models to predict plasma concentrations of the flavonoid quercetin and its metabolites in individual human subjects and to define species differences compared with male rat. The human models were developed based on in vitro metabolic parameters derived from incubations with pooled and 20 individual human tissue fractions and by fitting kinetic parameters to available in vivo data. The outcomes obtained were compared to a previously developed model for quercetin and its metabolites formation in male rat. Quercetin-3'-O-glucuronide was predicted to be the major circulating metabolite in 19 out of 20 individuals, while in male rat di- and tri-conjugates of quercetin containing a glucuronic acid, sulfate and/or methyl moieties are the major metabolites. Significant species differences occur in major circulating metabolites of quercetin suggesting that rat is not an adequate model to study effects of quercetin in man. The defined PBK models can be used to guide the experimental design of in vitro experiments with flavonoids, especially to better take into account the relevance of metabolism and the contribution of metabolites to the biological activity in humans.

  6. Influences of Variations of Characteristic Parameters of Protein Molecules on States of Soliton Transported Bio-Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Huai-Wu; Yu, Jia-Feng; Luo, Yu-Hui

    We simulate numerically the dynamic properties of new soliton with quasi-coherent two quanta in the improved model by fourth-order Runge-Kutta way. We observed that the window of formation of new soliton is shifted toward smaller values of coupling constants when compared with the Davydov's soliton with one quantum and Förner's soliton with two quantum model. The new soliton formation starts at (χ1+χ2)=20 PN, and pinning starts from (χ1+χ2)=86 PN. The pinned solitons are also observed if both quanta are on the same end of the chain in the initial state. The behaviors of new soliton are varied under influences for variations of characteristic parameters arising from the structure nonuniformity of protein molecules. Although the new soliton is also sensitive to the dipole-dipole interaction and diagonal disorder, the sensitivity to the impurity is weaker than that of the Davydov's and Förner's solitons. Therefore, the new soliton is robust against the fluctuations of coupled constant, dipole-dipole interaction and diagonal disorder arising from the impurity or structure nonuniformity, when compared with that of the Davydov's and Förner's solitons.

  7. Assessment of Wall Elasticity Variations on Intraluminal Haemodynamics in Descending Aortic Dissections Using a Lumped-Parameter Model

    PubMed Central

    Rudenick, Paula A.; Bijnens, Bart H.; Segers, Patrick; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Descending aortic dissection (DAD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Aortic wall stiffness is a variable often altered in DAD patients and potentially involved in long-term outcome. However, its relevance is still mostly unknown. To gain more detailed knowledge of how wall elasticity (compliance) might influence intraluminal haemodynamics in DAD, a lumped-parameter model was developed based on experimental data from a pulsatile hydraulic circuit and validated for 8 clinical scenarios. Next, the variations of intraluminal pressures and flows were assessed as a function of wall elasticity. In comparison with the most rigid-wall case, an increase in elasticity to physiological values was associated with a decrease in systolic and increase in diastolic pressures of up to 33% and 63% respectively, with a subsequent decrease in the pressure wave amplitude of up to 86%. Moreover, it was related to an increase in multidirectional intraluminal flows and transition of behaviour as 2 parallel vessels towards a vessel with a side-chamber. The model supports the extremely important role of wall elasticity as determinant of intraluminal pressures and flow patterns for DAD, and thus, the relevance of considering it during clinical assessment and computational modelling of the disease. PMID:25881158

  8. Water-Exchange-Modified Kinetic Parameters from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI as Prognostic Biomarkers of Survival in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Antiangiogenic Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ho; Hayano, Koichi; Zhu, Andrew X.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background To find prognostic biomarkers in pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) water-exchange-modified (WX) kinetic parameters for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with antiangiogenic monotherapy. Methods Twenty patients with advanced HCC underwent DCE-MRI and were subsequently treated with sunitinib. Pretreatment DCE-MRI data on advanced HCC were analyzed using five different WX kinetic models: the Tofts-Kety (WX-TK), extended TK (WX-ETK), two compartment exchange, adiabatic approximation to tissue homogeneity (WX-AATH), and distributed parameter (WX-DP) models. The total hepatic blood flow, arterial flow fraction (γ), arterial blood flow (BFA), portal blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, permeability-surface area product, fractional interstitial volume (vI), extraction fraction, mean intracellular water molecule lifetime (τC), and fractional intracellular volume (vC) were calculated. After receiver operating characteristic analysis with leave-one-out cross-validation, individual parameters for each model were assessed in terms of 1-year-survival (1YS) discrimination using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and association with overall survival (OS) using univariate Cox regression analysis with permutation testing. Results The WX-TK-model-derived γ (P = 0.022) and vI (P = 0.010), and WX-ETK-model-derived τC (P = 0.023) and vC (P = 0.042) were statistically significant prognostic biomarkers for 1YS. Increase in the WX-DP-model-derived BFA (P = 0.025) and decrease in the WX-TK, WX-ETK, WX-AATH, and WX-DP-model-derived vC (P = 0.034, P = 0.038, P = 0.028, P = 0.041, respectively) were significantly associated with an increase in OS. Conclusions The WX-ETK-model-derived vC was an effective prognostic biomarker for advanced HCC treated with sunitinib. PMID:26366997

  9. The comparison of the estimation of enzyme kinetic parameters by fitting reaction curve to the integrated Michaelis-Menten rate equations of different predictor variables.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fei; Zhu, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Yong-Mei; Zuo, Yu-Ping

    2005-01-31

    The estimation of enzyme kinetic parameters by nonlinear fitting reaction curve to the integrated Michaelis-Menten rate equation ln(S(0)/S)+(S(0)-S)/K(m)=(V(m)/K(m))xt was investigated and compared to that by fitting to (S(0)-S)/t=V(m)-K(m)x[ln(S(0)/S)/t] (Atkins GL, Nimmo IA. The reliability of Michaelis-Menten constants and maximum velocities estimated by using the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation. Biochem J 1973;135:779-84) with uricase as the model. Uricase reaction curve was simulated with random absorbance error of 0.001 at 0.075 mmol/l uric acid. Experimental reaction curve was monitored by absorbance at 293 nm. For both CV and deviation <20% by simulation, K(m) from 5 to 100 micromol/l was estimated with Eq. (1) while K(m) from 5 to 50 micromol/l was estimated with Eq. (2). The background absorbance and the error in the lag time of steady-state reaction resulted in negative K(m) with Eq. (2), but did not affect K(m) estimated with Eq. (1). Both equations gave better estimation of V(m). The computation time and the goodness of fit with Eq. (1) were 40-fold greater than those with Eq. (2). By experimentation, Eq. (1) yielded K(m) consistent with the Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis, but Eq. (2) gave many negative parameters. Apparent K(m) by Eq. (1) linearly increased, while V(m) were constant, vs. xanthine concentrations, and the inhibition constant was consistent with the Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. These results suggested that the integrated rate equation that uses the predictor variable of reaction time was reliable for the estimation of enzyme kinetic parameters and applicable for the characterization of enzyme inhibitors.

  10. Evaluation of Tafel-Volmer kinetic parameters for the hydrogen oxidation reaction on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. F.; Thurgood, C. P.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling of PEM fuel cells has long been an active research area to improve understanding of cell and stack operation, facilitate design improvements and support simulation studies. The prediction of activation polarization in most PEM models has concentrated on the cathode losses since anode losses are commonly much smaller and tend to be ignored. Further development of the anode activation polarization term is being undertaken to broaden the application and usefulness of PEM models in general. Published work on the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) using Pt(h k l) electrodes in dilute H2SO4 has been recently reassessed and published. Correlations for diffusion-free exchange current densities were developed and empirical predictive equations for the anode activation polarization were proposed for the experimental conditions of the previously published work: Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 1 1) electrodes, pH2 of 1 atm, and temperatures of 1, 30 and 60 °C. It was concluded that the HOR on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes followed a Tafel-Volmer reaction sequence. The aim of the present paper is to generalize these Tafel-Volmer correlations, apply them to published data for Pt(1 1 0) electrodes and further develop the modelling of anode activation polarization over the range of operating conditions found in PEMFC operation.

  11. Kinetic Parameters of Secondary Carbide Precipitation in High-Cr White Iron Alloyed by Mn-Ni-Mo-V Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Brykov, M. N.

    2013-05-01

    This study presents kinetics of precipitation of secondary carbides in 14.55%Cr-Mn-Ni-Mo-V white cast iron during the destabilization heat treatment. The as-cast iron was heat treated at temperatures in the range of 800-1100 °C with soaking up to 6 h. Investigation was carried out by optical and electron microscopy, dilatometric analysis, Ms temperature measurement, and bulk hardness evaluation. TTT-curve of precipitation process of secondary carbides (M7C3, M23C6, M3C2) has been constructed in this study. It was determined that the precipitation occurs at the maximum rate at 950 °C where the process is started after 10 s and completed within 160 min further. The precipitation leads to significant increase of Ms temperature and bulk hardness; large soaking times at destabilization temperatures cause coarsening of secondary carbides and decrease in particles number, followed by decrease in hardness. The results obtained are discussed in terms of solubility of carbon in the austenite and diffusion activation of Cr atoms. The precipitation was found to consist of two stages with activation energies of 196.5 kJ/g-mole at the first stage and 47.1 kJ/g-mole at the second stage.

  12. Kinetic parameters and monomeric conversion of different dental composites using standard and soft-start photoactivation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, A. B.; Viana, R. B.; Plepis, A. M. G.

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the photopolymerization kinetics and degree of conversion of different commercial dental composites when photoactivated by a LED curing unit using two different modes (standard and soft-start mode). The investigation was performed on with RelyX ARC (dual-cured), Filtek Z-350 (Nanocomposite), Filtek Z-250 (Hybrid), and Filtek Z-350flow (Flowable) resin composites. The analysis used was attenuated total reflection with a Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). The RelyX ARC resin demonstrated the highest degree of conversion with both LED photoactivation modes. For this resin a 28% decrease in maximum rate was observed and the time to reach its highest rate was almost 2.3 times higher than when the soft-start photoactivation light curing was used. Z-350flow resin recorder a higher maximum rate using the soft-start mode rather than the standard mode. In contrast, the Z-250 showed a higher value using the standard mode. Although Z-250 and Z-350 showed a higher total degree of conversion effectiveness using the soft-start mode, RelyX and Z-350flow achieved a higher value using the standard mode.

  13. Simple tumor profile chart based on cell kinetic parameters and histologic grade is useful for estimating the natural growth rate of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tomoki; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Mitsumoto, Yasuhide; Katagishi, Tatsuo; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Shintani, Hiroyuki; Deguchi, Takeshi; Okanoue, Takeshi; Kagawa, Keizo; Ashihara, Tsukasa

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-four untreated hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) with known growth rates were classified into 5 groups on a tumor profile chart based on their doubling time (DT), Ki-67-positive index (Ki-67-PI), apoptotic index (Apo-I), and histologic grade. The slow-growing HCCs (DT > 100 days) consisted of well-differentiated tumors with slight cell kinetic imbalance and were divided into groups A and B. Group A had Apo-I values <3%, and most tumors had Ki-67-PI values <10%, whereas group B had Apo-I values of 3 per thousand to 10 per thousand and Ki-67-PI values of 10% to 20%. The HCCs with intermediate growth rates, which had Ki-67-PI values similar to those of the tumors in group B, were divided into groups C and D based on differences in cell kinetics: group C consisted of well-differentiated tumors, most of which had Apo-I values <3 per thousand, and group D consisted of moderately or poorly differentiated tumors with Apo-I values between 10 per thousand and 20 per thousand. The rapidly growing tumors (DT < 50 days, group E) had higher Ki-67-PI values than other groups and a wide range of Apo-I values. Rapidly growing tumors were mostly moderately or poorly differentiated, with a large cell kinetic imbalance in favor of cell production. This grouping system is useful for approximating the growth rate of HCCs in a clinical setting, even when only histologic parameters are available.

  14. Variation in the Kozak sequence of WNT16 results in an increased translation and is associated with osteoporosis related parameters.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Gretl; Boudin, Eveline; Fijałkowski, Igor; Nielsen, Torben Leo; Andersen, Marianne; Brixen, Kim; Van Hul, Wim

    2014-02-01

    The importance of WNT16 in the regulation of bone metabolism was recently confirmed by several genome-wide association studies and by a Wnt16 (Wnt16(-/-)) knockout mouse model. The aim of this study was thus to replicate and further elucidate the effect of common genetic variation in WNT16 on osteoporosis related parameters. Hereto, we performed a WNT16 candidate gene association study in a population of healthy Caucasian men from the Odense Androgen Study (OAS). Using HapMap, five tagSNPs and one multimarker test were selected for genotyping to cover most of the common genetic variation in and around WNT16 (MAF>5%). This study confirmed previously reported associations for rs3801387 and rs2707466 with bone mineral density (BMD) at several sites. Furthermore, we additionally demonstrated that rs2908007 is strongly associated with BMD at several sites in the young, elderly and complete OAS population. The observed effect of these three associated SNPs on the respective phenotypes is comparable and we can conclude that the presence of the minor allele results in an increase in BMD. Additionally, we performed re-sequencing of WNT16 on two cohorts selected from the young OAS cohort, based on their extreme BMD values. On this basis, rs55710688 was selected for an in vitro translation experiment since it is located in the Kozak sequence of WNT16a. We observed an increased translation efficiency and thus a higher amount of WNT16a for the Kozak sequence that was significantly more prevalent in the high BMD cohort. This observation is in line with the results of the Wnt16(-/-) mice. Finally, a WNT luciferase reporter assay was performed and showed no activation of the β-catenin dependent pathway by Wnt16. We did detect a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of Wnt16 on WNT1 activation of this canonical WNT pathway. Increased translation of WNT16 can thus lead to an increased inhibitory action of WNT16 on canonical WNT signaling. This statement is in contrast with the known

  15. Calculation of reactivities using ionization chamber currents with different sets of kinetic parameters for reduced scram system efficiency in the VVER-1000 of the third unit of the Kalinin nuclear power plant at the stage of physical start-up

    SciTech Connect

    Zizin, M. N.; Zizina, S. N.; Kryakvin, L. V.; Pitilimov, V. A.; Tereshonok, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    The effectiveness of the VVER-1000 reactor scram system is analyzed using ionization chamber currents with different sets of kinetic parameters with allowance for the isotopic composition in the calculation of these parameters. The most 'correct, aesthetically acceptable' results are obtained using the eight-group constants of the ROSFOND (BNAB-RF) library. The difference between the maximum and minimum values of the scram system effectiveness calculated with different sets of kinetic parameters slightly exceeds 2{beta}. The problems of introducing corrections due to spatial effects are not considered in this study.

  16. Insights on the development, kinetics, and variation of photoinhibition using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of a chilled, variegated leaf.

    PubMed

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The effect of chilling on photosystem II (PSII) efficiency was studied in the variegated leaves of Calathea makoyana, in order to gain insight into the causes of chilling-induced photoinhibition. Additionally, a relationship was revealed between (chilling) stress and variation in photosynthesis. Chilling treatments (5 degrees C and 10 degrees C) were performed for different durations (1-7 d) under a moderate irradiance (120 micromol m-2 s-1). The individual leaves were divided into a shaded zone and two illuminated, chilled zones. The leaf tip and sometimes the leaf base were not chilled. Measurements of the dark-adapted Fv/Fm were made on the different leaf zones at the end of the chilling treatment, and then for several days thereafter to monitor recovery. Chilling up to 7 d in the dark did not affect PSII efficiency and visual appearance, whereas chilling in the light caused severe photoinhibition, sometimes followed by leaf necrosis. Photoinhibition increased with the duration of the chilling period, whereas, remarkably, chilling temperature had no effect. In the unchilled leaf tip, photoinhibition also occurred, whereas in the unchilled leaf base it did not. Whatever the leaf zone, photoinhibition became permanent if the mean value dropped below 0.4, although chlorosis and necrosis were associated solely with chilled illuminated tissue. Starch accumulated in the unchilled leaf tip, in contrast to the adjacent chilled irradiated zone. This suggests that photoinhibition was due to a secondary effect in the unchilled leaf tip (sink limitation), whereas it was a direct effect of chilling and irradiance in the chilled illuminated zones. The PSII efficiency and its coefficient of variation showed a unique negative linearity across all leaf zones and different tissue types. The slope of this curve was steeper for chilled leaves than it was for healthy, non-stressed leaves, suggesting that the coefficient of variation may be an important tool for assessing stress in

  17. Influence of instrumental parameters on the kinetic energy of ions and plasma temperature for a hexapole collision/reaction-cell-based inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Favre, Georges; Brennetot, René; Chartier, Frédéric; Tortajada, Jeanine

    2009-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in inorganic analytical chemistry for element and/or isotope ratio measurements. The presence of interferences, which is one of the main limitations of this method, has been addressed in recent years with the introduction of collision/reaction cell devices on ICP-MS apparatus. The study of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase then became of great importance for the development of new analytical strategies. Knowing the kinetic energy and the electronic states of the ions prior to their entrance into the cell, i.e., just before they react, thereby constitutes crucial information for the interpretation of the observed reactivities. Such studies on an ICP-MS commonly used for routine analyses require the determination of the influence of different instrumental parameters on the energy of the ions and on the plasma temperature from where ions are sampled. The kinetic energy of ions prior to their entrance into the cell has been connected to the voltage applied to the hexapole according to a linear relationship determined from measurements of ion energy losses due to collisions with neutral gas molecules. The effects of the plasma forward power, sampling depth, and the addition of a torch shield to the ICP source were then examined. A decrease of the plasma potential due to the torch shielding, already mentioned in the literature, has been quantified in this study at about 3 V.

  18. Determination of the kinetic parameters for phospholipase C (Bacillus cereus) on different phospholipid substrates using a chromogenic assay based on the quantitation of inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Hergenrother, P J; Martin, S F

    1997-08-15

    The kinetic parameters of the phosphatidylcholine-preferring phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus (PLCBc) have been evaluated for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine substrates with a new assay based on the quantitation of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Treatment of the phosphomonoester product of the PLCBc-catalyzed hydrolysis of these phospholipids with alkaline phosphatase releases Pi. This Pi forms a complex with ammonium molybdate that is then reduced by ascorbic acid to provide a blue molybdenum chromogen with an absorbance maximum at 700 nm. This highly sensitive assay may be used to determine accurately less than 5 nmol of Pi in solution. Performing the assay in 96-well plates provides a rapid and convenient method to evaluate a variety of phospholipids as substrates for PLCBc. The assay has been utilized to ascertain the kinetic constants for the PLCBc-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine. It is found that these compounds are substrates for the enzyme with their VmaxS being in the order of phosphatidylcholine > phosphatidylethanolamine > phosphatidylserine.

  19. Structural characterization, thermoluminescence studies and kinetic parameters of SrSO4:Eu nanophosphors under X-ray and gamma excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasudha, S.; Madhukumar, K.; Nair, C. M. K.; Nair, Resmi G.; Anandakumar, V. M.; Elias, Thayal Singh

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured SrSO4:Eu phosphors with high thermoluminescence (TL) emission temperatures have been synthesized through a controlled chemical precipitation method. Structural analysis and TL studies under both γ-ray and X-ray excitations were done. The phosphors were characterized using Powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, thermogravimetry, UV-VIS and photoluminescence studies. The average crystallite size estimated using PXRD data is found to be around 40 nm. XPS and PL studies reveal that Eu2 + ions are the luminescence emission centres in the phosphor. The phosphor is found to be highly TL sensitive to both γ-rays and X-rays with very high emission temperature which is not reported so far. The emission behaviour is suitable for environmental radiation dosimetry applications. The TL glow curve shows well-defined isolated high temperature emission peak at 312 °C under 2 Gy γ-excitation and 284 °C for low energy diagnostic X-ray irradiation and 271 °C for high energy therapeutic X-rays. Chen's peak shape method is applied to obtain the kinetic parameters behind the TL emission. The TL mechanism is found to follow second order kinetics, suggesting the probability of re-trapping of charge carriers.

  20. Structural characterization, thermoluminescence studies and kinetic parameters of SrSO4:Eu nanophosphors under X-ray and gamma excitations.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, S; Madhukumar, K; Nair, C M K; Nair, Resmi G; Anandakumar, V M; Elias, Thayal Singh

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured SrSO4:Eu phosphors with high thermoluminescence (TL) emission temperatures have been synthesized through a controlled chemical precipitation method. Structural analysis and TL studies under both γ-ray and X-ray excitations were done. The phosphors were characterized using Powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, thermogravimetry, UV-VIS and photoluminescence studies. The average crystallite size estimated using PXRD data is found to be around 40nm. XPS and PL studies reveal that Eu(2+) ions are the luminescence emission centres in the phosphor. The phosphor is found to be highly TL sensitive to both γ-rays and X-rays with very high emission temperature which is not reported so far. The emission behaviour is suitable for environmental radiation dosimetry applications. The TL glow curve shows well-defined isolated high temperature emission peak at 312°C under 2Gy γ-excitation and 284°C for low energy diagnostic X-ray irradiation and 271°C for high energy therapeutic X-rays. Chen's peak shape method is applied to obtain the kinetic parameters behind the TL emission. The TL mechanism is found to follow second order kinetics, suggesting the probability of re-trapping of charge carriers.

  1. Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in water of Lake Dianchi--spatial and seasonal variation, and kinetics of biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Xiao, Bangding; Wu, Xingqiang; Tu, Xinhai; Wang, Yingcai; Sun, Xiaolei; Song, Lirong

    2010-12-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the environmental characteristics of anion surfactants [linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS)] in the water of Lake Dianchi, a sampling investigation in the field from October 2006 to July 2007 and a batch of biodegradation experiments in the laboratory were carried out. The results showed that concentrations of LAS ranged from 18.6 to 260.1 μg L(-1), and the average concentration was 52.6 μg L(-1) in Lake Dianchi. The highest concentrations of LAS were found in the Northwest region, and the distribution of LAS varied through seasons, with much lower concentrations in fall than in any other seasons. LAS can be primarily biodegraded by microorganisms in the lake water, and the percentage of degradation was >97% after 28 days. Biodegradation of LAS was well-fitted with the kinetic model presented in this paper, and the half-lives ranged from 3.2 to 16.3 days. Temperature, pH, and initial concentrations could affect the biodegradation of LAS, among which temperature was the major factor influencing on biodegradation of LAS in water of Lake Dianchi.

  2. Isotherm Modelling, Kinetic Study and Optimization of Batch Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology for Effective Removal of Cr(VI) Using Fungal Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption is a promising alternative method to replace the existing conventional technique for Cr(VI) removal from the industrial effluent. In the present experimental design, the removal of Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution was studied by Aspergillus niger MSR4 under different environmental conditions in the batch systems. The optimum conditions of biosorption were determined by investigating pH (2.0) and temperature (27°C). The effects of parameters such as biomass dosage (g/L), initial Cr(VI) concentration (mg/L) and contact time (min) on Cr(VI) biosorption were analyzed using a three parameter Box–Behnken design (BBD). The experimental data well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm, in comparison to the other isotherm models tested. The results of the D-R isotherm model suggested that a chemical ion-exchange mechanism was involved in the biosorption process. The biosorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, which indicates that the rate limiting step is chemisorption process. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic studies revealed the possible involvement of functional groups, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, amino and carbonyl group in the biosorption process. The thermodynamic parameters for Cr(VI) biosorption were also calculated, and the negative ∆Gº values indicated the spontaneous nature of biosorption process. PMID:25786227

  3. A critical study of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junmeng; Li, Tao; Liu, Ronghou

    2011-02-01

    Using some theoretically simulated data constructed from known sets of the activation energy distribution f(E) (assumed to follow the Gaussian distribution [Formula in text] where E is the activation energy, E(0) is the mean value of the activation energy distribution, and σ is the standard deviation of the activation energy distribution) and the frequency factor k(0), a critical study of the use of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model has been performed from three cases. For all cases, the use of the Miura-Maki integral method leads to important errors in the estimation of k(0). There are some differences between the assumed and calculated activation energy distributions and the differences decrease with increasing the assumed k(0) values (for Case 1), with increasing the assumed σ values (for Case 2), and with decreasing the b values (for Case 3).

  4. Limitations in the clinical usefulness of single-dose pharmacokinetic studies of drugs and a bayesian approach for the estimation of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Prandota, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This review presents several clinical examples indicating that physiological changes in the body dependent and/or independent of developmental age, genetic polymorphisms, different disease states, acute and/or chronic inflammations, and physicochemical properties of drugs as well as some environmental factors, such as viral infections, may exert a significant effect on the first-time assessment of kinetic parameters of drug absorption, disposition, metabolism, and excretion after a single-dose administration in children and adults. The available pharmacokinetic data in the literature suggest that one must be cautious in interpretation and practical use of pharmacokinetic variables derived from either single-dose studies or bayesian methods, especially in a pediatric population.

  5. Effect of next-nearest neighbor interactions on the dynamic order parameter of the Kinetic Ising model in an oscillating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, William D.; Datta, Trinanjan

    We study the effects of next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions in the two-dimensional ferromagnetic kinetic Ising model exposed to an oscillating field. By tuning the interaction ratio (p =JNNN /JNN) of the NNN (JNNN) to the nearest-neighbor (NN) interaction (JNN) we find that the model undergoes a transition from a regime in which the dynamic order parameter Q is equal to zero to a phase in which Q is not equal to zero. From our studies we conclude that the model can exhibit an interaction induced transition from a deterministic to a stochastic state. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the systemsˆˆe2ˆˆ80ˆˆ99 metastable lifetime is sensitive not only to the lattice size, external field amplitude, and temperature (as found in earlier studies) but also to additional interactions present in the system.

  6. Model of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate metabolism in the human erythrocyte based on detailed enzyme kinetic equations: equations and parameter refinement.

    PubMed Central

    Mulquiney, P J; Kuchel, P W

    1999-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, several mathematical models of erythrocyte metabolism have been developed. Although these models have identified the key features in the regulation and control of erythrocyte metabolism, many important aspects remain unexplained. In particular, none of these models have satisfactorily accounted for 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) metabolism. 2,3-BPG is an important modulator of haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and hence an understanding of the regulation of 2,3-BPG concentration is important for understanding blood oxygen transport. A detailed, comprehensive, and hence realistic mathematical model of erythrocyte metabolism is presented that can explain the regulation and control of 2,3-BPG concentration and turnover. The model is restricted to the core metabolic pathways, namely glycolysis, the 2,3-BPG shunt and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), and includes membrane transport of metabolites, the binding of metabolites to haemoglobin and Mg(2+), as well as pH effects on key enzymic reactions and binding processes. The model is necessarily complex, since it is intended to describe the regulation and control of 2,3-BPG metabolism under a wide variety of physiological and experimental conditions. In addition, since H(+) and blood oxygen tension are important external effectors of 2,3-BPG concentration, it was important that the model take into account the large array of kinetic and binding phenomena that result from changes in these effectors. Through an iterative loop of experimental and simulation analysis many values of enzyme-kinetic parameters of the model were refined to yield close conformity between model simulations and 'real' experimental data. This iterative process enabled a single set of parameters to be found which described well the metabolic behaviour of the erythrocyte under a wide variety of conditions. PMID:10477269

  7. Heterogeneity of the coumarin anticoagulant targeted vitamin K epoxide reduction system. Study of kinetic parameters in susceptible and resistant mice (Mus musculus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Lasseur, Romain; Grandemange, Agnès; Longin-Sauvageon, Christiane; Berny, Philippe; Benoit, Etienne

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) activity in liver microsomes from a susceptible and a genetically warfarin-resistant strain of mice (Mus Musculus domesticus) was analyzed to determine the mechanism of resistance to this 4-hydroxycoumarin derivative. Kinetic parameters for VKOR were calculated for each strain by incubating liver microsomes with vitamin K epoxide +/- warfarin. In susceptible mice, an Eadie-Hofstee plot of the data was not linear and suggested the involvement of at least two different components. Apparent kinetic parameters were obtained by nonlinear regression using a Michaelis--Menten model, which takes into account two enzymatic components. Component A presents a high Km and a high Vm, and as a consequence only an enzymatic efficiency Vm/Km was obtained (0.0024 mL/min/mg). Estimated warfarin Ki was 0.17 microM. Component B presented an apparent Km of 12.73 microM, an apparent Vm of 0.32 nmol/min/mg, and an apparent Ki for warfarin of 6.0 microM. In resistant mice, the enzymatic efficiency corresponding to component A was highly decreased (0.0003-0.00066 mL/min/mg) while the Ki for warfarin was not modified. The apparent Vm of component B was poorly modified between susceptible and resistant mice. The apparent Km of component B observed in resistant mice was similar to the Km observed in susceptible mice. These modifications of the catalytic properties are associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism (T175G) in the VKOR-C1 gene, which corresponds to a Trp59Gly mutation in the protein.

  8. Inhibition and activation of enzymes. The effect of a modifier on the reaction rate and on kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Fontes, R; Ribeiro, J M; Sillero, A

    2000-01-01

    A combined analysis of enzyme inhibition and activation is presented, based on a rapid equilibrium model assumption in which one molecule of enzyme binds one molecule of substrate (S) and/or one molecule of a modifier X. The modifier acts as activator (essential or non-essential), as inhibitor (total or partial), or has no effect on the reaction rate (v), depending on the values of the equilibrium constants, the rate constants of the limiting velocity steps, and the concentration of substrate ([S]). Different possibilities have been analyzed from an equation written to emphasize that v = f([X]) is, in general and at a fixed [S], a hyperbolic function. Formulas for Su (the value of [S], different from zero, at which v is unaffected by the modifier) and v(su) (v at that particular [S]) were deduced. In Lineweaver-Burk plots, the straight lines related to different [X] generally cross in a point (P) with coordinates (Su, v(su)). In certain cases, point P is located in the first quadrant which implies that X acts as activator, as inhibitor, or has no effect, depending on [S]. Furthermore, we discuss: (1) the apparent Vmax and Km displayed by the enzyme in different situations; (2) the degree of effect (inhibition or activation) observed at different concentrations of substrate and modifier; (3) the concept of Ke, a parameter that depends on the concentration of substrate and helps to evaluate the effect of the modifier: it equals the value of [X] at which the increase or decrease in the reaction rate is half of that achieved at saturating [X]. Equations were deduced for the general case and for particular situations, and used to obtain computer-drawn graphs that are presented and discussed. Formulas for apparent Vmax, Km and Ke have been written in a way making it evident that these parameters can be expressed as pondered means.

  9. Quantification of Kinetic Rate Law Parameters of Uranium Release from Sodium Autunite as a Function of Aqueous Bicarbonate Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gudavalli, Ravi; Katsenovich, Yelena; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-09-05

    ABSTRACT: Hydrogen carbonate is one of the most significant components within the uranium geochemical cycle. In aqueous solutions, hydrogen carbonate forms strong complexes with uranium. As such, aqueous bicarbonate may significantly increase the rate of uranium release from uranium minerals. Quantifying the relationship of aqueous hydrogen carbonate solutions to the rate of uranium release during dissolution is critical to understanding the long-term fate of uranium within the environment. Single-pass flow-through (SPTF) experiments were conducted to estimate the rate of uranium release from Na meta-autunite as a function of bicarbonate solutions (0.0005-0.003 M) under the pH range of 6-11 and temperatures of 5-60oC. Consistent with the results of previous investigation, the rate of uranium release from sodium autunite exhibited minimal dependency on temperature; but were strongly dependent on pH and increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions. Most notably at pH 7, the rate of uranium release exhibited 370 fold increases relative to the rate of uranium release in the absence of bicarbonate. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions on the release of uranium was significantly less under higher pH conditions. It is postulated that at high pH values, surface sites are saturated with carbonate, thus the addition of more bicarbonate would have less effect on uranium release. Results indicate the activation energies were unaffected by temperature and bicarbonate concentration variations, but were strongly dependent on pH conditions. As pH increased from 6 to 11, activation energy values were observed to decrease from 29.94 kJ mol-1 to 13.07 kJ mol-1. The calculated activation energies suggest a surface controlled dissolution mechanism.

  10. Impacts of variations in elemental nutrient concentration of Chardonnay musts on Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation kinetics and wine composition.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Simon A; Dillon, Simon; Kolouchova, Radka; Henschke, Paul A; Chambers, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Chardonnay, being the predominant white wine-grape cultivar in the Australian wine sector, is subject to widely varying winemaking processes with the aim of producing a variety of wine styles. Therefore, juice composition might not always be ideal for optimal fermentation outcomes. Our aim was to better understand the composition of Chardonnay juice and how compositional parameters impact on fermentation outcomes. This was achieved through a survey of 96 commercially prepared Chardonnay juices during the 2009 vintage. Common juice variables were estimated using near infrared spectroscopy, and elemental composition was determined using radial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The influence of elemental composition on fermentation outcomes was assessed by fermentation of a defined medium formulated to reflect the composition and range of concentrations as determined by the juice survey. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain effects were also assessed. Key parameters influencing fermentation outcomes were verified by laboratory scale fermentation of Chardonnay juice. This exploration of Chardonnay juice identified interactions between juice pH and potassium concentration as key factors impacting on fermentation performance and wine quality. Outcomes differed depending on yeast strain.

  11. Inverse method to estimate kinetic degradation parameters of grape anthocyanins in wheat flour under simultaneously changing temperature and moisture.

    PubMed

    Lai, K P K; Dolan, K D; Ng, P K W

    2009-06-01

    Thermal and moisture effects on grape anthocyanin degradation were investigated using solid media to simulate processing at temperatures above 100 degrees C. Grape pomace (anthocyanin source) mixed with wheat pastry flour (1: 3, w/w dry basis) was used in both isothermal and nonisothermal experiments by heating the same mixture at 43% (db) initial moisture in steel cells in an oil bath at 80, 105, and 145 degrees C. To determine the effect of moisture on anthocyanin degradation, the grape pomace-wheat flour mixture was heated isothermally at 80 degrees C at constant moisture contents of 10%, 20%, and 43% (db). Anthocyanin degradation followed a pseudo first-order reaction with moisture. Anthocyanins degraded more rapidly with increasing temperature and moisture. The effects of temperature and moisture on the rate constant were modeled according to the Arrhenius and an exponential relationship, respectively. The nonisothermal reaction rate constant and activation energy (mean +/- standard error) were k(80 degrees C, 43% (db) moisture) = 2.81 x 10(-4)+/- 1.1 x 10(-6) s(-1) and DeltaE = 75273 +/- 197 J/g mol, respectively. The moisture parameter for the exponential model was 4.28 (dry basis moisture content)(-1). One possible application of this study is as a tool to predict the loss of anthocyanins in nutraceutical products containing grape pomace. For example, if the process temperature history and moisture history in an extruded snack fortified with grape pomace is known, the percentage anthocyanin loss can be predicted.

  12. In vitro release of metoclopramide from hydrophobic matrix tablets. influence of hydrodynamic conditions on kinetic release parameters.

    PubMed

    Frutos, P; Pabón, C; Lastres, J L; Frutos, G

    2001-10-01

    There has been growing interest in the subject of drug delivery and the design and evaluation of controlled-release systems. The simplest way to control the release of an active agent is to disperse it in an inert polymeric matrix. Controlled-release systems are of interest because they are technologically simple, relatively cheap, and practically unaffected by physiological changes. In this study, a new matrix system was formed by an active principle, metoclopramide hydrochloride, scattered into a biocompatible hydrophobic polymerical mesh, polyamide 12, to achieve sustained and controlled delivery of metoclopramide hydrochloride. This research was conducted to investigate the in vitro drug release behavior from these new inert polymeric matrix tablets. The drug release process was investigated both experimentally and by means of mathematical models. Different models were applied for the evaluation of drug release data. On the basis of our results, a biexponential equation was proposed, Q=Qfast(1)(1 - e(-Kfast t)) + Qslow(2)(1 - e(-Kslow t)), in an attempt to explain the mechanism responsible for the release process. Additionally, the influence of the experimental conditions of the dissolution devices, such as rate of flow and pH of dissolution medium, on the parameters that characterize the release mechanism was studied, and it was found that the main factor was the hydrodynamic condition of rate of flow.

  13. Analysis of the energetic metabolism in cyclic Bedouin goats (Capra hircus): Nychthemeral and seasonal variations of some haematochemical parameters in relation with body and ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Malek, Mouna; Amirat, Zaina; Khammar, Farida; Khaldoun, Mounira

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have examined changes in some haematochemical parameters as a function of the different physiological status (cyclic, pregnant and lactating) of goats, but no relevant literature has exhaustively investigated these variations from anestrous to estrous stages in cyclic goats. In this paper, we report nychthemeral and seasonal variations in ambient and body temperatures, and in some haematochemical parameters (glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, creatininemia and uremia) measured during summer, winter and spring, in seven (7) experimental cyclic female Bedouin goats (Capra hircus) living in the Béni-Abbès region (Algerian Sahara desert). Cosinor rhythmometry procedure was used to determine the rhythmic parameters of ambient temperature and haematochemical parameters. To determine the effect of time of day on the rhythmicity of the studied parameters, as well as their seasonality, repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. The results showed that in spite of the nychthemeral profile presented by the ambient temperature for each season, the body temperature remained in a narrow range, thus indicating a successful thermoregulation. The rhythmometry analysis showed a circadian rhythmicity of ambient temperature and haematochemical parameters with diurnal acrophases. A statistically significant effect of the time of day was shown on all studied haematochemical parameters, except on creatininemia. It was also found that only uremia, cholesterolemia and triglyceridemia followed the seasonal sexual activity of the studied ruminant. This study demonstrated the good physiological adaptation developed by this breed in response to the harsh climatic conditions of its natural environment.

  14. Spin Saturation Transfer Difference NMR (SSTD NMR): A New Tool to Obtain Kinetic Parameters of Chemical Exchange Processes

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, María Teresa; Macdonald, Colin; Angulo, Jesús; Muñoz, María Paz

    2016-01-01

    This detailed protocol describes the new Spin Saturation Transfer Difference Nuclear Magnetic Resonance protocol (SSTD NMR), recently developed in our group to study processes of mutual-site chemical exchange that are difficult to analyze by traditional methods. As the name suggests, this method combines the Spin Saturation Transfer method used for small molecules, with the Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR method employed for the study of protein-ligand interactions, by measuring transient spin saturation transfer along increasing saturation times (build-up curves) in small organic and organometallic molecules undergoing chemical exchange. Advantages of this method over existing ones are: there is no need to reach coalescence of the exchanging signals; the method can be applied as long as one signal of the exchanging sites is isolated; there is no need to measure T1 or reach steady state saturation; rate constant values are measured directly, and T1 values are obtained in the same experiment, using only one set of experiments. To test the method, we have studied the dynamics of the hindered rotation of N,N-dimethylamides, for which much data is available for comparison. The thermodynamic parameters obtained using SSTD are very similar to the reported ones (spin-saturation transfer techniques and line-shape analysis). The method can be applied to more challenging substrates that cannot be studied by previous methods. We envisage that the simple experimental set up and the wide applicability of the method to a great variety of substrates will make this a common technique amongst organic and organometallic chemists without extensive expertise in NMR. PMID:27911361

  15. Mechanism and kinetics of organic matter degradation based on particle structure variation during pig manure aerobic composting.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinyi; Huang, Guangqun; Huang, Jing; Zeng, Jianfei; Han, Lujia

    2015-07-15

    Characterization of the dynamic structure of composting particles may facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms of organic matter degradation during pig manure-wheat straw aerobic composting. In this study, changes in the size, shape, pores, chemical compositions, and crystal structures of pig manure particles during composting were investigated. The results showed that the median diameter (D50) decreased exponentially, while the particle aspect ratio and sphericity were unchanged, suggesting that particles were degraded uniformly along different radial directions. Pores had a mean diameter of 15-30 μm and were elliptical. The particle porosity increased linearly mainly because of hemicellulose degradation. Furthermore, the influence of particle structure variation on the first order rate constant (k) of organic matter degradation was corrected, which may facilitate the optimization of operation conditions. The k value was proportional to the reciprocal of D50 according to the specific surface area of particles, and it decreased with increased porosity due to the stabilized chemical compositions and crystal structures of particles. However, the applicability of these data to other composting materials should be verified.

  16. Variational derivation of the dispersion relation of kinetic coherent modes in the acoustic frequency range in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, C.; Garbet, X.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2008-11-15

    In the present paper, we compare two modes with frequencies belonging to the acoustic frequency range: the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) and the Beta Alfven eigenmode (BAE). For this, a variational gyrokinetic energy principle coupled to a Fourier sidebands expansion is developed. High order finite Larmor radius and finite orbit width effects are kept. Their impact on the mode structures and on the Alfven spectrum is calculated and discussed. We show that in a local analysis, the degeneracy of the electrostatic GAM and the BAE dispersion relations is verified to a high order and based in particular on a local poloidal symmetry of the two modes. When a more global point of view is taken, and the full radial structures of the modes are computed, differences appear. The BAE structure is shown to have an enforced localization, and to possibly connect to a large magnetohydrodynamic structure. On the contrary, the GAM is seen to have a wavelike, nonlocalized structure, as long as standard slowly varying monotonic profiles are considered.

  17. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-02

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  18. Geostatistical analysis of space variation in underground water various quality parameters in Kłodzko water intake area (SW part of Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namysłowska-Wilczyńska, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents selected results of research connected with the development of a (3D) geostatistical hydrogeochemical model of the Kłodzko Drainage Basin, dedicated to the spatial variation in the different quality parameters of underground water in the water intake area (SW part of Poland). The research covers the period 2011-2012. Spatial analyses of the variation in various quality parameters, i.e., contents of: iron, manganese, ammonium ion, nitrate ion, phosphate ion, total organic carbon, pH redox potential and temperature, were carried out on the basis of the chemical determinations of the quality parameters of underground water samples taken from the wells in the water intake area. Spatial variation in the parameters was analyzed on the basis of data obtained (November 2011) from tests of water taken from 14 existing wells with a depth ranging from 9.5 to 38.0 m b.g.l. The latest data (January 2012) were obtained (gained) from 3 new piezometers, made in other locations in the relevant area. A depth of these piezometers amounts to 9-10 m. Data derived from 14 wells (2011) and 14 wells + 3 piezometers (2012) were subjected to spatial analyses using geostatistical methods. The evaluation of basic statistics of the quality parameters, including their histograms of distributions, scatter diagrams and correlation coefficient values r were presented. The directional semivariogram function γ(h) and the ordinary (block) kriging procedure were used to build the 3D geostatistical model. The geostatistical parameters of the theoretical models of directional semivariograms of the water quality parameters under study, calculated along the wells depth (taking into account the terrain elevation), were used in the ordinary (block) kriging estimation. The obtained results of estimation, i.e., block diagrams allowed us to determine the levels of increased values of estimated averages Z* of underground water quality parameters.

  19. Evolution of a mini-scale biphasic dissolution model: Impact of model parameters on partitioning of dissolved API and modelling of in vivo-relevant kinetics.

    PubMed

    Locher, Kathrin; Borghardt, Jens M; Frank, Kerstin J; Kloft, Charlotte; Wagner, Karl G

    2016-08-01

    Biphasic dissolution models are proposed to have good predictive power for the in vivo absorption. The aim of this study was to improve our previously introduced mini-scale dissolution model to mimic in vivo situations more realistically and to increase the robustness of the experimental model. Six dissolved APIs (BCS II) were tested applying the improved mini-scale biphasic dissolution model (miBIdi-pH-II). The influence of experimental model parameters including various excipients, API concentrations, dual paddle and its rotation speed was investigated. The kinetics in the biphasic model was described applying a one- and four-compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model. The improved biphasic dissolution model was robust related to differing APIs and excipient concentrations. The dual paddle guaranteed homogenous mixing in both phases; the optimal rotation speed was 25 and 75rpm for the aqueous and the octanol phase, respectively. A one-compartment PK model adequately characterised the data of fully dissolved APIs. A four-compartment PK model best quantified dissolution, precipitation, and partitioning also of undissolved amounts due to realistic pH profiles. The improved dissolution model is a powerful tool for investigating the interplay between dissolution, precipitation and partitioning of various poorly soluble APIs (BCS II). In vivo-relevant PK parameters could be estimated applying respective PK models.

  20. Insights into organogelation and its kinetics from Hansen solubility parameters. Toward a priori predictions of molecular gelation.

    PubMed

    Diehn, Kevin K; Oh, Hyuntaek; Hashemipour, Reza; Weiss, Richard G; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2014-04-21

    Many small molecules can self-assemble by non-covalent interactions into fibrous networks and thereby induce gelation of organic liquids. However, no capability currently exists to predict whether a molecule in a given solvent will form a gel, a low-viscosity solution (sol), or an insoluble precipitate. Gelation has been recognized as a phenomenon that reflects a balance between solubility and insolubility; however, the distinction between these regimes has not been quantified in a systematic fashion. In this work, we focus on a well-known gelator, 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS), and study its self-assembly in various solvents. From these data, we build a framework for DBS gelation based on Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs). While the HSPs for DBS are not known a priori, the HSPs are available for each solvent and they quantify the solvent's ability to interact via dispersion, dipole-dipole, and hydrogen bonding interactions. Using the three HSPs, we construct three-dimensional plots showing regions of solubility (S), slow gelation (SG), instant gelation (IG), and insolubility (I) for DBS in the different solvents at a given temperature and concentration. Our principal finding is that the above regions radiate out as concentric shells: i.e., a central solubility (S) sphere, followed in order by spheres corresponding to SG, IG, and I regions. The distance (R0) from the origin of the central sphere quantifies the incompatibility between DBS and a solvent-the larger this distance, the more incompatible the pair. The elastic modulus of the final gel increases with R0, while the time required for a super-saturated sol to form a gel decreases with R0. Importantly, if R0 is too small, the gels are weak, but if R0 is too large, insolubility occurs-thus, strong gels fall within an optimal window of incompatibility between the gelator and the solvent. Our approach can be used to design organogels of desired strength and gelation time by judicious choice of a

  1. Geostatistical Characteristic of Space -Time Variation in Underground Water Selected Quality Parameters in Klodzko Water Intake Area (SW Part of Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namysłowska-Wilczyńska, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents selected results of research connected with the development of a (3D) geostatistical hydrogeochemical model of the Klodzko Drainage Basin, dedicated to the spatial and time variation in the selected quality parameters of underground water in the Klodzko water intake area (SW part of Poland). The research covers the period 2011÷2012. Spatial analyses of the variation in various quality parameters, i.e, contents of: ammonium ion [gNH4+/m3], NO3- (nitrate ion) [gNO3/m3], PO4-3 (phosphate ion) [gPO4-3/m3], total organic carbon C (TOC) [gC/m3], pH redox potential and temperature C [degrees], were carried out on the basis of the chemical determinations of the quality parameters of underground water samples taken from the wells in the water intake area. Spatial and time variation in the quality parameters was analyzed on the basis of archival data (period 1977÷1999) for 22 (pump and siphon) wells with a depth ranging from 9.5 to 38.0 m b.g.l., later data obtained (November 2011) from tests of water taken from 14 existing wells. The wells were built in the years 1954÷1998. The water abstraction depth (difference between the terrain elevation and the dynamic water table level) is ranged from 276÷286 m a.s.l., with an average of 282.05 m a.s.l. Dynamic water table level is contained between 6.22 m÷16.44 m b.g.l., with a mean value of 9.64 m b.g.l. The latest data (January 2012) acquired from 3 new piezometers, with a depth of 9÷10m, which were made in other locations in the relevant area. Thematic databases, containing original data on coordinates X, Y (latitude, longitude) and Z (terrain elevation and time - years) and on regionalized variables, i.e. the underground water quality parameters in the Klodzko water intake area determined for different analytical configurations (22 wells, 14 wells, 14 wells + 3 piezometers), were created. Both archival data (acquired in the years 1977÷1999) and the latest data (collected in 2011÷2012) were analyzed

  2. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ratelle, Mylène; Coté, Jonathan; Bouchard, Michèle

    2015-12-01

    Biomonitoring of pyrethroid exposure is largely conducted but human toxicokinetics has not been fully documented. This is essential for a proper interpretation of biomonitoring data. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers have been documented and compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin dosing. Six volunteers ingested 0.1 mg kg(-1) bodyweight of cypermethrin acutely. The same volunteers were exposed to permethrin earlier. Blood samples were taken over 72 h after treatment and complete timed urine voids were collected over 84 h postdosing. Cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (trans- and cis-DCCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) metabolites, common to both cypermethrin and permethrin, were quantified. Blood and urinary time courses of all three metabolites were similar following cypermethrin and permethrin exposure. Plasma levels of metabolites reached peak values on average ≈ 5-7 h post-dosing; the elimination phase showed mean apparent half-lives (t½ ) for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA of 5.1, 6.9 and 9.2 h, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 7.1, 6.2 and 6.5 h after permethrin dosing. Corresponding mean values obtained from urinary rate time courses were peak values at ≈ 9 h post-dosing and apparent elimination t½ of 6.3, 6.4 and 6.4 h for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 5.4, 4.5 and 5.7 h after permethrin dosing. These data confirm that the kinetics of cypermethrin is similar to that of permethrin in humans and that their common biomarkers of exposure may be used for an overall assessment of exposure.

  3. Optimization of process parameters by response surface methodology and kinetic modeling for batch production of canthaxanthin by Dietzia maris NIT-D (accession number: HM151403).

    PubMed

    Goswami, Gargi; Chakraborty, Samarprit; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Dutta, Debjani

    2012-10-01

    Dietzia maris NIT-D, a canthaxanthin producer, was isolated during routine screening of pigment-producing bacteria. Response surface methodology was applied for statistical designing of process parameters for biomass and canthaxanthin production. The effects of four process parameters (considered as independent variables), namely temperature (10-30 °C), pH (4.75-5.75), shaker speed (75-135 rpm) and percentage inoculum (0.5-2.5 %) on the biomass and canthaxanthin yield (considered as dependent variables) were studied. As much as 122 mg L(-1) of canthaxanthin was obtained when Dietzia maris NIT-D was incubated for 120 h at 25 °C and 120 rpm, initial pH and percentage inoculum being 5.5 and 2 % respectively. The pigment yield is the highest reported till date, with Dietzia maris as the test organism. The maximum biomass yield was 7.39 g L(-1) under optimized process parameters. The predicted values were also verified by validation experiments in 5-day fermentation. Different mathematical models were used to describe growth and production, considering the effect of glucose in batch mode. The kinetic constants were calculated by fitting the experimental data to the models. Cell growth was inhibited beyond a glucose concentration of 15 g L(-1). Andrews' model gave the best fit with a R (2) value of 0.9993. During the exponential growth phase, the specific growth rate was found to remain fairly constant with respect to time. There was no inhibitory effect due to intracellular product accumulation for all concentrations of glucose. This observation is the first of its kind, as previous studies have reported that increasing accumulation of intracellular carotenoid exerts greater degree of inhibition on growth.

  4. Isoconversional Kinetics of Polymers: The Decade Past.

    PubMed

    Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2017-02-01

    This article surveys the decade of progress accomplished in the application of isoconversional methods to thermally stimulated processes in polymers. The processes of interest include: crystallization and melting of polymers, gelation of polymer solutions and gel melting, denaturation (unfolding) of proteins, glass transition, polymerization and crosslinking (curing), and thermal and thermo-oxidative degradation. Special attention is paid to the kinetics of polymeric nanomaterials. The article discusses basic principles for understanding the variations in the activation energy and emphasizes the possibility of using models for linking such variations to the parameters of individual kinetic steps. It is stressed that many kinetic effects are not linked to a change in the activation energy alone and may arise from changes in the preexponential factor and reaction model. Also noted is that some isoconversional methods are inapplicable to processes taking place on cooling and cannot be used to study such processes as the melt crystallization.

  5. Effects of secondary yield parameter variation on predicted equilibrium potential of an object in a charging environment. [using computerized simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.

    1979-01-01

    The sensitivity of predicted equilibrium potential to changes in secondary electron yield parameters was investigated using MATCHG, a simple charging code which incorporates the NASCAP material property formulations. The equilibrium potential was found to be a sensitive function of one of the two parameters specifying secondary electron yield due to proton impact and of essentially all the parameters specifying yield due to electron impact. The information on the electron generated secondary yield parameters was discovered to be obtainable from monoenergetic beam charging data if charging rates as well as equilibrium potentials are accurately recorded.

  6. Spatiotemporal variation of nitrate uptake kinetics within the maize (Zea mays L.) root system is associated with greater nitrate uptake and interactions with architectural phenes.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Silberbush, Moshe; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Increasing maize nitrogen acquisition efficiency is a major goal for the 21st century. Nitrate uptake kinetics (NUK) are defined by I max and K m, which denote the maximum uptake rate and the affinity of transporters, respectively. Because NUK have been studied predominantly at the molecular and whole-root system levels, little is known about the functional importance of NUK variation within root systems. A novel method was created to measure NUK of root segments that demonstrated variation in NUK among root classes (seminal, lateral, crown, and brace). I max varied among root class, plant age, and nitrate deprivation combinations, but was most affected by plant age, which increased I max, and nitrate deprivation time, which decreased I max K m was greatest for crown roots. The functional-structural simulation SimRoot was used for sensitivity analysis of plant growth to root segment I max and K m, as well as to test interactions of I max with root system architectural phenes. Simulated plant growth was more sensitive to I max than K m, and reached an asymptote near the maximum I max observed in the empirical studies. Increasing the I max of lateral roots had the largest effect on shoot growth. Additive effects of I max and architectural phenes on nitrate uptake were observed. Empirically, only lateral root tips aged 20 d operated at the maximum I max, and simulations demonstrated that increasing all seminal and lateral classes to this maximum rate could increase plant growth by as much as 26%. Therefore, optimizing I max for all maize root classes merits attention as a promising breeding goal.

  7. Variation in ruminal in situ degradation of crude protein and starch from maize grains compared to in vitro gas production kinetics and physical and chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Natascha; Steingaß, Herbert; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate in situ ruminal dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and starch degradation characteristics and in vitro gas production (GP) kinetics using a set of 20 different maize grain genotypes and (2) to predict the effective degradation (ED) of CP and starch from chemical and physical characteristics alone or in combination with in vitro GP measurements. Maize grains were characterised by different chemical and physical characteristics. Ruminal in situ degradation was measured in three lactating Jersey cows. Ground grains (sieve size: 2 mm) were incubated in bags for 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48 and 72 h. Bag residues were analysed for CP and starch content. Degradation kinetics was determined and the ED of DM, CP and starch calculated using a ruminal passage rate of 5%/h and 8%/h. The GP of the grains (sieve size: 1 mm) was recorded after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h incubation in buffered rumen fluid and fitted to an exponential equation to determine GP kinetics. Correlations and stepwise multiple linear regressions were evaluated for the prediction of ED calculated for a passage rate of 5%/h (ED5) for CP (EDCP5) and starch (EDST5). The in situ parameters and ED5 varied widely between genotypes with average values (±SD) of 64% ± 4.2, 62% ± 4.1 and 65% ± 5.2 for ED5 of DM, EDCP5 and EDST5 and were on average 10 percentage points lower for a passage rate of 8%/h. Degradation rates varied between 4.8%/h and 7.4%/h, 4.1%/h and 6.5%/h and 5.3%/h and 8.9%/h for DM, CP and starch, respectively. These rates were in the same range as GP rates (6.0-8.3%/h). The EDCP5 and EDST5 were related to CP concentration and could be evaluated in detail using CP fractions and specific amino acids. In vitro GP measurements and GP rates correlated well with EDCP5 and EDST5 and predicted EDCP5 and EDST5 in combination with the chemical characteristics of the samples. Equations can be used to obtain quick and cost effective information

  8. Visual evaluation of kinetic characteristics of PET probe for neuroreceptors using a two-phase graphic plot analysis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Ikoma, Yoko; Seki, Chie; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ichise, Masanori; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kanno, Iwao

    2017-02-08

    Objectives In PET studies for neuroreceptors, tracer kinetics are described by the two-tissue compartment model (2-TCM), and binding parameters, including the total distribution volume (V T), non-displaceable distribution volume (V ND), and binding potential (BPND), can be determined from model parameters estimated by kinetic analysis. The stability of binding parameter estimates depends on the kinetic characteristics of radioligands. To describe these kinetic characteristics, we previously developed a two-phase graphic plot analysis in which V ND and V T can be estimated from the x-intercept of regression lines for early and delayed phases, respectively. In this study, we applied this graphic plot analysis to visual evaluation of the kinetic characteristics of radioligands for neuroreceptors, and investigated a relationship between the shape of these graphic plots and the stability of binding parameters estimated by the kinetic analysis with 2-TCM in simulated brain tissue time-activity curves (TACs) with various binding parameters. Methods 90-min TACs were generated with the arterial input function and assumed kinetic parameters according to 2-TCM. Graphic plot analysis was applied to these simulated TACs, and the curvature of the plot for each TAC was evaluated visually. TACs with several noise levels were also generated with various kinetic parameters, and the bias and variation of binding parameters estimated by kinetic analysis were calculated in each TAC. These bias and variation were compared with the shape of graphic plots. Results The graphic plots showed larger curvature for TACs with higher specific binding and slower dissociation of specific binding. The quartile deviations of V ND and BPND determined by kinetic analysis were smaller for radioligands with slow dissociation. Conclusions The larger curvature of graphic plots for radioligands with slow dissociation might indicate a stable determination of V ND and BPND by kinetic analysis. For

  9. Protein Distribution and d34S Variation Within Microbially Formed Metal-Sulfide Colloids Provide Clues to the Mechanism and Kinetics of Extracellular Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, J. W.; Weber, P. K.; Martin, M. C.; Webb, R. I.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Banfield, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    Micron-scale spheroidal aggregates of 1-5 nanometer-diameter sphalerite and wurtzite particles form as the result of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Labrenz et al. 2000, Moreau et al. 2004). Because these particles can also sequester contaminant metal(loid)s such as Pb2+, Cd2+, As3+ and Hg2+, the process provides a model for the study of phenomena that occur during in situ environmental bioremediation. Our analyses have focused on biofilms growing on decaying wood in neutralized acid-mine drainage in subsurface regions of the flooded Piquette Mine near Tennyson, WI. The system experiences nearly constant annual temperatures of 8°C. Spectroscopic and electron diffraction methods revealed that the biogenic sulfides are virtually homogenous in composition (nearly pure ZnS), but contain both (cubic) sphalerite and metastable (hexagonal) wurtzite that reflect size-dependent phase stabilities. In order to explore the kinetics of sulfate reduction and metal sequestration, and to identify forces driving particle aggregation (thus, limiting their mobility in the subsurface), we have isotopically and biochemically characterized ultramicrotomed ZnS aggregates in situ using secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) and synchrotron Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (SR-FTIR). Initial nanoSIMS results showed that the spheroidal ZnS aggregates contain fine-scale variations in δ34S and significant organic nitrogen concentrations. SR-FTIR data support the presence of amide I and II absorption features indicative of the presence of polypeptides localized within aggregates. Efforts to isolate and identify candidate proteins are currently under way. We propose that isotopic heterogeneities may reflect open-system variations in the composition of local source sulfate (including via biologically-mediated reoxidation of biogenic sulfide), and/or variation in bacterial sulfate reduction rate over the growth cycle(s) of sulfate-reducers. Furthermore, we suggest that

  10. Assessment of total- and partial-body irradiation in a baboon model: preliminary results of a kinetic study including clinical, physical, and biological parameters.

    PubMed

    Hérodin, Francis; Richard, Sandrine; Grenier, Nancy; Arvers, Philippe; Gérome, Patrick; Baugé, Stéphane; Denis, Josiane; Chaussard, Hervé; Gouard, Stéphane; Mayol, Jean-François; Agay, Diane; Drouet, Michel

    2012-08-01

    This biodosimetry study used irradiated baboons to investigate the efficacy of a kinetic multiparameter (clinical, physical, and biological) approach for discriminating partial-body irradiation (PBI) and total-body irradiation (TBI). Animals were unilaterally (front) exposed to 60Co gamma rays (8 to 32 cGy min) using either TBI or vertical left hemi-body irradiation (HBI), as follows: 2.5 Gy TBI (n = 2), 5 Gy TBI (n = 2), 5 Gy HBI (n = 2), and 10 Gy HBI (n = 2). Midline tissue doses were measured at the anterior iliac crest level with an ionization chamber, and body dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Blood samples were collected before exposure and from 1 h until 200 d after irradiation. Clinical status, complete blood cell count, biochemical parameters, and cytogenetic analysis were evaluated. The partial least square discriminant analysis chosen for statistical analysis showed that the four groups of irradiated baboons were clearly separated. However, the dicentric chromosome assay may not distinguish HBI from TBI in confounding situations where equivalent whole-body doses are similar and the time of exposure is sufficient for peripheral blood lymphocyte homogenization. Interestingly, as bone marrow shielding in HBI animals prevented aplasia from happening, hematologic parameters such as the platelet count and Flt-3 ligand level helped to distinguish HBI and TBI. Moreover, the ratio of neutrophil to lymphocyte counts, creatine kinase, and citrulline levels may be discriminating biomarkers of dose or injury. Both early and delayed clinical signs and bioindicators appear to be useful for assessment of heterogeneous irradiation.

  11. Dependence of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters on hydrophilic-lipophilic character of alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam, doxepin and haloperidol in alkaline environment.

    PubMed

    Maślanka, Anna; Krzek, Jan; Szlósarczyk, Marek; Żmudzki, Paweł; Wach, Katarzyna

    2013-10-15

    Examination of the stability of clonazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, haloperidol, and doxepin in basic solutions was performed, together with an assessment of the kinetic (k, t0.1i t0.5) and thermodynamic (Ea, ΔH(++)i ΔS(++)) stability-indicating parameters, which were compared with the lipophilicity (logP) of the studied drugs. It was observed that the calculated values of Ea, ΔH(++) and ΔS(++) for the studied drugs increased from 41.04 kJ/mol to 125.50 kJ/mol, from 37.82 kJ/mol to 122.24 kJ/mol and from -167.09 J/Kmol to 53.02 J/Kmol, respectively, along with an increase of lipophilicity (logP) from 2.12 to 4.30 for the most hydrophilic alprazolam to the most lipophilic haloperidol. The degradation products were identified using UPLC/MS/MS method.

  12. Kinetic Parameters and Cytotoxic Activity of Recombinant Methionine γ-Lyase from Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Citrobacter freundii

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, E. A.; Kulikova, V. V.; Yashin, D. V.; Anufrieva, N. V.; Anisimova, N. Y.; Revtovich, S. V.; Kotlov, M. I.; Belyi, Y. F.; Pokrovsky, V. S.; Demidkina, T. V.

    2013-01-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent recombinant methionine γ -lyase from three pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined in β- and γ-elimination reactions. The enzyme from C. sporogenes is characterized by the highest catalytic efficiency in the γ-elimination reaction of L-methionine. It was demonstrated that the enzyme from these three sources exists as a tetramer. The N-terminal poly-histidine fragment of three recombinant enzymes influences their catalytic activity and facilitates the aggregation of monomers to yield dimeric forms under denaturing conditions. The cytotoxicity of methionine γ-lyase from C. sporogenes and C. tetani in comparison with Citrobacter freundii was evaluated using K562, PC-3, LnCap, MCF7, SKOV-3, and L5178y tumor cell lines. K562 (IC50=0.4–1.3 U/ml), PC-3 (IC50=0.1–0.4 U/ml), and MCF7 (IC50=0.04–3.2 U/ml) turned out to be the most sensitive cell lines. PMID:24303205

  13. Kinetic Parameters and Cytotoxic Activity of Recombinant Methionine γ-Lyase from Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Yashin, D V; Anufrieva, N V; Anisimova, N Y; Revtovich, S V; Kotlov, M I; Belyi, Y F; Pokrovsky, V S; Demidkina, T V

    2013-07-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent recombinant methionine γ -lyase from three pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined in β- and γ-elimination reactions. The enzyme from C. sporogenes is characterized by the highest catalytic efficiency in the γ-elimination reaction of L-methionine. It was demonstrated that the enzyme from these three sources exists as a tetramer. The N-terminal poly-histidine fragment of three recombinant enzymes influences their catalytic activity and facilitates the aggregation of monomers to yield dimeric forms under denaturing conditions. The cytotoxicity of methionine γ-lyase from C. sporogenes and C. tetani in comparison with Citrobacter freundii was evaluated using K562, PC-3, LnCap, MCF7, SKOV-3, and L5178y tumor cell lines. K562 (IC50=0.4-1.3 U/ml), PC-3 (IC50=0.1-0.4 U/ml), and MCF7 (IC50=0.04-3.2 U/ml) turned out to be the most sensitive cell lines.

  14. Variation of free asparagine concentration and association with quality parameters for hard red spring wheat grown in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free asparagine in wheat is known to be a precursor for the formation of acrylamide which is unacceptable to consumers due to its potential risks to human health. This research was performed to determine variation of free asparagine concentration (FAC) in hard red spring (HRS) wheat grown in North ...

  15. Diurnal radon variations in the upper soil layers and at the soil-air interface related to meteorological parameters.

    PubMed

    Schubert, M; Schulz, H

    2002-07-01

    Measurements of the radon concentration in a column (1 m2 x 2 m) consisting of a homogeneous mixture of dry sand and uranium tailings have been performed to obtain information on the radon transport under well defined conditions. The dependence of the radon concentration has been exclusively studied on the soil/air temperature gradient and on the wind speed. The soil moisture content has been kept constant. Significant diurnal variations of the radon concentration were detected in the uppermost soil layer and at the soil/air interface. Such a behavior was not found in 30 cm and deeper soil layers. It is argued that the diurnal radon variation in the uppermost soil layer is mainly associated with the diurnal inversion of the soil/air temperature gradient giving rise to a convective soil gas migration additional to the common upward diffusion processes, whereas the diurnal variation of the radon concentration at the soil/air interface is caused by the interplay of the temperature gradient and the wind speed. No impact of atmospheric pressure variations on the radon migration has been observed.

  16. Statistical variations of source parameters in inter- and intraplate earthquakes in Chile and their correlations with the slab properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derode, B.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the rupture processes of intermediate-depth earthquakes in active subduction zones and their dependence to inherited geophysical parameters, such as the maturity and orientation of pre-existing faults, is still of prime interest. Unfortunately, quantitative values describing the nucleation and propagation processes at depths are rare, and the earthquake source parameters determined from global databases or far-field measurements are often very heterogeneous, especially for the smallest and deepest earthquakes. In order to leveling this problem and discriminate specific characteristics of the intermediate-depth earthquakes in Chile (IDEQ-Chile), we conducted high precision measurements using local and regional waveforms data obtained from broadband and strong-motions stations of IPOC network in northern Chile. A strict and rigorous methodology was used to reduce the scattering of the source parameter estimation usually observed. With this high-quality database, we examined the source characteristics of a few hundreds of intra-slab intermediate depth-earthquakes, with depth varying from 40 km to 300 km. For the effective comparison of the source parameters, we studied with the same approach a hundred of interplate earthquakes located along the same latitude-dependent zone of the subducted slab. Based on static and cinematic considerations, we compared these source parameters with macroscopic geophysical parameters such as the stress regime, the coupling degree or the style of faulting, in order to show the possible correlations between them. Interestingly, we observed three major depth-dependent zones corresponding to three different sets of static and dynamic source parameters. We show that there are some evident differences between these distinct Chilean zones, although the apparent quasi-constant velocity and age of the subducted Nazca plate along Chile. We discuss how some of the various proposed sources mechanisms, explaining the earthquakes

  17. Measuring earthquake source parameters in the Mendocino triple junction region using a dense OBS array: Implications for fault strength variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Subduction zones produce earthquakes on a set of faults that operate under a wide variety of conditions resulting from considerable variations in depth, temperature, rock type, and fluid pressure. These variations likely lead to variation in the stress levels that drives particular earthquakes and that in turn effects the magnitude of seismic shaking they produce. In the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) region, intraplate faults within the mantle of the subducting plate fail regularly in energetic earthquakes while the adjacent thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone remains seismically quiet despite the likelihood that it operates at much lower levels of stress and strength. In 2012, as part of the Cascadia Initiative community experiment, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array was deployed in the MTJ area, providing unusually dense data covering both the inter- and intra-plate earthquakes. Combining these data with onshore networks, we detect and relocate 1137 earthquakes with a three dimensional velocity model. We perform detailed spectral and time domain analysis to study variations in earthquake source properties between the different types of faults. We observe a wide variability of stress drops and systematic lateral and depth variations in the earthquake source spectra resulting from the different types of tectonic fault systems in this region: intraplate faults within the subducted oceanic mantle, the Mendocino transform plate boundary fault, and the thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone. Some of the depth variability of source spectra can be explained by the expected increase in rupture velocity with depth. However, the overall variation in stress drop estimates is consistent with the highest stress drop earthquakes occurring in the depth range predicted by strength envelopes. Moreover, the earthquakes in the vicinity of the thrust interface, likely including some within the subducted oceanic crust, show clearly lower stress drops and

  18. Effects of particle size and coating on toxicologic parameters, fecal elimination kinetics and tissue distribution of acutely ingested silver nanoparticles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Wilding, Laura A; Morishita, Masako; Walacavage, Kim; Ault, Andrew P; Axson, Jessica L; Stark, Diana I; Hashway, Sara A; Capracotta, Sonja S; Leroueil, Pascale R; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Consumer exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNP) via ingestion can occur due to incorporation of AgNP into products such as food containers and dietary supplements. AgNP variations in size and coating may affect toxicity, elimination kinetics or tissue distribution. Here, we directly compared acute administration of AgNP of two differing coatings and sizes to mice, using doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight/day administered by oral gavage for 3 days. The maximal dose is equivalent to 2000× the EPA oral reference dose. Silver acetate at the same doses was used as ionic silver control. We found no toxicity and no significant tissue accumulation. Additionally, no toxicity was seen when AgNP were dosed concurrently with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. Between 70.5% and 98.6% of the administered silver dose was recovered in feces and particle size and coating differences did not significantly influence fecal silver. Peak fecal silver was detected between 6- and 9-h post-administration and <0.5% of the administered dose was cumulatively detected in liver, spleen, intestines or urine at 48 h. Although particle size and coating did not affect tissue accumulation, silver was detected in liver, spleen and kidney of mice administered ionic silver at marginally higher levels than those administered AgNP, suggesting that silver ion may be more bioavailable. Our results suggest that, irrespective of particle size and coating, acute oral exposure to AgNP at doses relevant to potential human exposure is associated with predominantly fecal elimination and is not associated with accumulation in tissue or toxicity.

  19. Combining wood anatomy and stable isotope variations in a 600-year multi-parameter climate reconstruction from Corsican black pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Sonja; Hetzer, Timo; Bräuning, Achim; Joachimski, Michael M.; Leuschner, Hanns-Hubert; Kuhlemann, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    We present a new multi-parameter dataset from Corsican black pine growing on the island of Corsica in the Western Mediterranean basin covering the period AD 1410-2008. Wood parameters measured include tree-ring width, latewood width, earlywood width, cell lumen area, cell width, cell wall thickness, modelled wood density, as well as stable carbon and oxygen isotopes. We evaluated the relationships between different parameters and determined the value of the dataset for climate reconstructions. Correlation analyses revealed that carbon isotope ratios are influenced by cell parameters determining cell size, whereas oxygen isotope ratios are influenced by cell parameters determining the amount of transportable water in the xylem. A summer (June to August) precipitation reconstruction dating back to AD 1185 was established based on tree-ring width. No long-term trends or pronounced periods with extreme high/low precipitation are recorded in our reconstruction, indicating relatively stable moisture conditions over the entire time period. By comparing the precipitation reconstruction with a summer temperature reconstruction derived from the carbon isotope chronologies, we identified summers with extreme climate conditions, i.e. warm-dry, warm-wet, cold-dry and cold-wet. Extreme climate conditions during summer months were found to influence cell parameter characteristics. Cold-wet summers promote the production of broad latewood composed of wide and thin-walled tracheids, while warm-wet summers promote the production of latewood with small thick-walled cells. The presented dataset emphasizes the potential of multi-parameter wood analysis from one tree species over long time scales.

  20. Study on the effect of hydrogen addition on the variation of plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge for synthesis of TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Bhuyan, Heman

    2016-04-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen addition on plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge plasma in the synthesis of H-doped TiO2 films. The parameters of the hydrogen-added Ar/O2 plasma influence the properties and the structural phases of the deposited TiO2 film. Therefore, the variation of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (Te), electron density (ne), ion density (ni), degree of ionization of Ar and degree of dissociation of H2 as a function of hydrogen content in the discharge is studied. Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the plasma. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase of the magnetron discharge, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. It is observed that the electron and heavy ion density decline with gradual addition of hydrogen in the discharge. Hydrogen addition significantly changes the degree of ionization of Ar which influences the structural phases of the TiO2 film.

  1. Coalescent-based method for learning parameters of admixture events from large-scale genetic variation data.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chi; Blelloch, Guy; Ravi, R; Schwartz, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying the timing and the genetic contributions of parental populations to a hybrid population is an important but challenging problem in reconstructing evolutionary histories from genetic variation data. With the advent of high throughput genotyping technologies, new methods suitable for large-scale data are especially needed. Furthermore, existing methods typically assume the assignment of individuals into subpopulations is known, when that itself is a difficult problem often unresolved for real data. Here, we propose a novel method that combines prior work for inferring non reticulate population structures with an MCMC scheme for sampling over admixture scenarios to both identify population assignments and learn divergence times and admixture proportions for those populations using genome-scale admixed genetic variation data. We validated our method using coalescent simulations and a collection of real bovine and human variation data. On simulated sequences, our methods show better accuracy and faster run time than leading competitive methods in estimating admixture fractions and divergence times. Analysis on the real data further shows our methods to be effective at matching our best current knowledge about the relevant populations.

  2. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity of Fthiotida, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael; Aarabelos, Dimitrios; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyridon

    2014-05-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ) . The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identifiation of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance, p, as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check on posterior if the variation of the confidence level index, p, indicate the fault matureness in the case of the recent seismic activity at Fthiotida, Greece. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in Terrestrial and Stellar Environment, eds.D. Arabelos, M

  3. [Variation of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in dairy cattle and its effect on the viability parameters].

    PubMed

    Kovaliuk, N V; Satsuk, V F; Volchenko, A E

    2012-08-01

    Genotyping of the BoLA-DRB3 alleles was performed in dairy cattle of Krasnodar krai and Holstein stud bulls. Loss of heterozygosity, which decreased the reproductive parameters, was observed. It was proposed that stud bulls be selected on the basis of their genotyping at the BoLA-DRB3 gene to prevent further decay of cattle viability.

  4. A study on the effect of gamma irradiation on Poly [-Ethylene Oxide]: structural modification and variation in the kinetics of isoconversional phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, M.; Saha, M.; Ray, R.; Tarafdar, S.

    2016-10-01

    Interactions of Poly [-Ethylene Oxide] [PEO of molecular weight 105] and gamma irradiation with variable doses (1-30 kGy) are studied for the thermal, crystalline and structural properties using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technique. Two states of PEO, viz. powder (P-S-series) and methanol solution (P-L-series) are subjected to irradiation and then cast into uniform films at room temperature. DSC results have revealed steady increment of crystallinity up to 20 kGy for P-S-series which starts reducing till 30 kGy. Conversely, P-L-series shows much enhanced crystallinity retained within low irradiation regime of 7 kGy, followed by sharp declining trend till 30 kGy. DSC is employed to study the influence of gamma radiation on multiple kinetic processes in an isoconversional melting of PEO using Friedman differential analysis. This study illustrates the variation of activation with degree of conversion of melting for different doses on irradiated PEO powder and methanol solution. Gamma irradiation is found to generate newer functional groups which are also established from FTIR study. Presence of -C=O and -C=C- groups in FTIR spectra reveals the predominance of scission during air assisted irradiation. FTIR spectra also prove higher degree of cross-linking in irradiation of methanol solution. The observations of DSC and FTIR are correlated with polymer microstructures. Therefore, selective irradiation dose can effectively be utilized to tailor the properties of PEO depending upon the exposed powder or methanol solution of polymer.

  5. Increase in winter haze over eastern China in recent decades: Roles of variations in meteorological parameters and anthropogenic emissions: INCREASE IN WINTER HAZE IN EASTERN CHINA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yang; Liao, Hong; Lou, Sijia

    2016-11-05

    The increase in winter haze over eastern China in recent decades due to variations in meteorological parameters and anthropogenic emissions was quantified using observed atmospheric visibility from the National Climatic Data Center Global Summary of Day database for 1980–2014 and simulated PM2.5 concentrations for 1985–2005 from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Observed winter haze days averaged over eastern China (105–122.5°E, 20–45°N) increased from 21 d in 1980 to 42 d in 2014, and from 22 to 30 d between 1985 and 2005. The GEOS-Chem model captured the increasing trend of winter PM2.5 concentrations for 1985–2005, with concentrations averaged over eastern China increasing from 16.1 μg m-3 in 1985 to 38.4 μg m-3 in 2005. Considering variations in both anthropogenic emissions and meteorological parameters, the model simulated an increase in winter surface-layer PM2.5 concentrations of 10.5 (±6.2) μg m-3 decade-1 over eastern China. The increasing trend was only 1.8 (±1.5) μg m-3 decade-1 when variations in meteorological parameters alone were considered. Among the meteorological parameters, the weakening of winds by -0.09 m s-1 decade-1 over 1985–2005 was found to be the dominant factor leading to the decadal increase in winter aerosol concentrations and haze days over eastern China during recent decades.

  6. An easy-to-use simulation program demonstrates variations in bacterial cell cycle parameters depending on medium and temperature.

    PubMed

    Stokke, Caroline; Flåtten, Ingvild; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Many studies are performed on chromosome replication and segregation in Escherichia coli and other bacteria capable of complex replication with C phases spanning several generations. For such investigations an understanding of the replication patterns, including copy numbers of origins and replication forks, is crucial for correct interpretation of the results.Flow cytometry is an important tool for generation of experimental DNA distributions of cell populations. Here, a Visual Basic based simulation program was written for the computation of theoretical DNA distributions for different choices of cell cycle parameters (C and D phase durations, doubling time etc). These cell cycle parameters can be iterated until the best fit between the experimental and theoretical DNA histograms is obtained. The Excel file containing the simulation software is attached as supporting information.Cultures of Escherichia coli were grown at twelve different media and temperature conditions, with following measurements by flow cytometry and simulation of the DNA distributions. A good fit was found for each growth condition by use of our simulation program. The resulting cell cycle parameters displayed clear inter-media differences in replication patterns, but indicated a high degree of temperature independence for each medium. The exception was the poorest medium (acetate), where the cells grew with overlapping replication cycles at 42 °C, but without at the lower temperatures.We have developed an easy-to-use tool for determination of bacteria's cell cycle parameters, and consequently the cells' chromosome configurations. The procedure only requires DNA distribution measurements by flow cytometry. Use of this simulation program for E. coli cultures shows that even cells growing quite slowly can have overlapping replication cycles. It is therefore always important not only to assume cells' replication patterns, but to actually determine the cell cycle parameters when changing growth

  7. Can the monitoring of animal welfare parameters predict pork meat quality variation through the supply chain (from farm to slaughter)?

    PubMed

    Rocha, L M; Velarde, A; Dalmau, A; Saucier, L; Faucitano, L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between the animal welfare conditions evaluated through the supply chain and pork quality variation. A total of 4,680 pigs from 12 farms-5 animal welfare improved raising system (AWIRS) and 7 conventional raising system (CON) farms-were assessed from farm to slaughter through a comprehensive audit protocol merging the European Welfare Quality, the Canadian Animal Care Assessment, and American Meat Institute audit guide criteria. At the abattoir, a subsample of 1,440 pigs (120 pigs/farm) was randomly chosen out of 24 loads (2 farms per wk) transported by 2 drivers (driver A and driver B) for the assessment of stunning effectiveness, carcass bruises, blood lactate levels, and meat quality traits. Meat quality was assessed in the longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle 24 h postmortem by measuring ultimate pH (pHu), color (L*, a*, and b*), and drip loss. Data were analyzed by the MIXED, GLIMMIX, and NAPAR1WAY procedures of SAS. Spearman correlations were calculated to determine the relationship between audit scores and meat quality traits. Better animal welfare conditions, as showed by greater final scores for good housing (GHo; = 0.001) and good health ( = 0.006) principles, were recorded at AWIRS farms. Pigs from AWIRS farms handled by driver B displayed a greater percentage of turning back ( = 0.01) and slips ( < 0.001) during unloading and a greater ( = 0.02) frequency of falls in the stunning chute. A greater ( = 0.02) reluctance to move at loading was found in CON pigs loaded by driver A compared with driver B, whereas a greater ( < 0.001) reluctance to move was found in these pigs at unloading when they were unloaded by driver B. Drip loss was higher ( = 0.003) and pale, soft, and exudative pork percentage was greater ( < 0.001) in the LL muscle of the heavier AWIRS pigs. The GHO principle was best correlated with pHu ( = -0.75, = 0.01) and Minolta L* value ( = 0.87, < 0.001) of the LL muscle. Overall, drip

  8. Kinetic parameters of the GUINEVERE reference configuration in VENUS-F reactor obtained from a pile noise experiment using Rossi and Feynman methods

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, Benoit; Pepino, Alexandra; Blaise, Patrick; Mellier, Frederic; Kochetkov, Anatoly; Vittiglio, Guido; Billebaud, Annick

    2015-07-01

    A pile noise measurement campaign has been conducted by the CEA in the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol Belgium) in April 2011 in the reference critical configuration of the GUINEVERE experimental program. The experimental setup made it possible to estimate the core kinetic parameters: the prompt neutron decay constant, the delayed neutron fraction and the generation time. A precise assessment of these constants is of prime importance. In particular, the effective delayed neutron fraction is used to normalize and compare calculated reactivities of different subcritical configurations, obtained by modifying either the core layout or the control rods position, with experimental ones deduced from the analysis of measurements. This paper presents results obtained with a CEA-developed time stamping acquisition system. Data were analyzed using Rossi-α and Feynman-α methods. Results were normalized to reactor power using a calibrated fission chamber with a deposit of Np-237. Calculated factors were necessary to the analysis: the Diven factor was computed by the ENEA (Italy) and the power calibration factor by the CNRS/IN2P3/LPC Caen. Results deduced with both methods are consistent with respect to calculated quantities. Recommended values are given by the Rossi-α estimator, that was found to be the most robust. The neutron generation time was found equal to 0.438 ± 0.009 μs and the effective delayed neutron fraction is 765 ± 8 pcm. Discrepancies with the calculated value (722 pcm, calculation from ENEA) are satisfactory: -5.6% for the Rossi-α estimate and -2.7% for the Feynman-α estimate. (authors)

  9. Biohydrogen production based on the evaluation of kinetic parameters of a mixed microbial culture using glucose and fruit-vegetable waste as feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Peña, E I; Canul-Chan, M; Chairez, I; Salgado-Manjarez, E; Aranda-Barradas, J

    2013-09-01

    Hydrogen (H2) production from the organic fraction of solid waste such as fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) is a novel and feasible energy technology. Continuous application of this process would allow for the simultaneous treatment of organic residues and energy production. In this study, batch experiments were conducted using glucose as substrate, and data of H2 production obtained were successfully adjusted by a logistic model. The kinetic parameters (μ max = 0.101 h(-1), K s = 2.56 g/L) of an H2-producing microbial culture determined by the Monod and Haldane-Andrews growth models were used to establish the continuous culture conditions. This strategy led to a productive steady state in continuous culture. Once the steady state was reached in the continuous reactor, a maximum H2 production of 700 mL was attained. The feasibility of producing H2 from the FVW obtained from a local market in Mexico City was also evaluated using batch conditions. The effect of the initial FVW concentration on the H2 production and waste organic material degradation was determined. The highest H2 production rate (1.7 mmol/day), the highest cumulative H2 volume (310 mL), and 25 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were obtained with an initial substrate (FVW) concentration of 37 g COD/L. The lowest H2 production rates were obtained with relatively low initial substrate concentrations of 5 and 11 g COD/L. The H2 production rates with FVW were also characterized by the logistic model. Similar cumulative H2 production was obtained when glucose and FVW were used as substrates.

  10. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by Ceratocystis paradoxa MSR2 Using Isotherm Modelling, Kinetic Study and Optimization of Batch Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Chidambaram

    2015-01-01

    This study is focused on the possible use of Ceratocystis paradoxa MSR2 native biomass for Cr(VI) biosorption. The influence of experimental parameters such as initial pH, temperature, biomass dosage, initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time were optimized using batch systems as well as response surface methodology (RSM). Maximum Cr(VI) removal of 68.72% was achieved, at an optimal condition of biomass dosage 2g L−1, initial Cr(VI) concentration of 62.5 mg L−1 and contact time of 60 min. The closeness of the experimental and the predicted values exhibit the success of RSM. The biosorption mechanism of MSR2 biosorbent was well described by Langmuir isotherm and a pseudo second order kinetic model, with a high regression coefficient. The thermodynamic study also revealed the spontaneity and exothermic nature of the process. The surface characterization using FT-IR analysis revealed the involvement of amine, carbonyl and carboxyl groups in the biosorption process. Additionally, desorption efficiency of 92% was found with 0.1 M HNO3. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency, increased with increase in metal ion concentration, biomass concentration, temperature but with a decrease in pH. The size of the MSR2 biosorbent material was found to be 80 μm using particle size analyzer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) visualizes the distribution of Cr(VI) on the biosorbent binding sites with alterations in the MSR2 surface structure. The SEM-EDAX analysis was also used to evaluate the binding characteristics of MSR2 strain with Cr(VI) metals. The mechanism of Cr(VI) removal of MSR2 biomass has also been proposed. PMID:25822726

  11. The effect of wind and eruption source parameter variations on tephra fallout hazard assessment: an example from Vesuvio (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Scollo, Simona; Neri, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainty in the tephra fallout hazard assessment may depend on different meteorological datasets and eruptive source parameters used in the modelling. We present a statistical study to analyze this uncertainty in the case of a sub-Plinian eruption of Vesuvius of VEI = 4, column height of 18 km and total erupted mass of 5 × 1011 kg. The hazard assessment for tephra fallout is performed using the advection-diffusion model Hazmap. Firstly, we analyze statistically different meteorological datasets: i) from the daily atmospheric soundings of the stations located in Brindisi (Italy) between 1962 and 1976 and between 1996 and 2012, and in Pratica di Mare (Rome, Italy) between 1996 and 2012; ii) from numerical weather prediction models of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Furthermore, we modify the total mass, the total grain-size distribution, the eruption column height, and the diffusion coefficient. Then, we quantify the impact that different datasets and model input parameters have on the probability maps. Results shows that the parameter that mostly affects the tephra fallout probability maps, keeping constant the total mass, is the particle terminal settling velocity, which is a function of the total grain-size distribution, particle density and shape. Differently, the evaluation of the hazard assessment weakly depends on the use of different meteorological datasets, column height and diffusion coefficient.

  12. Variations of ionospheric profile parameters during solar maximum and comparison with IRI-2007 over Chung-Li, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuo, Y. J.

    2012-08-01

    This paper studies the seasonal changes in the diurnal variation of ionospheric bottomside slab thickness (B0), based on observations during high solar activities at the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) area station of Chung-Li (121.1° E, 24.9° N), Taiwan. The data examined in this investigation are derived from ionograms recorded at Chung-Li in 1999, and are compared with International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2007) model values. In our data set B0 shows largest values and biggest changes during the daytime (06:00-12:00 LT) particularly in the summer. Moreover, the diurnal variation of B0 shows an abnormal peak during the pre-sunrise period, especially in the winter. The variation in the F-peak height (hmF2) is related to a thermospheric wind traveling toward the equator, which also enhances B0 during the pre-sunrise period. The results of the comparison with the IRI model show that B0 is overestimated, in both the B0-table and the Gulyaeva option, after noon LT in the equinox (B0-table and Gulyaeva average values for the overestimation are 11 and 47 km, respectively) and summer (B0-table and Gulyaeva average values for the overestimation are 23 and 71 km, respectively) periods. Furthermore, the modeled values are underestimated at approximately 31 and 14 km for the table and Gulyaeva option during the daytime in the winter, respectively. The F2-layer maximum electron density (NmF2) data show reasonably favorable agreement with the model for a high correlation coefficient of approximately 0.97, with the major difference observed at approximately noon in the equinox and winter seasons. Regarding the hmF2 data, the model shows agreement with the observed values, and the largest discrepancy (average value is 39 km) was observed in the summer and the smallest (average value is 11 km) in the equinox season. This paper provides a comprehensive discussion on the relationship among B0, the NmF2 and the hmF2 for geomagnetic storm events.

  13. Kinetic investigation of wood pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thurner, F.; Mann, U.; Beck, S. R.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the kinetics of the primary reactions of wood pyrolysis. A new experimental method was developed which enabled us to measure the rate of gas, tar, and char production while taking into account the temperature variations during the wood heating up. The experimental method developed did not require any sophisticated instruments. It facilitated the collection of gas, tar and residue (unreacted wood and char) as well as accurate measurement of the temperature inside the wood sample. Expressions relating the kinetic parameters to the measured variables were derived. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated in the range of 300 to 400/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure and under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction temperature and mass fractions of gas, tar, and residue were measured as a function of time. Assuming first-order reactions, the kinetic parameters were determined using differential method. The measured activation energies of wood pyrolysis to gas, tar, and char were 88.6, 112.7, and 106.5 kJ/mole, respectively. These kinetic data were then used to predict the yield of the various pyrolysis products. It was found that the best prediction was obtained when an integral-mean temperature obtained from the temperature-time curve was used as reaction temperature. The pyrolysis products were analyzed to investigate the influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the composition. The gas consisted mainly of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and C/sub 3//sup +/-compounds. The gas composition depended on reaction time as well as reactor temperature. The tar analysis indicated that the tar consisted of about seven compounds. Its major compound was believed to be levoglucosan. Elemental analysis for the char showed that the carbon content increased with increasing temperature.

  14. Discrimination of inland and coastal dunes in Eastern Saudi Arabia desert system: An approach from particle size and textural parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeshidayatullah, Ardiansyah; Chan, Septriandi Asmaidi; Al-Ghamdi, Majed; Akif, Tariq; Al-Ramadan, Khalid

    2016-05-01

    Different particle size parameters have been investigated in this study in order to distinguish the characteristics of different dune morphologies in the Eastern Saudi Arabia. Sand samples were collected from various environments including: the stoss, lee, crest and interdune sides of the inland dunes and foreshore; berm; backshore and backdune of the coastal dunes. Statistical parameters reveal that the majority of inland dune samples are dominated by well sorted fine sand whereas coastal dune samples are mainly dominated by very coarse to medium sand, ranging from well sorted to moderately sorted with a low percentage of silt and clay. The presence of relatively coarser grains in the coastal dunes might be explained by continuous wind deflation along the coast together with wave and tidal activities that concentrate coarser grains. Cross-plots from four statistical parameters and supported by the ANOVA test clearly distinguish the particle variations between these dunes. The log-probability analysis suggest that the main transport mechanism in inland and coastal dunes is dominated by the saltation population, comprising up to 80 percent of the distribution. However, the coastal dunes suspension population is mostly belonging to coarser grained material, whereas the inland dunes population is finer. In comparison with particle size characteristics of dunes in the region, the current study shows a close relationship to mean particle size in Iraq, but is relatively finer compared to the Kuwait dunes. This similarity and difference in particle size variation is mostly controlled by the proximity to the coast and also the wind energy and variation in the wind direction.

  15. Cross-laboratory comparative study of the impact of experimental and regression methodologies on salmonella thermal inactivation parameters in ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isothermal inactivation studies are commonly used to quantify thermal inactivation kinetics of bacteria. Meta-analyses and comparisons utilizing results from multiple