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Sample records for kinetics parameters variations

  1. Sensitivity of benzene natural attenuation to variations in kinetic and transport parameters in Liwa Aquifer, UAE.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed M; Saleh, Nawal E; Sherif, Mohsen M

    2010-04-01

    Dissolved benzene was detected in the shallow unconfined Liwa aquifer (UAE). This aquifer represents the main freshwater source for a nearby residence camp area. A finite element model is used to simulate the fate, transport, and attenuation of the dissolved benzene plume to help decision makers assess natural attenuation as a viable remediation option. Sensitivity of benzene attenuation to uncertainties in the estimation of some of the kinetic and transport parameters is studied. It was found that natural attenuation is more sensitive to microbial growth rate and half saturation coefficients of both benzene and oxygen than initial biomass concentration and dispersivity coefficients. Increasing microbial growth rate by fourfold increased natural attenuation effectiveness after 40 years by 10%; while decreasing it by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 77%. On the other hand, increasing half saturation coefficient by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 46% in 40 years. Decreasing the same parameter fourfold caused natural attenuation effectiveness to increase by 9%.

  2. Non-Isothermic Chemical Kinetics in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Arrhenius Parameters from Experiments with Hyperbolic Temperature Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvador, F.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a method which adapts itself to the characteristics of the kinetics of a chemical reaction in solution, enabling students to determine the Arrhenius parameters with satisfactory accuracy by means of a single non-isothermic experiment. Both activation energy and the preexponential factor values can be obtained by the method. (JN)

  3. Photochemical ozone creation potentials for oxygenated volatile organic compounds: sensitivity to variations in kinetic and mechanistic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, Michael E.; Hayman, Garry D.

    The sensitivity of Photochemical Ozone Creation Potentials (POCP) to a series of systematic variations in the rates and products of reactions of radical intermediates and oxygenated products is investigated for the C 4 alcohols, 1-butanol ( n-butanol) and 2-methyl-1-propanol ( i-butanol), using the recently developed Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) as the base case. The POCP values are determined from the calculated formation of ozone in the boundary layer over a period of approximately five days along an idealised straight line trajectory, using a photochemical trajectory model and methodology described in detail previously. The results allow the relative impacts on calculated ozone formation of various classes of chemical reaction within the degradation chemistry to be assessed. The calculated POCP is found to be very insensitive to many of the changes investigated. However, it is found to be sensitive to variations in the rate coefficient for the initiating reaction with OH ( kOH), although the sensitivity decreases with increasing kOH. The POCP appears to vary approximately linearly with kOH at low values (i.e. kOH less than ca. 4×10 -13 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1), whereas at high reactivities (i.e. kOH greater than ca. 4×10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1), the calculated POCP value is comparatively insensitive to the precise value of kOH. The POCP is also very sensitive to mechanistic changes which influence the yields of unreactive oxygenated products (i.e. those with OH reactivities below ca. 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1), for example acetone. The propensity of the organic compound to produce organic nitrates (which act as comparatively unreactive reservoirs for free radicals and NO x) also appears to have a notable influence on the calculated POCP. Recently reported information relevant to the degradation of oxygenated VOCs is then used to update the chemical schemes for the 17 alcohols and glycols, 10 ethers and glycol ethers, and 8 esters included in the MCM

  4. Magnetic hyperthermia properties of nanoparticles inside lysosomes using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations: Influence of key parameters and dipolar interactions, and evidence for strong spatial variation of heating power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, R. P.; Carrey, J.; Respaud, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the influence of dipolar interactions in magnetic hyperthermia experiments is of crucial importance for fine optimization of nanoparticle (NP) heating power. In this study we use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to calculate hysteresis loops that correctly account for both time and temperature. This algorithm is shown to correctly reproduce the high-frequency hysteresis loop of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic NPs without any ad hoc or artificial parameters. The algorithm is easily parallelizable with a good speed-up behavior, which considerably decreases the calculation time on several processors and enables the study of assemblies of several thousands of NPs. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic NPs dispersed inside spherical lysosomes is studied as a function of several key parameters: volume concentration, applied magnetic field, lysosome size, NP diameter, and anisotropy. The influence of these parameters is illustrated and comprehensively explained. In summary, magnetic interactions increase the coercive field, saturation field, and hysteresis area of major loops. However, for small amplitude magnetic fields such as those used in magnetic hyperthermia, the heating power as a function of concentration can increase, decrease, or display a bell shape, depending on the relationship between the applied magnetic field and the coercive/saturation fields of the NPs. The hysteresis area is found to be well correlated with the parallel or antiparallel nature of the dipolar field acting on each particle. The heating power of a given NP is strongly influenced by a local concentration involving approximately 20 neighbors. Because this local concentration strongly decreases upon approaching the surface, the heating power increases or decreases in the vicinity of the lysosome membrane. The amplitude of variation reaches more than one order of magnitude in certain conditions. This transition occurs on a thickness corresponding to approximately

  5. Determination of kinetic parameters for biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, A; Pizarro, C; García, R; Bueno, J L; Lavín, A G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a wide database of kinetic data for the most common biomass by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Due to the characteristic parameters of DTG curves, a two-stage reaction model is proposed and the kinetic parameters obtained from model-based methods with energy activation values for first and second stages in the range 1.75·10(4)-1.55·10(5)J/mol and 1.62·10(4)-2.37·10(5)J/mol, respectively. However, it has been found that Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose model-free methods are not suitable to determine the kinetic parameters of biomass combustion since the assumptions of these two methods were not accomplished in the full range of the combustion process.

  6. Determination of kinetic parameters for biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, A; Pizarro, C; García, R; Bueno, J L; Lavín, A G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a wide database of kinetic data for the most common biomass by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Due to the characteristic parameters of DTG curves, a two-stage reaction model is proposed and the kinetic parameters obtained from model-based methods with energy activation values for first and second stages in the range 1.75·10(4)-1.55·10(5)J/mol and 1.62·10(4)-2.37·10(5)J/mol, respectively. However, it has been found that Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose model-free methods are not suitable to determine the kinetic parameters of biomass combustion since the assumptions of these two methods were not accomplished in the full range of the combustion process. PMID:27233095

  7. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  8. UPRE method for total variation parameter selection

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt; Lin, Youzuo

    2008-01-01

    Total Variation (TV) Regularization is an important method for solving a wide variety of inverse problems in image processing. In order to optimize the reconstructed image, it is important to choose the optimal regularization parameter. The Unbiased Predictive Risk Estimator (UPRE) has been shown to give a very good estimate of this parameter for Tikhonov Regularization. In this paper we propose an approach to extend UPRE method to the TV problem. However, applying the extended UPRE is impractical in the case of inverse problems such as de blurring, due to the large scale of the associated linear problem. We also propose an approach to reducing the large scale problem to a small problem, significantly reducing computational requirements while providing a good approximation to the original problem.

  9. Determining Kinetic Parameters for Isothermal Crystallization of Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Zhang, T.; Reis, S. T.; Brow, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    Non-isothermal crystallization techniques are frequently used to determine the kinetic parameters for crystallization in glasses. These techniques are experimentally simple and quick compared to the isothermal techniques. However, the analytical models used for non-isothermal data analysis, originally developed for describing isothermal transformation kinetics, are fundamentally flawed. The present paper describes a technique for determining the kinetic parameters for isothermal crystallization in glasses, which eliminates most of the common problems that generally make the studies of isothermal crystallization laborious and time consuming. In this technique, the volume fraction of glass that is crystallized as a function of time during an isothermal hold was determined using differential thermal analysis (DTA). The crystallization parameters for the lithium-disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) model glass were first determined and compared to the same parameters determined by other techniques to establish the accuracy and usefulness of the present technique. This technique was then used to describe the crystallization kinetics of a complex Ca-Sr-Zn-silicate glass developed for sealing solid oxide fuel cells.

  10. Evaluation of kinetic parameters for water soluble crystals by thermo gravimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, S.; Surendra Dilip, C.; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2015-01-01

    This work elevates the relevance of kinetic parameters of nucleation and thermal decomposition for water soluble crystals. The positive soluble Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) and negative soluble Lithium Sulfate Monohydrate (LSMH) materials were chosen for the kinetic evaluation. The results obtained from the classical nucleation theory are verified with the kinetic parameters which are evaluated from thermo gravimetric analysis. Nucleation parameters of a crystallization process such as interfacial energy (σ), volume free energy (ΔGv), critical energy barrier for nucleation (ΔG*), radius of the critical nucleus (r*) and nucleation rate (J) of the positive (KDP) and negative solubility (LSMH) crystals are determined from the classical nucleation theory of solubility-enthalpy relation. The kinetic parameters viz. the order of reaction, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy of activation, frequency factor, and entropy of activation are obtained from the TG based models viz. Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova. The effect of varying temperature with relative variation on Gibbs free energy for both positive and negative solubility crystals is also discussed. The developed model holds good for both positive and negative solubility crystals.

  11. Effect of experimental and sample factors on dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate: mechanism of dehydration and determination of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Actiņš, Andris

    2014-06-01

    The dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate [3-(1,1,1-trimethylhydrazin-1-ium-2-yl)propionate dihydrate] was analyzed in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The particle size, sample preparation and storage, sample weight, nitrogen flow rate, relative humidity, and sample history were varied in order to evaluate the effect of these factors and to more accurately interpret the data obtained from such analysis. It was determined that comparable kinetic parameters can be obtained in both isothermal and nonisothermal mode. However, dehydration activation energy values obtained in nonisothermal mode showed variation with conversion degree because of different rate-limiting step energy at higher temperature. Moreover, carrying out experiments in this mode required consideration of additional experimental complications. Our study of the different sample and experimental factor effect revealed information about changes of the dehydration rate-limiting step energy, variable contribution from different rate limiting steps, as well as clarified the dehydration mechanism. Procedures for convenient and fast determination of dehydration kinetic parameters were offered.

  12. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 1: First and second variations of total kinetic action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The case of a cold gas in the absence of external force fields is considered. Since the only energy involved is kinetic energy, the total kinetic action (i.e., the space-time integral of the kinetic energy density) should serve as the total free-energy functional in this case, and as such should be a local minimum for all possible fluctuations about stable flow. This conjecture is tested by calculating explicit, manifestly covariant expressions for the first and second variations of the total kinetic action in the context of Lagrangian kinematics. The general question of the correlation between physical stability and the convexity of any action integral that can be interpreted as the total free-energy functional of the flow is discussed and illustrated for the cases of rectillinear and rotating shearing flows.

  13. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  14. [Photosynthetic Parameters Inversion Algorithm Study Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence Induction Kinetics Curve].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-han; Zhang, Yu-jun; Yin, Gao-fang; Shi, Chao-yi; Yu, Xiao-ya; Zhao, Nan-jing; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-08-01

    The fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve contains rich information of photosynthesis. It can reflect various information of vegetation, such as, the survival status, the pathological condition and the physiology trends under the stress state. Through the acquisition of algae fluorescence and induced optical signal, the fast phase of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve was fitted. Based on least square fitting method, we introduced adaptive minimum error approaching method for fast multivariate nonlinear regression fitting toward chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve. We realized Fo (fixedfluorescent), Fm (maximum fluorescence yield), σPSII (PSII functional absorption cross section) details parameters inversion and the photosynthetic parameters inversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. And we also studied physiological variation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa under the stress of Cu(2+).

  15. [Photosynthetic Parameters Inversion Algorithm Study Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence Induction Kinetics Curve].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-han; Zhang, Yu-jun; Yin, Gao-fang; Shi, Chao-yi; Yu, Xiao-ya; Zhao, Nan-jing; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-08-01

    The fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve contains rich information of photosynthesis. It can reflect various information of vegetation, such as, the survival status, the pathological condition and the physiology trends under the stress state. Through the acquisition of algae fluorescence and induced optical signal, the fast phase of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve was fitted. Based on least square fitting method, we introduced adaptive minimum error approaching method for fast multivariate nonlinear regression fitting toward chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve. We realized Fo (fixedfluorescent), Fm (maximum fluorescence yield), σPSII (PSII functional absorption cross section) details parameters inversion and the photosynthetic parameters inversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. And we also studied physiological variation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa under the stress of Cu(2+). PMID:26672292

  16. Parameter Optimization of Nitriding Process Using Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, İ. Bedii; Akar, Firat; Lippmann, Nils

    2016-09-01

    Using the dynamics of chemical kinetics, an investigation to search for an optimum condition for a gas nitriding process is performed over the solution space spanned by the initial temperature and gas composition of the furnace. For a two-component furnace atmosphere, the results are presented in temporal variations of gas concentrations and the nitrogen coverage on the surface. It seems that the exploitation of the nitriding kinetics can provide important feedback for setting the model-based control algorithms. The present work shows that when the nitrogen gas concentration is not allowed to exceed 6 pct, the Nad coverage can attain maximum values as high as 0.97. The time evolution of the Nad coverage also reveals that, as long as the temperature is above the value where nitrogen poisoning of the surface due to the low-temperature adsorption of excess nitrogen occurs, the initial ammonia content in the furnace atmosphere is much more important in the nitriding process than is the initial temperature.

  17. Parameter estimation for models of ligninolytic and cellulolytic enzyme kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gangsheng; Post, Wilfred M; Mayes, Melanie; Frerichs, Joshua T; Jagadamma, Sindhu

    2012-01-01

    While soil enzymes have been explicitly included in the soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition models, there is a serious lack of suitable data for model parameterization. This study provides well-documented enzymatic parameters for application in enzyme-driven SOC decomposition models from a compilation and analysis of published measurements. In particular, we developed appropriate kinetic parameters for five typical ligninolytic and cellulolytic enzymes ( -glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, endo-glucanase, peroxidase, and phenol oxidase). The kinetic parameters included the maximum specific enzyme activity (Vmax) and half-saturation constant (Km) in the Michaelis-Menten equation. The activation energy (Ea) and the pH optimum and sensitivity (pHopt and pHsen) were also analyzed. pHsen was estimated by fitting an exponential-quadratic function. The Vmax values, often presented in different units under various measurement conditions, were converted into the same units at a reference temperature (20 C) and pHopt. Major conclusions are: (i) Both Vmax and Km were log-normal distributed, with no significant difference in Vmax exhibited between enzymes originating from bacteria or fungi. (ii) No significant difference in Vmax was found between cellulases and ligninases; however, there was significant difference in Km between them. (iii) Ligninases had higher Ea values and lower pHopt than cellulases; average ratio of pHsen to pHopt ranged 0.3 0.4 for the five enzymes, which means that an increase or decrease of 1.1 1.7 pH units from pHopt would reduce Vmax by 50%. (iv) Our analysis indicated that the Vmax values from lab measurements with purified enzymes were 1 2 orders of magnitude higher than those for use in SOC decomposition models under field conditions.

  18. Pyrolysis of Sawdust, Rice Husk and Sugarcane Bagasse: Kinetic Modeling and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters using Different Optimization Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonde, Ruta Dhanram; Chaurasia, Ashish Subhash

    2015-04-01

    The present study provides the kinetic model to describe the pyrolysis of sawdust, rice-husk and sugarcane bagasse as biomass. The kinetic scheme used for modelling of primary pyrolysis consisting of the two parallel reactions giving gaseous volatiles and solid char. Estimation of kinetic parameters for pyrolysis process has been carried out for temperature range of 773-1,173 K. As there are serious issues regarding non-convergence of some of the methods or solutions converging to local-optima, the proposed kinetic model is optimized to predict the best values of kinetic parameters for the system using three approaches—Two-dimensional surface fitting non-linear regression technique, MS-Excel Solver Tool and COMSOL software. The model predictions are in agreement with experimental data over a wide range of pyrolysis conditions. The estimated value of kinetic parameters are compared with earlier researchers and found to be matching well.

  19. Kinetic Parameters of Binary Iron/Oxidant Pyrolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Mahdi Pourmortazavi, Seied; Fathollahi, Manochehr

    2012-04-01

    The thermal properties of pyrotechnic mixtures containing iron powder as fuel and KNO3, KClO3, and KClO4 as oxidants are reported. The thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis results for pure components and corresponding pyrotechnic mixtures revealed that the melting point, decomposition temperature, and rate of oxygen releasing of the oxidants have dominant effects on ignition reaction of the pyrotechnic mixtures. The apparent activation energy and activation parameters for the combustion processes were evaluated from the differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Based on the ignition temperatures obtained and the resulting kinetic data, the thermal reactivity of the pyrotechnic mixtures was found to decrease as in the order Fe + KClO3 > Fe + KNO3 > Fe + KClO4.

  20. [Variation trend of male fertility and semen parameters].

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi-Qun

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the variation trend of male fertility and semen parameters has aroused much academic controversy and become a focus of public attention. For the assessment of male fertility, female pregnancy is regarded as a gold standard, but semen parameters are commonly used as surrogate or indirect evidence in clinical practice and laboratory research. The reference range of se- men parameters being used in China is based on the WHO recommended data and lacks the specific reference value for healthy Chinese men. No definite conclusion has yet been derived from studies at home and abroad on the general variation trend of semen parameters worldwide, but many researchers agree on the decline of semen quality in some areas of the world. Long-term continuous prospective studies are needed for the evaluation and prediction of the general variation trend of semen quality. PMID:25597168

  1. Unscented Kalman filter with parameter identifiability analysis for the estimation of multiple parameters in kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Baker, Syed Murtuza; Poskar, C Hart; Junker, Björn H

    2011-01-01

    In systems biology, experimentally measured parameters are not always available, necessitating the use of computationally based parameter estimation. In order to rely on estimated parameters, it is critical to first determine which parameters can be estimated for a given model and measurement set. This is done with parameter identifiability analysis. A kinetic model of the sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm tissue developed by Rohwer et al. was taken as a test case model. What differentiates this approach is the integration of an orthogonal-based local identifiability method into the unscented Kalman filter (UKF), rather than using the more common observability-based method which has inherent limitations. It also introduces a variable step size based on the system uncertainty of the UKF during the sensitivity calculation. This method identified 10 out of 12 parameters as identifiable. These ten parameters were estimated using the UKF, which was run 97 times. Throughout the repetitions the UKF proved to be more consistent than the estimation algorithms used for comparison. PMID:21989173

  2. Growth kinetics of calcium oxalate monohydrate. III. Variation of solution composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijvoet, Olav L. M.; Blomen, Leo J. M. J.; Will, Eric J.; van der Linden, Hanneke

    1983-11-01

    The influence of the variations of initial supersaturation, ionic strength and calcium-to-oxalate ratio on the growth kinetics of calcium oxalate monohydrate from suspension at 37°C have been investigated in an isotopic system. All experiments can be described with a single growth formula, containing three constants: kA (growth rate constant), La (thermodynamic solubility product) and [ tm] (a parameter describing the agglomeration of any seed suspension). This formula is able to predict any growth curve when the initial concentrations of seed, oxalate and indifferent electrolyte are known. Comparisons with datak from the literature are discussed.

  3. Electrochemical evaluation of glutathione S-transferase kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are a family of enzymes belonging to the phase II metabolism that catalyse the formation of thioether conjugates between the endogenous tripeptide glutathione and xenobiotic compounds. The voltammetric behaviour of glutathione (GSH), 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), as well as the catalytic conjugation reaction of GSH to CDNB by GST was investigated at room temperature, T=298.15K (25°C), at pH6.5, for low concentration of substrates and enzyme, using differential pulse (DP) voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. Only GSH can be oxidized; a sensitivity of 0.14nA/μM and a LOD of 6.4μM were obtained. The GST kinetic parameter electrochemical evaluation, in relation to its substrates, GSH and CDNB, using reciprocal Michaelis-Menten and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots, was determined. A value of KM~100μM was obtained for either GSH or CDNB, and Vmax varied between 40 and 60μmol/min per mg of GST.

  4. Kinetic comparisons during variations of the power clean.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; Allen, Mark; Graham-Smith, Phillip

    2011-12-01

    Comfort, P, Allen, M, and Graham-Smith, P. Kinetic comparisons during variations of the power clean. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3269-3273, 2011-The aim of this investigation was to determine the differences in peak power, peak vertical ground reaction forces, and rate of force development (RFD) during variations of the power clean. Elite rugby league players (n = 16; age 22 ± 1.58 years; height 182.25 ± 2.81 cm; body mass 98.65 ± 7.52 kg) performed 1 set of 3 repetitions of the power clean, hang power clean, midthigh power clean, or midthigh clean pull, using 60% of 1 repetition maximum power clean, in a randomized order, while standing on a force platform. One-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed a significantly (p < 0.001) greater peak power output during the midthigh power clean (3,565.7 ± 410.6 W) and the midthigh clean pull (3,686.8 ± 386.5 W) compared with both the power clean (2,591.2 ± 645.5 W) and the hang power clean (3,183.6 ± 309.1 W), along with a significantly (p < 0.001) greater peak Fz during the midthigh power clean (2,813.8 ± 200.5 N) and the midthigh clean pull (2,901.3 ± 226.1 N) compared with both the power clean (2,264.1 ± 199.6 N) and the hang power clean (2,479.3 ± 267.6 N). The midthigh power clean (15,049.8 ± 4,415.7 N·s) and the midthigh clean pull (15,623.6 ± 3,114.4 N·s) also demonstrated significantly (p < 0.001) greater instantaneous RFD when compared with both the power clean (8,657.9 ± 2,746.6 N·s) and the hang power clean (10,314.4 ± 4,238.2 N·s). From the findings of this study, when training to maximize power, Fz, and RFD, the midthigh power clean and midthigh clean pull appear to be the most advantageous variations of the power clean to perform.

  5. Investigating Molecular Kinetics by Variationally Optimized Diffusion Maps.

    PubMed

    Boninsegna, Lorenzo; Gobbo, Gianpaolo; Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-12-01

    Identification of the collective coordinates that describe rare events in complex molecular transitions such as protein folding has been a key challenge in the theoretical molecular sciences. In the Diffusion Map approach, one assumes that the molecular configurations sampled have been generated by a diffusion process, and one uses the eigenfunctions of the corresponding diffusion operator as reaction coordinates. While diffusion coordinates (DCs) appear to provide a good approximation to the true dynamical reaction coordinates, they are not parametrized using dynamical information. Thus, their approximation quality could not, as yet, be validated, nor could the diffusion map eigenvalues be used to compute relaxation rate constants of the system. Here we combine the Diffusion Map approach with the recently proposed Variational Approach for Conformation Dynamics (VAC). Diffusion Map coordinates are used as a basis set, and their optimal linear combination is sought using the VAC, which employs time-correlation information on the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. We have applied this approach to ultra-long MD simulations of the Fip35 WW domain and found that the first DCs are indeed a good approximation to the true reaction coordinates of the system, but they could be further improved using the VAC. Using the Diffusion Map basis, excellent approximations to the relaxation rates of the system are obtained. Finally, we evaluate the quality of different metric spaces and find that pairwise minimal root-mean-square deviation performs poorly, while operating in the recently introduced kinetic maps based on the time-lagged independent component analysis gives the best performance.

  6. NWP model forecast skill optimization via closure parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, H.; Ollinaho, P.; Laine, M.; Solonen, A.; Haario, H.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of a novel approach to tune predictive skill of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. These models contain tunable parameters which appear in parameterizations schemes of sub-grid scale physical processes. The current practice is to specify manually the numerical parameter values, based on expert knowledge. We developed recently a concept and method (QJRMS 2011) for on-line estimation of the NWP model parameters via closure parameter variations. The method called EPPES ("Ensemble prediction and parameter estimation system") utilizes ensemble prediction infra-structure for parameter estimation in a very cost-effective way: practically no new computations are introduced. The approach provides an algorithmic decision making tool for model parameter optimization in operational NWP. In EPPES, statistical inference about the NWP model tunable parameters is made by (i) generating an ensemble of predictions so that each member uses different model parameter values, drawn from a proposal distribution, and (ii) feeding-back the relative merits of the parameter values to the proposal distribution, based on evaluation of a suitable likelihood function against verifying observations. In this presentation, the method is first illustrated in low-order numerical tests using a stochastic version of the Lorenz-95 model which effectively emulates the principal features of ensemble prediction systems. The EPPES method correctly detects the unknown and wrongly specified parameters values, and leads to an improved forecast skill. Second, results with an ensemble prediction system emulator, based on the ECHAM5 atmospheric GCM show that the model tuning capability of EPPES scales up to realistic models and ensemble prediction systems. Finally, preliminary results of EPPES in the context of ECMWF forecasting system are presented.

  7. Pseudohyphal variations of yeasts exposed to specific space flight parameters.

    PubMed

    Volz, P A; Hunter, R L

    1998-01-01

    Phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Rhodotorula rubra exposed to specific parameters of space flight, which were measured both quantitatively and qualitatively, produced variations in pseudohyphal formation. Both the length of the parent and branch psuedohyphal filaments varied according to specific wavelengths and energy levels of UV light exposures when phenotypic isolates were compared with the parent or ground control isolate of each yeast species. PMID:9881461

  8. Classical nucleation theory of homogeneous freezing of water: thermodynamic and kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Ickes, Luisa; Welti, André; Hoose, Corinna; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-02-28

    The probability of homogeneous ice nucleation under a set of ambient conditions can be described by nucleation rates using the theoretical framework of Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). This framework consists of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, of which three are not well-defined (namely the interfacial tension between ice and water, the activation energy and the prefactor), so that any CNT-based parameterization of homogeneous ice formation is less well-constrained than desired for modeling applications. Different approaches to estimate the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of CNT are reviewed in this paper and the sensitivity of the calculated nucleation rate to the choice of parameters is investigated. We show that nucleation rates are very sensitive to this choice. The sensitivity is governed by one parameter - the interfacial tension between ice and water, which determines the energetic barrier of the nucleation process. The calculated nucleation rate can differ by more than 25 orders of magnitude depending on the choice of parameterization for this parameter. The second most important parameter is the activation energy of the nucleation process. It can lead to a variation of 16 orders of magnitude. By estimating the nucleation rate from a collection of droplet freezing experiments from the literature, the dependence of these two parameters on temperature is narrowed down. It can be seen that the temperature behavior of these two parameters assumed in the literature does not match with the predicted nucleation rates from the fit in most cases. Moreover a comparison of all possible combinations of theoretical parameterizations of the dominant two free parameters shows that one combination fits the fitted nucleation rates best, which is a description of the interfacial tension coming from a molecular model [Reinhardt and Doye, J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 139, 096102] in combination with the activation energy derived from self-diffusion measurements [Zobrist

  9. Classical nucleation theory of homogeneous freezing of water: thermodynamic and kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Ickes, Luisa; Welti, André; Hoose, Corinna; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-02-28

    The probability of homogeneous ice nucleation under a set of ambient conditions can be described by nucleation rates using the theoretical framework of Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). This framework consists of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, of which three are not well-defined (namely the interfacial tension between ice and water, the activation energy and the prefactor), so that any CNT-based parameterization of homogeneous ice formation is less well-constrained than desired for modeling applications. Different approaches to estimate the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of CNT are reviewed in this paper and the sensitivity of the calculated nucleation rate to the choice of parameters is investigated. We show that nucleation rates are very sensitive to this choice. The sensitivity is governed by one parameter - the interfacial tension between ice and water, which determines the energetic barrier of the nucleation process. The calculated nucleation rate can differ by more than 25 orders of magnitude depending on the choice of parameterization for this parameter. The second most important parameter is the activation energy of the nucleation process. It can lead to a variation of 16 orders of magnitude. By estimating the nucleation rate from a collection of droplet freezing experiments from the literature, the dependence of these two parameters on temperature is narrowed down. It can be seen that the temperature behavior of these two parameters assumed in the literature does not match with the predicted nucleation rates from the fit in most cases. Moreover a comparison of all possible combinations of theoretical parameterizations of the dominant two free parameters shows that one combination fits the fitted nucleation rates best, which is a description of the interfacial tension coming from a molecular model [Reinhardt and Doye, J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 139, 096102] in combination with the activation energy derived from self-diffusion measurements [Zobrist

  10. Variability and reproducibility of rubidium-82 kinetic parameters in the myocardium of the anesthetized canine

    SciTech Connect

    Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Huesman, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Kinetic analysis of {sup 82}Rb (I) dynamic PET data produces quantitative measures which could be used to evaluate ischemic heart disease. These measures have the potential to generate objective comparisons of different patients or the same patient at different times. To achieve this potential, it is essential to determine the variability and reproducibility of the kinetic parameters. A total of 48 I dynamic PET datasets were acquired from two pure bred beagles. Each animal underwent eight I PET studies with essentially the same protocol for three successive weeks. Data were acquired with the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph (PET600). In each week, single-slice dynamic I PET datasets were collected with the animal at rest at three different gantry positions separated by 5 mm. Additional dataset were collected after dipyridamole infusion and after administration of aminophylline to induce a return to rest. A two-compartment kinetic model with correction for myocardial vasculature and spillover from the left ventricular blood pool was used to analyze the dynamic datasets. Model parameters for uptake (k{sub 1}), washout (k{sub 2}) and vascular fraction (f{sub v}) were estimated in 11-14 myocardial regions of interest (ROIs) using a weighted least-squares criterion. Statistical fluctuation due to the PET acquisition process was minimized by using a relatively high I dose (about 30 mCi) to take advantage of the high count rate capacity of the PET600. The variation in mean k{sub 1}, where the mean is taken over the myocardial ROIs was 10%-20% (Dog 1) and 15%-50% (Dog 2) among the rest studies conducted on the same data. Similar variation was evident in comparing studies in the same animal for different weeks. Spatial and temporal variation in estimates of the uptake rate (k{sub 1}) of I in the resting myocardium of the anesthetized canine are small in relation to the functional increase in k{sub 1}, following dipyridamole stress. 17 refs., 14 figs.

  11. Additional Investigations of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2006-01-01

    A second parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this work was to further investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD and appendix C icing conditions. A previous study concluded that it was feasible to use changes in ice shape features (e.g., ice horn angle, ice horn thickness, and ice shape mass) to detect relatively small variations in icing spray condition parameters (LWC, MVD, and temperature). The subject of this current investigation extends the scope of this previous work, by also examining the effect of icing tunnel spray-bar parameter variations (water pressure, air pressure) on ice shape feature changes. The approach was to vary spray-bar water pressure and air pressure, and then evaluate the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes. This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results.

  12. Impact of kinetic parameters on heat transfer modeling for a pultrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorthala, R.; Roux, J. A.; Vaughan, J. G.; Donti, R. P.; Hassouneh, A.

    An examination is conducted of pultrusion heat model predictions for various parameters of resin chemical kinetics; these parameters' values affect model heat-transfer results and model predictions. Attention is given to the applicability of DSC kinetic parameters to resin cure modeling, by comparing the predicted product cure temperature profiles and resin degree-of-cure values with pultrusion experiment results obtained for both carbon and glass reinforcements, different pull speeds and fiber volumes, and various die temperature profiles.

  13. Describing variations of the Fisher-matrix across parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Björn Malte; Reischke, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Forecasts in cosmology, both with Monte Carlo Markov-chain methods and with the Fisher-matrix formalism, depend on the choice of the fiducial model because both the signal strength of any observable and the model non-linearities linking observables to cosmological parameters vary in the general case. In this paper we propose a method for extrapolating Fisher-forecasts across the space of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis. We demonstrate the validity of our method with constraints on a standard dark energy model extrapolated from a ΛCDM-model, as can be expected from two-bin weak lensing tomography with an Euclid-like survey, in the parameter pairs (Ωm, σ8), (Ωm, w0) and (w0, wa). Our numerical results include very accurate extrapolations across a wide range of cosmological parameters in terms of shape, size and orientation of the parameter likelihood, and a decomposition of the change of the likelihood contours into modes, which are straightforward to interpret in a geometrical way. We find that in particular the variation of the dark energy figure of merit is well captured by our formalism.

  14. Sensitivity of acoustic predictions to variation of input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Burley, Casey L.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Rotor noise prediction codes predict the thickness and loading noise produced by a helicopter rotor, given the blade motion, rotor operating conditions, and fluctuating force distribution over the blade surface. However, the criticality of these various inputs, and their respective effects on the predicted acoustic field, have never been fully addressed. This paper examines the importance of these inputs, and the sensitivity of the acoustic predicitions to a variation of each parameter. The effects of collective and cyclic pitch, as well as coning and cyclic flapping, are presented. Blade loading inputs are examined to determine the necessary spatial and temporal resolution, as well as the importance of the chordwise distribution. The acoustic predictions show regions in the acoustic field where significant errors occur when simplified blade motions or blade loadings are used. An assessment of the variation in the predicted acoustic field is balanced by a consideration of Central Processing Unit (CPU) time necessary for the various approximations.

  15. Sensitivity of acoustic predictions to variation of input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Burley, Casey L.

    1991-01-01

    The noise prediction code WOPWOP predicts the thickness and loading noise produced by a helicopter rotor, given the blade motion, rotor operating conditions, and fluctuating force distribution over the blade surface. However, the criticality of these various inputs, and their respective effects on the predicted acoustic field, have never been fully addressed. This paper examines the importance of these inputs, and the sensitivity of the acoustic predictions to a variation of each parameter. The effects of collective and cyclic pitch, as well as coning and flapping, are presented. Blade loading inputs are examined to determine the necessary spatial and temporal resolution, as well as the importance of the cordwise distribution. The acoustic predictions show regions in the acoustic field where significant errors occur when simplified blade motions or blade loadings are used. An assessment of the variation in the predicted acoustic field is balanced by a consideration of CPU time necessary for the various approximations.

  16. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the need for devoting time in differential equations courses to modelling and the completion of the modelling process with efforts to estimate the parameters in the models using data. We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of chemical reactions of order n, where n = 0, 1, 2, and apply more general…

  17. Determination of the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of adsorption of copper(II) ions onto seeds of Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Adnan; Ozcan, A Safa; Tunali, Sibel; Akar, Tamer; Kiran, Ismail

    2005-09-30

    Adsorption of copper ions onto Capsicum annuum (red pepper) seeds was investigated with the variation in the parameters of pH, contact time, adsorbent and copper(II) concentrations and temperature. The nature of the possible adsorbent and metal ion interactions was examined by the FTIR technique. The copper(II) adsorption equilibrium was attained within 60 min. Adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds followed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Maximum adsorption capacity (q(max)) of copper(II) ions onto red pepper seeds was 4.47x10(-4) molg(-1) at 50 degrees C. Three kinetic models including the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equations were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters such as rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated and discussed. It was indicated that the adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and also followed the intraparticle diffusion model up to 60 min, but diffusion is not only the rate controlling step. Thermodynamics parameters such as the change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy were also evaluated for the adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds.

  18. k-Cone analysis: determining all candidate values for kinetic parameters on a network scale.

    PubMed

    Famili, Iman; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2005-03-01

    The absence of comprehensive measured kinetic values and the observed inconsistency in the available in vitro kinetic data has hindered the formulation of network-scale kinetic models of biochemical reaction networks. To meet this challenge we present an approach to construct a convex space, termed the k-cone, which contains all the allowable numerical values of the kinetic constants in large-scale biochemical networks. The definition of the k-cone relies on the incorporation of in vivo concentration data and a simplified approach to represent enzyme kinetics within an established constraint-based modeling approach. The k-cone approach was implemented to define the allowable combination of numerical values for a full kinetic model of human red blood cell metabolism and to study its correlated kinetic parameters. The k-cone approach can be used to determine consistency between in vitro measured kinetic values and in vivo concentration and flux measurements when used in a network-scale kinetic model. k-Cone analysis was successful in determining whether in vitro measured kinetic values used in the reconstruction of a kinetic-based model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae central metabolism could reproduce in vivo measurements. Further, the k-cone can be used to determine which numerical values of in vitro measured parameters are required to be changed in a kinetic model if in vivo measured values are not reproduced. k-Cone analysis could identify what minimum number of in vitro determined kinetic parameters needed to be adjusted in the S. cerevisiae model to be consistent with the in vivo data. Applying the k-cone analysis a priori to kinetic model development may reduce the time and effort involved in model building and parameter adjustment. With the recent developments in high-throughput profiling of metabolite concentrations at a whole-cell scale and advances in metabolomics technologies, the k-cone approach presented here may hold the promise for kinetic

  19. k-Cone Analysis: Determining All Candidate Values for Kinetic Parameters on a Network Scale

    PubMed Central

    Famili, Iman; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2005-01-01

    The absence of comprehensive measured kinetic values and the observed inconsistency in the available in vitro kinetic data has hindered the formulation of network-scale kinetic models of biochemical reaction networks. To meet this challenge we present an approach to construct a convex space, termed the k-cone, which contains all the allowable numerical values of the kinetic constants in large-scale biochemical networks. The definition of the k-cone relies on the incorporation of in vivo concentration data and a simplified approach to represent enzyme kinetics within an established constraint-based modeling approach. The k-cone approach was implemented to define the allowable combination of numerical values for a full kinetic model of human red blood cell metabolism and to study its correlated kinetic parameters. The k-cone approach can be used to determine consistency between in vitro measured kinetic values and in vivo concentration and flux measurements when used in a network-scale kinetic model. k-Cone analysis was successful in determining whether in vitro measured kinetic values used in the reconstruction of a kinetic-based model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae central metabolism could reproduce in vivo measurements. Further, the k-cone can be used to determine which numerical values of in vitro measured parameters are required to be changed in a kinetic model if in vivo measured values are not reproduced. k-Cone analysis could identify what minimum number of in vitro determined kinetic parameters needed to be adjusted in the S. cerevisiae model to be consistent with the in vivo data. Applying the k-cone analysis a priori to kinetic model development may reduce the time and effort involved in model building and parameter adjustment. With the recent developments in high-throughput profiling of metabolite concentrations at a whole-cell scale and advances in metabolomics technologies, the k-cone approach presented here may hold the promise for kinetic

  20. Anisotropic parameter estimation using velocity variation with offset analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Herawati, I.; Saladin, M.; Pranowo, W.; Winardhie, S.; Priyono, A.

    2013-09-09

    Seismic anisotropy is defined as velocity dependent upon angle or offset. Knowledge about anisotropy effect on seismic data is important in amplitude analysis, stacking process and time to depth conversion. Due to this anisotropic effect, reflector can not be flattened using single velocity based on hyperbolic moveout equation. Therefore, after normal moveout correction, there will still be residual moveout that relates to velocity information. This research aims to obtain anisotropic parameters, ε and δ, using two proposed methods. The first method is called velocity variation with offset (VVO) which is based on simplification of weak anisotropy equation. In VVO method, velocity at each offset is calculated and plotted to obtain vertical velocity and parameter δ. The second method is inversion method using linear approach where vertical velocity, δ, and ε is estimated simultaneously. Both methods are tested on synthetic models using ray-tracing forward modelling. Results show that δ value can be estimated appropriately using both methods. Meanwhile, inversion based method give better estimation for obtaining ε value. This study shows that estimation on anisotropic parameters rely on the accuracy of normal moveout velocity, residual moveout and offset to angle transformation.

  1. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Paula M.; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity toward H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underlie the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses. PMID:25325054

  2. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Paula; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity towards H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underline the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  3. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins.

    PubMed

    Brito, Paula M; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity toward H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underlie the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  4. Determining the Kinetic Parameters Characteristic of Microalgal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez Sancho, Maria Eugenie; And Others

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students obtain a growth curve for algae, identify the exponential and linear growth phases, and calculate the parameters which characterize both phases is described. The procedure, a list of required materials, experimental conditions, analytical technique, and a discussion of the interpretations of individual results are…

  5. Validity of repeated initial rise thermoluminescence kinetic parameter determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of thermoluminescence (TL) analysis by repeated initial rise measurements has been studied by computer simulation. Thermoluminescence described by 1st Order, 2nd Order, General One Trap and Interactive TL Kinetics was investigated. In the simulation each of the repeated temperature increase and decrease cycles contains a linear temperature increase followed by a decrease appropriate for radiative cooling, i.e. the latter is approximated by a decreasing exponential. The activation energies computed from the simulated emission are readily compared with those used to compute the TL emission. In all cases studied, the repeated initial rise technique provides reliable results only for single peak glow curves or for glow curves containing peaks that do not overlap and, if sufficiently separated, the lowest temperature peak in multipeak curves. Also the temperatures, or temperature cycles corresponding to correct activation energies occur on the low temperature side of the normal glow curve, often well below the peak temperature. A variety of misleading and/or incorrect results an be obtained when the repeated initial rise technique is applied to TL systems that produce overlapping peaks in the usual glow curve. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  6. A Basis Set for Peptides for the Variational Approach to Conformational Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2015-09-01

    Although Markov state models have proven to be powerful tools in resolving the complex features of biomolecular kinetics, the discretization of the conformational space has been a bottleneck since the advent of the method. A recently introduced variational approach, which uses basis functions instead of crisp conformational states, opened up a route to construct kinetic models in which the discretization error can be controlled systematically. Here, we develop and test a basis set for peptides to be used in the variational approach. The basis set is constructed by combining local residue-centered kinetic modes that are obtained from kinetic models of terminally blocked amino acids. Using this basis set, we model the conformational kinetics of two hexapeptides with sequences VGLAPG and VGVAPG. Six basis functions are sufficient to represent the slow kinetic modes of these peptides. The basis set also allows for a direct interpretation of the slow kinetic modes without an additional clustering in the space of the dominant eigenvectors. Moreover, changes in the conformational kinetics due to the exchange of leucine in VGLAPG to valine in VGVAPG can be directly quantified by comparing histograms of the basis set expansion coefficients.

  7. Further examples of seasonal variations of ELF radio propagation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, Peter R.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we use experimentally determined values of effective attenuation rate, excitation factor, and relative phase velocity, along with the theoretical expressions derived by C. and P. Greifinger, to establish the seasonal variation of representative ionospheric conductivity parameters. These parameters include the reflection heights h0 and h1 (or hE), inverse scale height β, and reference height H. The basis for this analysis is provided by the 1990-1992 76-Hz field strength measurements taken at four land-based ELF monitoring sites established by the U.S. Navy. The source for these measurements was the U.S. Navy's dual-antenna transmitting system (WTF/MTF). The main conclusion of this paper is that the summertime and January nighttime attenuation rates are substantially lower than during other times of the year. This nighttime attenuation rate decrease appears to be mainly due to an increase in the inverse scale height β, rather than to an increase in the reflection heights h0 and hE.

  8. Inverse modeling approach for evaluation of kinetic parameters of a biofilm reactor using tabu search.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B Shiva; Venkateswarlu, Ch

    2014-08-01

    The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm reactors often poses difficulties in analyzing such reactors experimentally. Mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems proves somewhat ineffective due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, we propose an inverse modeling approach based on tabu search (TS) to estimate the parameters of kinetic and film thickness models. TS is used to estimate these parameters as a consequence of the validation of the mathematical models of the process with the aid of measured data obtained from an experimental fixed-bed anaerobic biofilm reactor involving the treatment of pharmaceutical industry wastewater. The results evaluated for different modeling configurations of varying degrees of complexity illustrate the effectiveness of TS for accurate estimation of kinetic and film thickness model parameters of the biofilm process. The results show that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Edward kinetics (with its optimum parameters as mu(max)rho(s)/Y = 24.57, Ks = 1.352 and Ki = 102.36) and three-parameter film thickness expression (with its estimated parameters as a = 0.289 x 10(-5), b = 1.55 x 10(-4) and c = 15.2 x 10(-6)) better describes the biofilm reactor treating the industry wastewater.

  9. A robust methodology for kinetic model parameter estimation for biocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Al-Haque, Naweed; Santacoloma, Paloma A; Neto, Watson; Tufvesson, Pär; Gani, Rafiqul; Woodley, John M

    2012-01-01

    Effective estimation of parameters in biocatalytic reaction kinetic expressions are very important when building process models to enable evaluation of process technology options and alternative biocatalysts. The kinetic models used to describe enzyme-catalyzed reactions generally include several parameters, which are strongly correlated with each other. State-of-the-art methodologies such as nonlinear regression (using progress curves) or graphical analysis (using initial rate data, for example, the Lineweaver-Burke plot, Hanes plot or Dixon plot) often incorporate errors in the estimates and rarely lead to globally optimized parameter values. In this article, a robust methodology to estimate parameters for biocatalytic reaction kinetic expressions is proposed. The methodology determines the parameters in a systematic manner by exploiting the best features of several of the current approaches. The parameter estimation problem is decomposed into five hierarchical steps, where the solution of each of the steps becomes the input for the subsequent step to achieve the final model with the corresponding regressed parameters. The model is further used for validating its performance and determining the correlation of the parameters. The final model with the fitted parameters is able to describe both initial rate and dynamic experiments. Application of the methodology is illustrated with a case study using the ω-transaminase catalyzed synthesis of 1-phenylethylamine from acetophenone and 2-propylamine.

  10. Influence of the mutable kinetic parameters on the adhesion and debonding of thin viscoelastic films.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abir; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2016-09-01

    Detachment of a surface from a viscoelastic layer, such as a film of glue, engenders bridges between the surfaces until separation. Such surface instabilities arising during contact and detachment of viscoelastic films with rigid contactors have been theoretically explored by linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulations. The contact instabilities of viscoelastic materials are found to manifest in either a 'critical' or a 'dominant' mode in which the former is preferred when the contactor is slowly brought near the film while the latter manifests when the film is 'hard-pressed' against it. The nonlinear analysis considers the movement of contactor during adhesion-debonding cycle, which uncovers that the kinetic parameters can overshadow the thermodynamically predicted area of contact, average force for pull-off, energy of contactor-film separation, and pathways of debonding. Three distinct pathways of debonding - peeling, catastrophic column collapse, and column coalescence, are found to manifest with the variation in the ratio of the elastic to viscous compliances of the viscoelastic film. The study also reveals that in the dominant mode of instability, a smaller length scale with a larger area contact between the contactor and film can develop patterns having aspect ratio ∼10 times larger than the same obtained from elastic film. PMID:27254253

  11. Solid State Kinetic Parameters and Chemical Mechanism of the Dehydration of CoCl2.6H2O.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribas, Joan; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents an experimental example illustrating the most common methods for the determination of kinetic parameters. Discusses the different theories and equations to be applied and the mechanism derived from the kinetic results. (CW)

  12. FitSpace explorer: an algorithm to evaluate multidimensional parameter space in fitting kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth A; Simpson, Zachary B; Blom, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    Fitting several sets of kinetic data directly to a model based on numerical integration provides the best method to extract kinetic parameters without relying on the simplifying assumptions required to achieve analytical solutions of rate equations. However, modern computer programs make it too easy to enter an overly complex model, and standard error analysis grossly underestimates errors when a system is underconstrained and fails to reveal the full degree to which multiple parameters are linked through the complex relationships common in kinetic data. Here we describe the application of confidence contour analysis obtained by measuring the dependence of the sum square error on each pair of parameters while allowing all remaining parameters to be adjusted in seeking the best fit. The confidence contours reveal complex relationships between parameters and clearly outline the space over which parameters can vary (the "FitSpace"). The utility of the method is illustrated by examples of well-constrained fits to published data on tryptophan synthase and the kinetics of oligonucleotide binding to a ribozyme. In contrast, analysis of alanine racemase clearly refutes claims that global analysis of progress curves can be used to extract the free energy profiles of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  13. Fuzzy Stochastic Petri Nets for Modeling Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic Petri nets (SPNs) have been widely used to model randomness which is an inherent feature of biological systems. However, for many biological systems, some kinetic parameters may be uncertain due to incomplete, vague or missing kinetic data (often called fuzzy uncertainty), or naturally vary, e.g., between different individuals, experimental conditions, etc. (often called variability), which has prevented a wider application of SPNs that require accurate parameters. Considering the strength of fuzzy sets to deal with uncertain information, we apply a specific type of stochastic Petri nets, fuzzy stochastic Petri nets (FSPNs), to model and analyze biological systems with uncertain kinetic parameters. FSPNs combine SPNs and fuzzy sets, thereby taking into account both randomness and fuzziness of biological systems. For a biological system, SPNs model the randomness, while fuzzy sets model kinetic parameters with fuzzy uncertainty or variability by associating each parameter with a fuzzy number instead of a crisp real value. We introduce a simulation-based analysis method for FSPNs to explore the uncertainties of outputs resulting from the uncertainties associated with input parameters, which works equally well for bounded and unbounded models. We illustrate our approach using a yeast polarization model having an infinite state space, which shows the appropriateness of FSPNs in combination with simulation-based analysis for modeling and analyzing biological systems with uncertain information. PMID:26910830

  14. Fuzzy Stochastic Petri Nets for Modeling Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic Petri nets (SPNs) have been widely used to model randomness which is an inherent feature of biological systems. However, for many biological systems, some kinetic parameters may be uncertain due to incomplete, vague or missing kinetic data (often called fuzzy uncertainty), or naturally vary, e.g., between different individuals, experimental conditions, etc. (often called variability), which has prevented a wider application of SPNs that require accurate parameters. Considering the strength of fuzzy sets to deal with uncertain information, we apply a specific type of stochastic Petri nets, fuzzy stochastic Petri nets (FSPNs), to model and analyze biological systems with uncertain kinetic parameters. FSPNs combine SPNs and fuzzy sets, thereby taking into account both randomness and fuzziness of biological systems. For a biological system, SPNs model the randomness, while fuzzy sets model kinetic parameters with fuzzy uncertainty or variability by associating each parameter with a fuzzy number instead of a crisp real value. We introduce a simulation-based analysis method for FSPNs to explore the uncertainties of outputs resulting from the uncertainties associated with input parameters, which works equally well for bounded and unbounded models. We illustrate our approach using a yeast polarization model having an infinite state space, which shows the appropriateness of FSPNs in combination with simulation-based analysis for modeling and analyzing biological systems with uncertain information. PMID:26910830

  15. Fuzzy Stochastic Petri Nets for Modeling Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic Petri nets (SPNs) have been widely used to model randomness which is an inherent feature of biological systems. However, for many biological systems, some kinetic parameters may be uncertain due to incomplete, vague or missing kinetic data (often called fuzzy uncertainty), or naturally vary, e.g., between different individuals, experimental conditions, etc. (often called variability), which has prevented a wider application of SPNs that require accurate parameters. Considering the strength of fuzzy sets to deal with uncertain information, we apply a specific type of stochastic Petri nets, fuzzy stochastic Petri nets (FSPNs), to model and analyze biological systems with uncertain kinetic parameters. FSPNs combine SPNs and fuzzy sets, thereby taking into account both randomness and fuzziness of biological systems. For a biological system, SPNs model the randomness, while fuzzy sets model kinetic parameters with fuzzy uncertainty or variability by associating each parameter with a fuzzy number instead of a crisp real value. We introduce a simulation-based analysis method for FSPNs to explore the uncertainties of outputs resulting from the uncertainties associated with input parameters, which works equally well for bounded and unbounded models. We illustrate our approach using a yeast polarization model having an infinite state space, which shows the appropriateness of FSPNs in combination with simulation-based analysis for modeling and analyzing biological systems with uncertain information.

  16. Variation of seismic source parameters around the southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, H. M.; Sheen, D. H.; Kang, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we determined seismic source parameters from 557 events with ML≥1.6 that occurred in the southern part of the Korean Peninsula from 2001 to 2013. A total of 7,267 S-wave trains on three-component seismograms recorded at broadband seismic stations were used for measuring the corner frequency, Brune stress drop and moment magnitude by using the iterative method of Jo and Baag (2001) based on the methods of Snoke (1987) and Andrews (1986). The SNR were calculated for each seismogram to exclude the possible contamination of the records by noise and/or instrumental malfunctioning. For the stable correction of attenuation, we tested several Q factors from the previous studies on those for the Korean Peninsula and found Kim (2007) gave the best result. In this study, as shown by Shi et al. (1998), the stress drop tended to decrease with decreasing seismic moment from the magnitude 3.5. Although there was large scatter in stress drop, however, the stress drops seemed to be constant for the larger events and the average stress drop was estimated to around 45.5 bar. It is interesting that there was a variation in stress drops depending on earthquake location: stress drops of the earthquakes occurred in the East Sea (Japan Sea) and the southwestern part of North Korea were relatively lower than those for the events occurred at other region in the southern Korean Peninsula.

  17. Calibration of Parameters in Beta-Delta HMX Phase Transformation Kinetics Using Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Burnham, A K

    2005-11-17

    The kinetics of the beta-delta solid-solid phase transformation of HMX (nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) were modeled in ALE2D using four similar equilibrium-inhibited nucleation-growth models: a reversible set of Arrhenius kinetics following a LANL model, and three sets of kinetics derived based on an autocatalytic model using the bidirectional reaction formalism. The parameters for the bidirectional kinetics models were calibrated using simulations of two experimental setup scenarios where experimental data is available: 165 C XRD and SITI. In this calibration, the transition enthalpy and activation energy values were kept constant, while the frequency factors were iterated to achieve results similar to those provided by the experiments. This process yielded six unique sets of kinetic parameters that describe the phase transformation: a pair of sets for each of the three bidirectional kinetics models. The models calibrated using 165 C XRD data showed good agreement with LX-04 STEX experimental results, while the SITI-based models were in good agreement with the LANL model and PBX-9501 STEX experimental data. These bidirectional models were also shown to require less computational effort than the LANL model.

  18. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    PubMed

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-09-01

    Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors.

  19. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors. PMID:24065871

  20. A Comparison of Isoconversional and Model-Fitting Approaches to Kinetic Parameter Estimation and Application Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K

    2006-05-17

    Chemical kinetic modeling has been used for many years in process optimization, estimating real-time material performance, and lifetime prediction. Chemists have tended towards developing detailed mechanistic models, while engineers have tended towards global or lumped models. Many, if not most, applications use global models by necessity, since it is impractical or impossible to develop a rigorous mechanistic model. Model fitting acquired a bad name in the thermal analysis community after that community realized a decade after other disciplines that deriving kinetic parameters for an assumed model from a single heating rate produced unreliable and sometimes nonsensical results. In its place, advanced isoconversional methods (1), which have their roots in the Friedman (2) and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (3) methods of the 1960s, have become increasingly popular. In fact, as pointed out by the ICTAC kinetics project in 2000 (4), valid kinetic parameters can be derived by both isoconversional and model fitting methods as long as a diverse set of thermal histories are used to derive the kinetic parameters. The current paper extends the understanding from that project to give a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of isoconversional and model-fitting approaches. Examples are given from a variety of sources, including the former and current ICTAC round-robin exercises, data sets for materials of interest, and simulated data sets.

  1. Variational methods to estimate terrestrial ecosystem model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaies, Sylvain; Roulstone, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Carbon is at the basis of the chemistry of life. Its ubiquity in the Earth system is the result of complex recycling processes. Present in the atmosphere in the form of carbon dioxide it is adsorbed by marine and terrestrial ecosystems and stored within living biomass and decaying organic matter. Then soil chemistry and a non negligible amount of time transform the dead matter into fossil fuels. Throughout this cycle, carbon dioxide is released in the atmosphere through respiration and combustion of fossils fuels. Model-data fusion techniques allow us to combine our understanding of these complex processes with an ever-growing amount of observational data to help improving models and predictions. The data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) model is a simple box model simulating the carbon budget allocation for terrestrial ecosystems. Over the last decade several studies have demonstrated the relative merit of various inverse modelling strategies (MCMC, ENKF, 4DVAR) to estimate model parameters and initial carbon stocks for DALEC and to quantify the uncertainty in the predictions. Despite its simplicity, DALEC represents the basic processes at the heart of more sophisticated models of the carbon cycle. Using adjoint based methods we study inverse problems for DALEC with various data streams (8 days MODIS LAI, monthly MODIS LAI, NEE). The framework of constraint optimization allows us to incorporate ecological common sense into the variational framework. We use resolution matrices to study the nature of the inverse problems and to obtain data importance and information content for the different type of data. We study how varying the time step affect the solutions, and we show how "spin up" naturally improves the conditioning of the inverse problems.

  2. Kinetic Parameters for the Noncatalyzed and Enzyme-Catalyzed Mutarotation of Glucose Using a Blood Glucometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardee, John R.; Delgado, Bryan; Jones, Wray

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic parameters for the conversion of alpha-D-glucose to beta-D-glucose were measured using a blood glucometer. The reaction order, rate constant, and Arrhenius activation energy are reported for the noncatalyzed reaction and turnover number and Michaelis constant are reported for the reaction catalyzed by porcine kidney mutarotase. The…

  3. Combined Yamamoto approach for simultaneous estimation of adsorption isotherm and kinetic parameters in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rüdt, Matthias; Gillet, Florian; Heege, Stefanie; Hitzler, Julian; Kalbfuss, Bernd; Guélat, Bertrand

    2015-09-25

    Application of model-based design is appealing to support the development of protein chromatography in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, the required efforts for parameter estimation are frequently perceived as time-consuming and expensive. In order to speed-up this work, a new parameter estimation approach for modelling ion-exchange chromatography in linear conditions was developed. It aims at reducing the time and protein demand for the model calibration. The method combines the estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters based on the simultaneous variation of the gradient slope and the residence time in a set of five linear gradient elutions. The parameters are estimated from a Yamamoto plot and a gradient-adjusted Van Deemter plot. The combined approach increases the information extracted per experiment compared to the individual methods. As a proof of concept, the combined approach was successfully applied for a monoclonal antibody on a cation-exchanger and for a Fc-fusion protein on an anion-exchange resin. The individual parameter estimations for the mAb confirmed that the new approach maintained the accuracy of the usual Yamamoto and Van Deemter plots. In the second case, offline size-exclusion chromatography was performed in order to estimate the thermodynamic parameters of an impurity (high molecular weight species) simultaneously with the main product. Finally, the parameters obtained from the combined approach were used in a lumped kinetic model to simulate the chromatography runs. The simulated chromatograms obtained for a wide range of gradient lengths and residence times showed only small deviations compared to the experimental data.

  4. Comparison of gasification kinetics parameters of different types of nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M. S.; Tournier, J. M. P.

    2012-07-01

    A chemical-reaction kinetics model of nuclear graphite gasification has recently been developed and successfully validated with gasification rate measurements for nuclear graphite grades of IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18 and NBG-25. The model employs 4 elementary chemical reactions with applicable parameters, including the values and Gaussian-like distributions of the specific activation energies, the pre-exponential coefficients for adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO and CO{sub 2} gases, and the surface area of free active sites. These parameters are determined from the reported measurements of the total gasification and transient weight loss using a multi-parameter optimization algorithm. The determined chemical kinetics parameters for IG-100 and NB-25 are nearly the same, but slightly different from those for NBG-18 and IG-430. The initial specific area of free active sites is inversely proportional to the square root of the mass or volume of the graphite specimens used in experiments. The recommended chemical kinetics parameters in this paper for these grades of nuclear graphite should be applicable to future safety analysis of high-temperature gas cooled reactors in the unlikely event of a massive air ingress accident. (authors)

  5. The geomagnetic secular variation S parameter: A mathematical artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, J. M.; Gilder, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Secular variation, the change in the Earth's magnetic field through time, reflects the energy state of the geodynamo. Secular variation is commonly quantified by the standard deviation of the angular distances of the virtual geomagnetic poles to their mean pole, known as the S value. The S value has long been thought to exhibit latitude dependence [S(λ)] whose origin is widely attributed to a combination of time-varying dipole and non-dipole components. The slope, magnitude and uncertainty of S(λ) are taken as a basis to model the geomagnetic field and understand its evolution. Here we show that variations in S stem from a mathematical aberration of the conversion from directions to poles. A new method to quantify secular variation is proposed.

  6. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, James L.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical reaction path modeling is useful for rapidly assessing the extent of water-aqueous-gas interactions both in natural systems and in industrial processes. Modeling of some systems, such as those at low temperature with relatively high hydrologic flow rates, or those perturbed by the subsurface injection of industrial waste such as CO2 or H2S, must account for the relatively slow kinetics of mineral-gas-water interactions. We have therefore compiled parameters conforming to a general Arrhenius-type rate equation, for over 70 minerals, including phases from all the major classes of silicates, most carbonates, and many other non-silicates. The compiled dissolution rate constants range from -0.21 log moles m-2 s-1 for halite, to -17.44 log moles m-2 s-1 for kyanite, for conditions far from equilibrium, at 25 ?C, and pH near neutral. These data have been added to a computer code that simulates an infinitely well-stirred batch reactor, allowing computation of mass transfer as a function of time. Actual equilibration rates are expected to be much slower than those predicted by the selected computer code, primarily because actual geochemical processes commonly involve flow through porous or fractured media, wherein the development of concentration gradients in the aqueous phase near mineral surfaces, which results in decreased absolute chemical affinity and slower reaction rates. Further differences between observed and computed reaction rates may occur because of variables beyond the scope of most geochemical simulators, such as variation in grain size, aquifer heterogeneity, preferred fluid flow paths, primary and secondary mineral coatings, and secondary minerals that may lead to decreased porosity and clogged pore throats.

  7. No kinetic differences during variations of the power clean in inexperienced female collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; McMahon, John J; Fletcher, Caroline

    2013-02-01

    Previous research has identified that the second pull phase of the clean generates the greatest power output and that the midthigh variations of the power clean also result in the greatest force and power output in male athletes; however, no research has compared the kinetics of the variations of the power clean in women. The aim of this investigation was to identify any differences between variations of the clean, across a range of loads, in inexperienced female collegiate athletes. Sixteen healthy female collegiate athletes (age 19 ± 2.3 years; height 166.5 ± 3.22 cm; body mass 62.25 ± 4.52 kg; 1 repetition maximum [1RM] power clean 51.5 ± 2.65 kg) performed 3 repetitions of 3 variations (power clean, hang power clean, midthigh power clean) of the power clean at 60, 70, and 80% of their predetermined 1RM power clean, in a randomized and counterbalanced order. A 2-way analysis of variance (3 × 3; load × variation) revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in peak power, peak vertical force (Fz) or rate of force development (RFD) between loads or variations of the power clean. There appears to be no advantage in terms of peak power, Fz, or RFD between variations of the clean, in inexperienced female athletes, it is suggested, therefore, that inexperienced athletes intermittently perform different variations of the clean to ensure all round development and technical competence in each variation of the exercise.

  8. Kinetic parameters for the thermal inactivation of quality-related enzymes in carrots and potatoes.

    PubMed

    Anthon, Gordon E; Barrett, Diane M

    2002-07-01

    Kinetic parameters for the thermal inactivation of several enzymes in carrot and potato homogenates have been determined. In carrots the most heat-resistant activity was polygalacturonase, followed by peroxidase and pectinmethylesterase. In potatoes peroxidase was the most resistant, followed by pectin methylesterase, polyphenol oxidase, and lipoxygenase. There were several notable similarities between the inactivation kinetics in the two vegetables. In both cases peroxidase activity gave simple first-order inactivation kinetics but yielded a curved Arrhenius plot for the temperature dependence. Pectin methylesterase in both commodities consisted of a labile and a resistant form. The relative amounts of the two forms and the temperature dependences for their inactivation were also similar. PMID:12083894

  9. Characterisation of sugar cane straw waste as pozzolanic material for construction: Calcining temperature and kinetic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Frias, Moises

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports on the influence of calcining temperature (800 and 1000 deg. C) on the pozzolanic activation of sugar cane straw (SCS). The reaction kinetics of SCS ash-lime mixtures were inferred from physicochemical characteristics (X-ray diffraction patterns and thermogravimetry analysis. The fitting of a kinetic-diffusive model to the experimental data (fixed lime versus time) allowed the computing of the kinetic parameters (reaction rate constant) of the pozzolanic reaction. Results obtained confirm that the sugar cane straw ash (SCSA) calcined at 800 and 1000 deg. C have properties indicative of very high pozzolanic activity. No influence of calcining temperature on the pozzolanic activity was observed. Also, no crystalline compounds during the pozzolanic reaction were identified up to 90 days of reaction. Environmental durability and strength of the consequential mortars remain to be assessed.

  10. Identification of random variation in structures and their parameter estimates.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.; Aumann, R. J.; McCarty, A. A.; Olson, C. C.

    2002-01-01

    Structures that are members of an ensemble of nominally identical systems actually differ due to variations in details among individuals. Furthermore, there are variations in the system response of an individual structure that can be attributed to unmeasured conditions (such as temperature and humidity) that are present during experiments. Finally, noise is present in all measurements of structural excitations and responses. For these reasons, there is always random variation associated with the characterizations of structural dynamic systems, and descriptions of results must be in statistical or probabilistic terms;. This study identifies and assesses the sources and the degrees of randomness in a metric of structural dynamics of a given system through experiments and analysis.

  11. Study of the kinetic parameters for synthesis and hydrolysis of pharmacologically active salicin isomer catalyzed by baker's yeast maltase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veličković, D. V.; Dimitrijević, A. S.; Bihelović, F. J.; Jankov, R. M.; Milosavić, N.

    2011-12-01

    One of the key elements for understanding enzyme reactions is determination of its kinetic parameters. Since transglucosylation is kinetically controlled reaction, besides the reaction of synthesis, very important is the reaction of enzymatic hydrolysis of created product. Therefore, in this study, kinetic parameters for synthesis and secondary hydrolysis of pharmacologically active α isosalicin by baker's yeast maltase were calculated, and it was shown that specifity of maltase for hydrolysis is approximately 150 times higher then for synthesis.

  12. Adsorption of methylene blue onto hazelnut shell: Kinetics, mechanism and activation parameters.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Mehmet; Abak, Harun; Alkan, Mahir

    2009-05-15

    The adsorption kinetics of methylene blue (MB) on the hazelnut shell with respect to the initial dye concentration, pH, ionic strength, particle size and temperature were investigated. The rate and the transport/kinetic processes of MB adsorption were described by applying the first-order Lagergren, the pseudo-second-order, mass transfer coefficient and the intraparticle diffusion models. Kinetic studies showed that the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Significant increases in initial adsorption rate were observed with the increase in temperature followed by pH and initial MB concentration. The intraparticle diffusion was found to be the rate-limiting step in the adsorption process. Adsorption activation energy was calculated to be 45.6kJmol(-1). The values of activation parameters such as free energy (DeltaG(*)), enthalpy (DeltaH(*)) and entropy (DeltaS(*)) were also determined as 83.4kJmol(-1), 42.9kJmol(-1) and -133.5Jmol(-1)K(-1), respectively.

  13. Calcium-binding parameter of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase determined by inactivation kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Hoshino, Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    The irreversible thermal inactivation and the thermodynamics of calcium ion binding of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase in the absence of substrates were studied. The enzyme inactivation on heating was apparently followed by first-order kinetics. The enzyme was stabilized with an increased concentration of calcium ion and thus the inactivation was highly dependent on the state of calcium binding. The activation parameter for the inactivation suggests an unfolding of the enzyme protein upon heating. Values of both the activation enthalpy and entropy were increased with a higher calcium ion concentration. An inactivation kinetic model is based on the assumption of a two-stage unfolding transition in which the bivalent ion dissociation occurs in the first step followed by the secondary structural unfolding. This simple kinetic model provides both a qualitative and quantitative interpretation of calcium ion binding to the enzyme and its effect on the inactivation properties. The specific approximations of the kinetic model were strictly followed in the analysis to calculate the apparent inactivation rate at each calcium ion concentration in terms of the calcium-binding parameters. The enthalpy and entropy changes for the calcium ion binding were calculated to be -149 kJ/mol and -360 J.mol(-1).K(-1) respectively and these values suggest a strong enthalpic affinity for the bivalent ion binding to the enzyme protein. The thermodynamical interpretation attempts to provide clear relations between the terms of an apparent inactivation rate and the calcium binding. PMID:12049626

  14. Effects of correlated parameters and uncertainty in electronic-structure-based chemical kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Jonathan E; Guo, Wei; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic models based on first principles are becoming common place in heterogeneous catalysis because of their ability to interpret experimental data, identify the rate-controlling step, guide experiments and predict novel materials. To overcome the tremendous computational cost of estimating parameters of complex networks on metal catalysts, approximate quantum mechanical calculations are employed that render models potentially inaccurate. Here, by introducing correlative global sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, we show that neglecting correlations in the energies of species and reactions can lead to an incorrect identification of influential parameters and key reaction intermediates and reactions. We rationalize why models often underpredict reaction rates and show that, despite the uncertainty being large, the method can, in conjunction with experimental data, identify influential missing reaction pathways and provide insights into the catalyst active site and the kinetic reliability of a model. The method is demonstrated in ethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production for fuel cells. PMID:27001728

  15. Effects of correlated parameters and uncertainty in electronic-structure-based chemical kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Jonathan E.; Guo, Wei; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic models based on first principles are becoming common place in heterogeneous catalysis because of their ability to interpret experimental data, identify the rate-controlling step, guide experiments and predict novel materials. To overcome the tremendous computational cost of estimating parameters of complex networks on metal catalysts, approximate quantum mechanical calculations are employed that render models potentially inaccurate. Here, by introducing correlative global sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, we show that neglecting correlations in the energies of species and reactions can lead to an incorrect identification of influential parameters and key reaction intermediates and reactions. We rationalize why models often underpredict reaction rates and show that, despite the uncertainty being large, the method can, in conjunction with experimental data, identify influential missing reaction pathways and provide insights into the catalyst active site and the kinetic reliability of a model. The method is demonstrated in ethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production for fuel cells.

  16. Effects of sonication on the kinetics of orange juice quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, B K; Muthukumarappan, K; O'Donnell, C P; Cullen, P J

    2008-04-01

    The effects of sonication on pH, degrees Brix, titratable acidity (TA), cloud, browning index, and color parameters ( L*, a*, and b*) of freshly squeezed orange juice samples were studied. Ultrasonic intensity (UI) levels of 8.61, 9.24, 10.16, 17.17, and 22.79 W/cm2 and treatment times of 0 (control), 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min were investigated. No significant changes in pH, degrees Brix, and TA ( p < 0.05) were found. Cloud value, browning index, and color parameters were significantly affected by ultrasonic intensity and treatment time. Changes in cloud value followed first-order kinetics, whereas browning index, L*, a*, and b* values followed zero-order kinetics. Reaction rate constants were linearly correlated ( R2 > 0.90) to ultrasonic intensity. PMID:18321054

  17. Parameter variations in prediction skill optimization at ECMWF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollinaho, P.; Bechtold, P.; Leutbecher, M.; Laine, M.; Solonen, A.; Haario, H.; Järvinen, H.

    2013-11-01

    Algorithmic numerical weather prediction (NWP) skill optimization has been tested using the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). We report the results of initial experimentation using importance sampling based on model parameter estimation methodology targeted for ensemble prediction systems, called the ensemble prediction and parameter estimation system (EPPES). The same methodology was earlier proven to be a viable concept in low-order ordinary differential equation systems, and in large-scale atmospheric general circulation models (ECHAM5). Here we show that prediction skill optimization is possible even in the context of a system that is (i) of very high dimensionality, and (ii) carefully tuned to very high skill. We concentrate on four closure parameters related to the parameterizations of sub-grid scale physical processes of convection and formation of convective precipitation. We launch standard ensembles of medium-range predictions such that each member uses different values of the four parameters, and make sequential statistical inferences about the parameter values. Our target criterion is the squared forecast error of the 500 hPa geopotential height at day three and day ten. The EPPES methodology is able to converge towards closure parameter values that optimize the target criterion. Therefore, we conclude that estimation and cost function-based tuning of low-dimensional static model parameters is possible despite the very high dimensional state space, as well as the presence of stochastic noise due to initial state and physical tendency perturbations. The remaining question before EPPES can be considered as a generally applicable tool in model development is the correct formulation of the target criterion. The one used here is, in our view, very selective. Considering the multi-faceted question of improving forecast model performance, a more general target criterion should be developed

  18. Systematic variational method for statistical nonlinear state and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jingxin; Rey, Daniel; Kadakia, Nirag; Eldridge, Michael; Morone, Uriel I; Rozdeba, Paul; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Quinn, John C

    2015-11-01

    In statistical data assimilation one evaluates the conditional expected values, conditioned on measurements, of interesting quantities on the path of a model through observation and prediction windows. This often requires working with very high dimensional integrals in the discrete time descriptions of the observations and model dynamics, which become functional integrals in the continuous-time limit. Two familiar methods for performing these integrals include (1) Monte Carlo calculations and (2) variational approximations using the method of Laplace plus perturbative corrections to the dominant contributions. We attend here to aspects of the Laplace approximation and develop an annealing method for locating the variational path satisfying the Euler-Lagrange equations that comprises the major contribution to the integrals. This begins with the identification of the minimum action path starting with a situation where the model dynamics is totally unresolved in state space, and the consistent minimum of the variational problem is known. We then proceed to slowly increase the model resolution, seeking to remain in the basin of the minimum action path, until a path that gives the dominant contribution to the integral is identified. After a discussion of some general issues, we give examples of the assimilation process for some simple, instructive models from the geophysical literature. Then we explore a slightly richer model of the same type with two distinct time scales. This is followed by a model characterizing the biophysics of individual neurons. PMID:26651756

  19. [Determination of kinetic parameters lymphocyte populations in cows with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V A; Feofanova, T V; Busol, V A; Nikolaeva, N V

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed changes in the number of lymphocytes in the blood of cows with chronic lymphoid leukemia using the Gomperts equation of population dynamics. The parameters of this equation were determined. Coefficients beta and gamma proved to be the most variable. The former reflects the delay and the latter characterizes the maximum rate of growth of the lymphocyte population. According to these parameters, three groups of animals were distinguished with different kinetics of leucosis and different correlations between immuno-hematological indices. PMID:7670356

  20. Lattice parameter variations during aging in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of the state of coherency on measurements of gamma/gamma-prime lattice mismatch has been experimentally demonstrated during aging at 1000 C of specimens of an alloy with composition Ni-(8.6)Cr-(5.3)Al-(10.1)Co-(11.7)W-(1.2)Ti-(0.7)Mo (wt pct). Lattice parameter measurements are given as a function of aging time, and the corresponding sample microstructures are presented. The results show that changes of the two phases during aging did not influence the lattice parameter measurements, indicating that aging specimens to produce a semicoherent gamma/gamma-prime structure provides a good approximation of the true, unconstrained lattice mismatch.

  1. Preliminary Investigation of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2005-01-01

    A parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this preliminary work was to investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD icing conditions. It was desired to identify the minimum change (threshold) in a parameter value, which yielded an observable change in the ice shape. Liquid Water Content (LWC), drop size distribution (MVD), and tunnel static temperature were varied about a nominal value, and the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes were documented. The resulting differences in ice shapes were compared on the basis of qualitative and quantitative criteria (e.g., mass, ice horn thickness, ice horn angle, icing limits, and iced area). This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results, followed by a discussion of recommendations for future research.

  2. Nonlocal, kinetic stimulated Raman scattering in nonuniform plasmas: Averaged variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, P.; Friedland, L.; Shagalov, A. G.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2012-07-01

    Excitation of continuously phase-locked (autoresonant) plasma waves in a nonuniform plasma via stimulated Raman backscattering is analyzed with a focus on the kinetic regime (kλD˜1). The dominant nonlinear effect in this regime is that of resonant particles, and the plasma wave excitation is a nonlocal process involving formation and transport of the electron phase space holes. Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied in studying the coupled plasma, laser pump, and seed waves dynamics. A flat-top electron velocity distribution is used as the simplest model allowing a variational formulation within the water bag theory. The corresponding Lagrangian, averaged over the fast phase variable, yields evolution equations for the slow field variables. The adiabatic multiple water bag extension of the theory for application to autoresonant plasma waves in nonuniform plasmas with more realistic initial distributions is also discussed. Numerical solutions of the system of slow variational equations are compared with Vlasov-Ampere simulations.

  3. Nonlocal, kinetic stimulated Raman scattering in nonuniform plasmas: Averaged variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, P.; Friedland, L.; Shagalov, A. G.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2012-07-15

    Excitation of continuously phase-locked (autoresonant) plasma waves in a nonuniform plasma via stimulated Raman backscattering is analyzed with a focus on the kinetic regime (k{lambda}{sub D}{approx}1). The dominant nonlinear effect in this regime is that of resonant particles, and the plasma wave excitation is a nonlocal process involving formation and transport of the electron phase space holes. Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied in studying the coupled plasma, laser pump, and seed waves dynamics. A flat-top electron velocity distribution is used as the simplest model allowing a variational formulation within the water bag theory. The corresponding Lagrangian, averaged over the fast phase variable, yields evolution equations for the slow field variables. The adiabatic multiple water bag extension of the theory for application to autoresonant plasma waves in nonuniform plasmas with more realistic initial distributions is also discussed. Numerical solutions of the system of slow variational equations are compared with Vlasov-Ampere simulations.

  4. Kinetics of bacterial phospholipase C activity at micellar interfaces: effect of substrate aggregate microstructure and a model for the kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha; Hajdu, Joseph

    2008-12-25

    Activity at micellar interfaces of bacterial phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on phospholipids solubilized in micelles was investigated with the goal of elucidating the role of the interface microstructure and developing further an existing kinetic model. Enzyme kinetics and physicochemical characterization of model substrate aggregates were combined, thus enabling the interpretation of kinetics in the context of the interface. Substrates were diacylphosphatidylcholine of different acyl chain lengths in the form of mixed micelles with dodecyldimethylammoniopropanesulfonate. An early kinetic model, reformulated to reflect the interfacial nature of the kinetics, was applied to the kinetic data. A better method of data treatment is proposed, use of which makes the presence of microstructure effects quite transparent. Models for enzyme-micelle binding and enzyme-lipid binding are developed, and expressions incorporating the microstructural properties are derived for the enzyme-micelle dissociation constant K(s) and the interface Michaelis-Menten constant, K(M). Use of these expressions in the interface kinetic model brings excellent agreement between the kinetic data and the model. Numerical values for the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are determined. Enzyme-lipid binding is found to be an activated process with an acyl chain length dependent free energy of activation that decreases with micelle lipid molar fraction with a coefficient of about -15RT and correlates with the tightness of molecular packing in the substrate aggregate. Thus, the physical insight obtained includes a model for the kinetic parameters that shows that these parameters depend on the substrate concentration and acyl chain length of the lipid. Enzyme-micelle binding is indicated to be hydrophobic and solvent mediated with a dissociation constant of 1.2 mM.

  5. Thermoluminescence kinetic parameters of different amount La-doped ZnB₂O₄.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Gozel, Aziz Halit; Yüksel, Mehmet; Dogan, Tamer; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% La-doped ZnB2O4 phosphors (i.e. ZnB2O4:0.01La, ZnB2O4:0.02La, ZnB2O4:0.03La and ZnB2O4:0.04La) synthesized by nitric acid method have been calculated. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of ZnB2O4:La phosphors after beta-irradiation showed a very well defined main peak having the maximum temperature at around 200°C and a shoulder peak at around 315°C with a constant heating rate of 5°C/s. The kinetic parameters of ZnB2O4:La phosphors TL glow peaks (i.e. order of kinetics (b), activation energies (Ea) and frequency factors (s)) have been determined and evaluated by Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD), and Peak Shape (PS) methods using the glow curve data. From the results, it can conclude that the values of Ea obtained with these methods for ZnB2O4:La phosphors are consistent with each other, but the s values differ considerably.

  6. Optimization of kinetic parameters for the degradation of plasmid DNA in rat plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Q. A.

    2014-12-01

    Biotechnology is a rapidly growing area of research work in the field of pharmaceutical sciences. The study of pharmacokinetics of plasmid DNA (pDNA) is an important area of research work. It has been observed that the process of gene delivery faces many troubles on the transport of pDNA towards their target sites. The topoforms of pDNA has been termed as super coiled (S-C), open circular (O-C) and linear (L), the kinetic model of which will be presented in this paper. The kinetic model gives rise to system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the exact solution of which has been found. The kinetic parameters, which are responsible for the degradation of super coiled, and the formation of open circular and linear topoforms have a great significance not only in vitro but for modeling of further processes as well, therefore need to be addressed in great detail. For this purpose, global optimization techniques have been adopted, thus finding the optimal results for the said model. The results of the model, while using the optimal parameters, were compared against the measured data, which gives a nice agreement.

  7. Kinetic parameters related to sources and sinks of vibrationally excited OH in the nightglow

    SciTech Connect

    McDade, I.C.; Llewellyn, E.J. )

    1987-07-01

    Kinetic parameters related to vibrational deactivation and chemical removal of vibrationally excited OH radicals in the mesosphere are deduced from ground-based measurements of the mean vibrational distribution of the OH Meinel bands in the nightglow. The derived parameters, which rely on a laboratory measured rate coefficient for the removal of OH(v = 9) by O{sub 2} and a set of relative Meinel band transition probabilities, have been obtained for two limiting Meinel band excitation models that differ in the extent to which single-quantum vibrational deactivation and sudden death' collisional removal processes determine the OH vibrational distribution. It is shown that the OH Meinel band emission can be adequately explained with the deduced parameters and the H + O{sub 3} {yields} OH + O{sub 2} reaction as the only chemical source of vibrationally excited OH. Evidence is presented which suggests that the reaction HO{sub 2} + O {leftrightarrow} HO + O{sub 2} may perhaps be involved as a sink of vibrationally excited OH rather than as a potential source. The deduced kinetic parameters should be particularly useful in future Meinel band studies as they have been obtained from an analysis for which there is no assumption about the very uncertain OH radiative lifetimes.

  8. Narrow-track wheeled agricultural tractor parameter variation.

    PubMed

    Guzzomi, A; Rondelli, V

    2013-10-01

    Despite a general consensus among farmers, manufacturers, and researchers that wheeled agricultural tractor design has changed over time, there is little published evidence. There is debate as to whether the standardized rollover protective structure (ROPS) energy and force requirements, based on a tractor reference mass and pertaining to studies conducted more than 40 years ago, are appropriate for modern tractors. This article investigated the physical parameters of 326 modern narrow-track tractors, measured according to OECD Code 6 over 16 years (1993 to 2008 inclusive): 252 (-77%) were fixed-chassis tractors and 74 (-23%) were articulated. To understand the significance of design changes, the data were analyzed with respect to time and as a function of tractor mass. Articulated and fixed-chassis data were treated separately. The time data allowed qualitative analysis, while the mass data allowed quantitative analysis. The parameters show some changes over time and clearly indicate differences between articulated and fixed-chassis types. The parameter changes, along with the differences between types, may have important safety ramifications for ROPS energy absorption requirements, and these aspects are discussed. Regression lines with R2 values were fitted to the mass-related data for fixed-chassis and articulated tractors to determine the suitability of fit. The mass relations also displayed differences between fixed-chassis and articulated tractors. Thus, the most significant recommendation from this study is that the standardized testing procedure for narrow-track wheeled agricultural tractor category should be split into two groups: fixed-chassis and articulated. PMID:24673034

  9. Variation in the modal parameters of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Barlow, Mark S.; Van Schoor, Marthinus C.; Bicos, Andrew S.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic and experimental study of gravity and suspension influences on space structural test articles is presented. A modular test article including deployable, erectable, and rotary modules was assembled in three one- and two-dimensional structures. The two deployable modules utilized cable diagonal bracing rather than rigid cross members; within a bay of one of the deployable modules, the cable preload was adjustable. A friction lock was used on the alpha joint to either allow or prohibit rotary motion. Suspension systems with plunge fundamentals of 1, 2, and 5 Hz were used for ground testing to evaluate the influences of suspension stiffness. Assembly and reassembly testing was performed, as was testing on two separate shipsets at two test sites. Trends and statistical variances in modal parameters are presented as a function of force amplitude, joint preload, reassembly, shipset and suspension. Linear finite element modeling of each structure provided analytical results for 0-g unsuspended and 1-g suspended models, which are correlated with the analytical model.

  10. Kinetic Parameter Extraction of Square Wave Voltammograms from DNA-Modified Gold Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Marc; Wohlgamuth, Chris; Slinker, Jason

    2012-10-01

    The field of surface bound electrochemistry is important in a variety of applications specifically sensing. A fundamental understanding of the processes involved could help to improve detection limits, optimize rates of detection and direct changes in device design. Accurate extraction of electrochemical kinetic parameters such as the rate constant k and charge transfer coefficient α from cyclic voltammograms can be challenging when confronted with large background currents and relatively weak signals. The commonly used technique of Laviron analysis is both time consuming and somewhat subjective. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) is therefore an ideal alternative method given that it maximizes signal while minimizing capacitive effects. In this experiment kinetic parameters of DNA-modified gold electrodes are obtained from SWV curves through background subtraction followed by nonlinear least squares fitting using a first order quasi-reversible surface process model. The fitting is accomplished using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm with standard parameters and a convergence condition of less than 0.0001%. General agreement with experimental data is shown with varying levels of confidence. Difficulties specific to this experiment are discussed as well as the possible benefits of utilizing the Bayesian statistical approach of nested sampling when confronted with multiple peaks of interest and the background source is well defined.

  11. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  12. AB-OSEM reconstruction for improved Patlak kinetic parameter estimation: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Reader, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    The non-negativity constraint inherently present in OSEM reconstruction successfully reduces the standard deviation in cold regions but at the cost of introducing a positive bias, especially at low iteration numbers. For low-count data, as often encountered in short-duration frames in dynamic imaging protocols, it has been shown that it can be advantageous (in terms of bias in the reconstructed image) to remove the non-negativity constraint. In this work two competing algorithms that do not impose non-negativity in the reconstructed image are investigated: NEG-ML and AB-OSEM. It was found that the AB-OSEM reconstruction outperformed the NEG-ML reconstruction. The AB-OSEM algorithm was then further developed to allow a forward model that includes randoms and scatter background terms. In addition to static reconstruction the current analysis was extended to consider the important case of kinetic parameter estimation from dynamic PET data. Simulation studies (comparing OSEM, FBP and AB-OSEM) showed that the positive bias obtained with OSEM reconstruction can be avoided in both static and parametric imaging through use of a negative lower bound in AB-OSEM reconstruction (i.e. by lifting the implicit non-negativity constraint of OSEM). When quantification tasks are considered, the overall error in the estimates (composed of both bias and standard deviation) is often of primary concern. An important finding of this work is that in most cases the activity concentration and the kinetic parameters obtained from images reconstructed using AB-OSEM showed a lower overall root mean squared error compared to the popular choices of either OSEM or FBP reconstruction for both cold and warm regions. As such, AB-OSEM should be preferred instead of the standard OSEM and FBP reconstructions when kinetic parameter estimation is considered. Finally, this work shows example parametric images from the high-resolution research tomograph obtained using the different reconstruction methods.

  13. AB-OSEM reconstruction for improved Patlak kinetic parameter estimation: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Reader, Andrew J

    2010-11-21

    The non-negativity constraint inherently present in OSEM reconstruction successfully reduces the standard deviation in cold regions but at the cost of introducing a positive bias, especially at low iteration numbers. For low-count data, as often encountered in short-duration frames in dynamic imaging protocols, it has been shown that it can be advantageous (in terms of bias in the reconstructed image) to remove the non-negativity constraint. In this work two competing algorithms that do not impose non-negativity in the reconstructed image are investigated: NEG-ML and AB-OSEM. It was found that the AB-OSEM reconstruction outperformed the NEG-ML reconstruction. The AB-OSEM algorithm was then further developed to allow a forward model that includes randoms and scatter background terms. In addition to static reconstruction the current analysis was extended to consider the important case of kinetic parameter estimation from dynamic PET data. Simulation studies (comparing OSEM, FBP and AB-OSEM) showed that the positive bias obtained with OSEM reconstruction can be avoided in both static and parametric imaging through use of a negative lower bound in AB-OSEM reconstruction (i.e. by lifting the implicit non-negativity constraint of OSEM). When quantification tasks are considered, the overall error in the estimates (composed of both bias and standard deviation) is often of primary concern. An important finding of this work is that in most cases the activity concentration and the kinetic parameters obtained from images reconstructed using AB-OSEM showed a lower overall root mean squared error compared to the popular choices of either OSEM or FBP reconstruction for both cold and warm regions. As such, AB-OSEM should be preferred instead of the standard OSEM and FBP reconstructions when kinetic parameter estimation is considered. Finally, this work shows example parametric images from the high-resolution research tomograph obtained using the different reconstruction methods.

  14. Wind turbine response to parameter variation of analytic inflow vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, M. Maureen; Robinson, Michael C.; Balas, Mark J.

    2006-05-01

    As larger wind turbines are placed on taller towers, rotors frequently operate in atmospheric conditions that support organized, coherent turbulent structures. It is hypothesized that these structures have a detrimental impact on the blade fatigue life experienced by the wind turbine. These structures are extremely difficult to identify with sophisticated anemometry such as ultrasonic anemometers. This study was performed to identify the vortex characteristics that contribute to high-amplitude cyclic blade loads, assuming that these vortices exist under certain atmospheric conditions. This study does not attempt to demonstrate the existence of these coherent turbulent structures. In order to ascertain the idealized worst-case scenario for vortical inflow structures impinging on a wind turbine rotor, we created a simple, analytic vortex model. The Rankine vortex model assumes that the vortex core undergoes solid body rotation to avoid a singularity at the vortex centre and is surrounded by a two-dimensional potential flow field. Using the wind turbine as a sensor and the FAST wind turbine dynamics code with limited degrees of freedom, we determined the aerodynamic loads imparted to the wind turbine by the vortex structure. We varied the size, strength, rotational direction, plane of rotation, and location of the vortex over a wide range of operating parameters. We identified the vortex conformation with the most significant effect on the blade root bending moment cyclic amplitude. Vortices with radii on the scale of the rotor diameter or smaller caused blade root bending moment cyclic amplitudes that contribute to high damage density. The rotational orientation, clockwise or counter-clockwise, produces little difference in the bending moment response. Vortices in the XZ plane produce bending moment amplitudes significantly greater than vortices in the YZ plane. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Received: 9 April 2004; Revised: 14 March 2005; Accepted: 19

  15. Gas phase NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine. Environmental effects on kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; Leung, Doris Y.; True, Nancy S.

    1984-04-01

    Gas phase 1H NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine are consistent with first order chemical exchange rate constants which are ca. 25 times faster than those observed in neat liquids at corresponding temperatures. The associated kinetic parameters: Eact(∞), 20.5(1.1) kcal mol -1, Δ H‡, 19.7(1.0) kcal mol -1 and Δ G‡, 21.1(0.4) kcal mol -1 are approximately 2.5 kcal mol -1 lower than the most recently reported values for the neat liquid. The observed phase dependence is consistent with a process proceeding via a freely rotating transition state.

  16. Effects of metformin on cell kinetic parameters of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topcul, Mehmet; Cetin, Idil

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antiproliferative effects of the metformin was evaluated on MCF-7 Cells (human breast adenocarcinoma cell line). For this purpose cell kinetic parameters including cell proliferation assay, mitotic index and labelling index analysis were used. 30 μM, 65 μM and 130 μM Metformin doses were applied to cells for 24, 48 and 72 hours. The results showed that there was a significant decrease in cell proliferation, mitotic index and labelling index for all experimental groups (p<0.05) for all applications. PMID:25824763

  17. Kinetic parameters for the generation of endothelins-1,-2 and -3 by human cathepsin E.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, P S; Lees, W E; Kay, J; Cook, N D

    1992-01-01

    The specific conversion of human endothelin (ET) precursors big ET-1, big ET-2 and big ET-3 into their respective ET by cathepsin E was examined. Comparable pH optima were obtained for ET-1 and ET-2 generation, whereas effective conversion of big ET-3 into ET-3 necessitated a lower pH value. Determination of kinetic parameters (Km, kcat.) for all three conversions indicated that the precursors were efficiently bound by cathepsin E. The significance of the values obtained for the catalytic-centre activities and the effect of a specific inhibitor are discussed. PMID:1599425

  18. A Computer Code System for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by One-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP1 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for one-dimensional geometry.

  19. A Computer Program for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by Two-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP2 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for two-dimensional geometry.

  20. Kinetic and spectral parameters of interaction of Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Morozova, E A; Bazhulina, N P; Anufrieva, N V; Mamaeva, D V; Tkachev, Y V; Streltsov, S A; Timofeev, V P; Faleev, N G; Demidkina, T V

    2010-10-01

    Kinetic parameters of Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase were determined with substrates in γ-elimination reactions as well as the inhibition of the enzyme in the γ-elimination of L-methionine by amino acids with different structure. The data indicate an important contribution of the sulfur atom and methylene groups to the efficiency of binding of substrates and inhibitors. The rate constants of the enzyme-catalyzed exchange of C-α- and C-β-protons with deuterium were determined, as well as the kinetic isotope effect of the deuterium label in the C-α-position of inhibitors on the rate of exchange of their β-protons. Neither stereoselectivity in the β-proton exchange nor noticeable α-isotope effect on the exchange rates of β-protons was found. The ionic and tautomeric composition of the external Schiff base of methionine γ-lyase was determined. Spectral characteristics (absorption and circular dichroism spectra) of complexes with substrates and inhibitors were determined. The spectral and kinetic data indicate that deamination of aminocrotonate should be the rate-determining stage of the enzymatic reaction.

  1. Effect of diet-induced obesity on kinetic parameters of amino acid uptake by rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Picó, C; Pons, A; Palou, A

    1992-11-01

    The effects of cafeteria diet-induced obesity upon in vitro uptake of L-Alanine, Glycine, L-Lysine, L-Glutamine, L-Glutamic acid, L-Phenylalanine and L-Leucine by isolated rat erythrocytes have been studied. The total Phe and Leu uptakes followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The Glu uptake was fitted to diffusion kinetics. The uptakes of Ala, Gly, Lys and Gln were best explained by a two-component transport: one saturable and one diffusion. Obesity increased the Km value for Ala, Gln and Leu, and the Vmax value for Ala, but decreased the Vmax for Lys. Kinetic parameters of Phe uptake were unaffected by obesity. In addition, the pseudo-first order rate constant (Vmax/Km) for Ala, Gly, Gln, Lys and Leu uptake decreased as a result of cafeteria diet-induced obesity. The Kd value for Ala, Gly, Gln and Glu decreased and that of Lys increased as result of obesity. These adaptations could, at least in part, explain alterations in amino acid distribution between blood cells and plasma related to overfeeding or obesity.

  2. Sparsity Constrained Mixture Modeling for the Estimation of Kinetic Parameters in Dynamic PET

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanguang; Haldar, Justin P.; Li, Quanzheng; Conti, Peter S.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    The estimation and analysis of kinetic parameters in dynamic PET is frequently confounded by tissue heterogeneity and partial volume effects. We propose a new constrained model of dynamic PET to address these limitations. The proposed formulation incorporates an explicit mixture model in which each image voxel is represented as a mixture of different pure tissue types with distinct temporal dynamics. We use Cramér-Rao lower bounds to demonstrate that the use of prior information is important to stabilize parameter estimation with this model. As a result, we propose a constrained formulation of the estimation problem that we solve using a two-stage algorithm. In the first stage, a sparse signal processing method is applied to estimate the rate parameters for the different tissue compartments from the noisy PET time series. In the second stage, tissue fractions and the linear parameters of different time activity curves are estimated using a combination of spatial-regularity and fractional mixture constraints. A block coordinate descent algorithm is combined with a manifold search to robustly estimate these parameters. The method is evaluated with both simulated and experimental dynamic PET data. PMID:24216681

  3. Accounting for the kinetics in order parameter analysis: Lessons from theoretical models and a disordered peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovska, Ganna; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Molecular simulations as well as single molecule experiments have been widely analyzed in terms of order parameters, the latter representing candidate probes for the relevant degrees of freedom. Notwithstanding this approach is very intuitive, mounting evidence showed that such descriptions are inaccurate, leading to ambiguous definitions of states and wrong kinetics. To overcome these limitations a framework making use of order parameter fluctuations in conjunction with complex network analysis is investigated. Derived from recent advances in the analysis of single molecule time traces, this approach takes into account the fluctuations around each time point to distinguish between states that have similar values of the order parameter but different dynamics. Snapshots with similar fluctuations are used as nodes of a transition network, the clusterization of which into states provides accurate Markov-state-models of the system under study. Application of the methodology to theoretical models with a noisy order parameter as well as the dynamics of a disordered peptide illustrates the possibility to build accurate descriptions of molecular processes on the sole basis of order parameter time series without using any supplementary information.

  4. Accounting for the kinetics in order parameter analysis: lessons from theoretical models and a disordered peptide.

    PubMed

    Berezovska, Ganna; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco

    2012-11-21

    Molecular simulations as well as single molecule experiments have been widely analyzed in terms of order parameters, the latter representing candidate probes for the relevant degrees of freedom. Notwithstanding this approach is very intuitive, mounting evidence showed that such descriptions are inaccurate, leading to ambiguous definitions of states and wrong kinetics. To overcome these limitations a framework making use of order parameter fluctuations in conjunction with complex network analysis is investigated. Derived from recent advances in the analysis of single molecule time traces, this approach takes into account the fluctuations around each time point to distinguish between states that have similar values of the order parameter but different dynamics. Snapshots with similar fluctuations are used as nodes of a transition network, the clusterization of which into states provides accurate Markov-state-models of the system under study. Application of the methodology to theoretical models with a noisy order parameter as well as the dynamics of a disordered peptide illustrates the possibility to build accurate descriptions of molecular processes on the sole basis of order parameter time series without using any supplementary information. PMID:23181288

  5. Determination of the kinetic parameters of BeO using isothermal decay method.

    PubMed

    Azorin Nieto, Juan; Vega, Claudia Azorin; Montalvo, Teodoro Rivera; Cabrera, Eugenio Torijano

    2016-02-01

    Most of the existing methods for obtaining the frequency factors make use of the trap depth (activation energy) making some assumptions about the order of the kinetics. This causes inconsistencies in the reported values of trapping parameters due that the values of the activation energy obtained by different methods differ appreciably among them. Then, it is necessary to use a method independent of the trap depth making use of the isothermal luminescence decay (ILD) method. The trapping parameters associated with the prominent glow peak of BeO (280°C) are reported using ILD method. As a check, the trap parameters are also calculated by glow curve shape (Chen's) method after isolating the prominent glow peak by thermal cleaning technique. Our results show a very good agreement between the trapping parameters calculated by the two methods. ILD method was used for determining the trapping parameters of BeO. Results obtained applying this method are in good agreement with those obtained using other methods, except in the value of the frequency factor.

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of ofloxacin adsorption from aqueous solution onto modified coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.-L.; Zhao, F.; Wang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were carried out for the removal of ofloxacin from aqueous solution using modified coal fly ash as adsorbent. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, initial solution concentration and temperature on the adsorption system were investigated. The optimum contact time was found to be 150 min. The adsorption isotherm data fit well with the Langmuir model, and the kinetic data fit well with the pseudo-second order and the intra-particle diffusion model. Intra-particle diffusion analysis demonstrates that ofloxacin diffuses quickly among the particles at the beginning of the adsorption process, and then the diffusion slows down and stabilizes. Thermodynamic parameters such as Δ G, Δ H, and Δ S were also calculated. The negative Gibbs free energy change and the positive enthalpy change indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption, and the positive entropy change indicated that the adsorption process was aided by increased randomness.

  7. Kinetic parameters of the conversion of methane precursors to methane in a hypereutrophic lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Strayer, R F; Tiedje, J M

    1978-08-01

    The kinetic parameters K(m), V(max), T(t) (turnover time), and v (natural velocity) were determined for H(2) and acetate conversion to methane by Wintergreen Lake sediment, using short-term (a few hours) methods and incubation temperatures of 10 to 14 degrees C. Estimates of the Michaelis-Menten constant, K(m), for both the consumption of hydrogen and the conversion of hydrogen to methane by sediment microflora averaged about 0.024 mumol g of dry sediment. The maximal velocity, V(max), averaged 4.8 mumol of H(2) g h for hydrogen consumption and 0.64 mumol of CH(4) g h for the conversion of hydrogen to methane during the winter. Estimated natural rates of hydrogen consumption and hydrogen conversion to methane could be calculated from the Michaelis-Menten equation and estimates of K(m), V(max), and the in situ dissolved-hydrogen concentration. These results indicate that methane may not be the only fate of hydrogen in the sediment. Among several potential hydrogen donors tested, only formate stimulated the rate of sediment methanogenesis. Formate conversion to methane was so rapid that an accurate estimate of kinetic parameters was not possible. Kinetic experiments using [2-C]acetate and sediments collected in the summer indicated that acetate was being converted to methane at or near the maximal rate. A minimum natural rate of acetate conversion to methane was estimated to be about 110 nmol of CH(4) g h, which was 66% of the V(max) (163 nmol of CH(4) g h). A 15-min preincubation of sediment with 5.0 x 10 atm of hydrogen had a pronounced effect on the kinetic parameters for the conversion of acetate to methane. The acetate pool size, expressed as the term K(m) + S(n) (S(n) is in situ substrate concentration), decreased by 37% and T(t) decreased by 43%. The V(max) remained relatively constant. A preincubation with hydrogen also caused a 37% decrease in the amount of labeled carbon dioxide produced from the metabolism of [U-C]valine by sediment heterotrophs.

  8. Prediction of interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo from individual enzyme kinetic data and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Bogaards, J J; Hissink, E M; Briggs, M; Weaver, R; Jochemsen, R; Jackson, P; Bertrand, M; van Bladeren, P J

    2000-12-01

    A strategy is presented to predict interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo by the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and human in vitro metabolic parameters, obtained through the combined use of microsomes containing single cytochrome P450 enzymes and a human liver microsome bank. The strategy, applied to the pharmaceutical compound (N-[2-(7-methoxy-1-naphtyl)-ethyl]acetamide), consists of the following steps: (1) estimation of enzyme kinetic parameters K(m) and V(max) for the key cytochrome P450 enzymes using microsomes containing individual P450 enzymes; (2) scaling-up of the V(max) values for each individual cytochrome P450 involved using the ratio between marker substrate activities obtained from the same microsomes containing single P450 enzymes and a human liver microsome bank; (3) incorporation into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. For validation, predicted blood plasma levels and pharmacokinetic parameters were compared to those found in human volunteers: both the absolute plasma levels as well as the range in plasma levels were well predicted. Therefore, the presented strategy appears to be promising with respect to the integration of interindividual differences in metabolism and prediction of the possible impact on plasma and tissue concentrations of drugs in humans. PMID:11102739

  9. Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

  10. Local field potentials in primate motor cortex encode grasp kinetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Milekovic, Tomislav; Truccolo, Wilson; Grün, Sonja; Riehle, Alexa; Brochier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reach and grasp kinematics are known to be encoded in the spiking activity of neuronal ensembles and in local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from primate motor cortex during movement planning and execution. However, little is known, especially in LFPs, about the encoding of kinetic parameters, such as forces exerted on the object during the same actions. We implanted two monkeys with microelectrode arrays in the motor cortical areas MI and PMd to investigate encoding of grasp-related parameters in motor cortical LFPs during planning and execution of reach-and-grasp movements. We identified three components of the LFP that modulated during grasps corresponding to low (0.3 - 7Hz), intermediate (∼10 - ∼40Hz) and high (∼80 - 250Hz) frequency bands. We show that all three components can be used to classify not only grip types but also object loads during planning and execution of a grasping movement. In addition, we demonstrate that all three components recorded during planning or execution can be used to continuously decode finger pressure forces and hand position related to the grasping movement. Low and high frequency components provide similar classification and decoding accuracies, which were substantially higher than those obtained from the intermediate frequency component. Our results demonstrate that intended reach and grasp kinetic parameters are encoded in multiple LFP bands during both movement planning and execution. These findings also suggest that the LFP is a reliable signal for the control of parameters related to object load and applied pressure forces in brain-machine interfaces. PMID:25869861

  11. Variational perturbation and extended Plefka approaches to dynamics on random networks: the case of the kinetic Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachschmid-Romano, L.; Battistin, C.; Opper, M.; Roudi, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We describe and analyze some novel approaches for studying the dynamics of Ising spin glass models. We first briefly consider the variational approach based on minimizing the Kullback–Leibler divergence between independent trajectories and the real ones and note that this approach only coincides with the mean field equations from the saddle point approximation to the generating functional when the dynamics is defined through a logistic link function, which is the case for the kinetic Ising model with parallel update. We then spend the rest of the paper developing two ways of going beyond the saddle point approximation to the generating functional. In the first one, we develop a variational perturbative approximation to the generating functional by expanding the action around a quadratic function of the local fields and conjugate local fields whose parameters are optimized. We derive analytical expressions for the optimal parameters and show that when the optimization is suitably restricted, we recover the mean field equations that are exact for the fully asymmetric random couplings (Mézard and Sakellariou 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 L07001). However, without this restriction the results are different. We also describe an extended Plefka expansion in which in addition to the magnetization, we also fix the correlation and response functions. Finally, we numerically study the performance of these approximations for Sherrington–Kirkpatrick type couplings for various coupling strengths and the degrees of coupling symmetry, for both temporally constant but random, as well as time varying external fields. We show that the dynamical equations derived from the extended Plefka expansion outperform the others in all regimes, although it is computationally more demanding. The unconstrained variational approach does not perform well in the small coupling regime, while it approaches dynamical TAP equations of (Roudi and Hertz 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 P03031) for strong

  12. Seasonal variation of photosynthetic model parameters and leaf area index from global Fluxnet eddy covariance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenendijk, M.; Dolman, A. J.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Cescatti, A.; Dragoni, D.; Gash, J. H. C.; Gianelle, D.; Gioli, B.; Kiely, G.; Knohl, A.; Law, B. E.; Lund, M.; Marcolla, B.; van der Molen, M. K.; Montagnani, L.; Moors, E.; Richardson, A. D.; Roupsard, O.; Verbeeck, H.; Wohlfahrt, G.

    2011-12-01

    Global vegetation models require the photosynthetic parameters, maximum carboxylation capacity (Vcm), and quantum yield (α) to parameterize their plant functional types (PFTs). The purpose of this work is to determine how much the scaling of the parameters from leaf to ecosystem level through a seasonally varying leaf area index (LAI) explains the parameter variation within and between PFTs. Using Fluxnet data, we simulate a seasonally variable LAIF for a large range of sites, comparable to the LAIM derived from MODIS. There are discrepancies when LAIF reach zero levels and LAIM still provides a small positive value. We find that temperature is the most common constraint for LAIF in 55% of the simulations, while global radiation and vapor pressure deficit are the key constraints for 18% and 27% of the simulations, respectively, while large differences in this forcing still exist when looking at specific PFTs. Despite these differences, the annual photosynthesis simulations are comparable when using LAIF or LAIM (r2 = 0.89). We investigated further the seasonal variation of ecosystem-scale parameters derived with LAIF. Vcm has the largest seasonal variation. This holds for all vegetation types and climates. The parameter α is less variable. By including ecosystem-scale parameter seasonality we can explain a considerable part of the ecosystem-scale parameter variation between PFTs. The remaining unexplained leaf-scale PFT variation still needs further work, including elucidating the precise role of leaf and soil level nitrogen.

  13. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Young, Jodi N; Heureux, Ana M C; Sharwood, Robert E; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Morel, François M M; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-05-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat (c)), oxygenation (k cat (o)), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23-68 µM), SC/O (57-116mol mol(-1)), and K O (413-2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat (c) for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1-3.7s(-1)), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat (c) for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  14. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jodi N.; Heureux, Ana M.C.; Sharwood, Robert E.; Rickaby, Rosalind E.M.; Morel, François M.M.; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat c), oxygenation (k cat o), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23–68 µM), SC/O (57–116mol mol−1), and K O (413–2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat c for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1–3.7s−1), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat c for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  15. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Young, Jodi N; Heureux, Ana M C; Sharwood, Robert E; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Morel, François M M; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-05-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat (c)), oxygenation (k cat (o)), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23-68 µM), SC/O (57-116mol mol(-1)), and K O (413-2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat (c) for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1-3.7s(-1)), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat (c) for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily.

  16. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  17. The role of test parameters on the kinetics and thermodynamics of glass leaching. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1988-01-01

    The relative durabilities of nuclear waste, natural, and ancient glasses have been assessed by standard laboratory leach tests. Different test conditions result in different glass surface areas (SA), leachant volumes (V), and test durations (t). Leachate concentrations are known to be a parabolic function of the kinetic test parameter SAV/center dot/t. Based on durability experiments of glass monoliths at low (SAV)/center dot/ glass durability has been shown to be a logarithmic function of the thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/. The thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, can be calculated from glass composition and solution pH. In the repository environment high effective glass surface areas to solution volume ratios may occur as a result of slow groundwater flow rates. The application of hydration thermodynamics to crushed glass, high (SAV)/center dot/t, durability tests has been demonstrated. The relative contributions of the kinetic test parameters, (SAV)/center dot/t, and the thermodynamic parameter, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, have been shown to define a plane in ..delta..G/sub hyd/-concentration-(SAV)/center dot/t space. At constant test conditions, e.g. constant (SAV/center dot/t, the intersection with this surface indicates that all /delta G//sub hyd/-concentration plots should have similar slopes and predict the same relative durabilities for various glasses as a function of glass composition. Using this approach, the durability of nuclear waste glasses has been interpolated to be -- 10/sup 6/ years and no less than 10/sup 3/ years. 28 refs., 24 figs.

  18. {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter variability due to depth of anesthesia in the anesthetized canine

    SciTech Connect

    Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Yang, L.

    1995-05-01

    The effect of {open_quotes}depth of anesthesia{close_quotes} on {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter estimates in the myocardium was tested in a series of replicated studies on six dogs using the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. A single lateral slice through the myocardium was imaged following each of four successive injections of {sup 82}Rb. For three of the injections the animals were lightly anesthetized (mean blood pressure about 90 mmHg). For the second injection, the amount of anesthetic was increased until blood pressure dipped to about 70 mHg. The fourth injection was preceded by an infusion of dipyridamole to induce a stress-state. The entire sequence was repeated at least twice with each of the six animals. A two compartment model with parameters k{sub 1} (uptake rate), k{sub 2} (wash-out rate), and f{sub v} (vascular fraction) was fit to the data. There was a consistent finding of a 20% to 30% decrease in k{sub 1} during the deeply anesthetized state compared with the two lightly anesthetized rest states. Analysis of variance showed that the difference observed is significant, though small in comparison with the difference between the rest and stress states (60% to 160% increase). The difference between the two lightly anesthetized states was not significant. Kinetic PET studies using dogs are routinely carried out with the animal anesthetized. Depth of anesthesia has been suspected as as source of variability in parameter estimates, but this conjecture has not previously been systematically investigated. These studies at extremes in the depth of anesthesia show a small but predictable effect on the uptake k{sub 1} of {sup 82}Rb.

  19. AgNOR clusters as a parameter of cell kinetics in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lorand-Metze, Irene; Metze, Konradin

    1996-01-01

    Aims—To study correlations between the pattern of silver stained nucleolar organiser regions (AgNORs) in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and parameters of tumour kinetics. To investigate whether quantitation of the AgNOR pattern can be used to discriminate between patients with stable and progressive disease. Methods—Peripheral blood smears from 48 patients with CLL, classified as having either stable or progressive disease (Rai stage III or IV; bulky lymph nodes or massive splenomegaly; or peripheral lymphocytes >100 × 109/1), were studied. For each patient, total tumour mass (TTM) and for patients undergoing a period of observation without treatment, the TTM duplication time (DT) and the lymphocyte doubling time (LDT) were calculated. Results—Four cell types could be distinguished according to their AgNOR pattern: (1) cells with a single cluster; (2) cells with a single compact nucleolus; (3) cells with two compact nucleoli; and (4) cells with several scattered dots. The percentage of cells with clusters was the AgNOR parameter which correlated best with TTM and LDT. Correlations were also seen between the proportion of cells with clusters and age and haemoglobin concentration. A significant correlation with DT could be detected only when age was kept constant. Linear discriminant analysis revealed that the percentage of cells with clusters was the most important prognostic factor. This alone classified 94% of the patients correctly (jackknive procedure) as either stable or progressive CLL. Conclusions—The percentage of circulating lymphocytes with clusters of AgNORs can be used as a parameter of tumour kinetics in CLL and helps to discriminate between patients with stable and progressive disease. For practical purposes, a value of more than 13% of cells with clusters is suggestive of progressive disease. Images PMID:16696103

  20. Chemical kinetics parameters and model validation for the gasification of PCEA nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S; Tournier, Jean-Michel; Contescu, Cristian I

    2014-01-01

    A series of gasification experiments, using two right cylinder specimens (~ 12.7 x 25.4 mm and 25.4 x 25.4 mm) of PCEA nuclear graphite in ambient airflow, measured the total gasification flux at weight losses up to 41.5% and temperatures (893-1015 K) characteristics of those for in-pores gasification Mode (a) and in-pores diffusion-limited Mode (b). The chemical kinetics parameters for the gasification of PCEA graphite are determined using a multi-parameters optimization algorithm from the measurements of the total gasification rate and transient weight loss in experiments. These parameters are: (i) the pre-exponential rate coefficients and the Gaussian distributions and values of specific activation energies for adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO gas; (ii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential rate coefficient for the breakup of stable un-dissociated C(O2) oxygen radicals to form stable (CO) complexes; (iii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential coefficient for desorption of CO2 gas and; (iv) the initial surface area of reactive free sites per unit mass. This area is consistently 13.5% higher than that for nuclear graphite grades of NBG-25 and IG-110 and decreases inversely proportional with the square root of the initial mass of the graphite specimens in the experiments. Experimental measurements successfully validate the chemical-reactions kinetics model that calculates continuous Arrhenius curves of the total gasification flux and the production rates of CO and CO2 gases. The model results at different total weight losses agree well with measurements and expand beyond the temperatures in the experiments to the diffusion-limited mode of gasification. Also calculated are the production rates of CO and CO2 gases and their relative contributions to the total gasification rate in the experiments as functions of temperature, for total weight losses of 5% and 10%.

  1. Chemical kinetics parameters and model validation for the gasification of PCEA nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; Contescu, Cristian I.

    2014-01-01

    A series of gasification experiments, using two right cylinder specimens (∼12.7 × 25.4 mm and 25.4 × 25.4 mm) of PCEA nuclear graphite in ambient airflow, measured the total gasification flux at weight losses up to 41.5% and temperatures (893-1015 K) characteristics of those for in-pores gasification Mode (a) and in-pores diffusion-limited Mode (b). The chemical kinetics parameters for the gasification of PCEA graphite are determined using a multi-parameters optimization algorithm from the measurements of the total gasification rate and transient weight loss in experiments. These parameters are: (i) the pre-exponential rate coefficients and the Gaussian distributions and values of specific activation energies for adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO gas; (ii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential rate coefficient for the breakup of stable un-dissociated C(O2) oxygen radicals to form stable (CO) complexes; (iii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential coefficient for desorption of CO2 gas and; (iv) the initial surface area of reactive free sites per unit mass. This area is consistently 13.5% higher than that for nuclear graphite grades of NBG-25 and IG-110 and decreases inversely proportional with the square root of the initial mass of the graphite specimens in the experiments. Experimental measurements successfully validate the chemical-reactions kinetics model that calculates continuous Arrhenius curves of the total gasification flux and the production rates of CO and CO2 gases. The model results at different total weight losses agree well with measurements and expand beyond the temperatures in the experiments to the diffusion-limited mode of gasification. Also calculated are the production rates of CO and CO2 gases and their relative contributions to the total gasification rate in the experiments as functions of temperature, for total weight losses of 5% and 10%.

  2. Variation ranges of motion parameters for space debris in the geosynchronous ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chang-Yin; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Yu, Sheng-Xian; Xiong, Jian-Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Ting-Lei

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method that uses only one set of known orbital elements to directly determine the motion state and variation ranges of motion parameters, including the inclination, right ascension of the ascending node (RAAN), evolution period of the orbital plane, maximum libration amplitude of the semi-major axis, commensurable angle, libration period and drift period, for space debris in the geosynchronous ring. These variation ranges of motion parameters characterize the evolution of debris quantitatively and illustrate the three-dimensional (3D) variations. Employing the proposed method, we study the motion state and variation ranges of motion parameters for catalogued and uncontrolled space debris with existing two-line element (TLE) data in the geosynchronous ring, and present specific results. We also compare our results with actual observational results derived from long-term TLE historical data, and find that, in the vast majority of cases, our proposed method of determining the motion state and variation ranges of motion parameters via only one set of known orbital elements is effective. In addition, before the elaboration of the variation ranges of motion parameters stated above, we obtain the statistical distribution of space debris in the orbital plane and the daily motion from the TLE historical data. We then derive two mathematical formulae that explain the statistical distribution and daily motion on the basis of the essence of dynamics, which contributes to the characterization of the evolution of debris.

  3. An identification algorithm of model kinetic parameters of the interfacial layer growth in fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, V.; Lurie, S.; Solyaev, Y.

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the identification algorithm of parameters included in a parabolic law that is often used to predict the time dependence of the thickness of the interfacial layers in the structure of composite materials based on a metal matrix. The incubation period of the process and the speed of reaction and pressure are taken into account. The proposed algorithm of identification is based on the introduction of a minimized objective function of a special kind. The problem of identification of unknown parameters in the parabolic law is formulated in a variational form. The authors of the paper have determined the desired parameters, under which the objective function has a minimum value. It is shown that on the basis of four known experimental values of the interfacial layer thickness, corresponding to different values of temperature, pressure and the time of the interfacial layer growth, it is possible to identified four model parameters. They are the activation energy, a pre-exponential parameter, the delay time of the start of the interfacial layer formation, and the parameter determining the pressure effect on the rate of interfacial layer growth. The stability of the proposed identification algorithm is also studied.

  4. Characterization of nicotinamidases: steady state kinetic parameters, classwide inhibition by nicotinaldehydes, and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    French, Jarrod B; Cen, Yana; Vrablik, Tracy L; Xu, Ping; Allen, Eleanor; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Sauve, Anthony A

    2010-12-14

    Nicotinamidases are metabolic enzymes that hydrolyze nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are widely distributed across biology, with examples found encoded in the genomes of Mycobacteria, Archaea, Eubacteria, Protozoa, yeast, and invertebrates, but there are none found in mammals. Although recent structural work has improved our understanding of these enzymes, their catalytic mechanism is still not well understood. Recent data show that nicotinamidases are required for the growth and virulence of several pathogenic microbes. The enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans regulate life span in their respective organisms, consistent with proposed roles in the regulation of NAD(+) metabolism and organismal aging. In this work, the steady state kinetic parameters of nicotinamidase enzymes from C. elegans, Sa. cerevisiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae (a pathogen responsible for human pneumonia), Borrelia burgdorferi (the pathogen that causes Lyme disease), and Plasmodium falciparum (responsible for most human malaria) are reported. Nicotinamidases are generally efficient catalysts with steady state k(cat) values typically exceeding 1 s(-1). The K(m) values for nicotinamide are low and in the range of 2 -110 μM. Nicotinaldehyde was determined to be a potent competitive inhibitor of these enzymes, binding in the low micromolar to low nanomolar range for all nicotinamidases tested. A variety of nicotinaldehyde derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors in kinetic assays. Inhibitions are consistent with reaction of the universally conserved catalytic Cys on each enzyme with the aldehyde carbonyl carbon to form a thiohemiacetal complex that is stabilized by a conserved oxyanion hole. The S. pneumoniae nicotinamidase can catalyze exchange of (18)O into the carboxy oxygens of nicotinic acid with H(2)(18)O. The collected data, along with kinetic analysis of several mutants, allowed us to propose a catalytic

  5. Temperature dependence of kinetic parameters for hyperthermophilic glutamate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Mohammad W; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2002-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the steady-state kinetic parameters for a glutamate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was investigated. The enzyme showed a biphasic kinetic characteristic for L-glutamate and a monophasic one for NADP at 50-90 degrees C. At low concentrations of L-glutamate the Km decreased from 2.02 to 0.56 mM and the catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) markedly increased (4-150 micromol x mg(-1) x mM(-1)) along with the increase of temperature from 50 to 90 degrees C. At high concentrations of the substrate the Km was fairly high and approximately constant (around 225 mM), and the catalytic efficiency was low and its temperature-dependent change was small. The Km (0.039 mM) for NADP did not change with the increase of temperature. In the reductive amination, the Kms for 2-oxoglutarate (1.81 and 9.37 mM at low and high levels of ammonia, respectively) were independent on temperature, but the Kms for ammonia and NADPH rose from 86 to 185 mM and 0.050 to 0.175 mM, respectively.

  6. Does Vibration Warm-up Enhance Kinetic and Temporal Sprint Parameters?

    PubMed

    Cochrane, D J; Cronin, M J; Fink, P W

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of vibration warm-up to enhance sprint performance. 12 males involved in representative team sports performed 4 warm-up conditions in a randomised order performed at least 24 h apart; VbX warm-up (VbX-WU); Neural activation warm-up (Neu-WU); Dynamic warm-up (Dyn-WU) and Control (No VbX). Participants completed 5 m sprint at 30 s, 2:30 min and 5 min post warm-up where sprint time, kinetics, and temporal components were recorded. There was no significant (p>0.05) main effect or interaction effect between the split sprint times of 1 m, 2.5 m, and 5 m. There was a condition effect where vertical mean force was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Dyn-WU and Control compared to Neu-WU. No other significant (p>0.05) main and interaction effects in sprint kinetic and temporal parameters existed. Overall, all 4 warm-up conditions produced comparable results for sprint performance, and there was no detrimental effect on short-duration sprint performance using VbX-WU. Therefore, VbX could be useful for adding variety to the training warm-up or be included into the main warm-up routine as a supplementary modality.

  7. Determination of kinetic parameters of Phlomis bovei de Noé using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Meriem; Hadoun, Hocine; Toumert, Idir; Hassani, Aicha

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports the pyrolysis study of Phlomis bovei biomass by thermogravimetric experiments in order to determine the thermal degradation behavior and kinetic parameters. The weight losses were found to occur in three stages. In the DTG thermograms, an increase of the heating rate tended to delay thermal degradation processes towards higher temperatures. The average values of activation energy and pre-exponential factor calculated from Ozawa-Flynn-Wall, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Kissinger methods are 134.83, 134.06, 223.31kJ/mol and 4.1610(13), 1.1810(10), 2.8110(11)/s, respectively. The three-pseudo-component method shows that the activation energy increases with increasing the heating rate for hemicellulose and cellulose while the activation energy of the lignin decreased with an increase of the heating rate. Predicted results and experimental data exhibit similar tendencies and the three pseudo-components model with n different from unity 1 is recommended as the most suitable for prediction of kinetic behavior of Phlomis bovei de Noé.

  8. Kinetic study of the anaerobic biodegradation of alkyl polyglucosides and the influence of their structural parameters.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Francisco; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro; Lechuga, Manuela; Jurado, Encarnación; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a study of the anaerobic biodegradation of non-ionic surfactants alkyl polyglucosides applying the method by measurement of the biogas production in digested sludge. Three alkyl polyglucosides with different length alkyl chain and degree of polymerization of the glucose units were tested. The influence of their structural parameters was evaluated, and the characteristics parameters of the anaerobic biodegradation were determined. Results show that alkyl polyglucosides, at the standard initial concentration of 100 mgC L(-1), are not completely biodegradable in anaerobic conditions because they inhibit the biogas production. The alkyl polyglucoside having the shortest alkyl chain showed the fastest biodegradability and reached the higher percentage of final mineralization. The anaerobic process was well adjusted to a pseudo first-order equation using the carbon produced as gas during the test; also, kinetics parameters and a global rate constant for all the involved metabolic process were determined. This modeling is helpful to evaluate the biodegradation or the persistence of alkyl polyglucosides under anaerobic conditions in the environment and in the wastewater treatment.

  9. Kinetic parameters of the thermal degradation of the PP and nondegraded and degraded HDPE blends

    SciTech Connect

    Albano, C.; Freitas, E.

    1996-12-31

    We study the thermodegradative behavior of PP, of non-degraded and degraded HDPE and their blends, in order to analyze the thermal stability of such materials. Van-Krevelen (V-K), Coats-Redfern (C-R) and Horowitz-Metzger (H-M) integral methods as well as the Freeman-Carroll (F-C) differential one, were used to determine the kinetic parameters. The activation energy (E{sub a}) obtained for the PP mixed with non-degraded HDPE (5 to 50%) is lower than the E{sub a} correspondent to pure polymers and does not depend on the HDPE concentration. Blends of degraded materials, show an approximate value of E{sub a} of 200 kJ/mol for mixtures with concentrations by weight of HDPE up to 20%, but its value decreases drastically with higher concentrations. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Sensitivity of natural gas HCCI combustion to fuel and operating parameters using detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S; Dibble, R; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Westbrook, C K

    1999-07-19

    This paper uses the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to analyze natural gas HCCI combustion in an engine. The HCT code has been modified to better represent the conditions existing inside an engine, including a wall heat transfer correlation. Combustion control and low power output per displacement remain as two of the biggest challenges to obtaining satisfactory performance out of an HCCI engine, and these are addressed in this paper. The paper considers the effect of natural gas composition on HCCI combustion, and then explores three control strategies for HCCI engines: DME (dimethyl ether) addition, intake heating and hot EGR addition. The results show that HCCI combustion is sensitive to natural gas composition, and an active control may be required to compensate for possible changes in composition. The three control strategies being considered have a significant effect in changing the combustion parameters for the engine, and should be able to control HCCI combustion.

  11. Determination of μd chemistry kinetic parameters for the MuSun Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raha, Nandita

    2014-09-01

    The MuSun experiment at PSI will measure the muon doublet capture rate Λd in ultra pure deuterium gas to 1.5% precision from the measured decay-electron time distribution. This reaction cleanly determines the strength of the two-nucleon weak axial current interaction. The kinetic parameters of the μd chemistry are essential for extracting Λd, which in turn are determined from the process of muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium. This process yields 3 He recoils and 2.45 MeV monoenergetic neutrons from the reaction ddμ -->3 He + n + μ . Encoded in the time dependence of the fusion products are the ddμ molecular formation rates from the F = 1 / 2 , 3 / 2 hyperfine states (λd and λq) and the hyperfine transition rate (λqd) from the higher-energy F = 3 / 2 state to the lower-energy F = 1 / 2 state. This work concentrates on the analysis of the fusion neutrons, which are detected by an array of eight neutron detectors. Pulse shape discrimination was used to distinguish neutrons from background gamma rays. A least squared fit to the time spectrum of the fusion neutrons determines the μd chemistry kinetic parameters λqd and the ratio λq / λd. The MuSun experiment at PSI will measure the muon doublet capture rate Λd in ultra pure deuterium gas to 1.5% precision from the measured decay-electron time distribution. This reaction cleanly determines the strength of the two-nucleon weak axial current interaction. The kinetic parameters of the μd chemistry are essential for extracting Λd, which in turn are determined from the process of muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium. This process yields 3 He recoils and 2.45 MeV monoenergetic neutrons from the reaction ddμ -->3 He + n + μ . Encoded in the time dependence of the fusion products are the ddμ molecular formation rates from the F = 1 / 2 , 3 / 2 hyperfine states (λd and λq) and the hyperfine transition rate (λqd) from the higher-energy F = 3 / 2 state to the lower-energy F = 1 / 2 state. This work concentrates

  12. Kinetics of surface segregation in metallic alloys with first-principles interaction parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, L.T. |; Ouannasser, S.; Dreysse, H.

    1996-12-31

    The authors report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the kinetics of surface segregation at the (001) face of CuNi and MoW alloys. These two systems were selected because they are based on different lattice structures and show contrasting segregation behavior: CuNi exhibits a monotonic profile, while that of MoW is oscillatory. To describe the energetics they have determined a set of effective cluster interactions (ECI) which govern the ordering or clustering tendencies of these alloys. The ECI were obtained by means of tight-binding electronic structure calculations in which no adjustable or experimentally determined parameters were used. Equilibrium segregation profiles are calculated and a series of quenches are performed. The layer concentrations are studied as a function of time and the existence of metastable phases in the surface region is investigated.

  13. Measuring the kinetic parameters of saltating sand grains using a high-speed digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Jia, Pan

    2014-06-01

    A high-speed digital camera is used to record the saltation of three sand samples (diameter range: 300-500, 200-300 and 100-125 μm). This is followed by an overlapping particle tracking algorithm to reconstruct the saltating trajectory and the differential scheme to abstract the kinetic parameters of saltating grains. The velocity results confirm the propagating feature of saltation in maintaining near-face aeolian sand transport. Moreover, the acceleration of saltating sand grains was obtained directly from the reconstructed trajectory, and the results reveal that the climbing stage of the saltating trajectory represents an critical process of energy transfer while the sand grains travel through air.

  14. Dependence of effective desorption kinetic parameters on surface coverage and adsorption temperature: CO on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingcai; Yates, John T., Jr.

    1989-06-01

    The effective desorption kinetic parameters of CO on the Pd(111) surface have been studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy. The zero coverage effective desorption activation energy and the preexponential factor were found to be 35.5 kcal/mol and 1013.5 s-1, respectively. As a function of CO coverage, a four-stage correlation between Ed(θ) and the development of stable low-energy electron desorption (LEED) structures was observed for the first time at Tads= 200 K. Ed and ν1 showed a strong compensation effect with Tc=519 K. The adsorption temperature dependence of Ed from Tads=87 to 200 K was observed and interpreted qualitatively by a model involving the production of different domain structures at various adsorption temperatures and the preservation of domain structures at higher coverages during temperature programmed desorption.

  15. Graphical estimation of the dual-enzyme kinetic parameters for Cr(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akram

    2006-03-01

    Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) contamination of soil and groundwater is a major environmental concern. Bioreduction of Cr(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1) can be considered a feasible option to reduce the toxic and mobile Cr(VI) to the less toxic and less mobile chromium(III) (Cr(III)). The reaction rate expression for Cr(VI) reduction is nonlinear and the rate constants are evaluated by employing nonlinear optimization techniques. The outcome of the optimization techniques, in general, depends on the initial estimate of the kinetic parameters which is not always available. A graphical approach based on sound mathematical reasoning has been developed which is accurate, simpler to use, and can provide the best initial estimate for nonlinear optimization.

  16. Calculation of Reactor Kinetics Parameters βeff and Λ with Monte Carlo Differential Operator Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Yasunobu

    2014-06-01

    The methods to calculate the kinetics parameters of βeff and Λ with the differential operator sampling have been reviewed. The comparison of the results obtained with the differential operator sampling and iterated fission probability approaches has been performed. It is shown that the differential operator sampling approach gives the same results as the iterated fission probability approach within the statistical uncertainty. In addition, the prediction accuracy of the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 for the measured βeff/Λ and βeff values is also examined. It is shown that JENDL-4.0 gives a good prediction except for the uranium-233 systems. The present results imply the need for revisiting the uranium-233 nuclear data evaluation and performing the detailed sensitivity analysis.

  17. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Al-Subeihi, Ala A A; Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment.

  18. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Al-Subeihi, Ala A A; Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment. PMID:25549870

  19. Synergistic improvement of gas sensing performance by micro-gravimetrically extracted kinetic/thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuanbao; Xu, Pengcheng; Yu, Haitao; Cheng, Zhenxing; Li, Xinxin

    2015-03-10

    A novel method is explored for comprehensive design/optimization of organophosphorus sensing material, which is loaded on mass-type microcantilever sensor. Conventionally, by directly observing the gas sensing response, it is difficult to build quantitative relationship with the intrinsic structure of the material. To break through this difficulty, resonant cantilever is employed as gravimetric tool to implement molecule adsorption experiment. Based on the sensing data, key kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of the material to the molecule, including adsorption heat -ΔH°, adsorption/desorption rate constants Ka and Kd, active-site number per unit mass N' and surface coverage θ, can be quantitatively extracted according to physical-chemistry theories. With gaseous DMMP (simulant of organophosphorus agents) as sensing target, the optimization route for three sensing materials is successfully demonstrated. Firstly, a hyper-branched polymer is evaluated. Though suffering low sensitivity due to insufficient N', the bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-hexafluoropropane (BHPF) sensing-group exhibits satisfactory reproducibility due to appropriate -ΔH°. To achieve more sensing-sites, KIT-5 mesoporous-silica with higher surface-area is assessed, resulting in good sensitivity but too high -ΔH° that brings poor repeatability. After comprehensive consideration, the confirmed BHPF sensing-group is grafted on the KIT-5 carrier to form an optimized DMMP sensing nanomaterial. Experimental results indicate that, featuring appropriate kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of -ΔH°, Ka, Kd, N' and θ, the BHPF-functionalized KIT-5 mesoporous silica exhibits synergistic improvement among reproducibility, sensitivity and response/recovery speed. The optimized material shows complete signal recovery, 55% sensitivity improvement than the hyper-branched polymer and 2∼3 folds faster response/recovery speed than the KIT-5 mesoporous silica.

  20. Optimization of Process Parameters and Kinetic Model of Enzymatic Extraction of Polyphenols from Lonicerae Flos

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fansheng; Yu, Shujuan; Bi, Yongguang; Huang, Xiaojun; Huang, Mengqian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To optimize and verify the cellulase extraction of polyphenols from honeysuckle and provide a reference for enzymatic extracting polyphenols from honeysuckle. Materials and Methods: The uniform design was used According to Fick's first law and kinetic model, fitting analysis of the dynamic process of enzymatic extracting polyphenols was conducted. Results: The optimum enzymatic extraction parameters for polyphenols from honeysuckle are found to be 80% (v/v) of alcohol, 35:1 (mL/g) of liquid-solid ratio, 80°C of extraction temperature, 8.5 of pH, 6.0 mg of enzyme levels, and 130 min of extraction time. Under the optimal conditions, the extraction rate of polyphenols was 3.03%. The kinetic experiments indicated kinetic equation had a good linear relationship with t even under the conditions of different levels of enzyme and temperature, which means fitting curve tallies well with the experimental values. Conclusion: The results of quantification showed that the results provide a reference for enzymatic extracting polyphenols from honeysuckle. SUMMARY Lonicerae flos (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) is a material of traditional Chinese medicine and healthy drinks, of which active compounds mainly is polyphenols. At present, plant polyphenols are the hotspots centents of food, cosmetic and medicine, because it has strong bioactivity. Several traditional methods are available for the extraction of plant polyphenols including impregnation, solvent extraction, ultrasonic extraction, hot-water extraction, alkaline dilute alcohol or alkaline water extraction, microwave extraction and Supercritical CO2 extraction. But now, an increasing number of research on using cellulase to extract active ingredients from plants. Enzymatic method is widely used for enzyme have excellent properties of high reaction efficiency and specificity, moderate reaction conditions, shorter extraction time and easier to control, less damage to the active ingredient. At present, the enzymatic

  1. Variational tensor approach for approximating the rare-event kinetics of macromolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Nüske, Feliks; Schneider, Reinhold; Vitalini, Francesca; Noé, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Essential information about the stationary and slow kinetic properties of macromolecules is contained in the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the dynamical operator of the molecular dynamics. A recent variational formulation allows to optimally approximate these eigenvalues and eigenfunctions when a basis set for the eigenfunctions is provided. In this study, we propose that a suitable choice of basis functions is given by products of one-coordinate basis functions, which describe changes along internal molecular coordinates, such as dihedral angles or distances. A sparse tensor product approach is employed in order to avoid a combinatorial explosion of products, i.e., of the basis set size. Our results suggest that the high-dimensional eigenfunctions can be well approximated with relatively small basis set sizes. PMID:26851906

  2. Ammonium removal from aqueous solutions by clinoptilolite: determination of isotherm and thermodynamic parameters and comparison of kinetics by the double exponential model and conventional kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Ismail

    2012-03-01

    The adsorption isotherm, the adsorption kinetics, and the thermodynamic parameters of ammonium removal from aqueous solution by using clinoptilolite in aqueous solution was investigated in this study. Experimental data obtained from batch equilibrium tests have been analyzed by four two-parameter (Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R)) and four three-parameter (Redlich-Peterson (R-P), Sips, Toth and Khan) isotherm models. D-R and R-P isotherms were the models that best fitted to experimental data over the other two- and three-parameter models applied. The adsorption energy (E) from the D-R isotherm was found to be approximately 7 kJ/mol for the ammonium-clinoptilolite system, thereby indicating that ammonium is adsorbed on clinoptilolite by physisorption. Kinetic parameters were determined by analyzing the nth-order kinetic model, the modified second-order model and the double exponential model, and each model resulted in a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of above 0.989 with an average relative error lower than 5%. A Double Exponential Model (DEM) showed that the adsorption process develops in two stages as rapid and slow phase. Changes in standard free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) of ammonium-clinoptilolite system were estimated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients.

  3. Ammonium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Clinoptilolite: Determination of Isotherm and Thermodynamic Parameters and Comparison of Kinetics by the Double Exponential Model and Conventional Kinetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, İsmail

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption isotherm, the adsorption kinetics, and the thermodynamic parameters of ammonium removal from aqueous solution by using clinoptilolite in aqueous solution was investigated in this study. Experimental data obtained from batch equilibrium tests have been analyzed by four two-parameter (Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R)) and four three-parameter (Redlich-Peterson (R-P), Sips, Toth and Khan) isotherm models. D-R and R-P isotherms were the models that best fitted to experimental data over the other two- and three-parameter models applied. The adsorption energy (E) from the D-R isotherm was found to be approximately 7 kJ/mol for the ammonium-clinoptilolite system, thereby indicating that ammonium is adsorbed on clinoptilolite by physisorption. Kinetic parameters were determined by analyzing the nth-order kinetic model, the modified second-order model and the double exponential model, and each model resulted in a coefficient of determination (R2) of above 0.989 with an average relative error lower than 5%. A Double Exponential Model (DEM) showed that the adsorption process develops in two stages as rapid and slow phase. Changes in standard free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) of ammonium-clinoptilolite system were estimated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients. PMID:22690177

  4. Seasonal, diurnal and vertical variation in photosynthetic parameters in Phyllostachys humilis bamboo plants.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Davina; Potters, Geert; De Smedt, Sebastiaan; Gu, Lianhong; Samson, Roeland

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, temperate bamboo species have been introduced in Europe for multiple uses such as renewable bio-based materials (wood, composites, fibres, biochemicals…) and numerous ecological functions (soil and water conservation, erosion control, phytoremediation…). Despite their interesting potential, little is known on the ecophysiology of these plants in their new habitat. Therefore, we studied gas exchange parameters on a full soil bamboo plantation of Phyllostachys humilis on a test field in Ireland (Europe). We evaluated the seasonal, diurnal and vertical variation of the parameters of two commonly used photosynthetic models, i.e. the light response curve (LRC) model and the model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry (FvCB). Furthermore, we tested if there were environmental effects on the photosynthetic parameters of these models and if a correlation between photosynthetic parameters and fluorescence parameters was present, fluorescence parameters can be easily and fast determined. Our results show that the gas exchange parameters do not vary diurnally or vertically. Only seasonal variations were found and should, therefore, be taken into account when using the LRC or FvCB model when modelling canopy growth. Therefore, a big-leaf model or a sunlit-shade model can be used for modelling bamboo growth in Western Europe. There is no straightforward relation between environmental variables and the photosynthetic parameters. Although fluorescence parameters showed a correlation with the photosynthetic parameters, application of such correlation may be limited.

  5. Estimation of the growth kinetic parameters of Bacillus cereus spores as affected by pulsed light treatment.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; de Fernando, Gonzalo García; Hierro, Eva; Hospital, Xavier F; Ordóñez, Juan A; Fernández, Manuela

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment requires the knowledge of the effect of food preservation technologies on the growth parameters of the survivors of the treatment. This is of special interest in the case of the new non-thermal technologies that are being investigated for minimal processing of foods. This is a study on the effect of pulsed light technology (PL) on the lag phase of Bacillus cereus spores surviving the treatment and the maximum growth rate (μmax) of the survivors after germination. The D value was estimated as 0.35 J/cm(2) and our findings showed that PL affected the kinetic parameters of the microorganism. A log linear relationship was observed between the lag phase and the intensity of the treatment. Increasing the lethality lengthened the mean lag phase and proportionally increased its variability. A polynomial regression was fitted between the μmax of the survivors and the inactivation achieved. The μmax decreased as intensity increased. From these data, and their comparison to published results on the effect of heat and e-beam irradiation on B. cereus spores, it was observed that the shelf-life of PL treated foods would be longer than those treated with heat and similar to irradiated ones. These findings offer information of interest for the implementation of PL for microbial decontamination in the food industry. PMID:25755081

  6. A new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for one- and two-step chemical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, T.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Bowman, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for simple chemical models and simple transport properties classically used in DNS of premixed combustion is presented. First, a one-dimensional code is utilized to performed steady unstrained laminar methane-air flame in order to verify intrinsic features of laminar flames such as burning velocity and temperature and concentration profiles. Second, the flame response to steady and unsteady strain in the opposed jet configuration is numerically investigated. It appears that for a well determined set of parameters, one- and two-step mechanisms reproduce the extinction limit of a laminar flame submitted to a steady strain. Computations with the GRI-mech mechanism (177 reactions, 39 species) and multicomponent transport properties are used to validate these simplified models. A sensitivity analysis of the preferential diffusion of heat and reactants when the Lewis number is close to unity indicates that the response of the flame to an oscillating strain is very sensitive to this number. As an application of this methodology, the interaction between a two-dimensional vortex pair and a premixed laminar flame is performed by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) using the one- and two-step mechanisms. Comparison with the experimental results of Samaniego et al. (1994) shows a significant improvement in the description of the interaction when the two-step model is used.

  7. Functional imaging of kinetic parameters from the time dependent linear response function by dynamic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Stritzke, P.; Knop, J.; Spielmann, R.P.; Montz, R.; Schneider, C.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the locally differing time dependent linear response function h(r,t) of a radioactive tracer injected into a patients blood pool B(t) by mathematical analysis of a dynamic scintigraphic study A(r,t). Transit times, uptake rates and clearance rates of different tracers are calculated from the linear response function at every matrix point by one computer program. The parameters are presented in functional images on a standard computer display. Thus the whole information from a dynamic study can be condensed within a few images. The integral equation A=h+B +c(r)*B (+ means convolution, c(r)*B(t)=nontarget activity) derived from tracer theory is deconvoluted by mathematical methods, which are unsensitive against noise contamination of the input data. The numerical technique is successfully applied in Iodide-123-Hippuran and Tc-99m-DMSA kidney studies, in Tc-99m-MDP and -DPD bone studies, in Tl-201 myocardial studies and in Iodide-123 thyroid studies. Because the regional blood pool-or nontarget activity is calculated and subtracted, the kinetic parameters are considered to be free from nontarget contributions in all dynamic scintigraphic studies. Examples are demonstrated and the usefulness for clinical application is discussed.

  8. Estimation of the growth kinetic parameters of Bacillus cereus spores as affected by pulsed light treatment.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; de Fernando, Gonzalo García; Hierro, Eva; Hospital, Xavier F; Ordóñez, Juan A; Fernández, Manuela

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment requires the knowledge of the effect of food preservation technologies on the growth parameters of the survivors of the treatment. This is of special interest in the case of the new non-thermal technologies that are being investigated for minimal processing of foods. This is a study on the effect of pulsed light technology (PL) on the lag phase of Bacillus cereus spores surviving the treatment and the maximum growth rate (μmax) of the survivors after germination. The D value was estimated as 0.35 J/cm(2) and our findings showed that PL affected the kinetic parameters of the microorganism. A log linear relationship was observed between the lag phase and the intensity of the treatment. Increasing the lethality lengthened the mean lag phase and proportionally increased its variability. A polynomial regression was fitted between the μmax of the survivors and the inactivation achieved. The μmax decreased as intensity increased. From these data, and their comparison to published results on the effect of heat and e-beam irradiation on B. cereus spores, it was observed that the shelf-life of PL treated foods would be longer than those treated with heat and similar to irradiated ones. These findings offer information of interest for the implementation of PL for microbial decontamination in the food industry.

  9. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the phenol-degrading thermophile Bacillus themoleovorans sp. A2.

    PubMed

    Feitkenhauer, H; Schnicke, S; Müller, R; Märkl, H

    2001-12-01

    Phenolic compounds are pollutants in many wastewaters, e.g. from crude oil refineries, coal gasification plants or olive oil mills. Phenol removal is a key process for the biodegradation of pollutants at high temperatures because even low concentrations of phenol can inhibit microorganisms severely. Bacillus thermoleovorans sp. A2, a recently isolated thermophilic strain (temperature optimum 65 degrees C), was investigated for its capacity to degrade phenol. The experiments revealed that growth rates were about four times higher than those of mesophilic microorganisms such as Pseudomonas putida. Very high specific growth rates of 2.8 h(-1) were measured at phenol concentrations of 15 mg/l, while at phenol concentrations of 100-500 mg/l growth rates were still in the range of 1 h(-1). The growth kinetics of the thermophilic Bacillus thermoleovorans sp. A2 on phenol as sole carbon and energy source can be described using a three-parameter model developed in enzyme kinetics. The yield coefficient Yx/s of 0.8-1 g cell dry weight/g phenol was considerably higher than cell yields of mesophilic bacteria (Yx/s 0.40-0.52 g cell dry weight/g phenol). The highest growth rate was found at pH 6. Bacillus thermoleovorans sp. A2 was found to be insensitive to hydrodynamic shear stress in stirred bioreactor experiments (despite possible membrane damage caused by phenol) and flourished at an ionic strength of the medium of 0.25(-1) mol/l (equivalent to about 15-60 g NaCl/l). These exceptional properties make Bacillus thermoleovorans sp. A2 an excellent candidate for technical applications.

  10. Stochastic modelling of daily rainfall in Nigeria: intra-annual variation of model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimoh, O. D.; Webster, P.

    1999-09-01

    A Markov model of order 1 may be used to describe the occurrence of wet and dry days in Nigeria. Such models feature two parameter sets; P01 to characterise the probability of a wet day following a dry day and P11 to characterise the probability of a wet day following a wet day. The model parameter sets, when estimated from historical records, are characterised by a distinctive seasonal behaviour. However, the comparison of this seasonal behaviour between rainfall stations is hampered by the noise reflecting the high variability of parameters on successive days. The first part of this article is concerned with methods for smoothing these inherently noisy parameter sets. Smoothing has been approached using Fourier series, averaging techniques, or a combination thereof. It has been found that different methods generally perform well with respect to estimation of the average number of wet events and the frequency duration curves of wet and dry events. Parameterisation of the P01 parameter set is more successful than the P11 in view of the relatively small number of wet events lasting two or more days. The second part of the article is concerned with describing the regional variation in smoothed parameter sets. There is a systematic variation in the P01 parameter set as one moves northwards. In contrast, there is limited regional variation in the P11 set. Although this regional variation in P01 appears to be related to the gradual movement of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone, the contrasting behaviour of the two parameter sets is difficult to explain on physical grounds.

  11. Substrate specificity and kinetic parameters of GLUT3 in rat cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, F; Davies-Hill, T M; Simpson, I A

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the apparent affinity, catalytic-centre activity ("turnover number') and stereospecificity of the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 in primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Using a novel variation of the 3-O-[14C]methylglucose transport assay, by measuring zero-trans kinetics at 25 degrees C, GLUT3 was determined to be a high-apparent-affinity, high-activity, glucose transporter with a K(m) of 2.87 +/- 0.23 mM (mean +/- S.E.M.) for 3-O-methylglucose, a Vmax of 18.7 +/- 0.48 nmol/min per 10(6) cells, and cells, and a corresponding catalytic-centre activity of 853 s-1. Transport of 3-O-methylglucose was competed by glucose, mannose, 2-deoxyglucose and galactose, but not by fructose. This methodology is compared with the more common 2-[3H]deoxyglucose methodology and the [U-14C]-glucose transport method. The high affinity and transport activity of the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 appears to be an appropriate adaptation to meet the demands of neuronal metabolism at prevailing interstitial brain glucose concentrations (1-2 mM). PMID:8645164

  12. Variational Bayesian framework for estimating parameters of integrated E/MEG and fMRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Bowyer, Susan; Moran, John; Elisevich, Kost; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2009-02-01

    The integrated analysis of the Electroencephalography (EEG), Magnetoencephalography (MEG), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are instrumental for functional neuroimaging of the brain. A bottom-up integrated E/MEG and fMRI model based on physiology as well as a method for estimating its parameters are keys to the integrated analysis. We propose the variational Bayesian expectation maximization (VBEM) method to estimate parameters of our proposed integrated model. VBEM method iteratively optimizes a lower bound on the marginal likelihood. An iteration of the VBEM consists of two steps: a variational Bayesian expectation step implemented using the extended Kalman smoother (EKS) and the posterior probability of the parameters in the previous step, and a variational Bayesian maximization step to estimate the posterior distributions of the parameters. For a given external stimulus, a variety of multi-area models can be considered in which the number of areas and the configuration and strength of connections between the areas are different. The proposed VBEM method can be used to select an optimal model as well as estimate its parameters. The efficiency of the proposed VBEM method is illustrated using simulation and real datasets. The proposed VBEM method can be used to estimate parameters of other non-linear dynamical systems. This study proposes an effective method to integrate E/MEG and fMRI and plans to use these techniques in functional neuroimaging.

  13. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Subeihi, Ala' A.A.; Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert; Bladeren, Peter J. van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Punt, Ans

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Interindividual human differences in methyleugenol bioactivation were simulated. • This was done using in vitro incubations, PBK modeling

  14. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, and Equilibrium Parameters for the Removal of Lead and Cadmium from Aqueous Solutions with Calcium Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Cuevas-Villanueva, Ruth; Hidalgo-Vázquez, Aura Roxana; Cortés Penagos, Consuelo de Jesús; Cortés-Martínez, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    The sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by calcium alginate beads (CAB) from aqueous solutions in batch systems was investigated. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, as well as the sorption capacities of CAB in each system at different temperatures, were evaluated. The rate of sorption for both metals was rapid in the first 10 minutes and reached a maximum in 50 minutes. Sorption kinetic data were fitted to Lagergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models and it was found that the second-order kinetic model describes these data for the two metals; comparing kinetic parameters for Cd and Pb sorption a higher kinetic rate (K2) for Pb was observed, indicating that the interaction between lead cations and alginate beads was faster than for cadmium. Similarly, isotherm data were fitted to different models reported in literature and it was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich (L-F) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models describe the isotherms in all cases. CAB sorption capacity for cadmium was 27.4 mg/g and 150.4 mg/g for lead, at 25°C. Sorption capacities of Cd and Pb increase as temperature rises. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the cadmium and lead adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that pH has an important effect on the adsorption of these metals by CAB, as more were removed at pH values between 6 and 7. PMID:24587740

  15. Study of variation in human upper body parameters and motion for use in robotics based simulation.

    PubMed

    Lura, Derek J; Carey, Stephanie L; Dubey, Rajiv V

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the variations in human upper body motion of subjects completing activities of daily living. This study was completed to serve as a reference to evaluate the quality of simulated of human motion. In this paper we define the variation in motion as the variation in subjects' parameters (link lengths), joint angles, and hand positions, for a given task. All of these variations are related by forward kinematic equations. Motion data from eight healthy right hand dominant adults performing three activities of daily living (brushing hair, drinking from a cup, and opening a door) were collected using an eight camera Vicon motion analysis system. Subject parameters were calculated using relative positions of functional joint center locations between segments. Joint angles were calculated by Euler angle rotations between body segments. Hand position was defined as the origin of the hand frame relative to the pelvis frame. The variance of recorded human motion was analyzed based on the standard deviations of subject parameters, joint angles, and hand positions. Variances in joint angles were found to be similar in magnitude to root mean squared error of kinematics based motion simulation. To evaluate the relative variance, the forward kinematic solutions of the trials were found after removing subject parameter variance and reducing joint angle variance. The variance in the forward kinematic solution was then compared to the recorded hand position variance. Reductions in subject parameter and joint angle variance produced a proportionally much smaller reduction in the calculated hand position variance. Using the average instead of individual subject parameters had only a small impact on hand position variance. Modifying joint angles to reduce variance had a greater impact on the calculated hand position variance than using average subject parameters, but was still a relatively small change. Future work will focus on using these results to create formalized

  16. Diurnal variation of oxygen and carbonate system parameters in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Dufore, C.; Smiley, N.; Jackson, C.; Halley, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen and carbonate system parameters were measured, in situ, over diurnal cycles in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay, Florida. All system parameters showed distinct diurnal trends in Tampa Bay with an average range of diurnal variation of 39.1 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 165.1 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.22 for pH, 0.093 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 218.1 μatm for pCO2. Average range of diurnal variation for system parameters in Tampa Bay was 73% to 93% of the seasonal range of variability for dissolved oxygen and pH. All system parameters measured in Florida Bay showed distinct variation over diurnal time-scales. However, clear diurnal trends were less evident. The average range of diurnal variability in Florida Bay was 62.8 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 130.4 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.13 for pH, 0.053 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 139.8 μatm for pCO2. The average range of diurnal variation was 14% to 102% of the seasonal ranges for these parameters. Diurnal variability in system parameters was most influenced by primary productivity and respiration of benthic communities in Tampa Bay, and by precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate in Florida Bay. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability may impart significant error in calculations of annual carbon and oxygen budgets. These observations reinforce the need for higher temporal resolution measurements of oxygen and carbon system parameters in coastal ecosystems.

  17. A theoretical model of phase changes of a klystron due to variation of operating parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupiszewski, A.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model for phase changes of the VA-876 CW klystron amplifier output is presented and variations of several operating parameters are considered. The theoretical approach to the problem is based upon a gridded gap modeling with inclusion of a second order correction term so that actual gap geometry is reflected in the formulation. Physical measurements are contrasted to theoretical calculations.

  18. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [effects of measurable plant parameters on multispectral signal variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reflectance of crop residues, that are important in reducing wind and water erosion, was more often different from bare soil in band 4 than in bands 5, 6, or 7. The plant parameters leaf area index, plant population, plant cover, and plant height explained 95.9 percent of the variation in band 7 (reflective infrared) digital counts for cotton and 78.2 percent of the variation in digital counts for the combined crops sorghum and corn; hence, measurable plant parameters explain most of the signal variation recorded for corpland. Leaf area index and plant population are both highly correlated with crop yields; since plant population can be readily measured (or possibly inferred from seeding rates), it is useful measurement for calibrating ERTS-type MSS digital data in terms of yield.

  19. Cryptic genetic variation uncovers evolution of environmentally sensitive parameters in Caenorhabditis vulval development.

    PubMed

    Grimbert, Stéphanie; Braendle, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the robustness of developmental systems requires insights into the sensitivity of underlying molecular and cellular parameters to perturbations, and how such sensitivity evolves. We address these issues using vulval cell fate determination--a reproducible and robust patterning process regulated by a cross-talk of EGF-Ras-MAPK and Delta-Notch pathways. Although the final vulval cell fate pattern is identical in all Caenorhabditis species, the patterning process underlies extensive cryptic genetic variation between and within species. Here, we tested whether this cryptic genetic variation translates into variation in developmental sensitivity to environmental perturbations. We disrupted vulval patterning using thermal perturbations to quantify and compare environmental sensitivity of different system parameters between distinct genotypes of C. elegans and C. briggsae. Thermal perturbations globally debuffered vulval development, triggering diverse pattering variants, whose frequency and spectra were strongly species- and genotype-dependent. This condition-dependent variation indicates that environmental sensitivity of different system properties, such as vulval competence or vulval induction, is subject to evolutionary change. High temperature induced a genotype-specific decrease of secondary fate induction and corresponding Notch pathway activity in the C. elegans N2 strain; in contrast, hypoinduction of the primary cell fate was never observed. Vulval precursor cells therefore differ in temperature sensitivity and such cell-specific sensitivity shows evolutionary variation. We further compared spectra of temperature-induced vulval variants to the ones induced by mutation accumulation in the same genotypes. In response to either perturbation, we observed similar genotype-dependence of variant production, allowing identification of distinct system features most sensitive to both mutation and environment. Taken together, we show how sensitivity of system

  20. [Influence of Ca2+ on kinetic parameters of pancreatic acinar mitochondria in situ respiration].

    PubMed

    Man'ko, B O; Man'ko, V V

    2013-01-01

    The dependence of respiration rate of rat permeabilized acinar pancreacytes on oxidative substrates concentration was studied at various [Ca2+] - 10-8-10-6 M. Pancreacytes were permeabilized with 50 microg of digitonin per 1 million cells. Respiration rate was measured polarographically using the Clark electrode at oxidation of succinate or pyruvate either glutamate in the presence of malate. Parameters of Michaelis-Menten equation were calculated by the method of Cornish-Bowden or using Idi-Hofsti coordinates and parameters of Hill equation - using coordinates {v; v/[S]h}. In the studied range of [Ca2+] the kinetic dependence of respiration at pyruvate oxidation is described by the Michaelis-Menten equation, and at oxidation of succinate or glutamate - by Hill equation with h = 1.11-1.43 and 0.50-0.85, respectively. The apparent constant of respiration half-activation (K0.5) did not significantly change in the studied range of [Ca2+] while at 10-7 M Ca2+ it was 0.90 +/- 0.06 mM for succinate, 0.096 +/- 0.007 mM for pyruvate and 0.34 +/- 0.03 mM for glutamate. Maximum respiration rate Vax at pyruvate oxidation increased from 0.077 +/- 0.002 to 0.119 +/- 0.002 and 0.140 +/- 0.002 nmol O2/(s.million cells) due to the increase of [Ca2+] from 10-7 to 5x10-7 or 10-6 M, respectively. At oxidation of succinate or glutamate Ca2+ did not significantly affect Vmax Thus, the increase of [Ca2+] stimulates respiration of mitochondria in situ of acinar pancreacytes at oxidation of exogenous pyruvate (obviously due to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation), but not at succinate or glutamate oxidation.

  1. Monte Carlo evaluation of biological variation: Random generation of correlated non-Gaussian model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Maarten L. A. T. M.; Scheerlinck, Nico; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2009-01-01

    When modelling the behaviour of horticultural products, demonstrating large sources of biological variation, we often run into the issue of non-Gaussian distributed model parameters. This work presents an algorithm to reproduce such correlated non-Gaussian model parameters for use with Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm works around the problem of non-Gaussian distributions by transforming the observed non-Gaussian probability distributions using a proposed SKN-distribution function before applying the covariance decomposition algorithm to generate Gaussian random co-varying parameter sets. The proposed SKN-distribution function is based on the standard Gaussian distribution function and can exhibit different degrees of both skewness and kurtosis. This technique is demonstrated using a case study on modelling the ripening of tomato fruit evaluating the propagation of biological variation with time.

  2. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough.

  3. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A.

    2012-07-01

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  4. Kinetic parameters and tissue distribution of 5-oxo-L-prolinase determined by a fluorimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Weber, P; Jäger, M; Bangsow, T; Knell, G; Piechaczek, K; Koch, J; Wolf, S

    1999-01-13

    5-Oxo-L-prolinase (5-OPase) catalyses the hydrolysis of 5-oxo-L-proline to glutamate with concomitant stoichiometric cleavage of ATP to ADP, a reaction which is known to be part of the gamma-glutamyl cycle-an interrelated series of reactions involved in the synthesis and metabolism of glutathione. As recent studies indicate, this cyclic pathway plays a crucial role in the regulation of amino acid transport. Apparently, the intermediate product 5-oxo-L-proline functions as a second messenger molecule that upregulates the activity of certain amino acid transport systems. Thus, the degradation of 5-oxo-L-proline by 5-OPase leads to the downregulation of this stimulus. In this study, a new sensitive fluorimetric assay for 5-OPase activity was established which is based on the derivatization of glutamate with o-phthaldialdehyde in the presence of thiols and subsequent separation of the products by HPLC. The method is suitable for the screening of chromatography fractions as well as for the determination of the kinetic parameters Km and Vmax of purified 5-OPase. Additionally, it can be used for the measurement of enzyme activity in crude cell extracts and evaluation of tissue distribution.

  5. [Comparison of kinematic and kinetic parameters between the locomotion patterns in nordic walking, walking and running].

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, F I; Michel, K J; Schwarz, J; Krabbe, B

    2006-03-01

    Based on a higher cardio-pulmonary and cardio-vascular benefit and a promised reduction of mechanical load of the musculoskeletal system Nordic Walking (NW) shows an increased market potential. The present study should investigate whether there are biomechanical differences between the locomotion patterns NW, walking and running. Moreover possible resultant load differences should be determined. Eleven subjects, who were already experienced with the NW-technique, participated in this experiment. The kinematic data were collected using two high-speed camera systems from posterior and from lateral at the same time. Simultaneously the ground reaction forces were recorded. The kinematic and the kinetic data reveal differences between the three analyzed locomotion patterns. For NW as well as walking the mechanical load of the lower extremity is lower compared to running. None of the kinematic parameters suggest a "physiological benefit" of NW compared to walking. Moreover NW shows higher vertical and horizontal forces during landing. Exclusively the lower vertical force peak during push off indicates a lower mechanical load for NW in comparison to walking. Consequently it is questionable is NW -- based on its promised "biomechanical benefits" compared to walking -- should be still recommended for overweight people and for people with existing musculoskeletal problems of the lower limb.

  6. Kinetics of oxidative degradation of white wines and how they are affected by selected technological parameters.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Antonio César Silva; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Rodrigues, Paula; Hogg, Timothy

    2002-10-01

    The negative effects of oxygen on white wine quality and the various factors which influence it (including temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and free SO(2)) are well documented both at the sensory and compositional levels. What is less defined is the quantitative relationship between these parameters and the kinetics of the development of the negative effects of oxidation. The experiment presented here attempts to generate data which can be used to predictively model the oxidative degradation of white wines. Bottled wines were submitted to extreme conditions (45 degrees C temperature, O(2) saturation) during 3 months witth samples taken every 15 days for both sensorial and chemical analysis (GC-O/FPD/MS, 420 nm). The synergistic effects of increasing temperature and O(2) at lower pH are evident, both on the decrease in levels of terpene alcohols and norisoprenoids (which impart floral aromas), and on the development of off-flavors such as "honey-like", "boiled-potato", and "farm-feed" associated with the presence of phenylacetaldehyde, methional, and 1,1,6-trimethyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. PMID:12358460

  7. Predicting heavy metals' adsorption edges and adsorption isotherms on MnO2 with the parameters determined from Langmuir kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghai; Xiao, Zhongjin; Xiong, Xinmei; Zhou, Gongming; Guan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Although surface complexation models have been widely used to describe the adsorption of heavy metals, few studies have verified the feasibility of modeling the adsorption kinetics, edge, and isotherm data with one pH-independent parameter. A close inspection of the derivation process of Langmuir isotherm revealed that the equilibrium constant derived from the Langmuir kinetic model, KS-kinetic, is theoretically equivalent to the adsorption constant in Langmuir isotherm, KS-Langmuir. The modified Langmuir kinetic model (MLK model) and modified Langmuir isotherm model (MLI model) incorporating pH factor were developed. The MLK model was employed to simulate the adsorption kinetics of Cu(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) on MnO2 at pH3.2 or 3.3 to get the values of KS-kinetic. The adsorption edges of heavy metals could be modeled with the modified metal partitioning model (MMP model), and the values of KS-Langmuir were obtained. The values of KS-kinetic and KS-Langmuir are very close to each other, validating that the constants obtained by these two methods are basically the same. The MMP model with KS-kinetic constants could predict the adsorption edges of heavy metals on MnO2 very well at different adsorbent/adsorbate concentrations. Moreover, the adsorption isotherms of heavy metals on MnO2 at various pH levels could be predicted reasonably well by the MLI model with the KS-kinetic constants.

  8. Variational cross-validation of slow dynamical modes in molecular kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Markov state models are a widely used method for approximating the eigenspectrum of the molecular dynamics propagator, yielding insight into the long-timescale statistical kinetics and slow dynamical modes of biomolecular systems. However, the lack of a unified theoretical framework for choosing between alternative models has hampered progress, especially for non-experts applying these methods to novel biological systems. Here, we consider cross-validation with a new objective function for estimators of these slow dynamical modes, a generalized matrix Rayleigh quotient (GMRQ), which measures the ability of a rank-m projection operator to capture the slow subspace of the system. It is shown that a variational theorem bounds the GMRQ from above by the sum of the first m eigenvalues of the system’s propagator, but that this bound can be violated when the requisite matrix elements are estimated subject to statistical uncertainty. This overfitting can be detected and avoided through cross-validation. These result make it possible to construct Markov state models for protein dynamics in a way that appropriately captures the tradeoff between systematic and statistical errors. PMID:25833563

  9. Silica coating and photocatalytic activities of ZnO nanoparticles: effect of operational parameters and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ismail, L F M; Emara, M M; El-Moselhy, M M; Maziad, N A; Hussein, O K

    2014-10-15

    Silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using the hydrothermal method. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). It was found that ultrafine core/shell structured silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were successfully obtained. TEM analysis revealed a continuous and uniform silica coating layer of about 8nm in thickness on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance of silica-coating ZnO core/shell nanoparticles in methylene blue aqueous solution was investigated. The effects of some operational parameters such as pH value, nanocatalyst loading and initial MB concentration on the degradation efficiency were discussed. Kinetic parameters were experimentally determined and a pseudo-first-order kinetic was observed. Thus, the main advantage of the coating is the stability of the photocatalysts and the better performance in acidic or alkaline solutions. Compared to ZnO the maximum apparent rate constant is obtained at pH 8.5 (pH 11.5 in case of bare ZnO). Moreover, the Langmuir adsorption model was applied to describe the equilibrium isotherm at different MB concentration. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm suggests monolayer coverage of the MB onto surface of silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles. The kinetics of the adsorption with respect to the initial dye concentration, were also investigated. The pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated. The kinetic studies revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model better represented the adsorption kinetics, suggesting that the adsorption process may be chemisorption.

  10. Sorption of selenate on soils and pure phases: kinetic parameters and stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Loffredo, N; Mounier, S; Thiry, Y; Coppin, F

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to identify the principle selenate carrier phases for two selected soils, by comparing their reactivity with selenate to that of pure phases of the solids. Silica, calcium carbonate, aluminium hydroxide, goethite, bentonite and humic acid were selected as the main soil carrier phases. Comparisons were made first on the parameter values obtained with the best fit of a kinetic sorption model which can discriminate instantaneous sorption from kinetically limited sorption. Then comparisons were made of the ability for each solid to stabilise selenate by measuring the ratio of the partition coefficient for sorption (Kd(sorption)) over that of the desorption (Kd(desorption)). Kinetics and stabilisation were used to help elucidate the nature of interactions with the test solid phases for a large range of selenate concentrations. The experiments were conducted over 165 h in batch reactors, the solid being isolated from the solution by dialysis tubing, at two pH (5.4 and 8) and three selenate concentrations (1 × 10(-3), 1 × 10(-6) and 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1)). The results obtained showed that only aluminium hydroxide can sorb selenate throughout the studied pH range (pH 5.4 to 8.0). The sorption capacity on this mineral was high (Kd(sorption) > 100 to 1 × 10(4) L kg(-1)) and the selenate was mainly stabilized by the formation of inner sphere complexes. The sorption on goethite occurred at pH 5.4 (Kd(sorption) 52 L kg(-1)), mainly as outer sphere complexes, and was null at pH 8. On silica, a weak sorption was observed only at pH 5.4 and at 165 h (Kd(sorption) 4 L kg(-1)). On bentonite, calcium carbonate and humic acid no significant sorption was observed. Concerning the two soils studied, different behaviours were observed for selenate. For soil Ro (pH 5.4), Kd(sorption) was low (8 L kg(-1)) compared to soil Bu (pH 8) (70 L kg(-1)). The sorption behaviour of selenate on soil Ro was mainly due to outer sphere complexes, as for

  11. High frequency variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS observations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-28

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future.

  12. High frequency variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS observations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future. PMID:25635416

  13. High Frequency Variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future. PMID:25635416

  14. Fuzzy C-mean clustering on kinetic parameter estimation with generalized linear least square algorithm in SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hon-Chit; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, Dagan

    2006-03-01

    Dynamic Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has the potential to quantitatively estimate physiological parameters by fitting compartment models to the tracer kinetics. The generalized linear least square method (GLLS) is an efficient method to estimate unbiased kinetic parameters and parametric images. However, due to the low sensitivity of SPECT, noisy data can cause voxel-wise parameter estimation by GLLS to fail. Fuzzy C-Mean (FCM) clustering and modified FCM, which also utilizes information from the immediate neighboring voxels, are proposed to improve the voxel-wise parameter estimation of GLLS. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to generate dynamic SPECT data with different noise levels and processed by general and modified FCM clustering. Parametric images were estimated by Logan and Yokoi graphical analysis and GLLS. The influx rate (K I), volume of distribution (V d) were estimated for the cerebellum, thalamus and frontal cortex. Our results show that (1) FCM reduces the bias and improves the reliability of parameter estimates for noisy data, (2) GLLS provides estimates of micro parameters (K I-k 4) as well as macro parameters, such as volume of distribution (Vd) and binding potential (BP I & BP II) and (3) FCM clustering incorporating neighboring voxel information does not improve the parameter estimates, but improves noise in the parametric images. These findings indicated that it is desirable for pre-segmentation with traditional FCM clustering to generate voxel-wise parametric images with GLLS from dynamic SPECT data.

  15. Influence of different types of effectors on the kinetic parameters of suicide inactivation of catalase by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ghadermarzi, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    1999-04-12

    The effects of cyanide and azide ions (class A), sodium-n-dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and 2-mercaptoethanol (class B), 3-aminotriazole (class C) and NADPH (class D) on the initial activity (ai), inactivation rate constant (ki) and the partition ratio (r) of bovine liver catalase reaction with its suicide substrate, hydrogen peroxide, were studied in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 at 27 degrees C. The above kinetic parameters were determined by processing the progress curve data. In class A, which contains fast and reversible inhibitors of catalase, a proportional decrease in ai and ki was observed by inhibitors, so that the r remained constant. In class B, which contains slow and irreversible inactivators, a decrease in ai and constancy of ki and r were observed when catalase was incubated in the presence of such inactivators for a determined time. In class C, containing effector which can combine with intermediate compound I, ai was relatively unchanged but an increase in ki and a decrease in r were observed. In class D, containing effector which reduces compound I to ferricatalase, ai was not affected significantly but some decrease in ki was detected which was linked with an increase in r. These results demonstrate that different classes of effectors affect the determined kinetic parameters of catalase in various ways. Thus, determination of such parameters by simple kinetic experiments can be carried out for classification of the agents which have an effect on the kinetics of catalase. PMID:10209276

  16. Kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation in intertidal marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvind K.; Sherry, Angela; Gray, Neil D.; Jones, D. Martin; Bowler, Bernard F. J.; Head, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Availability of inorganic nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorous, is often a primary control on crude oil hydrocarbon degradation in marine systems. Many studies have empirically determined optimum levels of inorganic N and P for stimulation of hydrocarbon degradation. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information on fundamental kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation that can be used to model the fate of crude oil in bioremediation programmes that use inorganic nutrient addition to stimulate oil biodegradation. Here we report fundamental kinetic parameters (Ks and qmax) for nitrate- and phosphate-stimulated crude oil biodegradation under nutrient limited conditions and with respect to crude oil, under conditions where N and P are not limiting. In the marine sediments studied, crude oil degradation was limited by both N and P availability. In sediments treated with 12.5 mg/g of oil but with no addition of N and P, hydrocarbon degradation rates, assessed on the basis of CO2 production, were 1.10 ± 0.03 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day which were comparable to rates of CO2 production in sediments to which no oil was added (1.05 ± 0.27 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day). When inorganic nitrogen was added alone maximum rates of CO2 production measured were 4.25 ± 0.91 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. However, when the same levels of inorganic nitrogen were added in the presence of 0.5% P w/w of oil (1.6 μmol P/g wet sediment) maximum rates of measured CO2 production increased more than four-fold to 18.40 ± 1.04 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. Ks and qmax estimates for inorganic N (in the form of sodium nitrate) when P was not limiting were 1.99 ± 0.86 μmol/g wet sediment and 16.16 ± 1.28 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day respectively. The corresponding values for P were 63 ± 95 nmol/g wet sediment and 12.05 ± 1.31 μmol CO2/g wet sediment/day. The qmax values with respect to N and P were not significantly different (P < 0.05). When N and P

  17. Evolution of process parameters and determination of kinetics for co-composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste with poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Petric, Ivan; Helić, Azra; Avdić, Edisa Avdihodžić

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to monitor the process parameters and to determine kinetics in composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and poultry manure. The experiments were carried out with three different mixtures. The results showed that the mixture 60% OFMSW, 20% poultry manure, 10% mature compost and 10% sawdust provided the most appropriate conditions for composting process. Using nine kinetic models and nonlinear regression method, kinetic parameters were estimated and the models were analyzed with four statistical indicators. Kinetic models with four measured variables proved to be better than models with less number of measured variables. The number of measured experimental variables influences kinetics more than the number of kinetic parameters. Satisfactory fittings of proposed kinetic model to the experimental data of OM were achieved. The model is more suitable for data obtained from composting of mixtures with much higher percentage of OFMSW than percentage of poultry manure. PMID:22609720

  18. Comparisons of selected methods for the determination of kinetic parameters from electrothermal atomic absorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Rodney W.; Pfefferkorn, Lisa L.; Holcombe, James A.

    1994-12-01

    Three of the methods available for the determination of kinetic parameters for atom formation in ETAAS were compared. In the approach of mcnally and holcombe [ Anal. Chem. 59, 1015 (1987)], Arrhenius-type plots are used to extract activation energy values while an approximation of the order of release is obtained by studying the alignment of the absorption maxima at increasing analyte concentrations. In the method of rojas and olivares [ Spectrochim. Acta47B, 387 (1992)], plots are prepared for different orders of release, with the correct order yielding a longer linear region from whose slope the activation energy is calculated. The method of yan et al. [ Spectrochim. Acta48B, 605 (1993)] uses a single absorption profile for the calculations. Activation energy and the order of release are obtained from the slope and intercept, respectively, on their graph. All three methods assume linear heating rate, constant activation energies, and furnace isothermality. The methods were tested with the same experimental data sets for Cu, Au and Ni using a spatially isothermal cuvette. Since intensive mathematical treatments commonly have deleterious effects on the uncertainty of the final result, the methods were compared using both the original data and a smoothed version of it. In general, the three methods yielded comparable results for the metals studied. However, choosing the most linear plot to determine the correct order of release when using Rojas and Olivares' method was sometimes subjective, and McNally and Holcombe's method provided only estimates for the orders of release that were neither zero nor unity.

  19. [The kinetic parameters of retainment and release of deposited in human tissue structures calcium].

    PubMed

    Ermakova, I P; Potanina, T V; Pronchenko, I A; Larina, I M; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2014-11-01

    The analysis of retainment and release kinetics of deposited in tissue structures calcium was made in the hypercalcemic conditions in 28 healthy volunteers (22 males and 6 females) of the age of 33 ± 6.5 years via drip infusion (Groups 1, 2) and in 9 individuals (3 males and 6 females) in 12 trials via stream infusion (Group 3). By the end of each hour after the termination of calcium infusion the amount of calcium retained in tissues was calculated (Mtis./kg); the parameters of its binding (specific buffer volume--β3 sp, association constant--Ka, number of binding centers--n) were established using the Langmuir and Scetchard coordinates. The Group 1 volunteers (n = = 12) showed a section of positive cooperativity (a direct regression on Sketchard coordinates, Hill coefficient 3.36 ± 1.63) and 2 sections of the consecutive calcium separation from one set of noninteracting centers. 5 volunteers of Group 2 and 8 volunteers of Group 3 demonstrated a slight calcium delivery to tissues after 1 hour of observation which then followed for 2 volunteers of Group 2 and for 2 volunteers of Group 3. Other volunteers of Groups 2 and 3 showed a release of tissue-deposited calcium via the mechanism of the consecutive separation from one set of noninteracting centers with βsp 3 times less and Ka 7 times higher than with the calcium infusion. The excretion of calcium in urine was the highest in Group 1 and the lowest in Group 3. The [Ca2+] and Mtis./kg values were normalized in Groups 1 and 2 the next morning and in Group 3 after 2-3 hours of observation. An assumption was made about the relationship between the tissue and kidney [Ca2+] normalizing mechanisms with hypercalcemia.

  20. Kinetic parameter estimation in N. europaea biofilms using a 2-D reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Semprini, Lewis; Wood, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms of the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were cultivated to study microbial processes associated with ammonia oxidation in pure culture. We explored the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters of ammonia oxidation in N. europaea biofilms were in the range of those determined with batch suspended cells. Oxygen and pH microelectrodes were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH above and inside biofilms and reactive transport modeling was performed to simulate the measured DO and pH profiles. A two dimensional (2-D) model was used to simulate advection parallel to the biofilm surface and diffusion through the overlying fluid while reaction and diffusion were simulated in the biofilm. Three experimental studies of microsensor measurements were performed with biofilms: i) NH3 concentrations near the Ksn value of 40 μM determined in suspended cell tests ii) Limited buffering capacity which resulted in a pH gradient within the biofilms and iii) NH3 concentrations well below the Ksn value. Very good fits to the DO concentration profiles both in the fluid above and in the biofilms were achieved using the 2-D model. The modeling study revealed that the half-saturation coefficient for NH3 in N. europaea biofilms was close to the value measured in suspended cells. However, the third study of biofilms with low availability of NH3 deviated from the model prediction. The model also predicted shifts in the DO profiles and the gradient in pH that resulted for the case of limited buffering capacity. The results illustrate the importance of incorporating both key transport and chemical processes in a biofilm reactive transport model.

  1. Interaction between chitosan and uranyl ions. Role of physical and physicochemical parameters on the kinetics of sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Piron, E. |; Accominotti, M.; Domard, A.

    1997-03-19

    This work corresponds to the first part of our studies on the interactions between chitosan particles dispersed in water and uranyl ions. The measurements were obtained by ICP, and we considered the role of various physical and physicochemical parameters related to chitosan. We showed that the crystallinity, the particle dimensions, and the swelling in water of chitosan are parameters which are connected together and govern the kinetic laws of metal diffusion and sorption. The molecular mobility of the polymer chains is then essential parameter. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Coefficient of variation: a powerful Doppler ultrasonographic parameter for detection of renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Eibenberger, K; Schima, H; Trubel, W; Temel, T; Schmidt, C; Scherer, R; Windberger, U; Dock, W; Grabenwöger, F

    1996-07-01

    The aim of our study was to objectively compare the effectiveness of various Doppler parameters in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. In three sheep, variable degrees of renal artery stenosis were induced and renal segmental arteries were investigated using pulsed Doppler sonography. In each animal the standard deviation of the instantaneous peak velocity within one cardiac cycle normalized by the mean peak velocity (coefficient of variation) had significantly higher normalized regression coefficients (k* = -0.215, average of three animals) when compared to resistive index (k* = -0.090) and acceleration index (k* = -0.069). In each individual animal, coefficient of variation detected lower pressure gradients (6.3 mm Hg, average value) than did resistive index (13.4 mm Hg) or acceleration index (17.3 mm Hg). The coefficient of variation may detect the presence of pressure gradients in renal artery stenosis more accurately than acceleration index or resistive index.

  3. [Periodical changes of various hematological parameters of the human body adaptation and gravitation fields variations].

    PubMed

    Gederim, V V; Sokolovskiĭ, V V; Gorshkov, E S; Shapovalov, S N; Troshichev, O A

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring the content of lymphocytes and nucleated neutrophils (observation period 10.5 months) and the determination of the values of leucocytes coefficient and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in chronic patients revealed rhythms of oscillations of these parameters (from 3-5 to 33 days). The coincidence of these rhythms with the rhythms of variations of gravitational field indicates that gravitational field affects the quantitative blood cell composition and the rheological properties of blood.

  4. Investigation of thermoluminescence and kinetic parameters of CaMgB2O5: Dy3+ nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhas, M.; Kumar, Vinay; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, thermoluminescence (TL) properties of Dy3+ (1.5 mol %) doped CaMgB2O5 nanophosphor after being exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiations (λ=254nm) were investigated. In UV exposed samples, the thermoluminescence glow curve consists of a broad glow peak located at 380 K with a small shoulder at 507 K. A shift in glow peak temperature from 367 K to 380 K after the UV exposure for 80 min was observed, which clearly shows that glow peaks follow the second order kinetics. The TL intensity of the peaks increases with an increase in the exposure time of UV rays (10-180 min). The TL Anal program was used to analyze the glow curve. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), the frequency factor (s) and the order of kinetics (b) were calculated for CaMgB2O5: Dy3+ nanophosphors.

  5. Haematology and Serum Biochemistry Parameters and Variations in the Eurasian Beaver (Castor fiber)

    PubMed Central

    Girling, Simon J.; Campbell-Palmer, Roisin; Pizzi, Romain; Fraser, Mary A.; Cracknell, Jonathan; Arnemo, Jon; Rosell, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Haematology parameters (N = 24) and serum biochemistry parameters (N = 35) were determined for wild Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber), between 6 months – 12 years old. Of the population tested in this study, N = 18 Eurasian beavers were from Norway and N = 17 originating from Bavaria but now living extensively in a reserve in England. All blood samples were collected from beavers via the ventral tail vein. All beavers were chemically restrained using inhalant isoflurane in 100% oxygen prior to blood sampling. Results were determined for haematological and serum biochemical parameters for the species and were compared between the two different populations with differences in means estimated and significant differences being noted. Standard blood parameters for the Eurasian beaver were determined and their ranges characterised using percentiles. Whilst the majority of blood parameters between the two populations showed no significant variation, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin and white blood cell counts showed significantly greater values (p<0.01) in the Bavarian origin population than the Norwegian; neutrophil counts, alpha 2 globulins, cholesterol, sodium: potassium ratios and phosphorus levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Bavarian versus Norwegian; and potassium, bile acids, gamma globulins, urea, creatinine and total calcium values levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Norwegian versus Bavarian relict populations. No significant differences were noted between male and female beavers or between sexually immature (<3 years old) and sexually mature (≥3 years old) beavers in the animals sampled. With Eurasian beaver reintroduction encouraged by legislation throughout Europe, knowledge of baseline blood values for the species and any variations therein is essential when assessing their health and welfare and the success or failure of any reintroduction program. This is the first study to produce base

  6. Comparison of Parameter Estimations Using Dual-Input and Arterial-Input in Liver Kinetic Studies of FDG Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yunfeng; Bai, Jing

    2005-01-01

    Liver kinetic study of [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) metabolism in human body is an important tool for functional modeling and glucose metabolic rate estimation. In general, the arterial blood time-activity curve (TAC) and the tissue TAC are required as the input and output functions for the kinetic model. For liver study, however, the arterial-input may be not consistent with the actual model input because the liver has a dual blood supply from the hepatic artery (HA) and the portal vein (PV) to the liver. In this study, the result of model parameter estimation using dual-input function is compared with that using arterial-input function. First, a dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) experiment is performed after injection of FDG into the human body. The TACs of aortic blood, PV blood, and five regions of interest (ROIs) in liver are obtained from the PET image. Then, the dual-input curve is generated by calculating weighted sum of both the arterial and PV input curves. Finally, the five liver ROIs' kinetic parameters are estimated with arterial-input and dual-input functions respectively. The results indicate that the two methods provide different parameter estimations and the dual-input function may lead to more accurate parameter estimation.

  7. Determination of char combustion kinetics parameters: Comparison of point detector and imaging-based particle-sizing pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemann, Martin; Geier, Manfred; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Vorobiev, Nikita; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the char burnout characteristics of two German coals (a lignite and a high-volatile bituminous coal) were investigated using two different experimental configurations and optical techniques in two distinct laboratories for measurement of temperature and size of burning particles. The optical diagnostic hardware is quite different in the two systems, but both perform two-color pyrometry and optical sizing measurements on individual particles burning in isolation from each other in high-temperature laminar flows to characterize the char consumption kinetics. The performance of the specialized systems is compared for two different combustion atmospheres (with 6.6 and 12 vol.% O2) and gas temperatures between 1700 and 1800 K. The measured particle temperatures and diameters are converted to char burning rate parameters for several residence times during the course of the particles' burnout. The results confirm that comparable results are obtained with the two configurations, although higher levels of variability in the measured data were observed in the imaging-based pyrometer setup. Corresponding uncertainties in kinetics parameters were larger, and appear to be more sensitive to systematic measurement errors when lower oxygen contents are used in the experiments. Consequently, burnout experiments in environments with sufficiently high O2 contents may be used to measure reliable char burning kinetics rates. Based on simulation results for the two coals, O2 concentrations in the range 10%-30% are recommended for kinetic rate measurements on 100 μm particles.

  8. Determination of char combustion kinetics parameters: comparison of point detector and imaging-based particle-sizing pyrometry.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Martin; Geier, Manfred; Shaddix, Christopher R; Vorobiev, Nikita; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the char burnout characteristics of two German coals (a lignite and a high-volatile bituminous coal) were investigated using two different experimental configurations and optical techniques in two distinct laboratories for measurement of temperature and size of burning particles. The optical diagnostic hardware is quite different in the two systems, but both perform two-color pyrometry and optical sizing measurements on individual particles burning in isolation from each other in high-temperature laminar flows to characterize the char consumption kinetics. The performance of the specialized systems is compared for two different combustion atmospheres (with 6.6 and 12 vol.% O2) and gas temperatures between 1700 and 1800 K. The measured particle temperatures and diameters are converted to char burning rate parameters for several residence times during the course of the particles' burnout. The results confirm that comparable results are obtained with the two configurations, although higher levels of variability in the measured data were observed in the imaging-based pyrometer setup. Corresponding uncertainties in kinetics parameters were larger, and appear to be more sensitive to systematic measurement errors when lower oxygen contents are used in the experiments. Consequently, burnout experiments in environments with sufficiently high O2 contents may be used to measure reliable char burning kinetics rates. Based on simulation results for the two coals, O2 concentrations in the range 10%-30% are recommended for kinetic rate measurements on 100 μm particles.

  9. Determination of char combustion kinetics parameters: comparison of point detector and imaging-based particle-sizing pyrometry.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Martin; Geier, Manfred; Shaddix, Christopher R; Vorobiev, Nikita; Scherer, Viktor

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the char burnout characteristics of two German coals (a lignite and a high-volatile bituminous coal) were investigated using two different experimental configurations and optical techniques in two distinct laboratories for measurement of temperature and size of burning particles. The optical diagnostic hardware is quite different in the two systems, but both perform two-color pyrometry and optical sizing measurements on individual particles burning in isolation from each other in high-temperature laminar flows to characterize the char consumption kinetics. The performance of the specialized systems is compared for two different combustion atmospheres (with 6.6 and 12 vol.% O2) and gas temperatures between 1700 and 1800 K. The measured particle temperatures and diameters are converted to char burning rate parameters for several residence times during the course of the particles' burnout. The results confirm that comparable results are obtained with the two configurations, although higher levels of variability in the measured data were observed in the imaging-based pyrometer setup. Corresponding uncertainties in kinetics parameters were larger, and appear to be more sensitive to systematic measurement errors when lower oxygen contents are used in the experiments. Consequently, burnout experiments in environments with sufficiently high O2 contents may be used to measure reliable char burning kinetics rates. Based on simulation results for the two coals, O2 concentrations in the range 10%-30% are recommended for kinetic rate measurements on 100 μm particles. PMID:25085180

  10. Variations in protein/flavin hydrogen bonding in a LOV domain produce non-Arrhenius kinetics of adduct decay†

    PubMed Central

    Zoltowski, Brian D.; Nash, Abigail I.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Light Oxygen Voltage (LOV) domains utilize a conserved blue light-dependent mechanism to control a diverse array of effector domains in biological and engineered proteins. Variations in the kinetics and efficiency of LOV photochemistry fine tune various aspects of the photic response. Characterization of the kinetics of a key aspect of this photochemical mechanism in EL222, a blue-light responsive DNA binding protein from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594, reveals unique non-Arrhenius behavior in the rate of dark state cleavage of the photochemically-generated adduct. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis studies establish that this effect stems from a Gln to Ala mutation unique to EL222 and homologous proteins from marine bacteria. Kinetic and spectroscopic analyses reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions between the FMN N1, O2 and ribityl hydroxyls with the surrounding protein regulate photocycle kinetics and stabilize the LOV active site from temperature-induced alteration in local structure. Substitution of residues interacting with the N1-O2 locus modulates adduct stability, structural flexibility and sequestration of the active site from bulk solvent without perturbation of light-activated DNA binding. Together, these variants link non-Arrhenius behavior to specific alteration of an H-bonding network, while affording tunability of photocycle kinetics. PMID:21923139

  11. Tolerable Variation in Item Parameter Estimates for Linear and Adaptive Computer-Based Testing. Research Report No. 04-28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizavi, Saba; Way, Walter D.; Davey, Tim; Herbert, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Item parameter estimates vary for a variety of reasons, including estimation error, characteristics of the examinee samples, and context effects (e.g., item location effects, section location effects, etc.). Although we expect variation based on theory, there is reason to believe that observed variation in item parameter estimates exceeds what…

  12. Fourier domain closed-form formulas for estimation of kinetic parameters in reversible multi-compartment models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Compared with static imaging, dynamic emission computed tomographic imaging with compartment modeling can quantify in vivo physiologic processes, providing useful information about molecular disease processes. Dynamic imaging involves estimation of kinetic rate parameters. For multi-compartment models, kinetic parameter estimation can be computationally demanding and problematic with local minima. Methods This paper offers a new perspective to the compartment model fitting problem where Fourier linear system theory is applied to derive closed-form formulas for estimating kinetic parameters for the two-compartment model. The proposed Fourier domain estimation method provides a unique solution, and offers very different noise response as compared to traditional non-linear chi-squared minimization techniques. Results The unique feature of the proposed Fourier domain method is that only low frequency components are used for kinetic parameter estimation, where the DC (i.e., the zero frequency) component in the data is treated as the most important information, and high frequency components that tend to be corrupted by statistical noise are discarded. Computer simulations show that the proposed method is robust without having to specify the initial condition. The resultant solution can be fine tuned using the traditional iterative method. Conclusions The proposed Fourier-domain estimation method has closed-form formulas. The proposed Fourier-domain curve-fitting method does not require an initial condition, it minimizes a quadratic objective function and a closed-form solution can be obtained. The noise is easier to control, simply by discarding the high frequency components, and emphasizing the DC component. PMID:22995548

  13. Monoculture parameters successfully predict coculture growth kinetics of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and two Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Van Wey, A S; Cookson, A L; Roy, N C; McNabb, W C; Soboleva, T K; Shorten, P R

    2014-11-17

    Microorganisms rarely live in isolation but are most often found in a consortium. This provides the potential for cross-feeding and nutrient competition among the microbial species, which make it challenging to predict the growth kinetics in coculture. In this paper we developed a mathematical model to describe substrate consumption and subsequent microbial growth and metabolite production for bacteria grown in monoculture. The model characterized substrate utilization kinetics of 18 Bifidobacterium strains. Some bifidobacterial strains demonstrated preferential degradation of oligofructose in that sugars with low degree of polymerization (DP) (DP≤3 or 4) were metabolized before sugars of higher DP, or vice versa. Thus, we expanded the model to describe the preferential degradation of oligofructose. In addition, we adapted the model to describe the competition between human colonic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 or Bifidobacterium breve Yakult for inulin as well as cross-feeding of breakdown products from the extracellular hydrolysis of inulin by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. We found that the coculture growth kinetics could be predicted based on the respective monoculture growth kinetics. Using growth kinetics from monoculture experiments to predict coculture dynamics will reduce the number of in vitro experiments required to parameterize multi-culture models.

  14. Effects of fragmentation parameter variations on estimates of galactic cosmic ray exposure: Dose sensitivity studies for aluminum shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Initial studies of the sensitivities of estimates of particle fluence, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent to fragmentation parameter variations are undertaken by using the LaRC galactic cosmic ray transport code (HZETRN). The new results, presented as a function of aluminum shield thickness, include upper and lower bounds on dose/dose equivalent corresponding to the physically realistic extremes of the fragmentation process and the percentage of variation of the dose/dose equivalent as a function of fragmentation parameter variation.

  15. An automated image-based method of 3D subject-specific body segment parameter estimation for kinetic analyses of rapid movements.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Alison L; Corazza, Stefano; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Accurate subject-specific body segment parameters (BSPs) are necessary to perform kinetic analyses of human movements with large accelerations, or no external contact forces or moments. A new automated topographical image-based method of estimating segment mass, center of mass (CM) position, and moments of inertia is presented. Body geometry and volume were measured using a laser scanner, then an automated pose and shape registration algorithm segmented the scanned body surface, and identified joint center (JC) positions. Assuming the constant segment densities of Dempster, thigh and shank masses, CM locations, and moments of inertia were estimated for four male subjects with body mass indexes (BMIs) of 19.7-38.2. The subject-specific BSP were compared with those determined using Dempster and Clauser regression equations. The influence of BSP and BMI differences on knee and hip net forces and moments during a running swing phase were quantified for the subjects with the smallest and largest BMIs. Subject-specific BSP for 15 body segments were quickly calculated using the image-based method, and total subject masses were overestimated by 1.7-2.9%.When compared with the Dempster and Clauser methods, image-based and regression estimated thigh BSP varied more than the shank parameters. Thigh masses and hip JC to thigh CM distances were consistently larger, and each transverse moment of inertia was smaller using the image-based method. Because the shank had larger linear and angular accelerations than the thigh during the running swing phase, shank BSP differences had a larger effect on calculated intersegmental forces and moments at the knee joint than thigh BSP differences did at the hip. It was the net knee kinetic differences caused by the shank BSP differences that were the largest contributors to the hip variations. Finally, BSP differences produced larger kinetic differences for the subject with larger segment masses, suggesting that parameter accuracy is more

  16. An automated image-based method of 3D subject-specific body segment parameter estimation for kinetic analyses of rapid movements.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Alison L; Corazza, Stefano; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Accurate subject-specific body segment parameters (BSPs) are necessary to perform kinetic analyses of human movements with large accelerations, or no external contact forces or moments. A new automated topographical image-based method of estimating segment mass, center of mass (CM) position, and moments of inertia is presented. Body geometry and volume were measured using a laser scanner, then an automated pose and shape registration algorithm segmented the scanned body surface, and identified joint center (JC) positions. Assuming the constant segment densities of Dempster, thigh and shank masses, CM locations, and moments of inertia were estimated for four male subjects with body mass indexes (BMIs) of 19.7-38.2. The subject-specific BSP were compared with those determined using Dempster and Clauser regression equations. The influence of BSP and BMI differences on knee and hip net forces and moments during a running swing phase were quantified for the subjects with the smallest and largest BMIs. Subject-specific BSP for 15 body segments were quickly calculated using the image-based method, and total subject masses were overestimated by 1.7-2.9%.When compared with the Dempster and Clauser methods, image-based and regression estimated thigh BSP varied more than the shank parameters. Thigh masses and hip JC to thigh CM distances were consistently larger, and each transverse moment of inertia was smaller using the image-based method. Because the shank had larger linear and angular accelerations than the thigh during the running swing phase, shank BSP differences had a larger effect on calculated intersegmental forces and moments at the knee joint than thigh BSP differences did at the hip. It was the net knee kinetic differences caused by the shank BSP differences that were the largest contributors to the hip variations. Finally, BSP differences produced larger kinetic differences for the subject with larger segment masses, suggesting that parameter accuracy is more

  17. Sample size planning for the coefficient of variation from the accuracy in parameter estimation approach.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken

    2007-11-01

    The accuracy in parameter estimation approach to sample size planning is developed for the coefficient of variation, where the goal of the method is to obtain an accurate parameter estimate by achieving a sufficiently narrow confidence interval. The first method allows researchers to plan sample size so that the expected width of the confidence interval for the population coefficient of variation is sufficiently narrow. A modification allows a desired degree of assurance to be incorporated into the method, so that the obtained confidence interval will be sufficiently narrow with some specified probability (e.g., 85% assurance that the 95 confidence interval width will be no wider than to units). Tables of necessary sample size are provided for a variety of scenarios that may help researchers planning a study where the coefficient of variation is of interest plan an appropriate sample size in order to have a sufficiently narrow confidence interval, optionally with somespecified assurance of the confidence interval being sufficiently narrow. Freely available computer routines have been developed that allow researchers to easily implement all of the methods discussed in the article.

  18. Spatial variation of plasma parameters and ion acceleration in an inductive plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Volynets, V.N.; Park, Wontaek; Tolmachev, Yu.N.; Pashkovsky, V.G.; Yoo, Jinwoo

    2006-02-15

    Plasma parameters of inductively coupled plasma system with an annular plasma source have been studied experimentally. At low pressures (about 1 mTorr), electron temperature inside the plasma source is rather high (8-13 eV) and is much greater than in the diffusion (main) chamber (4-5 eV). The plasma potential inside the source is also much higher than in the main chamber. There is a rapid drop of the electron temperature and plasma potential at the boundary between the plasma source and the main chamber. The drop of the plasma potential at the boundary (about 20 V) means the existence of a strong axial electric field, which retards the electrons inside the plasma source and accelerates the ions from the source into the main chamber. Measurements of ion energy distributions in the main chamber volume reveal the existence of ions with kinetic energies about 15 eV.

  19. Simulations of a epidemic model with parameters variation analysis for the dengue fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardim, C. L. T. F.; Prates, D. B.; Silva, J. M.; Ferreira, L. A. F.; Kritz, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical models can be widely found in the literature for describing and analyzing epidemics. The models that use differential equations to represent mathematically such description are specially sensible to parameters involved in the modelling. In this work, an already developed model, called SIR, is analyzed when applied to a scenario of a dengue fever epidemic. Such choice is powered by the existence of useful tools presented by a variation of this original model, which allow an inclusion of different aspects of the dengue fever disease, as its seasonal characteristics, the presence of more than one strain of the vector and of the biological factor of cross-immunity. The analysis and results interpretation are performed through numerical solutions of the model in question, and a special attention is given to the different solutions generated by the use of different values for the parameters present in this model. Slight variations are performed either dynamically or statically in those parameters, mimicking hypothesized changes in the biological scenario of this simulation and providing a source of evaluation of how those changes would affect the outcomes of the epidemic in a population.

  20. Arsenic Species in Chicken Breast: Temporal Variations of Metabolites, Elimination Kinetics, and Residual Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingqing; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Zuidhof, Martin J.; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chicken meat has the highest per capita consumption among all meat types in North America. The practice of feeding 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, Rox) to chickens lasted for more than 60 years. However, the fate of Rox and arsenic metabolites remaining in chicken are poorly understood. Objectives: We aimed to determine the elimination of Rox and metabolites from chickens and quantify the remaining arsenic species in chicken meat, providing necessary information for meaningful exposure assessment. Methods: We have conducted a 35-day feeding experiment involving 1,600 chickens, of which half were control and the other half were fed a Rox-supplemented diet for the first 28 days and then a Rox-free diet for the final 7 days. We quantified the concentrations of individual arsenic species in the breast meat of 229 chickens. Results: Rox, arsenobetaine, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, and a new arsenic metabolite, were detected in breast meat from chickens fed Rox. The concentrations of arsenic species, except arsenobetaine, were significantly higher in the Rox-fed than in the control chickens. The half-lives of elimination of these arsenic species were 0.4–1 day. Seven days after termination of Rox feeding, the concentrations of arsenite (3.1 μg/kg), Rox (0.4 μg/kg), and a new arsenic metabolite (0.8 μg/kg) were significantly higher in the Rox-fed chickens than in the control. Conclusion: Feeding of Rox to chickens increased the concentrations of five arsenic species in breast meat. Although most arsenic species were excreted rapidly when the feeding of Rox stopped, arsenic species remaining in the Rox-fed chickens were higher than the background levels. Citation: Liu Q, Peng H, Lu X, Zuidhof MJ, Li XF, Le XC. 2016. Arsenic species in chicken breast: temporal variations of metabolites, elimination kinetics, and residual concentrations. Environ Health Perspect 124:1174–1181; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp

  1. Long-period variations of wind parameters in the mesopause region and the solar cycle dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greisiger, K. M.; Schminder, R.; Kuerschner, D.

    1987-01-01

    The solar cycle dependence of wind parameters below 100 km on the basis of long term continuous ionospheric drift measurements in the low frequency range is discussed. For the meridional prevailing wind no significant variation was found. The same comparison as for winter was done for summer where the previous investigations gave no correlation. Now the radar meteor wind measurement values, too, showed a significant negative correlation of the zonal prevailing wind with solar activity for the years 1976 to 1983. The ionospheric drift measurement results of Collm have the same tendency but a larger dispersion due to the lower accuracy of the harmonic analysis because of the shorter daily measuring interval in summer. Continuous wind observations in the upper mesopause region over more than 20 years revealed distinct long term variations, the origin of which cannot be explained with the present knowledge.

  2. Study of gain variation as a function of physical parameters of GEM foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Supriya

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC has planned to upgrade the TPC by replacing the MWPC with GEM based detecting elements to restrict the IBF to a tolerable value. However the variation of the gain as a function of physical parameters of industrially produced large size GEM foils is needed to be studied as a part of the QA procedure for the detector. The size of the electron avalanche and consequently the gain for GEM based detectors depend on the electric field distribution inside the holes. Geometry of a hole plays an important role in defining the electric field inside it. In this work we have studied the variation of the gain as a function of the hole diameters using Garfield++ simulation package.

  3. Temporal variation of tidal parameters in superconducting gravimeter time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurers, Bruno; Van Camp, Michel; Francis, Olivier; Pálinkáš, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    Analysing independent 1-yr data sets of 10 European superconducting gravimeters (SG) reveals statistically significant temporal variations of M2 tidal parameters. Both common short-term (<2 yr) and long-term (>2 yr) features are identified in all SG time-series but one. The averaged variations of the amplitude factor are about 0.2‰. The path of load vector variations equivalent to the temporal changes of tidal parameters suggests the presence of an 8.85 yr modulation (lunar perigee). The tidal waves having the potential to modulate M2 with this period belong to the 3rd degree constituents. Their amplitude factors turn out to be much closer to body tide model predictions than that of the main 2nd degree M2, which indicates ocean loading for 3rd degree waves to be less prominent than for 2nd degree waves within the M2 group. These two different responses to the loading suggest that the observed modulation is more due to insufficient frequency resolution of limited time-series rather than to time variable loading. Presently, SG gravity time-series are still too short to prove if time variable loading processes are involved too as in case of the annual M2 modulation known to appear for analysis intervals of less than 1 yr. Whatever the variations are caused by, they provide the upper accuracy limit for earth model validation and permit estimating the temporal stability of SG scale factors and assessing the quality of gravity time-series.

  4. Diurnal and seasonal variation of coastal carbonate system parameters in South Florida and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, K.; Smiley, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    Assessing the impact of climate change and ocean acidification on coastal and marine ecosystems requires accurate characterization of its chemical and physical effects on the carbonate system in seawater. Very few data exist that characterize natural variations in coastal carbonate chemistry, limiting the development and validation of coastal climate change and ocean acidification models. We measured carbonate system parameters over diurnal cycles in shallow, coastal ecosystems of Florida Bay, Tampa Bay, Biscayne National Park, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Tobago, and the Bahamas. Salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured continuously, and seawater samples were collected every 4 hours throughout multiple 24-hour time periods. Total alkalinity and pH were measured using spectrophotometric techniques, dissolved inorganic carbon was measured via carbon coulometry, and remaining carbonate system parameters were calculated using CO2SYS. Seasonal variability was either determined from existing data sets, or modeled using salinity and temperature data collected from CTDs deployed at study locations or long-term monitoring sites. Results indicate that all carbonate system parameters showed distinct variation over diurnal timescales primarily due to productivity, respiration, and precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate. The average range of diurnal variation was up to 102% of the seasonal range of variability in carbonate chemistry. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability (or vice versa) may impart significant error in calculation of annual carbon budgets and modeling carbon cycling in coastal ecosystems. Implications for modeling long-term impacts of ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems will be discussed.

  5. A two-parameter kinetic model based on a time-dependent activity coefficient accurately describes enzymatic cellulose digestion

    PubMed Central

    Kostylev, Maxim; Wilson, David

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential source of renewable, low-carbon-footprint liquid fuels. Biomass recalcitrance and enzyme cost are key challenges associated with the large-scale production of cellulosic fuel. Kinetic modeling of enzymatic cellulose digestion has been complicated by the heterogeneous nature of the substrate and by the fact that a true steady state cannot be attained. We present a two-parameter kinetic model based on the Michaelis-Menten scheme (Michaelis L and Menten ML. (1913) Biochem Z 49:333–369), but with a time-dependent activity coefficient analogous to fractal-like kinetics formulated by Kopelman (Kopelman R. (1988) Science 241:1620–1626). We provide a mathematical derivation and experimental support to show that one of the parameters is a total activity coefficient and the other is an intrinsic constant that reflects the ability of the cellulases to overcome substrate recalcitrance. The model is applicable to individual cellulases and their mixtures at low-to-medium enzyme loads. Using biomass degrading enzymes from a cellulolytic bacterium Thermobifida fusca we show that the model can be used for mechanistic studies of enzymatic cellulose digestion. We also demonstrate that it applies to the crude supernatant of the widely studied cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei and can thus be used to compare cellulases from different organisms. The two parameters may serve a similar role to Vmax, KM, and kcat in classical kinetics. A similar approach may be applicable to other enzymes with heterogeneous substrates and where a steady state is not achievable. PMID:23837567

  6. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Tejbir Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-28

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  7. A normalized wave number variation parameter for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of the Acoustic Black Hole has been developed as an efficient passive, lightweight absorber of bending waves in plates and beams. Theory predicts greater absorption for a higher thickness taper power. However, a higher taper power also increases the violation of an underlying theory smoothness assumption. This paper explores the effects of high taper power on the reflection coefficient and spatial change in wave number and discusses the normalized wave number variation as a spatial design parameter for performance, assessment, and optimization. PMID:25096139

  8. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tejbir; Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-01

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  9. Anthropometric Indices Associated with Variation in Cardiovascular Parameters among Primary School Pupils in Ile-Ife

    PubMed Central

    Abiodun, Adedeji G.; Egwu, Michael O.; Adedoyin, Rufus A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the anthropometric indices associated with variations in cardiovascular parameters among primary school pupils in Ile-Ife. Method. One thousand and twenty-six pupils (age range 6–14 years, mean age 10.12 years) from ten schools were recruited with parents' informed consent. Anthropometric (Height (Ht), Weight (Wt), Abdominal Circumference (AC)) and cardiovascular (Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP), Heart Rate (HR)) parameters were measured using standard instruments and procedures. Blood pressure (BP) was measured after ten minutes of quiet sitting. Body Mass Index (BMI), Rate Pressure Product (RPP) and Pulse Pressure (PP) were estimated. Results. Age, Ht, Wt, BMI, and AC correlated significantly (P < .01) with BP and PP. AC and BMI were predictors of BP, HR, RPP, and PP. Conclusion. Significant correlations exist between age, Ht, Wt, BMI, AC, and BP with weight being a more viable predictor of SBP and age a more viable predictor of DBP. PMID:21747972

  10. A multiscale variational approach to the kinetics of viscous classical liquids: The coarse-grained mean field approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-04-07

    A closed kinetic equation for the single-particle density of a viscous simple liquid is derived using a variational method for the Liouville equation and a coarse-grained mean-field (CGMF) ansatz. The CGMF ansatz is based on the notion that during the characteristic time of deformation a given particle interacts with many others so that it experiences an average interaction. A trial function for the N-particle probability density is constructed using a multiscale perturbation method and the CGMF ansatz is applied to it. The multiscale perturbation scheme is based on the ratio of the average nearest-neighbor atom distance to the total size of the assembly. A constraint on the initial condition is discovered which guarantees that the kinetic equation is mass-conserving and closed in the single-particle density. The kinetic equation has much of the character of the Vlasov equation except that true viscous, and not Landau, damping is accounted for. The theory captures condensation kinetics and takes much of the character of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the weak-gradient short-range force limit.

  11. Time of erythema onset after application of methyl nicotinate ointments as response parameter: influence of penetration kinetics and enhancing agents.

    PubMed

    Remane, Y; Leopold, C S

    2006-01-01

    The time of erythema onset may be used as a response parameter for quantification of the cutaneous erythema response induced by methyl nicotinate. The vehicles light mineral oil (LMO; test) and medium chain triglycerides (MCT; standard) were compared with regard to the pharmacodynamic response. Moreover, the influence of penetration enhancers on the time of erythema onset was investigated under zero order penetration kinetics. The enhancers dimethyl sulfoxide, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether and three different glycerides in different concentrations were added to MCT as a standard vehicle. All preparations were applied to the forearms of volunteers under infinite dose conditions at different thermodynamic drug activity levels (0.2-3.2% of the saturation level) and different drug concentrations (0.051-0.816%), respectively. Different penetration kinetics do not influence data of erythema onset, as these data are comparable to those obtained under finite dose conditions (first order penetration kinetics). With regard to the penetration enhancers, a significantly enhanced penetration of methyl nicotinate could be observed only for diethylene glycol monoethyl ether and dimethyl sulfoxide. However, no significant difference between light mineral oil and MCT could be found with regard to penetration enhancement. The time of erythema onset is an easy and efficient parameter for quantification of the pharmacodynamic response caused by nicotinates.

  12. Variational estimation of process parameters in a simplified atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guokun; Koehl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    Parameterizations are used to simulate effects of unresolved sub-grid-scale processes in current state-of-the-art climate model. The values of the process parameters, which determine the model's climatology, are usually manually adjusted to reduce the difference of model mean state to the observed climatology. This process requires detailed knowledge of the model and its parameterizations. In this work, a variational method was used to estimate process parameters in the Planet Simulator (PlaSim). The adjoint code was generated using automatic differentiation of the source code. Some hydrological processes were switched off to remove the influence of zero-order discontinuities. In addition, the nonlinearity of the model limits the feasible assimilation window to about 1day, which is too short to tune the model's climatology. To extend the feasible assimilation window, nudging terms for all state variables were added to the model's equations, which essentially suppress all unstable directions. In identical twin experiments, we found that the feasible assimilation window could be extended to over 1-year and accurate parameters could be retrieved. Although the nudging terms transform to a damping of the adjoint variables and therefore tend to erases the information of the data over time, assimilating climatological information is shown to provide sufficient information on the parameters. Moreover, the mechanism of this regularization is discussed.

  13. Quantifying the performance of in vivo portal dosimetry in detecting four types of treatment parameter variations

    SciTech Connect

    Bojechko, C.; Ford, E. C.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To quantify the ability of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry used during treatment (in vivo) in detecting variations that can occur in the course of patient treatment. Methods: Images of transmitted radiation from in vivo EPID measurements were converted to a 2D planar dose at isocenter and compared to the treatment planning dose using a prototype software system. Using the treatment planning system (TPS), four different types of variability were modeled: overall dose scaling, shifting the positions of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves, shifting of the patient position, and changes in the patient body contour. The gamma pass rate was calculated for the modified and unmodified plans and used to construct a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve to assess the detectability of the different parameter variations. The detectability is given by the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The TPS was also used to calculate the impact of the variations on the target dose–volume histogram. Results: Nine intensity modulation radiation therapy plans were measured for four different anatomical sites consisting of 70 separate fields. Results show that in vivo EPID dosimetry was most sensitive to variations in the machine output, AUC = 0.70 − 0.94, changes in patient body habitus, AUC = 0.67 − 0.88, and systematic shifts in the MLC bank positions, AUC = 0.59 − 0.82. These deviations are expected to have a relatively small clinical impact [planning target volume (PTV) D{sub 99} change <7%]. Larger variations have even higher detectability. Displacements in the patient’s position and random variations in MLC leaf positions were not readily detectable, AUC < 0.64. The D{sub 99} of the PTV changed by up to 57% for the patient position shifts considered here. Conclusions: In vivo EPID dosimetry is able to detect relatively small variations in overall dose, systematic shifts of the MLC’s, and changes in the patient habitus. Shifts in the

  14. Vibration control of an MR vehicle suspension system considering both hysteretic behavior and parameter variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Seong, Min-Sang; Ha, Sung-Hoon

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents vibration control responses of a controllable magnetorheological (MR) suspension system considering the two most important characteristics of the system; the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper and the parameter variation of the suspension. In order to achieve this goal, a cylindrical MR damper which is applicable to a middle-sized passenger car is designed and manufactured. After verifying the damping force controllability, the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper is identified using the Preisach hysteresis model. The full-vehicle suspension model is then derived by considering vertical, pitch and roll motions. An H_{\\infty } controller is designed by treating the sprung mass of the vehicle as a parameter variation and integrating it with the hysteretic compensator which produces additional control input. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control system, the hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) methodology is adopted by integrating the suspension model with the proposed MR damper. Vibration control responses of the vehicle suspension system such as vertical acceleration are evaluated under both bump and random road conditions.

  15. Reaction kinetic parameters for ion transport from steady-state current-voltage curves.

    PubMed Central

    Gradmann, D; Klieber, H G; Hansen, U P

    1987-01-01

    This study demonstrates possible ways to estimate the rate constants of reaction kinetic models for ion transport from steady-state current-voltage data as measured at various substrate concentrations. This issue is treated theoretically by algebraic reduction and extension of a reaction kinetic four-state model for uniport. Furthermore, an example for application is given; current-voltage data from an open K+ selective channel (Schroeder, J.I., R. Hedrich, and J.M. Fernandez, 1984, Nature (Lond.), 312:361-362) supplemented by some new data have been evaluated. The analysis yields absolute numerical estimates of the 14 rate constants of a six-state model, which is discussed in a wider context. PMID:2437973

  16. Kinetic parameters for plasma. beta. -endorphin in lean and obese Zucker rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rodd, D.; Farrell, P.A.; Caston, A.L.; Green, M.H. )

    1991-03-01

    To determine plasma clearance kinetics for {beta}-endorphin (BE) by empirical compartmental analysis, a bolus of radioactive labeled 125I-BE was rapidly injected into a carotid artery catheter of unanesthetized lean (L) and obese (O) Zucker rats. The plasma disappearance of 125I was followed over a 3-h period. A 3-component exponential equation provided the best fit for plasma data. Plasma transit times were very short (10 s); however, plasma fractional catabolic rate was much slower. Plasma mean residence time was similar for both groups (50 min) as was recycle time (1.3 min). These data suggest that BE plasma disappearance kinetics are similar in L and O rats.

  17. Variations of the ionospheric parameters obtained from ground based measurements of ULF magnetic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Elena; Kotik, Dmitry; Bösinger, Tilmann

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of the amplitude spectra and polarization parameter (epsilon)[1] of magnetic ULF noise were investigated during different seasons and high geomagnetic activity time using the data on the horizontal magnetic components monitoring at mid-latitude (New Life, Russia, 56 N, 46 E) and low-latitude stations (Crete, 35.15 N, 25.20 E). It was found that abrupt changes in the spectral polarization parameters can be linked as with variation of height of maximum and the electron density of the F-layer, and with a change in ionospheric parameters profiles at lower altitudes, for example, with the appearance of sporadic Es-layers and intermediate layers, located between the E and F-layers. It was detected the peculiarities in the daily dynamics of the epsilon parameter at low latitudes: a) the appearance in some cases more complicated than in the mid-latitudes, epsilon structure of the spectrum associated with the presence of two different values of the boundary frequency fB [2]; b) a decreasing of fB near local midnight observed in 70% of cases; c) observation of typical for dark time epsilon spectra after sunrise in the winter season. The numerical calculations of epsilon parameter were made using the IRI-2012 model with setting the models of sporadic and intermediate layers. The results revealed the dependence of the polarization spectra of the intensity and height of such thin layers. The specific changes in the electron density at altitudes of 80-350 km during the recovery phase of strong magnetic storms were defined basing on a comparative analysis of the experimental spectra and the results of the numerical calculations. References. 1. E. N. Ermakova, D. S. Kotik, A. V.Ryabov, A. V.Pershin, T. B.osinger, and Q. Zhou, Studying the variation of the broadband spectral maximum parameters in the natural ULF fields, Radiophysics and Quantum Electronics, Vol. 55, No. 10-11, March, 2013 p. 605-615. 2. T. Bosinger, A. G. Demekhov, E. N. Ermakova, C. Haldoupis and Q

  18. Controls on ostracod valve geochemistry, Part 1: Variations of environmental parameters in ostracod (micro-)habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten Walter; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The variations of environmental conditions ( T°, pH, δ 13C DIC, [DIC], δ 18O, Mg/Ca, and Sr/Ca) of ostracod habitats were examined to determine the controls of environmental parameters on the chemical and isotopic composition of ostracod valves. Results of a one-year monitoring of environmental parameters at five sites, with depths of between 2 and 70 m, in Lake Geneva indicate that in littoral to sub-littoral zones (2, 5, and 13 m), the chemical composition of bottom water varies seasonally in concert with changes in temperature and photosynthetic activity. An increase of temperature and photosynthetic activity leads to an increase in δ 13C values of DIC and to precipitation of authigenic calcite, which results in a concomitant increase of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of water. In deeper sites (33 and 70 m), the composition of bottom water remains constant throughout the year and isotopic values and trace element contents are similar to those of deep water within the lake. The chemical composition of interstitial pore water also does not reflect seasonal variations but is controlled by calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration with reduction of sulphate and/or nitrate, and methanogenesis that may occur in the sediment pores. Relative influence of each of these factors on the pore water geochemistry depends on sediment thickness and texture, oxygen content in bottom as well as pore water. Variations of chemical compositions of the ostracod valves of this study vary according to the specific ecology of the ostracod species analysed, that is its life-cycle and its (micro-)habitat. Littoral species have compositions that are related to the seasonal variations of temperature, δ 13C values of DIC, and of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of water. In contrast, the compositions of profundal species are largely controlled by variations of pore fluids along sediment depth profiles according to the specific depth preference of the species. The control on the

  19. Bioactive constituents in Prunus africana: geographical variation throughout Africa and associations with environmental and genetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Kadu, Caroline A C; Parich, Alexandra; Schueler, Silvio; Konrad, Heino; Muluvi, Geoffrey M; Eyog-Matig, Oscar; Muchugi, Alice; Williams, Vivienne L; Ramamonjisoa, Lolona; Kapinga, Consolatha; Foahom, Bernard; Katsvanga, Cuthbert; Hafashimana, David; Obama, Crisantos; Vinceti, Barbara; Schumacher, Rainer; Geburek, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Prunus africana--an evergreen tree found in Afromontane forests--is used in traditional medicine to cure benign prostate hyperplasia. Different bioactive constituents derived from bark extracts from 20 tree populations sampled throughout the species' natural range in Africa were studied by means of GC-MSD. The average concentration [mg/kgw/w] in increasing order was: lauric acid (18), myristic acid (22), n-docosanol (25), ferulic acid (49), β-sitostenone (198), β-sitosterol (490), and ursolic acid (743). The concentrations of many bark constituents were significantly correlated and concentration of n-docosanol was highly significantly correlated with all other analytes. Estimates of variance components revealed the highest variation among populations for ursolic acid (66%) and the lowest for β-sitosterol (20%). In general, environmental parameters recorded (temperature, precipitation, altitude) for the samples sites were not correlated with the concentration of most constituents; however, concentration of ferulic acid was significantly correlated with annual precipitation. Because the concentration of compounds in bark extracts may be affected by tree size, the diameter of sampled plants at 1.3m tree height (as proxy of age) was recorded. The only relationship with tree diameter was a negative correlation with ursolic acid. Under the assumption that genetically less variable populations have less variable concentrations of bark compounds, correlations between variation parameters of the concentration and the respective genetic composition based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA markers were assessed. Only variation of β-sitosterol concentration was significantly correlated with haplotypic diversity. The fixation index (F(IS)) was positively correlated with the variation in concentration of ferulic acid. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) indicated a weak geographic pattern. Mantel tests, however, revealed associations between the geographic patterns of bioactive

  20. Modelling cycle to cycle variations in an SI engine with detailed chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Etheridge, Jonathan; Mosbach, Sebastian; Kraft, Markus; Wu, Hao; Collings, Nick

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents experimental results and a new computational model that investigate cycle to cycle variations (CCV) in a spark ignition (SI) engine. An established stochastic reactor model (SRM) previously used to examine homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion has been extended by spark initiation, flame propagation and flame termination sub-models in order to simulate combustion in SI engines. The model contains a detailed chemical mechanism but relatively short computation times are achieved. The flame front is assumed to be spherical and centred at the spark location, and a pent roof and piston bowl geometry are accounted for. The model is validated by simulating the pressure profile and emissions from an iso-octane fuelled single cylinder research engine that showed low CCV. The effects of key parameters are investigated. Experimental results that show cycle to cycle fluctuations in a four-cylinder naturally aspirated gasoline fuelled SI engine are presented. The model is then coupled with GT-Power, a one-dimensional engine simulation tool, which is used to simulate the breathing events during a multi-cycle simulation. This allows an investigation of the cyclic fluctuations in peak pressure. The source and magnitude of nitric oxide (NO) emissions produced by different cycles are then investigated. It was found that faster burning cycles result in increased NO emissions compared with cycles that have a slower rate of combustion and that more is produced in the early stages of combustion compared with later in the cycle. The majority of NO was produced via the thermal mechanism just after combustion begins. (author)

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Physico-chemical Parameters in the Merbok Estuary, Kedah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fatema, Kaniz; Wan Maznah, W O; Isa, Mansor Mat

    2014-12-01

    In this study, factor analysis (FA) was applied to extract the hidden factors responsible for water quality variations during both wet and dry seasons. Water samples were collected from six sampling stations (St. 1 Lalang River, St. 2 Semeling River, St. 3 Jagung River, St. 4 Teluk Wang River, St. 5 Gelam River and St. 6 Derhaka River) in the Merbok estuary, Malaysia from January to December 2011; the samples were further analysed in the laboratory. Correlation analysis of the data sets showed strong correlations between the parameters. Nutrients such as nitrate (NO3 (-)), nitrite (NO2 (-)), ammonia (NH3) and phosphate (PO4 (3-)) were determined to be critical indicators of water quality throughout the year. Influential water quality parameters during the wet season were conductivity, salinity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), dissolved oxygen (DO) and chlorophyll a (Chla), whereas total suspended solid (TSS) and pH were critical water quality indicators during the dry season. The Kruskal-Wallis H test showed that water quality parameters were significantly different among the sampling months and stations (p<0.05), and Mann-Whitney U tests further revealed that the significantly different parameters were temperature, pH, DO, TSS, NO2 (-) and BOD (p<0.01), whereas salinity, conductivity, NO3 (-), PO4 (3-), NH3 and Chla were not significantly different (p>0.05). Water quality parameters in the estuary varied on both temporal and spatial scales and these results may serve as baseline information for estuary management, specifically for the Merbok estuary. PMID:27073596

  2. A comparison of region-based and pixel-based CEUS kinetics parameters in the assessment of arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisan, E.; Raffeiner, B.; Coran, A.; Rizzo, G.; Ciprian, L.; Stramare, R.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are leading causes of disability and constitute a frequent medical disorder, leading to inability to work, high comorbidity and increased mortality. The gold-standard for diagnosing and differentiating arthritis is based on patient conditions and radiographic findings, as joint erosions or decalcification. However, early signs of arthritis are joint effusion, hypervascularization and synovial hypertrophy. In particular, vascularization has been shown to correlate with arthritis' destructive behavior, more than clinical assessment. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) examination of the small joints is emerging as a sensitive tool for assessing vascularization and disease activity. The evaluation of perfusion pattern rely on subjective semi-quantitative scales, that are able to capture the macroscopic degree of vascularization, but are unable to detect the subtler differences in kinetics perfusion parameters that might lead to a deeper understanding of disease progression and a better management of patients. Quantitative assessment is mostly performed by means of the Qontrast software package, that requires the user to define a region of interest, whose mean intensity curve is fitted with an exponential function. We show that using a more physiologically motivated perfusion curve, and by estimating the kinetics parameters separately pixel per pixel, the quantitative information gathered is able to differentiate more effectively different perfusion patterns. In particular, we will show that a pixel-based analysis is able to provide significant markers differentiating rheumatoid arthritis from simil-rheumatoid psoriatic arthritis, that have non-significant differences in clinical evaluation (DAS28), serological markers, or region-based parameters.

  3. Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; de Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia ( wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered.

  4. Colocalization Estimation Using Graphical Modeling and Variational Bayesian Expectation Maximization: Towards a Parameter-Free Approach.

    PubMed

    Awate, Suyash P; Radhakrishnan, Thyagarajan

    2015-01-01

    In microscopy imaging, colocalization between two biological entities (e.g., protein-protein or protein-cell) refers to the (stochastic) dependencies between the spatial locations of the two entities in the biological specimen. Measuring colocalization between two entities relies on fluorescence imaging of the specimen using two fluorescent chemicals, each of which indicates the presence/absence of one of the entities at any pixel location. State-of-the-art methods for estimating colocalization rely on post-processing image data using an adhoc sequence of algorithms with many free parameters that are tuned visually. This leads to loss of reproducibility of the results. This paper proposes a brand-new framework for estimating the nature and strength of colocalization directly from corrupted image data by solving a single unified optimization problem that automatically deals with noise, object labeling, and parameter tuning. The proposed framework relies on probabilistic graphical image modeling and a novel inference scheme using variational Bayesian expectation maximization for estimating all model parameters, including colocalization, from data. Results on simulated and real-world data demonstrate improved performance over the state of the art.

  5. Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; De Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia (wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered. PMID:20676599

  6. Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; De Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia (wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered.

  7. Effect of the label of oligosaccharide acceptors on the kinetic parameters of nasturtium seed xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET).

    PubMed

    Kosík, Ondřej; Garajová, Soňa; Matulová, Mária; Rehulka, Pavel; Stratilová, Eva; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescently labeled derivatives of a xyloglucan (XG) nonasaccharide Glc(4)Xyl(3)Gal(2) (XLLG) were used as glycosyl acceptors in assays of xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) from germinated nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) seeds. We have investigated how the type of the oligosaccharide label influences the kinetic parameters of the reaction. The fluorescent probes used to label XLLG were anthranilic acid (AA), 8-aminonaphtalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (ANTS), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and sulforhodamine (SR), respectively. The obtained data were compared with those of the reactions where aldose and/or alditol forms of tritium-labeled xyloglucan-derived nonasaccharide served as the respective acceptors. Modification at C-1 of the reducing-end glucose in XLLG by substitution with the fluorophore markedly affected the kinetic parameters of the reaction. The Michaelis constants K(m) for individual acceptors increased in the order [1-(3)H]XLLGXLLG-SR>XLLG-ANTS>[1-(3)H]XLLGol>[1-(3)H]XLLG>XLLG-AA. Catalytic efficiency (expressed as k(cat)/K(m)) with XLLG labeled with SR or FITC was 15 and 28 times, respectively, higher than with the tritium-labeled natural substrate [1-(3)H]XLLG. Comparison of the kinetic parameters found with acceptors labeled with different types of labels enables to select the most effective substrates for the high-throughput assays of XET.

  8. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate. PMID:22792053

  9. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  10. Kinetic approach and estimation of the parameters of cellular interaction between the immunity system and a tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V A; Zhivoglyadov, V P; Stepanova, L A

    1993-01-01

    A method is suggested to estimate multi component dynamic systems, which permits, with the help of the computer-calculated kinetic curves, to obtain information about the possible mechanisms of the system component interaction. The method is based on the structural and parametrical identification of mathematical models presented in the form of a system of nonlinear differential equations, using a multi-criterial approach. Using experimental data of studies on growth kinetics and regression of multicellular tumor EMT6 line spheroids in the mouse allogenic system and the immune system cell accumulation in spheroids a mathematical model has been developed of the cellular interaction process in a spheroid. It has been stated that the rate of macrophage and neutrophil accumulation in a spheroid depends on the amount of tumor cells and is determined by the hyperbolic law (as analogous to the Michaelis-Menthen kinetics), while the accumulation of immune lymphocytes in a tumor is determined besides that by the three-cellular cooperation of lymphocytes, macrophages and tumor cells. According to the model, the inhibition of the process of neutrophil and lymphocyte (but not of macrophages) accumulation is realized through the auto-suppression mechanism. The numerical values of the process parameters, which characterise the rates of accumulation, cellular death in a tumor and of local cellular interactions intensity are obtained. PMID:8239905

  11. Study of reaction parameters and kinetics of esterification of lauric acid with butanol by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sini; Agarwal, Madhu; Chaurasia, S P

    2013-12-01

    Esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol, catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase (CAL) in aqueous-organic biphasic solvent system was studied. Effects of various reaction parameters on esterification were investigated, such as type and amount of solvent, amount of buffer, pH, temperature, speed of agitation, amount of enzyme, butanol and lauric acid. The most suitable reaction conditions for esterification were observed at 50 degrees C and pH 7.0 using 5000 micromoles of lauric acid, 7000 pmoles of butanol, 0.25 ml phosphate buffer, 1 ml of isooctane as the solvent and 50 mg of immobilized enzyme in the reaction medium at agitation speed of 150 rpm. Maximum esterification of 96.36% was acheived in 600 min of reaction time at n-butanol to lauric acid molar ratio of 1: 0.7. Kinetic study for the esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol using immobilized CAL was carried out and the kinetic constants were estimated by using non-linear regression method. The estimated value of Michaelis kinetic constants for butanol (KmBt) and acid (KmAc) were 451.56 (M) and 4.7 x 10(-7)(M), respectively and the value of dissociation constant (KBt) of the butanol-lipase complex was 9.41 x 10(7)(M). The estimated constants agreed fairly well with literature data.

  12. Estimating the dual-enzyme kinetic parameters for Cr (VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 from soil column experiments.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akram; Alam, Mahbub; Yonge, David R

    2005-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) contamination of soil and groundwater is considered a major environmental concern. Bioreduction of Cr (VI) to trivalent chromium (Cr (III)) can be considered an effective technology in remediating Cr (VI) contaminated sites. Among the Cr (VI) reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1) is relatively effective. Reduction of Cr (VI) by MR-1 is defined by the dual-enzyme kinetic model. The feasibility of bioreduction of Cr (VI) is usually evaluated by performing batch experiments which may not accurately represent the subsurface environment. The objective of this paper is to present a rational approach to determine the dual-enzyme reaction kinetics of Cr (VI) reduction by MR-1 from continuous flow soil column experiments which more accurately simulate the subsurface environment. Kinetic parameters obtained from soil column data were found to be much smaller than that obtained from batch data. The stable enzyme induced reaction rate was found to be 127th and the average deactivating enzyme induced reaction rate was 117th of the corresponding values obtained from batch reactor data as reported in literature.

  13. Degradation of carbofuran in aqueous solution by ultrasound and Fenton processes: Effect of system parameters and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying-Shih; Sung, Chi-Fanga; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2010-06-15

    To establish an efficient oxidation process for carbofuran degradation, the effects of some operating parameters such as dosages of H(2)O(2), Fe(2+) and initial carbofuran concentrations were observed during carbofuran degradation by the ultrasound process, Fenton process and a combined ultrasound/Fenton process. The degradation kinetics of carbofuran was also examined based on the experimental data. The results show that more than 99% of the carbofuran was degraded by the ultrasound/Fenton process within short reaction time periods. Increased dosages of H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+) enhanced the degradation of carbofuran in the ultrasound and Fenton oxidation processes, but initial carbofuran concentrations decreased carbofuran degradation in both the Fenton and ultrasound/Fenton processes. The degradation kinetics of carbofuran by the three oxidation processes was found to be in accordance with first-order reaction kinetics. The results provide fundamental information about the treatment of carbofuran wastewater and/or other pesticides by the ultrasound/Fenton oxidation process.

  14. Choosing parameters of kernel subspace LDA for recognition of face images under pose and illumination variations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Yuen, Pong C; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Lai, Jian Huang

    2007-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatically tuning multiple kernel parameters for the kernel-based linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method. The kernel approach has been proposed to solve face recognition problems under complex distribution by mapping the input space to a high-dimensional feature space. Some recognition algorithms such as the kernel principal components analysis, kernel Fisher discriminant, generalized discriminant analysis, and kernel direct LDA have been developed in the last five years. The experimental results show that the kernel-based method is a good and feasible approach to tackle the pose and illumination variations. One of the crucial factors in the kernel approach is the selection of kernel parameters, which highly affects the generalization capability and stability of the kernel-based learning methods. In view of this, we propose an eigenvalue-stability-bounded margin maximization (ESBMM) algorithm to automatically tune the multiple parameters of the Gaussian radial basis function kernel for the kernel subspace LDA (KSLDA) method, which is developed based on our previously developed subspace LDA method. The ESBMM algorithm improves the generalization capability of the kernel-based LDA method by maximizing the margin maximization criterion while maintaining the eigenvalue stability of the kernel-based LDA method. An in-depth investigation on the generalization performance on pose and illumination dimensions is performed using the YaleB and CMU PIE databases. The FERET database is also used for benchmark evaluation. Compared with the existing PCA-based and LDA-based methods, our proposed KSLDA method, with the ESBMM kernel parameter estimation algorithm, gives superior performance.

  15. The influence of estimated body segment parameters on predicted joint kinetics during diplegic cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Walsh, M; O'Sullivan, R; O'Brien, T; Simms, C K

    2014-01-01

    Inverse Dynamic calculations are routinely used in joint moment and power estimates during gait with anthropometric data often taken from published sources. Many biomechanical analyses have highlighted the need to obtain subject-specific anthropometric data (e.g. Mass, Centre of Mass, Moments of Inertia) yet the types of imaging techniques required to achieve this are not always available in the clinical setting. Differences in anthropometric sets have been shown to affect the reactive force and moment calculations in normal subjects but the effect on a paediatric diplegic cerebral palsy group has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using different anthropometric sets on predicted sagittal plane moments during normal and diplegic cerebral palsy gait. Three published anthropometric sets were applied to the reactive force and moment calculations of 14 Cerebral Palsy and 14 Control subjects. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the different anthropometric sets but variability in the resulting sagittal plane moment calculations between sets was low (0.01-0.07 Nm/kg). In addition, the GDI-Kinetic, used as an outcome variable to assess whether differences were clinically meaningful, indicated no clinically meaningful difference between sets. The results suggest that the effects of using different anthropometric sets on the kinetic profiles of normal and diplegic cerebral palsy subjects are clinically insignificant.

  16. Kinetic parameters of red pepper waste as biomass to solid biofuel.

    PubMed

    Maia, Amanda Alves Domingos; de Morais, Leandro Cardoso

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to study the kinetic of thermal degradation of red pepper waste as solid biofuel to bioenergy production. The thermal degradation experiments were conducted at three heating rates, 5°C/min, 7.5°C/min and 10°C/min in a thermogravimetric analyzer and oxidative atmosphere. The kinetic analysis was carried out applying the isoconversional model of Ozawa-Flynn-Wall. The activation energy was considerate low and varied 29.49-147.25k J/mol. The enthalpies revealed the energy difference between the reagent and the activated complex agreed with activation energies, the values of the pre-exponential factor indicated empirical first order reactions, Gibbs free energy varied from 71.77 kJ/mol to 207.03 kJ/mol and the changes of entropies had negative values, indicating that the degree of disorder of products formed through bond dissociations was lower than initial reactants. The calorific value was 19.5 MJ/kg, considered a relevant result for bioenergy production.

  17. The influence of estimated body segment parameters on predicted joint kinetics during diplegic cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Walsh, M; O'Sullivan, R; O'Brien, T; Simms, C K

    2014-01-01

    Inverse Dynamic calculations are routinely used in joint moment and power estimates during gait with anthropometric data often taken from published sources. Many biomechanical analyses have highlighted the need to obtain subject-specific anthropometric data (e.g. Mass, Centre of Mass, Moments of Inertia) yet the types of imaging techniques required to achieve this are not always available in the clinical setting. Differences in anthropometric sets have been shown to affect the reactive force and moment calculations in normal subjects but the effect on a paediatric diplegic cerebral palsy group has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using different anthropometric sets on predicted sagittal plane moments during normal and diplegic cerebral palsy gait. Three published anthropometric sets were applied to the reactive force and moment calculations of 14 Cerebral Palsy and 14 Control subjects. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the different anthropometric sets but variability in the resulting sagittal plane moment calculations between sets was low (0.01-0.07 Nm/kg). In addition, the GDI-Kinetic, used as an outcome variable to assess whether differences were clinically meaningful, indicated no clinically meaningful difference between sets. The results suggest that the effects of using different anthropometric sets on the kinetic profiles of normal and diplegic cerebral palsy subjects are clinically insignificant. PMID:24200337

  18. Indoor formaldehyde removal by thermal catalyst: kinetic characteristics, key parameters, and temperature influence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiujian; Zhang, Yinping; Mo, Jinhan; Li, Xinxiao

    2011-07-01

    Thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO) technology can continuously degrade formaldehyde at room temperature without added energy. However, there is very little knowledge on the TCO kinetic reaction mechanism, which is necessary in developing such air cleaners and in comparison with other air cleaning techniques. This paper addresses the problem of a novel TCO catalyst, Pt/MnO(x)-CeO(2). The experiments measuring the outlet concentrations of formaldehyde and other possible byproducts were conducted at temperatures of 25, 40, 60, 100, and 180 °C and at a series of inlet formaldehyde concentrations (280-3000 ppb). To measure the concentrations precisely and real timely, proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used. We found the following from the experimental results: (1) no byproducts were detected; (2) the bimolecular L-H kinetic model best described the catalytic reaction rate; (3) the activation energy of the oxidation was about 25.8 kJ mol(-1); (4) TCO is most energy efficient at room temperature without auxiliary heating; (5) compared with photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) which needs ultraviolet light radiation, the reaction area of TCO can be much larger for a given volume so that TCO can perform much better not only in formaldehyde removal efficiency but also in energy saving.

  19. Study on the impact of device parameter variations on performance of III-V homojunction and heterojunction tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmat, Maedeh; Kamal, Mehdi; Afzali-Kusha, Ali; Pedram, Massoud

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the impact of physical parameter variations on the electrical characteristics of III-V TFETs is investigated. The study is performed on the operations of two optimized ultra-thin 20 nm double-gate transistors. The two device structures are InAs homojunction TFET and InAs-GaAs0.1Sb0.9 heterojunction TFET. The operation parameters are the ON-current, OFF-current, and threshold voltage. The investigation is performed at the device level, using a device simulator and the Monte-Carlo simulation approach is exploited to extract the distribution of electrical parameters in the presence of the process variation. The results reveal that the operation of the transistor is more sensitive to the doping of the source and gate work function compared to other physical parameters. Furthermore, the heterojunction TFETs show less sensitivity to physical parameter variations compared to the homojunction ones.

  20. High-order total variation-based multiplicative noise removal with spatially adapted parameter selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Xu, Zongben; Lv, Xiao-Guang

    2013-10-01

    Multiplicative noise is one common type of noise in imaging science. For coherent image-acquisition systems, such as synthetic aperture radar, the observed images are often contaminated by multiplicative noise. Total variation (TV) regularization has been widely researched for multiplicative noise removal in the literature due to its edge-preserving feature. However, the TV-based solutions sometimes have an undesirable staircase artifact. In this paper, we propose a model to take advantage of the good nature of the TV norm and high-order TV norm to balance the edge and smoothness region. Besides, we adopt a spatially regularization parameter updating scheme. Numerical results illustrate the efficiency of our method in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio and structure similarity index.

  1. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented. PMID:26619516

  2. Effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Metallorganic chemical-vapor-deposited heteroepitaxial indium phosphide (InP) solar cell experimental results were simulated by using a PC-1D computer model. The effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of n(+)/p/p(+) heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs solar cell was presented. The thinner and lighter doped emitters were observed to offer higher cell efficiencies. The influence of emitter thickness and minority carrier diffusion length on the cell efficiency with respect to dislocation density was studied. Heteroepitaxial cells with efficiencies similar to present day homojunction InP efficiencies (greater than 16 percent AMO) were shown to be attainable if a dislocation density lower than 10(exp 6)/sq cm could be achieved. A realistic optimized design study yielded InP solar cells of over 22 percent AMO efficiency at 25 C.

  3. Effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Metalorganic chemical-vapor-deposited heteroepitaxial indium phosphide (InP) solar cell experimental results were simulated by using a PC-1D computer model. The effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of n(+)/p/p(+) heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs solar cell was presented. The thinner and lighter doped emitters were observed to offer higher cell efficiencies. The influence of emitter thickness and minority carrier diffusion length on the cell efficiency with respect to dislocation density was studied. Heteroepitaxial cells with efficiencies similar to present day homojunction InP efficiencies (greaater than 16 percent AM0) were shown to be attainable if a dislocation density lower than 10(exp 6)/sq cm could be achieved. A realistic optimized design study yielded InP solar cells of over 22 percent AM0 efficiency at 25 C.

  4. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  5. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  6. Variation in available cesium concentration with parameters during temperature induced extraction of cesium from soil.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Durga; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Hisashi; Sato, Mutsuto; Fukuda, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Ryuichi; Kawamoto, Tohru

    2015-02-01

    Cesium extraction behavior of brown forest type soil collected from paddy fields in Fukushima nuclear accident affected areas was studied. In nitric acid or sulfuric acid solutions at elevated temperature, the concentration of Cs in soil available for extraction, m0, has been estimated on the basis of modified canonical equation and the equations derived from assumed equilibria. With the variation in temperature, mixing time, and soil to solvent ratio, the observed m0 values in 0.5 M acid solution ranged between 1.5 and 2.9 mg cesium per kilogram of soil. By increasing the acid concentration to 3 M, the value of m0 could be sharply increased to 5.1 mg/kg even at 95 °C. This variation in the extractable concentration of cesium with the parameters signifies the existence of different binding sites in the soil matrix. The results observed for uncontaminated sample could be reproduced with the radioactive cesium contaminated sample belonging to the same soil group.

  7. Crystallization kinetics of lithium niobate glass: determination of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov parameters.

    PubMed

    Choi, H W; Kim, Y H; Rim, Y H; Yang, Y S

    2013-06-28

    The formation of crystalline LiNbO3 (LN) from LN glass has been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The LN glass with no glass former was prepared by the polymerized complex method. The isothermal kinetics of the crystallization process is described using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation and the Avrami exponent n is found to be ~2.0, indicating that the crystallization mechanism is diffusion-controlled growth with a decreasing nucleation rate. The effective activation energy of crystallization calculated from isothermal measurements is 6.51 eV. It is found that the LN glass directly transforms into a rhombohedral LN crystal without any intermediate crystalline phase and most crystal grains are confined within the size of ~40 nm irrespective of different isothermal temperatures. Application of JMAK theory to the non-isothermal thermoanalytical study of crystallization of LN glass is discussed.

  8. Drug release and its relationship with kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of drug sorption onto starch acetate fibers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weijie; Yang, Yiqi

    2010-03-01

    Drug release and its relationship with kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of drug sorption onto starch acetate (SA) fibers have been studied using Diclofenac, 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), and Metformin as model drugs. The sorption method is more flexible and can avoid limitations or problems which occur with molten or dissolution methods. To understand drug release of sorption loading, kinetic and apparent thermodynamic parameters, such as diffusion coefficient, activation energy for diffusion, affinity, and sorption enthalpy and entropy, have been investigated. The quantitative relationship between drug release and drug-loading concentration, affinity, and activation energy for diffusion has been established to predict the initial burst and subsequent release of the drugs. Up to 12% of Diclofenac, based on the weight of SA, can be loaded onto fibers using the sorption method. Drugs with higher activation energy for diffusion, lower diffusion coefficients, and higher affinity for SA fiber, such as Diclofenac, are more suitable for sorption loading. It has also been found that elevated temperatures will achieve higher loading capacity and a more constant release rate.

  9. [Molecular-kinetic parameters of thiamine enzymes and the mechanism of antivitamin action of hydroxythiamine in animal organisms].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ KuM; Voskoboev, A I; Gorenshtenĭn, B I; Dosta, G A

    1979-09-01

    The molecula-kinetic parameters (Km, Ki) of three thiamine enzymes, e. g. thiamine pyrophosphokinase (EC 2.7.6.2), pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1) and transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) with respect to the effects of the thiamine antimetabolite hydroxythiamine in the whole animal organism have been compared. It has been shown that only the first two enzymes, which interact competitively with the vitamin, antivitamin or their pyrophosphate ethers, obey the kinetic parameters obtained for the purified enzymes in vitro. The anticoenzymic effect of hydroxythiamine pyrophosphate with respect to transketolase is not observed in vivo at maximal concentration of the anticoenzyme in tissues due to the absence of competitive interactions with thiamine pyrophosphate. The incorporation of the true and false coenzymes into transketolase occurs only during de novo transketolase synthesis (the apoform is absent in tissues, with the exception of erythrocytes) and proceeds slowly with a half-life time equal to 24--30 hrs. After a single injection of hydroxythiamine at a large dose (70--400 mg/kg) the maximal inhibition of the transketolase activity in tissues (liver, heart, kidney, muscle, spleen, lungs adrenal grands) manifests itself by the 48th--72nd hour, when the concentration of free hydroxythiamine and its pyrophosphate is minimal and the whole anticoenzyme is tightly bound to the protein, forming the false holoenzyme. The use of hydroxythiamine for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase or transketolase in animal organism is discussed.

  10. Pixel-based approach to assess contrast-enhanced ultrasound kinetics parameters for differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Gaia; Raffeiner, Bernd; Coran, Alessandro; Ciprian, Luca; Fiocco, Ugo; Botsios, Costantino; Stramare, Roberto; Grisan, Enrico

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are the leading causes of disability and constitute a frequent medical disorder, leading to inability to work, high comorbidity, and increased mortality. The standard for diagnosing and differentiating arthritis is based on clinical examination, laboratory exams, and imaging findings, such as synovitis, bone edema, or joint erosions. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) examination of the small joints is emerging as a sensitive tool for assessing vascularization and disease activity. Quantitative assessment is mostly performed at the region of interest level, where the mean intensity curve is fitted with an exponential function. We showed that using a more physiologically motivated perfusion curve, and by estimating the kinetic parameters separately pixel by pixel, the quantitative information gathered is able to more effectively characterize the different perfusion patterns. In particular, we demonstrated that a random forest classifier based on pixelwise quantification of the kinetic contrast agent perfusion features can discriminate rheumatoid arthritis from different arthritis forms (psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, and arthritis in connective tissue disease) with an average accuracy of 97%. On the contrary, clinical evaluation (DAS28), semiquantitative CEUS assessment, serological markers, or region-based parameters do not allow such a high diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27014713

  11. Spatial Variation of the Relationship between PM 2.5 Concentrations and Meteorological Parameters in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gang; Fu, Jingying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Qiao; Dong, Donglin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies around the world have reported that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is closely associated with human health. The distribution of PM2.5 concentrations is influenced by multiple geographic and socioeconomic factors. Using a remote-sensing-derived PM2.5 dataset, this paper explores the relationship between PM2.5 concentrations and meteorological parameters and their spatial variance in China for the period 2001-2010. The spatial variations of the relationships between the annual average PM2.5, the annual average precipitation (AAP), and the annual average temperature (AAT) were evaluated using the Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that PM2.5 had a strong and stable correlation with meteorological parameters. In particular, PM2.5 had a negative correlation with precipitation and a positive correlation with temperature. In addition, the relationship between the variables changed over space, and the strong negative correlation between PM2.5 and the AAP mainly appeared in the warm temperate semihumid region and northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010, with some localized differences. The strong positive correlation between the PM2.5 and the AAT mainly occurred in the mid-temperate semiarid region, the humid, semihumid, and semiarid warm temperate regions, and the northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010. PMID:26295046

  12. Parameter study and optimization for piezoelectric energy harvester for TPMS considering speed variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghi Eshghi, Amin; Lee, Soobum; Lee, Hanmin; Kim, Young-Cheol

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we perform design parameter study and design optimization for a piezoelectric energy harvester considering vehicle speed variation. Initially, a FEM model using ANSYS is developed to appraise the performance of a piezoelectric harvester in a rotating tire. The energy harvester proposed here uses the vertical deformation at contact patch area from the car weight and centrifugal acceleration. This harvester is composed of a beam which is clamped at both ends and a piezoelectric material is attached on the top of that. The piezoelectric material possesses the 31 mode of transduction in which the direction of applied field is perpendicular to that of the electric field. To optimize the harvester performance, we would change the geometrical parameters of the harvester to obtain the maximum power. One of the main challenges in the design process is obtaining the required power while considering the constraints for harvester weight and volume. These two concerns are addressed in this paper. Since the final goal of this study is the development of an energy harvester with a wireless sensor system installed in a real car, the real time data for varied velocity of a vehicle are taken into account for power measurements. This study concludes that the proposed design is applicable to wireless tire sensor systems.

  13. Spatial Variation of the Relationship between PM2.5 Concentrations and Meteorological Parameters in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gang; Fu, Jingying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Qiao; Dong, Donglin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies around the world have reported that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is closely associated with human health. The distribution of PM2.5 concentrations is influenced by multiple geographic and socioeconomic factors. Using a remote-sensing-derived PM2.5 dataset, this paper explores the relationship between PM2.5 concentrations and meteorological parameters and their spatial variance in China for the period 2001–2010. The spatial variations of the relationships between the annual average PM2.5, the annual average precipitation (AAP), and the annual average temperature (AAT) were evaluated using the Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that PM2.5 had a strong and stable correlation with meteorological parameters. In particular, PM2.5 had a negative correlation with precipitation and a positive correlation with temperature. In addition, the relationship between the variables changed over space, and the strong negative correlation between PM2.5 and the AAP mainly appeared in the warm temperate semihumid region and northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010, with some localized differences. The strong positive correlation between the PM2.5 and the AAT mainly occurred in the mid-temperate semiarid region, the humid, semihumid, and semiarid warm temperate regions, and the northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010. PMID:26295046

  14. Spatial Variation of the Relationship between PM 2.5 Concentrations and Meteorological Parameters in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gang; Fu, Jingying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Qiao; Dong, Donglin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies around the world have reported that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is closely associated with human health. The distribution of PM2.5 concentrations is influenced by multiple geographic and socioeconomic factors. Using a remote-sensing-derived PM2.5 dataset, this paper explores the relationship between PM2.5 concentrations and meteorological parameters and their spatial variance in China for the period 2001-2010. The spatial variations of the relationships between the annual average PM2.5, the annual average precipitation (AAP), and the annual average temperature (AAT) were evaluated using the Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that PM2.5 had a strong and stable correlation with meteorological parameters. In particular, PM2.5 had a negative correlation with precipitation and a positive correlation with temperature. In addition, the relationship between the variables changed over space, and the strong negative correlation between PM2.5 and the AAP mainly appeared in the warm temperate semihumid region and northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010, with some localized differences. The strong positive correlation between the PM2.5 and the AAT mainly occurred in the mid-temperate semiarid region, the humid, semihumid, and semiarid warm temperate regions, and the northern subtropical humid region in 2001 and 2010.

  15. Material properties of evolutionary diverse spider silks described by variation in a single structural parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, Rodrigo; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Blackledge, Todd A.; Guinea, Gustavo. V.; Elices, Manuel; Pérez-Rigueiro, José

    2016-01-01

    Spider major ampullate gland silks (MAS) vary greatly in material properties among species but, this variation is shown here to be confined to evolutionary shifts along a single universal performance trajectory. This reveals an underlying design principle that is maintained across large changes in both spider ecology and silk chemistry. Persistence of this design principle becomes apparent after the material properties are defined relative to the true alignment parameter, which describes the orientation and stretching of the protein chains in the silk fiber. Our results show that the mechanical behavior of all Entelegynae major ampullate silk fibers, under any conditions, are described by this single parameter that connects the sequential action of three deformation micromechanisms during stretching: stressing of protein-protein hydrogen bonds, rotation of the β-nanocrystals and growth of the ordered fraction. Conservation of these traits for over 230 million years is an indication of the optimal design of the material and gives valuable clues for the production of biomimetic counterparts based on major ampullate spider silk.

  16. Material properties of evolutionary diverse spider silks described by variation in a single structural parameter

    PubMed Central

    Madurga, Rodrigo; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Blackledge, Todd A.; Guinea, Gustavo.V.; Elices, Manuel; Pérez-Rigueiro, José

    2016-01-01

    Spider major ampullate gland silks (MAS) vary greatly in material properties among species but, this variation is shown here to be confined to evolutionary shifts along a single universal performance trajectory. This reveals an underlying design principle that is maintained across large changes in both spider ecology and silk chemistry. Persistence of this design principle becomes apparent after the material properties are defined relative to the true alignment parameter, which describes the orientation and stretching of the protein chains in the silk fiber. Our results show that the mechanical behavior of all Entelegynae major ampullate silk fibers, under any conditions, are described by this single parameter that connects the sequential action of three deformation micromechanisms during stretching: stressing of protein-protein hydrogen bonds, rotation of the β-nanocrystals and growth of the ordered fraction. Conservation of these traits for over 230 million years is an indication of the optimal design of the material and gives valuable clues for the production of biomimetic counterparts based on major ampullate spider silk. PMID:26755434

  17. Performance Analysis of SISFCL with the Variation of Circuit Parameters using Jiles Atherton Hysteresis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debraj; Roy, Debabrata; Choudhury, Amalendu Bikash; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2016-08-01

    In modern day power systems, fault current limiters (FCL) are used to provide protection from high fault currents in the event of electrical faults and thus help to deliver uninterrupted electric supply to the consumers. Several technologies of FCLs are available for practical usage. However, the saturated iron-core superconducting fault current limiter (SISFCL) has gained a lot of attention in recent years in view of its ability to offer very low impedance during normal operation and high impedance during faulted condition. Previous mathematical models defining the performance of the device employs a simple BH curve. But as the change in mathematical state of saturation and unsaturation is important for the operation of the device, the paper investigates the responses considering the effects of magnetic hysteresis utilising the Jiles Atherton hysteresis model. Further the performance of the device is analysed with the variations of different parameters viz., the fault resistance magnitude, DC bias current, number of turns of the AC winding and number of turns of the DC winding that portray the effectiveness of the parameters encouraging an optimal design of the limiter.

  18. On the optimal use of fictitious time in variation of parameters methods with application to BG14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    The optimal way to use fictitious time in variation of parameter methods is presented. Setting fictitious time to zero at the end of each step is shown to cure the instability associated with some types of problems. Only some parameters are reinitialized, thereby retaining redundant information.

  19. Variations in the elemental ratio of organic matter in the central Baltic Sea: Part II - Sensitivities of annual mass flux estimates to model parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreus, Markus; Schartau, Markus

    2015-06-01

    This study describes a sensitivity analysis that allows the parameters of a one-dimensional ecosystem model to be ranked according to their specificity in determining biochemical key fluxes. Key fluxes of interest are annual (a) total production (TP), (b) remineralization above the halocline (RM), and (c) export at 50 m (EX) at the Baltic Sea monitoring site BY15 located in the Gotland Deep basin. The model resolves mass flux of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorous (P), while considering nitrogen fixation explicitly. Our first null hypothesis is that the variation of the value of every single model parameter affects each annual C, N, and P budget simultaneously. Our second null hypothesis states that the variation of every parameter value induces changes at least in either of the annual C, N or P budgets. Our analyses falsify both null hypotheses and reveal that 8 out of 36 parameters must be regarded redundant, as their variation neither alter annual key fluxes nor produce considerable time-shifts in model trajectories at the respective site. Seven parameters were found to induce substantial changes in annual C, N, and P flux estimates simultaneously. The assimilation efficiency of zooplankton turned out to be of vital importance. This parameter discriminates between the assimilation and destruction of algal prey during grazing. The fraction of unassimilated dead algal cells is critical for the amount of organic matter exported out of the euphotic zone. The maximum cellular N:C quota of diazotrophs and the degradation/hydrolysis rate of detrital carbon are two parameters that will likely remain unconstrained by time series data, but both affect the annual C budget considerably. Overall, our detailed specification of model sensitivities to parameter variations will facilitate the formulation of a well-posed inverse problem for the estimation of C, N and P fluxes from stock observations at the Gotland Deep.

  20. Association of parameter, software, and hardware variation with large-scale behavior across 57,000 climate models.

    PubMed

    Knight, Christopher G; Knight, Sylvia H E; Massey, Neil; Aina, Tolu; Christensen, Carl; Frame, Dave J; Kettleborough, Jamie A; Martin, Andrew; Pascoe, Stephen; Sanderson, Ben; Stainforth, David A; Allen, Myles R

    2007-07-24

    In complex spatial models, as used to predict the climate response to greenhouse gas emissions, parameter variation within plausible bounds has major effects on model behavior of interest. Here, we present an unprecedentedly large ensemble of >57,000 climate model runs in which 10 parameters, initial conditions, hardware, and software used to run the model all have been varied. We relate information about the model runs to large-scale model behavior (equilibrium sensitivity of global mean temperature to a doubling of carbon dioxide). We demonstrate that effects of parameter, hardware, and software variation are detectable, complex, and interacting. However, we find most of the effects of parameter variation are caused by a small subset of parameters. Notably, the entrainment coefficient in clouds is associated with 30% of the variation seen in climate sensitivity, although both low and high values can give high climate sensitivity. We demonstrate that the effect of hardware and software is small relative to the effect of parameter variation and, over the wide range of systems tested, may be treated as equivalent to that caused by changes in initial conditions. We discuss the significance of these results in relation to the design and interpretation of climate modeling experiments and large-scale modeling more generally.

  1. Kinetic Modeling and Parameter Estimation in a Tower Bioreactor for Bioethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Elmer Ccopa; da Costa, Aline Carvalho; Lunelli, Betânia Hoss; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Filho, Rubens Maciel

    In this work, a systematic method to support the building of bioprocess models through the use of different optimization techniques is presented. The method was applied to a tower bioreactor for bioethanol production with immobilized cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, a step-by-step procedure to the estimation problem is proposed. As the first step, the potential of global searching of real-coded genetic algorithm (RGA) was applied for simultaneous estimation of the parameters. Subsequently, the most significant parameters were identified using the Placket-Burman (PB) design. Finally, the quasi-Newton algorithm (QN) was used for optimization of the most significant parameters, near the global optimum region, as the initial values were already determined by the RGA global-searching algorithm. The results have shown that the performance of the estimation procedure applied in a deterministic detailed model to describe the experimental data is improved using the proposed method (RGA-PB-QN) in comparison with a model whose parameters were only optimized by RGA.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of large system of chemical kinetic parameters for engine combustion simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, H; Sanz-Argent, J; Petitpas, G; Havstad, M; Flowers, D

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the authors applied the state-of-the art sensitivity methods to downselect system parameters from 4000+ to 8, (23000+ -> 4000+ -> 84 -> 8). This analysis procedure paves the way for future works: (1) calibrate the system response using existed experimental observations, and (2) predict future experiment results, using the calibrated system.

  3. Gender bias on the effects of instruction on kinematic and kinetic jump parameters of high-level athletes.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Mark S; Waters, Jeff; Kersting, Uwe G

    2007-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine gender differences during drop jumps, to evaluate the effect of a set of simple instructions on kinematic and kinetic parameters during a drop jump, and to determine if there are gender differences in the effects of instruction on those parameters. Twenty-five basketball players, 13 men and 12 women, performed drop jumps from a box (height 30.5 cm) after being asked to perform a land and jump movement as they normally would do when aiming at maximum jump height. The experimental group received a set of instructions designed to make them land softer. The measured parameters were impact force at landing, ground contact time, flight time, frontal plane knee angle, sagittal plane knee angle, and distance between the knees. When the groups were examined by gender, no differences in the parameters were seen in men after instruction, but in women the following significant differences were detected: an increase in contact time, a decrease in landing force, and a decrease in inward movement of the knees after landing. These data indicate that females respond differently to jumping/landing instructions.

  4. Chemical mechanism of lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. pH-dependence of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gil, J; Martín, J; Acebal, C; Arche, R

    1990-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyses two reactions: hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine and transacylation between two molecules of lysophosphatidylcholine to give disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Following the kinetic model previously proposed for this enzyme [Martín, Pérez-Gil, Acebal & Arche (1990) Biochem. J. 266, 47-53], the values of essential pK values in free enzyme and substrate-enzyme complexes have now been determined. The chemical mechanism of catalysis was dependent on the deprotonation of a histidine residue with pK about 5.7. This result was supported by the perturbation of pK values by addition of organic solvent. Very high and exothermic enthalpy of ionization was measured, indicating that a conformational re-arrangement in the enzyme accompanies the ionization of the essential histidine residue. These results, as well as the results from previous studies, enabled the proposal of a chemical mechanism for the enzymic reactions catalysed by lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. PMID:2241908

  5. Kinetic parameters and relative turnovers of some important catabolic reactions in digesting sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, H F; Wuhrmann, K

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of propionate degradation, acetate splitting, and hydrogen consumption in digesting sludge were investigated in a lab-scale digester. At natural steady-state conditions, the acetate-splitting systems in well-digested sludge were about half saturated. Propionate-degrading systems were saturated to only 10 to 15%, and hydrogen removal was less than 1% of the maximum possible rate. It was concluded that acetate splitting rather than "methanogenesis from fatty acids" is the rate-limiting reaction in the anaerobic degradation of dissolved organic matter and that a methoanogenic anaerobic ecosystem is stabilized by its large unused capacity of hydrogen consumption which is "buffering" the partial pressure of dissolved hydrogen in the system at sufficiently low values to permit rapid fatty acid oxidation. A tentative scheme of the substrate flow in sludge digestion is presented. It suggests that acid formation coupled with hydrogen formation via pyridine dinucleotide oxidation yields the immediate substrates, namely acetate and hydrogen, for about 54% of the total methanogenesis. PMID:697354

  6. Temperature Effects on Kinetic Parameters and Substrate Affinity of Cel7A Cellobiohydrolases*

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Badino, Silke Flindt; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We measured hydrolytic rates of four purified cellulases in small increments of temperature (10–50 °C) and substrate loads (0–100 g/liter) and analyzed the data by a steady state kinetic model that accounts for the processive mechanism. We used wild type cellobiohydrolases (Cel7A) from mesophilic Hypocrea jecorina and thermophilic Rasamsonia emersonii and two variants of these enzymes designed to elucidate the role of the carbohydrate binding module (CBM). We consistently found that the maximal rate increased strongly with temperature, whereas the affinity for the insoluble substrate decreased, and as a result, the effect of temperature depended strongly on the substrate load. Thus, temperature had little or no effect on the hydrolytic rate in dilute substrate suspensions, whereas strong temperature activation (Q10 values up to 2.6) was observed at saturating substrate loads. The CBM had a dual effect on the activity. On one hand, it diminished the tendency of heat-induced desorption, but on the other hand, it had a pronounced negative effect on the maximal rate, which was 2-fold larger in variants without CBM throughout the investigated temperature range. We conclude that although the CBM is beneficial for affinity it slows down the catalytic process. Cel7A from the thermophilic organism was moderately more activated by temperature than the mesophilic analog. This is in accord with general theories on enzyme temperature adaptation and possibly relevant information for the selection of technical cellulases. PMID:26183777

  7. Temperature Effects on Kinetic Parameters and Substrate Affinity of Cel7A Cellobiohydrolases.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Badino, Silke Flindt; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-09-01

    We measured hydrolytic rates of four purified cellulases in small increments of temperature (10-50 °C) and substrate loads (0-100 g/liter) and analyzed the data by a steady state kinetic model that accounts for the processive mechanism. We used wild type cellobiohydrolases (Cel7A) from mesophilic Hypocrea jecorina and thermophilic Rasamsonia emersonii and two variants of these enzymes designed to elucidate the role of the carbohydrate binding module (CBM). We consistently found that the maximal rate increased strongly with temperature, whereas the affinity for the insoluble substrate decreased, and as a result, the effect of temperature depended strongly on the substrate load. Thus, temperature had little or no effect on the hydrolytic rate in dilute substrate suspensions, whereas strong temperature activation (Q10 values up to 2.6) was observed at saturating substrate loads. The CBM had a dual effect on the activity. On one hand, it diminished the tendency of heat-induced desorption, but on the other hand, it had a pronounced negative effect on the maximal rate, which was 2-fold larger in variants without CBM throughout the investigated temperature range. We conclude that although the CBM is beneficial for affinity it slows down the catalytic process. Cel7A from the thermophilic organism was moderately more activated by temperature than the mesophilic analog. This is in accord with general theories on enzyme temperature adaptation and possibly relevant information for the selection of technical cellulases. PMID:26183777

  8. Ethylene vinyl acetate based radiation grafted hydrophilic matrices: Process parameter standardization, grafting kinetics and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Mondal, R. K.; Dubey, K. A.; Grover, V.; Panicker, L.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Varshney, L.

    2016-08-01

    A transparent, elastomeric, grafted matrix for several potential applications was synthesized by single-step simultaneous radiation grafting of methacrylic acid onto ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). CuSO4 was found to be the most suitable homo-polymerization inhibitor among different inhibitors tried. The grafting kinetics was found to be a strong function of dose rate (D) and monomer content (M) and an equation relating grafting rate Rg=Kg [M]1.13D0.23 was deduced. Crystallinity of the grafted matrices as assessed from XRD and DSC measurements indicated decrease in crystalline content with increase in grafting yield, suggesting crystalline domain of EVA get disrupted on grafting. Elastic modulus increased linearly with the increase in grafting yield, though elongation at break decreased precipitously from 900% to 30% at even ~9% grafting. Thermo-gravimetric analysis showed three step weight loss of the grafted EVA matrix. The grafting of MAA resulted in increase in surface energy mainly due to enhanced polar component.

  9. Treatment of biodiesel wastewater by adsorption with commercial chitosan flakes: parameter optimization and process kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pitakpoolsil, Wipawan; Hunsom, Mali

    2014-01-15

    The possibility of using commercial chitosan flakes as an adsorbent for the removal of pollutants from biodiesel wastewater was evaluated. The effect of varying the adsorption time (0.5-5 h), initial wastewater pH (2-8), adsorbent dose (0.5-5.5 g/L) and mixing rate (120-350 rpm) on the efficiency of pollutant removal was explored by univariate analysis. Under the derived optimal conditions, greater than 59.3%, 87.9% and 66.2% of the biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and oil & grease, respectively, was removed by a single adsorption. Nevertheless, the remaining BOD, COD and oil & grease were still higher than the acceptable Thai government limits for discharge into the environment. When the treatment was repeated, a greater than 93.6%, 97.6% and 95.8% removal of the BOD, COD and oil & grease, respectively, was obtained. The reusability of commercial chitosan following NaOH washing (0.05-0.2 M) was not suitable, with less than 40% efficiency after just one recycling and declining rapidly thereafter. The adsorption kinetics of all pollutant types by the commercial chitosan flakes was controlled by a mixed process of diffusion and adsorption of the pollutants during the early treatment period (0-1.5 h) and then solely controlled by adsorption after 2 h.

  10. Kinetics Parameters of VVER-1000 Core with 3 MOX Lead Test Assemblies To Be Used for Accident Analysis Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2000-03-08

    The present work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactor and presents the neutronics calculations of kinetics parameters of VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs. MOX LTA design has been studied in [1] for two options of MOX LTA: 100% plutonium and of ''island'' type. As a result, zoning i.e. fissile plutonium enrichments in different plutonium zones, has been defined. VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs of chosen design has been calculated in [2]. In present work, the neutronics data for transient analysis codes (RELAP [3]) has been obtained using the codes chain of RRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' [5] that is to be used for exploitation neutronics calculations of VVER. Nowadays the 3D assembly-by-assembly code BIPR-7A and 2D pin-by-pin code PERMAK-A, both with the neutronics constants prepared by the cell code TVS-M, are the base elements of this chain. It should be reminded that in [6] TVS-M was used only for the constants calculations of MOX FAs. In current calculations the code TVS-M has been used both for UOX and MOX fuel constants. Besides, the volume of presented information has been increased and additional explications have been included. The results for the reference uranium core [4] are presented in Chapter 2. The results for the core with 3 MOX LTAs are presented in Chapter 3. The conservatism that is connected with neutronics parameters and that must be taken into account during transient analysis calculations, is discussed in Chapter 4. The conservative parameters values are considered to be used in 1-point core kinetics models of accident analysis codes.

  11. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  12. Physical parameters and orbital period variation of a newly discovered cataclysmic variable GSC 4560–02157

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhong-Tao; Qian, Sheng-Bang; Voloshina, Irina; Metlov, Vladimir G.; Zhu, Li-Ying; Li, Lin-Jia

    2016-10-01

    GSC 4560–02157 is a new eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 0.265359 days. By using the published V ‑ and R ‑ band data together with our observations, we discovered that the O ‑ C curve of GSC 4560–02157 may show a cyclic variation with a period of 3.51 years and an amplitude of 1.40 min. If this variation is caused by a light travel-time effect via the existence of a third body, then its mass can be derived as M 3 sin i' ≈ 91.08 M Jup, and it should be a low-mass star. In addition, several physical parameters were measured. The color of the secondary star was determined to be V ‑ R = 0.77(±0.03) which corresponds to a spectral type of K2–3. The secondary star's mass was estimated as M 2 = 0.73(±0.02) M ⊙ by combing the derived V ‑ R value around phase 0 with the assumption that it obeys the mass-luminosity relation for main sequence stars. This mass is consistent with the mass—period relation for CV donor stars. For the white dwarf, the eclipse durations and contacts of the white dwarf yield an upper limit on the white dwarf's radius corresponding to a lower limit on mass of M 1 ≈ 0.501 M ⊙. The overestimated radius and previously published spectral data indicate that the boundary layer may have a very high temperature.

  13. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters.

    PubMed

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-10-13

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height.

  14. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters.

    PubMed

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-10-13

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  15. Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM): description and sensitivity to some estimated kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraborrelli, Domenico; Cabrera Perez, David; Sander, Rolf; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Despite decades of reasearch, global atmospheric chemistry models still have significant biases compared to the estimated distribution and evolution of tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical. The gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is acknowledged to play an important role among the processes affecting tropospheric ozone, methane lifetime and aerosol evolution. Thus, chemical mechanisms of very diverse complexity have been developed for the major VOCs. However, all mechanisms present shortcomings such as neglection or lumping of intermediates and estimate of many rate constants and product distributions. Here, we present a VOC oxidation mechanism of intermediate complexity called the Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM). With about 400 species and 1500 reactions, it represents the oxidation of about 20 primarily emitted VOCs comprising small alkanes and alkenes, isoprene, pinenes and monocyclic aromatic compounds. The development protocol significantly borrows from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). However, MOM distinguishes itself for a number of features. First, the structure activity relationship for estimating the rate constants involving hydroxyl radical is site-specific and dependent on temperature. Second, the alkyl nitrate yields are considered to be dependent on temperature, pressure and molecular structure. RO2 + HO2 reaction kinetics is consistent with the recent direct studies of \\chem{OH}-reformation. Isoprene chemistry includes the latest experimental advancements with respect to OH-recycling and alkyl nitrate chemistry. Pinenes chemistry is largely the one by the MCM but with some modifications according to the work of the Leuven's group. Finally, the chemistry of the aromatics is also borrowed from the MCM but with additional photolysis of ortho-nitrophenols leading to \\chem{HONO} formation. The sensitivity of the model to the temperature and pressure dependence of estimated \\chem{OH} rate constants and alkyl nitrate yields will

  16. High-resolution gene expression profiling for simultaneous kinetic parameter analysis of RNA synthesis and decay.

    PubMed

    Dölken, Lars; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Rädle, Bernd; Friedel, Caroline C; Zimmer, Ralf; Mages, Jörg; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Ghazal, Peter; Koszinowski, Ulrich H

    2008-09-01

    RNA levels in a cell are determined by the relative rates of RNA synthesis and decay. State-of-the-art transcriptional analyses only employ total cellular RNA. Therefore, changes in RNA levels cannot be attributed to RNA synthesis or decay, and temporal resolution is poor. Recently, it was reported that newly transcribed RNA can be biosynthetically labeled for 1-2 h using thiolated nucleosides, purified from total cellular RNA and subjected to microarray analysis. However, in order to study signaling events at molecular level, analysis of changes occurring within minutes is required. We developed an improved approach to separate total cellular RNA into newly transcribed and preexisting RNA following 10-15 min of metabolic labeling. Employing new computational tools for array normalization and half-life determination we simultaneously study short-term RNA synthesis and decay as well as their impact on cellular transcript levels. As an example we studied the response of fibroblasts to type I and II interferons (IFN). Analysis of RNA transcribed within 15-30 min at different times during the first three hours of interferon-receptor activation resulted in a >10-fold increase in microarray sensitivity and provided a comprehensive profile of the kinetics of IFN-mediated changes in gene expression. We identify a previously undisclosed highly connected network of short-lived transcripts selectively down-regulated by IFNgamma in between 30 and 60 min after IFN treatment showing strong associations with cell cycle and apoptosis, indicating novel mechanisms by which IFNgamma affects these pathways.

  17. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) < or = [MA]0 < or = 4.30 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)) in the presence of bromate (6.20 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)), bromide (1.50 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3)), sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  18. Deciphering the impact of parameters influencing transgene expression kinetics after repeated cell transduction with integration-deficient retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Jaeschke, Nico M; Hoffmann, Dirk; Maetzig, Tobias; Ballmaier, Matthias; Godinho, Tamaryin; Cathomen, Toni; Schambach, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors are state-of-the-art tools for transgene expression within target cells. The integration of these vectors can be deliberately suppressed to derive a transient gene expression system based on extrachromosomal circular episomes with intact coding regions. These episomes can be used to deliver DNA templates and to express RNA or protein. Importantly, transient gene transfer avoids the genotoxic side effects of integrating vectors. Restricting their applicability, episomes are rapidly lost upon dilution in dividing target cells. Addressing this limitation, we could establish comparably stable percentages of transgene-positive cells over prolonged time periods in proliferating cells by repeated transductions. Flow cytometry was applied for kinetic analyses to decipher the impact of individual parameters on the kinetics of fluoroprotein expression after episomal retransduction and to visualize sequential and simultaneous transfer of heterologous fluoroproteins. Expression windows could be exactly timed by the number of transduction steps. The kinetics of signal loss was affected by the cell proliferation rate. The transfer of genes encoding fluoroproteins with different half-lives revealed a major impact of protein stability on temporal signal distribution and accumulation, determining optimal retransduction intervals. In addition, sequential transductions proved broad applicability in different cell types and using different envelope pseudotypes without receptor overload. Stable percentages of cells coexpressing multiple transgenes could be generated upon repeated coadministration of different episomal vectors. Alternatively, defined patterns of transgene expression could be recapitulated by sequential transductions. Altogether, we established a methodology to control and adjust a temporally defined window of transgene expression using retroviral episomal vectors. Combined with the highly efficient cell entry of these vectors while

  19. Determination of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that describe isothermal seed germination: A student research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hageseth, Gaylord T.

    1982-02-01

    Students under the supervision of a faculty member can collect data and fit the data to the theoretical mathematical model that describes the rate of isothermal seed germination. The best-fit parameters are interpreted as an initial substrate concentration, product concentration, and the autocatalytic reaction rate. The thermodynamic model enables one to calculate the activation energy for the substrate and product, the activation energy for the autocatalytic reaction, and changes in enthalpy, entropy, and the Gibb's free energy. Turnip, lettuce, soybean, and radish seeds have been investigated. All data fit the proposed model.

  20. Removal of Anionic Dyes from Water by Potash Alum Doped Polyaniline: Investigation of Kinetics and Thermodynamic Parameters of Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Patra, Braja N; Majhi, Deola

    2015-06-25

    Polyaniline was synthesized by the oxidative polymerization method by using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The positive charge in the backbone of the polymer was generated by using Potash alum as a dopant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for characterization of doped polyaniline. The doped polyaniline can be used for selective adsorption of various dyes (selectively sulfonated dyes) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies regarding the effect of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, doses of adsorbent, and temperature on adsorption kinetics were investigated. The influence of other anions like Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) on the adsorption density of dyes onto doped polyaniline was also explored. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics were found to be the most appropriate models to describe the removal of anionic dyes from water through adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and entropy (ΔS(0)) changes were also evaluated. The interaction of dyes with doped polyaniline was also investigated by FTIR and UV spectroscopy. PMID:26079693

  1. Removal of Anionic Dyes from Water by Potash Alum Doped Polyaniline: Investigation of Kinetics and Thermodynamic Parameters of Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Patra, Braja N; Majhi, Deola

    2015-06-25

    Polyaniline was synthesized by the oxidative polymerization method by using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The positive charge in the backbone of the polymer was generated by using Potash alum as a dopant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for characterization of doped polyaniline. The doped polyaniline can be used for selective adsorption of various dyes (selectively sulfonated dyes) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies regarding the effect of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, doses of adsorbent, and temperature on adsorption kinetics were investigated. The influence of other anions like Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) on the adsorption density of dyes onto doped polyaniline was also explored. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics were found to be the most appropriate models to describe the removal of anionic dyes from water through adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and entropy (ΔS(0)) changes were also evaluated. The interaction of dyes with doped polyaniline was also investigated by FTIR and UV spectroscopy.

  2. Simple Penalties on Maximum-Likelihood Estimates of Genetic Parameters to Reduce Sampling Variation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Multivariate estimates of genetic parameters are subject to substantial sampling variation, especially for smaller data sets and more than a few traits. A simple modification of standard, maximum-likelihood procedures for multivariate analyses to estimate genetic covariances is described, which can improve estimates by substantially reducing their sampling variances. This is achieved by maximizing the likelihood subject to a penalty. Borrowing from Bayesian principles, we propose a mild, default penalty-derived assuming a Beta distribution of scale-free functions of the covariance components to be estimated-rather than laboriously attempting to determine the stringency of penalization from the data. An extensive simulation study is presented, demonstrating that such penalties can yield very worthwhile reductions in loss, i.e., the difference from population values, for a wide range of scenarios and without distorting estimates of phenotypic covariances. Moreover, mild default penalties tend not to increase loss in difficult cases and, on average, achieve reductions in loss of similar magnitude to computationally demanding schemes to optimize the degree of penalization. Pertinent details required for the adaptation of standard algorithms to locate the maximum of the likelihood function are outlined.

  3. Numerical estimation of the noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters variance and coefficient of variation of residence times.

    PubMed

    Purves, R D

    1994-02-01

    Noncompartmental investigation of the distribution of residence times from concentration-time data requires estimation of the second noncentral moment (AUM2C) as well as the area under the curve (AUC) and the area under the moment curve (AUMC). The accuracy and precision of 12 numerical integration methods for AUM2C were tested on simulated noisy data sets representing bolus, oral, and infusion concentration-time profiles. The root-mean-squared errors given by the best methods were only slightly larger than the corresponding errors in the estimation of AUC and AUMC. AUM2C extrapolated "tail" areas as estimated from a log-linear fit are biased, but the bias is minimized by application of a simple correction factor. The precision of estimates of variance of residence times (VRT) can be severely impaired by the variance of the extrapolated tails. VRT is therefore not a useful parameter unless the tail areas are small or can be shown to be estimated with little error. Estimates of the coefficient of variation of residence times (CVRT) and its square (CV2) are robust in the sense of being little affected by errors in the concentration values. The accuracy of estimates of CVRT obtained by optimum numerical methods is equal to or better than that of AUC and mean residence time estimates, even in data sets with large tail areas.

  4. Parameter-specific electronic measurement and analysis of sources of variation using ring oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lynn T.-N.; Pang, Liang-Teck; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Nikolić, Borivoje

    2009-03-01

    Parameter-specific and simulation-calibrated ring oscillator (RO) inverter layouts are described for identifying and quantitatively modeling sources of circuit performance variation from source/drain stress, shallow trench isolation (STI) stress, lithography, etch, and misalignment. This paper extends the RO approach by adding physical modeling/simulation of the sources of variability to tune the layouts of monitors for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Poly and diffusion layout choices have been guided by fast-CAD pattern matching. The accuracy of the fast-CAD estimate from the Pattern Matcher for these lithography issues is corroborated by simulations in Mentor Graphics Calibre. Generic conceptual results are given based on the experience from preparing of proprietary layouts that pass DRC check for a 45 nm test chip with ST Micro. Typical improvements in sensitivity of 2 fold are possible with layouts for lithography focus. A layout monitor for poly to diffusion misalignment based on programmable off-sets shows a 0.8% change in RO frequency per 1nm poly to diffusion off-set. Layouts are also described for characterizing stress effects associated with diffusion area size, asymmetry, vertical spacing, and multiple gate lengths.

  5. Variation in climate sensitivity and feedback parameters during the historical period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, J. M.; Andrews, T.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the climate feedback parameter α (W m-2 K-1) during the historical period (since 1871) in experiments using the HadGEM2 and HadCM3 atmosphere general circulation models (AGCMs) with constant preindustrial atmospheric composition and time-dependent observational sea surface temperature (SST) and sea ice boundary conditions. In both AGCMs, for the historical period as a whole, the effective climate sensitivity is ˜2 K (α≃1.7 W m-2 K-1), and α shows substantial decadal variation caused by the patterns of SST change. Both models agree with the AGCMs of the latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Project in showing a considerably smaller effective climate sensitivity of ˜1.5 K (α = 2.3 ± 0.7 W m-2 K-1), given the time-dependent changes in sea surface conditions observed during 1979-2008, than the corresponding coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) give under constant quadrupled CO2 concentration. These findings help to relieve the apparent contradiction between the larger values of effective climate sensitivity diagnosed from AOGCMs and the smaller values inferred from historical climate change.

  6. Spatial and temporal variations of reddening parameters toward HII regions in the Milky Way galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Alvarez, Carlos A.

    The purpose of this thesis is to determine if the value of the total-to-selective extinction ratio, RV, has spatial and temporal variations as dust is modified by UV photons. Historically this value has been assumed to be 3.1 after averaging the values along different sightlines in the Milky Way Galaxy. This work will also demonstrate, that for areas of recent star formation with heavy extinction a proper study can not be done when assuming the nominal value, but a local value of RV must first be determined. For this purpose I will analyze the reddening parameters RV and A V toward the massive cluster Westerlund 2 and several mid-IR bubbles located in the G38.91-0.42 complex. Three reddening laws that made different assumptions about RV are applied to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the observed stars. These SEDs are compared to the available optical and IR photometry searching for the RV and AV that minimizes the chi 2 of the fit.

  7. Variation in biochemical parameters in different parts of potato tubers for processing purposes.

    PubMed

    Bandana; Sharma, Vineet; Kaushik, S K; Singh, Brajesh; Raigond, Pinky

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to estimate the variation in bio-chemical parameters among eight different parts viz. bud end cortex, bud end medulla, central cortex, central medulla, pith, stem end cortex, stem end medulla and peel of potato tuber of processing varieties. Concentration of dry matter, reducing sugar, sucrose and starch content were higher in cortical region than in medullar region of stem end, bud end and central portion. Variety Kufri Chipsona-1 had maximum dry matter content in stem end cortex (SEC 30.34 %), followed by Kufri Frysona (SEC 27.71 %). Mean reducing sugar values were comparatively more in bud end cortex (BEC 111.3 mg/100 g Fresh Weight) and lowest in stem end medulla (SEM 44.05 mg/100 g FW). Bio-chemical contents varied considerably within different parts of tuber as well as in different genotypes. The information generated in this study can help processors for effective utilization of potato for various types of processing products viz., chips and French fries. PMID:27413232

  8. Variation in biochemical parameters in different parts of potato tubers for processing purposes.

    PubMed

    Bandana; Sharma, Vineet; Kaushik, S K; Singh, Brajesh; Raigond, Pinky

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to estimate the variation in bio-chemical parameters among eight different parts viz. bud end cortex, bud end medulla, central cortex, central medulla, pith, stem end cortex, stem end medulla and peel of potato tuber of processing varieties. Concentration of dry matter, reducing sugar, sucrose and starch content were higher in cortical region than in medullar region of stem end, bud end and central portion. Variety Kufri Chipsona-1 had maximum dry matter content in stem end cortex (SEC 30.34 %), followed by Kufri Frysona (SEC 27.71 %). Mean reducing sugar values were comparatively more in bud end cortex (BEC 111.3 mg/100 g Fresh Weight) and lowest in stem end medulla (SEM 44.05 mg/100 g FW). Bio-chemical contents varied considerably within different parts of tuber as well as in different genotypes. The information generated in this study can help processors for effective utilization of potato for various types of processing products viz., chips and French fries.

  9. Micropollutant biotransformation kinetics associate with WWTP process parameters and microbial community characteristics.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Honti, Mark; Fenner, Kathrin

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this work was to identify relevant wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) parameters and underlying microbial processes that influence the biotransformation of a diverse set of micropollutants. To do this, we determined biotransformation rate constants for ten organic micropollutants in batch reactors seeded with activated sludge from ten diverse WWTPs. The estimated biotransformation rate constants for each compound ranged between one and four orders of magnitude among the ten WWTPs. The biotransformation rate constants were tested for statistical associations with various WWTP process parameters, amoA transcript abundance, and acetylene-inhibited monooxygenase activity. We determined that (i) ammonia removal associates with oxidative micropollutant biotransformation reaction rates; (ii) archaeal but not bacterial amoA transcripts associate with both ammonia removal and oxidative micropollutant biotransformation reaction rates; and (iii) the activity of acetylene-inhibited monooxygenases (including ammonia monooxygenase) associates with ammonia removal and the biotransformation rate of isoproturon, but does not associate with all oxidative micropollutant biotransformations. In combination, these results lead to the conclusion that ammonia removal and amoA transcript abundance can potentially be predictors of oxidative micropollutant biotransformation reactions, but that the biochemical mechanism is not necessarily linked to ammonia monooxygenase activity. PMID:22938719

  10. Thermoluminescence dosimetry properties and kinetic parameters of lithium potassium borate glass co-doped with titanium and magnesium oxides.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Alajerami, Y S M; Ramli, A T; Ghoshal, S K; Saleh, M A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Saripan, M I; Alzimami, K; Bradley, D A; Mhareb, M H A

    2014-09-01

    Lithium potassium borate (LKB) glasses co-doped with TiO2 and MgO were prepared using the melt quenching technique. The glasses were cut into transparent chips and exposed to gamma rays of (60)Co to study their thermoluminescence (TL) properties. The TL glow curve of the Ti-doped material featured a single prominent peak at 230 °C. Additional incorporation of MgO as a co-activator enhanced the TL intensity threefold. LKB:Ti,Mg is a low-Z material (Z(eff)=8.89) with slow signal fading. Its radiation sensitivity is 12 times lower that the sensitivity of TLD-100. The dose response is linear at doses up to 10(3) Gy. The trap parameters, such as the kinetics order, activation energy, and frequency factor, which are related to the glow peak, were determined using TolAnal software.

  11. Determination of kinetic parameters of crystal growth rate of borax in aqueous solution by using the rotating disc technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Omer; Aslan, Fevzi; Ozdemir, Mustafa; Durgun, Mustafa

    2004-10-01

    Growth rate of polycrystalline disc of borax compressed at different pressure and rotated at various speed has been measured in a rotating disc crystallizer under well-defined conditions of supersaturation. It was found that the mass transfer coefficient, K, increased while overall growth rate constant, Kg, and surface reaction constant, kr, decreased with increasing smoothness of the disc. It was also determined that kinetic parameters (kr , r , K , g) of crystal growth rate of borax decreased with increasing rotating speed of the polycrystalline disc. The effectiveness factor was calculated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitude of the steps in series bulk diffusion through the mass transfer boundary layer and the surface integration. At low rotating speed of disc, the crystal growth rate of borax is mainly controlled by integration. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth rate of borax at higher rotating speed of polycrystalline disc.

  12. Multidimensional Voice Program (MDVP) and amplitude variation parameters in euphonic adult subjects. Normative study.

    PubMed

    Nicastri, M; Chiarella, G; Gallo, L V; Catalano, M; Cassandro, E

    2004-12-01

    The introduction, in the late 70s, of the first digital spectrograph (DSP Sonograph) by Kay Elemetrics has improved the possibilities of spectroacoustic voice analysis in the clinical field. Thanks to the marketing, in 1993, of the Multi Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) advanced system, it is now possible to analyse 33 quantitative voice parameters which, in turn, allow evaluation of fundamental frequency, amplitude and spectral energy balance and the presence of any sonority gap and diplophony. Despite its potentials, the above-mentioned system is not widely used yet, partly on account of the lack of a standard procedure. Indeed, there are still only a few case reports in the literature taking into consideration prescriptive aspects related both to procedure and analysis. This study aims to provide the results of amplitude perturbation parameter analysis in euphonic adult patients. In our opinion, these are the most significant parameters in determining the severity of a phonation disorder. The study has been carried out on 35 patients (24 female, 11 male, mean age 31.6 years, range 19-59). The voice signal has been recorded using a 4300 B Kay Computer Speech Lab (CSL) supported by a personal computer including a SM48 Shure-Prolog microphone located at a distance of 15 cm and angled at 45 degrees. Input microphone saturation has been adjusted to 6/9 of the CH1 channel. The voice sample consisted in a held /a/ and the analysis has been carried out on the central 3 seconds of the recording. The analysis has been carried out using a 5105 MDVP software version 2.3 and the signal digitalised at a 50 kHz sample rate. In order for the sample to be as free from intensity or frequency changes as possible, each patient underwent a training session (including at least 3 phonation tests) before the recording. The study included only emissions between 55 and 65 dB and with spectrum stability. Environmental noise has constantly been monitored and maintained below 30 dB. Data

  13. Estimation of Hoffman-Lauritzen parameters from nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of PET/MWCNT nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonkar, Amita; Murudkar, Vrishali; Deshpande, V. D.

    2016-05-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and Nucleated PET/ multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposites with different MWCNTs loadings were prepared by melt compounding. The influence of the addition of MWCNTs and precipitated PET (p-PET) on the morphology and thermal properties of the nanocomposites was investigated. From Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) and Wide angle X-Ray diffraction (WAXD) study, it can be clearly seen that nanocomposites with low MWCNTs contents (0.1 wt. %) get better MWCNTs dispersion than higher MWCNT loading. Comparing with PET, nucleated PET nanocomposite with 0.1% MWCNT loading shows higher value of Lauritzen-Hoffman parameters U* and Kg evaluated using the differential isoconversional method. Crystallization regime transition temperature range shifts to higher temperature (208°C - 215°C) for nanocomposites. The presence of p-PET in addition of MWCNT, which act as good nucleating agent, enhanced the crystallization of PET through heterogeneous nucleation.

  14. An electrical network model of intracranial arteriovenous malformations: analysis of variations in hemodynamic and biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Hademenos, G J; Massoud, T F

    1996-12-01

    The propensity of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) to hemorrhage is correlated significantly with their hemodynamic features. Biomathematical models offer a theoretical approach to analyse complex AVM hemodynamics, which otherwise are difficult to quantify, particularly within or in close proximity to the nidus. Our purpose was to investigate a newly developed biomathematical AVM model based on electrical network analysis in which morphological, biophysical, and hemodynamic characteristics of intracranial AVMs were replicated accurately. Several factors implemented into the model were altered systematically to study the effects of a possible wide range of normal variations in AVM hemodynamic and biophysical parameters on the behavior of this model and its fidelity to physiological reality. The model represented a complex, noncompartmentalized AVM with four arterial feeders, two draining veins, and a nidus consisting of 28 interconnected plexiform and fistulous components. Various clinically-determined experimentally-observed, or hypothetically-assumed values for the nidus vessel radii (plexiform: 0.01 cm-0.1 cm; fistulous: 0.1 cm-0.2 cm), mean systemic arterial pressure (71 mm Hg-125 mm Hg), mean arterial feeder pressures (21 mm Hg-80 mm Hg), mean draining vein pressures (5 mm Hg-23 mm Hg), wall thickness of nidus vessels (20 microns-70 microns), and elastic modulus of nidus vessels (1 x 10(4) dyn/cm2 to 1 x 10(5) dyn/cm2) were used as normal or realistic ranges of parameters implemented in the model. Using an electrical analogy of Ohm's law, flow was determined based on Poiseuille's law given the aforementioned pressures and resistance of each nidus vessel. Circuit analysis of the AVM vasculature based on the conservation of flow and voltage revealed the flow rate through each vessel in the AVM network. An expression for the risk of AVM nidus rupture was derived based on the functional distribution of the critical radii of component vessels. The two

  15. Relationship Between Human Physiological Parameters And Geomagnetic Variations Of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    This study attempts to assess the influence of increased geomagnetic activity on some human physiological parameters. The blood pressure, heart rate and general well-being of 86 volunteers were measured (the latter by means of a standardized questionnaire) on work days in autumn 2001 (01/10 to 09/11) and in spring 2002 (08/04 to 28/05). These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. Altogether, 2799 recordings were obtained and analysed. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The three factors were the following: 1) planetary geomagnetic activity level estimated by Ap-index and divided into five levels; 2) gender - males and females; 3) blood pressure degree - persons in the group examined were divided into hypotensive, normotensive and hypertensive. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors' levels. The average arterial blood pressure of the group was found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity level. The average increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure reached 9%, which deserves attention from a medical point of view. This effect was present irrespectively of gender. Results obtained suppose that hypertensive persons have the highest sensitivity and the hypotensive persons have the lowest sensitivity of the arterial blood pressure to increase of geomagnetic activity. The results did not show significant changes in the heart rate. The percentage of the persons who reported subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also found to increase significantly with the geomagnetic activity increase. During severe geomagnetic storms 30% of the persons examined reported subjective complaints and the highest sensitivity was revealed for the hypertensive females. The results obtained add further evidence that blood pressure seems to be affected by geomagnetic

  16. Degradation of atenolol by UV/peroxymonosulfate: kinetics, effect of operational parameters and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Tuqiao; Zhou, Yongchao; Fang, Lei; Shao, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Photoactivation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) with UV (254nm) irradiation was used to generate the SO4(-)-based advanced oxidation process, which was adopted to degrade atenolol (ATL) in water. The second-order reaction rate constants of ATL with HO and SO4(-) were determined, and the effects of operational parameters (dose of PMS, solution pH, HCO3(-), humic acids (HA), and N2 bubbling) were evaluated as well. Finally the main transformation intermediates were identified and possible degradation pathways were proposed. The results showed that there was a linear positive correlation between the degradation rate of ATL and specific dose of PMS (1-16M PMS/M ATL). Increasing solution pH from 3 to 9 promoted elimination of ATL due to the pH-dependent effect of PMS photodecomposition, while further pH increase from 9 to 11 caused slowing down of degradation because of apparent conversion of HO to SO4(-). 1-8mM HCO3(-) exerted no more than 5.3% inhibition effect on ATL destruction, suggesting HCO3(-) was a weak inhibitor. Absorption (or complexation) and photosensitized oxidation induced by HA improved ATL degradation during the first minute of degradation process, whereas photon competition and radical scavenging effects became the leading role afterward. Bubbling with nitrogen enhanced the degradation rate due to the stripping of dissolved oxygen. Hydroxylation of aromatic ring, cleavage of ether bond, oxidation of primary and secondary amine moieties, and dimerization were involved in the degradation mechanism of ATL by UV/PMS.

  17. Thermodynamics and kinetics parameters of co-combustion between sewage sludge and water hyacinth in CO2/O2 atmosphere as biomass to solid biofuel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Limao; Liu, Jingyong; He, Yao; Sun, Shuiyu; Chen, Jiacong; Sun, Jian; Chang, KenLin; Kuo, Jiahong; Ning, Xun'an

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of sewage sludge (SS) and water hyacinth (WH) co-combustion as a blend fuel (SW) for bioenergy production were studied through thermogravimetric analysis. In CO2/O2 atmosphere, the combustion performance of SS added with 10-40wt.% WH was improved 1-1.97 times as revealed by the comprehensive combustion characteristic index (CCI). The conversion of SW in different atmospheres was identified and their thermodynamic parameters (ΔH,ΔS,ΔG) were obtained. As the oxygen concentration increased from 20% to 70%, the ignition temperature of SW decreased from 243.1°C to 240.3°C, and the maximum weight loss rate and CCI increased from 5.70%·min(-1) to 7.26%·min(-1) and from 4.913%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2) to 6.327%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2), respectively, which corresponded to the variation in ΔS and ΔG. The lowest activation energy (Ea) of SW was obtained in CO2/O2=7/3 atmosphere.

  18. Thermodynamics and kinetics parameters of co-combustion between sewage sludge and water hyacinth in CO2/O2 atmosphere as biomass to solid biofuel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Limao; Liu, Jingyong; He, Yao; Sun, Shuiyu; Chen, Jiacong; Sun, Jian; Chang, KenLin; Kuo, Jiahong; Ning, Xun'an

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of sewage sludge (SS) and water hyacinth (WH) co-combustion as a blend fuel (SW) for bioenergy production were studied through thermogravimetric analysis. In CO2/O2 atmosphere, the combustion performance of SS added with 10-40wt.% WH was improved 1-1.97 times as revealed by the comprehensive combustion characteristic index (CCI). The conversion of SW in different atmospheres was identified and their thermodynamic parameters (ΔH,ΔS,ΔG) were obtained. As the oxygen concentration increased from 20% to 70%, the ignition temperature of SW decreased from 243.1°C to 240.3°C, and the maximum weight loss rate and CCI increased from 5.70%·min(-1) to 7.26%·min(-1) and from 4.913%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2) to 6.327%(2)·K(-3)·min(-2), respectively, which corresponded to the variation in ΔS and ΔG. The lowest activation energy (Ea) of SW was obtained in CO2/O2=7/3 atmosphere. PMID:27416513

  19. Androgen metabolism in the male hamster--2. Aromatization of androstenedione in the hypothalamus and in the cerebral cortex; kinetic parameters and effect of exposure to different photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Negri-Cesi, P; Celotti, F; Martini, L

    1989-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that exposure of the hamster to a short photoperiod (light on less than 12 h/day) induces an increased sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to the feedback effect of testosterone. It was consequently felt of interest to investigate whether the photoperiod might act by increasing the formation of estrogens in the CNS and/or in the anterior pituitary. The aromatase activity was studied utilizing a sensitive in vitro assay that measures the amount of 3H2O formed during the conversion of [1 beta-3H]androstenedione to estrone. First of all it has been investigated whether the aromatizing enzymes, previously found in the hypothalamus, were present also in the cerebral cortex and in the anterior pituitary; secondly, the kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined; finally, the possible variation of the central aromatase activity in hamsters exposed to a long or to a short photoperiod was investigated. The results obtained indicate that both in the hypothalamus and in the cerebral cortex the aromatization of androstenedione is linear with respect to time of incubation and tissue concentration; moreover, in the two structures, the enzyme demonstrated a similar Michaelis-Menten constant (0.03 and 0.08 microM respectively). From a quantitative point of view, the hypothalamus seems to possess an aromatizing activity higher than that of the cerebral cortex. Exposure of the hamsters to a short photostimulation for 60 days resulted in a significant regression of the reproductive system (decreased testicular weight and serum LH levels) and in a decrease of the aromatase activity of the hypothalamus. There was no effect of the photoperiod on the aromatase of the cerebral cortex. Since androgens are known to stimulate the aromatase, the present data might be tentatively interpreted by suggesting that the variation in the formation of estrogens during the short photoperiod might be the consequence of the decreased serum testosterone levels

  20. Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G

    2012-10-01

    The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

  1. Contribution of counterions and degree of ionization for birefringence creation and relaxation kinetics parameters of PAH/PAZO films

    SciTech Connect

    Raposo, Maria Monteiro Timóteo, Ana Rita; Ribeiro, Paulo A.; Ferreira, Quirina; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria

    2015-09-21

    Photo induced birefringent materials can be used to develop optical and conversion energy devices, and consequently, the study of the variables that influences the creation and relaxation of birefringence should be carefully analyzed. In this work, the parameters of birefringence creation and relaxation kinetics curves obtained on layer-by-layer (LBL) films, prepared from azo-polyectrolyte poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo) benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride)(PAH), are related with the presence of counterions and the degree of ionization of the polyelectrolytes. Those kinetics curves obtained on PAH/PAZO LBL films, prepared from PAH solutions with different pHs and maintaining the pH of PAZO solution constant at pH = 9, were analyzed taking into account the films composition which was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The creation and relaxation birefringence curves are justified by two processes: one associated to local mobility of the azobenzene with a characteristic time 30 s and intensity constant and other associated with polymeric chains mobility with the characteristic time and intensity decreasing with pH. These results allow us to conclude that the birefringence creation process, associated to local mobility of azobenzenes is independent of the degree of ionization and of number of counterions or co-ions present while the birefringence creation process associated to mobility of chains have its characteristic time and intensity dependent of both degree of ionization and number of counterions. The birefringence relaxation processes are dependent of the degree of ionization. The analysis of the films composition revealed, in addition, the presence of a protonated secondary or tertiary amine revealing that PAZO may have positive charges and consequently a zwitterionic behavior.

  2. Joint estimation of subject motion and tracer kinetic parameters of dynamic PET data in an EM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jieqing; Salinas, Cristian A.; Searle, Graham E.; Gunn, Roger N.; Schnabel, Julia A.

    2012-02-01

    Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography is a powerful tool for quantitative imaging of in vivo biological processes. The long scan durations necessitate motion correction, to maintain the validity of the dynamic measurements, which can be particularly challenging due to the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution, as well as the complex tracer behaviour in the dynamic PET data. In this paper we develop a novel automated expectation-maximisation image registration framework that incorporates temporal tracer kinetic information to correct for inter-frame subject motion during dynamic PET scans. We employ the Zubal human brain phantom to simulate dynamic PET data using SORTEO (a Monte Carlo-based simulator), in order to validate the proposed method for its ability to recover imposed rigid motion. We have conducted a range of simulations using different noise levels, and corrupted the data with a range of rigid motion artefacts. The performance of our motion correction method is compared with pairwise registration using normalised mutual information as a voxel similarity measure (an approach conventionally used to correct for dynamic PET inter-frame motion based solely on intensity information). To quantify registration accuracy, we calculate the target registration error across the images. The results show that our new dynamic image registration method based on tracer kinetics yields better realignment of the simulated datasets, halving the target registration error when compared to the conventional method at small motion levels, as well as yielding smaller residuals in translation and rotation parameters. We also show that our new method is less affected by the low signal in the first few frames, which the conventional method based on normalised mutual information fails to realign.

  3. Effect of diet variations on the kinetic disposition of oxfendazole in sheep.

    PubMed

    Oukessou, M; Chkounda, S

    1997-11-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of oxfendazole (OFZ) were determined in five sheep submitted to two different feeding regimens: a poor/dry diet based on wheat straw ad libitum, and a rich/green diet based on fresh grass grazed on pasture. Animals were acclimatised to each diet before they were administered OFZ orally at a dose of 5 mg kg-1 body weight. Blood samples were taken serially between 10 min and 168 h post-administration. Plasma concentrations of OFZ and its metabolites (fenbendazole (FBZ) and fenbendazole sulphone) were quantified using an HPLC technique. Rates of absorption of OFZ and of formation of FBZ and fenbendazole sulphone were slower with the poor/dry diet; however, the area under FBZ plasma concentration vs time curve was higher when sheep were offered the low quality diet, suggesting a shift of OFZ metabolism towards FBZ formation.

  4. Along-strike Variations of Subduction Parameters at the Chilean Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann-Rothe, A.; Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.

    2004-12-01

    Newly compiled data of the geometric, kinematic and mechanic properties and their variations along-strike the oblique Chilean subduction margin between 20° S and 46° S are used to weigh their competing influence on forearc deformation. Special emphasis lies on the formation of margin-parallel strike-slip systems. Among the parameters considered are the convergence rate and obliquity, the ocean floor age, the dip of the down-going and the slope of the overriding plate, the geodetic and seismic coupling depth, the interplate seismicity, the depth of the trench-fill and the mass transfer mode at the subduction front. Commonly discussed control factors for forearc deformation can be attributed to three major elements of a subduction system, namely (1) the plate kinematic boundary conditions, (2) the plate coupling properties that govern the effectiveness of force transmission from the subducting plate to the overriding plate, and (3) the upper plate heterogeneities affecting its rheology (e.g. elasticity, shear strength) or resistance to block motion (buttressing). An example is given for each of these elements: (1) Oblique convergence is a pre-requisite for the activation of margin-parallel strike-slip systems, but apparently not a sufficient condition. For example, strike-slip motion can presently be observed along the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone in southern Chile, while neither the Atacama Fault Zone nor the Precordilleran Fault System in northern Chile accommodate significant amounts of margin-parallel slip since the Pliocene. This difference can not be explained by variations of convergence rate or obliquity as the plate kinematic framework is almost constant along the Chilean trench. (2) The plate coupling force is a function of the frictionally coupled area on the plate interface and of the shear friction that needs to be overcome. Along the Chilean margin various factors affect coupling in opposing manner: The slab-dip is shallower in southern Chile compared to

  5. TU-C-12A-11: Comparisons Between Cu-ATSM PET and DCE-CT Kinetic Parameters in Canine Sinonasal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, M; Bradshaw, T; Kubicek, L; Forrest, L; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Regions of poor perfusion within tumors may be associated with higher hypoxic levels. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing measurements of hypoxia from Cu-ATSM PET to vasculature kinetic parameters from DCE-CT kinetic analysis. Methods: Ten canine patients with sinonasal tumors received one Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan and three DCE-CT scans prior to treatment. Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were registered and resampled to matching voxel dimensions. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans and for each patient, the resulting kinetic parameter values from the three DCE-CT scans were averaged together. Cu-ATSM SUVs were spatially correlated (r{sub spatial}) on a voxel-to-voxel basis against the following DCE-CT kinetic parameters: transit time (t{sub 1}), blood flow (F), vasculature fraction (v{sub 1}), and permeability (PS). In addition, whole-tumor comparisons were performed by correlating (r{sub ROI}) the mean Cu-ATSM SUV (SUV{sub mean}) with median kinetic parameter values. Results: The spatial correlations (r{sub spatial}) were poor and ranged from -0.04 to 0.21 for all kinetic parameters. These low spatial correlations may be due to high variability in the DCE-CT kinetic parameter voxel values between scans. In our hypothesis, t{sub 1} was expected to have a positive correlation, while F was expected to have a negative correlation to hypoxia. However, in wholetumor analysis the opposite was found for both t{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = -0.25) and F (r{sub ROI} = 0.56). PS and v{sub 1} may depict angiogenic responses to hypoxia and found positive correlations to Cu-ATSM SUV for PS (r{sub ROI} = 0.41), and v{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = 0.57). Conclusion: Low spatial correlations were found between Cu-ATSM uptake and DCE-CT vasculature parameters, implying that poor perfusion is not associated with higher hypoxic regions. Across patients, the most hypoxic tumors tended to have higher blood flow values, which is contrary to our initial hypothesis. Funding

  6. Analysis of Changes of Cardiological Parameters at Middle Latitude Region in Relation to Geomagnetic Disturbances and Cosmic Ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papailiou, M.; Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    2010-01-01

    Collaborating scientific groups from Athens (Greece), Baku (Azerbaijan) and Sofia (Bulgaria) have conducted a research work on the possible effects of geomagnetic field disturbances (GMF) and cosmic ray intensity (CRI) variations on human homeostasis, particularly, the cardio-health state. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) of seven functionally healthy persons were digitally registered at the joint Laboratory of Heliobiology located in the Medical Centre INAM, Baku, on working days and Saturdays. Heart rate values, estimated from ECGs, were analysed in relation to daily values of CRI, as measured by the Neutron Monitor of the University of Athens and daily variations of Dst and Ap geomagnetic indices and some significant results had been revealed in previous studies. Researches were continued by study of additional cardiologic parameters estimated from the same ECG data. In this study digital data of RR interval (the time elapsing between two consecutive R waves in the ECG), namely RRminimum, RRmaximum and RRaverage were analyzed taking into consideration different levels of GMF disturbances (estimated through variations of Dst and Ap indices) and cosmic ray activity (through CRI variations). The data refer to the time period 15 July 2006-31 March 2008. Variations of RR intervals show connection to GMF disturbances and CRI variations. The revealed effects are more pronounced for high levels of geomagnetic activity (when geomagnetic storms occur) and large CRI decreases as well as on the days before and after these variations.

  7. Evaluation of Interindividual Human Variation in Bioactivation and DNA Adduct Formation of Estragole in Liver Predicted by Physiologically Based Kinetic/Dynamic and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    PubMed

    Punt, Ans; Paini, Alicia; Spenkelink, Albertus; Scholz, Gabriele; Schilter, Benoit; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2016-04-18

    Estragole is a known hepatocarcinogen in rodents at high doses following metabolic conversion to the DNA-reactive metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole. The aim of the present study was to model possible levels of DNA adduct formation in (individual) humans upon exposure to estragole. This was done by extending a previously defined PBK model for estragole in humans to include (i) new data on interindividual variation in the kinetics for the major PBK model parameters influencing the formation of 1'-sulfooxyestragole, (ii) an equation describing the relationship between 1'-sulfooxyestragole and DNA adduct formation, (iii) Monte Carlo modeling to simulate interindividual human variation in DNA adduct formation in the population, and (iv) a comparison of the predictions made to human data on DNA adduct formation for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol. Adequate model predictions could be made, with the predicted DNA adduct levels at the estimated daily intake of estragole of 0.01 mg/kg bw ranging between 1.6 and 8.8 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides (nts) (50th and 99th percentiles, respectively). This is somewhat lower than values reported in the literature for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol in surgical human liver samples. The predicted levels seem to be below DNA adduct levels that are linked with tumor formation by alkenylbenzenes in rodents, which were estimated to amount to 188-500 adducts per 10(8) nts at the BMD10 values of estragole and methyleugenol. Although this does not seem to point to a significant health concern for human dietary exposure, drawing firm conclusions may have to await further validation of the model's predictions. PMID:26952143

  8. Variations of line parameters and bisectors over granular-intergranular regions in the 2-D artificial solar granulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadun, A. S.; Hanslmeier, A.

    Variations in the Fe I lines λλ 491.154, 491.178, and 649.499 nm in the solar spectrum observed with high spectral and spatial resolution in selected granular-intergranular regions are interpreted with the use of two sets of solar granulation models which differ by the horizontal size of the region modeled and by treatment of thermal convection. The authors analyze variations of the continuum intensity, residual intensity in the line cores, Doppler velocities, equivalent widths, half-widths, and asymmetries of synthesized lines in the center of the solar disk, as well as correlations between the parameter variations. The authors compare also these correlations with those between the observed line parameters. It is found that the models which describe the solar thermal convection as quasi-stationary, cellular, and laminar motions show strong correlation between line parameter variations and cannot reproduce the behavior of spectral line characteristics observed in individual granular-intergranular areas. Observational results are well reproduced by the models where the thermal convection is treated as a completely nonstationary system with active secondary motions in the middle and upper photosphere.

  9. Carbon reaction and diffusion on Ni(111), Ni(100), and Fe(110): Kinetic parameters from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltner, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Jacob, T.

    2008-08-28

    This paper investigates the reactivity of elemental carbon films deposited from the vapor phase with Fe and Ni substrates at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are presented as a method for evaluating kinetic reaction data. Carbon films are deposited on different surface orientations representing geometries from a dense atom packing as in fcc (111) to an open surface structure as in fcc (100). During annealing experiments several reactions are observed (carbon subsurface diffusion, carbide formation, carbide decomposition, and graphite ordering). These reactions and the respective kinetic parameters are analyzed and quantified by XPS measurements performed while annealing at elevated temperatures (620-820 K). The resulting activation barriers for carbon subsurface diffusion are compared with calculated values using the density functional theory. The determined kinetic parameters are used to reproduce the thermal behavior of carbon films on nickel surfaces.

  10. Effect of Simultaneous Inoculation with Yeast and Bacteria on Fermentation Kinetics and Key Wine Parameters of Cool-Climate Chardonnay

    PubMed Central

    Jussier, Delphine; Dubé Morneau, Amélie; Mira de Orduña, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Inoculating grape musts with wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) concurrently in order to induce simultaneous alcoholic fermentation (AF) and malolactic fermentation (MLF) can be an efficient alternative to overcome potential inhibition of LAB in wines because of high ethanol concentrations and reduced nutrient content. In this study, the simultaneous inoculation of yeast and LAB into must was compared with a traditional vinification protocol, where MLF was induced after completion of AF. For this, two suitable commercial yeast-bacterium combinations were tested in cool-climate Chardonnay must. The time courses of glucose and fructose, acetaldehyde, several organic acids, and nitrogenous compounds were measured along with the final values of other key wine parameters. Sensory evaluation was done after 12 months of storage. The current study could not confirm a negative impact of simultaneous AF/MLF on fermentation success and kinetics or on final wine parameters. While acetic acid concentrations were slightly increased in wines after simultaneous AF/MLF, the differences were of neither practical nor legal significance. No statistically significant differences were found with regard to the final values of pH or total acidity and the concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, glycerol, citric and lactic acids, and the nitrogen compounds arginine, ammonia, urea, citrulline, and ornithine. Sensory evaluation by a semiexpert panel confirmed the similarity of the wines. However, simultaneous inoculation led to considerable reductions in overall fermentation durations. Furthermore, differences of physiological and microbiological relevance were found. Specifically, we report the vinification of “super-dry” wines devoid of glucose and fructose after simultaneous inoculation of yeast and bacteria. PMID:16391046

  11. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for heat denaturation of Cry1a(b) protein from transgenic maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    De Luis, R; Pérez, M D; Sánchez, L; Lavilla, M; Calvo, M

    2008-08-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the denaturation of Cry1A(b) protein expressed in transgenic maize was studied over a temperature range of 69 to 77 degrees C. Denaturation of Cry1A(b) protein was measured by the loss of reactivity with its specific antibodies using a sandwich ELISA. The process of denaturation was studied by analyzing the values of inmunoreactive protein after each heat treatment by kinetic analysis. Denaturation of Cry1A(b) protein was best described assuming a reaction order of 1.5. D-values calculated were 4338, 2350, 1272, 734, and 601 s at 69, 71, 73, 75, and 77 degrees C, respectively. Z-value was estimated to be 9.0 degrees C and the activation energy value was 266.15 kJ/mol. Thermodynamic parameters for the process of denaturation of Cry1A(b) protein were also calculated. The high values of the enthalpy of activation and the positive values of the entropy of activation obtained for Cry1A(b) protein are typical of a reaction in which the denaturation of the protein is the rate-determining process that predominates over an aggregation process during heating.

  12. Comparison of dual-echo DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived contrast agent kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Quarles, C Chad; Gore, John C; Xu, Lei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-09-01

    The application of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess brain tumors is often confounded by the extravasation of contrast agent (CA). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier allows CA to leak out of the vasculature leading to additional T(1), T(2) and T(2) relaxation effects in the extravascular space, thereby affecting the signal intensity time course in a complex manner. The goal of this study was to validate a dual-echo DSC-MRI approach that separates and quantifies the T(1) and T(2) contributions to the acquired signal and enables the estimation of the volume transfer constant, K(trans), and the volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space, v(e). To test the validity of this approach, DSC-MRI- and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived K(trans) and v(e) estimates were spatially compared in both 9L and C6 rat brain tumor models. A high degree of correlation (concordance correlation coefficients >0.83, Pearson's r>0.84) and agreement was found between the DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived measurements. These results indicate that dual-echo DSC-MRI can be used to simultaneously extract reliable DCE-MRI kinetic parameters in brain tumors in addition to conventional blood volume and blood flow metrics.

  13. Study of kinetic parameters and development of a voltammetric sensor for the determination of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) in oil samples.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Divya; Rasheed, Zafna; Jagan, Jesny Siri; Kumar, Krishnapillai Girish

    2015-10-01

    Electrochemical behavior of artificial antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), was investigated at a glassy carbon electrode modified with poly L- cysteine [poly (L- Cys/GCE)]. BHA exhibits a pair of well - defined redox peak on L- cysteine modified GCE with Epa = 69 mV and Epc = 4 mV. The modified electrode showed good electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of BHA under optimal conditions and exhibited a linear response in the range from 1.0 × 10(-5) to 1.0 × 10(-6) M with a correlation coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection was found to be 4.1 × 10(-7) M. The kinetics parameters of the proposed sensor such as heterogeneous electron transfer rate, k s , and charge transfer coefficient,α, was calculated and found to be 1.20 s(-1) and 0.575 respectively. The average surface concentration of BHA on the surface of poly (L- Cys/GCE) was calculated to be 3.18 × 10(-4) mol cm(-2). The analytical utility of the proposed sensor was evaluated by the successful determination of BHA in coconut oil and sesame oil samples. PMID:26396421

  14. Bifurcations, chaos, and sensitivity to parameter variations in the Sato cardiac cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Stefan; Berg, Sebastian; Luther, Stefan; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of a detailed ionic cardiac cell model proposed by Sato et al. (2009) is investigated in terms of periodic and chaotic action potentials, bifurcation scenarios, and coexistence of attractors. Starting from the model's standard parameter values bifurcation diagrams are computed to evaluate the model's robustness with respect to (small) parameter changes. While for some parameters the dynamics turns out to be practically independent from their values, even minor changes of other parameters have a very strong impact and cause qualitative changes due to bifurcations or transitions to coexisting attractors. Implications of this lack of robustness are discussed.

  15. Measurement of diurnal and semidiurnal rotational variations and tidal parameters of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the determination of diurnal and semidiurnal variations in the rotation rate and the direction of rotation axis of Earth from the analysis of 8 years of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data. This analysis clearly show that these variations are largely periodic and tidally driven; that is, the periods of the variations correspond to the periods of the largest lunar and solar tides. For rotation rate variations, expressed in terms of changes in universal time (UT), the tidal lines with the largest observed signals are O1 (amplitude 23.5 microseconds in time (microseconds), period 25.82 solar hours); KL (18.9 microseconds, 23.93 hours); M2 (17.9 microseconds, 12.54 hours); and S2 (8.6 microseconds, 12.00 hours). For variations in the direction of the rotation axis (polar motion), significant signals exist in the retrograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and S2 tides (amplitudes 265 and 119 microarc seconds (microarc seconds, respectively); the prograde diurnal band at the O1, K1, and P1 tides (amplitudes 199, 152, and 60 microarc seconds, respectively); and the prograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and K2 tides (amplitudes 58 and 39 microarc seconds, respectively). Variations in the retrograde diurnal band are represented by corrections with previous estimates except that a previously noted discrepancy in the 13.66-day nutation (corresponding to the O1 tide) is largely removed in this new analysis. We estimate that the standard deviations of these estimates are 1.0 microseconds for the UT1 variations and 14-16 microarc seconds for the polar motion terms. These uncertainties correspond to surface displacements of approximately 0.5 mm. From the analysis of atmospheric angular momentum data we conclude that variations in UT1 excited by the atmosphere with subdaily periods are small (approximately 1 microsecond). We find that the average radial tidal displacements of the VLBI sites in the diurnal band are largely consistent with known deficiencies in current

  16. Inverse Kinetics

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  17. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Accurate estimate of α variation and isotope shift parameters in Na and Mg+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present accurate calculations of fine-structure constant variation coefficients and isotope shifts in Na and Mg+ using the relativistic coupled-cluster method. In our approach, we are able to discover the roles of various correlation effects explicitly to all orders in these calculations. Most of the results, especially for the excited states, are reported for the first time. It is possible to ascertain suitable anchor and probe lines for the studies of possible variation in the fine-structure constant by using the above results in the considered systems.

  18. Hill-type muscle model parameters determined from experiments on single muscles show large animal-to-animal variation.

    PubMed

    Blümel, Marcus; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Hooper, Scott L; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Models built using mean data can represent only a very small percentage, or none, of the population being modeled, and produce different activity than any member of it. Overcoming this "averaging" pitfall requires measuring, in single individuals in single experiments, all of the system's defining characteristics. We have developed protocols that allow all the parameters in the curves used in typical Hill-type models (passive and active force-length, series elasticity, force-activation, force-velocity) to be determined from experiments on individual stick insect muscles (Blümel et al. 2012a). A requirement for means to not well represent the population is that the population shows large variation in its defining characteristics. We therefore used these protocols to measure extensor muscle defining parameters in multiple animals. Across-animal variability in these parameters can be very large, ranging from 1.3- to 17-fold. This large variation is consistent with earlier data in which extensor muscle responses to identical motor neuron driving showed large animal-to-animal variability (Hooper et al. 2006), and suggests accurate modeling of extensor muscles requires modeling individual-by-individual. These complete characterizations of individual muscles also allowed us to test for parameter correlations. Two parameter pairs significantly co-varied, suggesting that a simpler model could as well reproduce muscle response.

  19. Electron holography study of the temperature variation of the magnetic order parameter within circularly chained nickel nanoparticle rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Akira; Fukunaga, Kei-ichi; Scheinfein, M. R.; Kobayashi, H.; Kitagawa, H.; Tonomura, A.

    2007-12-24

    The magnetic structure within circular chains composed of 30-nm-diameter, polymer-coated nickel particles was studied by electron holography. The magnetic flux closure due to dipolar coupling was confirmed at zero external magnetic field. Its long-range order parameter was determined from the magnitude of the electron phase shift, and it was found to decrease more rapidly than that of bulk nickel as a function of temperature. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the temperature variation of the order-parameter was explained in terms of weakened dipolar coupling field ascribed to the decay of the bulk magnetization and enhanced thermal fluctuations.

  20. Sensitivity of the stability of a waste emplacement drift to variation in assumed rock joint parameters in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, M.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents the results of a numerical analysis to determine the effects of variation of rock joint parameters on stability of waste disposal rooms for vertical emplacement. Conditions and parameters used were taken from the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design report (MacDougall et al., 1987). Mechanical results are presented which illustrate the predicted distribution of stress, joint slip, and room deformations for times of initial excavation and after 50 years heating. 82 refs., 93 figs.

  1. Electrical Characterization of 4H-SiC JFET Wafer: DC Parameter Variations for Extreme Temperature IC Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liangyu; Spry, David J.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Chang, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports DC electrical characterization of a 76 mm diameter 4H-SiC JFET test wafer fabricated as part of NASA's on-going efforts to realize medium-scale ICs with prolonged and stable circuit operation at temperatures as high as 500 degC. In particular, these measurements provide quantitative parameter ranges for use in JFET IC design and simulation. Larger than expected parameter variations were observed both as a function of position across the wafer as well as a function of ambient testing temperature from 23 degC to 500 degC.

  2. Variations in environmental tritium doses due to meteorological data averaging and uncertainties in pathway model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kock, A.

    1996-05-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to calculate and compare off site doses from atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site using monthly versus 5 year meteorological data and annual source terms, including additional seasonal and site specific parameters not included in present annual assessments; and (2) to calculate the range of the above dose estimates based on distributions in model parameters given by uncertainty estimates found in the literature. Consideration will be given to the sensitivity of parameters given in former studies.

  3. Net thrust calculation sensitivity of an afterburning turbofan engine to variations in input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Ray, R. J.; Walton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The calculated value of net thrust of an aircraft powered by a General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine was evaluated for its sensitivity to various input parameters. The effects of a 1.0-percent change in each input parameter on the calculated value of net thrust with two calculation methods are compared. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and also gives the estimated accuracy of the overall net thrust calculation as determined from the influence coefficients and estimated parameter measurement accuracies.

  4. Influence of Analogy Instruction for Pitch Variation on Perceptual Ratings of Other Speech Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Andy C. Y.; Wong, Andus W-K.; Ma, Estella P-M.; Whitehill, Tara L.; Masters, Rich S. W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: "Analogy" is the similarity of different concepts on which a comparison can be based. Recently, an analogy of "waves at sea" was shown to be effective in modulating fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) variation. Perceptions of intonation were not examined, as the primary aim of the work was to determine whether…

  5. Diurnal and seasonal variations of carbonate system parameters on Luhuitou fringing reef, Sanya Bay, Hainan Island, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenglong; Huang, Hui; Ye, Cheng; Huang, Liangmin; Li, Xiubao; Lian, Jiansheng; Liu, Sheng

    2013-11-01

    The 3-day diurnal dynamics of carbonate system and related parameters on Luhuitou fringing reef of Sanya Bay-adjacent to the South China Sea (SCS) were observed in December of 2009 (early winter), April (spring), July (summer) and November (late-autumn) of 2010. The Luhuitou fringing reef ecosystem was generally dominated by macro and planktonic algae throughout the year except by coralline algae in winter. The system parameters showed distinct diurnal trends in the four seasons. Averaged ranges of diurnal variation for dissolved oxygen and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) were higher in the autumn, 4.67mgL-1 and 218.2μatm, respectively than other seasons. Averaged ranges of diurnal variation for normalized total alkalinity (NTA) was higher in the winter (61.3μmolkg-1), and lower in the spring (16.0μmolkg-1). The diurnal variations are mainly controlled by biological activities, especially by the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in the reef ecosystem. In winter, however, calcification and dissolution contributed more to the diurnal variations, compared with the other three seasons. Total alkalinity was largely related to seasonal changes in river inflow rates. Dissolved oxygen, pH, total CO2 and aragonite saturation also showed seasonal variations. These variations were mainly controlled by the seasonal changes of photosynthesis and respiration, which were mainly affected by changes in benthic community structure, temperature and river inflow rates. The oversaturated pCO2 in the reef ecosystem with respect to the atmosphere in the winter and summer resulted in CO2 discharge from the reef ecosystem to the SCS. The whole system served as net source of CO2 to the atmosphere and the adjacent South China Sea on an annual time scale.

  6. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    SciTech Connect

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for thermal denaturation of ovine milk lactoferrin determined by its loss of immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Navarro, F; Harouna, S; Calvo, M; Pérez, M D; Sánchez, L

    2015-07-01

    Lactoferrin is a protein with important biological functions that can be obtained from milk and by-products derived from the dairy industry, such as whey. Although bovine lactoferrin has been extensively studied, ovine lactoferrin is not quite as well known. In the present study, the effect of several heat treatments in 3 different media, over a temperature range from 66 to 75°C, has been studied on lactoferrin isolated from sheep milk. Denaturation of lactoferrin was determined by measuring its immunoreactivity with specific polyclonal antibodies. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that lactoferrin denatures by heat more rapidly in whey than in phosphate buffer or milk. The value of activation energy found for the denaturation process of lactoferrin when treated in whey is higher (390kJ/mol) than that obtained in milk (194kJ/mol) or phosphate buffer (179kJ/mol). This indicates that a great amount of energy is necessary to start denaturation of ovine lactoferrin, probably due to the interaction of this protein with other whey proteins. The changes in the hydrophobicity of lactoferrin after heat treatments were determined by fluorescence measurement using acrylamide. The decrease in the hydrophobicity constant was very small for the treatments from 66 to 75°C, up to 20min, which indicates that lactoferrin conformation did not experienced a great change. The results obtained in this study permit the prediction of behavior of ovine lactoferrin under several heat treatments and show that high-temperature, short-time pasteurization (72°C, 15 s) does not cause loss of its immunoreactivity and, consequently, would not affect its conformation and biological activity. PMID:25958286

  8. L-methionine gamma-lyase from Citrobacter freundii: cloning of the gene and kinetic parameters of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Manukhov, I V; Mamaeva, D V; Morozova, E A; Rastorguev, S M; Faleev, N G; Demidkina, T V; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2006-04-01

    It is shown for the first time for the Enterobacteriaceae family that a gene encoding L-methionine gamma-lyase (MGL) is present in the genome of Citrobacter freundii. Homogeneous enzyme has been purified from C. freundii cells and its N-terminal sequence has been determined. The hybrid plasmid pUCmgl obtained from the C. freundii genomic library contains an EcoRI insert of about 3000 bp, which ensures the appearance of MGL activity when expressed in Escherichia coli TG1 cells. The nucleotide sequence of the EcoRI fragment contains two open reading frames. The first frame (the megL gene) encodes a protein of 398 amino acid residues that has sequence homology with MGLs from different sources. The second frame encodes a protein with sequence homology with proteins belonging to the family of permeases. To overexpress the megL gene it was cloned into pET-15b vector. Recombinant enzyme has been purified and its kinetic parameters have been determined. It is demonstrated that a presence of a hybrid plasmid pUCmgl, containing the megL gene in the E. coli K12 cells, leads to a decrease in efficiency of EcoKI-restriction. It seems likely that decomposition of L-methionine under the action of MGL leads to a decrease in the intracellular content of S-adenosylmethionine. Expression of the megL gene in the C. freundii genome occurs only upon induction by a significant amount of L-methionine.

  9. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for thermal denaturation of ovine milk lactoferrin determined by its loss of immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Navarro, F; Harouna, S; Calvo, M; Pérez, M D; Sánchez, L

    2015-07-01

    Lactoferrin is a protein with important biological functions that can be obtained from milk and by-products derived from the dairy industry, such as whey. Although bovine lactoferrin has been extensively studied, ovine lactoferrin is not quite as well known. In the present study, the effect of several heat treatments in 3 different media, over a temperature range from 66 to 75°C, has been studied on lactoferrin isolated from sheep milk. Denaturation of lactoferrin was determined by measuring its immunoreactivity with specific polyclonal antibodies. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that lactoferrin denatures by heat more rapidly in whey than in phosphate buffer or milk. The value of activation energy found for the denaturation process of lactoferrin when treated in whey is higher (390kJ/mol) than that obtained in milk (194kJ/mol) or phosphate buffer (179kJ/mol). This indicates that a great amount of energy is necessary to start denaturation of ovine lactoferrin, probably due to the interaction of this protein with other whey proteins. The changes in the hydrophobicity of lactoferrin after heat treatments were determined by fluorescence measurement using acrylamide. The decrease in the hydrophobicity constant was very small for the treatments from 66 to 75°C, up to 20min, which indicates that lactoferrin conformation did not experienced a great change. The results obtained in this study permit the prediction of behavior of ovine lactoferrin under several heat treatments and show that high-temperature, short-time pasteurization (72°C, 15 s) does not cause loss of its immunoreactivity and, consequently, would not affect its conformation and biological activity.

  10. Release kinetics, quantal parameters and their modulation during short-term depression at a developing synapse in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Taschenberger, Holger; Scheuss, Volker; Neher, Erwin

    2005-10-15

    We have characterized developmental changes in the kinetics and quantal parameters of action potential (AP)-evoked neurotransmitter release during maturation of the calyx of Held synapse. Quantal size (q) and peak amplitudes of evoked EPSCs increased moderately, whereas the fraction of vesicles released by single APs decreased. During synaptic depression induced in postnatal day (P) 5-7 synapses by 10-100 Hz stimulation, q declined rapidly to 40-12% of its initial value. The decrease in q was generally smaller in more mature synapses (P12-14), but quite severe for frequencies > or = 300 Hz. The stronger decline of q in immature synapses resulted from a slower recovery from desensitization, presumably due to delayed glutamate clearance. Recovery from this desensitization followed an exponential time course with a time constant of approximately 480 ms in P5-7 synapses, and sped up > 20-fold during maturation. Deconvolution analysis of EPSCs revealed a significant acceleration of the release time course during development, which was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the peak release rate. During long 100 Hz trains, more mature synapses were able to sustain average rates of 8-10 quanta s(-1) per active zone for phasic release. The rates of asynchronous vesicle release increased transiently > 35-fold immediately after such stimuli and decayed rapidly with an exponential time constant of approximately 50 ms to low resting levels of spontaneous release. However, even following extended periods of 100 Hz stimulation, the amount of asynchronous release was relatively minor with peak rates of less than 5% of the average rate of synchronous release measured at steady state during the tetani. Therefore, a multitude of mechanisms seems to converge on the generation of fast, temporally precise and reliable high-frequency transmission at the mature calyx of Held synapse.

  11. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 2: Kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    The application of several monosolute equilibrium models has previously shown that Bromacil adsorption on SA-UF (Norit) powdered activated carbon (PAC) is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites were found to be 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites, according to the q(m) values calculated by isotherm models. The aims of this work were trying, primarily, to identify the kinetic-determinant stage of the sorption of Bromacil at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), and secondly, to specify the rate constants and other useful design parameters for the application in water treatment. It was therefore not possible to specify a priori whether the diffusion or surface reaction is the key step. It shows that many of the tested models which describe the stage of distribution or the surface reaction are correctly applied. However, the diffusivity values (D and D(0)) were found to be constant only constants for some specific experimental concentrations. The HSDM model of surface diffusion in pores was also applied but the values of the diffusion coefficient of surface (D(s)) were widely scattered and reduce significantly with the initial concentration or the equilibrium concentration in Bromacil. The model of surface reaction of pseudo-second order fitted particularly well and led to constant values which are independent of the equilibrium concentration, except for the low concentrations where the constants become significantly more important. This last observation confirms perfectly the hypothesis based on two types of sites as concluded by the equilibrium data (part 1).

  12. Signal Intensities Derived from Different NMR Probes and Parameters Contribute to Variations in Quantification of Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Michael; Karnovsky, Alla; Woehler, Scott; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    We discovered that serious issues could arise that may complicate interpretation of metabolomic data when identical samples are analyzed at more than one NMR facility, or using slightly different NMR parameters on the same instrument. This is important because cross-center validation metabolomics studies are essential for the reliable application of metabolomics to clinical biomarker discovery. To test the reproducibility of quantified metabolite data at multiple sites, technical replicates of urine samples were assayed by 1D-1H-NMR at the University of Alberta and the University of Michigan. Urine samples were obtained from healthy controls under a standard operating procedure for collection and processing. Subsequent analysis using standard statistical techniques revealed that quantitative data across sites can be achieved, but also that previously unrecognized NMR parameter differences can dramatically and widely perturb results. We present here a confirmed validation of NMR analysis at two sites, and report the range and magnitude that common NMR parameters involved in solvent suppression can have on quantitated metabolomics data. Specifically, saturation power levels greatly influenced peak height intensities in a frequency-dependent manner for a number of metabolites, which markedly impacted the quantification of metabolites. We also investigated other NMR parameters to determine their effects on further quantitative accuracy and precision. Collectively, these findings highlight the importance of and need for consistent use of NMR parameter settings within and across centers in order to generate reliable, reproducible quantified NMR metabolomics data. PMID:24465670

  13. Variation of Solar, Interplanetary and Geomagnetic Parameters during Solar Cycles 21-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon; Kim, Bogyeong

    2013-06-01

    The length of solar cycle 23 has been prolonged up to about 13 years. Many studies have speculated that the solar cycle 23/24 minimum will indicate the onset of a grand minimum of solar activity, such as the Maunder Minimum. We check the trends of solar (sunspot number, solar magnetic fields, total solar irradiance, solar radio flux, and frequency of solar X-ray flare), interplanetary (interplanetary magnetic field, solar wind and galactic cosmic ray intensity), and geomagnetic (Ap index) parameters (SIG parameters) during solar cycles 21-24. Most SIG parameters during the period of the solar cycle 23/24 minimum have remarkably low values. Since the 1970s, the space environment has been monitored by ground observatories and satellites. Such prevalently low values of SIG parameters have never been seen. We suggest that these unprecedented conditions of SIG parameters originate from the weakened solar magnetic fields. Meanwhile, the deep 23/24 solar cycle minimum might be the portent of a grand minimum in which the global mean temperature of the lower atmosphere is as low as in the period of Dalton or Maunder minimum.

  14. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  15. Variation of plasma parameters of vacuum arc column with gap distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic model, we studied long-gap-distance vacuum arcs in a uniform axial magnetic field and determined the effect of gap distance varying in a large range on plasma parameters. Simulation results showed that with increasing gap distance, the parameters of the plasma near the cathode are almost invariant, except for ion number density, but the parameters of the plasma in front of the anode clearly vary; meanwhile, joule heat gradually becomes the main source of energy for the arc column. In a short gap, a clear current constriction can be found in the entire arc column. Whereas when the gap distance exceeds a certain value, a sharp contraction of the current only arises in front of the anode.

  16. Solar cycle variation of the statistical distribution of the solar wind ɛ parameter and its constituent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindale, E.; Chapman, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    We use 20 years of Wind solar wind observations to investigate the solar cycle variation of the solar wind driving of the magnetosphere. For the first time, we use generalized quantile-quantile plots to compare the statistical distribution of four commonly used solar wind coupling parameters, Poynting flux, B2, the ɛ parameter, and vB, between the maxima and minima of solar cycles 23 and 24. We find the distribution is multicomponent and has the same functional form at all solar cycle phases; the change in distribution is captured by a simple transformation of variables for each component. The ɛ parameter is less sensitive than its constituent variables to changes in the distribution of extreme values between successive solar maxima. The quiet minimum of cycle 23 manifests only in lower extreme values, while cycle 24 was less active across the full distribution range.

  17. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED: 2. Estimations of auroral parameters and magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; André, Nicolas; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Jupiter's auroral parameters are estimated from observations by a spectrometer EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) on board Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. EXCEED provides continuous auroral spectra covering the wavelength range over 80-148 nm from the whole northern polar region. The auroral electron energy is estimated using a hydrocarbon color ratio adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED, and the emission power in the long wavelength range 138.5-144.8 nm is used as an indicator of total emitted power before hydrocarbon absorption and auroral electron energy flux. The quasi-continuous observations by Hisaki provide the auroral electron parameters and their relation under different auroral activity levels. Short- (within < one planetary rotation) and long-term (> one planetary rotation) enhancements of auroral power accompany increases of the electron number flux rather than the electron energy variations. The relationships between the auroral electron energy (~70-400 keV) and flux (1026-1027/s, 0.08-0.9 μA/m2) estimated from the observations over a 40 day interval are in agreement with field-aligned acceleration theory when incorporating probable magnetospheric parameters. Applying the electron acceleration theory to each observation point, we explore the magnetospheric source plasma variation during these power-enhanced events. Possible scenarios to explain the derived variations are (i) an adiabatic variation of the magnetospheric plasma under a magnetospheric compression and/or plasma injection, and (ii) a change of the dominant auroral component from the main emission (main aurora) to the emission at the open-closed boundary.

  18. Fast T2-weighted MR imaging: impact of variation in pulse sequence parameters on image quality and artifacts.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Mirowitz, Scott A

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate in a phantom model the practical impact of alteration of key imaging parameters on image quality and artifacts for the most commonly used fast T(2)-weighted MR sequences. These include fast spin-echo (FSE), single shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE), and spin-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequences. We developed a composite phantom with different T1 and T2 values, which was evaluated while stationary as well as during periodic motion. Experiments involved controlled variations in key parameters including effective TE, TR, echo spacing (ESP), receive bandwidth (BW), echo train length (ETL), and shot number (SN). Quantitative analysis consisted of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image nonuniformity, full-width-at-half-maximum (i.e., blurring or geometric distortion) and ghosting ratio. Among the fast T(2)-weighted sequences, EPI was most sensitive to alterations in imaging parameters. Among imaging parameters that we tested, effective TE, ETL, and shot number most prominently affected image quality and artifacts. Short T(2) objects were more sensitive to alterations in imaging parameters in terms of image quality and artifacts. Optimal clinical application of these fast T(2)-weighted imaging pulse sequences requires careful attention to selection of imaging parameters.

  19. Benchmarking study of parameter variation when using signature fingerprints together with support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Alvarsson, Jonathan; Eklund, Martin; Andersson, Claes; Carlsson, Lars; Spjuth, Ola; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2014-11-24

    QSAR modeling using molecular signatures and support vector machines with a radial basis function is increasingly used for virtual screening in the drug discovery field. This method has three free parameters: C, γ, and signature height. C is a penalty parameter that limits overfitting, γ controls the width of the radial basis function kernel, and the signature height determines how much of the molecule is described by each atom signature. Determination of optimal values for these parameters is time-consuming. Good default values could therefore save considerable computational cost. The goal of this project was to investigate whether such default values could be found by using seven public QSAR data sets spanning a wide range of end points and using both a bit version and a count version of the molecular signatures. On the basis of the experiments performed, we recommend a parameter set of heights 0 to 2 for the count version of the signature fingerprints and heights 0 to 3 for the bit version. These are in combination with a support vector machine using C in the range of 1 to 100 and γ in the range of 0.001 to 0.1. When data sets are small or longer run times are not a problem, then there is reason to consider the addition of height 3 to the count fingerprint and a wider grid search. However, marked improvements should not be expected. PMID:25318024

  20. The effects of the variations of turbulence parameters on the observable turbulence statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2016-06-01

    In order to study how the statistical properties of the observational quantities of the turbulent molecular cloud models vary with different turbulence parameters, I use the artificially generated random numerical models based on Gaussian fields created by the code PYFC with different values of the 1D density Fourier spectral index βn, the turbulence driving parameter, i.e. the b parameter and the 1D Fourier velocity power spectral index βv. Then I calculate the line profiles of 13CO emission on every sight line. I derive the statistical properties of column density N, line intensity W, peak intensity Tpeak and velocity dispersion Vrms on every sight line. I discover that as βn increases, (1) the standard deviations σln (N/) and σln (W/) of the logarithmic column density ln (N/) and the logarithmic integrated intensity ln (W/) increase; (2) the number of the low Tpeak values becomes larger; (3) the probability distribution function (PDF) of Vrms inclines to left a little. As the b parameter increases, (1) the values of both σln (N/) and σln (W/) increase; (2) the numbers of both the low Tpeak values and the saturated Tpeak values become larger; (3) the PDF of Vrms inclines to left obviously. As βv increases, (1) the PDF of ln (W/) remains generally unchanged; (2) the PDF of Tpeak remains generally unchanged; (3) the PDF of Vrms inclines to left obviously. I also discuss the relationship among σN/, Mach number, the b parameter and βn.

  1. Neutron diffraction measurements and micromechanical modelling of temperature-dependent variations in TATB lattice parameters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yeager, John D.; Luscher, Darby J.; Vogel, Sven C.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W.

    2016-02-02

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. TATB-based explosives exhibit irreversible volume expansion (“ratchet growth”) when thermally cycled. A theoretical understanding of the relationship between anisotropy of the crystal, crystal orientation distribution (texture) of polycrystalline aggregates, and the intergranular interactions leading to this irreversible growth is necessary to accurately develop physics-based predictive models for TATB-based PBXs under various thermal environments. In this work, TATB lattice parameters were measured using neutron diffraction during thermal cycling of loose powder and a pressed pellet. The measured lattice parameters help clarify conflicting reports in the literaturemore » as these new results are more consistent with one set of previous results than another. The lattice parameters of pressed TATB were also measured as a function of temperature, showing some differences from the powder. This data is used along with anisotropic single-crystal stiffness moduli reported in the literature to model the nominal stresses associated with intergranular constraints during thermal expansion. The texture of both specimens were characterized and the pressed pellet exhibits preferential orientation of (001) poles along the pressing direction, whereas no preferred orientation was found for the loose powder. Lastly, thermal strains for single-crystal TATB computed from lattice parameter data for the powder is input to a self-consistent micromechanical model, which predicts the lattice parameters of the constrained TATB crystals within the pellet. The agreement of these model results with the diffraction data obtained from the pellet is discussed along with future directions of research.« less

  2. Latitudinal variations of cloud base height and lightning parameters in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E. R.; Boccippio, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed reduction in cloud-to-ground lightning in the new-equational zone is examined from the perspective of the width of the main negative charge region. Thermodynamic observations of cloud base height also show a climatological minimum value in the near-equatorial region. The association of low cloud base with both narrow updrafts and narrow changing zones may impede the bridging of the large air gap to ground, and thereby suppress cloud-to-ground lightning activity. This width dependence may be more important than the approx. 10% variation in height of the freezing level in the encouraging flashes to ground.

  3. Multivariate statistical analysis of diffusion imaging parameters using partial least squares: Application to white matter variations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Konukoglu, Ender; Coutu, Jean-Philippe; Salat, David H; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is a unique technology that allows the noninvasive quantification of microstructural tissue properties of the human brain in healthy subjects as well as the probing of disease-induced variations. Population studies of dMRI data have been essential in identifying pathological structural changes in various conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases (Salat et al., 2010; Rosas et al., 2006). The most common form of dMRI involves fitting a tensor to the underlying imaging data (known as diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI), then deriving parametric maps, each quantifying a different aspect of the underlying microstructure, e.g. fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity. To date, the statistical methods utilized in most DTI population studies either analyzed only one such map or analyzed several of them, each in isolation. However, it is most likely that variations in the microstructure due to pathology or normal variability would affect several parameters simultaneously, with differing variations modulating the various parameters to differing degrees. Therefore, joint analysis of the available diffusion maps can be more powerful in characterizing histopathology and distinguishing between conditions than the widely used univariate analysis. In this article, we propose a multivariate approach for statistical analysis of diffusion parameters that uses partial least squares correlation (PLSC) analysis and permutation testing as building blocks in a voxel-wise fashion. Stemming from the common formulation, we present three different multivariate procedures for group analysis, regressing-out nuisance parameters and comparing effects of different conditions. We used the proposed procedures to study the effects of non-demented aging, Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment on the white matter. Here, we present results demonstrating that the proposed PLSC-based approach can differentiate between effects of

  4. A size-based emphysema severity index: robust to the breath-hold-level variations and correlated with clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Lee, Minho; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the power-law exponents (D) of emphysema hole-size distributions as a competent emphysema index. Robustness to extreme breath-hold-level variations and correlations with clinical parameters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were investigated and compared to a conventional emphysema index (EI%). Patients and methods A total of 100 patients with COPD (97 males and three females of mean age 67±7.9 years) underwent multidetector row computed tomography scanning at full inspiration and full expiration. The diameters of the emphysematous holes were estimated and quantified with a fully automated algorithm. Power-law exponents (D) of emphysematous hole-size distribution were evaluated. Results The diameters followed a power-law distribution in all cases, suggesting the scale-free nature of emphysema. D of inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography of patients showed intraclass correlation coefficients >0.8, indicating statistically absolute agreement of different breath-hold levels. By contrast, the EI% failed to agree. Bland–Altman analysis also revealed the superior robustness of D to EI%. D also significantly correlated with clinical parameters such as airflow limitation, diffusion capacity, exercise capacity, and quality of life. Conclusion The D of emphysematous hole-size distribution is robust to breath-hold-level variations and sensitive to the severity of emphysema. This measurement may help rule out the confounding effects of variations in breath-hold levels. PMID:27536095

  5. The Rate-Size Trade-Off Structures Intraspecific Variation in Daphnia ambigua Life History Parameters

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, John P.; Hanley, Torrance C.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of trade-offs is necessary for understanding the evolution and maintenance of diversity. Here we employ the supply-demand (SD) body size optimization model to predict a trade-off between asymptotic body size and growth rate. We use the SD model to quantitatively predict the slope of the relationship between asymptotic body size and growth rate under high and low food regimes and then test the predictions against observations for Daphnia ambigua. Close quantitative agreement between observed and predicted slopes at both food levels lends support to the model and confirms that a ‘rate-size’ trade-off structures life history variation in this population. In contrast to classic life history expectations, growth and reproduction were positively correlated after controlling for the rate-size trade-off. We included 12 Daphnia clones in our study, but clone identity explained only some of the variation in life history traits. We also tested the hypothesis that growth rate would be positively related to intergenic spacer length (i.e. the growth rate hypothesis) across clones, but we found that clones with intermediate intergenic spacer lengths had larger asymptotic sizes and slower growth rates. Our results strongly support a resource-based optimization of body size following the SD model. Furthermore, because some resource allocation decisions necessarily precede others, understanding interdependent life history traits may require a more nested approach. PMID:24312518

  6. An optimal output feedback gain variation scheme for the control of plants exhibiting gross parameter changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, Daniel D.

    1987-01-01

    A concept for optimally designing output feedback controllers for plants whose dynamics exhibit gross changes over their operating regimes was developed. This was to formulate the design problem in such a way that the implemented feedback gains vary as the output of a dynamical system whose independent variable is a scalar parameterization of the plant operating point. The results of this effort include derivation of necessary conditions for optimality for the general problem formulation, and for several simplified cases. The question of existence of a solution to the design problem was also examined, and it was shown that the class of gain variation schemes developed are capable of achieving gain variation histories which are arbitrarily close to the unconstrained gain solution for each point in the plant operating range. The theory was implemented in a feedback design algorithm, which was exercised in a numerical example. The results are applicable to the design of practical high-performance feedback controllers for plants whose dynamics vary significanly during operation. Many aerospace systems fall into this category.

  7. Variation of statistical parameters of random wave groups along a large wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, A.; Shemer, L.

    2009-04-01

    Evolution of unidirectional random wave groups generated by a wavemaker in a 300 m long wave tank is investigated within three series of experiments for different values of the nonlinear parameter ɛ. Spatial evolution of numerous statistical wave field parameters is studied. It is demonstrated that the statistical characteristics depend on the local width of frequency spectrum and deviate from the Gaussian statistics: the probability of extremely large (the so-called freak) waves is the highest when the local spectral width attains maximum. It is also found that the distribution model of the 3rd order random wave field of Tayfun and Fedele (2007) provides an appropriate description of the observed phenomena. Tayfun, M.A., and Fedele, F. 2007 Wave height distributions and nonlinear effects. Ocean Eng., 34, 1631-1649.

  8. The variation in molecular gas depletion time among nearby galaxies: what are the main parameter dependences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Ling; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2014-09-01

    We re-analyse correlations between global molecular gas depletion time (tdep) and galaxy parameters for nearby galaxies from the COLD GASS survey. We improve on previous work of Saintonge et al. by estimating star formation rates using the combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer 22 μm data and by deriving tdep within a fixed aperture set by the beam size of gas observation. In our new study, we find correlations with much smaller scatter. Dependences of the depletion time on galaxy structural parameters such as stellar surface density and concentration index are now weak or absent. We demonstrate that the primary global parameter correlation is between tdep and specific star formation rate (sSFR); all other remaining correlations can be shown to be induced by this primary dependence. This implies that galaxies with high current-to-past-averaged star formation activity, will drain their molecular gas reservoir sooner. We then analyse tdep on 1 kpc scales in galactic discs using data from the HERA CO-Line Extragalactic Survey survey. There is remarkably good agreement between the global tdep-sSFR relation for the COLD GASS galaxies and that derived for 1 kpc scale grids in discs. This leads to the conclusion that the local molecular gas depletion time in galactic discs is dependent on the local fraction of young-to-old stars.

  9. Variational optimization of sub-grid scale convection parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zivkovic-Rothman, M.

    1997-11-25

    Under the DOE CHAMMP/CLIMATE Program, a convective scheme was developed for use in climate models. The purpose of the present study was to develop an adjoint model of its tangent-linear model. the convective scheme was integrated within a single column model which provides radiative-convective equilibrium solutions applicable to climate models. The main goal of this part of the project was to develop an adjoint of the scheme to facilitate the optimization of its convective parameters. For that purpose, adjoint sensitivities were calculated with the adjoint code. Parameter optimization was based on TOGA COARE data which were also used in this study to obtain integrations of the nonlinear and tangent-linear models as well as the integrations of the adjoint model. Some inadequacies of the inner IFA data array were found, and did not permit a single numerical integration during the entire 4 months of data. However, reliable monthly radiative-convective equilibrium solutions and associated adjoint sensitivities were obtained and used to bring about the parameter optimization.

  10. Variation in plasmonic (electronic) spectral parameters of Pr (III) and Nd (III) with varied concentration of moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Shubha; Limaye, S. N.

    2015-07-31

    It is said that the -4f shells behave as core and are least perturbed by changes around metal ion surrounding. However, there are evidences that-4f shells partially involved in direct moderator interaction. A systematic investigation on the plasmonic (electronic) spectral studies of some Rare Earths[RE(III).Mod] where, RE(III) = Pr(III),Nd(III) and Mod(moderator) = Y(III),La(III),Gd(III) and Lu(III), increased moderator concentration from 0.01 mol dm{sup −3} to 0.025 mol dm{sup −3} keeping the metal ion concentration at 0.01mol dm{sup −3} have been carried out. Variations in oscillator strengths (f), Judd-Ofelt parameters (T{sub λ}),inter-electronic repulsion Racah parameters (δE{sup k}),nephelauxetic ratio (β), radiative parameters (S{sub ED},A{sub T},β{sub R},T{sub R}). The values of oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters have been discussed in the light of coordination number of RE(III) metal ions, denticity and basicity of the moderators. The [RE(III).Mod] bonding pattern has been studies in the light of the change in Racah parameters and nephelauxetic ratio.

  11. Effect of Variation in Process Parameters on the Formation of Freckle in INCONEL 718 by Vacuum Arc Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianhui; Ward, R. Mark; Jacobs, Mike H.; Barratt, Mark D.

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the effect of variation in process parameters on the final ingot of INCONEL 718 during vacuum arc remelting, a 508-mm-diameter vacuum arc remelting (VAR) ingot of INCONEL 718 was produced under conditions of variation in electrode diameter and arc gap. It was sectioned and analyzed in the as-cast state. Freckle was found in the midradius and center regions when the electrode diameter and arc gap changed. The experimental results were discussed in relation to composition, current distribution, and fluid flow. Freckle formation was found to be associated with large changes in melting conditions probably resulting in significant perturbation of the fluid flow in the melt pool and mushy zone. Instability in the solidification process may contribute to the initiation and formation of freckle defects in INCONEL 718 ingot.

  12. Robust evaluation of statistical surface topography parameters using focus-variation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, E. N.; Gould, M.; Mujica-Schwann, N. P.

    2016-09-01

    Spatial bandwidth limitations frequently introduce large biases into the estimated values of rms roughness and autocorrelation length that are extracted from topography data on random rough surfaces. The biases can be particularly severe for focus-variation microscopy data because of the reduced lateral resolution (and therefore dynamic range) inherent in the technique. In this paper, we describe a measurement protocol—something similar to a deconvolution algorithm—that greatly reduces these biases. The measurement protocol is developed for the case of surfaces that are isotropic, and whose topography displays an autocovariance function that is exponential, with a single autocorrelation length. The protocol is first validated against Monte Carlo-generated mock surfaces of this form that have been filtered so as to simulate the lateral resolution and field-of-view limits of a particular commercial focus-variation microscope. It is found that accurate values of roughness and autocorrelation length can be extracted over a four octave range in autocorrelation length by applying the protocol, whereas errors without applying the protocol are a minimum of 30% even at the absolute optimum autocorrelation length. Then, microscopy data on eleven examples of rough, outdoor building materials are analyzed using the protocol. Even though the samples were not in any way selected to conform to the model’s assumptions, we find that applying the protocol yields extracted values of roughness and autocorrelation length for each surface that are highly consistent among datasets obtained at different magnifications (i.e. datasets obtained with different spatial bandpass limits). Publication of the US Government, not subject to copyright.

  13. Discriminant Analysis of 18F-Fluoro-Thymidine Kinetic Parameters to Predict Survival in Patients with Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wardak, Mirwais; Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus; Cloughesy, Timothy; Chen, Wei; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Czernin, Johannes; Phelps, Michael E.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to investigate if changes in 18F-FLT kinetic parameters, taken at an early stage after start of therapy, could predict overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with recurrent malignant glioma undergoing treatment with bevacizumab and irinotecan. Experimental Design High-grade recurrent brain tumors were investigated in 18 patients (8M, 10F), 26-76 yr. Each had 3 dynamic PET studies: at baseline, and after 2 weeks, and 6 weeks from the start of treatment. 2.0 MBq/kg of 18F-FLT was injected intravenously and dynamic PET images acquired for 1 hr. Factor analysis generated factor images from which blood and tumor uptake curves were derived. A 3-compartment, 2-tissue model was applied to estimate the tumor 18F-FLT kinetic rate constants using a metabolite and partial volume corrected input function. Different combinations of predictor variables were exhaustively searched in a discriminant function to accurately classify patients into their known OS and PFS groups. A leave-one-out cross-validation technique was used to assess the generalizability of the model predictions. Results In this study population, changes in single parameters such as standardized uptake value or influx rate constant did not accurately classify patients into their respective OS groups (<1yr and ≥1yr) [hit-ratios ≤ 78%]. However, changes in a set of 18F-FLT kinetic parameters could perfectly separate these two groups of patients [hit-ratio=100%] and were also able to correctly classify patients into their respective PFS groups (<100 days and ≥100 days) [hit-ratio=88%]. Conclusions Discriminant analysis using changes in 18F-FLT kinetic parameters early during treatment appears to be a powerful method for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic regimens. PMID:21868765

  14. Reproductive parameters of tropical lesser noddies respond to local variations in oceanographic conditions and weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticelli, David; Ramos, Jaime A.; Catry, Teresa; Pedro, Patricia; Paiva, Vitor H.

    2014-02-01

    Most attempts to link seabirds and climate/oceanographic effects have concerned the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with comparatively few studies in the tropical Indian Ocean. This paper examines the reproductive response of the lesser noddy Anous tenuirostris to temporal fluctuations in oceanographic and climatic conditions using 8 years of monitoring data from Aride Island (Seychelles), tropical Western Indian Ocean. We tested the hypothesis that breeding parameters (mean hatching date, mean egg size, hatching and fledging successes) and chick growth are influenced by local, seasonal oceanographic conditions as expressed by ocean primary productivity (surface chlorophyll-a concentrations; CC), sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed. We also examined the relationship between lesser noddy breeding parameters and climate conditions recorded at the basin-wide scale of the Indian Ocean (Indian Ocean Dipole Mode Index, DMI). Our findings suggest that birds had a tendency to lay slightly larger eggs during breeding seasons (years) with higher CC during April-June (pre-laying, laying and incubation periods). Hatching date was positively related to SST in April-June, with the regression parameters suggesting that each 0.5 °C increase in SST meant a delay of approx.10 days in hatching date. A negative linear relationship was also apparent between hatching success and SST in June-August (hatching and chick-rearing periods), while the quadratic regression models detected a significant effect of wind speed in June-August on fledging success. Body mass increments of growing chicks averaged over 7-day periods were positively related with (2-week) lagged CC values and negatively related with (2-week) lagged SST values. No significant relationship between DMI and lesser noddy breeding parameters was found, but DMI indices were strongly correlated with local SST. Altogether, our results indicate that the reproduction of this top marine predator is dictated by fluctuations in

  15. Analysis of the Intra-City Variation of Urban Heat Island and its Relation to Land Surface/cover Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerçek, D.; Güven, İ. T.; Oktay, İ. Ç.

    2016-06-01

    Along with urbanization, sealing of vegetated land and evaporation surfaces by impermeable materials, lead to changes in urban climate. This phenomenon is observed as temperatures several degrees higher in densely urbanized areas compared to the rural land at the urban fringe particularly at nights, so-called Urban Heat Island. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect is related with urban form, pattern and building materials so far as it is associated with meteorological conditions, air pollution, excess heat from cooling. UHI effect has negative influences on human health, as well as other environmental problems such as higher energy demand, air pollution, and water shortage. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect has long been studied by observations of air temperature from thermometers. However, with the advent and proliferation of remote sensing technology, synoptic coverage and better representations of spatial variation of surface temperature became possible. This has opened new avenues for the observation capabilities and research of UHIs. In this study, "UHI effect and its relation to factors that cause it" is explored for İzmit city which has been subject to excess urbanization and industrialization during the past decades. Spatial distribution and variation of UHI effect in İzmit is analysed using Landsat 8 and ASTER day & night images of 2015 summer. Surface temperature data derived from thermal bands of the images were analysed for UHI effect. Higher temperatures were classified into 4 grades of UHIs and mapped both for day and night. Inadequate urban form, pattern, density, high buildings and paved surfaces at the expanse of soil ground and vegetation cover are the main factors that cause microclimates giving rise to spatial variations in temperatures across cities. These factors quantified as land surface/cover parameters for the study include vegetation index (NDVI), imperviousness (NDISI), albedo, solar insolation, Sky View Factor (SVF), building envelope

  16. [Variations in fatty acids, tocopherol and other quality parameters of virgin olive oil subjected to refining process].

    PubMed

    Bonilla Polo, A; Murillo Ramos, J J; González Bonillo, J; Sanz Pérez, B

    1997-01-01

    In the refining process of the oil, this is subjected to extreme conditions, and there is an interest in knowing the comparative variation in the contents of fatty acids, alpha tocopherol and other quality indicating parameters during the refining process carried out under the same conditions as in industry, but in the laboratory. Refined oil is a product which meets the characteristics of the food regulations, but which, due to the decrease in the alpha tocopherol content and in polyunsaturated fatty acids, has decreased some of its excellent nutritional properties. The process with the greatest influence is saponification.

  17. [Variations in fatty acids, tocopherol and other quality parameters of virgin olive oil subjected to refining process].

    PubMed

    Bonilla Polo, A; Murillo Ramos, J J; González Bonillo, J; Sanz Pérez, B

    1997-01-01

    In the refining process of the oil, this is subjected to extreme conditions, and there is an interest in knowing the comparative variation in the contents of fatty acids, alpha tocopherol and other quality indicating parameters during the refining process carried out under the same conditions as in industry, but in the laboratory. Refined oil is a product which meets the characteristics of the food regulations, but which, due to the decrease in the alpha tocopherol content and in polyunsaturated fatty acids, has decreased some of its excellent nutritional properties. The process with the greatest influence is saponification. PMID:9477657

  18. Monthly variation of some parameters about internal solitary waves in the South China sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuqun; Xie, Jieshuo; Xu, Jiexin; Wang, Dongxiao; Chen, Zhiwu; Deng, Xiaodong; Long, Xiaomin

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, by non-dimensional analysis, it is found that finite-depth theory is more appropriate to the study of internal solitary waves (ISWs) in the South China Sea (SCS) than shallow-water theory. The 1-degree grid data of monthly mean temperature and salinity data at standard levels in the SCS are used to solve the linearized vertical eigenvalue problem. The nonlinear parameter and the wave phase speed are computed, then the nonlinear phase speed and the characteristic half-width of ISWs are calculated respectively by two different theories to investigate the difference between these two parameters in the SCS. The nonlinearity is the strongest near the continental slope of the SCS or islands where the bottom topography changes sharply, it is stronger in summer than that in winter; it increases (decreases) as pycnocline depth deepens (shallows), stratification strengthens (weakens) and pycnocline thickness thins (thickens). The nonlinear wave phase speed and the characteristic half-width are the largest in deep sea area, they then reduce peripherally in shallower water. The nonlinear wave phase speed in the SCS changes slightly with time, but the characteristic half-width changes somewhat larger with time. In most of the SCS basin, the nonlinear wave phase speed derived from shallow-water theory is very close to that derived from finite-depth theory, but the characteristic half-width derived from shallow-water theory is about 0.2-0.6 times larger than that derived from finite-depth theory. The ISW induced horizontal current velocity derived from shallow-water theory is larger than that derived from finite-depth theory. Some observed and numerical modeled ISW characteristic half-widths are compared with those derived from shallow-water and finite-depth theories, respectively. It is shown that, the characteristic half-widths derived from finite-depth theory agree better with observational and numerical modeled results than those derived from shallow

  19. Parameter variation and scenario analysis in impact assessments of emerging energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hanna Marie

    There is a global need for energy technologies that reduce the adverse impacts of societal progress and that address today's challenges without creating tomorrow's problems. Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) can support technology developers in achieving these prerequisites of sustainability by providing a systems perspective. However, modeling the early-stage scale up and impacts of technology systems may lead to unreliable or incomplete results due to a lack of representative technical, spatial, and temporal data. The goal of this dissertation is to support the acceleration of clean energy technology development by providing information about the regional variation of impacts and benefits resulting from plausible deployment scenarios. Three emerging energy technologies are selected as case studies: (1) brine management for carbon dioxide sequestration; (2) carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and sequestration; (3) stationary fuel cells for combined heat and power in commercial buildings. In all three case studies, priority areas are identified where more reliable data and models are necessary for reducing uncertainty, and vital information is revealed on how impacts vary spatially and temporally. Importantly, moving away from default technology and waste management hierarchies as a source of data fosters goal-driven systems thinking which in turn leads to the discovery of technology improvement potentials.

  20. Spatial variation of physicochemical and bacteriological parameters elucidation with GIS in Rangat Bay, Middle Andaman, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dheenan, P. S.; Jha, Dilip Kumar; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Ponmalar, A. Angelin; Venkateshwaran, P.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration, distribution of bacteria and physicochemical property of surface seawater in Rangat Bay, Middle Andaman, Andaman Islands (India). The bay experiences tidal variations. Perhaps physicochemical properties of seawater in Rangat Bay were found not to vary significantly. The concentration of faecal streptococci was high (2.2 × 103 CFU/100 mL) at creek and harbour area, whereas total coliforms were high (7.0 × 102 CFU/100 mL) at mangrove area. Similarly, total heterotrophic bacterial concentration was high (5.92 × 104 CFU/100 mL) in mangrove and harbour area. The Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus concentration was high (4.2 × 104 CFU/100 mL and 9 × 103 CFU/100 mL) at open sea. Cluster analysis showed grouping of stations in different tidal periods. The spatial maps clearly depicted the bacterial concentration pattern in the bay. The combined approach of multivariate analysis and spatial mapping techniques was proved to be useful in the current study.

  1. Variation in water chemistry parameters in the Clayburn Creek watershed, British Columbia during fall 2015.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Janmaat, A.; Clemence, E.; Faber, A.; Yakemchuk, A.; McCabe, M.; Toner, A.; Strangway, A.; Turner, S.; Sidhu, D.; Sidhu, B.; Sekhton, J.; Puri, K.; Paulson, D.; Mahil, G.; Leffers, R.; Kanda, S.; Gaultier, M.; Dhaliwal, H.

    2015-12-01

    faculty and students from the University of the Fraser Valley have conducted the time series sampling of water chemistry of the Fraser River at Fort Langley and five Fraser Valley tributaries as a member of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) organized by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. Clayburn Creek and Willband Creek in Abbotsford, British Columbiahave been part of this project and have been sampled for nutrient and major ion concentrations and parameters such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH and turbidity. This watershed is being threatened by increasing anthropogenic activity (agricultural, industrial and residential development) that may threaten the salmon that spawn in this watershed. Documenting the change in the water chemistry in this watershed as the seasons progress from a dry summer to a wet fall will yield a greater understanding of our impact on this watershed and may assist our attempts to protect this watershed.

  2. Displacement cascades and defect annealing in tungsten, Part III: The sensitivity of cascade annealing in tungsten to the values of kinetic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-07-01

    Object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations have been performed to investigate various aspects of cascade aging in bulk tungsten and to determine the sensitivity of the results to the kinetic parameters. The primary focus is on how the kinetic parameters affect the initial recombination of defects in the first few ns of a simulation. The simulations were carried out using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) code KSOME (kinetic simulations of microstructure evolution), using a database of cascades obtained from results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at various primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies and directions at temperatures of 300, 1025 and 2050 K. The OKMC model was parameterized using defect migration barriers and binding energies from ab initio calculations. Results indicate that, due to the disparate mobilities of SIA and vacancy clusters in tungsten, annealing is dominated by SIA migration even at temperatures as high as 2050 K. For 100 keV cascades initiated at 300 K recombination is dominated by annihilation of large defect clusters. But for all other PKA energies and temperatures most of the recombination is due to the migration and rotation of small SIA clusters, while all the large SIA clusters escape the cubic simulation cell. The inverse U-shape behavior exhibited by the annealing efficiency as a function of temperature curve, especially for cascades of large PKA energies, is due to asymmetry in SIA and vacancy clustering assisted by the large difference in mobilities of SIAs and vacancies. This annealing behavior is unaffected by the dimensionality of SIA migration persists over a broad range of relative mobilities of SIAs and vacancies.

  3. Relationship between human physiological parameters and geomagnetic variations of solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    Results presented concern influence of increased geomagnetic activity on some human physiological parameters. The blood pressure and heart rate of 86 volunteers were measured on working days in autumn 2001 (01/10 09/11) and in spring 2002 (08/04 28/05). These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained and analysed. Questionnaire information about subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also gathered. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The factors were the following: (1) planetary geomagnetic activity level estimated by Ap-index and divided into five levels; (2) gender males and females; (3) blood pressure degree persons in the group examined were divided into hypotensive, normotensive and hypertensive. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors’ levels. The average arterial blood pressure of the group was found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity level. The average increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure of the group examined reached 9%. This effect was present irrespectively of gender. Results obtained suppose that hypertensive persons have the highest sensitivity and the hypotensive persons have the lowest sensitivity of the arterial blood pressure to increase of geomagnetic activity. The results did not show significant changes in the heart rate. The percentage of the persons who reported subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also found to increase significantly with the geomagnetic activity increase and the highest sensitivity was revealed for the hypertensive females.

  4. Theoretical investigations of the spin Hamiltonian parameters and local angular variations for the trigonal V3+ centers in alum compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Shao-Yi; Hu, Xian-Fen; Kuang, Min-Quan

    2014-04-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters (zero-field splittings D, g factors g // and g ⊥) for V3+ in the alum compounds are theoretically studied using the perturbation formulas for these parameters for a 3d2 ion in the trigonally distorted octahedra. The contributions from the dynamical Jahn-Teller effect, the configuration interactions and the ligand orbital and spin-orbit coupling interactions are considered from the cluster approach in a uniform way. The angles in the deformed octahedra around V3+ ions are increased by 1.1°-2.7°, as compared with those ones for the host. The theoretical spin Hamiltonian parameters based on the above angular variations and the related effects show good agreement with the experimental data, which reveal that these effects (especially the Jahn-Teller effect) can bring forward significant influences on the spin Hamiltonian parameters, and should be taken into account in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. The contributions from the configuration interactions and the ligand orbital and spin-orbit coupling interactions are quantitatively involved from the cluster approach in a uniform way. The results are discussed.

  5. The Social Network of Tracer Variations and O(100) Uncertain Photochemical Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, D. D.; Labute, M.; Chowdhary, K.; Debusschere, B.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Simulating the atmospheric cycles of ozone, methane, and other radiatively important trace gases in global climate models is computationally demanding and requires the use of 100's of photochemical parameters with uncertain values. Quantitative analysis of the effects of these uncertainties on tracer distributions, radiative forcing, and other model responses is hindered by the "curse of dimensionality." We describe efforts to overcome this curse using ensemble simulations and advanced statistical methods. Uncertainties from 95 photochemical parameters in the trop-MOZART scheme were sampled using a Monte Carlo method and propagated through 10,000 simulations of the single column version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The variance of the ensemble was represented as a network with nodes and edges, and the topology and connections in the network were analyzed using lasso regression, Bayesian compressive sensing, and centrality measures from the field of social network theory. Despite the limited sample size for this high dimensional problem, our methods determined the key sources of variation and co-variation in the ensemble and identified important clusters in the network topology. Our results can be used to better understand the flow of photochemical uncertainty in simulations using CAM and other climate models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the DOE Office of Science through the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC).

  6. Variation of thermal parameters in two different color morphs of a diurnal poison toad, Melanophryniscus rubriventris (Anura: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Eduardo A; Vaira, Marcos; Quiroga, Lorena B; Akmentins, Mauricio S; Pereyra, Laura C

    2014-04-01

    We study the variation in thermal parameters in two contrasting populations Yungas Redbelly Toads (Melanophryniscus rubriventris) with different discrete color phenotypes comparing field body temperatures, critical thermal maximum and heating rates. We found significant differences in field body temperatures of the different morphs. Temperatures were higher in toads with a high extent of dorsal melanization. No variation was registered in operative temperatures between the study locations at the moment of capture and processing. Critical thermal maximum of toads was positively related with the extent of dorsal melanization. Furthermore, we founded significant differences in heating rates between morphs, where individuals with a high extent of dorsal melanization showed greater heating rates than toads with lower dorsal melanization. The color pattern-thermal parameter relationship observed may influence the activity patterns and body size of individuals. Body temperature is a modulator of physiological and behavioral functions in amphibians, influencing daily and seasonal activity, locomotor performance, digestion rate and growth rate. It is possible that some growth constraints may arise due to the relationship of color pattern-metabolism allowing different morphs to attain similar sizes at different locations instead of body-size clines.

  7. The first orbital parameters and period variation of the short-period eclipsing binary AQ Boo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Liyun; Pi, Qingfeng; Han, Xianming L.; Zhang, Xiliang; Lu, Hongpeng; Wang, Daimei; Li, TongAn

    2016-10-01

    We obtained the first VRI CCD light curves of the short-period contact eclipsing binary AQ Boo, which was observed on March 22 and April 19 in 2014 at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, and on January 20, 21 and February 28 in 2015 at Kunming station of Yunnan Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. Using our six newly obtained minima and the minima that other authors obtained previously, we revised the ephemeris of AQ Boo. By fitting the O-C (observed minus calculated) values of the minima, the orbital period of AQ Boo shows a decreasing tendency P˙ = - 1.47(0.17) ×10-7 days/year. We interpret the phenomenon by mass transfer from the secondary (more massive) component to the primary (less massive) one. By using the updated Wilson & Devinney program, we also derived the photometric orbital parameters of AQ Boo for the first time. We conclude that AQ Boo is a near contact binary with a low contact factor of 14.43%, and will become an over-contact system as the mass transfer continues.

  8. Variation of Biophysical Parameters of the Skin with Age, Gender, and Body Region

    PubMed Central

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Babakoohi, Shahab; Sarraf-Yazdy, Maryam; Fanian, Ferial; Kazerouni-Timsar, Ali; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Dowlati, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Understanding the physiological, chemical, and biophysical characteristics of the skin helps us to arrange a proper approach to the management of skin diseases. Objective. The aim of this study was to measure 6 biophysical characteristics of normal skin (sebum content, hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity) in a normal population and assess the effect of sex, age, and body location on them. Methods. Fifty healthy volunteers in 5 age groups (5 males and females in each) were enrolled in this study. A multifunctional skin physiology monitor (Courage & Khazaka electronic GmbH, Germany) was used to measure skin sebum content, hydration, TEWL, erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity in 8 different locations of the body. Results. There were significant differences between the hydration, melanin index, and elasticity of different age groups. Regarding the locations, forehead had the highest melanin index, where as palm had the lowest value. The mean values of erythema index and melanin index and TEWL were significantly higher in males and anatomic location was a significant independent factor for all of 6 measured parameters. Conclusion. Several biophysical properties of the skin vary among different gender, age groups, and body locations. PMID:22536139

  9. Variation of sesquiterpene lactone contents in different Arnica montana populations: influence of ecological parameters.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Andreas; Wallner, Teresa; Poschlod, Peter; Heilmann, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    In ten grassland or heathland sites along a geographic (north to south) and climatic gradient in Germany, flowerheads of Arnica montana were collected, and the total content of sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) as well as the content of the detected single compounds were determined. The ratios of helenalin (H)- and corresponding 11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin(DH)-type compounds were calculated. All habitats were characterised concerning the climatic and soil conditions, and the values obtained were correlated with SL contents according to univariate statistical analyses. All populations showed very similar and constant ratios of helenalin ( 1)/11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin ( 2) at around 1.5-2/1 irrespective of different ecological parameters. The ratio of helenalin/11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin esters was several fold higher in all samples, but it was nearly identical in every habitat among each other, except for the helenalin/11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin 2-methylbutyrate pair ( 5/ 11), which showed a constantly twofold higher H/DH ratio. However, the 6- O-isovalerylhelenalin content ( 6) showed highly significant correlations to climatic factors.

  10. Variation of patient imaging doses with scanning parameters for linac-integrated kilovoltage cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiongfei; Wang, Yunlai; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Ge, Ruigang; Yang, Jack

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the Elekta kilovoltage CBCT doses and the associated technical protocols with patient dosimetry estimation. Image guidance technique with cone-beam CT (CBCT) in radiation oncology on a daily basis can deliver a significant dose to the patient. To evaluate the patient dose from LINAC-integrated kV cone beam CT imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. CT dose index (CTDI) were measured with PTW TM30009 CT ion chamber in air, in head phantom and body phantom, respectively; with different combinations of tube voltage, current, exposure time per frame, collimator and gantry rotation range. Dose length products (DLP) were subsequently calculated to account for volume integration effects. The CTDI and DLP were also compared to AcQSim™ simulator CT for routine clinical protocols. Both CTDIair and CTDIw depended quadratically on the voltage, while linearly on milliampere x seconds (mAs) settings. It was shown that CTDIw and DLP had very close relationship with the collimator settings and the gantry rotation ranges. Normalized CTDIw for Elekta XVI™ CBCT was lower than that of ACQSim simulator CT owing to its pulsed radiation output characteristics. CTDIw can be used to assess the patient dose in CBCT due to its simplicity for measurement and reproducibility. Regular measurement should be performed in QA & QC program. Optimal image parameters should be chosen to reduce patient dose during CBCT. PMID:26405932

  11. Radiative heating and cooling in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus and responses to atmospheric and spectroscopic parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2015-11-01

    A sophisticated radiative transfer model that considers absorption, emission, and multiple scattering by gaseous and particulate constituents over the broad spectral range 0.125-1000 μm is applied to calculate radiative fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km). Responses of these quantities to spectroscopic and atmospheric parameter variations are examined in great detail. Spectroscopic parameter studies include the definition of an optimum spectral grid for monochromatic calculations as well as comparisons for different input data with respect to spectral line databases, continuum absorption, line shape factors, and solar irradiance spectra. Atmospheric parameter studies are based on distinct variations of an initial model data set. Analyses of actual variations of the radiative energy budget using atmospheric features that have been recently retrieved from Venus Express data will be subject of a subsequent paper. The calculated cooling (heating) rates are very reliable at altitudes below 95 (85) km with maximum uncertainties of about 0.25 K/day. Heating uncertainties may reach 3-5 K/day at 100 km. Using equivalent Planck radiation as solar insolation source in place of measured spectra is not recommended. Cooling rates strongly respond to variations of atmospheric thermal structure, while heating rates are less sensitive. The influence of mesospheric minor gas variations is small, but may become more important near the cloud base and in case of episodic SO2 boosts. Responses to cloud mode 1 particle abundance changes are weak, but variations of other mode parameters (abundances, cloud top and base altitudes) may significantly alter radiative temperature change rates up to 50% in Venus' lower mesosphere and upper troposphere. A new model for the unknown UV absorber for two altitude domains is proposed. It is not directly linked to cloud particle modes and permits an investigation of radiative effects regardless of

  12. Variations of clinical biochemical parameters of laying hens and broiler chickens fed aflatoxin-containing feed.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, A; Verde, M T; Gascon, M; Ramos, J; Gomez, J; Luco, D F; Chavez, G

    1994-03-01

    Two groups of 32 laying hens (Hyssex Brown) and two groups of 32 23-day-old (Hybro) broiler chickens were fed 2.5 and 5 parts/10(6) of aflatoxin in their diet for 4, 8, 16 and 32 days; 16 hens and 32 chicks were maintained as control groups (0 parts/10(6)). After the intoxication period, a clearance period was established of 1, 2, 4 and 8 days. Relative weights of liver and kidneys significantly increased in intoxicated hens, but not in broiler chickens. Histological lesions in both types of bird consisted of hepatic cell vacuolation with fatty infiltration. There was a significant decrease (P< 0.001) in egg production in the 5 parts/10(6) group, which started to recover during the clearance period. No morbidity or mortality due to the aflatoxicosis were observed in either type of bird. In intoxicated laying hens, cholesterol levels were not significantly (P> 0.05) different from control values, but triglyceride levels decreased (P< 0.001) in both intoxicated groups. The effect of aflatoxin on calcium and phosphorus levels was important, because on the 4th day their values decreased significantly. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum levels remained normal, whereas alanino aminotransferase (ALT) activity decreased in both intoxicated groups. The activity of serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and gammaglutamil transferase (GGT) increased significantly. In intoxicated broiler chickens, aflatoxins did not alter (P> 0.05) the biochemical parameters studied, except that the serum calcium concentration was lower in the 5 parts/10(6) group. These data indicated that in intoxicated laying hens, a severe clinical biochemical alteration was produced, and that this together with the hepatic lesions observed in hens and broilers may aid disease diagnosis.

  13. Displacement cascades and defect annealing in tungsten, Part III: The sensitivity of cascade annealing in tungsten to the values of kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-07-01

    A study has been performed using object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations to investigate various aspects of cascade aging in bulk tungsten (W) and to determine its sensitivity to the kinetic parameters. The primary focus is on how the kinetic parameters affect the intracascade recombination of defects. Results indicate that, due to the disparate mobilities of SIA and vacancy clusters, annealing is dominated by SIA migration even at 2050 K. It was found that for 100 keV cascades initiated at 300 K, recombination is dominated by the annihilation of large defect clusters, while for all the other primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies and temperatures, recombination is primarily due to the migration and rotation of small SIA clusters, while the large SIA clusters escape the simulation cell. The annealing efficiency exhibits an inverse U-shaped curve behavior with increasing temperature, especially at large PKA energies, caused by the asymmetry in SIA and vacancy clustering assisted by the large differences in their mobilities. This behavior is unaffected by the dimensionality of SIA migration, and it persists over a broad range of relative mobilities of SIAs and vacancies.

  14. Temporal variations in parameters reflecting terminal-electron-accepting processes in an aquifer contaminated with waste fuel and chlorinated solvents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Jennifer T.; Smith, Erik W.; Long, David T.; Hyndman, David W.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Klug, Michael J.; Velbel, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    A fundamental issue in aquifer biogeochemistry is the means by which solute transport, geochemical processes, and microbiological activity combine to produce spatial and temporal variations in redox zonation. In this paper, we describe the temporal variability of TEAP conditions in shallow groundwater contaminated with both waste fuel and chlorinated solvents. TEAP parameters (including methane, dissolved iron, and dissolved hydrogen) were measured to characterize the contaminant plume over a 3-year period. We observed that concentrations of TEAP parameters changed on different time scales and appear to be related, in part, to recharge events. Changes in all TEAP parameters were observed on short time scales (months), and over a longer 3-year period. The results indicate that (1) interpretations of TEAP conditions in aquifers contaminated with a variety of organic chemicals, such as those with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, must consider additional hydrogen-consuming reactions (e.g., dehalogenation); (2) interpretations must consider the roles of both in situ (at the sampling point) biogeochemical and solute transport processes; and (3) determinations of microbial communities are often necessary to confirm the interpretations made from geochemical and hydrogeological measurements on these processes.

  15. A comparative study of dried apple using hot air, intermittent and continuous microwave: evaluation of kinetic parameters and physicochemical quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Aghilinategh, Nahid; Rafiee, Shahin; Gholikhani, Abolfazl; Hosseinpur, Soleiman; Omid, Mahmoud; Mohtasebi, Seyed S; Maleki, Neda

    2015-11-01

    In the study, the effectiveness of intermittent (IMWD) and continuous (CMWD) microwave drying and hot air drying (HAD) treatments on apple slices were compared in terms of drying kinetics (moisture diffusivity and activation energy) and critical physicochemical quality attributes (color change, rehydration ratio, bulk density, and total phenol content (TPC) of the final dried product. The temperature, microwave power, air velocity, and pulse ratio (PR) applied in the experiments were 40-80°C, 200-600 W, 0.5-2 m/s, and 2-6, respectively. Results showed that IMWD and CMWD more effective than HAD in kinetic parameters and physicochemical quality attributes. Also, results indicated CMWD had the lowest and highest drying time and effective diffusivity. The exponential model for estimating IMWD activation energy, considering absolute power (1/P) and pulse ratio were also represented. The color change in apple slices dried by HAD showed the highest change. PMID:26788293

  16. Impact of physicochemical parameters on in vitro assembly and disassembly kinetics of recombinant triple-layered rotavirus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Maria Candida M; Mena, Jimmy A; Lopes, António; Ramírez, Octavio T; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Palomares, Laura A; Alves, Paula M

    2009-11-01

    Virus-like particles constitute potentially relevant vaccine candidates. Nevertheless, their behavior in vitro and assembly process needs to be understood in order to improve their yield and quality. In this study we aimed at addressing these issues and for that purpose triple- and double-layered rotavirus-like particles (TLP 2/6/7 and DLP 2/6, respectively) size and zeta potential were measured using dynamic light scattering at different physicochemical conditions, namely pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Both TLP and DLP were stable within a pH range of 3-7 and at 5-25 degrees C. Aggregation occurred at 35-45 degrees C and their disassembly became evident at 65 degrees C. The isoelectric points of TLP and DLP were 3.0 and 3.8, respectively. In vitro kinetics of TLP disassembly was monitored. Ionic strength, temperature, and the chelating agent employed determined disassembly kinetics. Glycerol (10%) stabilized TLP by preventing its disassembly. Disassembled TLP was able to reassemble by dialysis at high calcium conditions. VP7 monomers were added to DLP in the presence of calcium to follow in vitro TLP assembly kinetics; its assembly rate being mostly affected by pH. Finally, DLP and TLP were found to coexist under certain conditions as determined from all reaction products analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Overall, these results contribute to the design of new strategies for the improvement of TLP yield and quality by reducing the VP7 detachment from TLP.

  17. [Diurnal variation of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of cotton functional leaves under effects of soil salinity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-wei; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Ming-xing; Zhou, Ling-ling; Chen, Bing-lin; Zhou, Zhi-guo

    2011-07-01

    A two-year (2007-2008) pot experiment with cotton varieties Sumian 12 (salinity-sensitive) and Zhongmiansuo 44 (salinity-tolerance) was conducted at the Pailou experimental station of Nanjing Agricultural University to study the diurnal variation of the gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of cotton functional leaves under five levels (0, 0.35%, 0.60% , 0.85%, and 1.00%) of soil salinity. With the increase of soil salinity, the concentrations of Na+, Cl-, and Mg2+ in functional leaves increased, whereas the concentrations of K+ and Ca2+ decreased. The salinity level <0. 35% had little effects on the gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, but that >0.35% depressed the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) dramatically. At the salinity level >0.35%, the sensitivity of functional leaves to daytime photon flux density (PFD) and air temperature (Ta) enhanced, which in turn resulted in more severe photo- and temperature inhibition, and changed the diurnal variation patterns of Pn and stomatal conductance (Gs) from a one-peak curve to a constantly decreasing one. Along with the variations of daytime PED and Ta, the diurnal variation patterns of the maximum photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)), quantum yield of electron transport (phi(PS II), and photochemical quenching coefficient (q(P)) of functional leaves presented a V-shaped curve, with the minimum value appeared at 12:00-13:00, while the non-photochemical quenching coefficient (q(N)) showed a single-peak curve. Soil salinity decreased the F(v)/F(m), phi(PS II), and q(P) significantly, but increased the q(N) and enlarged its change trend. The comparatively low concentrations of Na+ and Cl- and the relatively high concentrations of K+ and Ca2+ in salt-tolerant Zhongmiansuo 44 functional leaves benefited the relative stability of PS II, and the maintenance of a relatively high thermal dissipation capacity could be one of the reasons for a high level of Pn at high salinity level.

  18. Variability of OH rotational temperatures on time scales from hours to 15 years by kinetic temperature variations, emission layer changes, and non-LTE effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Rotational temperatures derived from hydroxyl (OH) line emission are frequently used to study atmospheric temperatures at altitudes of about 87 km. While the measurement only requires intensities of a few bright lines of an OH band, the interpretation can be complicated. Ground-based temperatures are averages for the entire, typically 8 km wide emission layer. Variations in the rotational temperature are then caused by changes of the kinetic temperature and the OH emission profile. The latter can also be accompanied by differences in the layer-averaged efficiency of the thermalisation of the OH rotational level populations. Since this especially depends on the frequency of collisions with O_2, which is low at high altitudes, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) contribution to the measured temperatures can be significant and variable. In order to understand the impact of the different sources of OH rotational temperature variations from time scales of hours to a solar cycle, we have studied spectra from the astronomical echelle spectrographs X-shooter and UVES located at Cerro Paranal in Chile. While the X-shooter data spanning 3.5 years allowed us to measure temperatures for 25 OH and two O_2 bands, the UVES spectra cover no more than 10 OH bands simultaneously but a period of about 15 years. These data have been complemented by kinetic temperature and OH and O_2 emission profiles from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. Taking the O_2 and SABER kinetic temperatures as reference and considering the different band-dependent emission profiles, we could evaluate the contribution of non-LTE effects to the measured OH rotational temperatures depending on line set, band, and time. Non-LTE contributions are significant for most bands and can exceed 10 K. The amplitudes of their average nocturnal and seasonal variation are of the order of 1 to 2 K.

  19. Variations of immune parameters in the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus after infection with enteritis pathogen of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Xiao, Dongxue

    2016-03-01

    Enteritis has been increasingly recognized as one of the major obstacles for the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus mass culture success. In the present study, the intestinal bacteria strains of the lined seahorses H. erectus suffered from enteritis were isolated, then their pathogenicities were confirmed by artificial infection, and one pathogenic bacteria strain named DS3 was obtained. The median lethal dose (LD50) of strain DS3 for 10 days was determined. The seahorses with different infection levels of uninfected (control), early stage of infection (ESI) and late stage of infection (LSI) were respectively sampled at 0, 3, 6 and 9 days post infection, and 12 immune parameters in the plasma were analyzed. The strain DS3 identified with a biochemical test combined with a molecular method was Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and its LD50 for 10 days was 1.3 × 10(3) cfu/fish. Six parameters including monocytes/leucocytes, leucocytes phagocytic rate, interleukin-2, interferon-α, lysozyme and immunoglobulin M exhibited a generally similar variation trend: highest in the control, second in the ESI and lowest in the LSI throughout the entire experiment. In view of the infection level of V. parahaemolyticus to H. erectus is largely decided by the seahorse's own immune capacity, therefore, these immune parameters were high in the non- or slightly infected seahorses, and low in the severely infected individuals may be an indicator for immune level. These immune parameters may be reliable indicators for the juvenile and broodstock quality assessment. Moreover, clarification of the enteritis pathogen also provides guidances for targeted medicine choice for the lined seahorse.

  20. Variation in ion leakage parameters of two wheat genotypes with different Rht-B1 alleles in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Kocheva, Konstantina V; Landjeva, Svetlana P; Georgiev, Georgi I

    2014-12-01

    The reaction to soil drying was evaluated in two Triticum aestivum near-isogenic lines carrying different alleles of the height-reducing gene Rht-B1 based on an improved method for assessment of electrolyte leakage. The two lines were previously shown to differ in their physiological responses to induced water deficit stress. Drought was imposed for 6 days on 10-day-old seedlings. Ion efflux from leaves was measured conductometrically in multiple time points during the 24 h incubation period, and the obtained biphasic kinetics was interpreted according to a previously developed theoretical model proposing different leakage rates through the apoplast and the symplast. Most of the model parameters were able to properly differentiate the two closely related genotypes. The mutant Rht-B1c displayed lower and slower electrolyte leakage in comparison with the wild-type Rht-B1a. It was speculated that the Rht genes expressing defective DELLA proteins might be involved in water stress response through modulation of cell wall stiffness, which influences its capacity for ions retention, and also by their contribution to ROS detoxification, thus indirectly stabilizing cellular membranes. The presented analytical approach relating processes of ion and water flow in and out of the cell could be used for characterization of membrane and cell wall properties of different genotypes under normal and stress conditions.

  1. A Variation of the F-Test for Determining Statistical Relevance ofParticular Parameters in EXAFS Fits

    SciTech Connect

    Downward, L.; Booth, C.H.; Lukens, W.W.; Bridges, F.

    2006-07-25

    A general problem when fitting EXAFS data is determining whether particular parameters are statistically significant. The F-test is an excellent way of determining relevancy in EXAFS because it only relies on the ratio of the fit residual of two possible models, and therefore the data errors approximately cancel. Although this test is widely used in crystallography (there, it is often called a 'Hamilton test') and has been properly applied to EXAFS data in the past, it is very rarely applied in EXAFS analysis. We have implemented a variation of the F-test adapted for EXAFS data analysis in the RSXAP analysis package, and demonstrate its applicability with a few examples, including determining whether a particular scattering shell is warranted, and differentiating between two possible species or two possible structures in a given shell.

  2. Determination of kinetic parameters of fermentation processes by a continuous unsteady-state method: Application to the alcoholic fermentation of D-xylose by Pichia stipitis

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, H.; Nunez, M.J.; Lema, J.M. ); Chamy, R. )

    1993-05-01

    A quick technique for determination of kinetic parameters of fermentation processes is proposed and applied to the transformation of D-xylose into ethanol by Pichi stipitis. The commonly used method to evaluate these parameters is based on achieving several steady states. In the proposed procedure, [mu][sub m] and K[sub S] can be determined from only one steady state, by provoking a disturbance over it, after allowing the system to return to the original conditions. The main difference between the steady and unsteady state methods is the required fermentation time; while the former method lasted 350 h, the latter required a period 25 times lower. Kinetic and stoichiometric parameters were determined with both methods under anoxic and limited oxygen concentration conditions. Results from the two methods were compared, giving only 2% and 4.5% differences in the values of K[sub S] and [mu][sub m], respectively, under anoxic conditions; 12.5% for K[sub S] and a little over 4% for [mu][sub m] were the deviations under the latter ones.

  3. Assessment and parameter identification of simplified models to describe the kinetics of semi-continuous biomethane production from anaerobic digestion of green and food waste.

    PubMed

    Owhondah, Raymond O; Walker, Mark; Ma, Lin; Nimmo, Bill; Ingham, Derek B; Poggio, Davide; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical reactions occurring during anaerobic digestion have been modelled using reaction kinetic equations such as first-order, Contois and Monod which are then combined to form mechanistic models. This work considers models which include between one and three biochemical reactions to investigate if the choice of the reaction rate equation, complexity of the model structure as well as the inclusion of inhibition plays a key role in the ability of the model to describe the methane production from the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of green waste (GW) and food waste (FW). A parameter estimation method was used to investigate the most important phenomena influencing the biogas production process. Experimental data were used to numerically estimate the model parameters and the quality of fit was quantified. Results obtained reveal that the model structure (i.e. number of reactions, inhibition) has a much stronger influence on the quality of fit compared with the choice of kinetic rate equations. In the case of GW there was only a marginal improvement when moving from a one to two reaction model, and none with inclusion of inhibition or three reactions. However, the behaviour of FW digestion was more complex and required either a two or three reaction model with inhibition functions for both ammonia and volatile fatty acids. Parameter values for the best fitting models are given for use by other authors.

  4. The moments of the breakthrough curves of instantaneously and kinetically sorbing solutes in heterogeneous geologic media: Prediction and parameter inference from field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Yoram; Cushey, Mark A.; Wilson, Amy

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents a concise methodology for estimating the moments of the breakthrough curves for tracers and reactive solutes in heterogeneous aquifers. Under some conditions these are also the temporal or travel time moments between a source and a given destination downstream. The temporal moments of tracers as well as instantaneously or kinetically sorbing solutes, characterized by linear isotherms, are expressed in terms of a few parameters which characterize the chemical reactions and the spatial distribution and correlation structure of the hydraulic conductivity. The chemical reaction parameters are assumed to be homogeneous. The estimated moments can also be made conditional to field measurements. Applications for the case of uniform mean flow are presented, but the general approach can be applied for other flow regimes such as injection-pumping well doublets. Physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes are represented by mobile-immobile domains and two-site models, respectively. The estimated temporal moments can be used for both predictive purposes as well as for interpretation of field experiments. These two objectives are pursued in this paper. A significant advantage of the solution is that it does not require the assumptions of Gaussianity or log Gaussianity of the travel times. Throughout the discussion the combined and relative effects of the mass transfer and kinetic parameters and the spatial variability of the conductivity on the travel time moments are evaluated.

  5. Stratification based on reproductive state reveals contrasting patterns of age-related variation in demographic parameters in the kittiwake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Monnat, J.-Y.

    2000-01-01

    Heterogeneity in individual quality can be a major obstacle when interpreting age-specific variation in life-history traits. Heterogeneity is likely to lead to within-generation selection, and patterns observed at the population level may result from the combination of hidden patterns specific to subpopulations. Population-level patterns are not relevant to hypotheses concerning the evolution of age-specific reproductive strategies if they differ from patterns at the individual level. We addressed the influence of age and a variable used as a surrogate of quality (yearly reproductive state) on survival and breeding probability in the kittiwake. We found evidence of an effect of age and quality on both demographic parameters. Patterns observed in breeders are consistent with the selection hypothesis, which predicts age-related increases in survival and traits positively correlated with survival. Our results also reveal unexpected age effects specific to subgroups: the influence of age on survival and future breeding probability is not the same in nonbreeders and breeders. These patterns are observed in higher-quality breeding habitats, where the influence of extrinsic factors on breeding state is the weakest. Moreover, there is slight evidence of an influence of sex on breeding probability (not on survival), but the same overall pattern is observed in both sexes. Our results support the hypothesis that age-related variation in demographic parameters observed at the population level is partly shaped by heterogeneity among individuals. They also suggest processes specific to subpopulations. Recent theoreticaI developments lay emphasis on integration of sources of heterogeneity in optimization models to account for apparently 'sub-optimal' empirical patterns. Incorporation of sources of heterogeneity is also the key to investigation of age-related reproductive strategies in heterogeneous populations. Thwarting 'heterogeneity's ruses' has become a major challenge: for

  6. Variations in Quercus sp. pollen seasons (1996-2011) in Poznań, Poland, in relation to meteorological parameters.

    PubMed

    Grewling, Lukasz; Jackowiak, Bogdan; Smith, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to supply detailed information about oak (Quercus sp.) pollen seasons in Poznań, Poland, based on a 16-year aerobiological data series (1996-2011). The pollen data were collected using a volumetric spore trap of the Hirst design located in Poznań city center. The limits of the pollen seasons were calculated using the 95 % method. The influence of meteorological parameters on temporal variations in airborne pollen was examined using correlation analysis. Start and end dates of oak pollen seasons in Poznań varied markedly from year-to-year (14 and 17 days, respectively). Most of the pollen grains (around 75 % of the seasonal pollen index) were recorded within the first 2 weeks of the pollen season. The tenfold variation was observed between the least and the most intensive pollen seasons. These fluctuations were significantly related to the variation in the sum of rain during the period second fortnight of March to first fortnight of April the year before pollination (r = 0.799; p < 0.001). During the analyzing period, a significant advance in oak pollen season start dates was observed (-0.55 day/year; p = 0.021), which was linked with an increase in the mean temperature during the second half of March and first half of April (+0.2 °C; p = 0.014). Daily average oak pollen counts correlated positively with mean and maximum daily temperatures, and negatively with daily rainfall and daily mean relative humidity.

  7. The time variations in the parameters of the volumetric strain response to the tidal and baric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepantsev, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters describing the state of the geological medium include its response to the continuous external impacts, which characterizes the structure of the medium and the stresses accumulated in it. In the present paper, through analyzing the long time series of the volumetric strain monitoring data in the nearsurface crustal layer, which were obtained by the American geophysicists under the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) project within the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault, the time behavior of the volumetric strain response to the separate components of the tides and the air pressure impacts is considered. The analysis of the response regime at the different observational stations suggests a significant influence of the local structural features and tectonic processes at the considered sites of the volumetric strain observations. The estimate of the variations in the partial information from the individual observations (values) is used for improving the reliability of identifying the amplitude peculiarities of the response when synchronizing the variations of the set of the tidal components. It is established that at the PKDLT observation point, a synchronous increase in the transfer coefficient of the tidal impact of the M 2, O 1, and L 2 components two years before the Parkfield earthquake of 2004 took place.

  8. Is it possible to study the kinetic parameters of interaction between PNA and parallel and antiparallel DNA by stopped-flow fluorescence?

    PubMed

    Barbero, N; Cauteruccio, S; Thakare, P; Licandro, E; Viscardi, G; Visentin, S

    2016-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are among the most interesting and versatile artificial structural mimics of nucleic acids and exhibit peculiar and important properties (i.e. high chemical stability, and a high resistance to cellular enzymes and nucleases). Despite their unnatural structure, they are able to recognize and bind DNA and RNA in a very high, specific and selective manner. One of the most popular, easy and reliable method to measure the stability of PNA-DNA hybrid systems is the melting temperature but the thermodynamic data are obtained using a big quantity of materials failing to provide information on the kinetics of the interaction. In the present work, the PNA decamer 6, with the TCACTAGATG sequence of nucleobases, and the corresponding fluorescent PNA-FITU (fluorescein isothiourea) decamer 8 were synthesized with standard manual Boc-based chemistry. The interaction of the PNA-FITU with parallel and antiparallel DNA has been studied by stopped-flow fluorescence, which is proposed as an alternative technique to obtain the kinetic parameters of the binding. The great advantage of using the stopped-flow technique is the possibility of studying the kinetics of the PNA-DNA duplex formation in a physiological environment. In particular, fluorescence stopped-flow technique has been exploited to compare the affinity of two PNA-DNA duplexes since it can discriminate between parallel and antiparallel DNA binding.

  9. Is it possible to study the kinetic parameters of interaction between PNA and parallel and antiparallel DNA by stopped-flow fluorescence?

    PubMed

    Barbero, N; Cauteruccio, S; Thakare, P; Licandro, E; Viscardi, G; Visentin, S

    2016-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are among the most interesting and versatile artificial structural mimics of nucleic acids and exhibit peculiar and important properties (i.e. high chemical stability, and a high resistance to cellular enzymes and nucleases). Despite their unnatural structure, they are able to recognize and bind DNA and RNA in a very high, specific and selective manner. One of the most popular, easy and reliable method to measure the stability of PNA-DNA hybrid systems is the melting temperature but the thermodynamic data are obtained using a big quantity of materials failing to provide information on the kinetics of the interaction. In the present work, the PNA decamer 6, with the TCACTAGATG sequence of nucleobases, and the corresponding fluorescent PNA-FITU (fluorescein isothiourea) decamer 8 were synthesized with standard manual Boc-based chemistry. The interaction of the PNA-FITU with parallel and antiparallel DNA has been studied by stopped-flow fluorescence, which is proposed as an alternative technique to obtain the kinetic parameters of the binding. The great advantage of using the stopped-flow technique is the possibility of studying the kinetics of the PNA-DNA duplex formation in a physiological environment. In particular, fluorescence stopped-flow technique has been exploited to compare the affinity of two PNA-DNA duplexes since it can discriminate between parallel and antiparallel DNA binding. PMID:27611452

  10. Determination of pyrolysis kinetic parameters of San Miguel (Texas) lignite. Final report. [650 to 800/sup 0/C; atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, U.; Selim, S.; Jih, J.

    1982-06-01

    The thermal decomposition of lignite in the absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) is important as a part of processes for converting lignite to more desirable fuels or for recovery of energy from deep basin lignite. The pyrolysis reaction kinetics of San Miguel (Texas) lignite has been experimentally studied in the temperature range 650 to 800/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure. Gas and tar produced were collected and measured, and weight change as a function of time was measured. Lignite decomposition into gas, tar, and char can be described by three parallel first order reactions. In the temperature range investigated, the rates of pyrolysis are controlled by intraparticle transport phenomena. A simplified kinetic-transport model was used to estimate the individual reaction rate constants and activation energies. The gas produced was found to consist primarily of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen, with some methane, ethane, ethylene, and a trace C/sub 3/ compounds. Sample temperature increases and theoretical calculations indicate that oxygen from the lignite structure may be oxidizing lignite or pyrolysis products. It is recommended that, after suitable equipment modifications, the investigation be extended to study combined oxidation and pyrolysis of lignite.

  11. Site and age class variation of hematologic parameters for female Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) of Northern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kathryn J; Perryman, Barry L; Holcombe, Dale W

    2010-01-01

    Decreases in Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) numbers throughout the western United States have been attributed to declining habitat quantity and quality. Improving our understanding of how interannual ecologic site variability affects nutritional status and fitness of different bird age classes will lead to improved land management and conservation strategies. Greater Sage Grouse were sampled from two Population Management Units located in northern Nevada, United States: Tuscarora (TU) and Lone Willow (LW) during 15 March-11 April 2004 and 14-20 March 2005. Twenty (16 yearlings, four adults) and 17 (7 yearlings, 10 adults) female Sage Grouse were captured and bled during 2004, and 12 (four yearlings, eight adults) and 14 (10 yearlings, four adults) were sampled during 2005 in TU and LW, respectively. Samples were evaluated to examine the effect of site, age, and year on specific hematologic and serum chemistry parameters. Several differences between age classes, sites, and years were detected for a number of fitness indicators; however, actual values fell within normal ranges of variation for Sage Grouse or other avian species. Differences were also detected for several parameters more closely related to reproductive fitness, including total plasma and serum proteins, and serum calcium and phosphorus. Yearlings had lower plasma protein (P<0.0001) and lower serum protein than did adults (P=0.0003). In 2004, TU yearlings had lower serum calcium levels than the adults, and in 2005, LW yearlings had lower levels than adults (P=0.008). Females on the TU site had lower serum phosphorus than the LW females (P<0.0001). Overall, adult females weighed more than yearlings (P=0.0004). Lower values found in yearlings, and on the TU management unit, indicate a lower production potential, particularly in unfavorable years. A lower intrinsic ability of yearlings to reproduce, combined with lower nutrition potentials and associated annual variations on certain types

  12. Prostate-specific Antigen Density Variation Rate as a Potential Guideline Parameter for Second Prostate Cancer Detection Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gan-Sheng; Lyv, Jin-Xing; Li, Gang; Yan, Chun-Yin; Hou, Jian-Quan; Pu, Jin-Xian; Ding, Xiang; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic value of current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests is challenged by the poor detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) in repeat prostate biopsy. In this study, we proposed a novel PSA-related parameter named PSA density variation rate (PSADVR) and designed a clinical trial to evaluate its potential diagnostic value for detecting PCa on a second prostate biopsy. Methods: Data from 184 males who underwent second ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy 6 months after the first biopsy were included in the study. The subjects were divided into PCa and non-PCa groups according to the second biopsy pathological results. Prostate volume, PSA density (PSAD), free-total PSA ratio, and PSADVR were calculated according to corresponding formulas at the second biopsy. These parameters were compared using t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test between PCa and non-PCa groups, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate their predictability on PCa detection. Results: PCa was detected in 24 patients on the second biopsy. Mean values of PSA, PSAD, and PSADVR were greater in the PCa group than in the non-PCa group (8.39 μg/L vs. 7.16 μg/L, 0.20 vs. 0.16, 14.15% vs. −1.36%, respectively). PSADVR had the largest area under the curve, with 0.667 sensitivity and 0.824 specificity when the cutoff was 10%. The PCa detection rate was significantly greater in subjects with PSADVR >10% than PSADVR ≤10% (28.6% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.001). In addition, PSADVR was the only parameter in this study that showed a significant correlation with mid-to-high-risk PCa (r = 0.63, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that PSADVR improved the PCa detection rate on second biopsies, especially for mid-to-high-risk cancers requiring prompt treatment. PMID:27453228

  13. Network topology and parameter estimation: from experimental design methods to gene regulatory network kinetics using a community based approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate estimation of parameters of biochemical models is required to characterize the dynamics of molecular processes. This problem is intimately linked to identifying the most informative experiments for accomplishing such tasks. While significant progress has been made, effective experimental strategies for parameter identification and for distinguishing among alternative network topologies remain unclear. We approached these questions in an unbiased manner using a unique community-based approach in the context of the DREAM initiative (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessment of Methods). We created an in silico test framework under which participants could probe a network with hidden parameters by requesting a range of experimental assays; results of these experiments were simulated according to a model of network dynamics only partially revealed to participants. Results We proposed two challenges; in the first, participants were given the topology and underlying biochemical structure of a 9-gene regulatory network and were asked to determine its parameter values. In the second challenge, participants were given an incomplete topology with 11 genes and asked to find three missing links in the model. In both challenges, a budget was provided to buy experimental data generated in silico with the model and mimicking the features of different common experimental techniques, such as microarrays and fluorescence microscopy. Data could be bought at any stage, allowing participants to implement an iterative loop of experiments and computation. Conclusions A total of 19 teams participated in this competition. The results suggest that the combination of state-of-the-art parameter estimation and a varied set of experimental methods using a few datasets, mostly fluorescence imaging data, can accurately determine parameters of biochemical models of gene regulation. However, the task is considerably more difficult if the gene network topology is not completely

  14. Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of Coal/Corn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric Analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Huffman, Gerald; Shah, Naresh; Honaker, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The thermal evolution profiles and kinetic parameters for the pyrolysis of two Montana coals (DECS-38 subbituminous coal and DECS-25 lignite coal), one biomass sample (corn stover), and their blends (10%, 20%, and 30% by weight of corn stover) have been investigated at a heating rate of 5°C/min in an inert nitrogen atmosphere, using thermogravimetric analysis. The thermal evolution profiles of subbituminous coal and lignite coal display only one major peak over a wide temperature distribution, ~152–814°C and ~175–818°C, respectively, whereas the thermal decomposition profile for corn stover falls in a much narrower band than that of the coals, ~226–608°C. Themore » nonlinearity in the evolution of volatile matter with increasing percentage of corn stover in the blends verifies the possibility of synergistic behavior in the blends with subbituminous coal where deviations from the predicted yield ranging between 2% and 7% were observed whereas very little deviations (1%–3%) from predicted yield were observed in blends with lignite indicating no significant interactions with corn stover. In addition, a single first-order reaction model using the Coats-Redfern approximation was utilized to predict the kinetic parameters of the pyrolysis reaction. The kinetic analysis indicated that each thermal evolution profile may be represented as a single first-order reaction. Three temperature regimes were identified for each of the coals while corn stover and the blends were analyzed using two and four temperature regimes, respectively.« less

  15. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  16. Kinetic modeling of light limitation and sulfur deprivation effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Part I. Model development and parameter identification.

    PubMed

    Fouchard, Swanny; Pruvost, Jérémy; Degrenne, Benoit; Titica, Mariana; Legrand, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green microalga capable of turning its metabolism towards H2 production under specific conditions. However this H2 production, narrowly linked to the photosynthetic process, results from complex metabolic reactions highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the cells. A kinetic model has been developed to relate culture evolution from standard photosynthetic growth to H2 producing cells. It represents transition in sulfur-deprived conditions, known to lead to H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the two main processes then induced which are an over-accumulation of intracellular starch and a progressive reduction of PSII activity for anoxia achievement. Because these phenomena are directly linked to the photosynthetic growth, two kinetic models were associated, the first (one) introducing light dependency (Haldane type model associated to a radiative light transfer model), the second (one) making growth a function of available sulfur amount under extracellular and intracellular forms (Droop formulation). The model parameters identification was realized from experimental data obtained with especially designed experiments and a sensitivity analysis of the model to its parameters was also conducted. Model behavior was finally studied showing interdependency between light transfer conditions, photosynthetic growth, sulfate uptake, photosynthetic activity and O2 release, during transition from oxygenic growth to anoxic H2 production conditions.

  17. Crystal Growth Simulations To Establish Physically Relevant Kinetic Parameters from the Empirical Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, Eric D.; Folmer, Jacob C.W.; Martin, James D.

    2013-12-05

    A series of simulations was performed to enable interpretation of the material and physical significance of the parameters defined in the Kolmogorov, Johnson and Mehl, and Avrami (KJMA) rate expression commonly used to describe phase boundary controlled reactions of condensed matter. The parameters k, n, and t0 are shown to be highly correlated, which if unaccounted for seriously challenge mechanistic interpretation. It is demonstrated that rate measurements exhibit an intrinsic uncertainty without precise knowledge of the location and orientation of nucleation with respect to the free volume into which it grows. More significantly, it is demonstrated that the KJMA rate constant k is highly dependent on sample size. However, under the simulated conditions of slow nucleation relative to crystal growth, sample volume and sample anisotropy correction affords a means to eliminate the experimental condition dependence of the KJMA rate constant, k, producing the material-specific parameter, the velocity of the phase boundary, vpb.

  18. Phenotypic and genotypic background underlying variations in fatty acid composition and sensory parameters in European bovine breeds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Consuming moderate amounts of lean red meat as part of a balanced diet valuably contributes to intakes of essential nutrients. In this study, we merged phenotypic and genotypic information to characterize the variation in lipid profile and sensory parameters and to represent the diversity among 15 cattle populations. Correlations between fat content, organoleptic characteristics and lipid profiles were also investigated. Methods A sample of 436 largely unrelated purebred bulls belonging to 15 breeds and reared under comparable management conditions was analyzed. Phenotypic data -including fatness score, fat percentage, individual fatty acids (FA) profiles and sensory panel tests- and genotypic information from 11 polymorphisms was used. Results The correlation coefficients between muscle total lipid measurements and absolute vs. relative amounts of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) were in opposite directions. Increasing carcass fat leads to an increasing amount of FAs in triglycerides, but at the same time the relative amount of PUFAs is decreasing, which is in concordance with the negative correlation obtained here between the percentage of PUFA and fat measurements, as well as the weaker correlation between total phospholipids and total lipid muscle content compared with neutral lipids. Concerning organoleptic characteristics, a negative correlation between flavour scores and the percentage of total PUFA, particularly to n-6 fraction, was found. The correlation between juiciness and texture is higher than with flavour scores. The distribution of SNPs plotted by principal components analysis (PCA) mainly reflects their known trait associations, although influenced by their specific breed allele frequencies. Conclusions The results presented here help to understand the phenotypic and genotypic background underlying variations in FA composition and sensory parameters between breeds. The wide range of traits and breeds studied, along with the genotypic

  19. The ratio of the kinetic inductance to the geometric inductance: a key parameter for the frequency tuning of the THz semiconductor split-ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jiawei; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2013-08-26

    By introducing the frequency tuning sensitivity, an analytical model based on equivalent LC circuit is developed for the relative frequency tuning range of THz semiconductor split-ring resonator (SRR). And the model reveals that the relative tuning range is determined by the ratio of the kinetic inductance to the geometric inductance (RKG). The results show that under the same carrier density variation, a larger RKG results in a larger relative tuning range. Based on this model, a stacked SRR-dimer structure with larger RKG compared to the single SRR due to the inductive coupling is proposed, which improves the relative tuning range effectively. And the results obtained by the simple analytical model agree well with the numerical FDTD results. The presented analytical model is robust and can be used to analyze the relative frequency tuning of other tunable THz devices.

  20. Microbial maximal specific growth rate as a square-root function of biomass yield and two kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wilson W; Liao, James C

    2009-11-01

    Understanding how growth rates changes under different perturbations is fundamental to many aspect of microbial physiology. In this work, we experimentally showed that maximal specific growth rate is a square-root function of the biomass yield, the substrate turnover number, and the maximum synthesis rate of the substrate transporter under that condition. We used Escherichia coli cultures in lactose minimal medium as a model system by introducing genetic modifications, in vitro evolution, and ethanol stress to the cell. Deletion of crr affected all three parameters in different directions while deletion of ptsG decreased only the biomass yield. Ethanol stress negatively impacted all three parameters, while anaerobicity decreased biomass yield and transporter synthesis rate. In addition, laboratory evolution increased the growth rate in lactose mostly through enhancing the expression rate of the lac operon. Despite all these changes, the growth rate of the perturbed strain was successfully related to the three parameters by the square-root equation. Thus, this square-root relationship provides insight into how growth rate is altered by different physiological parameters. PMID:19712746

  1. Seasonal variation in meteorological parameters and office, ambulatory and home blood pressure: predicting factors and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, George S; Myrsilidi, Aikaterini; Kollias, Anastasios; Destounis, Antonios; Roussias, Leonidas; Kalogeropoulos, Petros

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between seasonal variations in blood pressure (BP) and the corresponding changes in meteorological parameters and weather-induced patients' discomfort. Hypertensives on stable treatment were assessed in winter-1, summer and winter-2 with clinic (CBP), home (HBP) and 24-hour ambulatory BP (ABP). Discomfort indices derived from temperature, humidity and atmospheric pressure that reflected subjects' discomfort were evaluated. Symptomatic orthostatic hypotension was assessed with a questionnaire. Sixty subjects (mean age 65.1±8.8 [s.d.], 39 men) were analyzed. CBP, HBP and daytime ABP were lower in summer than in winter (P<0.01). Nighttime ABP was unchanged, which resulted in a 55% higher proportion of non-dippers (P<0.001). All the discomfort indices that reflected weather-induced subjects' discomfort were higher in summer (P<0.05) and systolic daytime ABP was <110 mm Hg in 15 subjects (25%). Seasonal changes in temperature and the discomfort indices were correlated with BP changes (P<0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that winter BP levels, seasonal differences in temperature, female gender and the use of diuretics predicted the summer BP decline. In conclusion, all aspects of the BP profile, except nighttime ABP, are reduced in summer, resulting in an increased prevalence of non-dippers in summer with unknown consequences. Seasonal BP changes are influenced by changes in meteorological parameters, anthropometric and treatment characteristics. Trials are urgently needed to evaluate the clinical relevance of excessive BP decline in summer and management guidelines for practicing physicians should be developed.

  2. A protocol for the measurement of all the parameters of the mass transfer kinetics in columns used in liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    Band broadening in chromatography results from the combination of the dispersive effects that are associated with the different steps involved in the migration of compound bands along the column. These steps include longitudinal diffusion, trans-particle mass transfer, external film mass transfer, overall eddy diffusion, including trans-column, short-range inter-channel, trans-channel eddy diffusion, and the possible, additional mass transfer contributions arising from heat friction and the thermal heterogeneity of the column. We describe a series of experiments that provide the data needed to determine the coefficients of the contributions to band broadening of each one of these individual mass transfer steps. This specifically designed protocol can provide key information regarding the kinetic performance of columns used in liquid chromatography and explain why different columns behave so differently. The limitations, accuracy and precision of these methods are discussed. Further avenues of research that could improve the characterization of the mass transfer mechanisms in chromatographic columns, possibly contributing to the development of better columns, are suggested.

  3. Kinetic Parameters of Secondary Carbide Precipitation in High-Cr White Iron Alloyed by Mn-Ni-Mo-V Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Brykov, M. N.

    2013-05-01

    This study presents kinetics of precipitation of secondary carbides in 14.55%Cr-Mn-Ni-Mo-V white cast iron during the destabilization heat treatment. The as-cast iron was heat treated at temperatures in the range of 800-1100 °C with soaking up to 6 h. Investigation was carried out by optical and electron microscopy, dilatometric analysis, Ms temperature measurement, and bulk hardness evaluation. TTT-curve of precipitation process of secondary carbides (M7C3, M23C6, M3C2) has been constructed in this study. It was determined that the precipitation occurs at the maximum rate at 950 °C where the process is started after 10 s and completed within 160 min further. The precipitation leads to significant increase of Ms temperature and bulk hardness; large soaking times at destabilization temperatures cause coarsening of secondary carbides and decrease in particles number, followed by decrease in hardness. The results obtained are discussed in terms of solubility of carbon in the austenite and diffusion activation of Cr atoms. The precipitation was found to consist of two stages with activation energies of 196.5 kJ/g-mole at the first stage and 47.1 kJ/g-mole at the second stage.

  4. Kinetic parameters and monomeric conversion of different dental composites using standard and soft-start photoactivation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, A. B.; Viana, R. B.; Plepis, A. M. G.

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the photopolymerization kinetics and degree of conversion of different commercial dental composites when photoactivated by a LED curing unit using two different modes (standard and soft-start mode). The investigation was performed on with RelyX ARC (dual-cured), Filtek Z-350 (Nanocomposite), Filtek Z-250 (Hybrid), and Filtek Z-350flow (Flowable) resin composites. The analysis used was attenuated total reflection with a Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). The RelyX ARC resin demonstrated the highest degree of conversion with both LED photoactivation modes. For this resin a 28% decrease in maximum rate was observed and the time to reach its highest rate was almost 2.3 times higher than when the soft-start photoactivation light curing was used. Z-350flow resin recorder a higher maximum rate using the soft-start mode rather than the standard mode. In contrast, the Z-250 showed a higher value using the standard mode. Although Z-250 and Z-350 showed a higher total degree of conversion effectiveness using the soft-start mode, RelyX and Z-350flow achieved a higher value using the standard mode.

  5. Evaluation of Tafel-Volmer kinetic parameters for the hydrogen oxidation reaction on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. F.; Thurgood, C. P.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling of PEM fuel cells has long been an active research area to improve understanding of cell and stack operation, facilitate design improvements and support simulation studies. The prediction of activation polarization in most PEM models has concentrated on the cathode losses since anode losses are commonly much smaller and tend to be ignored. Further development of the anode activation polarization term is being undertaken to broaden the application and usefulness of PEM models in general. Published work on the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) using Pt(h k l) electrodes in dilute H2SO4 has been recently reassessed and published. Correlations for diffusion-free exchange current densities were developed and empirical predictive equations for the anode activation polarization were proposed for the experimental conditions of the previously published work: Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 1 1) electrodes, pH2 of 1 atm, and temperatures of 1, 30 and 60 °C. It was concluded that the HOR on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes followed a Tafel-Volmer reaction sequence. The aim of the present paper is to generalize these Tafel-Volmer correlations, apply them to published data for Pt(1 1 0) electrodes and further develop the modelling of anode activation polarization over the range of operating conditions found in PEMFC operation.

  6. Assessment of Wall Elasticity Variations on Intraluminal Haemodynamics in Descending Aortic Dissections Using a Lumped-Parameter Model

    PubMed Central

    Rudenick, Paula A.; Bijnens, Bart H.; Segers, Patrick; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Descending aortic dissection (DAD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Aortic wall stiffness is a variable often altered in DAD patients and potentially involved in long-term outcome. However, its relevance is still mostly unknown. To gain more detailed knowledge of how wall elasticity (compliance) might influence intraluminal haemodynamics in DAD, a lumped-parameter model was developed based on experimental data from a pulsatile hydraulic circuit and validated for 8 clinical scenarios. Next, the variations of intraluminal pressures and flows were assessed as a function of wall elasticity. In comparison with the most rigid-wall case, an increase in elasticity to physiological values was associated with a decrease in systolic and increase in diastolic pressures of up to 33% and 63% respectively, with a subsequent decrease in the pressure wave amplitude of up to 86%. Moreover, it was related to an increase in multidirectional intraluminal flows and transition of behaviour as 2 parallel vessels towards a vessel with a side-chamber. The model supports the extremely important role of wall elasticity as determinant of intraluminal pressures and flow patterns for DAD, and thus, the relevance of considering it during clinical assessment and computational modelling of the disease. PMID:25881158

  7. Investigation of the skin effect in plasmas with the use of a two-parameter kinetic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, A. V.; Tereshina, T. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    An analytic solution taking into account the effect of electron-electron collisions has been obtained for the problem on the skin effect in a nondegenerate electron plasma. The impedance was analyzed in relation to a parameter b, which describes the ratio of the frequency of electron-electron collisions to the total frequency of electron scattering. For b→0 the results obtained become the classical ones for weakly ionized plasma.

  8. Quality changes of pasteurised orange juice during storage: A kinetic study of specific parameters and their relation to colour instability.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Scheling; Grauwet, Tara; Santiago, Jihan Santanina; Tomic, Jovana; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2015-11-15

    In view of understanding colour instability of pasteurised orange juice during storage, to the best of our knowledge, this study reports for the first time in a systematic and quantitative way on a range of changes in specific quality parameters as a function of time and as well as temperature (20-42 °C). A zero-order (°Brix, fructose, glucose), a first-order (vitamin C), a second-order (sucrose) and a fractional conversion model (oxygen) were selected to model the evolution of the parameters between parentheses. Activation energies ranged from 22 to 136 kJ mol(-1), HMF formation being the most temperature sensitive. High correlations were found between sugars, ascorbic acid, their degradation products (furfural and HMF) and total colour difference (ΔE(∗)). Based on PLS regression, the importance of the quality parameters for colour degradation was ranked relatively among each other: the acid-catalysed degradation of sugars and ascorbic acid degradation reactions appeared to be important for browning development in pasteurised orange juice during ambient storage. PMID:25977009

  9. Quality changes of pasteurised orange juice during storage: A kinetic study of specific parameters and their relation to colour instability.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Scheling; Grauwet, Tara; Santiago, Jihan Santanina; Tomic, Jovana; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2015-11-15

    In view of understanding colour instability of pasteurised orange juice during storage, to the best of our knowledge, this study reports for the first time in a systematic and quantitative way on a range of changes in specific quality parameters as a function of time and as well as temperature (20-42 °C). A zero-order (°Brix, fructose, glucose), a first-order (vitamin C), a second-order (sucrose) and a fractional conversion model (oxygen) were selected to model the evolution of the parameters between parentheses. Activation energies ranged from 22 to 136 kJ mol(-1), HMF formation being the most temperature sensitive. High correlations were found between sugars, ascorbic acid, their degradation products (furfural and HMF) and total colour difference (ΔE(∗)). Based on PLS regression, the importance of the quality parameters for colour degradation was ranked relatively among each other: the acid-catalysed degradation of sugars and ascorbic acid degradation reactions appeared to be important for browning development in pasteurised orange juice during ambient storage.

  10. Temporal and spatial variations in photosynthetic parameters in the South Sea and East/Japan Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2015-12-01

    Although the photosynthetic parameters are important factors for phytoplankton ecology and simulation models of ecological dynamics in marine ecosystems, very limited data for temporal and spatial variations in in situ photosynthetic parameters are available in Korean oceans. To obtain the photosynthetic parameters, we measured carbon fixation rates of phytoplankton from six light depths (100, 50, 30, 12, 5, and 1 %) at 2 sampling sites (Hupo-Pohang and Gwangyang bay, Korea) in 2013, using a stable carbon isotope (13C) tracer technique. Based on the results from this study, the ranges of α (photosynthetic efficiency), β (strength of the photoinhibition) and μ (growth rate) were 0.06-0.07 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1, 3.90-21.41 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1, and 0.18-0.19 d-1, respectively at Hupo-Pohang site in the East/Japan Sea. The values of α and β were higher in November (Average ± S.D = 0.07±0.02 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1 and 21.41±36.89 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1, respectvitly) than those (Average ± S.D = 0.06±0.05 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1 and 3.90±5.36 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1, respectively) in September, 2013. In contrast, μ value was higher in September (Average ± S.D = 0.19±0.15 d-1) than that (Average ± S.D = 0.18±0.14 d-1) in November. In comparison, the ranges of α, β and μ at Gwangyang bay site in the South Sea were 0.05-0.11 mg C h-1 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1 , 3.14-93.91 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1 and 0.14-0.34 d-1, respectively. The parameters of α and μ were highest in June (Average ± S.D = 0.11±0.05 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1, and 0.34±0.27 d-1), and β was highest value in January (Average ± S.D = 93.31±81.47 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1). The photosynthetic parameters obtained in this study are within the ranges of α (0.08 to 0.26 mg C h-1 (µmol quanta m-2 s-1) -1) and μ (0.42 to 1.31 d-1) in Bedford basin previously reported by Brenda

  11. Structural characterization, thermoluminescence studies and kinetic parameters of SrSO4:Eu nanophosphors under X-ray and gamma excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasudha, S.; Madhukumar, K.; Nair, C. M. K.; Nair, Resmi G.; Anandakumar, V. M.; Elias, Thayal Singh

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured SrSO4:Eu phosphors with high thermoluminescence (TL) emission temperatures have been synthesized through a controlled chemical precipitation method. Structural analysis and TL studies under both γ-ray and X-ray excitations were done. The phosphors were characterized using Powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, thermogravimetry, UV-VIS and photoluminescence studies. The average crystallite size estimated using PXRD data is found to be around 40 nm. XPS and PL studies reveal that Eu2 + ions are the luminescence emission centres in the phosphor. The phosphor is found to be highly TL sensitive to both γ-rays and X-rays with very high emission temperature which is not reported so far. The emission behaviour is suitable for environmental radiation dosimetry applications. The TL glow curve shows well-defined isolated high temperature emission peak at 312 °C under 2 Gy γ-excitation and 284 °C for low energy diagnostic X-ray irradiation and 271 °C for high energy therapeutic X-rays. Chen's peak shape method is applied to obtain the kinetic parameters behind the TL emission. The TL mechanism is found to follow second order kinetics, suggesting the probability of re-trapping of charge carriers.

  12. Structural characterization, thermoluminescence studies and kinetic parameters of SrSO4:Eu nanophosphors under X-ray and gamma excitations.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, S; Madhukumar, K; Nair, C M K; Nair, Resmi G; Anandakumar, V M; Elias, Thayal Singh

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured SrSO4:Eu phosphors with high thermoluminescence (TL) emission temperatures have been synthesized through a controlled chemical precipitation method. Structural analysis and TL studies under both γ-ray and X-ray excitations were done. The phosphors were characterized using Powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, thermogravimetry, UV-VIS and photoluminescence studies. The average crystallite size estimated using PXRD data is found to be around 40nm. XPS and PL studies reveal that Eu(2+) ions are the luminescence emission centres in the phosphor. The phosphor is found to be highly TL sensitive to both γ-rays and X-rays with very high emission temperature which is not reported so far. The emission behaviour is suitable for environmental radiation dosimetry applications. The TL glow curve shows well-defined isolated high temperature emission peak at 312°C under 2Gy γ-excitation and 284°C for low energy diagnostic X-ray irradiation and 271°C for high energy therapeutic X-rays. Chen's peak shape method is applied to obtain the kinetic parameters behind the TL emission. The TL mechanism is found to follow second order kinetics, suggesting the probability of re-trapping of charge carriers. PMID:26562181

  13. Structural characterization, thermoluminescence studies and kinetic parameters of SrSO4:Eu nanophosphors under X-ray and gamma excitations.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, S; Madhukumar, K; Nair, C M K; Nair, Resmi G; Anandakumar, V M; Elias, Thayal Singh

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured SrSO4:Eu phosphors with high thermoluminescence (TL) emission temperatures have been synthesized through a controlled chemical precipitation method. Structural analysis and TL studies under both γ-ray and X-ray excitations were done. The phosphors were characterized using Powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, thermogravimetry, UV-VIS and photoluminescence studies. The average crystallite size estimated using PXRD data is found to be around 40nm. XPS and PL studies reveal that Eu(2+) ions are the luminescence emission centres in the phosphor. The phosphor is found to be highly TL sensitive to both γ-rays and X-rays with very high emission temperature which is not reported so far. The emission behaviour is suitable for environmental radiation dosimetry applications. The TL glow curve shows well-defined isolated high temperature emission peak at 312°C under 2Gy γ-excitation and 284°C for low energy diagnostic X-ray irradiation and 271°C for high energy therapeutic X-rays. Chen's peak shape method is applied to obtain the kinetic parameters behind the TL emission. The TL mechanism is found to follow second order kinetics, suggesting the probability of re-trapping of charge carriers.

  14. Isotherm Modelling, Kinetic Study and Optimization of Batch Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology for Effective Removal of Cr(VI) Using Fungal Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption is a promising alternative method to replace the existing conventional technique for Cr(VI) removal from the industrial effluent. In the present experimental design, the removal of Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution was studied by Aspergillus niger MSR4 under different environmental conditions in the batch systems. The optimum conditions of biosorption were determined by investigating pH (2.0) and temperature (27°C). The effects of parameters such as biomass dosage (g/L), initial Cr(VI) concentration (mg/L) and contact time (min) on Cr(VI) biosorption were analyzed using a three parameter Box–Behnken design (BBD). The experimental data well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm, in comparison to the other isotherm models tested. The results of the D-R isotherm model suggested that a chemical ion-exchange mechanism was involved in the biosorption process. The biosorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, which indicates that the rate limiting step is chemisorption process. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic studies revealed the possible involvement of functional groups, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, amino and carbonyl group in the biosorption process. The thermodynamic parameters for Cr(VI) biosorption were also calculated, and the negative ∆Gº values indicated the spontaneous nature of biosorption process. PMID:25786227

  15. A critical study of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junmeng; Li, Tao; Liu, Ronghou

    2011-02-01

    Using some theoretically simulated data constructed from known sets of the activation energy distribution f(E) (assumed to follow the Gaussian distribution [Formula in text] where E is the activation energy, E(0) is the mean value of the activation energy distribution, and σ is the standard deviation of the activation energy distribution) and the frequency factor k(0), a critical study of the use of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model has been performed from three cases. For all cases, the use of the Miura-Maki integral method leads to important errors in the estimation of k(0). There are some differences between the assumed and calculated activation energy distributions and the differences decrease with increasing the assumed k(0) values (for Case 1), with increasing the assumed σ values (for Case 2), and with decreasing the b values (for Case 3).

  16. Effects of organic ligands and temperature variations on the kinetics of olivine carbonation and the formation of associated secondary phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissmann, O.; Daval, D.; Martinez, I.; Brunet, F.; Verlaguet, A.; Pinquier, Y.; Guyot, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    The slow dissolution kinetics of Mg-rich silicates has become a critical issue for the geologic CO2 sequestration in basic rocks. Previous batch carbonation studies on San Carlos olivine [1] performed in CO2 saturated water (at 90°C and P CO2 = 280 bar) have focused on the role that secondary phases, such as amorphous silica layers (SiO2 (am)), have on the transport of reactants from and to the reactive surfaces. The fluid composition remained roughly constant over the duration of the experiment, close to saturation with respect to amorphous silica and with a [Mg2+]/[SiO2 (aq)] ratio close to stoechiometric release, suggesting a passivation of the olivine surface by the silica layer. In order to accelerate the dissolution process, organic ligands such as citrate and acetate were added to the solutions and tested at 1M and 0.1M concentrations in similar batch experiments. An intrinsic increase of the dissolution rate of olivine was expected [2], [3] prior to the formation of a passivating silica layer. Preliminary results confirm this idea since Mg was released in non-stoechimoetric proportions with respect to SiO2 (aq) (found to be in equilibrium with SiO2 (am)). Similarly, a slight increase of temperature (from 90°C to 120°C) accelerated the reaction kinetics as well, possibly impacting the textural properties of SiO2 (am). Current TEM investigations are directed to confirming a possible link between the observed increase of the rate and textural properties of secondary phases. In addition, because carbonate minerals have a retrograde solubility, thermodynamical modelling suggests that this temperature increase should allow the fluid to reach saturation with respect to carbonates before reaching saturation with respect to SiO2 (am). Enough Mg can therefore be released to initiate the formation of carbonates before the silica precipitates and passivates the olivine surface. [1] Daval et al (2011), Chemical Geology, v.284, p.193-209 [2] Grandstaff, D.E. (1986) In

  17. Model of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate metabolism in the human erythrocyte based on detailed enzyme kinetic equations: equations and parameter refinement.

    PubMed Central

    Mulquiney, P J; Kuchel, P W

    1999-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, several mathematical models of erythrocyte metabolism have been developed. Although these models have identified the key features in the regulation and control of erythrocyte metabolism, many important aspects remain unexplained. In particular, none of these models have satisfactorily accounted for 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) metabolism. 2,3-BPG is an important modulator of haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and hence an understanding of the regulation of 2,3-BPG concentration is important for understanding blood oxygen transport. A detailed, comprehensive, and hence realistic mathematical model of erythrocyte metabolism is presented that can explain the regulation and control of 2,3-BPG concentration and turnover. The model is restricted to the core metabolic pathways, namely glycolysis, the 2,3-BPG shunt and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), and includes membrane transport of metabolites, the binding of metabolites to haemoglobin and Mg(2+), as well as pH effects on key enzymic reactions and binding processes. The model is necessarily complex, since it is intended to describe the regulation and control of 2,3-BPG metabolism under a wide variety of physiological and experimental conditions. In addition, since H(+) and blood oxygen tension are important external effectors of 2,3-BPG concentration, it was important that the model take into account the large array of kinetic and binding phenomena that result from changes in these effectors. Through an iterative loop of experimental and simulation analysis many values of enzyme-kinetic parameters of the model were refined to yield close conformity between model simulations and 'real' experimental data. This iterative process enabled a single set of parameters to be found which described well the metabolic behaviour of the erythrocyte under a wide variety of conditions. PMID:10477269

  18. Insights on the development, kinetics, and variation of photoinhibition using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of a chilled, variegated leaf.

    PubMed

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The effect of chilling on photosystem II (PSII) efficiency was studied in the variegated leaves of Calathea makoyana, in order to gain insight into the causes of chilling-induced photoinhibition. Additionally, a relationship was revealed between (chilling) stress and variation in photosynthesis. Chilling treatments (5 degrees C and 10 degrees C) were performed for different durations (1-7 d) under a moderate irradiance (120 micromol m-2 s-1). The individual leaves were divided into a shaded zone and two illuminated, chilled zones. The leaf tip and sometimes the leaf base were not chilled. Measurements of the dark-adapted Fv/Fm were made on the different leaf zones at the end of the chilling treatment, and then for several days thereafter to monitor recovery. Chilling up to 7 d in the dark did not affect PSII efficiency and visual appearance, whereas chilling in the light caused severe photoinhibition, sometimes followed by leaf necrosis. Photoinhibition increased with the duration of the chilling period, whereas, remarkably, chilling temperature had no effect. In the unchilled leaf tip, photoinhibition also occurred, whereas in the unchilled leaf base it did not. Whatever the leaf zone, photoinhibition became permanent if the mean value dropped below 0.4, although chlorosis and necrosis were associated solely with chilled illuminated tissue. Starch accumulated in the unchilled leaf tip, in contrast to the adjacent chilled irradiated zone. This suggests that photoinhibition was due to a secondary effect in the unchilled leaf tip (sink limitation), whereas it was a direct effect of chilling and irradiance in the chilled illuminated zones. The PSII efficiency and its coefficient of variation showed a unique negative linearity across all leaf zones and different tissue types. The slope of this curve was steeper for chilled leaves than it was for healthy, non-stressed leaves, suggesting that the coefficient of variation may be an important tool for assessing stress in

  19. Insights on the development, kinetics, and variation of photoinhibition using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of a chilled, variegated leaf.

    PubMed

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The effect of chilling on photosystem II (PSII) efficiency was studied in the variegated leaves of Calathea makoyana, in order to gain insight into the causes of chilling-induced photoinhibition. Additionally, a relationship was revealed between (chilling) stress and variation in photosynthesis. Chilling treatments (5 degrees C and 10 degrees C) were performed for different durations (1-7 d) under a moderate irradiance (120 micromol m-2 s-1). The individual leaves were divided into a shaded zone and two illuminated, chilled zones. The leaf tip and sometimes the leaf base were not chilled. Measurements of the dark-adapted Fv/Fm were made on the different leaf zones at the end of the chilling treatment, and then for several days thereafter to monitor recovery. Chilling up to 7 d in the dark did not affect PSII efficiency and visual appearance, whereas chilling in the light caused severe photoinhibition, sometimes followed by leaf necrosis. Photoinhibition increased with the duration of the chilling period, whereas, remarkably, chilling temperature had no effect. In the unchilled leaf tip, photoinhibition also occurred, whereas in the unchilled leaf base it did not. Whatever the leaf zone, photoinhibition became permanent if the mean value dropped below 0.4, although chlorosis and necrosis were associated solely with chilled illuminated tissue. Starch accumulated in the unchilled leaf tip, in contrast to the adjacent chilled irradiated zone. This suggests that photoinhibition was due to a secondary effect in the unchilled leaf tip (sink limitation), whereas it was a direct effect of chilling and irradiance in the chilled illuminated zones. The PSII efficiency and its coefficient of variation showed a unique negative linearity across all leaf zones and different tissue types. The slope of this curve was steeper for chilled leaves than it was for healthy, non-stressed leaves, suggesting that the coefficient of variation may be an important tool for assessing stress in

  20. Inhibition and activation of enzymes. The effect of a modifier on the reaction rate and on kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Fontes, R; Ribeiro, J M; Sillero, A

    2000-01-01

    A combined analysis of enzyme inhibition and activation is presented, based on a rapid equilibrium model assumption in which one molecule of enzyme binds one molecule of substrate (S) and/or one molecule of a modifier X. The modifier acts as activator (essential or non-essential), as inhibitor (total or partial), or has no effect on the reaction rate (v), depending on the values of the equilibrium constants, the rate constants of the limiting velocity steps, and the concentration of substrate ([S]). Different possibilities have been analyzed from an equation written to emphasize that v = f([X]) is, in general and at a fixed [S], a hyperbolic function. Formulas for Su (the value of [S], different from zero, at which v is unaffected by the modifier) and v(su) (v at that particular [S]) were deduced. In Lineweaver-Burk plots, the straight lines related to different [X] generally cross in a point (P) with coordinates (Su, v(su)). In certain cases, point P is located in the first quadrant which implies that X acts as activator, as inhibitor, or has no effect, depending on [S]. Furthermore, we discuss: (1) the apparent Vmax and Km displayed by the enzyme in different situations; (2) the degree of effect (inhibition or activation) observed at different concentrations of substrate and modifier; (3) the concept of Ke, a parameter that depends on the concentration of substrate and helps to evaluate the effect of the modifier: it equals the value of [X] at which the increase or decrease in the reaction rate is half of that achieved at saturating [X]. Equations were deduced for the general case and for particular situations, and used to obtain computer-drawn graphs that are presented and discussed. Formulas for apparent Vmax, Km and Ke have been written in a way making it evident that these parameters can be expressed as pondered means.

  1. Changes in the kinetic behaviour of threonine transport into Trypanosoma brucei elicited by variation in hydrogen ion concentration

    PubMed Central

    Voorheis, H. Paul

    1977-01-01

    1. The dependence of V and V/Km for threonine transport into Trypanosoma brucei upon the external concentration of H+ was studied. 2. Two ionizing groups, the α-amino group of the substrate and a group at the substrate-binding site of the carrier, were found to influence the observed kinetic behaviour of transport. 3. The pK of the group at the substrate-binding site on the free carrier was found to be 6.95 at 30°C and to be temperature-dependent; its heat of ionization was −63.8kJ, which is outside the range for most proton dissociations and suggests a significant contribution from some other source, possibly the remainder of the carrier or the membrane environment. 4. Binding of substrate caused the pK of its α-amino group to shift to a higher value, whereas that of the carrier group shifted to a lower value (6.65 at 30°C). 5. The ionic interaction between substrate and carrier appeared to be involved in the stabilizing of the protonated substrate and the species of the carrier–substrate complex required for the membrane-translocation step. 6. The same ionic species of carrier–substrate complex is required for both substrate dissociation and translocation of the substrate through the membrane. 7. H+ symport or antiport did not occur during threonine uptake. PMID:18141

  2. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions: Part 1 - general equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2005-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It allows to describe mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface and to link aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion correction, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependencies; flexible inclusion/omission of chemical species and physicochemical processes; flexible convolution/deconvolution of species and processes; and full compatibility with traditional resistor model

  3. Quantification of Kinetic Rate Law Parameters of Uranium Release from Sodium Autunite as a Function of Aqueous Bicarbonate Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gudavalli, Ravi; Katsenovich, Yelena; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-09-05

    ABSTRACT: Hydrogen carbonate is one of the most significant components within the uranium geochemical cycle. In aqueous solutions, hydrogen carbonate forms strong complexes with uranium. As such, aqueous bicarbonate may significantly increase the rate of uranium release from uranium minerals. Quantifying the relationship of aqueous hydrogen carbonate solutions to the rate of uranium release during dissolution is critical to understanding the long-term fate of uranium within the environment. Single-pass flow-through (SPTF) experiments were conducted to estimate the rate of uranium release from Na meta-autunite as a function of bicarbonate solutions (0.0005-0.003 M) under the pH range of 6-11 and temperatures of 5-60oC. Consistent with the results of previous investigation, the rate of uranium release from sodium autunite exhibited minimal dependency on temperature; but were strongly dependent on pH and increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions. Most notably at pH 7, the rate of uranium release exhibited 370 fold increases relative to the rate of uranium release in the absence of bicarbonate. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions on the release of uranium was significantly less under higher pH conditions. It is postulated that at high pH values, surface sites are saturated with carbonate, thus the addition of more bicarbonate would have less effect on uranium release. Results indicate the activation energies were unaffected by temperature and bicarbonate concentration variations, but were strongly dependent on pH conditions. As pH increased from 6 to 11, activation energy values were observed to decrease from 29.94 kJ mol-1 to 13.07 kJ mol-1. The calculated activation energies suggest a surface controlled dissolution mechanism.

  4. Inverse method to estimate kinetic degradation parameters of grape anthocyanins in wheat flour under simultaneously changing temperature and moisture.

    PubMed

    Lai, K P K; Dolan, K D; Ng, P K W

    2009-06-01

    Thermal and moisture effects on grape anthocyanin degradation were investigated using solid media to simulate processing at temperatures above 100 degrees C. Grape pomace (anthocyanin source) mixed with wheat pastry flour (1: 3, w/w dry basis) was used in both isothermal and nonisothermal experiments by heating the same mixture at 43% (db) initial moisture in steel cells in an oil bath at 80, 105, and 145 degrees C. To determine the effect of moisture on anthocyanin degradation, the grape pomace-wheat flour mixture was heated isothermally at 80 degrees C at constant moisture contents of 10%, 20%, and 43% (db). Anthocyanin degradation followed a pseudo first-order reaction with moisture. Anthocyanins degraded more rapidly with increasing temperature and moisture. The effects of temperature and moisture on the rate constant were modeled according to the Arrhenius and an exponential relationship, respectively. The nonisothermal reaction rate constant and activation energy (mean +/- standard error) were k(80 degrees C, 43% (db) moisture) = 2.81 x 10(-4)+/- 1.1 x 10(-6) s(-1) and DeltaE = 75273 +/- 197 J/g mol, respectively. The moisture parameter for the exponential model was 4.28 (dry basis moisture content)(-1). One possible application of this study is as a tool to predict the loss of anthocyanins in nutraceutical products containing grape pomace. For example, if the process temperature history and moisture history in an extruded snack fortified with grape pomace is known, the percentage anthocyanin loss can be predicted. PMID:19646039

  5. Impacts of variations in elemental nutrient concentration of Chardonnay musts on Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation kinetics and wine composition.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Simon A; Dillon, Simon; Kolouchova, Radka; Henschke, Paul A; Chambers, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Chardonnay, being the predominant white wine-grape cultivar in the Australian wine sector, is subject to widely varying winemaking processes with the aim of producing a variety of wine styles. Therefore, juice composition might not always be ideal for optimal fermentation outcomes. Our aim was to better understand the composition of Chardonnay juice and how compositional parameters impact on fermentation outcomes. This was achieved through a survey of 96 commercially prepared Chardonnay juices during the 2009 vintage. Common juice variables were estimated using near infrared spectroscopy, and elemental composition was determined using radial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The influence of elemental composition on fermentation outcomes was assessed by fermentation of a defined medium formulated to reflect the composition and range of concentrations as determined by the juice survey. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain effects were also assessed. Key parameters influencing fermentation outcomes were verified by laboratory scale fermentation of Chardonnay juice. This exploration of Chardonnay juice identified interactions between juice pH and potassium concentration as key factors impacting on fermentation performance and wine quality. Outcomes differed depending on yeast strain.

  6. Analysis of the energetic metabolism in cyclic Bedouin goats (Capra hircus): Nychthemeral and seasonal variations of some haematochemical parameters in relation with body and ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Malek, Mouna; Amirat, Zaina; Khammar, Farida; Khaldoun, Mounira

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have examined changes in some haematochemical parameters as a function of the different physiological status (cyclic, pregnant and lactating) of goats, but no relevant literature has exhaustively investigated these variations from anestrous to estrous stages in cyclic goats. In this paper, we report nychthemeral and seasonal variations in ambient and body temperatures, and in some haematochemical parameters (glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, creatininemia and uremia) measured during summer, winter and spring, in seven (7) experimental cyclic female Bedouin goats (Capra hircus) living in the Béni-Abbès region (Algerian Sahara desert). Cosinor rhythmometry procedure was used to determine the rhythmic parameters of ambient temperature and haematochemical parameters. To determine the effect of time of day on the rhythmicity of the studied parameters, as well as their seasonality, repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. The results showed that in spite of the nychthemeral profile presented by the ambient temperature for each season, the body temperature remained in a narrow range, thus indicating a successful thermoregulation. The rhythmometry analysis showed a circadian rhythmicity of ambient temperature and haematochemical parameters with diurnal acrophases. A statistically significant effect of the time of day was shown on all studied haematochemical parameters, except on creatininemia. It was also found that only uremia, cholesterolemia and triglyceridemia followed the seasonal sexual activity of the studied ruminant. This study demonstrated the good physiological adaptation developed by this breed in response to the harsh climatic conditions of its natural environment. PMID:27503720

  7. Evolution of a mini-scale biphasic dissolution model: Impact of model parameters on partitioning of dissolved API and modelling of in vivo-relevant kinetics.

    PubMed

    Locher, Kathrin; Borghardt, Jens M; Frank, Kerstin J; Kloft, Charlotte; Wagner, Karl G

    2016-08-01

    Biphasic dissolution models are proposed to have good predictive power for the in vivo absorption. The aim of this study was to improve our previously introduced mini-scale dissolution model to mimic in vivo situations more realistically and to increase the robustness of the experimental model. Six dissolved APIs (BCS II) were tested applying the improved mini-scale biphasic dissolution model (miBIdi-pH-II). The influence of experimental model parameters including various excipients, API concentrations, dual paddle and its rotation speed was investigated. The kinetics in the biphasic model was described applying a one- and four-compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model. The improved biphasic dissolution model was robust related to differing APIs and excipient concentrations. The dual paddle guaranteed homogenous mixing in both phases; the optimal rotation speed was 25 and 75rpm for the aqueous and the octanol phase, respectively. A one-compartment PK model adequately characterised the data of fully dissolved APIs. A four-compartment PK model best quantified dissolution, precipitation, and partitioning also of undissolved amounts due to realistic pH profiles. The improved dissolution model is a powerful tool for investigating the interplay between dissolution, precipitation and partitioning of various poorly soluble APIs (BCS II). In vivo-relevant PK parameters could be estimated applying respective PK models.

  8. Evolution of a mini-scale biphasic dissolution model: Impact of model parameters on partitioning of dissolved API and modelling of in vivo-relevant kinetics.

    PubMed

    Locher, Kathrin; Borghardt, Jens M; Frank, Kerstin J; Kloft, Charlotte; Wagner, Karl G

    2016-08-01

    Biphasic dissolution models are proposed to have good predictive power for the in vivo absorption. The aim of this study was to improve our previously introduced mini-scale dissolution model to mimic in vivo situations more realistically and to increase the robustness of the experimental model. Six dissolved APIs (BCS II) were tested applying the improved mini-scale biphasic dissolution model (miBIdi-pH-II). The influence of experimental model parameters including various excipients, API concentrations, dual paddle and its rotation speed was investigated. The kinetics in the biphasic model was described applying a one- and four-compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model. The improved biphasic dissolution model was robust related to differing APIs and excipient concentrations. The dual paddle guaranteed homogenous mixing in both phases; the optimal rotation speed was 25 and 75rpm for the aqueous and the octanol phase, respectively. A one-compartment PK model adequately characterised the data of fully dissolved APIs. A four-compartment PK model best quantified dissolution, precipitation, and partitioning also of undissolved amounts due to realistic pH profiles. The improved dissolution model is a powerful tool for investigating the interplay between dissolution, precipitation and partitioning of various poorly soluble APIs (BCS II). In vivo-relevant PK parameters could be estimated applying respective PK models. PMID:27297570

  9. Isotopic discrimination and kinetic parameters of RubisCO from the marine bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Boller, A J; Thomas, P J; Cavanaugh, C M; Scott, K M

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan, bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum, is a prominent primary producer in coastal oceans, fixing CO2 with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) that is phylogenetically distinct from terrestrial plant RubisCO. RubisCOs are subdivided into groups based on sequence similarity of their large subunits (IA-ID, II, and III). ID is present in several major oceanic primary producers, including diatoms such as S. costatum, coccolithophores, and some dinoflagellates, and differs substantially in amino acid sequence from the well-studied IB enzymes present in most cyanobacteria and in green algae and plants. Despite this sequence divergence, and differences in isotopic discrimination apparent in other RubisCO enzymes, stable carbon isotope compositions of diatoms and other marine phytoplankton are generally interpreted assuming enzymatic isotopic discrimination similar to spinach RubisCO (IB). To interpret phytoplankton δ(13) C values, S. costatum RubisCO was characterized via sequence analysis, and measurement of its KCO2 and Vmax , and degree of isotopic discrimination. The sequence of this enzyme placed it among other diatom ID RubisCOs. Michaelis-Menten parameters were similar to other ID enzymes (KCO2 = 48.9 ± 2.8 μm; Vmax = 165.1 ± 6.3 nmol min(-1 ) mg(-1) ). However, isotopic discrimination (ε = [(12) k/(13) k - 1] × 1000) was low (18.5‰; 17.0-19.9, 95% CI) when compared to IA and IB RubisCOs (22-29‰), though not as low as ID from coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi (11.1‰). Variability in ε-values among RubisCOs from primary producers is likely reflected in δ(13) C values of oceanic biomass. Currently, δ(13) C variability is ascribed to physical or chemical factors (e.g. illumination, nutrient availability) and physiological responses to these factors (e.g. carbon-concentrating mechanisms). Estimating the importance of these factors from δ(13) C measurements requires an accurate ε-value, and a mass

  10. Isotopic discrimination and kinetic parameters of RubisCO from the marine bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Boller, A J; Thomas, P J; Cavanaugh, C M; Scott, K M

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan, bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum, is a prominent primary producer in coastal oceans, fixing CO2 with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) that is phylogenetically distinct from terrestrial plant RubisCO. RubisCOs are subdivided into groups based on sequence similarity of their large subunits (IA-ID, II, and III). ID is present in several major oceanic primary producers, including diatoms such as S. costatum, coccolithophores, and some dinoflagellates, and differs substantially in amino acid sequence from the well-studied IB enzymes present in most cyanobacteria and in green algae and plants. Despite this sequence divergence, and differences in isotopic discrimination apparent in other RubisCO enzymes, stable carbon isotope compositions of diatoms and other marine phytoplankton are generally interpreted assuming enzymatic isotopic discrimination similar to spinach RubisCO (IB). To interpret phytoplankton δ(13) C values, S. costatum RubisCO was characterized via sequence analysis, and measurement of its KCO2 and Vmax , and degree of isotopic discrimination. The sequence of this enzyme placed it among other diatom ID RubisCOs. Michaelis-Menten parameters were similar to other ID enzymes (KCO2 = 48.9 ± 2.8 μm; Vmax = 165.1 ± 6.3 nmol min(-1 ) mg(-1) ). However, isotopic discrimination (ε = [(12) k/(13) k - 1] × 1000) was low (18.5‰; 17.0-19.9, 95% CI) when compared to IA and IB RubisCOs (22-29‰), though not as low as ID from coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi (11.1‰). Variability in ε-values among RubisCOs from primary producers is likely reflected in δ(13) C values of oceanic biomass. Currently, δ(13) C variability is ascribed to physical or chemical factors (e.g. illumination, nutrient availability) and physiological responses to these factors (e.g. carbon-concentrating mechanisms). Estimating the importance of these factors from δ(13) C measurements requires an accurate ε-value, and a mass

  11. Mechanism and kinetics of organic matter degradation based on particle structure variation during pig manure aerobic composting.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinyi; Huang, Guangqun; Huang, Jing; Zeng, Jianfei; Han, Lujia

    2015-07-15

    Characterization of the dynamic structure of composting particles may facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms of organic matter degradation during pig manure-wheat straw aerobic composting. In this study, changes in the size, shape, pores, chemical compositions, and crystal structures of pig manure particles during composting were investigated. The results showed that the median diameter (D50) decreased exponentially, while the particle aspect ratio and sphericity were unchanged, suggesting that particles were degraded uniformly along different radial directions. Pores had a mean diameter of 15-30 μm and were elliptical. The particle porosity increased linearly mainly because of hemicellulose degradation. Furthermore, the influence of particle structure variation on the first order rate constant (k) of organic matter degradation was corrected, which may facilitate the optimization of operation conditions. The k value was proportional to the reciprocal of D50 according to the specific surface area of particles, and it decreased with increased porosity due to the stabilized chemical compositions and crystal structures of particles. However, the applicability of these data to other composting materials should be verified. PMID:25781372

  12. Geostatistical Characteristic of Space -Time Variation in Underground Water Selected Quality Parameters in Klodzko Water Intake Area (SW Part of Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namysłowska-Wilczyńska, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents selected results of research connected with the development of a (3D) geostatistical hydrogeochemical model of the Klodzko Drainage Basin, dedicated to the spatial and time variation in the selected quality parameters of underground water in the Klodzko water intake area (SW part of Poland). The research covers the period 2011÷2012. Spatial analyses of the variation in various quality parameters, i.e, contents of: ammonium ion [gNH4+/m3], NO3- (nitrate ion) [gNO3/m3], PO4-3 (phosphate ion) [gPO4-3/m3], total organic carbon C (TOC) [gC/m3], pH redox potential and temperature C [degrees], were carried out on the basis of the chemical determinations of the quality parameters of underground water samples taken from the wells in the water intake area. Spatial and time variation in the quality parameters was analyzed on the basis of archival data (period 1977÷1999) for 22 (pump and siphon) wells with a depth ranging from 9.5 to 38.0 m b.g.l., later data obtained (November 2011) from tests of water taken from 14 existing wells. The wells were built in the years 1954÷1998. The water abstraction depth (difference between the terrain elevation and the dynamic water table level) is ranged from 276÷286 m a.s.l., with an average of 282.05 m a.s.l. Dynamic water table level is contained between 6.22 m÷16.44 m b.g.l., with a mean value of 9.64 m b.g.l. The latest data (January 2012) acquired from 3 new piezometers, with a depth of 9÷10m, which were made in other locations in the relevant area. Thematic databases, containing original data on coordinates X, Y (latitude, longitude) and Z (terrain elevation and time - years) and on regionalized variables, i.e. the underground water quality parameters in the Klodzko water intake area determined for different analytical configurations (22 wells, 14 wells, 14 wells + 3 piezometers), were created. Both archival data (acquired in the years 1977÷1999) and the latest data (collected in 2011÷2012) were analyzed

  13. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-01

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure. PMID:26841076

  14. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-01

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  15. Quantifying the allosteric properties of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase: determination of thermodynamic linked-function parameters in an ordered kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Braxton, B L; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M; Reinhart, G D

    1992-03-01

    The effects of the allosteric ligands UMP, IMP, and ornithine on the partial reactions catalyzed by Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase have been examined. Both of these reactions, a HCO3(-)-dependent ATP synthesis reaction and a carbamyl phosphate-dependent ATP synthesis reaction, follow bimolecular ordered sequential kinetic mechanisms. In the ATPase reaction, MgATP binds before HCO3- as established previously for the overall reaction catalyzed by carbamyl phosphate synthetase [Raushel, F. M., Anderson, P. M., & Villafranca, J. J. (1978) Biochemistry 17, 5587-5591]. The initial velocity kinetics for the ATP synthesis reaction indicate that MgADP binds before carbamyl phosphate in an equilibrium ordered mechanism except in the presence of ornithine. Determination of true thermodynamic linked-function parameters describing the impact of allosteric ligands on the binding interactions of the first substrate to bind in an ordered mechanism requires experiments to be performed in which both substrates are varied even if only one is apparently affected by the allosteric ligands. In so doing, we have found that IMP has little effect on the overall reaction of either of these two partial reactions. UMP and ornithine, which have a pronounced effect on the apparent Km for MgATP in the overall reaction, both substantially change the thermodynamic dissociation constant for MgADP from the binary E-MgADP complex, Kia, in the ATP synthesis reaction, with UMP increasing Kia 15-fold and ornithine decreasing Kia by 18-fold. By contrast, only UMP substantially affects the Kia for MgATP in the ATPase reaction, increasing it by 5-fold.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1531767

  16. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ratelle, Mylène; Coté, Jonathan; Bouchard, Michèle

    2015-12-01

    Biomonitoring of pyrethroid exposure is largely conducted but human toxicokinetics has not been fully documented. This is essential for a proper interpretation of biomonitoring data. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers have been documented and compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin dosing. Six volunteers ingested 0.1 mg kg(-1) bodyweight of cypermethrin acutely. The same volunteers were exposed to permethrin earlier. Blood samples were taken over 72 h after treatment and complete timed urine voids were collected over 84 h postdosing. Cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (trans- and cis-DCCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) metabolites, common to both cypermethrin and permethrin, were quantified. Blood and urinary time courses of all three metabolites were similar following cypermethrin and permethrin exposure. Plasma levels of metabolites reached peak values on average ≈ 5-7 h post-dosing; the elimination phase showed mean apparent half-lives (t½ ) for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA of 5.1, 6.9 and 9.2 h, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 7.1, 6.2 and 6.5 h after permethrin dosing. Corresponding mean values obtained from urinary rate time courses were peak values at ≈ 9 h post-dosing and apparent elimination t½ of 6.3, 6.4 and 6.4 h for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 5.4, 4.5 and 5.7 h after permethrin dosing. These data confirm that the kinetics of cypermethrin is similar to that of permethrin in humans and that their common biomarkers of exposure may be used for an overall assessment of exposure.

  17. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed.

  18. Quantifying kinetic fractionation in Bunker Cave speleothems using Δ47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.

    2012-08-01

    Isotopic signals in speleothems are used for investigating paleoclimate variability on land and are useful to constrain the dating of prominent climate events. A quantitative use, however, is limited by an incomplete understanding of parameters contributing to the carbon and oxygen isotope signals. These include external and environmental parameters such as δ18O of cave drip waters as well as internal parameters associated with speleothem formation, such as the presence of non-equilibrium effects and especially the magnitude of their isotopic shifts. We explore the use of clumped isotopes as a new tool for investigating the kinetic isotope effect in speleothems. Holocene and modern speleothems from Bunker Cave (Germany) as well as modern material from the adjacent Dechen Cave are all offset from the equilibrium relationship due to kinetic fractionation. This kinetic offset in clumped isotopes is observed in a stalagmite despite mostly negative Hendy tests, providing a sensitive indicator for kinetic fractionation in cave carbonates. The temperature dependence of the clumped isotope values (0.005‰ per °C) is low compared to the observed magnitude of kinetic offsets (between -0.021 and -0.075‰), so that the mean offsets in apparent temperatures due to kinetic isotope effects are on the order of 10 °C. As a result clumped isotopes are useful in identifying temporal variations in the kinetic fractionation in a stalagmite, when the temperatures during the speleothem growth period are either relatively constant (variations <2 °C) or can be independently constrained. The variations in the kinetic isotope fractionation in Bunker Cave are associated with changing drip water super saturation with periods of stronger prior calcite precipitation associated with lower kinetic offsets in the speleothem calcite. In contrast, stalagmite growth rates show no direct correlation with the degree of kinetic fractionation in the investigated range (13-1500 μm/a).

  19. Spatiotemporal variation of nitrate uptake kinetics within the maize (Zea mays L.) root system is associated with greater nitrate uptake and interactions with architectural phenes.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Silberbush, Moshe; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Increasing maize nitrogen acquisition efficiency is a major goal for the 21st century. Nitrate uptake kinetics (NUK) are defined by I max and K m, which denote the maximum uptake rate and the affinity of transporters, respectively. Because NUK have been studied predominantly at the molecular and whole-root system levels, little is known about the functional importance of NUK variation within root systems. A novel method was created to measure NUK of root segments that demonstrated variation in NUK among root classes (seminal, lateral, crown, and brace). I max varied among root class, plant age, and nitrate deprivation combinations, but was most affected by plant age, which increased I max, and nitrate deprivation time, which decreased I max K m was greatest for crown roots. The functional-structural simulation SimRoot was used for sensitivity analysis of plant growth to root segment I max and K m, as well as to test interactions of I max with root system architectural phenes. Simulated plant growth was more sensitive to I max than K m, and reached an asymptote near the maximum I max observed in the empirical studies. Increasing the I max of lateral roots had the largest effect on shoot growth. Additive effects of I max and architectural phenes on nitrate uptake were observed. Empirically, only lateral root tips aged 20 d operated at the maximum I max, and simulations demonstrated that increasing all seminal and lateral classes to this maximum rate could increase plant growth by as much as 26%. Therefore, optimizing I max for all maize root classes merits attention as a promising breeding goal.

  20. Spatiotemporal variation of nitrate uptake kinetics within the maize (Zea mays L.) root system is associated with greater nitrate uptake and interactions with architectural phenes.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Silberbush, Moshe; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Increasing maize nitrogen acquisition efficiency is a major goal for the 21st century. Nitrate uptake kinetics (NUK) are defined by I max and K m, which denote the maximum uptake rate and the affinity of transporters, respectively. Because NUK have been studied predominantly at the molecular and whole-root system levels, little is known about the functional importance of NUK variation within root systems. A novel method was created to measure NUK of root segments that demonstrated variation in NUK among root classes (seminal, lateral, crown, and brace). I max varied among root class, plant age, and nitrate deprivation combinations, but was most affected by plant age, which increased I max, and nitrate deprivation time, which decreased I max K m was greatest for crown roots. The functional-structural simulation SimRoot was used for sensitivity analysis of plant growth to root segment I max and K m, as well as to test interactions of I max with root system architectural phenes. Simulated plant growth was more sensitive to I max than K m, and reached an asymptote near the maximum I max observed in the empirical studies. Increasing the I max of lateral roots had the largest effect on shoot growth. Additive effects of I max and architectural phenes on nitrate uptake were observed. Empirically, only lateral root tips aged 20 d operated at the maximum I max, and simulations demonstrated that increasing all seminal and lateral classes to this maximum rate could increase plant growth by as much as 26%. Therefore, optimizing I max for all maize root classes merits attention as a promising breeding goal. PMID:27037741

  1. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions - Part 1: General equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It enables a detailed description of mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface, and it allows linking aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined and consistent rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependences (transient and steady-state conditions); flexible addition of unlimited numbers of chemical species and physicochemical processes; optional aggregation or resolution

  2. Variation in ruminal in situ degradation of crude protein and starch from maize grains compared to in vitro gas production kinetics and physical and chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Natascha; Steingaß, Herbert; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate in situ ruminal dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and starch degradation characteristics and in vitro gas production (GP) kinetics using a set of 20 different maize grain genotypes and (2) to predict the effective degradation (ED) of CP and starch from chemical and physical characteristics alone or in combination with in vitro GP measurements. Maize grains were characterised by different chemical and physical characteristics. Ruminal in situ degradation was measured in three lactating Jersey cows. Ground grains (sieve size: 2 mm) were incubated in bags for 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48 and 72 h. Bag residues were analysed for CP and starch content. Degradation kinetics was determined and the ED of DM, CP and starch calculated using a ruminal passage rate of 5%/h and 8%/h. The GP of the grains (sieve size: 1 mm) was recorded after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h incubation in buffered rumen fluid and fitted to an exponential equation to determine GP kinetics. Correlations and stepwise multiple linear regressions were evaluated for the prediction of ED calculated for a passage rate of 5%/h (ED5) for CP (EDCP5) and starch (EDST5). The in situ parameters and ED5 varied widely between genotypes with average values (±SD) of 64% ± 4.2, 62% ± 4.1 and 65% ± 5.2 for ED5 of DM, EDCP5 and EDST5 and were on average 10 percentage points lower for a passage rate of 8%/h. Degradation rates varied between 4.8%/h and 7.4%/h, 4.1%/h and 6.5%/h and 5.3%/h and 8.9%/h for DM, CP and starch, respectively. These rates were in the same range as GP rates (6.0-8.3%/h). The EDCP5 and EDST5 were related to CP concentration and could be evaluated in detail using CP fractions and specific amino acids. In vitro GP measurements and GP rates correlated well with EDCP5 and EDST5 and predicted EDCP5 and EDST5 in combination with the chemical characteristics of the samples. Equations can be used to obtain quick and cost effective information

  3. Effect of genetic and physiological manipulations onthe kinetic and binding parameters of the adenine nucleotide translocator in Saccharomyces cervisiae and Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Lauquin, G; Lunardi, J; Vignais, P V

    1976-01-01

    1. Ghe kinetic and binding parameters of adenine-nucleotide transport have been studied in mitochondria isolated from yeast cells in which the mitochondrial protein-synthetizing system had been inhibited by growth in the presence of erythromycin. These parameters have also been studied in promitochondria isolated from yeast grown in anaerobiosis aesence of ethidium bromide results in a loss of cytochromes b, alpha and alpha 3, but it does not affect the rate constant of ADP transport in isolated mitochondria, nor the number of binding sites for atractyloside, bongkrekic acid and ADP. 3. Promitochondria from S. cerevisiae grown in anaerobiosis, mitochondria from a qo mutant (qo mitochondria) and mitochondria from S. cerevisiae grown in the presence of erythromycin (ERY-mitochondria) are able to transport ADP by the same exchange-diffusion mechanism, sensitive to carboxy-atractyloside, and with the same rate constant as the wild type mitochondria. Promitochondria, qo mitochondria and ERY-mitochondria bind atractyloside, bongkrekic acid and ADP with the same high affinity as the wild type mitochondria. They only differ from the wild type mitochondria by a lower number of binding sites for ADP and for specific inhibitors of ADP transport. 4. Mitochondria isolated from the nuclear mutant p9 of S. cerevisae, called also op1, are characterized by a much lower affinity for bongkrekic acid than mitochondria from the wild type (20 times less). 5. Manipulation of the fatty acid composition of the mitochondrial membranes in the desaturase auxotroph mutant KD115 does not modify the number of sites, no their affinity of bongkrekic acid. 6. The above results are interpreted to mean that the structure and function of the mitochondrial adN translocator are not affected by any change in the mitochondrial protein synthetizing system. PMID:795470

  4. Dynamic determination of kinetic parameters for the interaction between polypeptide hormones and cell-surface receptors in the perfused rat liver by the multiple-indicator dilution method

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, H.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sawada, Y.; Iga, T.; Sakamoto, S.; Fuwa, T.; Hanano, M. )

    1988-11-01

    Hepatic elimination of epidermal growth factor (EGF) via receptor-mediated endocytosis was studied by a multiple-indicator dilution method in the isolated perfused rat liver, in which cell polarity and spatial organization are maintained. In this method EGF was given with inulin, an extracellular reference, as a bolus into the portal vein, and dilution curves of both compounds in the hepatic vein effluent were analyzed. Analysis of the dilution curve for EGF, compared with that for somatostatin, which showed no specific binding to isolated liver plasma membranes, resulted as follows: (i) both extraction ratio and distribution volume of {sup 125}I-labeled EGF decreased as the injected amount of unlabeled EGF increased; (ii) the ratio plot of the dilution curve for EGF exhibited an upward straight line initially for a short period of time, whereas the ratio plot of somatostatin gradually decreased. The multiple-indicator dilution method was used for other peptides also. Insulin and glucagon, known to have hepatocyte receptors, behaved similarly to EGF in shape of their ratio plots. The kinetic parameters calculated by this analysis were comparable with reported values obtained by in vitro direct binding measurements at equilibrium using liver homogenates. They conclude that the multiple-indicator dilution method is a good tool for analyzing the dynamics of peptide hormones-cell-surface receptor interaction under a condition in which spatial architecture of the liver is maintained.

  5. Kinetic Parameters and Cytotoxic Activity of Recombinant Methionine γ-Lyase from Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Yashin, D V; Anufrieva, N V; Anisimova, N Y; Revtovich, S V; Kotlov, M I; Belyi, Y F; Pokrovsky, V S; Demidkina, T V

    2013-07-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent recombinant methionine γ -lyase from three pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined in β- and γ-elimination reactions. The enzyme from C. sporogenes is characterized by the highest catalytic efficiency in the γ-elimination reaction of L-methionine. It was demonstrated that the enzyme from these three sources exists as a tetramer. The N-terminal poly-histidine fragment of three recombinant enzymes influences their catalytic activity and facilitates the aggregation of monomers to yield dimeric forms under denaturing conditions. The cytotoxicity of methionine γ-lyase from C. sporogenes and C. tetani in comparison with Citrobacter freundii was evaluated using K562, PC-3, LnCap, MCF7, SKOV-3, and L5178y tumor cell lines. K562 (IC50=0.4-1.3 U/ml), PC-3 (IC50=0.1-0.4 U/ml), and MCF7 (IC50=0.04-3.2 U/ml) turned out to be the most sensitive cell lines.

  6. [Kinetic parameters of hydrolysis of CpA and UpA sequences in an oligoribonucleotide by compounds functionally mimicking ribonuclease A].

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, N G; Mironova, N L; Konevets, D A; Petiuk, V A; Sil'nikov, V N; Vlasov, V V; Zenkova, M A

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of cleavage of CpA and UpA sequences in an oligoribonucleotide under the action of artificial ribonuclease ABL3C1 were measured. The compounds were built of RNA-binding domain B, catalytic fragment C, linker L3 comprising 3 methylene groups, and aliphatic fragment A. The rate of cleavage of phosphodiester bonds in CpA sequence within decaribonucleotide UUCAUGUAAA was shown to be 3.4 +/- 0.2 times higher than in UpA sequence. The rate of cleavage of phosphodiester bonds were found to depend on substrate length: a thousandfold increase in cleavage rate constant was observed for CpA sequence in decaribonucleotide as compared with diribonucleotide monophosphate CpA. A slight decrease in the cleavage rates was observed for the reactions proceeding in different buffers at pH 7.0: imidazole > HEPES > phosphate > cacodylate. At the same time, the ratio of cleavage rates for CpA and UpA sequences remained constant.

  7. Continuous-flow step gradient mass spectrometry based method for the determination of kinetic parameters of immobilized mushroom tyrosinase in equilibrating conditions: comparison with free enzyme.

    PubMed

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2011-12-15

    A mass spectrometry (MS)-based methodology for enzymatic assay in equilibrium conditions was designed and evaluated. This on-line assay involves the introduction of a continuous-flow step gradient (CFSG) of a substrate solution in the column containing immobilized enzyme and the simultaneous tracking of the product formation. We showed that the constant concentration of substrate in the entire bioreactor for an appropriate duration ensures the equilibration of the studied enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase). Under these conditions, it was demonstrated also that the kinetic and enzymatic parameters (Michaelis-Menten constant, K(M) , the maximal specific activity, SA(max)) are independent of the flow rate of the mobile phase. The feasibility of the mentioned approach for inhibitory tests was also investigated. The coupling of the mass spectrometer to the bio-reactor allows the selective monitoring of the enzymatic reaction products and increases their detection level. Very high sensitivity, 500 pmol/min/column, and selective monitoring of the products of the enzymatic reaction are allowed by MS detection. The methodology developed here constitutes a sensitive analytical tool to study enzymes requiring long equilibration times.

  8. Determination of the kinetic parameters during continuous cultivation of the lipase-producing thermophile Bacillus sp. IHI-91 on olive oil.

    PubMed

    Becker, P; Abu-Reesh, I; Markossian, S; Antranikian, G; Märkl, H

    1997-08-01

    A thermostable lipase was produced in continuous cultivation of a newly isolated thermophilic Bacillus sp. strain IHI-91 growing optimally at 65 degrees C. Lipase activity decreased with increasing dilution rate while lipase productivity showed a maximum of 340 U l-1 h-1 at a condition rate of 0.4 h-1. Lipase productivity was increased by 50% compared to data from batch fermentations. Up to 70% of the total lipase activity measured was associated to cells and by-products or residual substrate. Kinetic and stoichiometric parameters for the utilisation of olive oil were determined. The maximal biomass output method led to a saturation constant Ks of 0.88 g/l. Both batch growth data and a washout experiment yielded a maximal specific growth rate, mu max, of 1.0 h-1. Oxygen uptake rates of up to 2.9 g l-1 h-1 were calculated and the yield coefficient, Y X/O, was determined to be 0.29 g dry cell weight/g O2. From an overall material balance the yield coefficient, Y X/S, was estimated to be 0.60 g dry cell weight/g olive oil.

  9. Magnetic isotope effect on kinetic parameters and quantum beats of radical pairs in micellar solution studied by optically detected esr using pulsed microwave.

    PubMed

    Kitahama, Yasutaka; Sakaguchi, Yoshio

    2008-01-17

    We investigated the quantum beats, the oscillation between singlet and triplet states of radical pairs induced by the microwave field resonant to one of the component radicals. They were observed as the alternation of the yields of the component radicals by a nanosecond time-resolved optical absorption with the X-band (9.15 GHz) resonant microwave pulse. This technique was applied to the photochemical reaction of benzophenone, benzophenone-d(10), and benzophenone-carbonyl-(13)C in a sodium dodecylsulfate micellar solution with a step-by-step increase of the resonant microwave pulse width. The yields of the component radicals showed alternation with an increase of the microwave pulse width. This indicates that the radical pair retains spin coherence in the micellar solution. The magnetic isotope effect on the amplitude of the quantum beat was observed. The MW effect on the quantum beat of BP-(13)C decreases from 80% to 60% of that of BP by irradiation of the pi-pulse MW due to spin-locking. The kinetic parameters were also determined using the X- or Ku-band (17.44 GHz) region. They are almost similar to each other except for the intersystem recombination rate in the system of BP-(13)C, which may be slightly higher than those in other systems.

  10. A new conception of space weather prediction based on the UT variations of geoeffective parameters and its validation for 35 years of spaced measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, T. V.; Laptukhov, A. I.

    As we become a space culture, we are more and more in need of a predictive understanding of the key processes that constitute the interaction of the solar wind plasma and the IMF with the terrestrial magnetic field. The paper presents results of our analysis of geoeffective parameters of the solar wind calculated from measurements of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) for the period from 1964-1999 of space measurements at 1 a.u. at ecliptic plane and Kp, Dst indexes (planetary geomagnetic activity). We attract for calculation of geoeffective parameters a reconnection model that describes a reconnection between terrestrial magnetic field and an IMF of arbitrary orientation taking into account annual and daily rotations of the Earth's dipole (Kuznetsova and Laptukhov, 2001). As result we introduce two new geoeffective invariant parameters (independent from a choice of a coordinate system) that have clear physical sense of components of electric field of the solar wind along special directions of the geomagnetic moment (M): vector of electric field of the solar wind E are presented by its projections along and across the M vector (Em and Emv). For calculations of the electric field we used measured components of the IMF and solar wind velocity V. To project vector E along the directions we calculated orientation of geomagnetic moment at each moment of the Universal Time during its orbital motion (in GSE coordinate system). In terms of our approach mutual orientation of vectors of E and M is important. We obtained two functional dependencies: Kp=F1(Emv), Kp=F2(Em) on the basis of measurements for 35 years. Remarkable feature of derived functions Kp=F1(Emv), Kp=F2(Em) is that standard error is nearly the same both for high and low values of Kp (including extreme values). Results demonstrate that Emv electric field is one the main contributor to the Kp variations. Results of our detailed analysis showed that Emv can explain 94.5 % variations in Kp, Em

  11. Statistical variations of source parameters in inter- and intraplate earthquakes in Chile and their correlations with the slab properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derode, B.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the rupture processes of intermediate-depth earthquakes in active subduction zones and their dependence to inherited geophysical parameters, such as the maturity and orientation of pre-existing faults, is still of prime interest. Unfortunately, quantitative values describing the nucleation and propagation processes at depths are rare, and the earthquake source parameters determined from global databases or far-field measurements are often very heterogeneous, especially for the smallest and deepest earthquakes. In order to leveling this problem and discriminate specific characteristics of the intermediate-depth earthquakes in Chile (IDEQ-Chile), we conducted high precision measurements using local and regional waveforms data obtained from broadband and strong-motions stations of IPOC network in northern Chile. A strict and rigorous methodology was used to reduce the scattering of the source parameter estimation usually observed. With this high-quality database, we examined the source characteristics of a few hundreds of intra-slab intermediate depth-earthquakes, with depth varying from 40 km to 300 km. For the effective comparison of the source parameters, we studied with the same approach a hundred of interplate earthquakes located along the same latitude-dependent zone of the subducted slab. Based on static and cinematic considerations, we compared these source parameters with macroscopic geophysical parameters such as the stress regime, the coupling degree or the style of faulting, in order to show the possible correlations between them. Interestingly, we observed three major depth-dependent zones corresponding to three different sets of static and dynamic source parameters. We show that there are some evident differences between these distinct Chilean zones, although the apparent quasi-constant velocity and age of the subducted Nazca plate along Chile. We discuss how some of the various proposed sources mechanisms, explaining the earthquakes

  12. Protein Distribution and d34S Variation Within Microbially Formed Metal-Sulfide Colloids Provide Clues to the Mechanism and Kinetics of Extracellular Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, J. W.; Weber, P. K.; Martin, M. C.; Webb, R. I.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Banfield, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    Micron-scale spheroidal aggregates of 1-5 nanometer-diameter sphalerite and wurtzite particles form as the result of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Labrenz et al. 2000, Moreau et al. 2004). Because these particles can also sequester contaminant metal(loid)s such as Pb2+, Cd2+, As3+ and Hg2+, the process provides a model for the study of phenomena that occur during in situ environmental bioremediation. Our analyses have focused on biofilms growing on decaying wood in neutralized acid-mine drainage in subsurface regions of the flooded Piquette Mine near Tennyson, WI. The system experiences nearly constant annual temperatures of 8°C. Spectroscopic and electron diffraction methods revealed that the biogenic sulfides are virtually homogenous in composition (nearly pure ZnS), but contain both (cubic) sphalerite and metastable (hexagonal) wurtzite that reflect size-dependent phase stabilities. In order to explore the kinetics of sulfate reduction and metal sequestration, and to identify forces driving particle aggregation (thus, limiting their mobility in the subsurface), we have isotopically and biochemically characterized ultramicrotomed ZnS aggregates in situ using secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) and synchrotron Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (SR-FTIR). Initial nanoSIMS results showed that the spheroidal ZnS aggregates contain fine-scale variations in δ34S and significant organic nitrogen concentrations. SR-FTIR data support the presence of amide I and II absorption features indicative of the presence of polypeptides localized within aggregates. Efforts to isolate and identify candidate proteins are currently under way. We propose that isotopic heterogeneities may reflect open-system variations in the composition of local source sulfate (including via biologically-mediated reoxidation of biogenic sulfide), and/or variation in bacterial sulfate reduction rate over the growth cycle(s) of sulfate-reducers. Furthermore, we suggest that

  13. Effects of particle size and coating on toxicologic parameters, fecal elimination kinetics and tissue distribution of acutely ingested silver nanoparticles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Wilding, Laura A; Morishita, Masako; Walacavage, Kim; Ault, Andrew P; Axson, Jessica L; Stark, Diana I; Hashway, Sara A; Capracotta, Sonja S; Leroueil, Pascale R; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Consumer exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNP) via ingestion can occur due to incorporation of AgNP into products such as food containers and dietary supplements. AgNP variations in size and coating may affect toxicity, elimination kinetics or tissue distribution. Here, we directly compared acute administration of AgNP of two differing coatings and sizes to mice, using doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight/day administered by oral gavage for 3 days. The maximal dose is equivalent to 2000× the EPA oral reference dose. Silver acetate at the same doses was used as ionic silver control. We found no toxicity and no significant tissue accumulation. Additionally, no toxicity was seen when AgNP were dosed concurrently with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. Between 70.5% and 98.6% of the administered silver dose was recovered in feces and particle size and coating differences did not significantly influence fecal silver. Peak fecal silver was detected between 6- and 9-h post-administration and <0.5% of the administered dose was cumulatively detected in liver, spleen, intestines or urine at 48 h. Although particle size and coating did not affect tissue accumulation, silver was detected in liver, spleen and kidney of mice administered ionic silver at marginally higher levels than those administered AgNP, suggesting that silver ion may be more bioavailable. Our results suggest that, irrespective of particle size and coating, acute oral exposure to AgNP at doses relevant to potential human exposure is associated with predominantly fecal elimination and is not associated with accumulation in tissue or toxicity. PMID:26305411

  14. Measuring earthquake source parameters in the Mendocino triple junction region using a dense OBS array: Implications for fault strength variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Subduction zones produce earthquakes on a set of faults that operate under a wide variety of conditions resulting from considerable variations in depth, temperature, rock type, and fluid pressure. These variations likely lead to variation in the stress levels that drives particular earthquakes and that in turn effects the magnitude of seismic shaking they produce. In the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) region, intraplate faults within the mantle of the subducting plate fail regularly in energetic earthquakes while the adjacent thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone remains seismically quiet despite the likelihood that it operates at much lower levels of stress and strength. In 2012, as part of the Cascadia Initiative community experiment, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array was deployed in the MTJ area, providing unusually dense data covering both the inter- and intra-plate earthquakes. Combining these data with onshore networks, we detect and relocate 1137 earthquakes with a three dimensional velocity model. We perform detailed spectral and time domain analysis to study variations in earthquake source properties between the different types of faults. We observe a wide variability of stress drops and systematic lateral and depth variations in the earthquake source spectra resulting from the different types of tectonic fault systems in this region: intraplate faults within the subducted oceanic mantle, the Mendocino transform plate boundary fault, and the thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone. Some of the depth variability of source spectra can be explained by the expected increase in rupture velocity with depth. However, the overall variation in stress drop estimates is consistent with the highest stress drop earthquakes occurring in the depth range predicted by strength envelopes. Moreover, the earthquakes in the vicinity of the thrust interface, likely including some within the subducted oceanic crust, show clearly lower stress drops and

  15. Study on the effect of hydrogen addition on the variation of plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge for synthesis of TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Bhuyan, Heman

    2016-04-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen addition on plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge plasma in the synthesis of H-doped TiO2 films. The parameters of the hydrogen-added Ar/O2 plasma influence the properties and the structural phases of the deposited TiO2 film. Therefore, the variation of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (Te), electron density (ne), ion density (ni), degree of ionization of Ar and degree of dissociation of H2 as a function of hydrogen content in the discharge is studied. Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the plasma. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase of the magnetron discharge, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. It is observed that the electron and heavy ion density decline with gradual addition of hydrogen in the discharge. Hydrogen addition significantly changes the degree of ionization of Ar which influences the structural phases of the TiO2 film.

  16. Carbon and water flux responses to physiology by environment interactions: a sensitivity analysis of variation in climate on photosynthetic and stomatal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerle, William L.; Daniels, Alex B.; Barnard, David M.

    2014-05-01

    Sensitivity of carbon uptake and water use estimates to changes in physiology was determined with a coupled photosynthesis and stomatal conductance ( g s) model, linked to canopy microclimate with a spatially explicit scheme (MAESTRA). The sensitivity analyses were conducted over the range of intraspecific physiology parameter variation observed for Acer rubrum L. and temperate hardwood C3 (C3) vegetation across the following climate conditions: carbon dioxide concentration 200-700 ppm, photosynthetically active radiation 50-2,000 μmol m-2 s-1, air temperature 5-40 °C, relative humidity 5-95 %, and wind speed at the top of the canopy 1-10 m s-1. Five key physiological inputs [quantum yield of electron transport ( α), minimum stomatal conductance ( g 0), stomatal sensitivity to the marginal water cost of carbon gain ( g 1), maximum rate of electron transport ( J max), and maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco ( V cmax)] changed carbon and water flux estimates ≥15 % in response to climate gradients; variation in α, J max, and V cmax input resulted in up to ~50 and 82 % intraspecific and C3 photosynthesis estimate output differences respectively. Transpiration estimates were affected up to ~46 and 147 % by differences in intraspecific and C3 g 1 and g 0 values—two parameters previously overlooked in modeling land-atmosphere carbon and water exchange. We show that a variable environment, within a canopy or along a climate gradient, changes the spatial parameter effects of g 0, g 1, α, J max, and V cmax in photosynthesis- g s models. Since variation in physiology parameter input effects are dependent on climate, this approach can be used to assess the geographical importance of key physiology model inputs when estimating large scale carbon and water exchange.

  17. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by Ceratocystis paradoxa MSR2 Using Isotherm Modelling, Kinetic Study and Optimization of Batch Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Chidambaram

    2015-01-01

    This study is focused on the possible use of Ceratocystis paradoxa MSR2 native biomass for Cr(VI) biosorption. The influence of experimental parameters such as initial pH, temperature, biomass dosage, initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time were optimized using batch systems as well as response surface methodology (RSM). Maximum Cr(VI) removal of 68.72% was achieved, at an optimal condition of biomass dosage 2g L−1, initial Cr(VI) concentration of 62.5 mg L−1 and contact time of 60 min. The closeness of the experimental and the predicted values exhibit the success of RSM. The biosorption mechanism of MSR2 biosorbent was well described by Langmuir isotherm and a pseudo second order kinetic model, with a high regression coefficient. The thermodynamic study also revealed the spontaneity and exothermic nature of the process. The surface characterization using FT-IR analysis revealed the involvement of amine, carbonyl and carboxyl groups in the biosorption process. Additionally, desorption efficiency of 92% was found with 0.1 M HNO3. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency, increased with increase in metal ion concentration, biomass concentration, temperature but with a decrease in pH. The size of the MSR2 biosorbent material was found to be 80 μm using particle size analyzer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) visualizes the distribution of Cr(VI) on the biosorbent binding sites with alterations in the MSR2 surface structure. The SEM-EDAX analysis was also used to evaluate the binding characteristics of MSR2 strain with Cr(VI) metals. The mechanism of Cr(VI) removal of MSR2 biomass has also been proposed. PMID:25822726

  18. Biohydrogen production based on the evaluation of kinetic parameters of a mixed microbial culture using glucose and fruit-vegetable waste as feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Peña, E I; Canul-Chan, M; Chairez, I; Salgado-Manjarez, E; Aranda-Barradas, J

    2013-09-01

    Hydrogen (H2) production from the organic fraction of solid waste such as fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) is a novel and feasible energy technology. Continuous application of this process would allow for the simultaneous treatment of organic residues and energy production. In this study, batch experiments were conducted using glucose as substrate, and data of H2 production obtained were successfully adjusted by a logistic model. The kinetic parameters (μ max = 0.101 h(-1), K s = 2.56 g/L) of an H2-producing microbial culture determined by the Monod and Haldane-Andrews growth models were used to establish the continuous culture conditions. This strategy led to a productive steady state in continuous culture. Once the steady state was reached in the continuous reactor, a maximum H2 production of 700 mL was attained. The feasibility of producing H2 from the FVW obtained from a local market in Mexico City was also evaluated using batch conditions. The effect of the initial FVW concentration on the H2 production and waste organic material degradation was determined. The highest H2 production rate (1.7 mmol/day), the highest cumulative H2 volume (310 mL), and 25 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were obtained with an initial substrate (FVW) concentration of 37 g COD/L. The lowest H2 production rates were obtained with relatively low initial substrate concentrations of 5 and 11 g COD/L. The H2 production rates with FVW were also characterized by the logistic model. Similar cumulative H2 production was obtained when glucose and FVW were used as substrates.

  19. Can the monitoring of animal welfare parameters predict pork meat quality variation through the supply chain (from farm to slaughter)?

    PubMed

    Rocha, L M; Velarde, A; Dalmau, A; Saucier, L; Faucitano, L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between the animal welfare conditions evaluated through the supply chain and pork quality variation. A total of 4,680 pigs from 12 farms-5 animal welfare improved raising system (AWIRS) and 7 conventional raising system (CON) farms-were assessed from farm to slaughter through a comprehensive audit protocol merging the European Welfare Quality, the Canadian Animal Care Assessment, and American Meat Institute audit guide criteria. At the abattoir, a subsample of 1,440 pigs (120 pigs/farm) was randomly chosen out of 24 loads (2 farms per wk) transported by 2 drivers (driver A and driver B) for the assessment of stunning effectiveness, carcass bruises, blood lactate levels, and meat quality traits. Meat quality was assessed in the longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle 24 h postmortem by measuring ultimate pH (pHu), color (L*, a*, and b*), and drip loss. Data were analyzed by the MIXED, GLIMMIX, and NAPAR1WAY procedures of SAS. Spearman correlations were calculated to determine the relationship between audit scores and meat quality traits. Better animal welfare conditions, as showed by greater final scores for good housing (GHo; = 0.001) and good health ( = 0.006) principles, were recorded at AWIRS farms. Pigs from AWIRS farms handled by driver B displayed a greater percentage of turning back ( = 0.01) and slips ( < 0.001) during unloading and a greater ( = 0.02) frequency of falls in the stunning chute. A greater ( = 0.02) reluctance to move at loading was found in CON pigs loaded by driver A compared with driver B, whereas a greater ( < 0.001) reluctance to move was found in these pigs at unloading when they were unloaded by driver B. Drip loss was higher ( = 0.003) and pale, soft, and exudative pork percentage was greater ( < 0.001) in the LL muscle of the heavier AWIRS pigs. The GHO principle was best correlated with pHu ( = -0.75, = 0.01) and Minolta L* value ( = 0.87, < 0.001) of the LL muscle. Overall, drip

  20. On fast reactor kinetics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

  1. [Daily variation of some cardiovascular parameters in healthy children and in those with chronic cholecystitis, changes on mud cure].

    PubMed

    Kochergin, Iu V

    2007-01-01

    Studies covered chronologic algorithm of physiologic parameters in healthy children and those with hepato-biliary diseases. 71.3% of children suffering from hepato-biliary diseases appeared to have significant desynchronization. The authors conducted time-wise optimization of mud care in children with cholecystitis. Findings are that mud care has considerable sanogenous effect and could be recommended as a treatment for children with ecologically mediated cholecystitis.

  2. The effect of wind and eruption source parameter variations on tephra fallout hazard assessment: an example from Vesuvio (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Scollo, Simona; Neri, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainty in the tephra fallout hazard assessment may depend on different meteorological datasets and eruptive source parameters used in the modelling. We present a statistical study to analyze this uncertainty in the case of a sub-Plinian eruption of Vesuvius of VEI = 4, column height of 18 km and total erupted mass of 5 × 1011 kg. The hazard assessment for tephra fallout is performed using the advection-diffusion model Hazmap. Firstly, we analyze statistically different meteorological datasets: i) from the daily atmospheric soundings of the stations located in Brindisi (Italy) between 1962 and 1976 and between 1996 and 2012, and in Pratica di Mare (Rome, Italy) between 1996 and 2012; ii) from numerical weather prediction models of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Furthermore, we modify the total mass, the total grain-size distribution, the eruption column height, and the diffusion coefficient. Then, we quantify the impact that different datasets and model input parameters have on the probability maps. Results shows that the parameter that mostly affects the tephra fallout probability maps, keeping constant the total mass, is the particle terminal settling velocity, which is a function of the total grain-size distribution, particle density and shape. Differently, the evaluation of the hazard assessment weakly depends on the use of different meteorological datasets, column height and diffusion coefficient.

  3. General aspects of peptide selectivity towards lipid bilayers and cell membranes studied by variation of the structural parameters of amphipathic helical model peptides.

    PubMed

    Dathe, Margitta; Meyer, Jana; Beyermann, Michael; Maul, Björn; Hoischen, Christian; Bienert, Michael

    2002-02-01

    Model compounds of modified hydrophobicity (Eta), hydrophobic moment (mu) and angle subtended by charged residues (Phi) were synthesized to define the general roles of structural motifs of cationic helical peptides for membrane activity and selectivity. The peptide sets were based on a highly hydrophobic, non-selective KLA model peptide with high antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. Variation of the investigated parameters was found to be a suitable method for modifying peptide selectivity towards either neutral or highly negatively charged lipid bilayers. Eta and mu influenced selectivity preferentially via modification of activity on 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers, while the size of the polar/hydrophobic angle affected the activity against 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidyl-DL-glycerol (POPG). The influence of the parameters on the activity determining step was modest in both lipid systems and the activity profiles were the result of the parameters' influence on the second less pronounced permeabilization step. Thus, the activity towards POPC vesicles was determined by the high permeabilizing efficiency, however, changes in the structural parameters preferentially influenced the relatively moderate affinity. In contrast, intensive peptide accumulation via electrostatic interactions was sufficient for the destabilization of highly negatively charged POPG lipid membranes, but changes in the activity profile, as revealed by the modification of Phi, seem to be preferentially caused by variation of the low permeabilizing efficiency. The parameters proved very effective also in modifying antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. However, their influence on cell selectivity was limited. A threshold value of hydrophobicity seems to exist which restricted the activity modifying potential of mu and Phi on both lipid bilayers and cell membranes.

  4. Can the monitoring of animal welfare parameters predict pork meat quality variation through the supply chain (from farm to slaughter)?

    PubMed

    Rocha, L M; Velarde, A; Dalmau, A; Saucier, L; Faucitano, L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between the animal welfare conditions evaluated through the supply chain and pork quality variation. A total of 4,680 pigs from 12 farms-5 animal welfare improved raising system (AWIRS) and 7 conventional raising system (CON) farms-were assessed from farm to slaughter through a comprehensive audit protocol merging the European Welfare Quality, the Canadian Animal Care Assessment, and American Meat Institute audit guide criteria. At the abattoir, a subsample of 1,440 pigs (120 pigs/farm) was randomly chosen out of 24 loads (2 farms per wk) transported by 2 drivers (driver A and driver B) for the assessment of stunning effectiveness, carcass bruises, blood lactate levels, and meat quality traits. Meat quality was assessed in the longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle 24 h postmortem by measuring ultimate pH (pHu), color (L*, a*, and b*), and drip loss. Data were analyzed by the MIXED, GLIMMIX, and NAPAR1WAY procedures of SAS. Spearman correlations were calculated to determine the relationship between audit scores and meat quality traits. Better animal welfare conditions, as showed by greater final scores for good housing (GHo; = 0.001) and good health ( = 0.006) principles, were recorded at AWIRS farms. Pigs from AWIRS farms handled by driver B displayed a greater percentage of turning back ( = 0.01) and slips ( < 0.001) during unloading and a greater ( = 0.02) frequency of falls in the stunning chute. A greater ( = 0.02) reluctance to move at loading was found in CON pigs loaded by driver A compared with driver B, whereas a greater ( < 0.001) reluctance to move was found in these pigs at unloading when they were unloaded by driver B. Drip loss was higher ( = 0.003) and pale, soft, and exudative pork percentage was greater ( < 0.001) in the LL muscle of the heavier AWIRS pigs. The GHO principle was best correlated with pHu ( = -0.75, = 0.01) and Minolta L* value ( = 0.87, < 0.001) of the LL muscle. Overall, drip

  5. Convergence of the variational parameter without convergence of the energy in Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations using the Stochastic Gradient Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissenbaum, Daniel; Lin, Hsin; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun

    2009-03-01

    To study the performance of the Stochastic Gradient Approximation (SGA) for variational Quantum Monte Carlo methods, we have considered lithium nano-clusters [1] described by Hartree-Fock wavefunctions multiplied by two-body Jastrow factors with a single variational parameter b. Even when the system size increases, we have shown the feasibility of obtaining an accurate value of b that minimizes the energy without an explicit calculation of the energy itself. The present SGA algorithm is so efficient because an analytic gradient formula is used and because the statistical noise in the gradient is smaller than in the energy [2]. Interestingly, in this scheme the absolute value of the gradient is less important than the sign of the gradient. Work supported in part by U.S. DOE. [1] D. Nissenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 033412 (2007). [2] A. Harju, J. Low. Temp. Phys. 140, 181 (2005).

  6. Discrimination of inland and coastal dunes in Eastern Saudi Arabia desert system: An approach from particle size and textural parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeshidayatullah, Ardiansyah; Chan, Septriandi Asmaidi; Al-Ghamdi, Majed; Akif, Tariq; Al-Ramadan, Khalid

    2016-05-01

    Different particle size parameters have been investigated in this study in order to distinguish the characteristics of different dune morphologies in the Eastern Saudi Arabia. Sand samples were collected from various environments including: the stoss, lee, crest and interdune sides of the inland dunes and foreshore; berm; backshore and backdune of the coastal dunes. Statistical parameters reveal that the majority of inland dune samples are dominated by well sorted fine sand whereas coastal dune samples are mainly dominated by very coarse to medium sand, ranging from well sorted to moderately sorted with a low percentage of silt and clay. The presence of relatively coarser grains in the coastal dunes might be explained by continuous wind deflation along the coast together with wave and tidal activities that concentrate coarser grains. Cross-plots from four statistical parameters and supported by the ANOVA test clearly distinguish the particle variations between these dunes. The log-probability analysis suggest that the main transport mechanism in inland and coastal dunes is dominated by the saltation population, comprising up to 80 percent of the distribution. However, the coastal dunes suspension population is mostly belonging to coarser grained material, whereas the inland dunes population is finer. In comparison with particle size characteristics of dunes in the region, the current study shows a close relationship to mean particle size in Iraq, but is relatively finer compared to the Kuwait dunes. This similarity and difference in particle size variation is mostly controlled by the proximity to the coast and also the wind energy and variation in the wind direction.

  7. Short communication: Variation in production parameters among Canadian Holstein cows classified as high, average, and low immune responders.

    PubMed

    Stoop, C L; Thompson-Crispi, K A; Cartwright, S L; Mallard, B A

    2016-06-01

    Dairy cattle evaluated for immune responses and identified as high responders are known to have a lower occurrence of economically important diseases, including mastitis, metritis, ketosis, and retained placenta. These high immune responders have also been shown to make more antibody following vaccination and to have improved milk and colostrum quality. Therefore, breeding for improved immune response is expected to have several benefits in the dairy industry. However, a concern of such an approach to improve animal health is the potential cost of lost production due to an allocation of host resources to mount a robust immune response. The objective of this study was to evaluate early- and late-lactation production parameters in cattle classified as having high, average, or low estimated breeding values (EBV) for cell-mediated (CMIR), antibody-mediated (AMIR), and overall immune responses. A total of 561 cows from 6 herds were phenotyped for immune response and ranked based on EBV for CMIR and AMIR. A linear animal model was used to evaluate differences in milk, fat, and protein yields among immune response groups, and a regression analysis was conducted based on immune response EBV. Overall, no difference in production parameters was found based on immune response rank; however, some positive relationships with immune response EBV were found, suggesting that breeding for enhanced immune responsiveness as a prophylactic approach to improve animal health would not come at the cost of lost production.

  8. Kinetic investigation of wood pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thurner, F.; Mann, U.; Beck, S. R.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the kinetics of the primary reactions of wood pyrolysis. A new experimental method was developed which enabled us to measure the rate of gas, tar, and char production while taking into account the temperature variations during the wood heating up. The experimental method developed did not require any sophisticated instruments. It facilitated the collection of gas, tar and residue (unreacted wood and char) as well as accurate measurement of the temperature inside the wood sample. Expressions relating the kinetic parameters to the measured variables were derived. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated in the range of 300 to 400/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure and under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction temperature and mass fractions of gas, tar, and residue were measured as a function of time. Assuming first-order reactions, the kinetic parameters were determined using differential method. The measured activation energies of wood pyrolysis to gas, tar, and char were 88.6, 112.7, and 106.5 kJ/mole, respectively. These kinetic data were then used to predict the yield of the various pyrolysis products. It was found that the best prediction was obtained when an integral-mean temperature obtained from the temperature-time curve was used as reaction temperature. The pyrolysis products were analyzed to investigate the influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the composition. The gas consisted mainly of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and C/sub 3//sup +/-compounds. The gas composition depended on reaction time as well as reactor temperature. The tar analysis indicated that the tar consisted of about seven compounds. Its major compound was believed to be levoglucosan. Elemental analysis for the char showed that the carbon content increased with increasing temperature.

  9. Cross-laboratory comparative study of the impact of experimental and regression methodologies on salmonella thermal inactivation parameters in ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isothermal inactivation studies are commonly used to quantify thermal inactivation kinetics of bacteria. Meta-analyses and comparisons utilizing results from multiple sources have revealed large variations in reported inactivation parameters for Salmonella, even in similar food materials. Different ...

  10. Pair Identity and Smooth Variation Rules Applicable for the Spectroscopic Parameters of H2O Transitions Involving High-J States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.; Lavrentieva, N. N.

    2010-01-01

    Two basic rules (i.e. the pair identity and the smooth variation) applicable for H2O transitions involving high-J states have been discovered. The origins of these rules are the properties of the energy levels and wavefunctions of H2O states with the quantum number J above certain boundaries. As a result, for lines involving high-J states in individually defined groups, all their spectroscopic parameters (i.e. the transition wavenumber, intensity, pressure-broadened half-width, pressure-induced shift, and temperature exponent) must follow these rules. One can use these rules to screen spectroscopic data provided by databases and to identify possible errors. In addition, by using extrapolation methods within the individual groups, one is able to predict the spectroscopic parameters for lines in this group involving very high-J states. The latter are required in developing high-temperature molecular spectroscopic databases such as HITEMP.

  11. Simulation of characteristic variation in 16 nm gate FinFET devices due to intrinsic parameter fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Hwang, Chih-Hong; Han, Ming-Hung

    2010-03-01

    High-kappa/metal-gate and vertical channel transistors are well-known solutions to continue the device scaling. This work extensively explores the physics and mechanism of the intrinsic parameter fluctuations in nanoscale fin-type field-effect transistors by using an experimentally validated three-dimensional quantum-corrected device simulation. The dominance fluctuation sources in threshold voltage, gate capacitance and cutoff frequency have been found. The emerging fluctuation source, workfunction fluctuation, shows significant impacts on DC characteristics; however, its impact is reduced in AC characteristics due to the screening effect of the inversion layer. Additionally, the channel discrete dopant may enhance the electric field and therefore make the averaged cutoff frequency of fluctuated devices larger than the nominal value of cutoff frequency. PMID:20124665

  12. Orbital and Spin Parameter Variations of Partial Eclipsing Low Mass X-Ray Binary X 1822-371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yi; Hsieh, Hung-En; Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang; Su, Yi-Hao

    2016-11-01

    We report our measurements for the orbital and spin parameters of X 1822-371 using its X-ray partial eclipsing profile and pulsar timing from data collected by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). Four more X-ray eclipse times obtained by the RXTE 2011 observations were combined with historical records to trace the evolution of the orbital period. We found that a cubic ephemeris likely better describes the evolution of the X-ray eclipse times during a time span of about 34 years with a marginal second order derivative of {\\ddot{P}}{orb}=(-1.05+/- 0.59)× {10}-19 s‑1. Using the pulse arrival time delay technique, the orbital and spin parameters were obtained from RXTE observations from 1998 to 2011. The detected pulse periods show that the neutron star in X 1822-371 is continuously spun-up with a rate of {\\dot{P}}s=(-2.6288+/- 0.0095)× {10}-12 s s‑1. Although the evolution of the epoch of the mean longitude l = π/2 (i.e., T π/2) gives an orbital period derivative value consistent with that obtained from the quadratic ephemeris evaluated from the X-ray eclipse, the detected T π/2 values are significantly and systematically earlier than the corresponding expected X-ray eclipse times by 90 ± 11 s. This deviation is probably caused by asymmetric X-ray emissions. We also attempted to constrain the mass and radius of the neutron star using the spin period change rate and concluded that the intrinsic luminosity of X 1822-371 is likely more than 1038 erg s‑1.

  13. Contribution of long-term accounting for raindrop size distribution variations on quantitative precipitation estimation by weather radar: Disdrometers vs parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Leijnse, H.

    2015-12-01

    Volumetric weather radars provide information on the characteristics of precipitation at high spatial and temporal resolution. Unfortunately, rainfall measurements by radar are affected by multiple error sources, which can be subdivided into two main groups: 1) errors affecting the volumetric reflectivity measurements (e.g. ground clutter, vertical profile of reflectivity, attenuation, etc.), and 2) errors related to the conversion of the observed reflectivity (Z) values into rainfall intensity (R) and specific attenuation (k). Until the recent wide-scale implementation of dual-polarimetric radar, this second group of errors received relatively little attention, focusing predominantly on precipitation type-dependent Z-R and Z-k relations. The current work accounts for the impact of variations of the drop size distribution (DSD) on the radar QPE performance. We propose to link the parameters of the Z-R and Z-k relations directly to those of the normalized gamma DSD. The benefit of this procedure is that it reduces the number of unknown parameters. In this work, the DSD parameters are obtained using 1) surface observations from a Parsivel and Thies LPM disdrometer, and 2) a Monte Carlo optimization procedure using surface rain gauge observations. The impact of both approaches for a given precipitation type is assessed for 45 days of summertime precipitation observed within The Netherlands. Accounting for DSD variations using disdrometer observations leads to an improved radar QPE product as compared to applying climatological Z-R and Z-k relations. However, overall precipitation intensities are still underestimated. This underestimation is expected to result from unaccounted errors (e.g. transmitter calibration, erroneous identification of precipitation as clutter, overshooting and small-scale variability). In case the DSD parameters are optimized, the performance of the radar is further improved, resulting in the best performance of the radar QPE product. However

  14. Parameter variation effects on temperature elevation in a steady-state, one-dimensional thermal model for millimeter wave exposure of one- and three-layer human tissue.

    PubMed

    Kanezaki, Akio; Hirata, Akimasa; Watanabe, Soichi; Shirai, Hiroshi

    2010-08-21

    The present study describes theoretical parametric analysis of the steady-state temperature elevation in one-dimensional three-layer (skin, fat and muscle) and one-layer (skin only) models due to millimeter-wave exposure. The motivation of this fundamental investigation is that some variability of warmth sensation in the human skin has been reported. An analytical solution for a bioheat equation was derived by using the Laplace transform for the one-dimensional human models. Approximate expressions were obtained to investigate the dependence of temperature elevation on different thermal and tissue thickness parameters. It was shown that the temperature elevation on the body surface decreases monotonically with the blood perfusion rate, heat conductivity and heat transfer from the body to air. Also revealed were the conditions where maximum and minimum surface temperature elevations were observed for different thermal and tissue thickness parameters. The surface temperature elevation in the three-layer model is 1.3-2.8 times greater than that in the one-layer model. The main reason for this difference is attributed to the adiabatic nature of the fat layer. By considering the variation range of thermal and tissue thickness parameters which causes the maximum and minimum temperature elevations, the dominant parameter influencing the surface temperature elevation was found to be the heat transfer coefficient between the body surface and air.

  15. Effect of sampling site and collection method on variations in baseline clinical pathology parameters in Fischer-344 rats. 1. Clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Neptun, D A; Smith, C N; Irons, R D

    1985-12-01

    An analysis of the influence of blood sampling site and collection method on clinical chemistry parameters was conducted in male Fischer-344 rats. Sampling sites compared included the right ventricle, aorta, vena cava, retroorbital sinus, and tail. Methods of collection included Vacutainer (3 ml sample), syringe (exsanguination), and capillary tube. Nineteen frequently measured clinical chemistry procedures were determined, including serum enzym