Science.gov

Sample records for klapper wim salomons

  1. Experimental verification of the model by Klapper for 4H-SiC homoepitaxy on vicinal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, Birgit; Polster, Sebastian; Berwian, Patrick; Friedrich, Jochen; Danilewsky, Andreas N.

    2013-11-01

    4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers free of basal plane dislocations (BPDs) are urgently needed to overcome the so-called bipolar degradation of high-voltage devices. BPDs being present in substrates are able to either propagate to the epilayer or convert to harmless threading edge dislocations (TEDs) in the epilayer. The model by Klapper predicts the conversion of BPDs to TEDs to be more efficient for growth on vicinal substrates with low off-cut angle. This paper aims to verify the model by Klapper by an extensive variation of epitaxial growth parameters and the substrates' off-cut. It is shown that the off-cut angle is the key parameter for growth of BPD-free epilayers. Furthermore, it is shown that the model also describes adequately the behavior of different types of TEDs, i.e., TED II and TED III dislocations, during epitaxial growth. Therefore, the model by Klapper is verified successfully for 4H-SiC homoepitaxial growth on vicinal substrates.

  2. 76 FR 12786 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Charlotte Salomon: Life...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Charlotte Salomon: Life? Or Theatre... Salomon: Life? Or Theatre?'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States,...

  3. Application of SAGE III inversion algorithm to SALOMON measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazureau, A.; Brogniez, Colette; Renard, J.-B.

    2001-01-01

    The SAGE II, whose first flight is planned to be launched in Winter 2000-2001 on the polar orbit spacecraft METEOR 3M, is a part of NASA's Earth Observing Systems (EOS). A preliminary outcome for the LOA inversion has been obtained for resolved channel for the retrieval of daytime and nighttime constituents such as O3, NO2, NO3, OCIO and aerosols, with good quality, from simulated transmission profiles. An opportunity for testing the inversion algorithm on real measurements is offered by the SALOMON team of the LPCE to validate the method. The purpose of this paper is to present the LOA inversion of SALOMON real measurements, performed in February 2000 from Kiruna, Sweden. The retrieved gas densities and aerosol extinction profiles are compared to the corresponding retrieved values by the SALOMON team.

  4. Upgrades to the WIMS-ANL code.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W. L.

    1998-10-14

    The dusty old source code in WIMS-D4M has been completely rewritten to conform more closely with current FORTRAN coding practices. The revised code contains many improvements in appearance, error checking and in control of the output. The output is now tabulated to fit the typical 80 column window or terminal screen. The Segev method for resonance integral interpolation is now an option. Most of the dimension limitations have been removed and replaced with variable dimensions within a compile-time fixed container. The library is no longer restricted to the 69 energy group structure, and two new libraries have been generated for use with the code. The new libraries are both based on ENDF/B-VI data with one having the original 69 energy group structure and the second with a 172 group structure. The common source code can be used with PCs using both Windows 95 and NT, with a Linux based operating system and with UNIX based workstations. Comparisons of this version of the code to earlier evaluations with ENDF/B-V are provided, as well as, comparisons with the new libraries.

  5. Scalable WIM: effective exploration in large-scale astrophysical environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinggang; Fu, Chi-Wing; Hanson, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Navigating through large-scale virtual environments such as simulations of the astrophysical Universe is difficult. The huge spatial range of astronomical models and the dominance of empty space make it hard for users to travel across cosmological scales effectively, and the problem of wayfinding further impedes the user's ability to acquire reliable spatial knowledge of astronomical contexts. We introduce a new technique called the scalable world-in-miniature (WIM) map as a unifying interface to facilitate travel and wayfinding in a virtual environment spanning gigantic spatial scales: Power-law spatial scaling enables rapid and accurate transitions among widely separated regions; logarithmically mapped miniature spaces offer a global overview mode when the full context is too large; 3D landmarks represented in the WIM are enhanced by scale, positional, and directional cues to augment spatial context awareness; a series of navigation models are incorporated into the scalable WIM to improve the performance of travel tasks posed by the unique characteristics of virtual cosmic exploration. The scalable WIM user interface supports an improved physical navigation experience and assists pragmatic cognitive understanding of a visualization context that incorporates the features of large-scale astronomy.

  6. [Salomon Neumann (1819-1908) and the Right to Health].

    PubMed

    Gostomzyk, J G; von Mittelstaedt, G

    2016-12-01

    The "Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)" of the United Nations (UN) of 1948 sets out a right to health as a common ideal and aspiration. In his writings on the reform of the Prussian Medical Charter "Public Health and property" 100 years before the UDHR was set out, the Jewish physician Salomon Neumann had defined health as a right for every citizen, a right that should to be protected by a public system of health care. His reasoning went beyond contemporaneous critical social discussion. Right of humans to health has been acknowledged nationally and internationally; in the Federal Republic of Germany, the question as to whether there is a basic right to health is still open. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Neutron transport in WIMS by the characteristics method

    SciTech Connect

    Halsall, M.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The common methods of solving the neutron transport equation in reactor assembly geometries involve some geometric approximation. The standard differential transport methods and diffusion methods rely on pin-cell smearing, and transmission probability methods make approximations to the boundary fluxes linking pin cells. Integral transport methods (collision probabilities) can cope with pin geometries by numerical integration but require excessive computing times that increase with the square of the number of regions. The characteristics method in WIMS, known as CACTUS, solves the differential transport equation by a numerical tracking technique whose accuracy is limited only by computing resources; in its WIMS implementation it can handle any pin-type geometry without the need for preliminary spatial smearing.

  8. Civil Engineering Work Information Management System (WIMS) Planning Guide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    Over a four-year period beginning in 1985, the Air Force will purchase and install 130 Work Information Management System minicomputers at a cost of...almost 100 million dollars. Currently there is no consolidated guidance available to help the Work Information Management System Project Managers...install and implement the system at their bases. The Civil Engineering Work Information Management System (WIMS) Planning Guide fills that gap. This guide

  9. Variations of archived static-weight data and WIM

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; Gillmann, R.; Kent, P.M.

    1998-12-01

    Using seven-card archived, static-weight and weigh-in-motion (WIM), truck data received by FHWA for 1966--1992, the authors examine the fluctuations of four fiducial weight measures reported at weight sites in the 50 states. The reduced 172 MB Class 9 (332000) database was prepared and ordered from 2 CD-ROMS with duplicate records removed. Front-axle weight and gross-vehicle weight (GVW) are combined conceptually by determining the front axle weight in four-quartile GVW categories. The four categories of front axle weight from the four GVW categories are combined in four ways. Three linear combinations are with fixed-coefficient fiducials and one is that optimal linear combination producing the smallest standard deviation to mean value ratio. The best combination gives coefficients of variation of 2--3% for samples of 100 trucks, below the expected accuracy of single-event WIM measurements. Time tracking of data shows some high-variation sites have seasonal variations, or linear variations over the time-ordered samples. Modeling of these effects is very site specific but provides a way to reduce high variations. Some automatic calibration schemes would erroneously remove such seasonal or linear variations were they static effects.

  10. Learning from Television and Books: A Dutch Replication Study Based on Salomon's Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beentjes, Johannes W. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the amount of mental effort children invest in television viewing versus book reading focuses on a Dutch study based on Salomon's model and his studies with children in Israel and the United States. The depth of information processed is discussed, and differences in results are examined. (18 references) (LRW)

  11. Lattice Cell Calculations, Slowing Down Theory and Computer Code Wims; Vver Type Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J.; Brekke, A.; Hall, C.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * WIMS AS A TOOL FOR REACTOR CORE CALCULATIONS * GENERAL STRUCTURE OF THE WIMS CODE * WIMS APPROACH TO THE SLOWING DOWN CALCULATIONS * MULTIGROUP OSCOPIC CROSS SECTIONS, RESONANCE TREATMENT * DETERMINATION OF MULTIGROUP SPECTRA * PHYSICAL MODELS IN MAIN TRANSPORT CALCULATIONS * BURNUP CALCULATIONS * APPLICATION OF WIMSD-4 TO VVER TYPE LATTICES * FINAL REMARKS * REFERENCES * APPENDIX A: DANCOFF FACTOR - STANDARD APPROACH * APPENDIX B: FORMULAS FOR DANCOFF AND BELL FACTORS CALCULATIONS APPLIED IN PREWIM * APPENDIX C: CALCULATION OF ONE GROUP PROBABILITIES Pij IN AN ANNULAR SYSTEM * APPENDIX D: SCHAEFER'S METHOD

  12. Methodology and application of the WIMS-D4M fission product data

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, S.C.

    1995-02-01

    The WIMS-D4 code has been modified (WIMS-D4m) to generate burn-up dependent microscopic cross sections for use in full core depletion calculations. The calculation of neutron absorption by fission products can be obtained from a reduced fission-product-chain model that includes the {sup 135}Xe and {sup 149}Sm chains, and a lumped fission product to account for the absorption by fission products not explicitly treated. Burn-up calculations were performed for the ANS MEU core using WIMS and EPRI-CELL cross sections. The calculated eigenvalues and material loadings are in good agreements.

  13. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-Visible spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J. B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-04-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which uses stars and Moon as light source, respectively, were involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the validation of the GOMOS algorithm dedicated to the correction of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l’Adour, France. The night-time SALOMON and GOMOS measurements were conducted at the same time (around 21h30 TU) and with a spatial coincidence less than 250 km. Comparison of vertical profiles was done for an altitude in the 15-40 km range. While the global shape of the GOMOS and SALOMON ozone profiles are quite in agreement, the GOMOS NO2 and NO3 profiles are unrealistic when compared to SALOMON profiles. A reanalysis of the GOMOS transmission using algorithms already developed for SALOMON shows that accurate NO2 and NO3 profiles can be retrieved if DOAS technique and dedicated spectral windows are used. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight and a new SALOMON flight should occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) in January and March 2003, respectively. The same analyses as for the September 2002 flight will be conducted, including this time the OClO and aerosols extinction coefficient retrievals. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) Configuration and Data Management Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Schlicher, Bob G

    2006-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involvement in the Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) research with both government agencies and private companies dates back to 1989. The discussion here will focus on the US Army's current need for an automated WIM system to weigh and determine the center-of-balance for military wheeled vehicles and cargo and the expanded uses of WIM data. ORNL is addressing configuration and data management issues as they relate to deployments for both military and humanitarian activities. The transition from the previous WIM Gen I to the current Gen II system illustrates a configuration and data management solution that ensures data integration, integrity, coherence and cost effectiveness. Currently, Army units use portable and fixed scales, tape measures, and calculators to determine vehicle axle, total weights and center of balance for vehicles prior to being transshipped via railcar, ship, or airlifted. Manually weighing and measuring all vehicles subject to these transshipment operations is time-consuming, labor-intensive, hazardous and is prone to human errors (e.g., misreading scales and tape measures, calculating centers of balance and wheel, axle, and vehicle weights, recording data, and transferring data from manually prepared work sheets into an electronic data base and aggravated by adverse weather conditions). Additionally, in the context of the military, the timeliness, safety, success, and effectiveness of airborne heavy-drop operations can be significantly improved by the use of an automated system to weigh and determine center of balance of vehicles while they are in motion. The lack of a standardized airlift-weighing system for joint service use also creates redundant weighing requirements at the cost of scarce resources and time. This case study can be judiciously expanded into commercial operations related to safety and enforcement. The WIM program will provide a means for the Army to automatically identify/weigh and monitor

  15. The Wim Van Leer Competition for Young Film Makers at the Jerusalem Film Festival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Gilli

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Jerusalem Film Center and the background, history, and organization of the Wim Van Leer Competition which was established for young filmmakers in high school. Describes the Jerusalem Film Festival, film studies programs at Israeli high schools, and future possibilities. (Author/LRW)

  16. The Wim Van Leer Competition for Young Film Makers at the Jerusalem Film Festival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Gilli

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Jerusalem Film Center and the background, history, and organization of the Wim Van Leer Competition which was established for young filmmakers in high school. Describes the Jerusalem Film Festival, film studies programs at Israeli high schools, and future possibilities. (Author/LRW)

  17. Mental Effort and Perceptions of TV and Books: A Dutch Replication Study Based on Salomon's Model of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beentjes, Hans W. J.

    This comparison of students' learning from reading books and from watching television uses Gavriel Salomon's model of learning effects, which is based on the amount of mental effort invested (AIME) in a medium as determining how deeply the information from that medium is processed. Mental effort, in turn, is predicted to depend on two perceptions…

  18. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 85-002-1551, Salomon Brothers, New York, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Fannick, N.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon-monoxide (630080) and carbon-dioxide (124389) concentrations were measured at Salomon Brothers, Incorporated (SIC-6711), New York, New York, in September and October, 1984. The evaluation was requested by the firm's medical department because of complaints of headache and eye, nose, and sinus irritation among employees who worked on the 40th floor, trading center. Ventilation surveys were also performed. After additional ventilation equipment was installed, a second survey found that the outdoor air supplied exceeded the ASHRAE recommendations. Following installation of the supplemental ventilation equipment, the employees complaints abated. The author concludes that in the preliminary survey, a potential health hazard existed due to an inadequate supply of fresh air. Installation of additional ventilation equipment removed the potential hazard.

  19. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-visible spetrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J.-B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-08-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which use stars and Moon as light source, respectively, are involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the analysis of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l'Adour, France. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) on March 1, 2003. The vertical profiles are compared to those obtained by GOMOS. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  20. [Crossed paths of two pharmacists in the French Resistance: Jean-François Salomon and Paul-Antoine Joanny].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    Born in 1922, Jean-François Salomon--originating from Erstein (Bas-Rhin)--and Paul-Antoine Joanny--originating from Besse-en-Chandesse (Puy-de-Dôme)--begin together their higher education at the "full exercise school of pharmacy" of the University of Clermont-Ferrand (where the University of Strasbourg found refuge from 1940 to 1945). They met again for their officinal initiation training period at the same pharmacist, Mr. Robin, who helped them join the Resistance fighters. They entered thus the movement "Combat". After the war, they kept close family ties--since J.-F. Salomon married in 1949 Yvette Lucienne Joanny, precisely P.-A. Joanny's sister--as well as a shared geographical attachment, in as far as both of them set up as pharmacists in the Auvergne. J.-F. Salomon fulfilled even heavy responsabilities for the National pharmaceutical association in his region of adoption, whereas P.-A. Joanny annexed to his own pharmacy two herbalist's shops without holder.

  1. Automated-In-Motion Vehicle Evaluation Environment (AIMVEE) Weigh-In Motion (WIM) User Training and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2006-05-04

    The AIMVEE/WIM system electronically retrieves deployment information, identifies vehicle automatically, and determines total weight, individual wheel weight, individual axle weights, axle spacing, and center-of-balance for any wheeled vehicle in motion. The AIMVEE/WIM system can also perform these functions statically for both wheel vehicles and cargo with information. The AIMVEE/WIM system incorporates digital images and applies cubing algorithms to determine length, width, height for cubic dimensions of both vehicle and cargo. Once all this information is stored, it electronically links to data collection and dissemination systems to provide “actual” weight and measurement information for planning, deployment, and in-transit visibility. The Static Scale Conversion (SSC) system is an unique enhancement to the AIMVEE/WIM system. It enables a SSC to weigh and measure vehicles and cargo dynamically (i.e., as they pass over the large scale and is included in the AIMVEE computer code base. The material to be copyrighted is the Automated-In-Motion Vehicle Evaluation Environment (AIMVEE)/Weigh-In-Motion User Training and Testing material. It includes instructional material in the set-up, operation and tear-down of the AIMVEE/WIM system. It also includes a final exam associated with the training.

  2. Validation of WIMS-IST for CANDU R-type lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B. P.; Davis, R.

    2006-07-01

    Prior validation studies of 28-element natural uranium (28-NU) CANDU R-type fuel bundles using the WIMS-IST lattice physics code had demonstrated a bias in the calculation of the coolant void reactivity (CVR) of approximately +0.5 to +0.6 mk (1 mk =100 pcm = 0.001 {Delta}k/k). However, these validation studies were performed using experimental data for 28-element bundles with pressure tubes that were smaller than standard CANDU-type pressure tubes, giving a smaller coolant volume, and a modified neutron energy spectrum. Validation studies performed with 37-element and 43-element fuel bundles with a CANDU-type lattice pitch and pressure tube had shown a CVR bias of {approx} 1.7 to 1.9 mk. It was believed that the CVR bias for a 28-element bundle would be closer to this range of values if a standard CANDU pressure tube diameter were used The objective of this study was to confirm this hypothesis, that using a larger CANDU-standard pressure tube would give a larger CVR bias for a 28-NU fuel bundle, as computed by WIMS-IST in comparison to experimental measurements of critical buckling. Thus, new critical-height and flux-map measurements were performed in substitution experiments in the ZED-2 research reactor to determine the pure critical lattice buckling for 28-element fuel with standard-size CANDU pressure tubes. The derived buckling from these experiments were used in WIMS-IST transport calculations to determine the effective multiplication factors for cooled and voided lattices and hence the bias in the CVR. Calculation results demonstrated that the CVR bias for the 28-NU was {approx} 1.7 mk {+-} 0.42 mk, which is consistent with the results for 37-element and 43-element CANDU-type lattices. (authors)

  3. A wireless inertial measurement system (WIMS) for an interactive dance environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, A.; Majeed, B.; O'Flynn, B.; Barton, J.; Murphy, F.; Delaney, K.; O'Mathuna, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will present the work carried out in designing a Wireless Inertial Measurement System (WIMS) designed for a wearable system operating in an interactive dance environment. The concept underpinning this system is the generation of inertial information from multiple nodes distributed over a dancer's body, which will enable the dancer to communicate with their environment and interact with their surroundings through movement. The IMU nodes will be arranged in a network configuration whose control will be based upon existing technology developed at Tyndall.

  4. Determining the nuclear data uncertainty on MONK10 and WIMS10 criticality calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Tim; Dobson, Geoff; Hanlon, David; Hiles, Richard; Mason, Robert; Perry, Ray

    2017-09-01

    The ANSWERS Software Service is developing a number of techniques to better understand and quantify uncertainty on calculations of the neutron multiplication factor, k-effective, in nuclear fuel and other systems containing fissile material. The uncertainty on the calculated k-effective arises from a number of sources, including nuclear data uncertainties, manufacturing tolerances, modelling approximations and, for Monte Carlo simulation, stochastic uncertainty. For determining the uncertainties due to nuclear data, a set of application libraries have been generated for use with the MONK10 Monte Carlo and the WIMS10 deterministic criticality and reactor physics codes. This paper overviews the generation of these nuclear data libraries by Latin hypercube sampling of JEFF-3.1.2 evaluated data based upon a library of covariance data taken from JEFF, ENDF/B, JENDL and TENDL evaluations. Criticality calculations have been performed with MONK10 and WIMS10 using these sampled libraries for a number of benchmark models of fissile systems. Results are presented which show the uncertainty on k-effective for these systems arising from the uncertainty on the input nuclear data.

  5. New performances of the UV-visible spectrometer "SALOMON" dedicated to measurements of night-time stratospheric trace gas species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, Gwenael; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Chartier, Michel; Robert, Claude; Pirre, Michel; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Goutail, Florence; François, Pierre

    2001-08-01

    The light balloon-borne spectrometer SALOMON performs night-time observations of O3, NO2, NO3, OClO and aerosols using the Moon as light source. Four flights have occurred since the first one on October 1998 and have allowed to obtain vertical profiles of the species at mid and high latitude. Since the first flight, the performances concerning the pointing system, the spectral domain (340-700 nm) and the transmission of the instrument have been significantly improved. In particular, the increase of the optical system transmission has allowed to perform measurements during low flux Moon phases and to obtain a better retrieval of OClO contribution. The sensitivity of SALOMON allows to measure species absorption lines corresponding to mixing ratios of a few pptv. It appears that this sensitivity is better than the accuracy of the absorption cross-sections of the species measured in laboratories. Therefore, new laboratory measurements of these cross-sections especially at low temperatures are necessary.

  6. WIMS/PANTHER analysis of UO{sub 2}/MOX cores using embedded super-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M.; Bryce, P.; Hall, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a method of analysing PWR UO{sub 2}MOX cores with WIMS/PANTHER. Embedded super-cells, run within the reactor code, are used to correct the standard methodology of using 2-group smeared data from single assembly lattice calculations. In many other codes the weakness of this standard approach has been improved for MOX by imposing a more realistic environment in the lattice code, or by improving the sophistication of the reactor code. In this approach an intermediate set of calculations is introduced, leaving both lattice and reactor calculations broadly unchanged. The essence of the approach is that the whole core is broken down into a set of 'embedded' super-cells, each extending over just four quarter assemblies, with zero leakage imposed at the assembly mid-lines. Each supercell is solved twice, first with a detailed multi-group pin-by-pin solution, and then with the standard single assembly approach. Correction factors are defined by comparing the two solutions, and these can be applied in whole core calculations. The restriction that all such calculations are modelled with zero leakage means that they are independent of each other and of the core-wide flux shape. This allows parallel pre-calculation for the entire cycle once the loading pattern has been determined, in much the same way that single assembly lattice calculations can be pre-calculated once the range of fuel types is known. Comparisons against a whole core pin-by-pin reference demonstrates that the embedding process does not introduce a significant error, even after burnup and refuelling. Comparisons against a WIMS reference demonstrate that a pin-by-pin multi-group diffusion solution is capable of capturing the main interface effects. This therefore defines a practical approach for achieving results close to lattice code accuracy, but broadly at the cost of a standard reactor calculation. (authors)

  7. SALOMON: A New, Light Balloonborne UV visible spectrometer for Nighttime Observations of Stratospheric Trace-Gas Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Chartier, Michel; Robert, Claude; Chalumeau, Gilles; Berthet, Gwenaël; Pirre, Michel; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Goutail, Florence

    2000-01-01

    A new, light balloonborne UV visible spectrometer, called SALOMON, is designed to perform nighttime measurements of stratospheric trace-gas species by using the Moon as a light source. The first flight, performed on 31 October 1998 at mid-latitude with a float altitude of 26.7 km, allowed the performance of the pointing system to be checked and vertical profiles of ozone, NO 2 , NO 3 , and possibly OBrO to be obtained. First the instrument and then the performance of the pointing system and the detector are described. Finally the vertical profiles are compared with other profiles obtained at the same location five years before with the heavier balloonborne spectrometer AMON, which uses a star as the light source.

  8. "Experience Is Our Great and Only Teacher": A Peircean Reading of Wim Wenders' "Wings of Desire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Torill

    2014-01-01

    Wim Wenders' film "Wings of Desire" tells the story of an angel who wishes to become mortal in order to know the simple joy of human life. Told from the angel's point of view, the film is shot in black and white. But at the very instant the angel perceives the realities of human experience, the film blossoms into colour. In…

  9. "Experience Is Our Great and Only Teacher": A Peircean Reading of Wim Wenders' "Wings of Desire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Torill

    2014-01-01

    Wim Wenders' film "Wings of Desire" tells the story of an angel who wishes to become mortal in order to know the simple joy of human life. Told from the angel's point of view, the film is shot in black and white. But at the very instant the angel perceives the realities of human experience, the film blossoms into colour. In…

  10. Fuel burnup analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMS-D5 codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, E. A.; Bashter, I. I.; Hassan, Nabil M.; Mustafa, S. S.

    2017-02-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) reactor is a compact power reactor designed with especial features. It contains Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA). The core is heterogeneous both axially and radially. This work provides the full core burn up analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMDS-D5 codes. Criticality calculations, radial and axial power distributions and nuclear peaking factor at the different stages of burnup were studied. Effective multiplication factor values for the core were estimated by coupling MCNPX code with WIMS-D5 code and compared with SAS2H/KENO-V code values at different stages of burnup. The two calculation codes show good agreement and correlation. The values of radial and axial powers for the full core were also compared with published results given by SAS2H/KENO-V code (at the beginning and end of reactor operation). The behavior of both radial and axial power distribution is quiet similar to the other data published by SAS2H/KENO-V code. The peaking factor values estimated in the present work are close to its values calculated by SAS2H/KENO-V code.

  11. Analysis of climate change scenarios in an olive orchard microcatchment in Spain using the model WIMMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Enrique; Aguilar, Cristina; José Polo, María; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2015-04-01

    Olive orchards constitute traditional systems in the Mediterranean Basin. In Andalusia, Southern Spain, more than 1.5Mha are dedicated to olive crop land use, which represent a production of 1Mt of olive oil per year. This is a strategic economic sector with environmental and social relevance. In the context of climate change in Andalusia, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has highlighted that an increase of temperatures and rainfall intensities as well as the reduction of cumulated rainfall might be expected. This may mean serious detrimental economic and environmental risks associated to floods and the reduction of available water resources which would be convenient to quantify. The objective of this work is to analyse the rainfall-runoff relationships in an olive orchard catchment by the application of the distributed hydrological model WIMMED (Herrero et al., 2009) simulating the effects of climate change, with a special emphasis on extreme events. Firstly, the model was calibrated and validated with 9 maximum annual events of a datasets from 2005-2012 obtained in an olive orchard catchment in Spain (Taguas et al., 2010). In this stage, only the saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil moisture in saturation were adjusted after a sensitivity analysis where 68 simulations were carried out. A good agreement was obtained between observed and simulated hydrographs. The mean errors and the root mean square errors were 0.18 mm and 2.19 mm for the calibration and 0.18 and 1.94 mm, for the validation. Finally, the catchment response to the increase of intensity and temperature and the reduction of cumulated rainfall were simulated for the maximum event of the series. The results showed a rise of 11% of the runoff coefficient quantifying the possible impact of climate change. REFERENCES Herrero J, Polo M., Moñino A., Losada MA (2009). An energy balance snowmelt model in a Mediterranean site. J. Hydrol. 371, pp. 98-107 Taguas EV, Peña A, Ayuso JL, Yuan Y

  12. Calculation of the Fast Flux Test Facility fuel pin tests with the WIMS-E and MCNP codes

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Wittekind, W.D.; Toffer, H.

    1991-10-01

    The Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) at the Fast Flux Test Facility site on the Hanford Site at Richland, Washington currently is being prepared to fabricate mixed oxide fuel (U, Pu) for the FFTF. Calculational tools are required to perform criticality safety analyses for various process locations and to establish safe limits for fissile material handling at the FAA. These codes require validation against experimental data appropriate for the compositions that will be handled. Critical array experiments performed by Bierman provide such data for mixed oxide fuel in the range Pu/(U+Pu) = 22 wt %, and with Pu-240 contents equal to 12 wt %. Both the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) and the Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS-E) computer codes were used to calculate the neutron multiplication factor for explicit models of the various critical arrays. The W-CACTUS modules within the WIMS-E code system was used to calculate k{infinity} for the explicit array configuration, as well as few-group cross sections that were then used in a three-dimensional diffusion theory code for the calculation of k{sub eff} for the finite array. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. A portable multi-function weight-in-motion (WIM) sensor system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Wei, Zhanxiong; Zhao, Qiming; Guan, Liang; Zou, Jilin; Fan, Lingling; Yang, Shangming; Song, Dongcao; Recine, Gregory; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2008-04-01

    A portable, multi-function WIM sensing system based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) technology is developed to measure the total weight, the distribution of weight of vehicle in motion (the weights of left front, right front, left rear and right rear wheels respectively), the distance of wheels axles and distance between left and right wheels. Currently the speed of vehicle to be tested can be up to 15 mph, the full scope of measurement for this system is 4000 lbs, and the static sensitivity of sensor head is 20 lbs. This system has been tested respectively at Stevens' campus and Army base. Compared to other schemes, our method has a number of advantages such as immune to electromagnetic interference, high repeatability, lightweight, low power consumption, high sensitivity to dynamic strain caused by load of vehicles in high-speed. The accuracy of whole system can be improved by simulating the mathematical model of sensor heads and improving the quality of manufacture as well as the calibration condition in the future.

  14. Estimating NIRR-1 burn-up and core life time expectancy using the codes WIMS and CITATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahaya, B.; Ahmed, Y. A.; Balogun, G. I.; Agbo, S. A.

    The Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) is a low power miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria Nigeria. The reactor went critical with initial core excess reactivity of 3.77 mk. The NIRR-1 cold excess reactivity measured at the time of commissioning was determined to be 4.97 mk, which is more than the licensed range of 3.5-4 mk. Hence some cadmium poison worth -1.2 mk was inserted into one of the inner irradiation sites which act as reactivity regulating device in order to reduce the core excess reactivity to 3.77 mk, which is within recommended licensed range of 3.5 mk and 4.0 mk. In this present study, the burn-up calculations of the NIRR-1 fuel and the estimation of the core life time expectancy after 10 years (the reactor core expected cycle) have been conducted using the codes WIMS and CITATION. The burn-up analyses carried out indicated that the excess reactivity of NIRR-1 follows a linear decreasing trend having 216 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD) operations. The reactivity worth of top beryllium shim data plates was calculated to be 19.072 mk. The result of depletion analysis for NIRR-1 core shows that (7.9947 ± 0.0008) g of U-235 was consumed for the period of 12 years of operating time. The production of the build-up of Pu-239 was found to be (0.0347 ± 0.0043) g. The core life time estimated in this research was found to be 30.33 years. This is in good agreement with the literature

  15. The Potential and Beneficial Use of Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) Systems Integrated with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems for Characterizing Disposal of Waste Debris to Optimize the Waste Shipping Process

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Buckner Jr, Dooley; Newton, David D

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system provides a portable and/or semi-portable means of accurately weighing vehicles and its cargo as each vehicle crosses the scales (while in motion), and determining (1) axle weights and (2) axle spacing for vehicles (for determination of Bridge Formula compliance), (3) total vehicle/cargo weight and (4) longitudinal center of gravity (for safety considerations). The WIM system can also weigh the above statically. Because of the automated nature of the WIM system, it eliminates the introduction of human errors caused by manual computations and data entry, adverse weather conditions, and stress. Individual vehicles can be weighed continuously at low speeds (approximately 3-10 mph) and at intervals of less than one minute. The ORNL WIM system operates and is integrated into the Bethel Jacobs Company Transportation Management and Information System (TMIS, a Radio-Frequency Identification [RFID] enabled information system). The integrated process is as follows: Truck Identification Number and Tare Weight are programmed into a RFID Tag. Handheld RFID devices interact with the RFID Tag, and Electronic Shipping Document is written to the RFID Tag. The RFID tag read by an RFID tower identifies the vehicle and its associated cargo, the specific manifest of radioactive debris for the uniquely identified vehicle. The weight of the cargo (in this case waste debris) is calculated from total vehicle weight information supplied from WIM to TMIS and is further processed into the Information System and kept for historical and archival purposes. The assembled data is the further process in downstream information systems where waste coordination activities at the Y-12 Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) are written to RFID Tag. All cycle time information is monitored by Transportation Operations and Security personnel.

  16. A high speed, portable, multi-function, weigh-in-motion (WIM) sensing system and a high performance optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) demodulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Wei, Zhanxiong; Fan, Lingling; Yang, Shangming; Wang, Pengfei; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2010-04-01

    A high speed, portable, multi-function WIM sensing system based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) technology is reported in this paper. This system is developed to measure the total weight, the distribution of weight of vehicle in motion, the distance of wheel axles and the distance between left and right wheels. In this system, a temperature control system and a real-time compensation system are employed to eliminate the drifts of optical fiber Fabry-Pérot tunable filter. Carbon Fiber Laminated Composites are used in the sensor heads to obtain high reliability and sensitivity. The speed of tested vehicles is up to 20 mph, the full scope of measurement is 4000 lbs, and the static resolution of sensor head is 20 lbs. The demodulator has high speed (500 Hz) data collection, and high stability. The demodulator and the light source are packed into a 17'' rack style enclosure. The prototype has been tested respectively at Stevens' campus and Army base. Some experiences of avoiding the pitfalls in developing this system are also presented in this paper.

  17. Magnetic Turbulence in the WIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minter, A.

    2004-10-01

    The turbulence in the Galactic magnetic field can be measured using Faraday rotation measures towards extra-galactic radio sources along with Hα emission measures from the Warm Ionized Medium in our galaxy. This has now been done for two 10° by 10° regions of the sky centered on (l,b)=145°, -20° (Minter & Spangler 1996), and 185°, +20°. I will present preliminary results for the 185°,+20° region.

  18. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. I. Analysis of aerosol extinction spectra from the AMON and SALOMON balloonborne spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, Gwenaël; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Brogniez, Colette; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Pirre, Michel

    2002-12-01

    Aerosol extinction coefficients have been derived in the 375-700-nm spectral domain from measurements in the stratosphere since 1992, at night, at mid- and high latitudes from 15 to 40 km, by two balloonborne spectrometers, Absorption par les Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (AMON) and Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (SALOMON). Log-normal size distributions associated with the Mie-computed extinction spectra that best fit the measurements permit calculation of integrated properties of the distributions. Although measured extinction spectra that correspond to background aerosols can be reproduced by the Mie scattering model by use of monomodal log-normal size distributions, each flight reveals some large discrepancies between measurement and theory at several altitudes. The agreement between measured and Mie-calculated extinction spectra is significantly improved by use of bimodal log-normal distributions. Nevertheless, neither monomodal nor bimodal distributions permit correct reproduction of some of the measured extinction shapes, especially for the 26 February 1997 AMON flight, which exhibited spectral behavior attributed to particles from a polar stratospheric cloud event.

  19. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part I: Benchmark comparisons of WIMS-D5 and DRAGON cell and control rod parameters with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure-vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels, and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update calculation methods and models (cell, supercell and reactor) was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. As a validation of the new models some benchmark comparisons were done with Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5. This paper presents comparisons of cell and supercell benchmark problems based on a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the WIMS-D5 and DRAGON codes with MCNP5 results. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, and more symmetric than Atucha-II Cell parameters compared include cell k-infinity, relative power levels of the different rings of fuel rods, and some two-group macroscopic cross sections. Supercell comparisons include supercell k-infinity changes due to the control rods (tubes) of steel and hafnium. (authors)

  20. Galactic Magnetic Fields, from Radio Polarimetry of the WIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, M.; Katgert, P.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Heitsch, F.

    2004-10-01

    Multi-frequency radio polarimetry of the diffuse Galactic synchrotron back-ground gives new viewpoints on the Galactic magnetic field. Rotation measure maps reveal magnetic structures on arcminute to degree scales, such as a ring in polarization that we interpret as a magnetic tunnel. A complication using this technique is depolarization across the beam and along the line of sight. The influence of beam depolarization has been estimated using numerical models of the magneto-ionic ISM, through which polarized radiation propagates. The models show that depolarization canals similar to those observed can be caused by beam depolarization, and that the one-dimensional gradients in RM needed to produce these canals are ubiquitous in the medium.

  1. Otto Salomon in Nääs and His First Icelandic Students in Nordic Sloyd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli; Ólafsson, Brynjar

    2014-01-01

    Pedagogically aimed craft education was established around the same time as the school-based system of formative education, under the term Sloyd. This refers to a pedagogical system of manual training that promotes general child development, through the acquisition of the technical skills employed in woodwork, metalwork, sewing, knitting and the…

  2. Nutrient concentrations and primary productivity at the Peros Banhos and Salomon atolls in the Chagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, R. F.; Drew, E. A.

    1984-02-01

    Coral atolls are areas of high biological productivity even though they are usually located in regions of the tropical ocean characterized by low primary production and extremely low levels of vital dissolved nutrient materials. Recent studies have indicated the possible importance of in situ dinitrogen fixation on shallow reef flats in supplementing low oceanic nitrate levels and thus contributing to the maintenance of high reef productivity. Variations in the structure of atolls may have a direct bearing on the accumulation of fixed nitrogen and other nutrient materials, and consequently on lagoonal and reefal primary productivity. This paper investigates the effect of differing atoll configurations by comparing neighbouring, but structurally dissimilar, mid-ocean atolls. The findings are discussed in terms of ecosystem function and possible influences on the structural evolution of atolls.

  3. Otto Salomon in Nääs and His First Icelandic Students in Nordic Sloyd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli; Ólafsson, Brynjar

    2014-01-01

    Pedagogically aimed craft education was established around the same time as the school-based system of formative education, under the term Sloyd. This refers to a pedagogical system of manual training that promotes general child development, through the acquisition of the technical skills employed in woodwork, metalwork, sewing, knitting and the…

  4. The Effects of Thermal Heating Via the Dissipation Of Turbulence on the WIM/DIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minter, A.; Balser, D. S.

    1997-05-01

    The observed properties of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in our Galaxy are not easily reconcilable with simple photoionization models. Photoionization models, however, can reproduce the observed properties of H II regions. This suggests that there are different or additional physical processes at work in the DIG. The He I lambda 5876/Hα line ratio indicates that a soft ionizing spectrum is needed in the DIG while [N II] lambda 6583/Hα and [S II] lambda 6716/Hα line ratios indicate that a harder ionizing spectrum is needed if only photoionization is to explain the properties of the DIG. Minter and Spangler (1997, ApJ, in press) have shown that the thermal heating due to the dissipation of the turbulence is likely to be an important heating mechanism in the DIG while being unimportant in H II regions. We have developed a model of the DIG whereby it is ionized by a relatively soft ionizing spectrum (T_eff <= 32,000{K}) and is also heated by an additional thermal mechanism: the dissipation of turbulence. This model predicts the same electron temperature, [N II] lambda 6583 ratio, [S II] lambda 6716 ratio and He I lambda 5876 ratio as observed in the DIG. The model suggests that the observed [O III] lambda 5007 emission from the diffuse ISM does not originate from the oxygen in the DIG. Without the turbulent thermal heating term, this model will not reproduce the observed properties of the DIG. The dissipation of turbulence may also be important in other phases of the ISM.

  5. Code System to Calculate Integral Parameters with Reaction Rates from WIMS Output.

    SciTech Connect

    LESZCZYNSKI, FRANCISCO

    1994-10-25

    Version 00 REACTION calculates different integral parameters related to neutron reactions on reactor lattices, from reaction rates calculated with WIMSD4 code, and comparisons with experimental values.

  6. From Salomon's House to the Land-Grant College: Practical Arts Education and the Utopian Vision of Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterous, Frank B.

    1989-01-01

    This article explores the significance of practical arts education in both the utopian literary tradition and American social development. An argument is presented that land grant colleges partly evolved in response to the ideas expressed in literary utopias regarding the utilization of knowledge for individual and social betterment. (IAH)

  7. Electric river: salomon still run the Columbia, but hydropower is the bigger catch. [Full use of potential of Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, J.

    1981-07-01

    Centralized computers control virtually the entire length of the Columbia River to feed hydroelectric power plants, supply irrigation, prevent flooding, and aid migrating fish as it drops 2700 feet on its 1214 mile flow to the Pacific Ocean. The river carries a burden which may not be sustainable in the face of competing and incompatible demands. In spite of all the Columbia River development, the Pacific Northwest suffers a loss of topsoil which threatens food production, possible power interruptions wich threaten industrial development, and a decline in the salmon population. The river's size encouraged the feeling that it couldn't be depleted, but political pressure from Southern California now threatens to place even greater demands. A national water policy and an end to regional fighting is needed before massive water transfers should be developed. (DCK)

  8. FERRET-SAND II physics-dosimetry analysis for N Reactor Pressure Tubes 2954, 3053 and 1165 using a WIMS calculated input spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, W.N.; Kellogg, L.S.; Matsumoto, W.Y.; Morgan, W.C.; Suski, A.E.

    1988-05-01

    This report is in response to a request from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) that the PNL National Dosimetry Center (NDC) perform physics-dosimetry analyses (E > MeV) for N Reactor Pressure Tubes 2954 and 3053. As a result of these analyses, and recommendations for additional studies, two physics-dosimetry re-evaluations for Pressure Tube 1165 were also accomplished. The primary objective of Pacific Northwest Laboratories' (PNL) National Dosimetry Center (NDC) physics-dosimetry work for N Reactor was to provide FERRET-SAND II physics-dosimetry results to assist in the assessment of neutron radiation-induced changes in the physical and mechanical properties of N Reactor pressure tubes. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. United States Transportation Command’s Transformation Technology Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    recovered pallets. 6. Weigh - in - Motion (WIM): This proposal, which will conclude in FY06, seeks to refine portable weigh - in - motion systems that enables...Comptroller) USTRANSCOM United States Transportation Command WIM Weigh - in - Motion 49

  10. Interview: Professor Helle Neergaard, President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, on the Nature of Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industry and Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    On August 13, 2014, Rita G. Klapper conducted a Skype interview with Helle Neergaard. Neergaard is not only President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, but also Docent at the Hanken School of Economics, and Professor at iCARE, Department of Business Administration, School of Business and Social Sciences, University…

  11. Interview: Professor Helle Neergaard, President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, on the Nature of Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industry and Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    On August 13, 2014, Rita G. Klapper conducted a Skype interview with Helle Neergaard. Neergaard is not only President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, but also Docent at the Hanken School of Economics, and Professor at iCARE, Department of Business Administration, School of Business and Social Sciences, University…

  12. Taking Communication to Task--Again: What Difference Does a Decade Make?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A decade ago, Klapper (2003: "Taking communication to task? A critical review of recent trends in language teaching", "The Language Learning Journal" 27: 33-42) created the opportunity to reflect on the assets and limitations of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in comparison with more established communicative language…

  13. A Mystagogical View of "Withness" in Entrepreneurship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Refai, Deema; Higgins, David

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a philosophical conceptualization of how learners engage in entrepreneurial learning from within by focusing on the role of the inner identity and mission of the learner. Klapper and Neergaard add "withness" to the learning frameworks of entrepreneurship education (EE), but there is scant literature discussing the…

  14. Taking Communication to Task--Again: What Difference Does a Decade Make?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A decade ago, Klapper (2003: "Taking communication to task? A critical review of recent trends in language teaching", "The Language Learning Journal" 27: 33-42) created the opportunity to reflect on the assets and limitations of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in comparison with more established communicative language…

  15. Abstracting of Legal Cases: The Potential of Clustering Based on the Selection of Representative Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moens, Marie-Francine; Uyttendaele, Caroline; Dumortier, Jos

    1999-01-01

    The SALOMON project automatically summarizes Belgian criminal cases to improve access to existing and future court decisions. This article gives background information about the texts of the cases and describes the output, design models, and architecture of the SALOMON system. Evaluation of 700 criminal cases demonstrates that the algorithms have…

  16. 75 FR 38151 - Governors' Designees Receiving Advance Notification of Transportation of Nuclear Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... to Dr. Stephen N. Salomon, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555, by e-mail at Stephen.Salomon@nrc.gov or..., Commissioner, Department of Same. Planning and Natural Resources, 8100 Linberg Bay, Ste 61, Cyril E....

  17. Micromachined Gas Chromatography Microsystem For Complex Gas Analysis (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-07

    Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS), Applications • Gas Analysis Using µGC • The “Actuator”: Integrated Gas Micropump • Concluding Remarks, Future...mode Analysis mode • No previous gas micropump meets the WIMS µGC requirements. • Size and power...leakage. • Single mode operation Summary of Previous Gas Micropumps NSF ERC for Wireless Integrated MicroSystems (WIMS) 22 • Goal: Develop a miniature

  18. A bridge-style fiber-optic weigh-in-motion sensor for military vehicle monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Wei, Zhanxiong; Chen, Bingquan; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2005-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel design of "bridge style" fiber-optic weigh-in-motion (WIM) sensor using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. Compared with other designs of fiber-optic WIM sensors, the bridge-style design is reliable, sensitive and can bear more loads. With these advantages, the bridge-style WIM sensor is specifically suitable for heavy vehicle dynamic weighing, especially for military vehicles, cargos and equipments. Experiment is conducted and the results show good repeatability and sensitivity under large loads. The minimum achieved resolvable weight is 7.1 kilograms. Finally, WIM sensor on-site installation method is suggested.

  19. Comparison study between static and dynamic responses of optical fiber weight in motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanto, D.; Ula, R. K.; Setiono, A.; Puranto, P.; Adinanta, H.; Waluyo, T. B.; Widiyatmoko, B.

    2017-04-01

    This research investigates responses of Optical Fiber Weight in Motion (WIM) sensors when static and dynamic weighing vehicle are applied. The vehicle used in the experiment was a replica of Mitsubishi FE 71 with weight of 23.01 kg. The WIM measurement system consisted of LED 1310 nm, optical fiber based WIM sensor, transimpedance amplified photodetector Ge PDA50 from Thorlabs, data acquisition DT translation 9816 S, speed sensors, and software program for WIM Evaluation. Static weighing was performed when the vehicle stopped. Besides performing static weighing on WIM sensor, measurement was also conducted on Kenko scale as validation. Meanwhile, measurement of dynamic weight was only conducted when the vehicle moved at a constant speed of about 1 km/h through WIM sensor. Experimental results showed two curves corresponded to the front axle load and the rear axle load. During static weighing, both WIM sensor and Kenko scales indicated similar output, which were flat curves. On the other hand, during dynamic weighing, WIM sensor had different output that was a pulse response. This preliminary study resulted in changes of amplitude and output shape. Unlike static weighing, moving vehicles contributed to the output of WIM sensor.

  20. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 96. Smith PW, Salomone LJ, Hanks JB. Thyroid. In: Townsend ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  1. Type VI secretion system.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor; Orth, Kim

    2015-03-30

    Bacteria employ a variety of tools to survive in a competitive environment. Salomon and Orth describe one such tool-the Type 6 Secretion Systems used by bacteria to deliver a variety of toxins into competing cells.

  2. When cost-effective interventions are unaffordable: Integrating cost-effectiveness and budget impact in priority setting for global health programs.

    PubMed

    Bilinski, Alyssa; Neumann, Peter; Cohen, Joshua; Thorat, Teja; McDaniel, Katherine; Salomon, Joshua A

    2017-10-01

    Potential cost-effective barriers in cost-effectiveness studies mean that budgetary impact analyses should also be included in post-2015 Sustainable Development Goal projects says Joshua Salomon and colleagues.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Alexander disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Li R, Johnson AB, Salomons G, Goldman JE, Naidu S, Quinlan R, Cree B, Ruyle SZ, Banwell ... Citation on PubMed Quinlan RA, Brenner M, Goldman JE, Messing A. GFAP and its role in Alexander ...

  4. Key Qualifications in Work and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhof, Wim J., Ed.; Streumer, Jan N., Ed.

    This book contains the following chapters: "The Demarcation Issue: Introduction" (Wim J. Nijhof, Jan N. Streumer); "Qualifying for the Future" (Wim J. Nijhof); "The Many Meanings of Occupational Competence and Qualification" (Per-Erik Ellstroem); "Qualification and Labour Markets: Institutionalisation and…

  5. Waste Information Management System v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamante, David G.; Schade, A. Carl

    2016-08-25

    WIMS is a functional interface to an Oracle database for managing the required regulatory information about the handling of Hazardous Waste. WIMS does not have a component to track Radiological Waste data. And it does not have the ability to manage sensitive information.

  6. Case-Based Reasoning in Transfer Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    study of transfer in psychology and education (e.g., Thorndike & Woodworth, 1901; Perkins & Salomon, 1994; Bransford et al., 2000), among other...disciplines. Transfer is, more specifically, a focus of some research related to case-based reasoning (CBR), namely psychologically plausible theories of...Springer. Perkins, D. N., & Salomon, G. (1994). Transfer of learning. In T. Husen & T. N. Postelwhite (Eds.). International Handbook of Educational

  7. Weigh-in-motion and smart bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Leon L.

    1997-05-01

    The bridge Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system uses bridge structures as weigh scales to measure axle and gross vehicle weights and vehicle configurations without stopping or detouring the vehicles. Because the system is mobile and is almost invisible to the truck drivers, it can be used to collect unbiased traffic data for transportation and loadometer study. The WIM + RESPONSE system, which is an expansion of the original WIM system, was developed to collect additional bridge response data and perform bridge structural evaluation. These additional bridge response data provide bridge engineers with information necessary for improving bridge design and evaluation procedures. Bridge health monitoring and damage detection may also be conducted with long term installation of the WIM + RESPONSE system. This paper discusses what has been achieved by the WIM + RESPONSE system and how the system can be further improved to enhance its functions in a smart bridge.

  8. Vehicle Signal Analysis Using Artificial Neural Networks for a Bridge Weigh-in-Motion System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungkon; Lee, Jungwhee; Park, Min-Seok; Jo, Byung-Wan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures for development of signal analysis algorithms using artificial neural networks for Bridge Weigh-in-Motion (B-WIM) systems. Through the analysis procedure, the extraction of information concerning heavy traffic vehicles such as weight, speed, and number of axles from the time domain strain data of the B-WIM system was attempted. As one of the several possible pattern recognition techniques, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was employed since it could effectively include dynamic effects and bridge-vehicle interactions. A number of vehicle traveling experiments with sufficient load cases were executed on two different types of bridges, a simply supported pre-stressed concrete girder bridge and a cable-stayed bridge. Different types of WIM systems such as high-speed WIM or low-speed WIM were also utilized during the experiments for cross-checking and to validate the performance of the developed algorithms.

  9. Vehicle Signal Analysis Using Artificial Neural Networks for a Bridge Weigh-in-Motion System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungkon; Lee, Jungwhee; Park, Min-Seok; Jo, Byung-Wan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures for development of signal analysis algorithms using artificial neural networks for Bridge Weigh-in-Motion (B-WIM) systems. Through the analysis procedure, the extraction of information concerning heavy traffic vehicles such as weight, speed, and number of axles from the time domain strain data of the B-WIM system was attempted. As one of the several possible pattern recognition techniques, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was employed since it could effectively include dynamic effects and bridge-vehicle interactions. A number of vehicle traveling experiments with sufficient load cases were executed on two different types of bridges, a simply supported pre-stressed concrete girder bridge and a cable-stayed bridge. Different types of WIM systems such as high-speed WIM or low-speed WIM were also utilized during the experiments for cross-checking and to validate the performance of the developed algorithms. PMID:22408487

  10. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    the Dutch Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) and by the Dutch Gelderland province. We thank all these sponsors and the members of the International Programme Committee for making the Workshop such a success. At this point we take the opportunity to express our gratitude to both authors and reviewers, for their efforts in preparing and ensuring the high quality of the papers in this special issue. Wim Vassen Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam Andreas Hemmerich Universität Hamburg Ennio Arimondo Università di Pisa Guest Editors International Programme Committee A Aspect Orsay, France E Cornell Boulder, USA W Ertmer Hannover, Germany T W Haensch Munich, Germany A Hemmerich Hamburg, Germany W Hogervorst Amsterdam, The Netherlands D Kleppner Cambridge, USA C Salomon Paris, France G V Shlyapnikov Amsterdam, Paris, Moscow S Stringari Trento, Italy W Vassen Amsterdam, The Netherlands J T M Walraven Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  11. Advanced weigh-in-motion system for weighing vehicles at high speed

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Muhs, J.D.; Scudiere, M.B.

    1998-02-01

    A state-of-the-art, Advanced Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system has been designed, installed, and tested on the west bound side of Interstate I-75/I-40 near the Knox County Weigh Station. The project is a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Road Dynamics, Inc. (IRD) sponsored by the Office of Uranium Programs, Facility and Technology Management Division of the Department of Energy under CRADA No. ORNL95-0364. ORNL, IRD, the Federal Highway Administration, the Tennessee Department of Safety and the Tennessee Department of Transportation have developed a National High Speed WIM Test Facility for test and evaluation of high-speed WIM systems. The WIM system under evaluation includes a Single Load Cell WIM scale system supplied and installed by IRD. ORNL developed a stand-alone, custom data acquisition system, which acquires the raw signals from IRD`s in-ground single load cell transducers. Under a separate contract with the Federal Highway Administration, ORNL designed and constructed a laboratory scale house for data collection, analysis and algorithm development. An initial advanced weight-determining algorithm has been developed. The new advanced WIM system provides improved accuracy and can reduce overall system variability by up to 30% over the existing high accuracy commercial WIM system.

  12. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Industrial Model

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) World Industrial Model (WIM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  13. HEATING OF THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM BY LOW-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark A.

    2016-02-10

    In light of evidence for a high ionization rate due to low-energy cosmic rays (LECR) in diffuse molecular gas in the solar neighborhood, we evaluate their heat input to the warm ionized medium (WIM). LECR are much more effective at heating plasma than they are at heating neutrals. We show that the upper end of the measured ionization rates corresponds to a local LECR heating rate sufficient to maintain the WIM against radiative cooling, independent of the nature of the ionizing particles or the detailed shape of their spectrum. Elsewhere in the Galaxy the LECR heating rates may be higher than those measured locally. In particular, higher fluxes of LECR have been suggested for the inner Galactic disk, based on the observed hard X-ray emission, with correspondingly larger heating rates implied for the WIM. We conclude that LECR play an important and perhaps dominant role in the thermal balance of the WIM.

  14. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Industrial Module

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) World Industrial Model (WIM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  15. Utility of palmatolepids and icriodontids in recognizing Upper Devonian Series, Stage, and possible substage boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ziegler, W.; Sandberg, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Conodonts are accepted internationally to define Devonian Series and Stage boundaries. Hence, the evolution and taxonomy of pelagic palmatolepids, primarily Palmatolepis and its direct ancestor Mesotaxis, and shallow-water icriodontids, Icriodus, Pelekysgnathus, and "Icriodus", are the major tools for recognizing subdivisions of the Upper Devonian. Palmatolepids are the basis for the Late Devonian Standard Conodont Zonation (ZIEGLER & SANDBERG 1990), whereas icriodontids are the basis for the alternative, integrated shallow-water zonation (SANDBERG & DREESEN 1984). However, an alternative palmatolepid taxonomy for some Frasnian species has been employed recently by some conodont workers using the Montagne Noire (M.N.) zonation, shape analyses of Pa elements, and multielement reconstructions of KLAPPER (1989), KLAPPER & FOSTER (1993); and KLAPPER et al. (1996). Herein, the evolution of palmatolepids and icriodontids is summarized in terms of our zonation and some of the taxonomic differences with the alternative M.N. zonation are exemplified. One of the problems in relating the Standard and M.N. zonations arises from previous errors of interpretation and drafting of the Martenberg section in Germany. This section was designated the reference section for the Frasnian transitans through jamieae Zones by ZIEGLER & SANDBERG (1990). Herein, the early and middle Frasnian zonal boundaries at Martenberg are improved by re-study of our old and recent collections from three profiles, spaced only 4 m apart. Serious problems exist with the Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSP's), selected by the Subcommission on Devonian Stratigraphy, following the paleontologic definition of the bases of the Frasnian, Famennian, and Tournaisian Stages, because of the difficulty in making global correlations from these GSSP's. Our summary of these problems should be helpful if future workers decide to relocate these GSSP's.

  16. Cripto-1 in Mammary Gland Development and Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Cancer Res. 51:1051-1054. 13. Ciardiello F., Tortora G., Bianco C., Selvam M.P., Basolo F., Fontanini G., Pacifico F., Normanno N., Brandt R., Persico...flow cytometry. Cancer Res. 52:593-602. 18. Ciardiello F., Bianco C., Normanno N., Baldassarre G., Pepe S., Tortora G., Bianco A.R., and Salomon D.S...Ciardiello, F., Bianco, C., Normanno, N., Baldassarre, G., Pepe, D. S. (1991) Cancer Res. 51, 1051-1054. S., Tortora , G., Bianco, A. R., and Salomon

  17. An Evaluation of Student Content Learning and Affective Perceptions of a Two-Way Interactive Video Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of distance learning focuses on a study of graduate education students that compared the content mastery and the attitudes of students in on- and off-campus courses that used interactive video. Theoretical perspectives are offered, including the conduit theory, the interactive theory, and the Salomon model. (14 references) (LRW)

  18. Processus d'apprentissage a distance et teleconference assistee par ordinateur: essai d'analyse (The Process of Distance Learning and Teleconferencing Assisted by Computer: An Analytic Essay).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henri, France

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the distance learning process that occurs when computer-mediated communication is used and presents a conceptual framework based on the theoretical principles developed by Gavriel Salomon. Characteristics of the technology are identified, including active user participation, activation of cognitive skills related to information…

  19. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division of Bibliographic Control. Sections on Bibliography, Cataloging, and Classification. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on cataloging and classification which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Online Cataloging at the Bibliotheque Nationale (Francoise Finelli and Serge Salomon, France); (2) "Development of National Press Repertoire in the Condition of Multinational State: Its…

  20. A Correlational Study of Nature Awareness and Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Kelly; Swartzentruber, Monica

    2011-01-01

    As part of a pilot program, the researchers sought to develop an instrument that would effectively measure the nature awareness of students. With this information, the researchers correlated nature awareness scores and science averages. According to Salomon and Perkins' theory of transfer, experiences in one situation can influence experiences in…

  1. Using Student Response Systems to Increase Motivation, Learning, and Knowledge Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radosevich, David J.; Salomon, Roger; Radosevich, Deirdre M.; Kahn, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Student response system (SRS) technology is one of many tools available to help instructors create a rich and productive learning environment. David J. Radosevich, Roger Salomon, Deirdre M. Radosevich, and Patricia Kahn describe a study designed to measure the effect of an SRS on student interest and retention. Two sections of an undergraduate…

  2. What Are the Affordances of Information and Communication Technologies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conole, Grainne; Dyke, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The paper examines the notion that Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have affordances that epitomize the features of our late modern age (Giddens, 1991) and explores whether these affordances (Salomon, 1993, p. 51) can be used to facilitate particular approaches to educational practice. It argues that a clear articulation of these…

  3. The Fickle Finger of Fats (Research).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the dilemma concerning whether students should be taught specific knowledge or strategic knowledge. Focuses on E. D. Hirsch's position in his book "Dictionary of Cultural Literacy" and a synthesis position presented by David Perkins and Gavriel Salomon in several articles. Argues that students need both specific and strategic…

  4. Automatic Text Structuring and Categorization As a First Step in Summarizing Legal Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moens, Marie-Francine; Uyttendaele, Caroline

    1997-01-01

    Describes SALOMON (Summary and Analysis of Legal texts for Managing Online Needs), a system which automatically summarizes Belgian criminal cases to improve access to court decisions. Highlights include a text grammar represented as a semantic network; automatic abstracting; knowledge acquisition and representation; parsing; evaluation, including…

  5. Culture Wars: Air Force Culture and Civil-Military Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    integration with civilian values.”4 Peter Feaver fills this theoretical void with a deductive theory that accounts for the rational incentives that...understanding of specific self-interest in shaping policy preferences. Research Question Using agency theory for the structural context, this... Michael Salomone, Managing Defense Transformation: Agency, Culture and Service Change (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007). 4 evaluates national security

  6. Proceedings of the First Inter-American Conference on Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troike, Rudolph C., Ed.; Modiano, Nancy, Ed.

    The conference papers presented here are grouped under the six topics around which the conference was organized. The section on program goals and models for bilingual education contains papers by Joshua Fishman, Salomon Nahmad, John C. Molina, Alberto Escobar, G. Kent Gooderham, and Dillon Platero. The section on teaching the second language…

  7. Sticker shock at the hospital. Freed from reins of managed care, hospitals accelerate price hikes for fourth consecutive year; blame placed on staffing, tech costs.

    PubMed

    Jaklevic, Mary Chris

    2003-01-20

    Free from the shackles of managed care, the nation's hospitals boosted prices for the fourth consecutive year, according to a new report released by the government last week. David Cyganowski, left, a managing director at Salomon Smith Barney, says if taxes on dividends are wiped out, hospitals could be confronted with higher long-term interest rates.

  8. Structure-Activity Relationships in the Cytoprotective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and Fluorinated Derivatives: Effects on Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction and Antioxidant Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-09

    fluorinated derivatives: Effects on heme oxygenase-1 induction and antioxidant activities Xinyu Wang a,b, Salomon Stavchansky a, Sean M. Kerwin c, Phillip D...February 2010 Available online 9 March 2010 Keywords: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester Fluorinated derivative Cytoprotection Oxidative stress Human...acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as a cytoprotective agent, six catechol ring fluorinated CAPE derivatives were evaluated for their cytoprotective

  9. An Evaluation of Reported Changes in Teachers' Practices in the Classroom for the Future Initiative Based on Levels of Technology Implemented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordstrom, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of computers and related educational technologies into the classrooms in the late 1970s came with the expectation that technology would transform teaching and learning by improving teaching conditions, enhancing classroom management, individualizing learning, and resulting in a pedagogical shift (Salomon & Perkins, 1996).…

  10. An Evaluation of Reported Changes in Teachers' Practices in the Classroom for the Future Initiative Based on Levels of Technology Implemented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordstrom, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of computers and related educational technologies into the classrooms in the late 1970s came with the expectation that technology would transform teaching and learning by improving teaching conditions, enhancing classroom management, individualizing learning, and resulting in a pedagogical shift (Salomon & Perkins, 1996).…

  11. Processus d'apprentissage a distance et teleconference assistee par ordinateur: essai d'analyse (The Process of Distance Learning and Teleconferencing Assisted by Computer: An Analytic Essay).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henri, France

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the distance learning process that occurs when computer-mediated communication is used and presents a conceptual framework based on the theoretical principles developed by Gavriel Salomon. Characteristics of the technology are identified, including active user participation, activation of cognitive skills related to information…

  12. The Development of an Automated Armor Data Base - Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    success of this program task. ARL/XD Michael Castro Shun-Chin Chou Dennis Gosselin Robert Muldoon Joseph Prifti Karl Salomon Anthone Zarkades CSTA William ...ATTN: DTIC-FDAC 1 MIA/ CINDAS , Purdue University, 2595 Yeager Road, West Lafayette, IN 47905 Commander, Army Research Office, P.O. Box ’ 2211, Research

  13. The Galactic Warm Ionized Medium: the First Direct Measures of its Ionization and Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howk, J.

    2002-07-01

    The warm ionized medium {WIM} is the dominant gaseous component of the Galactic halo and represents an important sink of the radiative and kinetic energy output of stars and supernovae, though the source of its ionization remains unknown. We will use stis spectroscopy of the post-AGB stars ROB 162 and ZNG 1 in the globular clusters NGC 6397 and Messier 5 to measure directly the abundances and ionization states of several key metals in the Galactic WIM. These sight lines are unique: because the two clusters also contain pulsars with published radio dispersion measurements, these are the only sight lines for which we can derive the column densities of both HI, em and ionH2, as well as the columns of multiple ionization stages of the important metals S, P, and Fe. We will use the proposed stis observations with existing Ause data to derive the total gas-phase abundances of S, P, and Fe for the material along these sight lines with no ionization uncertainties. We will directly measure the ionization fractions of S and P in the WIM. We will also infer the dust content of the WIM. Our study of the ionization state and dust content of the WIM will provide the best yet constraints for models of this gas. Our work will also provide the best constraint for the fundamental ``cosmic'' reference abundance {averaged over these sight lines} of the undepleted elements S and P.

  14. Use of finite elements analysis for a weigh-in-motion sensor design.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Rigobert; Goanta, Viorel; Carlescu, Petru; Barsanescu, Paul-Doru; Taranu, Nicolae; Banu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    High speed weigh-in-motion (WIM) sensors are utilized as components of complex traffic monitoring and measurement systems. They should be able to determine the weights on wheels, axles and vehicle gross weights, and to help the classification of vehicles (depending on the number of axles). WIM sensors must meet the following main requirements: good accuracy, high endurance, low price and easy installation in the road structure. It is not advisable to use cheap materials in constructing these devices for lower prices, since the sensors are normally working in harsh environmental conditions such as temperatures between -40 °C and +70 °C, dust, temporary water immersion, shocks and vibrations. Consequently, less expensive manufacturing technologies are recommended. Because the installation cost in the road structure is high and proportional to the WIM sensor cross section (especially with its thickness), the device needs to be made as flat as possible. The WIM sensor model presented and analyzed in this paper uses a spring element equipped with strain gages. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), the authors have attempted to obtain a more sensitive, reliable, lower profile and overall cheaper elastic element for a new WIM sensor.

  15. Use of Finite Elements Analysis for a Weigh-in-Motion Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Rigobert; Goanta, Viorel; Carlescu, Petru; Barsanescu, Paul-Doru; Taranu, Nicolae; Banu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    High speed weigh-in-motion (WIM) sensors are utilized as components of complex traffic monitoring and measurement systems. They should be able to determine the weights on wheels, axles and vehicle gross weights, and to help the classification of vehicles (depending on the number of axles). WIM sensors must meet the following main requirements: good accuracy, high endurance, low price and easy installation in the road structure. It is not advisable to use cheap materials in constructing these devices for lower prices, since the sensors are normally working in harsh environmental conditions such as temperatures between −40 °C and +70 °C, dust, temporary water immersion, shocks and vibrations. Consequently, less expensive manufacturing technologies are recommended. Because the installation cost in the road structure is high and proportional to the WIM sensor cross section (especially with its thickness), the device needs to be made as flat as possible. The WIM sensor model presented and analyzed in this paper uses a spring element equipped with strain gages. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), the authors have attempted to obtain a more sensitive, reliable, lower profile and overall cheaper elastic element for a new WIM sensor. PMID:22969332

  16. Automated-In-Motion Vehicle Evaluation Environment (AIMVEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K.; Sheldon, Frederick T.

    2006-05-04

    The AIMVEE/WIM system electronically retrieves deployment information, identifies vehicle automatically, and determines total weight, individual wheel weight, individual axle weights, axle spacing, and center-of-balance for any wheeled vehicle in motion. The AIMVEE/WIM system can also perform these functions statically for both wheel vehicles and cargo with information. The AIMVEE/WIM system incorporates digital images and applies cubing algorithms to determine length, width, height for cubic dimensions of both vehicle and cargo. Once all this information is stored, it electronically links to data collection and dissemination systems to provide “actual” weight and measurement information for planning, deployment, and in-transit visibility. The Static Scale Conversion (SSC) system is an unique enhancement to the AIMVEE/WIM system. It enables a SSC to weigh and measure vehicles and cargo dynamically (i.e., as they pass over the large scale and is included in the AIMVEE computer code base. The material to be copyrighted is the Automated-In-Motion Vehicle Evaluation Environment (AIMVEE)/Weigh-In-Motion User Training and Testing material. It includes instructional material in the set-up, operation and tear-down of the AIMVEE/WIM system. It also includes a final exam associated with the training.

  17. ORNL Automated-In-Motion Evaluation Environment (AIMVEE) User Training and Testing Materials - U.S. Copyright TXu 1-797-273

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2012-01-01

    The AIMVEE/WIM system electronically retrieves deployment information, identifies vehicle automatically, and determines total weight, individual wheel weight, individual axle weights, axle spacing, and center-of-balance for any wheeled vehicle in motion. The AIMVEE/WIM system can also perform these functions statically for both wheel vehicles and cargo with information. The AIMVEE/WIM system incorporates digital images and applies cubing algorithms to determine length, width, height for cubic dimensions of both vehicle and cargo. Once all this information is stored, it electronically links to data collection and dissemination systems to provide actual weight and measurement information for planning, deployment, and in-transit visibility. The Static Scale Conversion (SSC) system is an unique enhancement to the AIMVEE/WIM system. It enables a SSC to weigh and measure vehicles and cargo dynamically (i.e., as they pass over the large scale and is included in the AIMVEE computer code base. The material copyrighted is the ORNL Automated-In-Motion Vehicle Evaluation Environment (AIMVEE)/Weigh-In-Motion User Training and Testing material. It includes instructional material in the set-up, operation and tear-down of the AIMVEE/WIM system. It also includes a final exam associated with the training.

  18. Metrological approach to the force exerted by the axle of a road vehicle in motion carrying liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruolo, Luciano Bruno; de Noronha Castro Pinto, Fernando Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems are used for identifying the dynamic force exerted on the ground by axles of a vehicle. These systems are important for monitoring the gross vehicle weight and the vehicle axle load. Overweighted trucks on the roads increase pavement damage and traffic accidents. Knowing the accuracy of WIM systems is necessary. In the case of liquid transport the ‘sloshing effect’ affects this accuracy. This paper aims to analyze the dynamic measurement of the axle forces in vehicles carrying liquid during WIM up to 6 km h-1. Laboratory experiments using one vehicle with six axles and liquid loads on different levels in weighing instruments are presented. A non-linear computational multi-mass-springs model was developed and laboratory experiments were carried out to show the acceleration influences on axle forces of vehicles with six axles and with and without baffles to vary the ‘sloshing effect’.

  19. ZigBee-based wireless multi-sensor system for physical activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lingfei; Liu, Shaopeng; Gao, Robert X; John, Dinesh; Staudenmayer, John; Freedson, Patty

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important for assessing human exposure to the environment. This paper presents a ZigBee-based Wireless wearable multi-sensor Integrated Measurement System (WIMS) for in-situ PA measurement. Two accelerometers, a piezoelectric displacement sensor, and an ultraviolet (UV) sensor have been used for the physical activity assessment. Detailed analysis was performed for the hardware design and embedded program control, enabling efficient data sampling and transmission, compact design, and extended battery life to meet requirements for PA assessment under free-living conditions. Preliminary testing of the WIMS has demonstrated the functionality of the design, while performance comparison of the WIMS with a wired version on an electromagnetic shaker has demonstrated the signal validity.

  20. The Vertical Structure of Warm Ionised Gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensler, B. M.; Madsen, G. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Mao, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    We present a new joint analysis of pulsar dispersion measures and diffuse Hα emission in the Milky Way, which we use to derive the density, pressure and filling factor of the thick disk component of the warm ionised medium (WIM) as a function of height above the Galactic disk. By excluding sightlines at low Galactic latitude that are contaminated by Hii regions and spiral arms, we find that the exponential scale-height of free electrons in the diffuse WIM is 1830-250+120 pc, a factor of two larger than has been derived in previous studies. The corresponding inconsistent scale heights for dispersion measure and emission measure imply that the vertical profiles of mass and pressure in the WIM are decoupled, and that the filling factor of WIM clouds is a geometric response to the competing environmental influences of thermal and non-thermal processes. Extrapolating the properties of the thick-disk WIM to mid-plane, we infer a volume-averaged electron density 0.014 +/- 0.001 cm-3, produced by clouds of typical electron density 0.34 +/- 0.06 cm-3 with a volume filling factor 0.04 +/- 0.01. As one moves off the plane, the filling factor increases to a maximum of ~30% at a height of ~1-1.5 kpc, before then declining to accommodate the increasing presence of hot, coronal gas. Since models for the WIM with a ~1 kpc scale-height have been widely used to estimate distances to radio pulsars, our revised parameters suggest that the distances to many high-latitude pulsars have been substantially underestimated.

  1. FLYSAFE, nowcasting of in flight icing supporting aircrew decision making process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, A.; Le Bot, C.

    2009-09-01

    FLYSAFE is an Integrated Project of the 6th framework of the European Commission with the aim to improve flight safety through the development of a Next Generation Integrated Surveillance System (NGISS). The NGISS provides information to the flight crew on the three major external hazards for aviation: weather, air traffic and terrain. The NGISS has the capability of displaying data about all three hazards on a single display screen, facilitating rapid pilot appreciation of the situation by the flight crew. Weather Information Management Systems (WIMS) were developed to provide the NGISS and the flight crew with weather related information on in-flight icing, thunderstorms, wake-vortex and clear-air turbulence. These products are generated on the ground from observations and model forecasts. WIMS supply relevant information on three different scales: global, regional and local (over airport Terminal Manoeuvring Area). Within the flysafe program, around 120 hours of flight trials were performed during February 2008 and August 2008. Two aircraft were involved each with separate objectives : - to assess FLYSAFE's innovative solutions for the data-link, on-board data fusion, data-display, and data-updates during flight; - to evaluate the new weather information management systems (in flight icing and thunderstorms) using in-situ measurements recorded on board the test aircraft. In this presentation we will focus on the in-flight icing nowcasting system developed at Météo France in the framework of FLYSAFE: the local ICE WIMS. The local ICE WIMS is based on data fusion. The most relevant information for icing detection is extracted from the numerical weather prediction model, the infra-red and visible satellite imagery and the ground weather radar reflectivities. After a presentation of the local ICE WIMS, we detail the evaluation of the local ICE WIMS performed using the winter and summer flight trial data.

  2. Application of adaptive inverse filtering approach in weigh-in-motion of vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinsong; Wu, Jie; Wan, Jiuqing; Li, Xingshan

    2006-11-01

    In this paper an adaptive inverse filter is employed which suppress noise within the bandwidth of the desired signal with the particular aim to improve the accuracy of WIM systems. Within the framework of the FIR filter, the inverse system of WIM system is constructed by using LMS adaptive algorithm as an innovative filter. Moreover, an additional filter, a noise filter, is adopted as well, in order to best improvement the measurement accuracy. The final results processed by cascaded filter combination show a significant improvement in estimation of static weight of moving vehicles.

  3. Prototype Weigh-In-Motion Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Beshears, David L; Hively, Lee M; Scudiere, Matthew B; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2006-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed and patented methods to weigh slowly moving vehicles. We have used this technology to produce a portable weigh-in-motion system that is robust and accurate. This report documents the performance of the second-generation portable weigh-in-motion prototype (WIM Gen II). The results of three modes of weight determination are compared in this report: WIM Gen II dynamic mode, WIM Gen II stop-and-go mode, and static (parked) mode on in-ground, static scales. The WIM dynamic mode measures axle weights as the vehicle passes over the system at speeds of 3 to 7 miles per hour (1.3 to 3.1 meters/second). The WIM stop-and-go mode measures the weight of each axle of the vehicle as the axles are successively positioned on a side-by-side pair of WIM measurement pads. In both measurement modes the center of balance (CB) and the total weight are obtained by a straight-forward calculation from axle weights and axle spacings. The performance metric is measurement error (in percent), which is defined as 100 x (sample standard deviation)/(average); see Appendix A for details. We have insufficient data to show that this metric is predictive. This report details the results of weight measurements performed in May 2005 at two sites using different types of vehicles at each site. In addition to the weight measurements, the testing enabled refinements to the test methodology and facilitated an assessment of the influence of vehicle speed on the dynamic-mode measurements. The initial test at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN, involved measurements of passenger and light-duty commercial vehicles. A subsequent test at the Arrival/Departure Airfield Control Group (A/DACG) facility in Ft. Bragg, NC, involved military vehicles with gross weights between 3,000 and 75,000 pounds (1,356 to 33,900 kilograms) with a 20,000-pound (9,040 kilograms) limit per axle. For each vehicle, four or more separate measurements were done

  4. Revised lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Middle-Upper Devonian strata of central Missouri, southern part of Iowa basin

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J. . Dept. of Geography-Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Middle-Upper Devonian strata of central Missouri are now included in the Cedar Valley Formation and Snyder Creek Shale. The Cedar Valley is divided into the Cooper, Mineola, and Callaway members. The Snyder Creek Shale is now defined to include: the New Bloomfield, Craghead Branch, Cow Creek, and Warren Branch members. The Cooper and Mineola members make up a carbonate-dominated late Givetian age depositional sequence. Cooper and Mineola strata contain brachiopods that correlate with the Rhyssochonetes bellarugosa-Neatrypa waterlooensis zones of the Little Cedar Formation of Iowa. Deposition of the Little Cedar of Iowa and Cedar Valley of Missouri corresponds to the lower part of Euramerican Devonian T-R Cycle IIa of Johnson et al. (1985). Carbonates of the Callaway Member and mixed shales and carbonates of the overlying Snyder Creek Shale make up a latest Givetian-early Frasnian depositional sequence. The Callaway brachiopod fauna is correlated with the Allanella allani Zone, and the Snyder Creek brachiopod fauna is correlated with the Strophodonta callawayensis Zone of the Lithograph City Formation of Iowa. Conodont faunas recovered from the Callaway correlate with the interval of the P. insita Fauna (latest Givetian-early Frasnian). Conodont faunas from the Snyder Creek contain species of Ancyrodella and Mesotaxis that provide the basis for direct correlation with Zone 3 of the Frasnian Montagne Noire conodont zonation of Klapper (1989) as discussed in Johnson and Klapper (1992). Deposition of the Callaway-Snyder Creek of Missouri and Lithograph City of Iowa corresponds to Euramerican Devonian T-R Cycle IIb of Johnson et al. (1985).

  5. Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These three papers are from a symposium on professional journals that was facilitated by Wim J. Nijhoff at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership" (Gary N. McLean) describes the purpose and operation of the "Human Resource…

  6. Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual…

  7. The Construct of Language Proficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Ludo, Ed.; de Jong, John H. A. L., Ed.

    A collection of essays on first and second language proficiency from the fields of psychology and linguistics includes the following: "Modeling and Assessing Language Proficiency" (John H. A. L. de Jong, Ludo Verhoeven); "The Construct of Grammar in Early Language Development" (Folkert Kuiken); "Dimensions in Grammatical Proficiency" (Wim H. J.…

  8. A Look at Psychometrics in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K.; Swaminathan, H.

    Comments are made on the review papers presented by six Dutch psychometricians: Ivo Molenaar, Wim van der Linden, Ed Roskam, Arnold Van den Wollenberg, Gideon Mellenbergh, and Dato de Gruijter. Molenaar has embraced a pragmatic viewpoint on Bayesian methods, using both empirical and pure approaches to solve educational research problems. Molenaar…

  9. Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These three papers are from a symposium on professional journals that was facilitated by Wim J. Nijhoff at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "Advancing the Profession through Journals: The Editor-Author-Profession Partnership" (Gary N. McLean) describes the purpose and operation of the "Human Resource…

  10. Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual…

  11. Glass fiber-reinforced polymer packaged fiber Bragg grating sensors for low-speed weigh-in-motion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Tarawneh, Mu'ath; Huang, Ying

    2016-08-01

    The weight of rolling trucks on roads is one of the critical factors for the management of road networks due to the continuous increase in truck weight. Weigh-in-motion (WIM) sensors have been widely used for weight enforcement. A three-dimensional glass fiber-reinforced polymer packaged fiber Bragg grating sensor (3-D GFRP-FBG) is introduced for in-pavement WIM measurement at low vehicle passing speed. A sensitivity study shows that the developed sensor is very sensitive to the sensor installation depth and the longitudinal and transverse locations of the wheel loading position. The developed 3-D GFRP-FBG sensor is applicable for most practical pavements with a panel length larger than 6 ft, and it also shows a very good long-term durability. For the three components in 3-D of the developed sensor, the longitudinal component has the highest sensitivity for WIM measurements, followed by the transverse and vertical components. Field testing validated the sensitivity and repeatability of the developed 3-D GFRP-FBG sensor. The developed sensor provides the transportation agency one alternative solution for WIM measurement, which could significantly improve the measurement efficiency and long-term durability.

  12. Heat-Transfer and Friction Factor Design Data for All-Metal Compact Heat Exchangers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    modeled as a "matrix," similar to a porous media , but the correlation parameters generated didn’t describe the system correctly. Finally, the plate...40. 3. WI.M. Kays, and A.L. London, Compact Heat Exchangers, ?nd Edition, McGraw Hill, New York, 1964. 4. McAdams, Heat Transmision , 3rd Edition

  13. Going up? Women in the Public Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Mary; Limerick, Brigid; Cranston, Neil; Andersen, Cheryl

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to document women's reflections on their careers over a ten-year period to provide quantitative baseline data on which to frame follow-up in-depth interviews. The participants work in the public service in Queensland (Australia) and had been recommended for, and participated in, women in management (WIM) courses conducted…

  14. Validation Report for FY 1997--Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    The report issued according to ''Work Release 02. P. 99-8'' presents a comparison of results on VVER Calculational Benchmarks computed with various codes: design code TVS-M and precision code MCU-REA elaborated in RRC KI, IPPE codes WIMS-ABBN, TRIANG-PWR and CONKEMO and 2-D fuel assembly analysis code HELIOS developed by Studsvik Scandpower.

  15. The Construct of Language Proficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Ludo, Ed.; de Jong, John H. A. L., Ed.

    A collection of essays on first and second language proficiency from the fields of psychology and linguistics includes the following: "Modeling and Assessing Language Proficiency" (John H. A. L. de Jong, Ludo Verhoeven); "The Construct of Grammar in Early Language Development" (Folkert Kuiken); "Dimensions in Grammatical Proficiency" (Wim H. J.…

  16. A Novel Sensor System for Measuring Wheel Loads of Vehicles on Highways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Suo, Chunguang; Wang, Qi

    2008-12-02

    With the development of the highway transportation and business trade, vehicle Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) technology has become a key technology for measuring traffic loads. In this paper a novel WIM system based on monitoring of pavement strain responses in rigid pavement was investigated. In this WIM system multiple low cost, light weight, small volume and high accuracy embedded concrete strain sensors were used as WIM sensors to measure rigid pavement strain responses. In order to verify the feasibility of the method, a system prototype based on multiple sensors was designed and deployed on a relatively busy freeway. Field calibration and tests were performed with known two-axle truck wheel loads and the measurement errors were calculated based on the static weights measured with a static weighbridge. This enables the weights of other vehicles to be calculated from the calibration constant. Calibration and test results for individual sensors or three-sensor fusions are both provided. Repeatability, sources of error, and weight accuracy are discussed. Successful results showed that the proposed method was feasible and proven to have a high accuracy. Furthermore, a sample mean approach using multiple fused individual sensors could provide better performance compared to individual sensors.

  17. A Novel Sensor System for Measuring Wheel Loads of Vehicles on Highways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenbin; Suo, Chunguang; Wang, Qi

    2008-01-01

    With the development of the highway transportation and business trade, vehicle Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) technology has become a key technology for measuring traffic loads. In this paper a novel WIM system based on monitoring of pavement strain responses in rigid pavement was investigated. In this WIM system multiple low cost, light weight, small volume and high accuracy embedded concrete strain sensors were used as WIM sensors to measure rigid pavement strain responses. In order to verify the feasibility of the method, a system prototype based on multiple sensors was designed and deployed on a relatively busy freeway. Field calibration and tests were performed with known two-axle truck wheel loads and the measurement errors were calculated based on the static weights measured with a static weighbridge. This enables the weights of other vehicles to be calculated from the calibration constant. Calibration and test results for individual sensors or three-sensor fusions are both provided. Repeatability, sources of error, and weight accuracy are discussed. Successful results showed that the proposed method was feasible and proven to have a high accuracy. Furthermore, a sample mean approach using multiple fused individual sensors could provide better performance compared to individual sensors. PMID:27873952

  18. Active Vibration Control of a Cantilevered Beam with Three Elastic Coordinates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    with force consatant o to Lk bano ~-, ... % /- or- 3. Th 7oe’ 1 saomret mge cr~cl Clna MO~TOR CHRATISATIC A I5NT aw tin tria eeeomfoec linea ...wi...MS. TEsis REOR _FROM___ TO 1987 December I 191 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 7. . COSATI CODES 18. SUBJEGTTRMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and

  19. HRD Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on professional development of human resource development (HRD) professionals. "Lifelong Learning and Performance: The Role of Key Qualifications in Human Resource Development" (Simone J. van Zolingen, Wim J. Nijhof) argues that, besides being of interest to employers, key…

  20. Low-cost fiber optic weigh-in-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaai-Jazi, A.; Ardekani, S. A.; Mehdikhani, M.

    1990-11-01

    A design for a fiber optic weigh in motion (WIM) sensor is proposed. A prototype of the proposed sensor is designed, manufactured, and tested in the laboratory for different load frequency combinations using a material testing system (MTS) machine. Statistical analysis of data are performed to assess the response of the sensor under varying load frequencies for comparison.

  1. Fiber optic weigh in motion: looking back and ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teral, Stephane R.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the fiber optic weight- in-motion (WIM) smart sensor situation. Based on the interrelationship between technology and needs, the analysis is divided into three parts. The first part reflects WIM equipment development, such as piezo-electric sensors, and some of the pitfalls encountered in WIM measurements that led to fiber optic sensor utilization. With a chronological approach, the second part reviews the various optical principles that have been developed to measure dynamic weight. Since 1986, three techniques have been fully tested on actual highways. On the one hand, the simplest one based on light attenuation in multimode fibers as suitable for counting. On the other hand, speckle analysis at the end of a multimode fiber allowed a better strain and deformation determination. Finally, the sophisticated polarimetric configuration seemed to be more powerful and led to impressive findings such as dynamic phenomenon observation. The third and last part of this paper reviews some of the future needs for WIM systems, and the ongoing developments in the intelligent transportation system (ITS) field. Then, the factual report derived from this analysis shows that despite their tremendous potential, fiber optic sensors are almost nonexistent in current ITS worldwide developments.

  2. Inventory processes for HANDI 2000 business management system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.

    1998-08-24

    Inventory records are maintained in the following inventory systems: HIP, (Spare Parts), WIM, (General Supplies): Convenient Storage, Shop Stock, Essential Materials, Special Tools, ESP (Excess Inventory). Requisitions for replenishment of inventory items are initiated in the respective inventory system and then forwarded to the purchasing system.

  3. [Collected Papers on International Aspects of Teacher Education and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dee Anna, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on international issues in technology and teacher education: "Developing and Researching the International Dimension in Teacher Education and Technology: A SITE Invited Panel" (Niki Davis, Therese Laferriere, Bridget Somekh, Wim Veen, and Jerry Willis); "Integrating ICT into the…

  4. Access, Equity, and Opportunity. Women in Machining: A Model Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Heather

    The Women in Machining (WIM) program is a Machine Action Project (MAP) initiative that was developed in response to a local skilled metalworking labor shortage, despite a virtual absence of women and people of color from area shops. The project identified post-war stereotypes and other barriers that must be addressed if women are to have an equal…

  5. [The decoration of Italian Renaissance drug jars after engravings].

    PubMed

    Drey, R E

    1994-01-01

    Although Italian drug jar painters generally devised original compositions for the ornamentation of their products, on occasion they derived their subjects from printed sources. Printed sources used by drug jar artists of the Renaissance include wood-engraved Italian tarot cards and wood-engraved illustrations by Hans Sebald Beham and Bernard Salomon in miniature bibles published in the sixteenth century in Frankfurt and in Lyons respectively.

  6. Analysis of OBrO, IO, and OIO absorption signature in UV-visible spectra measured at night and at sunrise by stratospheric balloon-borne instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, GwenaëL.; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Chartier, Michel; Pirre, Michel; Robert, Claude

    2003-03-01

    Absorption bands of OBrO, IO, and OIO in the visible region have been investigated in the data of the AMON ("Absorption par les Minoritaires Ozone et Nox") and SALOMON ("Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et Nox") balloon-borne spectrometers used to obtain measurements in the nighttime stratosphere, since 1992 and 1998 respectively. The absorption features initially detected in AMON residual spectra and attributed to OBrO are also observable in SALOMON data with better accuracy. New estimates of OBrO cross-section amplitudes taking into account recent laboratory measurements are used for the OBrO retrieval. A consequence is that previously published OBrO concentration and mixing ratio values are revised downwards of around 40%. Further tests are performed to assess the consistency of the OBrO detection. No correlation exists between OBrO and NO2 vertical profiles which practically rules out the possibility for the structures ascribed to OBrO absorption to be due to remaining NO2 contributions. It is shown that variability of OBrO quantities at high latitudes obtained from various AMON and SALOMON flights is possibly linked to the chemical processes involving the production of OClO. At midlatitudes, the exceptional and unexpected conditions of the April 28, 1999 SALOMON flight allow us to observe the drop in OBrO concentrations just after sunrise. As expected, if previous studies of stratospheric iodine species are considered, IO and OIO absorption lines are never detected in the residual spectra. The presence of unknown structures in the residual spectra in the IO and OIO absorption regions is obvious and tends to distort the retrievals. The possibility that these remaining features result from a temperature dependence effect or uncertainties of O3 and/or NO2 cross-sections is suggested. Thus, more accurate laboratory measurements and sets of cross-sections for low temperature are needed.

  7. Wiener Geologen im Spiegel des Geologenarchivs. Kober - Kieslinger - Ampferer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, I.; Seibold, E.

    2001-05-01

    The bulk of the correspondence in the Geologenarchiv comes in two major groups:a) letters relating mainly to professional matters and b) letters containing predominantly personal communication. This will be demonstrated by material relating to the three above mentioned Viennese Geologists: Leopold Kober's letter to Wilhelm Salomon-Calvi and the correspondence between Alois Kieslinger and Eugen Wegmann are mainly professional, whereas Otto Ampferer's letters to the Bavarian glaciologist Edith Ebers are a documentation of personal friendship.

  8. Reconstruction of motional states of neutral atoms via maximum entropy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobný, Gabriel; Bužek, Vladimír

    2002-05-01

    We present a scheme for a reconstruction of states of quantum systems from incomplete tomographiclike data. The proposed scheme is based on the Jaynes principle of maximum entropy. We apply our algorithm for a reconstruction of motional quantum states of neutral atoms. As an example we analyze the experimental data obtained by Salomon and co-workers and we reconstruct Wigner functions of motional quantum states of Cs atoms trapped in an optical lattice.

  9. Space clocks to test relativiy: ACES and SAGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Peter; Salomon, Christophe; Reynaud, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Atomic clocks are an outstanding tool for the experimental verification of general relativity and more generally for fundamental astronomy (VLBI, pulsar timing, navigation, etc). Recent years have seen a rapid improvement in the performance of such clocks, promising new improved tests of relativity, in particular onboard terrestrial and interplanetary space missions. We present the scientific motivations of such tests taking the ACES Salomon et al. and SAGAS Wolf et al. (2009) projects as particular examples.

  10. Real Time Urban Acoustics Using Commerical Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    28] for details. Figure 16: Curved Ray Model The image below shows how atmospheric refraction can reinforce sound and create shadow zones...Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 69(4), 1060-1064, ’ Shadowing by finite noise barriers’ [9] Herman Medwin, Emily Childs & Gary M. Jebsen...by hard sound barriers and seamounts .’ [20] E. Salomons, 1997 ACTA ACUSTICA, 83, 436-454, ’Sound propagation in complex outdoor situations with a

  11. 1978 Army Library Institute, 22-26 May 1978. Fort Bliss, Texas. A report of the Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    MEMBERS Dolores M. ANGUIANO Dorothy A. BROOKMAN Eva M. CATHEY M. Louise DOOLEY Judy A. HAWTHORNE Ruth S. JANSSEN Sharon J. KAUFFMAN Rosemary M...FORST Elizabeth T. HINKLE Patricia JARDIN Marie J. LINDSEY Rosemary C. MARLOWE John E. ROSENBERG Erica 0. SALOMON Dianne S. TAPLEY Joyce C...DORSEY Thomas A. GALLANT Rosemary C. MARLOWE RECOMMENDATIONS COMMITTEE Concetta R. ANACLERIO, Chairperson Madge J. BUSEY Lora-Frances DAVIS Agnes L

  12. UV and Visible Harmonic Generation Through Enhanced Transmission from GaAs-filled Nanocavities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 length of the dielectric...Salomon, F. Grillot, A. V. Zayats, and F. de Fornel , Near-field distribution of optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays, Phys. Rev...Lett. Vol. 86, 1110 (2001). [3] D. Krause, C . W. Teplin, and C . T. Rogers, Optical surface second harmonic measurements of isotropic thin-film

  13. Personal Military Investing: Ends-Means-Ways

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-16

    you these figures, and many daily newspapers also publish these figures. If your bond is callable you should also know the yield to call figure. 36...Salomon Bros., LIONS, by Lehman Brothers, and STRIPS offered by the U.S. Treasury. These may be either callable or non callable . As with any bond ,the...suggest using the first method rather then the second because it more accurately reflects the past inflationary history and the rate of Congressional pay

  14. Fatigue Prediction for Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Eugenio OÑATE CIMNE (International Center for Numerical Methods in Engineering) Building C-1, Campus Nord UPC -C/ Gran Capitán s/n 08034 Barcelona...SPAIN * salomon@cimne.upc.edu ABSTRACT The objective of this paper is to present a new computational methodology for predicting the durability of... methodology is validated using experimental data from tests on CFRR composite material samples. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Fatigue is defined as "the process

  15. Finite-Difference, Time-Domain Simulation of Sound Propagation in a Dynamic Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    Tech- nology Laboratory, David Aldridge and Neill Symons of the Sandia National Laboratory, David Marlin and Sandra Collier of the Army Research...above. [The reader may refer to Attenborough et al. (1995) and Salomons (2001) for detailed discussions of the FFP and PE methods.] On the other hand...small pores and/or low frequencies. Subsequent authors, such as Attenborough (1983), have shown that when the properties of the material are considered

  16. Warm ionized gas in CALIFA early-type galaxies. 2D emission-line patterns and kinematics for 32 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Breda, I.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; CALIFA Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Context. The morphological, spectroscopic, and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. Aims: This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (≲150 Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample. Methods: The analysis presented here includes Hα intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, and ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. It is supplemented by τ-ratio maps, which are a more efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component than alternative mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Results: Confirming and strengthening our previous conclusions, we find that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence in the properties of their wim, exemplified by two characteristic classes. The first (type i) comprises systems with a nearly constant EW(Hα) in their extranuclear component, which quantitatively agrees with (but is no proof of) the hypothesis that photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component is the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) stands for virtually wim-evacuated ETGs with a very low (≤0.5 Å), outwardly increasing EW(Hα). These two classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios in their extranuclear component. Here we extend the tentative classification we proposed previously by the type i+, which is assigned to a subset of type i ETGs exhibiting ongoing low-level star-forming activity in their periphery. This finding along with faint

  17. The relationship between fatty acid profiles in milk identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and onset of luteal activity in Norwegian dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Martin, A D; Afseth, N K; Kohler, A; Randby, Å; Eknæs, M; Waldmann, A; Dørum, G; Måge, I; Reksen, O

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of milk fatty acids as predictors of onset of luteal activity (OLA), 87 lactations taken from 73 healthy Norwegian Red cattle were surveyed over 2 winter housing seasons. The feasibility of using frozen milk samples for dry-film Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) determination of milk samples was also tested. Morning milk samples were collected thrice weekly (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) for the first 10 wk in milk (WIM). These samples had bronopol (2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol) added to them before being frozen at -20°C, thawed, and analyzed by ELISA to determine progesterone concentration and the concentrations of the milk fatty acids C4:0, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, and cis-9 C18:1 as a proportion of total milk fatty acid content using dry-film FTIR, and averaged by WIM. Onset of luteal activity was defined as the first day that milk progesterone concentrations were >3 ng/mL for 2 successive measurements; the study population was categorized as early (n=47) or late (n=40) OLA, using the median value of 21 DIM as the cutoff. Further milk samples were collected 6 times weekly, from morning and afternoon milkings, these were pooled by WIM, and one proportional sample was analyzed fresh for fat, protein, and lactose content by the dairy company Tine SA, using traditional FTIR spectrography in the wet phase of milk. Daily energy-balance calculations were performed in 42 lactations and averaged by WIM. Animals experiencing late OLA had a more negative energy balance in WIM 1, 3, 4, and 5, with the greatest differences been seen in WIM 3 and 4. A higher proportion of the fatty acids were medium chained, C14:0 and C16:0, in the early than in the late OLA group from WIM 1. In WIM 4, the proportion of total fatty acid content that was C16:0 predicted late OLA, with 74% sensitivity and 80% specificity. The long-chain proportion of the fatty acids C18:0 and cis-9 C18:1 were lower in the early than in the late OLA group. Differences were greatest in

  18. The interstellar halo of spiral galaxies: NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Rand, R. J.; Hester, J. Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Researchers have detected the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) phase in the galaxy NGC 891. They found that the radial distribution of the WIM follows the molecular or young star distribution - an expected dependence. The amount of the WIM in this galaxy exceeds that in our Galaxy. The major surprize is the large thickness of the WIM phase - about 9 kpc instead 3 kpc as in our Galaxy. Clearly, this is the most significant result of the observations. The presence of low ionization gas at high z as well as at large galactocentric radii (where young stars are rare) is an important clue to the origin of the halo and observations such as the one reported here provide important data on this crucial question. In particular, the ionization of gas at high absolute z implies that either the UV photons manage to escape from the disk of the galaxy or that the extragalactic UV background plays an important role. The bulk of the WIM in spiral galaxies is a result of star-formation activity and thus these results can be understood by invoking a high star formation rate in NGC 891. Only the concerted action of supernovae can get the gas to the large z-heights as is observed in this galaxy. Support for this view comes from our detection of many worms i.e., bits and pieces of supershells in the form of kilo-parsec long vertical filaments. Researchers also saw a 600-pc size supershell located nearly one kpc above the plane of the galaxy.

  19. Nonparametric factorial analysis of daily weigh-in-motion traffic: implications for the ozone "weekend effect" in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Oliver H.; Holmén, Britt A.; Niemeier, Debbie A.

    The Ozone Weekend Effect (OWE) has become increasingly more frequent and widespread in southern California since the mid-1970s. Although a number of hypotheses have been suggested to explain the effect, there remains uncertainty associated with the root factors contributing to elevated weekend ozone concentrations. Targeting the time window of the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study (SCOS97), this paper examines traffic activity data for 14 vehicle classes at 27 weigh-in-motion (WIM) stations in southern California. Nonparametric factorial analyses of light-duty vehicle (LDV) and heavy-duty truck (HDT) traffic volumes indicate significant differences in daily volumes by day of week and between the weekly patterns of daily LDV and HDT volumes. Across WIM stations, the daily LDV volume was highest on Friday and decreased by 10% on weekends compared to that on midweek days. In contrast, daily HDT volumes showed dramatic weekend drops of 53% on Saturday and 64% on Sunday. As a result, LDV to HDT ratios increased by 145% on weekends. Nonparametric tests also suggest that weekly traffic patterns varied significantly between WIM stations located close to (central) and far from (peripheral) the Los Angeles Metro area. Weekend increases in LDV/HDT ratios were more pronounced at central WIM sites due to greater weekend declines of HDT relative to LDV traffic. The implications of these weekly traffic patterns for the OWE in southern California were investigated by estimating daily WIM traffic on-road running exhaust emissions of total organic gas (TOG) and oxides of nitrogen (NO x) using EMFAC2002 emission factors. The results support the California Air Resource Board's (CARB's) NO x reduction hypothesis that greater weekend NO x reductions relative to volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, in combinations with the VOC-limited ozone system, contribute to the OWE observed in the region. The results from this study can be used to develop weekend on-road mobile emission

  20. First detection of [N II] 205 μm absorption in interstellar gas. Herschel-HIFI observations towards W 31C, W 49N, W 51, and G34.3+0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, C. M.; Gerin, M.; Mookerjea, B.; Black, J. H.; Olberg, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Hassel, G. E.; Falgarone, E.; Levrier, F.; Menten, K. M.; Pety, J.

    2014-08-01

    We present high resolution [N ii] 205 μm (3P1 - 3P0) spectra obtained with Herschel-HIFI towards a small sample of far-infrared bright star forming regions in the Galactic plane: W 31C (G10.6-0.4), W 49N (G43.2-0.1), W 51 (G49.5-0.4), and G34.3+0.1. All sources display an emission line profile associated directly with the H ii regions themselves. For the first time we also detect absorption of the [N ii] 205 μm line by extended low-density foreground material towards W 31C and W 49N over a wide range of velocities. We attribute this absorption to the warm ionised medium (WIM) and find N(N+) ≈ 1.5 × 1017 cm-2 towards both sources. This is in agreement with recent Herschel-HIFI observations of [C ii] 158 μm, also observed in absorption in the same sight-lines, if ≈7-10% of all C+ ions exist in the WIM on average. Using an abundance ratio of [N] / [H] = 6.76 × 10-5 in the gas phase we find that the mean electron and proton volume densities are ~0.1-0.3 cm-3 assuming a WIM volume filling fraction of 0.1-0.4 with a corresponding line-of-sight filling fraction of 0.46-0.74. A low density and a high WIM filling fraction are also supported by RADEX modelling of the [N ii] 205 μm absorption and emission together with visible emission lines attributed mainly to the WIM. The detection of the 205 μm line in absorption emphasises the importance of a high spectral resolution, and also offers a new tool for investigation of the WIM. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgHerschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Effect of microwave sterilization and water storage on the Vickers hardness of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Campanha, Nara Hellen; Pavarina, Ana Claudia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lucia

    2005-05-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth soften upon immersion in water, and the heating generated during microwave sterilization may enhance this process. Six brands of acrylic resin denture teeth were investigated with respect to the effect of microwave sterilization and water immersion on Vickers hardness (VHN). The acrylic resin denture teeth (Dentron [D], Vipi Dent Plus [V], Postaris [P], Biolux [B], Trilux [T], and Artiplus [A]) were embedded in heat-polymerized acrylic resin within polyvinylchloride tubes. For each brand, the occlusal surfaces of 32 identical acrylic resin denture posterior teeth were ground flat with 1500-grit silicon carbide paper and polished on a wet polishing wheel with a slurry of tin oxide. Hardness tests were performed after polishing (control group, C), after polishing followed by 2 cycles of microwave sterilization at 650 W for 6 minutes (MwS group), after polishing followed by 90-day immersion in water (90-day Wim group), and after polishing followed by 90-day storage in water and 2 cycles of microwave sterilization (90-day Wim + MwS group). For each specimen, 8 hardness measurements were made and the mean was calculated. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance followed by the Bonferroni procedure to determine any significance between pairs of mean values (alpha=.01). Microwave sterilization of specimens significantly decreased (P <.001) the hardness of the acrylic resin denture tooth specimens P (17.8 to 16.6 VHN), V (18.3 to 15.8 VHN), T (17.4 to 15.3 VHN), B (16.8 to 15.7 VHN), and A (17.3 to 15.7 VHN). For all acrylic resin denture teeth, no significant differences in hardness were found between the groups MwS, 90-day Wim, and 90-day Wim + MwS, with the exception of the 90-day Wim + MwS tooth A specimens (14.4 VHN), which demonstrated significant lower mean values (P <.001) than the 90-day Wim (15.8 VHN) and MwS (15.7 VHN) specimens. For specimens immersed in water for 90 days, 2 cycles of microwave sterilization had no effect

  2. Technology of 0-20 ton FBG loadcell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weilai; Zhu, Fenfang; Jiang, Bo

    2007-11-01

    In a traditional weighing scale, the loadcells with strain gauges are widely used, however, as an electrical device, its performance is poor under the conditions of interference and corrosion. According to the stress distribution of a cantilever loadcell, two FBGs (fiber Bragg grating), were adhered to replace traditional strain gauges in a 0-20t cantilever loadcell. One of them was used as a tensive sensor and the other is as a compressive sensor. To subtract their measuring results, the response is doubled, meanwhile, the environmental interference is eliminated. The calibration showed that the repeatability in full scale achieved as high as 0.02%. In its application, FBG loadcells were used to do weighing of running vehicles in a weigh-in-motion (WIM) scale, the results showed that the FBG scale performed better than strain gauge scale under the same WIM processing program. Under the speed of 11km/h, the measuring accuracy could be kept within 1%.

  3. Modification to ORIGEN2 for generating N Reactor source terms. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report discusses work that has been done to upgrade the ORIGEN2 code cross sections to be compatible with the WIMS computer code data. Because of the changes in the ORIGEN2 calculations. Details on changes made to the ORIGEN2 computer code and the Radnuc code will be discussed along with additional work that should be done in the future to upgrade both ORIGEN2 and Radnuc. A detailed historical description of how source terms have been generated for N Reactor fuel stored in the K Basins has been generated. The neutron source discussed in this description was generated by the WIMS computer code (Gubbins et al. 1982) because of known shortcomings in the ORIGEN2 (Croff 1980) cross sections. Another document includes a discussion of the ORIGEN2 cross sections.

  4. Evaluation of the DRAGON code for VHTR design analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Taiwo, T. A.; Kim, T. K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-01-12

    This letter report summarizes three activities that were undertaken in FY 2005 to gather information on the DRAGON code and to perform limited evaluations of the code performance when used in the analysis of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. These activities include: (1) Use of the code to model the fuel elements of the helium-cooled and liquid-salt-cooled VHTR designs. Results were compared to those from another deterministic lattice code (WIMS8) and a Monte Carlo code (MCNP). (2) The preliminary assessment of the nuclear data library currently used with the code and libraries that have been provided by the IAEA WIMS-D4 Library Update Project (WLUP). (3) DRAGON workshop held to discuss the code capabilities for modeling the VHTR.

  5. Pressure sensor for Weight-In-Motion measurement based on fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Songlin; Ruan, Chi; Wang, Yuntao

    2016-10-01

    In order to resolve the disturbance of external perturbation in Weight-In-Motion (WIM) measurement by traditional methods, a novel pressure sensor for WIM of vehicles based on fiber ring-down spectroscopy is proposed here. A micro-bending sensing head is designed and its working principle is discussed in this paper. The fiber loop ring-down (FLRD) system reveals that the sensing forces applied to the sensing head can be obtained by measuring the ring-down time. Meanwhile, the velocity of vehicles is measured by analyzing two ring-down spectrums in this scheme. Experiment results show that the precision of velocity of vehicles is good and the sensor has a linear response to the applied force.

  6. Study on weigh-in-motion system based on chirped fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong-sheng; Guo, Dan; Li, Wei; Li, Yong-guo; Wu, An; Yao, Kai-fang; Jiang, De-sheng

    2007-11-01

    A novel weigh-in-motion (WIM) system used for high way is developed based on Chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBG) in this paper. The WIM system consists of four CFBG pressure sensors, each of which contains a couple of CFBG. The sensor can directly output optical intensity signal, so the postprocessor instrument is simple and cheap instead of expensive wavelength demodulation apparatus. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that output optical intensity of the sensor is linearly proportional to the pressure, and the linearity and the repeated error can respectively reach to 0.9997 and 0.05%FS. We have also exceeded series experiments with several kinds of automobile with different velocity, and received good results of relative error below 5%.

  7. High speed, high-resolution fiber Bragg grating sensing system for monitoring of weigh-in-motion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, D.; Olivero, M.; Perrone, G.; Vallan, A.

    2011-05-01

    We present a fast high-resolution fiber Bragg grating sensing system for weigh-in-motion (WIM) application. The proposed system makes use of standard telecom photonics components operating at high speed and with insufficient resolution; then, using signal processing we artificially improve the accuracy of the system down to 1 μɛ. This way, the proposed architecture overcomes the state of the art of optical systems for WIM, which cannot cope with both high resolution and high frequency requirements. The developed system has been applied to a prototype weigh-in-motion device, which consists of a road speed bump. Structural deformations of the bump when perturbed by a thin-footmark load are well reproduced. Using multiple Bragg grating sensors, it is possible to unambiguously determine position and weight of a moving load on the bump with accuracy of 0.2 - 1.2 kg.

  8. High-speed weigh-in motion measurement with Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Soo; Cho, Seong-Kyu; Bae, Byung-Woo

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, a high speed fiber optic sensor weigh-in-motion (WIM) system is proposed. Bragg gratings which have several advantages such as good reproducibility and good multiplicity compare to other optical fiber sensors are used for the system. Fabry-Perot filter for the signal process, which cannot be used in the high speed measurement because of the limitation in fast operation of PZT, is excluded. A new signal processing system which employs bandwidth filter is proposed and bridge type new sensor package design is also proposed. The proposed fiber optic WIM system is tested in the laboratory and experimented with actual trucks. The new concept of calibration coefficient "k" is introduced and calculated by the experiments. The calculated calibration coefficients show good approximations to real axial weights regardless tire widths.

  9. Preparation macroconstants to simulate the core of VVER-1000 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic model is used in simulators of VVER-1000 reactor for training of operating staff and students. As a code for the simulation of neutron-physical characteristics is used DYNCO code that allows you to perform calculations of stationary, transient and emergency processes in real time to a different geometry of the reactor lattices [1]. To perform calculations using this code, you need to prepare macroconstants for each FA. One way of getting macroconstants is to use the WIMS code, which is based on the use of its own 69-group macroconstants library. This paper presents the results of calculations of FA obtained by the WIMS code for VVER-1000 reactor with different parameters of fuel and coolant, as well as the method of selection of energy groups for further calculation macroconstants.

  10. Teaching Writing Skills in the Undergraduate Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, Dennis W.

    1998-04-01

    Stanford University's Writing in the Major program (WIM) requires every undergraduate degree program to include a writing course specific to its field of study. In the physics department's WIM course, undergraduates learn writing skills by composing laboratory reports in the form of journal articles. While studying such topics as scintillation and population inversion, students also practice techniques for communicating the physics more effectively. Students learn how to select a thesis, organize a complex argument, write concisely, aim their content at the proper audience, prove their assertions, and revise a finished draft. Through clearer writing, students reach a clearer understanding of the physics, and the improvements in both understanding and communication stay with the students through later courses and into their graduate studies. Teaching assistants for the course also notice a marked improvement in their own writing skills.

  11. Progress on China nuclear data processing code system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Wu, Xiaofei; Ge, Zhigang; Li, Songyang; Wu, Haicheng; Wen, Lili; Wang, Wenming; Zhang, Huanyu

    2017-09-01

    China is developing the nuclear data processing code Ruler, which can be used for producing multi-group cross sections and related quantities from evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format [1]. The Ruler includes modules for reconstructing cross sections in all energy range, generating Doppler-broadened cross sections for given temperature, producing effective self-shielded cross sections in unresolved energy range, calculating scattering cross sections in thermal energy range, generating group cross sections and matrices, preparing WIMS-D format data files for the reactor physics code WIMS-D [2]. Programming language of the Ruler is Fortran-90. The Ruler is tested for 32-bit computers with Windows-XP and Linux operating systems. The verification of Ruler has been performed by comparison with calculation results obtained by the NJOY99 [3] processing code. The validation of Ruler has been performed by using WIMSD5B code.

  12. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-07-08

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  13. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2008-07-08

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  14. All States Guide to Consumer Laws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    satisfaction thereof, even though 2the indebtedness may have been reduced to a judgment by civil court. Soldiers and civilian creditors should be familia ...obigac"o quo tipne W vendodor do r"aLmr rupams- c" olConfaniu aa Is W ettalt, las-Samrits Wim fas 1k dndrleau~diwl on"puG~ dan a ato Inlu SISTEMAS

  15. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  16. Creation of Computational Benchmarks for LEU and MOX Fuel Assemblies Under Accident Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A M; Kalashnikov, A G; Kalugin, M A; Lazarenko, A P; Maiorov, L V; Sidorenko, V D

    1999-11-01

    The result of VVER-1000 computational benchmarks, calculations obtained with the use of various Russian codes (such as MCU-RFFI/A, TVS-M and WIMS-ABBN) are presented. List of benchmarks includes LEU and MOX cells with fresh and spent fuel under various conditions (for calculation of kinetic parameters, Doppler coefficient, reactivity effect of decreasing the water density). Calculations results are compared with each other and results of this comparison are discussed.

  17. Five-Year Budget Projections: Fiscal Years 1981-1985. A Report to the Senate and House Committees on the Budget. Part II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    NOTE: Excludes military retirement benefit payments. 30 Grants to State and Local Governments On a percentage basis, the largest growth in federal...transactions involving the foreign military sales trust fund and revolving funds administered by the Farmers Home Administration and the Federal Housing ...OK zv- wim All pV D FIVE-YEAR BYDGET.ROJECTIONS-. FISCAL YEARS 1981-1985. The Congress of the United States Congressional Budget Office Government

  18. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2016-07-12

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  19. A rheology model of soft elastomeric capacitor for Weigh-In-Motion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollipara, Venkata Dharmateja

    As a result of fast growing industry, there is an increase in traffic congestion and deterioration of transportation inventory. Real-time traffic characterisation could be used to amoliorate the efficiency of our transportation system. Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) systems offer the advantages of vehicle classification, speed measurement, in addition to weight measurement while vehicles are moving. In this thesis, state-of-the-art WIM systems are discussed and limitations of current technologies are identified. A Soft Elastomeric Capacitor (SEC) that works as a large scale surface strain gauge is introduced to address the limitations in existing techniques and investigated for its applicability as a WIM sensor. Though the novel SEC has potential advantages, the relationship axial strain-to-stress needs to be modeled to enable its utilization as a WIM sensor. A Zener model is selected and modified by the addition of a slider to characterize the polymer behavior. An overstress approach is used to study the resultant stress-strain response owing to its simplicity and computational benefits. Since the overstress approach is data-driven, an experimental testing scheme is used to identify the model parameters. The tests comprise three types of applied strain loading: multi step relaxation, simple relaxation and cyclic compression. Specimens with varying stiffness are employed for these tests. Numerical simulations for the cyclic compression loading are presented to assess the model performance. The model is found to be capable of reproducing the experimental data with an absolute maximum error value of 0.085 MPa for slow loading rate tests and 0.175 MPa for high loading rate tests. Comparative studies are completed to investigate the impact of patch stiffness on the mechanical behavior of the soft elastomeric capacitor patches. It is observed that as stiffness decreases, the nonlinearity in stress-strain response increases

  20. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY ON THE FATE OF IONIZING RADIATION IN LOCAL STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hanish, D. J.; Oey, M. S.; Rigby, J. R.; Lee, J. C.; De Mello, D. F.

    2010-12-20

    The fate of ionizing radiation is vital for understanding cosmic ionization, energy budgets in the interstellar and intergalactic medium, and star formation rate indicators. The low observed escape fractions of ionizing radiation have not been adequately explained, and there is evidence that some starbursts have high escape fractions. We examine the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a sample of local star-forming galaxies, containing 13 local starburst galaxies and 10 of their ordinary star-forming counterparts, to determine if there exist significant differences in the fate of ionizing radiation in these galaxies. We find that the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the SEDs are much larger than any systematic differences between starbursts and non-starbursts. For example, we find no significant differences in the total absorption of ionizing radiation by dust, traced by the 24 {mu}m, 70 {mu}m, and 160 {mu}m MIPS bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope, although the dust in starburst galaxies appears to be hotter than that of non-starburst galaxies. We also observe no excess ultraviolet flux in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer bands that could indicate a high escape fraction of ionizing photons in starburst galaxies. The small H{alpha} fractions of the diffuse, warm ionized medium (WIM) in starburst galaxies are apparently due to temporarily boosted H{alpha} luminosity within the star-forming regions themselves, with an independent, constant WIM luminosity. This independence of the WIM and starburst luminosities contrasts with WIM behavior in non-starburst galaxies and underscores our poor understanding of radiation transfer in both ordinary and starburst galaxies.

  1. A Longitudinal Study of the Relationship between User Attitudes and the Success of the MAJCOM and AFRCE Work Information Management System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    committed to support the implementation. Major General C. D. Wright, the Director of Engineering and Services at the Air Staff, issued a policy ...response to this policy was the 1984 Air Force Institute of Tecnnology (AFIT) thesis by Moschner and Nightengale (31). The purpose of their research was...the official plan and policy for "implementing, managing, and operating WIMS and SIMS throughout the Engineering and Services Community" (15:1). The

  2. System and method for identifying, validating, weighing and characterizing moving or stationary vehicles and cargo

    DOEpatents

    Beshears, David L.; Batsell, Stephen G.; Abercrombie, Robert K.; Scudiere, Matthew B.; White, Clifford P.

    2007-12-04

    An asset identification and information infrastructure management (AI3M) device having an automated identification technology system (AIT), a Transportation Coordinators' Automated Information for Movements System II (TC-AIMS II), a weigh-in-motion system (WIM-II), and an Automated Air Load Planning system (AALPS) all in electronic communication for measuring and calculating actual asset characteristics, either statically or in-motion, and further calculating an actual load plan.

  3. FloCon 2005 Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    funded research and development center. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s...Science, University of Arizona, 1996. 4 High-quality Internet for higher education and research NERD : Network Emergency Responder & Detector Wim.Biemolt...samplicator/ High-quality Internet for higher education and research Some specs of the new NERD • nerdd, analysis – boost libraries, MySQL database, php

  4. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    case TOPAZ : a hybrid coordinate ocean model of roughly 13 km horizontal resolution forced by ECMWF atmospheric fields, as the platform to construct a...the TOPAZ ice/ocean model and WAVEWATCH III, and, for the latter, cross-relate to any viscoelastic parametrization of the sea ice to calibrate the...goal of embedding the 3D WIM described above into the TOPAZ framework, by so doing allowing fully directional seas generated by WAVEWATCH III as

  5. Algorithm for a novel fiber-optic weigh-in-motion sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W. Jr.; Muhs, J.D.

    1991-08-01

    Over the past decade, the demand from both government and private industry for small, lightweight, vehicle weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems has grown substantially. During the 1980s several techniques for weighing vehicles in motion were developed that include piezoelectric cables, capacitive mats, and hydraulic and bending-plate load cells. These different systems have advantages and disadvantages that trade off between accuracy, physical size and system complexity. The smaller portable systems demonstrate medium to poor accuracy and repeatability while the larger more accurate systems are nonportable. A small, lightweight, and portable WIM system based on a fiber-optic pressure transducer has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the demands of government and industry. The algorithm for extracting vehicle weight from the time-dependent sensor response is developed and presented in this report, along with data collected by the system for several classes of vehicles. These results show that the ORNL fiber-optic WIM system is a viable alternative to other commercial systems that are presently available. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Improvement of the accuracy of the aircraft center of gravity by employing optical fiber Bragg grating technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Wang, Pengfei; Fan, LingLing; Guan, Liang; Zhao, Qiming; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2010-04-01

    Safety flight of aircrafts requires that the aircraft center of gravity (CG) must fall within specified limits established by the manufacturer. However, the aircraft CG depends not only on the structure of planes, but also on the passengers and their luggage. The current method of estimating the weight of passengers and luggage by the average weight may result in a violation of this requirement. To reduce the discrepancy between the actual weight and estimated weight, we propose a method of improving the accuracy of calculating the CG of the plane by weighing the passengers and their personal luggage. This method is realized by a Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system installed at boarding gates based on optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. One prototype of WIM is fabricated and tested at lab. The resolution of this system is 2 kg and can be further improved by advanced manufacture technology. With the accurate weight of passengers and luggage coming from the WIM system and the locations of passengers and luggage obtained from boarding cards, the aircraft CG can be calculated correctly. This method can be applied into other fields, such as escalators, boarding gates for ferries.

  7. TRIGA MARK-II source term

    SciTech Connect

    Usang, M. D. Hamzah, N. S. Abi, M. J. B. Rawi, M. Z. M. Rawi Abu, M. P.

    2014-02-12

    ORIGEN 2.2 are employed to obtain data regarding γ source term and the radio-activity of irradiated TRIGA fuel. The fuel composition are specified in grams for use as input data. Three types of fuel are irradiated in the reactor, each differs from the other in terms of the amount of Uranium compared to the total weight. Each fuel are irradiated for 365 days with 50 days time step. We obtain results on the total radioactivity of the fuel, the composition of activated materials, composition of fission products and the photon spectrum of the burned fuel. We investigate the differences of results using BWR and PWR library for ORIGEN. Finally, we compare the composition of major nuclides after 1 year irradiation of both ORIGEN library with results from WIMS. We found only minor disagreements between the yields of PWR and BWR libraries. In comparison with WIMS, the errors are a little bit more pronounced. To overcome this errors, the irradiation power used in ORIGEN could be increased a little, so that the differences in the yield of ORIGEN and WIMS could be reduced. A more permanent solution is to use a different code altogether to simulate burnup such as DRAGON and ORIGEN-S. The result of this study are essential for the design of radiation shielding from the fuel.

  8. A fiber-optic weigh-in-motion sensor using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Wei, Zhanxiong; Chen, Bingquan; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2005-11-01

    In this weigh-in-motion (WIM) research, we introduce a novel design of WIM system based-on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technologies. The novel design comes from the idea using in-service bridge as the weigh scale. While vehicles traveling over the bridge, the weights can be recorded by the strain gauges installed on the bridge abutments. In this system, the bridge beam is replaced by a piece of steel plate which supports the weight of the traveling vehicle. Four steel tubes are attached firmly at the corners of the plate serving as the bridge abutments. All weights will be finally transferred into the tubes where four FBGs are attached and can record the weight-induced strains by shifting their Bragg wavelengths. Compared with other designs of fiber-optic WIM systems, this design is easy and reliable. Especially it's suitable for heavy vehicles because of its large capacity, such as military vehicles, trucks and trailers. Over 40-ton load has been applied on the system and the experimental results show a good repeatability and linearity under such a large load. The system resolution has been achieved as low as 10 kg.

  9. Sampling optimization for high-speed weigh-in-motion measurements using in-pavement strain-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiming; Huang, Ying; Bridgelall, Raj; Palek, Leonard; Strommen, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Weigh-in-motion (WIM) measurement has been widely used for weight enforcement, pavement design, freight management, and intelligent transportation systems to monitor traffic in real-time. However, to use such sensors effectively, vehicles must exit the traffic stream and slow down to match their current capabilities. Hence, agencies need devices with higher vehicle passing speed capabilities to enable continuous weight measurements at mainline speeds. The current practices for data acquisition at such high speeds are fragmented. Deployment configurations and settings depend mainly on the experiences of operation engineers. To assure adequate data, most practitioners use very high frequency measurements that result in redundant samples, thereby diminishing the potential for real-time processing. The larger data memory requirements from higher sample rates also increase storage and processing costs. The field lacks a sampling design or standard to guide appropriate data acquisition of high-speed WIM measurements. This study develops the appropriate sample rate requirements as a function of the vehicle speed. Simulations and field experiments validate the methods developed. The results will serve as guidelines for future high-speed WIM measurements using in-pavement strain-based sensors.

  10. Description of convective-scale numerical weather simulation use in a flight simulator within the Flysafe project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradier-Vabre, S.; Forster, C.; Heesbeen, W. W. M.; Pagé, C.; Sénési, S.; Tafferner, A.; Bernard-Bouissières, I.; Caumont, O.; Drouin, A.; Ducrocq, V.; Guillou, Y.; Josse, P.

    2009-03-01

    Within the framework of the Flysafe project, dedicated tools aiming at improving flight safety are developed. In particular, efforts are directed towards the development of the Next Generation-Integrated Surveillance System (NG-ISS), i.e. a combination of new on-board systems and ground-based tools which provides the pilot with integrated information on three risks playing a major role in aircraft accidents: collision with another aircraft, collision with terrain, and adverse weather conditions. For the latter, Weather Information Management Systems (WIMSs) based on nowcasts of atmospheric hazards are developed. This paper describes the set-up of a test-bed for the NG-ISS incorporating two types of WIMS data, those related to aircraft in-flight icing and thunderstorm risks. The test-bed is based on convective-scale numerical simulations of a particular weather scenario with thunderstorms and icing in the area of the Innsbruck airport. Raw simulated fields as well as more elaborate diagnostics (synthetic reflectivity and satellite brightness temperature) feed both the flight simulator including the NG-ISS and the algorithms in charge of producing WIMS data. WIMS outputs based on the synthetic data are discussed, and it is indicated that the high-resolution simulated fields are beneficial for the NG-ISS test-bed purposes and its technical feasibility.

  11. TRIGA MARK-II source term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usang, M. D.; Hamzah, N. S.; J. B., Abi M.; M. Z., M. Rawi; Abu, M. P.

    2014-02-01

    ORIGEN 2.2 are employed to obtain data regarding γ source term and the radio-activity of irradiated TRIGA fuel. The fuel composition are specified in grams for use as input data. Three types of fuel are irradiated in the reactor, each differs from the other in terms of the amount of Uranium compared to the total weight. Each fuel are irradiated for 365 days with 50 days time step. We obtain results on the total radioactivity of the fuel, the composition of activated materials, composition of fission products and the photon spectrum of the burned fuel. We investigate the differences of results using BWR and PWR library for ORIGEN. Finally, we compare the composition of major nuclides after 1 year irradiation of both ORIGEN library with results from WIMS. We found only minor disagreements between the yields of PWR and BWR libraries. In comparison with WIMS, the errors are a little bit more pronounced. To overcome this errors, the irradiation power used in ORIGEN could be increased a little, so that the differences in the yield of ORIGEN and WIMS could be reduced. A more permanent solution is to use a different code altogether to simulate burnup such as DRAGON and ORIGEN-S. The result of this study are essential for the design of radiation shielding from the fuel.

  12. From ultracold Fermi Gases to Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Ultracold dilute atomic gases can be considered as model systems to address some pending problem in Many-Body physics that occur in condensed matter systems, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. We have developed a general method to probe with high precision the thermodynamics of locally homogeneous ultracold Bose and Fermi gases [1,2,3]. This method allows stringent tests of recent many-body theories. For attractive spin 1/2 fermions with tunable interaction (^6Li), we will show that the gas thermodynamic properties can continuously change from those of weakly interacting Cooper pairs described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory to those of strongly bound molecules undergoing Bose-Einstein condensation. First, we focus on the finite-temperature Equation of State (EoS) of the unpolarized unitary gas. Surprisingly, the low-temperature properties of the strongly interacting normal phase are well described by Fermi liquid theory [3] and we localize the superfluid phase transition. A detailed comparison with theories including recent Monte-Carlo calculations will be presented. Moving away from the unitary gas, the Lee-Huang-Yang and Lee-Yang beyond-mean-field corrections for low density bosonic and fermionic superfluids are quantitatively measured for the first time. Despite orders of magnitude difference in density and temperature, our equation of state can be used to describe low density neutron matter such as the outer shell of neutron stars. [4pt] [1] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, K. Jiang, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Nature 463, 1057 (2010) [0pt] [2] N. Navon, S. Nascimbène, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Science 328, 729 (2010) [0pt] [3] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, S. Pilati, F. Chevy, S. Giorgini, A. Georges, and C. Salomon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 215303 (2011)

  13. Scattering properties of weakly-bound dimers of Fermi atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Dmitry

    2005-03-01

    We discuss the behavior of weakly bound bosonic dimers formed in a two-component Fermi gas with a large positive scattering length for the interspecies interaction. We present a theoretical approach for solving a few-body scattering problem and describe the physics of dimer-dimer elastic and inelastic scattering. We explain why these diatomic molecules, while in the highest ro-vibrational level, are characterized by remarkable collisional stability. Co-authors are Christophe Salomon, LKB, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France; Georgy Shlyapnikov, LPTMS, University of South Paris, Orsay, France.

  14. Freshwater molluscs as indicators of bioavailability and toxicity of metals in surface-water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, John F.; Collins, Jerilyn J.; Ware, George W.

    1991-01-01

    During the past several decades, studies from a variety of locations have demonstrated widespread occurrence of metals in surface waters at concentrations significantly higher than background levels. Elevated concentrations are not limited to certain water types or polluted areas; they appear in all types of systems and in all geographic areas. It is clear that metals enter the aquatic systems from diverse sources, both point and nonpoint, and they can be readily transported from one system to another. Transport routes include atmospheric, terrestrial, subterranean, aquatic, and biological pathways (Elder 1988; Salomons and Forstner 1984).

  15. Testing General Relativity with Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud, S.; Salomon, C.; Wolf, P.

    2009-12-01

    We discuss perspectives for new tests of general relativity which are based on recent technological developments as well as new ideas. We focus our attention on tests performed with atomic clocks and do not repeat arguments present in the other contributions to the present issue (Space Sci. Rev. 2009, This Issue). In particular, we present the scientific motivations of the space projects ACES (Salomon et al. in CR Acad. Sci. IV-2:1313, 2001) and SAGAS (Wolf et al. in Exp. Astron. 23:651, 2009).

  16. Introduction: the fundamental constants of physics, precision measurements and the base units of the SI.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Terry; Burnett, Keith

    2005-09-15

    This is a short introductory note to the texts of lectures presented at a Royal Society Discussion meeting held on 14-15 February 2005 and now published in this issue of Philosophical Transactions A. It contains a brief resumé of the papers in the order they were presented at the meeting. This issue contains the texts of all of the presentations except those of Christophe Salomon, on cold atom clocks and tests of fundamental theory, and Francis Everitt, on Gravity Probe B, which were, unfortunately, not available.

  17. [Discussion of a medical officer carrying the arm-band of the Red Cross during the second world war].

    PubMed

    Riaud, Xavier

    2008-12-01

    Sacrificing his life to save that of his soldiers and of his nursing staff, Captain Ben Salomon became a legend. Yet, studies of international treaties and of some directives specific to the American Army have seriously held back the historical and public recognition of his heroism. Indeed, when he took hold of the machine gun to cover his men's retreat in 1944, he was wearing a Red Cross armband and was enlisted as a "doctor". What did this mean exactly? Was his action a misdemeanor or definitely an act of heroism?

  18. AN overview of the FLYSAFE datalink solution for the exchange of weather information: supporting aircrew decision making processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, A.; Drouin, A.

    2009-09-01

    FLYSAFE is an Integrated Project of the 6th framework of the European Commission with the aim to improve flight safety through the development of an avionics solution the Next Generation Integrated Surveillance System (NGISS), which is supported by a ground based network of Weather Information Management Systems (WIMS) and access points in the form of the Ground Weather Processor (GWP). The NGISS provides information to the flight crew on the three major external hazards for aviation: weather, air traffic and terrain. The NGISS has the capability of displaying data about all three hazards on a single display screen, facilitating rapid appreciation of the situation by the flight crew. Weather Information Management Systems (WIMS) were developed to provide the NGISS and the flight crew with weather related information on in-flight icing, thunderstorms and clear-air turbulence. These products are generated on the ground from observations and model forecasts. WIMS will supply relevant information on three different scales: global, regional and local (over airport Terminal Manoeuvring Area). The Ground Weather Processor is a client-server architecture that utilises open source components, which include a geospatial database and web feature services. The GWP stores Weather Objects generated by the WIMS. An aviation user can retrieve on-demand all Weather Objects that intersect the volume of space that is of interest to them. The Weather Objects are fused with in-situ observation data and can be used by the flight management system to propose a route to avoid the hazard. In addition they can be used to display the current hazardous weather to the Flight Crew thereby raising their awareness. Within the FLYSAFE program, around 120 hours of flight trials were performed during February 2008 and August 2008. Two aircraft were involved each with separate objectives: - to assess FLYSAFE's innovative solutions for the data-link, on-board data-fusion and data-display and data

  19. Extended nebular emission in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.

    2015-02-01

    The morphological, spectroscopic and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium ( wim ) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer a precious opportunity for advancing our understanding in this respect. We use deep IFS data from CALIFA (califa.caha.es) to study the wim over the entire extent and optical spectral range of 32 nearby ETGs. We find that all ETGs in our sample show faint (Hα equivalent width EW(Hα)~0.5 ... 2 Å) extranuclear nebular emission extending out to >=2 Petrosian50 radii. Confirming and strengthening our conclusions in Papaderos et al. (2013, hereafter P13) we argue that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence with regard to the properties of their wim , and they can be roughly subdivided into two characteristic classes. The first one (type i) comprises ETGs with a nearly constant EW(Hα)~1-3 Å in their extranuclear component, in quantitative agreement with (even though, no proof for) the hypothesis of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component being the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) consists of virtually wim -evacuated ETGs with a large Lyman continuum (Ly c) photon escape fraction and a very low (<=0.5 Å) EW(Hα) in their nuclear zone. These two ETG classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios. Additionally, here we extend the classification by P13 by the class i+ which stands for a subset of type i ETGs with low-level star-forming activity in contiguous spiral-arm like features in their outermost periphery. These faint features, together with traces of localized star formation in several type i&i+ systems point to a non-negligible contribution from young massive stars to the global ionizing photon

  20. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. III. Presence of aerosols in the middle stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Berthet, Gwenaël; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Brogniez, Colette; Hadamcik, Edith; Chartier, Michel; Ovarlez, Henri

    2005-07-01

    The aerosol extinction measurements in the ultraviolet and visible wavelengths by the balloonborne spectrometer Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (SALOMON) show that aerosols are present in the middle stratosphere, above 25-km altitude. These observations are confirmed by the extinction measurements performed by a solar occultation radiometer. The balloonborne Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) counter instrument also confirms the presence of aerosol around 30-km altitude, with an unrealistic excess of micronic particles assuming that only liquid sulfate aerosols are present. An unexpected spectral structure around 640-nm observed by SALOMON is also detectable in extinction measurements by the satellite instrument Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment III. This set of measurements could indicate that solid aerosols were detected at these altitude ranges. The amount of soot detected up to now in the lower stratosphere is too low to explain these measurements. Thus, the presence of interplanetary dust grains and micrometeorites may need to be invoked. Moreover, it seems that these grains fill the stratosphere in stratified layers.

  1. Spatially extensive microbial biogeography of the Indian Ocean provides insights into the unique community structure of a pristine coral atoll

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas C.; Ostrowski, Martin; Williams, Rohan B.; Xie, Chao; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Grzymski, Joseph J.; Senstius, Svend Jacob; Givskov, Michael; Hoeke, Ron; Philip, Gayle K.; Neches, Russell Y.; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Chénard, Caroline; Paulsen, Ian T.; Lauro, Federico M.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms act both as drivers and indicators of perturbations in the marine environment. In an effort to establish baselines to predict the response of marine habitats to environmental change, here we report a broad survey of microbial diversity across the Indian Ocean, including the first microbial samples collected in the pristine lagoon of Salomon Islands, Chagos Archipelago. This was the first large-scale ecogenomic survey aboard a private yacht employing a ‘citizen oceanography’ approach and tools and protocols easily adapted to ocean going sailboats. Our data highlighted biogeographic patterns in microbial community composition across the Indian Ocean. Samples from within the Salomon Islands lagoon contained a community which was different even from adjacent samples despite constant water exchange, driven by the dominance of the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechococcus. In the lagoon, Synechococcus was also responsible for driving shifts in the metatranscriptional profiles. Enrichment of transcripts related to photosynthesis and nutrient cycling indicated bottom-up controls of community structure. However a five-fold increase in viral transcripts within the lagoon during the day, suggested a concomitant top-down control by bacteriophages. Indeed, genome recruitment against Synechococcus reference genomes suggested a role of viruses in providing the ecological filter for determining the β-diversity patterns in this system. PMID:26481089

  2. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. III. Presence of aerosols in the middle stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Berthet, Gwenaël; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Brogniez, Colette; Hadamcik, Edith; Chartier, Michel; Ovarlez, Henri

    2005-07-01

    The aerosol extinction measurements in the ultraviolet and visible wavelengths by the balloonborne spectrometer Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NO_x (SALOMON) show that aerosols are present in the middle stratosphere, above 25-km altitude. These observations are confirmed by the extinction measurements performed by a solar occultation radiometer. The balloonborne Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) counter instrument also confirms the presence of aerosol around 30-km altitude, with an unrealistic excess of micronic particles assuming that only liquid sulfate aerosols are present. An unexpected spectral structure around 640-nm observed by SALOMON is also detectable in extinction measurements by the satellite instrument Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment III. This set of measurements could indicate that solid aerosols were detected at these altitude ranges. The amount of soot detected up to now in the lower stratosphere is too low to explain these measurements. Thus, the presence of interplanetary dust grains and micrometeorites may need to be invoked. Moreover, it seems that these grains fill the stratosphere in stratified layers.

  3. The Equation of State of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navon, Nir; Nascimbène, Sylvain; Jiang, Kaijun; Chevy, Frédéric; Salomon, Christophe

    2010-03-01

    In this talk, we will present recent experimental work on the thermodynamics of strongly interacting Fermi gases. We have developed a general method to probe with high precision the Equation of State (EoS) of locally homogeneous ultracold gases [1]. This allows stringent tests of recent many-body theories. First, we focus on the finite-temperature EoS of the unpolarized unitary gas. Precise thermometry is provided by adding to the Fermi gas of ^6Li a trace of bosonic ^7Li. We show that the low-temperature properties of the strongly interacting normal phase are well described by Fermi liquid theory and we localize the superfluid transition. Second, we address the zero-temperature EoS of the spin-polarized system. Surprisingly, despite strong interactions, the polarized phase behaves as a mixture of two ideal gases: a Fermi gas of majority atoms and a non-interacting gas of dressed quasi-particles, the Fermi polarons. Finally, we will report on work in progress on the extension of our study to the BEC-BCS crossover [2]. [4pt] [1] S. Nascimbene and N. Navon, K. Jiang, F. Chevy, C. Salomon, arXiv:0911.0747, Nature (in press, 2010) [0pt] [2] N. Navon and S. Nascimbene, F. Chevy, C. Salomon, in preparation (2010)

  4. Spatially extensive microbial biogeography of the Indian Ocean provides insights into the unique community structure of a pristine coral atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Thomas C.; Ostrowski, Martin; Williams, Rohan B.; Xie, Chao; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Grzymski, Joseph J.; Senstius, Svend Jacob; Givskov, Michael; Hoeke, Ron; Philip, Gayle K.; Neches, Russell Y.; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Chénard, Caroline; Paulsen, Ian T.; Lauro, Federico M.

    2015-10-01

    Microorganisms act both as drivers and indicators of perturbations in the marine environment. In an effort to establish baselines to predict the response of marine habitats to environmental change, here we report a broad survey of microbial diversity across the Indian Ocean, including the first microbial samples collected in the pristine lagoon of Salomon Islands, Chagos Archipelago. This was the first large-scale ecogenomic survey aboard a private yacht employing a ‘citizen oceanography’ approach and tools and protocols easily adapted to ocean going sailboats. Our data highlighted biogeographic patterns in microbial community composition across the Indian Ocean. Samples from within the Salomon Islands lagoon contained a community which was different even from adjacent samples despite constant water exchange, driven by the dominance of the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechococcus. In the lagoon, Synechococcus was also responsible for driving shifts in the metatranscriptional profiles. Enrichment of transcripts related to photosynthesis and nutrient cycling indicated bottom-up controls of community structure. However a five-fold increase in viral transcripts within the lagoon during the day, suggested a concomitant top-down control by bacteriophages. Indeed, genome recruitment against Synechococcus reference genomes suggested a role of viruses in providing the ecological filter for determining the β-diversity patterns in this system.

  5. Spatially extensive microbial biogeography of the Indian Ocean provides insights into the unique community structure of a pristine coral atoll.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Thomas C; Ostrowski, Martin; Williams, Rohan B; Xie, Chao; Jensen, Rachelle M; Grzymski, Joseph J; Senstius, Svend Jacob; Givskov, Michael; Hoeke, Ron; Philip, Gayle K; Neches, Russell Y; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Chénard, Caroline; Paulsen, Ian T; Lauro, Federico M

    2015-10-20

    Microorganisms act both as drivers and indicators of perturbations in the marine environment. In an effort to establish baselines to predict the response of marine habitats to environmental change, here we report a broad survey of microbial diversity across the Indian Ocean, including the first microbial samples collected in the pristine lagoon of Salomon Islands, Chagos Archipelago. This was the first large-scale ecogenomic survey aboard a private yacht employing a 'citizen oceanography' approach and tools and protocols easily adapted to ocean going sailboats. Our data highlighted biogeographic patterns in microbial community composition across the Indian Ocean. Samples from within the Salomon Islands lagoon contained a community which was different even from adjacent samples despite constant water exchange, driven by the dominance of the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechococcus. In the lagoon, Synechococcus was also responsible for driving shifts in the metatranscriptional profiles. Enrichment of transcripts related to photosynthesis and nutrient cycling indicated bottom-up controls of community structure. However a five-fold increase in viral transcripts within the lagoon during the day, suggested a concomitant top-down control by bacteriophages. Indeed, genome recruitment against Synechococcus reference genomes suggested a role of viruses in providing the ecological filter for determining the β-diversity patterns in this system.

  6. Waste Information Management System-2012 - 12114

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W.; Shoffner, P.; Lagos, L.; Roelant, D.

    2012-07-01

    The Waste Information Management System (WIMS) -2012 was updated to support the Department of Energy (DOE) accelerated cleanup program. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedule. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast and transportation information regarding the volumes and types of radioactive waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 40 years. Each local DOE site historically collected, organized, and displayed waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. In order for interested parties to understand and view the complete DOE complex-wide picture, the radioactive waste and shipment information of each DOE site needed to be entered into a common application. The WIMS application was therefore created to serve as a common application to improve stakeholder comprehension and improve DOE radioactive waste treatment and disposal planning and scheduling. WIMS allows identification of total forecasted waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal, along with forecasted waste transportation information by rail, truck and inter-modal shipments. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, developed and deployed the web-based forecast and transportation system and is responsible for updating the radioactive waste forecast and transportation data on a regular basis to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. WIMS continues to successfully accomplish the goals and objectives set forth by DOE for this project. It has

  7. First trials of oral vaccination with rabies SAG2 dog baits in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Boué, Franck; Demerson, Jean Michel; Fassi Fihri, Ouafaa; Yahia, Khadija Id Sidi; Cliquet, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Canine rabies is a serious health problem in Morocco and about 22 human deaths are reported yearly. Following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations, Moroccan authorities evaluated oral rabies vaccine baits specially designed for dogs. Materials and Methods The study was performed in Tiflet area. The vaccine strain was SAG2, a modified live oral rabies vaccine strain. Each bait contained an aluminium/PVC capsule filled with a liquid. Two kinds of baits were used: placebo baits containing methylene blue as a topical marker and vaccine baits containing vaccine suspension. The study was performed according to recommended WHO strategies, i.e., door to door model (DDDM), hand-out and wildlife immunization model (WIM). The DDDM was performed in the rural area of Tiflet on 60 owned dogs. The hand-out strategy was tested on 15 stray dogs. The WIM was performed on 4 transects lines near Tiflet slaughterhouse and near the weekly traditional market location. Results Using the DDDM, 100% of owned dogs were attracted by the baits and 77% ate the bait. Using the hand-out model, 100% of dogs showed interest in baits and 46.7% took the baits. Using the WIM in stray dogs, up to 73% of baits disappeared and 68% of the capsules containing the SAG2 vaccine were found pierced, depending on the sites of distribution. Conclusion This pilot study showed that baits have a good palatability and that oral vaccination of both owned and stray dogs is feasible with baits specifically developed for dogs and with adapted strategy of distribution. PMID:25003096

  8. Hanford inventory program user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkelman, K.C.

    1994-09-12

    Provides users with instructions and information about accessing and operating the Hanford Inventory Program (HIP) system. The Hanford Inventory Program is an integrated control system that provides a single source for the management and control of equipment, parts, and material warehoused by Westinghouse Hanford Company in various site-wide locations. The inventory is comprised of spare parts and equipment, shop stock, special tools, essential materials, and convenience storage items. The HIP replaced the following systems; ACA, ASP, PICS, FSP, WSR, STP, and RBO. In addition, HIP manages the catalog maintenance function for the General Supplies inventory stocked in the 1164 building and managed by WIMS.

  9. Groundwater/surface-water interactions in the Bad River Watershed, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leaf, Andrew T.; Fienen, Michael N.; Hunt, Randall J.; Buchwald, Cheryl A.

    2015-11-23

    Finally, a new data-worth analysis of potential new monitoring-well locations was performed by using the model. The relative worth of new measurements was evaluated based on their ability to increase confidence in model predictions of groundwater levels and base flows at 35 locations, under the condition of a proposed open-pit iron mine. Results of the new data-worth analysis, and other inputs and outputs from the Bad River model, are available through an online dynamic web mapping service at (http://wim.usgs.gov/badriver/).

  10. IVHS institutional issues and case studies. HELP/crescent case study. Final report, June 1993-January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Heavy Vehicle Electronic License Plate Program (HELP) project is a multi-state, multi-national research effort to design and test an integrated heavy vehicle monitoring system using automated vehicle identification (AVI), automated vehicle classification (AVC), and weigh-in-motion (WIM) technologies. The operational field test of the HELP program is known as the Crescent project. Its goal is to demonstrate the various technologies that would comprise a system whereby a truck entering in British Columbia, can drive through the entire crescent-shaped network, from British Columbia to Texas, without having to stop at other weigh stations or ports-of-entry.

  11. Error Reduction in Portable, Low-Speed Weigh-In-Motion (Sub-0.1 Percent Error)

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Hively, Lee M; Scudiere, Matthew B; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2008-01-01

    We present breakthrough findings based on significant modifications to the Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) Gen II approach, so-called the modified Gen II. The revisions enable slow speed weight measurements at least as precise as in ground static scales, which are certified to 0.1% error. Concomitant software and hardware revisions reflect a philosophical and practical change that enables an order of magnitude improvement in low-speed weighing precision. This error reduction breakthrough is presented within the context of the complete host of commercial and governmental application rationale including the flexibility to extend information and communication technology for future needs.

  12. Development of Site Characterization Simulator Specifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-11-01

    1991. A Method for Estimating Effective Porosity and Ground-Water Velocity. Ground Water, v. 29, no. 2, pp. 171 -174. Hegeman, Wim J.M., van der Weijden...no. 3, pp. 245-25 1. Waste Management, v. 14, no. 2, pp. 171 -173. Lindquist, J.C., Victor, W.R., and Meyer, J.J. 1996. Development of Quantitative Soil...and Gravel Aquifer, 1. Approach and Overview of Plume Movement. Water Resources Research, v. 22, no. 13, pp. 2017 -2029. Masters, G.M. 1991

  13. SPX: The Tenth International Conference on Stochastic Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Dupa ~ovA, Yuri Ermoliev, Peter Kall, Wim Klein Haneveld, Kurt Marti, Andras Prdkopa, Steve Robinson, Terry Rockafellar, Roger Wets, and Bill Ziemba...Methods in SP Chair: Jitka Dupa ~ov6, Charles University ThB 9:45-10:45 Grand Ballroom Plenary Address: Werner Roemisch,Humboldt-University Berlin...Dantzig Kurt Marti Michael A.H. Dempster Andras Pr~kopa Jitka Dupa ~ov6 Stephen M.Robinson Yuri Ermoliev R. Tyrell Rockafellar Peter Kall Roger J-B Wets

  14. Develop 3G Application with The J2ME SATSA API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JunWu, Xu; JunLing, Liang

    This paper describes research in the use of the Security and Trust Services API for J2ME (SATSA) to develop mobile applications. for 3G networks. SATSA defines a set of APIs that allows J2ME applications to communicate with and access functionality, secure storage and cryptographic operations provided by security elements such as smart cards and Wireless Identification Modules (WIM). A Java Card application could also work as an authentication module in a J2ME-based e-bank application. The e-bank application would allow its users to access their bank accounts using their cell phones.

  15. Error Reduction for Weigh-In-Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, Lee M; Abercrombie, Robert K; Scudiere, Matthew B; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2009-01-01

    Federal and State agencies need certifiable vehicle weights for various applications, such as highway inspections, border security, check points, and port entries. ORNL weigh-in-motion (WIM) technology was previously unable to provide certifiable weights, due to natural oscillations, such as vehicle bouncing and rocking. Recent ORNL work demonstrated a novel filter to remove these oscillations. This work shows further filtering improvements to enable certifiable weight measurements (error < 0.1%) for a higher traffic volume with less effort (elimination of redundant weighing).

  16. The disk-halo interface in edge-on spirals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walterbos, Rene; Braun, Robert; Norman, Colin

    1993-01-01

    We are studying the disk-halo interface in several edge-on spiral galaxies through extensive imagery in H(alpha) and other emission lines from Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG), also referred to as the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM). In addition, for the nearby Sc galaxy NGC4631 we have obtained x-ray observations with ROSAT, to map the distribution of hot (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7)) gas in the disk and halo. Here we present initial results for two late-type spirals, NGC4244 and NGC4631.

  17. Wideband Speech Enhancement Addition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    RADC-4-114 WIM9AND SEHENHANCMN ADDITION Mws IL Woes DT-iC&C JUN 2 3 S81 A SROME AIR DEVELOPMENT CENM2"a Air Force Sys~tems CoFW~mmand~ Griffiss Air ...1ii: ii i 4.1.1 INEL *9e******q***.*..**..... 41 4.1.2 DSS and IMP . • 43 4.2 Recommendations . 43 4.Z .1 Chant es Not Hequir :L -2 Re sear ch...developed over a number of years, primarily under the sp•naorship of the United States Air Force, Rome Air D~velopment Center (RADC). The device that is

  18. Formation and evolution of magma-poor margins, an example of the West Iberia margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Andres-Martinez, Miguel; Morgan, Jason P.; Ranero, Cesar R.; Reston, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The West Iberia-Newfoundland (WIM-NF) conjugate margins have been geophysically and geologically surveyed for the last 30 years and have arguably become a paradigm for magma-poor extensional margins. Here we present a coherent picture of the WIM-NF rift to drift evolution that emerges from these observations and numerical modeling, and point out important differences that may exist with other magma-poor margins world-wide. The WIM-NF is characterized by a continental crust that thins asymmetrically and a wide and symmetric continent-ocean transition (COT) interpreted to consist of exhumed and serpentinised mantle with magmatic products increasing oceanward. The architectural evolution of these margins is mainly dominated by cooling under very slow extension velocities (<~6 mm/yr half-rate) and a lower crust that most probably was not extremely weak at the start of rifting. These conditions lead to a system where initially deformation is distributed over a broad area and the upper, lower crust and lithosphere are decoupled. As extension progresses upper, lower, crust and mantle become tightly coupled and deformation localizes due to strengthening and cooling during rifting. Coupling leads to asymmetric asthenospheric uplift and weakening of the hanginwall of the active fault, where a new fault forms. This continued process leads to the formation of an array of sequential faults that dip and become younger oceanward. Here we show that these processes acting in concert: 1) reproduce the margin asymmetry observed at the WIM-NF, 2) explain the fault geometry evolution from planar, to listric to detachment like by having one common Andersonian framework, 3) lead to the symmetric exhumation of mantle with little magmatism, and 4) explain the younging of the syn-rift towards the basin centre and imply that unconformities separating syn- and post-rift may be diachronous and younger towards the ocean. Finally, we show that different lower crustal rheologies lead to different

  19. Estimation of the Operating Characteristics When the Test Information of the Old Test Is Not Constant. II. Simple Sum Procedure of the Conditional P.D.F. Approach/Normal Approach Method Using Three Subtests of the Old Test, Number 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    30332 Universite ’ de Geneve 3 fl. de l’Universite 1201 Geneva SWITZERLAND Army 1 Dr. Wim J. van der Linden Vakgroep OnderwisJ skunde Dr. Randall M...of the square root of the test information function of I Subtest 3 by a dotted curve, which is obtained by (2.14) [I*(T) ]1/2 i((e) 1]/2 de 1/2 k -i...Chief of Staff De . for Personnel Dept. of the Army Pentagon, Washington DC 20301 1 DR. JAMES L. RANEY U.S. ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE 5001 EISENHOWER

  20. Fiber optic weigh-in-motion sensor: correlation between modeling and practical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teral, Stephane R.; Larcher, Simon J.; Caussignac, Jean-Marie; Barbachi, Mohamed

    1996-05-01

    This paper shows the way to turn a defect inherent to single-mode fiber, namely birefringence, into a prime quality for a powerful and reliable sensor. The latter is entirely devoted to weigh- in-motion (WIM) applications extended to complete active traffic management systems. After a brief description of the sensor and its principle of operation, the theoretical model is developed. Then, a full characterization made in both static and dynamic conditions is presented. The results obtained illustrate how it is difficult to interpret a weight measured in dynamic conditions and correlate the value with the static weight.

  1. ELECTROSTATIC AIR CLEANING DEVICE AND METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, L.; Anderson, D.M.

    1961-07-18

    A method and apparatus for utilizing friction-charged particulate material from an aerosol are described. A bed of the plastic spheres is prepared, and the aerosol is passed upwardly through the bed at a rate just large enough to maintain the bed in a fluidized state wim over-all circulation of the balls. Wire members criss-crossing through the bed rub against the balls and maintain their surfaces with electrostatic charges. The particulate material in the aerosol adheres to the surfaces of the balls.

  2. IONIZED GAS IN THE FIRST 10 kpc OF THE INTERSTELLAR GALACTIC HALO: METAL ION FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Howk, J. Christopher; Consiglio, S. Michelle E-mail: smconsiglio@ucla.edu

    2012-11-10

    We present direct measures of the ionization fractions of several sulfur ions in the Galactic warm ionized medium (WIM). We obtained high-resolution ultraviolet absorption-line spectroscopy of post-asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular clusters Messier 3 [(l, b) = (42.{sup 0}2, +78.{sup 0}7), d = 10.2 kpc, and z = 10.0 kpc] and Messier 5 [(l, b) = (3.{sup 0}9, +46.{sup 0}8), d = 7.5 kpc, and z = +5.3 kpc] with the Hubble Space Telescope and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer to measure, or place limits on, the column densities of S I, S II, S III, S IV, S VI, and H I. These clusters also house millisecond pulsars, whose dispersion measures give an electron column density from which we infer the H II column in these directions. We find fractions of S{sup +2} in the WIM for the M 3 and M 5 sight lines x(S{sup +2}) {identical_to} N(S{sup +2})/N(S) = 0.33 {+-} 0.07 and 0.47 {+-} 0.09, respectively, with variations perhaps related to location. With negligible quantities of the higher ionization states, we conclude that S{sup +} and S{sup +2} account for all of the S in the WIM. We extend the methodology to study the ion fractions in the warm and hot ionized gas of the Milky Way, including the high ions Si{sup +3}, C{sup +3}, N{sup +4}, and O{sup +5}. The vast majority of the Galactic ionized gas is warm (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K) and photoionized (the WIM) or very hot (T > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) and collisionally ionized. The common tracer of ionized gas beyond the Milky Way, O{sup +5}, traces <1% of the total ionized gas mass of the Milky Way.

  3. Ungoverned Territories. Understanding and Reducing Terrorism Risks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Central Asia, London: I. B. Tauris, 2000. ———, “Islamists Impose Taliban-Type Moral Monitors,” Daily Telegraph (UK), June 3, 2003a. ———, “The Wild...sociales trasnacionales, respuestas represivas nacionales,” Foreign Affairs En Español, Abril–Junio 2004. As of January 5, 2007: http...www.foreignaffairs-esp.org/20040401faenespessay040205/wim-savenije/la-Mara-salvatrucha- y-el-barrio-18-st-fenomenos-sociales-trasnacionales- respuestas -represivas

  4. Simultaneous measurements of OClO and NO2 by night above Kiruna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirre, M.; Berthet, G.; Lefèvre, F.; Rivière, E. D.; Renard, J.-B.

    2003-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of OClO and NO2 profiles by night above Kiruna have been made during the last 3 years by the SALOMON remote sensing instruments. This instrument ia a UV-visible spectrometer which is operating by lunar occultation method. OClO is formed at sunset by one of the three channel of the reaction BrO + ClO. In the lower stratosphere, model calculations show that the formation of OClO in relatively large amount is possible only if NO2 mixing ratio is lower than a few tens of pptv at sunset. If NO2 mixing ratio is higher the reaction BrO + NO2 reduces BrO too much before OClO is formed. If we assume the known photochemistry a close relationship between OClO and NO2 must therefore exist by night. OClO and NO2 profiles retrieved by inversion of the measured slant columns by SALOMON compared with model calculations by the lagrangian model MiPLaSMO and the 3D CTM REPROBUS show that this relationship could not be observed in winter at high latitude in the vortex and at the edge of the vortex. Relatively large amount of OClO are indeed retrieved in the lower stratosphere when relatively large amount of NO2 are also retrieved. It has been argued that this disagreement could be only apparent, since these relatively large amount of both OClO and NO2 could be in the same slant column but not at the same altitude as it is retrieved from the inversion. Such bias in the inversion procedure could be indeed possible if the species concentrations are not horizontally homogeneous. To check such an hypothesis we have computed the slant columns in using output of the 3D CTM Reprobus up to 60 km in the conditions of 4 flights of the SALOMON instrument in January 2000, February 2000, December 2000 and January 2002. In the four cases, desagreements are also observed between measured and computed slant columns. We show that this means that OClO and NO2 are really both in a relative large amount, at least, in the same altitude range.

  5. Improved and new balloon-borne instruments for the measurements of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Chartier, Michel; Brogniez, Colette; Verwaerde, Christian; Balois, Jean-Yves; Auriol, Frédérique; Palumbo, Pasquale

    The aerosols in the stratosphere play an important role in the ozone chemistry. Liquid sulphate aerosols are involved in the heterogeneous chemistry of nitrogen and bromine species. The key parameters for modelling calculations of stratospheric species are the amount of these aerosols and their size distribution. In fact, the aerosol content in the stratosphere is more complex than previously assumed, since different natures of solid particles are present: soot from various origins and interplanetary dust intercepted by the Earth atmosphere. Since no major volcanic eruption has occurred since 15 years, it is possible to study at present the content of stratospheric background aerosols and to detect the different natures of particles. There is no unique technique of measurements in order to fully describe the physical properties of liquid and solid aerosols. Then different instruments must be used: SALOMON-N2, which is a night-time UV-visible spectrometer (from 350 to 950 nm) allowing the retrieval of the extinction coefficient of aerosols, the STAC particle counter (giving 14 size classes of aerosols), and MicroRADIBAL, which is a polarimeter allowing the retrieval of the aerosol phase function from the radiance and the polarisation measurements in the near infrared. Analysis of measurements performed during previous flights shows that significant amount of solid aerosols were detected in the middle stratosphere, up to about 30 km, with strong spatial and temporal variability. Combined aerosols measurements are necessary in order to be able to distinguish between the various natures of aerosols. Then, STAC is now implanted in the SALOMON-N2 and MicroRADIBAL gondolas. STAC can be also implanted on other gondolas flying in the stratosphere a few days apart, in order to study the variability of the total aerosol content. A new instrument, DUSTER, will be implanted soon in the SALOMON gondola. This instrument will collect solid particles in the middle stratosphere, in

  6. Hydrogeological features conditioning trophic levels of quarry lakes in western Po plain (north-western Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Domenico Antonio; Castagna, Sara; Lasagna, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    Quarry lakes occur in plains areas due to the extraction of alluvial sand and gravel used for grout and concrete in the construction industry. Excavation depths can reach and intersect the groundwater surface, thus creating a lake. Because of the need to optimize efficiency, the number of active open pit mines has increased in recent years; consequently, the global number of pit lakes will increase in coming decades (Castendyk and Eary 2009; Klapper and Geller 2001; Castro and Moore 2000). Similar to natural lakes, pit lakes are subject to eutrophication process, both during and after quarrying activity; during mining activity, the eutrophic level is strongly controlled by the excavation method. In the Piedmont territory (north-western Italy) there are 70 active quarry lakes, corresponding to approximately 0.1% of the entire plain area. Quarry lakes, located primarily along the main rivers occur in alluvial deposits of the plain area and have average depths between 20 and 30 m (maximum of 60 m deep) and surface areas between 3 and 30 hectares (Castagna 2008). The present study describes the trophic status of 23 active quarry lakes in the Piedmont plain that were evaluated by applying classifications from scientific literature. Currently, the majority of the studied quarry lakes may be defined as mesotrophic or eutrophic according to the trophic state classifications. Based on historic data, lake trophic levels have increased over time, during active mining. At the end of mining activity, further deterioration of water quality was expected, especially for smaller lakes with minimal oxygen stratification and higher levels of nutrients and algal growth. In addition, the paper focuses on the pit lake water quality and pit dimension; From an environmental perspective the excavation of quarry lakes with an appreciable size will likely result in a better safeguard of water quality and enhanced possibilities for lake end use after the cessation of mining. Piedmont quarry

  7. Counter-flow instability of a quantum mixture of two superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Marta; Recati, Alessio; Stringari, Sandro; Chevy, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    We study the instability of a mixture of two interacting counter-flowing superfluids. For a homogeneous system, we show that superfluid hydrodynamics leads to the existence of a dynamical instability at a critical value of the relative velocity vcr. When the interspecies coupling is small the critical value approaches the value vcr = c1 + c2, given by the sum of the sound velocities of the two uncoupled superfluids, in agreement with the recent prediction of [Y. Castin, I. Ferrier-Barbut, C. Salomon, arXiv:1408.1326 (2014)] based on Landau's argument. The crucial dependence of the critical velocity on the interspecies coupling is explicitly discussed. Our results agree with previous predictions for weakly interacting Bose-Bose mixtures and applies to Bose-Fermi superfluid mixtures as well. Results for the stability of transversally trapped mixtures are also presented.

  8. Quantum Tomography from Incomplete Data via MaxEnt Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bužek, Vladimír

    We show how the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle can be efficiently used for a reconstruction of states of quantum systems from incomplete tomographic data. This MaxEnt reconstruction scheme can be in specific cases several orders of magnitude more efficient than the standard inverse Radon transformation or the reconstruction via direct sampling using pattern functions. We apply the MaxEnt algorithm for a reconstruction of motional quantum states of neutral atoms. As an example we analyze the experimental data obtained by the group of C. Salomon at the ENS in Paris and we reconstruct Wigner functions of motional quantum states of Cs atoms trapped in an optical lattice. We also reconstruct Wigner functions of a cavity field based on a measurement of the parity operator. We analyze in detail experimental data obtained by the group of S. Haroche at the ENS in Paris.

  9. Thanks to Jan Hall from France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréant, Christian

    Dear Jan, Many French researchers are very grateful to you for the time they spent and all they learned with you in Boulder, and of course, some of them were invited to give talks in your honour, but they were not able to attend the symposium on these dates. They asked me to tell you how much they do regret not being here to share with you this very special time. But I can tell you that all of us share all we heard today with respect to your generosity, kindness, etc. I am speaking of people like Jean-Marie Chartier, Christian Borde, Alain Brillet, Christophe Salomon, Christian Chardonnet, Raymond Felder, Olivier Pfister and many more who spent weeks or months from time to time in your world renowned laboratory…

  10. Nodal resonance in a strong standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández C., David J.; Mielnik, Bogdan

    1990-06-01

    The motion of charged particles in a standing electromagnetic wave is considered. For amplitudes that are not too high, the wave causes an effect of attraction of particles to the nodal points, resembling the channeling effect reported by Salomon, Dalibard, Aspect, Metcalf, and Cohen-Tannoudji [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1659 (1987)] consistent with the ``high-frequency potential'' of Kapitza [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 21, 588 (1951)]. For high-field intensities, however, the nodal points undergo a qualitative metamorphosis, converting themselves from particle attractors into resonant centers. Some chaotic phenomena arise and the description of the oscillating field in terms of an ``effective potential'' becomes inappropriate. The question of a correct Floquet Hamiltonian that could describe the standing wave within this amplitude and frequency regime is open.

  11. Chemical data assimilation on air parcels trajectories for Envisat validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirre, M.; Huret, N.; Taupin, F. G.; Moreau, G.; Renard, J.-B.

    2003-08-01

    Balloon chemical instruments have shown to be very useful for the validation of ENVISAT instruments GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY. Nevertheless, it is necessary for that to obtain a very good rendezvous between balloon and satellite instruments. Such rendezvous have often been obtained during the validation campaigns, but for each balloon flight these rendezvous are obtained with only one satellite instrument. Moreover some operational problem could lead to miss the expected rendezvous. The paper presents a first attempt to use the air parcel trajectory concept to use nevertheless such balloon measurements for validation purposes. This concept is applied to the validation of the MIPAS instrument in using the flights of the instruments SALOMON on September 19, 2002 and SPIRALE on October 2, 2002 above Aire sur l'Adour. Difficulties encountered in this work and preliminary conclusions concerning MIPAS validation are given.

  12. An explanatory heuristic gives rise to the belief that words are well suited for their referents.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Shelbie L; Cimpian, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    The mappings between the words of a language and their meanings are arbitrary. There is, for example, nothing inherently dog-like about the word dog. And yet, building on prior evidence (e.g., Brook, 1970; Piaget, 1967), the six studies reported here (N=1062) suggest that both children and (at least to some extent) adults see a special "fit" between objects and their names, as if names were particularly suitable or appropriate for the objects they denote. These studies also provide evidence for a novel proposal concerning the source of these nominal fit beliefs. Specifically, beliefs about nominal fit may be a byproduct of the heuristic processes that people use to make sense of the world more generally (Cimpian & Salomon, 2014a). In sum, the present studies provide new insights into how people conceive of language and demonstrate that these conceptions are rooted in the processes that underlie broader explanatory reasoning.

  13. The Soleil View on Prototypical Organic Nitriles: Selected Vibrational Modes of Ethyl Cyanide, C_2H_5CN, and Spectroscopic Analysis Using AN Automated Spectral Assignment Procedure (asap)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Christian; Caselli, Paola; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.; Pirali, Olivier; Wehres, Nadine; Schlemmer, Stephan; Thorwirth, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Vibrational spectra of small organic nitriles, propionitrile and n-butyronitrile, have been investigated at high spectral resolution at the French national synchroton facility SOLEIL using Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy (< 700 cm-1). The Automated Spectral Assignment Procedure (ASAP) has been used for line assignement and accurate determination of rotational level energies, in particular, of the ν20=1 and the ν12=1 states of propionitrile. The analysis does not only confirm the applicability of the ASAP in the treatment of (dense) high-resolution infrared spectra but also reveals some of its limitations which will be discussed in some detail. M. A. Martin-Drumel, C. P. Endres, O. Zingsheim, T. Salomon, J. van Wijngaarden, O. Pirali, S. Gruet, F. Lewen, S. Schlemmer, M. C. McCarthy, and S. Thorwirth 2015, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 315, 72

  14. Synsedimentary tectonics, mud-mounds and sea-level changes on a Palaeozoic carbonate platform margin: a Devonian Montagne Noire example (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrouilh, Robert; Bourque, Pierre-André; Dansereau, Pauline; Bourrouilh-Le Jan, Françoise; Weyant, Pierre

    1998-06-01

    of Johnson et al. (1985). [Johnson, J.G., Klapper, G., Sanberg, C.A., 1985. Devonian eustatic fluctuations in Euramerica. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 96, 567-587.

  15. The application of eigensymmetries of face forms to X-ray diffraction intensities of crystals twinned by 'reticular merohedry'.

    PubMed

    Klapper, H; Hahn, Th

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an extension of a previous treatment of `twins by merohedry' with full lattice coincidence [Σ = 1, Klapper & Hahn (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 327-346] to `twins by reticular merohedry' with partial lattice coincidence (Σ > 1). Again, the sets of symmetrically equivalent reflections {hkl} are considered as sets of equivalent faces (face forms) {hkl}, and the behaviour of the oriented eigensymmetries of these forms under the action of a twin operation is used to determine the X-ray reflection sets, the intensities of which are affected or not affected by the twinning. The following cases are treated: rhombohedral obverse/reverse Σ3 twins, cubic Σ3 (spinel) twins, tetragonal Σ5 twins (twin elements m'(120), 2'[ ̅210]) and hexagonal Σ7 twins (m'(12 ̅30), 2'[2 ̅10]). For each case the twin laws for all relevant point groups are defined, and the twin diffraction cases A (intensity of twin-related reflection sets not affected), B1 (intensity affected), B2 (intensity affected only by anomalous scattering) and S (single, i.e. non-coincident reflection sets) are derived for all twin laws. A special treatment is provided for the cubic Σ3 twins, where the cubic face forms first have to be split into up to four rhombohedral subforms with a threefold axis along one of the four cube <111> directions, here [111]. These subforms exhibit different twin diffraction cases analogous to those derived for the rhombohedral obverse/reverse Σ3 twins. A complete list of the split forms and their diffraction cases for all cubic point groups and all Σ3 twin elements is given. The application to crystal structure determination of crystals twinned by reticular merohedry and to X-ray topographic mapping of twin domains is discussed.

  16. Distributed resonance self-shielding using the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect

    Altiparmakov, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the equivalence principle to allow distributed resonance self-shielding in a multi-region fuel configuration. Rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability is applied in order to establish equivalence between the actual fuel configuration and a homogeneous mixture of hydrogen and resonant absorber, which is a commonly used model to calculate library tables of resonance integrals. The main steps in derivation are given along with the basic physics assumptions on which the presented approach relies. The method has been implemented in the lattice code WIMS-AECL and routinely used for calculation of CANDU-type reactor lattices. Its capabilities are illustrated by comparison of WIMS-AECL and MCNP results of {sup 238}U resonance capture in a CANDU lattice cell. In order to determine optimal rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability, the calculations were carried out by varying the number of rational terms from 1 to 6. The results show that 4 terms are sufficient. The further increase of the number of terms affects the computing time, while the impact on accuracy is negligible. To illustrate the convergence of the results, the fuel subdivision is gradually refined varying the number of fuel pin subdivisions from 1 to 32 equal-area annuli. The results show very good agreement with the reference MCNP calculation. (authors)

  17. Optimum onset period for training based on maximum peak velocity of height by wavelet interpolation method in Japanese high school athletes.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Demura, Shinichi; Matsuzawa, Jinzaburou

    2005-01-01

    The Wavelet Interpolation Method (WIM) was applied to the longitudinal records of individuals' heights and weights from 6 to 17 years of age (1983 to 1994) in an athlete group (male: 45, female: 50) and a control group (male: 85, female: 85). The criterion of maturity was derived from age at Maximum Peak Velocity (MPV) of height in the control group. Ages at MPV of height and weight were compared between the athletes and control subjects. The WIM was also applied to mean heights from 6.5 to 17.5 years of all the subjects classified by maturation rate in order to derive a model of growth velocity types. Among the athletes, the males were early-maturing and the females tended to be late-maturing. The difference between the ages at MPV of height and weight in males and females was less in the athletes group than in the control group. For the growth velocity model, in the athlete group, three types could be confirmed among the males, and five among the females. By making use of the type models, it was possible to clarify the spans of adolescence as classified by maturation rates, and it was concluded that the period following the age at MPV seems appropriate for the introduction of regular athletic training for each level of maturity.

  18. Hα and [SII] Emission from Warm Ionized Gas in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Gostisha, Martin C.; Barger, Kathleen A.

    2014-06-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [SII] λ6716 and Hα spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310° < l < 345°. Using extinction-corrected Hα intensities (I_{{H} \\alpha }^c), we measure an exponential scale height of electron density squared in the arm of H_{n_e^2}= 0.30 \\, {kpc} (assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc), intermediate between that observed in the inner Galaxy and in the Perseus Arm. The [S II]/Hα line ratio is enhanced at large |z| and in sightlines with faint I_{{H} \\alpha }^c. We find that the [S II]/Hα line ratio has a power-law relationship with I_{{H} \\alpha }^c from a value of ≈1.0 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^c< 0.2 \\, {R} (Rayleighs) to a value of ≈0.08 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^c\\gtrsim 100 \\, {R}. The line ratio is better correlated with Hα intensity than with height above the plane, indicating that the physical conditions within the WIM vary systematically with electron density. We argue that the variation of the line ratio with height is a consequence of the decrease of electron density with height. Our results reinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse Hα emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.

  19. A single mechanism can explain the speed tuning properties of MT and V1 complex neurons.

    PubMed

    Perrone, John A

    2006-11-15

    A recent study by Priebe et al., (2006) has shown that a small proportion (27%) of primate directionally selective, complex V1 neurons are tuned for the speed of image motion. In this study, I show that the weighted intersection mechanism (WIM) model, which was previously proposed to explain speed tuning in middle temporal neurons, can also explain the tuning found in complex V1 neurons. With the addition of a contrast gain mechanism, this model is able to replicate the effects of contrast on V1 speed tuning, a phenomenon that was recently discovered by Priebe et al., (2006). The WIM model simulations also indicate that V1 neuron spatiotemporal frequency response maps may be asymmetrical in shape and hence poorly characterized by the symmetrical two-dimensional Gaussian fitting function used by Priebe et al., (2006) to classify their cells. Therefore, the actual proportion of speed tuning among directional complex V1 cells may be higher than the 27% estimate suggested by these authors.

  20. Economy of scale: a motion sensor with variable speed tuning.

    PubMed

    Perrone, John A

    2005-01-26

    We have previously presented a model of how neurons in the primate middle temporal (MT/V5) area can develop selectivity for image speed by using common properties of the V1 neurons that precede them in the visual motion pathway (J. A. Perrone & A. Thiele, 2002). The motion sensor developed in this model is based on two broad classes of V1 complex neurons (sustained and transient). The S-type neuron has low-pass temporal frequency tuning, p(omega), and the T-type has band-pass temporal frequency tuning, m(omega). The outputs from the S and T neurons are combined in a special way (weighted intersection mechanism [WIM]) to generate a sensor tuned to a particular speed, v. Here I go on to show that if the S and T temporal frequency tuning functions have a particular form (i.e., p(omega)/(m(omega) = k/omega), then a motion sensor with variable speed tuning can be generated from just two V1 neurons. A simple scaling of the S- or T-type neuron output before it is incorporated into the WIM model produces a motion sensor that can be tuned to a wide continuous range of optimal speeds.

  1. A fully integrated microbattery for an implantable microelectromechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, F.; Lin, Y. S.; Blaauw, D.; Sylvester, D. M.; Wise, K. D.; Sastry, A. M.

    The Wireless Integrated Microsystems Engineering Research Center's Intraocular Sensor (WIMS-ERC IOS) was studied as a model system for an integrated, autonomous implantable device. In the present study, we had four objectives: (1) select and designing an optimized power supply for the WIMS-IOS; (2) develop a fabrication technique allowing small scale, low-cost, and integrable fabrication for CMOS systems, and experimentally demonstrate a microscopic power source; (3) map capacity and lifetime of several fabricated microbatteries; (4) determine the effects of miniaturization on capacity, lifetime and device architecture. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) was used to deposit thin layers (≤1 μm) of metal sequentially onto glass substrates (SiO 2, as used in the device). To map the influence of size over cell capacity and cycle life, we fabricated and tested five stand-alone cells using a Solartron ® 1470E battery tester and a Maccor ® 4000 series tester. A sixth battery was fabricated to investigate the effects of system integration, variable discharge rate and size reduction simultaneously. The highest experimental capacity among the larger cells O(cm 2) was 100 μAh, achieved by IOS-C-1 at 250 μA (1.4 C) discharge. Among O(mm 2) cells, IOS-M-1 achieved the highest capacity (2.75 μAh, ∼76% of theoretical) at 2.5 μA discharge (0.7 C rate).

  2. POWER (power optimization for wireless energy requirements): A MATLAB based algorithm for design of hybrid energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. A.; Albano, F.; Nevius, P. E.; Sastry, A. M.

    We have expanded and implemented an algorithm for selecting power supplies into a turnkey MATLAB code, "POWER" (power optimization for wireless energy requirements). Our algorithm uses three approaches to system design, specifying either: (1) a single, aggregate power profile; (2) a power system designed to satisfy several power ranges (micro-, milli- and Watt); or (3) a power system designed to be housed within specified spaces within the system. POWER was verified by conducting two case studies on hearing prosthetics: the TICA (LZ 3001) (Baumann group at the Tübingen University) and Amadeus cochlear implant (CI) (WIMS-ERC at the University of Michigan) based on a volume constraint of 2 cm 3. The most suitable solution identified by POWER for the TICA device came from Approach 1, wherein one secondary cell provided 26,000 cycles of 16 h operation. POWER identified Approach 2 as the solution for the WIMS-ERC Amadeus CI, which consisted of 1 cell for the microWatt power range and 1 cell for the milliWatt range (4.43 cm 3, ∼55% higher than the target volume), and provided 3280 cycles of 16 h operation (including re-charge of the batteries). Future work will be focused on continuously improving our present tool.

  3. Nuclear data libraries assessment for modelling a small fluoride salt-cooled, high-temperature reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Hassan; Lindley, Benjamin; Parks, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear data consists of measured or evaluated probabilities of various fundamental physical interactions involving the nuclei of atoms and their properties. Most fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) studies that were reviewed do not give detailed information on the data libraries used in their assessments. Therefore, the main objective of this data libraries comparison study is to investigate whether there are any significant discrepancies between main data libraries, namely ENDF/B-VII, JEFF-3.1 and JEF-2.2. Knowing the discrepancies, especially its magnitude, is important and relevant for readers as to whether further cautions are necessary for any future verification or validation processes when modelling an FHR. The study is performed using AMEC's reactor physics software tool, WIMS. The WIMS calculation is simply a 2-D infinite lattice of fuel assembly calculation. The comparison between the data libraries in terms of infinite multiplication factor, kinf and pin power map are presented. Results show that the discrepancy between JEFF-3.1 and ENDF/B-VII libraries is reasonably small but increases as the fuel depletes due to the data libraries uncertainties that are accumulated at each burnup step. Additionally, there are large discrepancies between JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VII because of the inadequacy of the JEF-2.2 library.

  4. Impact of spatial inhomogeneities on stratospheric species vertical profiles from remote-sensing balloon-borne instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, Gwenael; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Catoire, Valery; Huret, Nathalie; Lefevre, Franck; Hauchecorne, Alain; Chartier, Michel; Robert, Claude

    Remote-sensing balloon observations have recurrently revealed high concentrations of polar stratospheric NO2 in particular in the lower stratosphere as can be seen in various published vertical profiles. A balloon campaign dedicated to the investigation of this problem through comparisons between remote-sensing (SALOMON) and in situ (SPIRALE) measurements of NO2 inside the polar vortex was conducted in January 2006. The published results show unexpected strong enhancements in the slant column densities of NO2 with respect to the elevation angle and displacement of the balloon. These fluctuations result from NO2 spatial inhomogeneities located above the balloon float altitude resulting from mid-latitude air intrusion as revealed by Potential Vorticity (PV) maps. The retrieval of the NO2 vertical profile is subsequently biased in the form of artificial excesses of NO2 concentrations. A direct implication is that the differences previously observed between measurements of NO2 and OClO and model results are probably mostly due to the improper inversion of NO2 in presence of either perturbed dynamical conditions or when mesospheric production events occur as recently highlighted from ENVISAT data. Through the occurrence of such events, we propose to re-examine formerly published high-latitude profiles from the remote-sensing instruments AMON and SALOMON using in parallel PV maps from the MIMOSA advection contour model and the REPROBUS CTM outputs. Mid-latitude profiles of NO2 will also be investigated since they are likely to be biased if presence of air from other latitudes was present at the time of the observations.

  5. Tuberculosis notifications, characteristics and treatment outcomes: urban vs. rural Solomon Islands, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Itogo, N; Hill, P C; Bissell, K; Harries, A D; Viney, K; Gounder, S

    2014-06-21

    Contexte : Toutes les unités provinciales de prise en charge de la tuberculose (TB) dans les îles Salomon.Objectif : Comparer la notification, les caractéristiques et les résultats du traitement de la TB dans les zones urbaines par rapport aux zones rurales.Schéma : Etude rétrospective de cohorte impliquant une revue des dossiers et extraction de données des registres de TB provinciaux, ceux des laboratoires et les dossiers des patients (2000–2011).Résultats : Un total de 4137 cas de TB ont été notifiés, dont 1364 (33%) venaient de zones urbaines et 3327 (67%) de zones rurales. Le taux de notification annuel était régulièrement plus élevé en zone urbaine (104–150/100 000) que dans les zones rurales (49–70/100 000). Les patients des zones rurales avaient plus souvent des frottis négatifs et moins souvent une TB extra pulmonaire (P < 0,001). Les patients ruraux mouraient plus souvent que les patients urbains (3,2% vs. 5.9%). Par contre, les patients ruraux abandonnaient moins souvent leur traitement (2,8% vs. 1,8%).Conclusion : Les taux de notification de TB étaient plus élevés dans les zones urbaines que rurales dans les îles Salomon. Les patients ruraux mouraient plus souvent, mais abandonnaient moins souvent leur traitement. Des recherches plus avancées sont requises pour vérifier la possibilité de sous-notification dans les zones rurales et améliorer les résultats du traitement.

  6. Using Runaway O Stars to Probe the Intercloud Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissing, S.; Bruhweiler, F.

    2001-12-01

    The intercloud medium (ICM) constitutes the largest volume fraction of the interstellar medium, yet the nature of the gas comprising the ICM is undetermined. The Local Bubble, in which the Sun and the local cloud complex are immersed, is filled by hot gas (HG) with T 106 K and n 10-2.5 cm-3, but this HG may be atypical of the ICM. Diffuse Galactic H-alpha and forbidden line emission present strong evidence that the ICM, at larger distances, consists largely of a warm, ionized medium (WIM) with T ~ 104 K and n 0.1 cm-3. Theory predicts ISM filling factors of 0.7 for the WIM and less than 0.2 for the HG. In a pilot study, we have used IUE and HST data to probe interstellar C IV and Si IV toward 5 runaway O stars in the Galactic plane that are also well away from recognized H II regions. The stars used in this study were HD 39680 (06 V), HD 210839 (06 I), HD 12993 (06.5 V), HD 13268 (07 V) and HD 30614 (09.5 Ia). Three of the five stars reveal column density upper limits that are factors of 100-500 below CLOUDY predictions that assume these species are due to stellar photoionization and that the O stars are embedded in an uniform WIM. The O star winds are expected to carve out evacuated cavites with denser shells or low-velocity bowshocks around the observed stars. This leads to dramatically reduced C IV and Si IV column densities. The hot cavities produced by the stellar winds of these very stars act to increase the filling factor for the HG component to the ICM. It is still premature to extrapolate from this small sample. Yet, a simple interpretation points to a much larger filling factor for the HG. Taking the observed diffuse Galactic emission and these results together implies a far more complex picture for the ICM than presently envisioned. More detailed interpretations of these results are discussed.

  7. The Ionization Structure of Sharpless 2-264: Multiwavelength Observations of the λ Ori H II Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahan, M.; Haffner, L. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present velocity-resolved maps taken with the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) in Hα, [S ii] λ 6716, and [N ii] λ 6583 around the well-known O8 III star λ Ori A (HD 36861) ({\\ell }=185^\\circ to 205^\\circ ,b=-24^\\circ to -1^\\circ ). The integrated intensity ({v}{{LSR}}=-80 to +80 km s-1), {I}{{H}α }, within WHAM’s one-degree beams varies from ˜190 R near the center to ˜10 R on the periphery of the nebula where it becomes comparable to foreground and/or background emission in this complex region. Intensity ratios for [N ii]/Hα and [S ii]/Hα average 0.28 and 0.35, respectively. In both ratios, higher values are found preferentially at larger radii from λ Ori, although the behavior of [N ii]/Hα is complicated near the edges of the nebula. The [S ii]/[N ii] intensity ratio ranges from ˜0.5 to ˜1.0, with the value increasing toward larger radii (and lower Hα intensities). Variations of the [S ii]/Hα, [N ii]/Hα, and [S ii]/[N ii] line ratios in this diffuse region show some similar trends to those seen in the warm ionized medium (WIM) but with generally lower metal-line ratios. As with the WIM, the trends are driven by changes in the underlying physical parameters, most notably the ionization states and gas temperature. To investigate which cause might be dominant in this region, we use these extremely high signal-to-noise observations to construct a map of temperature and non-thermal velocity throughout the nebula. Using the line widths of Hα and [S ii], we separate thermal and non-thermal components and find spatial trends of these parameters within the nebula. Ion temperatures range between 4000 and 8000 K throughout the nebula. The non-thermal velocity map reveals a decrease in velocity from about 10 to 5 km s-1 from the center to the edge of the lower half of the H ii region. In addition to using the widths as a measure of temperature, we also use the variation in [N ii]/Hα to estimate electron temperature. The results obtained from this

  8. WWER-1000 core and reflector parameters investigation in the LR-0 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, S. M.; Alekseev, N. I.; Bolshagin, S. N.; Riazanov, D. K.; Lichadeev, V. V.; Ocmera, B.; Cvachovec, F.

    2006-07-01

    Measurements and calculations carried out in the core and reflector of WWER-1000 mock-up are discussed: - the determination of the pin-to-pin power distribution in the core by means of gamma-scanning of fuel pins and pin-to-pin calculations with Monte Carlo code MCU-REA and diffusion codes MOBY-DICK (with WIMS-D4 cell constants preparation) and RADAR - the fast neutron spectra measurements by proton recoil method inside the experimental channel in the core and inside the channel in the baffle, and corresponding calculations in P{sub 3}S{sub 8} approximation of discrete ordinates method with code DORT and BUGLE-96 library - the neutron spectra evaluations (adjustment) in the same channels in energy region 0.5 eV-18 MeV based on the activation and solid state track detectors measurements. (authors)

  9. Study on POT model of vehicle load under toll-by-weight mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. P.; Xu, W. X.; Huang, D. Z.

    2017-04-01

    The overload and overweight operations of vehicles in expressway are particularly serious in China recently. Research on the extreme maximum value of the vehicle loads is an urgent problem in the bridge design. On the basis of statistical analysis of the WIM data from Yu-Zhan Expressway under toll-by-weight mode in Guangdong Province, the POT probability model of gross weight of the vehicle was established by the extreme value theory. It can predict the probability distribution of operating vehicle loads in any recurrence period. Results showed that the overweight vehicles were not accidental, and there may be heavier vehicles in the future. It is necessary to improve and modify the current toll-by-weight charging policy.

  10. Direct Localization Algorithm of White-light Interferogram Center Based on the Weighted Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Seichi; Kurihara, Toru; Ando, Shigeru

    This paper proposes an exact direct method to determine all parameters including an envelope peak of the white-light interferogram. A novel mathematical technique, the weighted integral method (WIM), is applied that starts from the characteristic differential equation of the target signal, interferogram in this paper, to obtain the algebraic relation among the finite-interval weighted integrals (observations) of the signal and the waveform parameters (unknowns). We implemented this method using FFT and examined through various numerical simulations. The results show the method is able to localize the envelope peak very accurately even if it is not included in the observed interval. The performance comparisons reveal the superiority of the proposed algorithm over conventional algorithms in all terms of accuracy, efficiency, and estimation range.

  11. Antenna Efficiency and the Genius of the IEEE Standard for Antenna Terms [Education Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, Karl F.

    2012-08-01

    At a 2007 Square Kilometre Array Design Studies (SKADS) workshop in Dwingeloo, Wim van Cappellen of the Nether lands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON) gave a presentation on figures of merit, in which he memorably compared antenna terms to apples. What seems like a simple, homogeneous fruit comes in all colors and varieties. Similarly, a survey of antenna literature and textbooks shows that authors use a wide variety of antenna figures of merit, often not in compliance with the relevant IEEE Standard Definitions of Terms for Antennas [1]. Since this standard is now in the process of revision by the Antennas and Propagation Society Antenna Standards Committee, it seems worth while to consider the standard, and clarify some common misunderstandings and inconsistent usages.

  12. Dosimetry aspects of the new Canadian MAPLE-X10 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstone, R.F.; Wilkin, G.B.

    1994-12-31

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is building the 10-MW{sub t} MAPLE-X10 reactor facility as a dedicated producer of medical and industrial radioisotopes. Dosimetry aspects of the MAPLE-X10 nuclear design include the calculated thermal and fast neutron flux distributions throughout the reactor assembly and the rate of heat generation in reactor materials and components. Examples of the resolution of design issues are also presented, such as the use of fission counters and ion chambers to provide diverse methods of detecting neutron flux levels and the use of the difference between photon and neutron signals to guard against the effects of downgrading of the heavy-water reflector. Computer codes employed in the calculations include MCNP, ONEDANT, WIMS-AECL, and 3DDT.

  13. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of THz Coherent Transition Radiation from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, D.; Messmer, P.; Cary, J. R.; Leemans, W. P.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.; Geddes, C.; van Tilborg, J.; Shadwick, B.

    2004-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) concepts are characterized by ultra-high gradients and ultra-short (tens of fs) bunch lengths. Non-invasive bunch-length diagnostics, at or very near the plasma exit, are key to continuing the rapid advances in LWFA technology. These short bunches can radiate strongly at THz frequencies via coherent transition radiation (CTR) as they exit the plasma [1]. Careful measurements of the THz spectrum will provide the necessary bunch-length diagnostic [2], once the effects of various secondary complications have been quantified. Particle-in-cell simulations, using the VORPAL code [3] are being used to characterize CTR emitted from a self-modulated LWFA. The status of this on-going work will be presented. [1] Wim Leemans et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 074802-1 (2003). [2] C. Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E 69, 016501 (2004). [3] C. Nieter and J. Cary, J. Comp. Phys. 196, 488 (2004).

  14. Andrews AFB, Washington DC Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-15

    8217 . Obs. me" me. of Now $ Wilk ’rompateteh Ra.. "Io. 0 F 32 -67F _73_ &$POP 93 F TeToi P Itn ~ 0.. P .2.. _ ___.._____m ,~r, GL..BAL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH U...m. of Homes wIui Tompem.... Rai. Nwe. 5380 69 4614.64 93 sft P 322 -F- 57p .-732P cup .-F-92P- T-1e U, Dy 161b 31408014 5586 60. 7.5 9301 93 W.. 1.1b...25 25 25 2912111/23 25 2 II 9 6 -’ 21 . . :J 1" 3 260 ( > / 19 a * - 8 18 221 Elamen (X) U r Ne. Obs. MAb Ne. of Now @ wim Tem twuo($11 v 32eNu.S0 P

  15. Validation of the ORIGEN-S code for predicting radionuclide inventories in used CANDU fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, J. C.; Gauld, I.; Kerr, A. H.

    1995-05-01

    The safety assessment being conducted by AECL Research for the concept of deep geological disposal of used CANDU UO 2 fuel requires the calculation of radionuclide inventories in the fuel to provide source terms for radionuclide release. This report discusses the validation of selected actinide and fission-product inventories calculated using the ORIGEN-S code coupled with the WIMS-AECL lattice code, using data from analytical measurements of radioisotope inventories in Pickering CANDU reactor fuel. The recent processing of new ENDF/B-VI cross-section data has allowed the ORIGEN-S calculations to be performed using the most up-to-date nuclear data available. The results indicate that the code is reliably predicting actinide and the majority of fission-product inventories to within the analytical uncertainty.

  16. On-line application of the PANTHER advanced nodal code

    SciTech Connect

    Hutt, P.K.; Knight, M.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Over the last few years, Nuclear Electric has developed an integrated core performance code package for both light water reactors (LWRs) and advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) that can perform a comprehensive range of calculations for fuel cycle design, safety analysis, and on-line operational support for such plants. The package consists of the following codes: WIMS for lattice physics, PANTHER whole reactor nodal flux and AGR thermal hydraulics, VIPRE for LWR thermal hydraulics, and ENIGMA for fuel performance. These codes are integrated within a UNIX-based interactive system called the Reactor Physics Workbench (RPW), which provides an interactive graphic user interface and quality assurance records/data management. The RPW can also control calculational sequences and data flows. The package has been designed to run both off-line and on-line accessing plant data through the RPW.

  17. Wave-ice interactions in the neXtSIM sea-ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Timothy D.; Rampal, Pierre; Bouillon, Sylvain

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we describe a waves-in-ice model (WIM), which calculates ice breakage and the wave radiation stress (WRS). This WIM is then coupled to the new sea-ice model neXtSIM, which is based on the elasto-brittle (EB) rheology. We highlight some numerical issues involved in the coupling and investigate the impact of the WRS, and of modifying the EB rheology to lower the stiffness of the ice in the area where the ice has broken up (the marginal ice zone or MIZ). In experiments in the absence of wind, we find that wind waves can produce noticeable movement of the ice edge in loose ice (concentration around 70 %) - up to 36 km, depending on the material parameters of the ice that are used and the dynamical model used for the broken ice. The ice edge position is unaffected by the WRS if the initial concentration is higher (≳ 0.9). Swell waves (monochromatic waves with low frequency) do not affect the ice edge location (even for loose ice), as they are attenuated much less than the higher-frequency components of a wind wave spectrum, and so consequently produce a much lower WRS (by about an order of magnitude at least).In the presence of wind, we find that the wind stress dominates the WRS, which, while large near the ice edge, decays exponentially away from it. This is in contrast to the wind stress, which is applied over a much larger ice area. In this case (when wind is present) the dynamical model for the MIZ has more impact than the WRS, although that effect too is relatively modest. When the stiffness in the MIZ is lowered due to ice breakage, we find that on-ice winds produce more compression in the MIZ than in the pack, while off-ice winds can cause the MIZ to be separated from the pack ice.

  18. The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, L. Matthew; Reynolds, Ronald J.; Babler, Brian L.; Madsen, Gregory J.; Hill, Alex S.; Barger, Kathleen; Jaehnig, Kurt P.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J.; Percival, Jeffrey W.; Chopra, Nitish; Pingel, Nickolas; Reese, Daniel T.; Gostisha, Martin; Wunderlin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    We present the first all-sky, kinematic survey of Hα from the Milky Way, combining survey observations taken with the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) from Kitt Peak (1997-2007) and Cerro Tololo (2009-present). The WHAM Sky Survey (WHAM-SS) reaches sensitivity levels of about 0.1 R (EM ~ 0.2 pc cm^-6) with emission detected toward every direction in the sky. Each pointing of the survey comprises a spatially integrated spectrum from a one-degree beam on the sky covering at least 200 km/s around the Local Standard of Rest with 12 km/s spectral resolution. WHAM was designed primarily to study the pervasive warm ionized medium (WIM) component of the interstellar medium (ISM) but also reveals many large-scale, locally-ionized regions throughout the Galaxy. The WIM is a diffuse but thick component of the ISM that extends several kiloparsecs into the Galactic halo with a kinematic signature that traces the gaseous spiral arms of the Galaxy. In addition to this fairly smooth global emission, the Hα sky contains many individual H II regions and supernova remnants, a few revealed in the WHAM-SS for the first time. Some locations are dominated by complex filamentary network of diffuse ionized gas where the ISM has been shaped by past winds and supernovae and is now powered by a new wave of star formation. At high latitudes, faint emission from intermediate-velocity clouds is also regularly present. The success of WHAM as a fully remote observing facility for nearly two decades is due in no small part to the excellent and responsive support staff at KPNO in Arizona and CTIO in Chile. WHAM has been designed, built, and operated primarily through support of the National Science Foundation. The current research presented here is funded by award AST-1108911.

  19. CONSTRAINING SPINNING DUST PARAMETERS WITH THE WMAP FIVE-YEAR DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Dobler, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Draine, Bruce

    2009-07-10

    We characterize spinning dust emission in the warm ionized medium (WIM) by comparing templates of Galactic dust and H{alpha} with the five-year maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). The H{alpha}-correlated microwave emission deviates from the thermal bremsstrahlung (free-free) spectrum expected for ionized gas, exhibiting an additional broad bump peaked at {approx}40 GHz which provides {approx}20% of the peak intensity. We confirm that the bump is consistent with a modified Draine and Lazarian spinning dust model, though the peak frequency of the emission is somewhat lower than the 50 GHz previously claimed. This frequency shift results from systematic errors in the large-scale modes of the three-year WMAP data which have been corrected in the five-year data release. We show that the bump is not the result of errors in the H{alpha} template by analyzing regions of high free-free intensity, where the WMAP K-band map may be used as the free-free template. We rule out a pure free-free spectrum for the H{alpha}-correlated emission at high confidence: {approx}27{sigma} for the nearly full-sky fit, even after marginalizing over the cosmic microwave background cross-correlation bias. We also extend the previous analysis by searching the parameter space of the Draine and Lazarian model but letting the amplitude float. The best fit for reasonable values of the characteristic electric dipole moment and density requires an amplitude factor of {approx}0.3. This suggests that small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the WIM are depleted by a factor of {approx}3.

  20. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  1. Herschel Galactic Plane Survey of [NII] Fine Structure Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10-8-10-7 Wm-2 sr-1 level over the range -60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10-50 cm-3 with an average value of 29 cm-3 and N+ column densities 1016-1017 cm-2. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  2. The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, S.; Fich, M.; Taylor, R.

    1999-01-01

    A summary of research activities carried out in this eighth and final progress report. The final report includes: this summary document, copies of three published research papers, plus a draft manuscript of a fourth research paper entitled "The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the FarInfrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way; Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo around the W4 Chimney/Supershell." The main activity during the final quarterly reporting period was research on W4, including analysis of the radio and far-infrared images, generation of shell models, a literature search, and preparation of a research manuscript. There will be additional consultation with co-authors prior to submission of the paper to the Astrophysical Journal. The results will be presented at the 4th Tetons Summer Conference on "Galactic Structure, Stars, and the ISM" in May 2000. In this fourth and last paper we show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis shows there is dense interstellar material directly below the shell, evidence that that the lower W4 shell "ran into a brick wall" and stalled, whereas the upper W4 shell achieved "breakout" to form a Galactic chimney. An ionized halo is evidence of Lyman continuum leakage which ionizes the WIM (warm ionized medium). It has long been postulated that the strong winds and abundant ionizing photons from massive stars are responsible for much of the large scale structure in the interstellar medium (ISM), including the ISM in other galaxies. However standard HII region theory predicts few photons will escape the local HII region. The significance of W4 and this work is it provides a direct example of how stellar winds power a galactic chimney, which in turn leads to a low density cavity from which ionizing photons can escape to large distances to ionize the WIM.

  3. Shortening rates at the mountain front of the Andean Precordillera (Argentina) on timescales of millions, thousands and a few years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, E.; Mechernich, S.; Hetzel, R.; Mingorance, F.; Ramos, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    The eastern margin of the Andean Precordillera between 30 and 33°S is one of the most seismically active regions in the world and indicated several destructive earthquakes, e.g. a MS ~7.0 event destroyed Mendoza city in 1861. Modeled GPS data revealed a short-term shortening rate of ~2-5 mm/a at the wider Andean mountain front at 32-33°S (Brooks et al., 2003; Kendrick et al., 2006). Using only GPS stations directly east and west of the mountain front near Mendoza (33°S) results in a shortening of 2.8 ± 1.3 mm/a (Salomon et al., in rev.), implying that this rate is accommodated by the respective active frontal thrust. To investigate the significance of this GPS rate on longer timescales and to account for its accommodation on specific faults, we studied two range-bounding thrust faults near Mendoza, the 48-km-long Peñas and the 31-km-long Cal thrust, using fault scarp profiles, paleoseismic trenching and age determinations of the deformed terraces T1-T4. Fault scarps on the lowest terrace level T1 reveal vertical offsets of 0.8-1.0 m for both faults, which are interpreted as coseismic displacements during the last earthquakes (Mw~6.9). Older terraces show stepwise increasing cumulative offsets, indicating that elastic strain energy was repeatedly released during strong earthquakes. For example at the Peñas thrust the ~3.3-ka-old terrace T2 is offset by ~1.9 m and the ~12-ka-old terrace T3 is displaced by ~11 m (Schmidt et al., 2011). Thus, shortening along the Peñas thrust occurred at a rather constant rate of ~2.0 mm/a during the past ~12 ka; i.e. at a similar value as the present-day shortening at the mountain front. In contrast, the Cal thrust fault, which extends into Mendoza, indicates a shortening rate that accelerated recently from ≥0.9 mm/a to ~5.4 mm/a since three terraces vertically offset by ~2.6, ~3.6, and ~7.0 m, yielded ages of ~0.8 ka (OSL), ~3.9 ka (14C), and ≤12 ka (10Be) (Schmidt et al., 2011). However, caution is needed when regarding

  4. Fast hydrodynamic model for medium- and long-term dispersion in seawater in the English Channel and southern North Sea, qualitative and quantitative validation by radionuclide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Bois, P. Bailly; Dumas, F.

    The database for medium- and long-term model validation using 125Sb released by the La Hague reprocessing plant includes 1400 measurements performed between 1987 and 1994 in the English Channel and the North Sea and data for each release since 1982. Antimony-125 has a conservative behaviour in water masses over a period of several years. These data can be used qualitatively and quantitatively to compare the measured concentrations with the calculated ones and quantities of tracers. Tritium measurements are also available for model calibration. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model has been developed to allow repetitive long-term simulations. This model uses a database of residual tidal currents calculated using the Lagrangian barycentric method [Salomon, J.C., Guéguéniat, P., Orbi, A., Baron, Y., 1988. A Lagrangian model for long-term tidally induced transport and mixing. Verification by artificial radionuclide concentrations. In: Guary, J.C., Guéguéniat, P., Pentreath, R.J. (Eds.), Radionuclides: A Tool for Oceanography, Cherbourg 1-5 June, 1987. Elsevier Applied Science Publishers, London, New York, pp. 384-394]. The area covered by the model includes the English Channel, the southern North Sea and the Irish Sea with a mesh size of 1 km. The main adjustment parameters of this model are the sources of wind data used and the calculation method for evaluating wind stress at the sea surface. With these parameters, the fluxes of radionuclides and water masses in the English Channel and the North Sea were balanced for the whole period of field measurements (1987-1994). The correlation factor between individual measurements in seawater and calculation results is 0.88 with an average error of ±54%, the error attributable to the measurement process being 15% on average. The mean flux through the Dover Strait is 126,000 m 3 s -1, close from the one obtained from previous studies [Salomon, J.C., Breton, M., Guéguéniat, P. 1993. Computed residual flow through the Dover

  5. Predictors of scientific understanding of middle school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strate, Joshua Matthew

    The purpose of this study was to determine if middle school student scientific understanding could be predicted by the variables: standardized 5th grade score in science, standardized 5th grade score in mathematics, standardized 5th grade score in reading, student attitude towards science, socioeconomic status, gender, and ethnicity. The areas of the comprehensive literature review were trends in science learning and teaching, research in the K-12 science education arena, what factors have influenced K-12 science education, scientific understanding, what research has been done on K-12 scientific understanding, and what factors have influenced science understanding in the K-12 arenas. Based on the results of the literature review, the researcher of this study examined a sample of middle school 8th grade students. An Attitude Towards Science Survey (SATS) Simpson & Oliver (1990) and a Survey of Scientific Understandings (Klapper, DeLucia, & Trent, 1993) were administered to these 116 middle school 8th grade students drawn from a total population of 1109 who attend this middle school in a typical county in Florida during the 2010- 2011 school year. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test each sub-hypothesis and to provide a model that attempted to predict student scientific understanding. Seven null sub-hypotheses were formed to determine if there were significant relationships between student scientific understanding and the abovementioned variables. The results of the tests of the seven null sub-hypotheses showed that the sub-hypothesis that involved socioeconomic status was rejected, which indicated that the socioeconomic status of a family does influence the level of scientific understanding of a student. Low SES students performed lower on the scientific understanding survey, on average, than high SES students. This study can be a source of information for teachers in low-income schools by recognizing potential areas of concern for low

  6. The Emsian - Eifelian (Lower - Middle Devonian) boundary occurs in a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum: A potentially useful secondary marker for the GSSP section (Wetteldorf Richtschnitt, Germany).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vleeschouwer, D.; Makarona, C.; Linnemann, U.; Königshof, P.; Claeys, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    A Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) of a stage is chosen such that it can be accurately correlated with widely separated sections. To make such correlation, one can use the primary marker (usually the first appearance of a species). However, more often than not, secondary markers of chemo-, magneto-, cyclo- or biostratigraphic nature prove useful in establishing accurate and precise correlations. The GSSP for the Emsian - Eifelian stage boundary is exposed in the Wetteldorf Richtschnitt, in the Eifel Hill in Germany. The Emsian-Eifelian boundary is defined by the first occurrence of the conodont Polygnathus costatus partitus (Ziegler and Klapper, 1985). However, no secondary markers are currently available for this GSSP section. Our aim is to construct a cyclostratigraphic framework for this GSSP section, and thus to facilitate future correlations. Therefore, we collected 4-cm spaced elemental data of an 8.65 m thick interval, using a Bruker Tracer handheld XRF. We complemented our data with previously-published magnetic susceptibility (MS) data (Ellwood et al., 2006). A strong anti-correlation exists between the calcium-iron ratio (Ca/Fe) and the MS data. These variations mainly reflect the lithological variability between carbonate-poor mud- and siltstones and argillaceous limestone beds or calcareous sandstones. These proxies, as well as Ti/Al and K/Al, reflect strong 0.5 - 1 m periodicity. However, the orbital calibration of this dominant periodicity is challenged by the few time constraints available for the studied section. To circumvent this problem, we apply the evolutive average spectral misfit method (eASM; Meyers and Sageman, 2007) to the 4 different proxy records. This method tests the null hypothesis of no orbital signal and provides an estimate of sedimentation rate throughout the section. For all proxies, the eASM method provides similar results and we use the obtained sedimentation rates to convert stratigraphic height into time

  7. Use of Z-scores to select a fetal biometric reference curve.

    PubMed

    Sananes, N; Guigue, V; Kohler, M; Bouffet, N; Cancellier, M; Hornecker, F; Hunsinger, M C; Kohler, A; Mager, C; Neumann, M; Schmerber, E; Tanghe, M; Nisand, I; Favre, R

    2009-10-01

    Fetal biometric data are a major part of prenatal ultrasound screening in the general population. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of choice of reference curve on the quality of screening for growth abnormalities, using a statistical tool based on Z-scores. The biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC), abdominal circumference (AC) and femur length (FL) were measured in 9699 ultrasound scans during the second trimester (20-24 weeks of gestation) and 8100 scans during the third trimester (30-34 weeks of gestation). These biometric data were all transformed retrospectively into Z-scores, calculated using five reference curves: those published by Snijders and Nicolaides (1994), Chitty et al. (1994), Kurmanavicius et al. (1999) and Salomon et al. (2006), and curves used at our ultrasound unit generated from a sample of the local population. The Z-score distribution was compared with the expected normal distribution by calculation of the mean and SD, and using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The sensitivity and specificity of each reference curve were calculated to determine the capacity of these curves to identify fetuses with measurements < 5(th) percentile or > 95(th) percentile for each parameter. Most of the distribution curves determined from the Z-scores of the measurements taken differed significantly from a non-skewed standard normal curve (mean of 0 and SD of 1). In our population, the Chitty reference curves gave the best results for identifying fetuses with abnormal (< 5(th) percentile or > 95(th) percentile) BPD (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 97.24%), HC (sensitivity, 96.07%; specificity, 98.89%) and FL (sensitivity, 96.46%; specificity, 98.80%). The best reference for AC was the Salomon curve (sensitivity, 72.25%; specificity, 99.64%). Checking for good concordance between the study population and chosen reference data is a key initial step in quality control. Z-scores are a simple tool for evaluating the performance of each

  8. Burnett description for plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, F. J.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    1999-10-01

    Two recent works have shown that at small Knudsen number (K) the pressure and temperature profiles in plane Poiseuille flow exhibit a different qualitative behavior from the profiles obtained by the Navier-Stokes equations. Tij and Santos [J. Stat. Phys. 76, 1399 (1994)] used the Bhatnagar-Gross-Kook model to show that the temperature profile is bimodal and the pressure profile is nonconstant. Malek-Mansour, Baras, and Garcia [Physica A 240, 255 (1997)] qualitatively confirmed these predictions in computer experiments using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). In this paper we compare the DSMC measurements of hydrodynamic variables and non-equilibrium fluxes with numerical solutions of the Burnett equations. Given that they are in better agreement with molecular-dynamics simulations [E. Salomons and M. Mareschal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 269 (1992)] of strong shock waves than Navier-Stokes [F. J. Uribe, R. M. Velasco, and L. S. García-Colín, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2044 (1998)], and that they are second order in Knudsen number suggests that the Burnett equations may provide a better description for large K. We find that for plane Poiseuille flow the Burnett equations do not predict the bimodal temperature profile but do recover many of the other anomalous features (e.g., nonconstant pressure and nonzero parallel heat flux).

  9. Burnett description for plane Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F J; Garcia, A L

    1999-10-01

    Two recent works have shown that at small Knudsen number (K) the pressure and temperature profiles in plane Poiseuille flow exhibit a different qualitative behavior from the profiles obtained by the Navier-Stokes equations. Tij and Santos [J. Stat. Phys. 76, 1399 (1994)] used the Bhatnagar-Gross-Kook model to show that the temperature profile is bimodal and the pressure profile is nonconstant. Malek-Mansour, Baras, and Garcia [Physica A 240, 255 (1997)] qualitatively confirmed these predictions in computer experiments using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). In this paper we compare the DSMC measurements of hydrodynamic variables and non-equilibrium fluxes with numerical solutions of the Burnett equations. Given that they are in better agreement with molecular-dynamics simulations [E. Salomons and M. Mareschal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 269 (1992)] of strong shock waves than Navier-Stokes [F. J. Uribe, R. M. Velasco, and L. S. García-Colín, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2044 (1998)], and that they are second order in Knudsen number suggests that the Burnett equations may provide a better description for large K. We find that for plane Poiseuille flow the Burnett equations do not predict the bimodal temperature profile but do recover many of the other anomalous features (e.g., nonconstant pressure and nonzero parallel heat flux).

  10. Ezetimibe. Schering-Plough.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q

    2002-03-01

    Ezetimibe (Sch-58235) is a cholesterol absorption inhibitor under development by Schering-Plough (SP), in collaboration with Merck, for the potential treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In late December 2001, the companies filed an NDA in the US for this indication. SP is studying ezetimibe as a monotherapy for lowering lipid levels, and also in combination with commonly used statins therapies. The company believes that ezetimibe will have additive effects with the statins, inhibiting the absorption of cholesterol in the intestine, while the statins work by inhibiting the production of cholesterol in the liver. In May 2000, SP and Merck signed an agreementfor the codevelopment of ezetimibe covering its uses as a monotherapy, in combination with statins, and as a fixed combination with simvastatin. In December 2001, Merck and SP expanded their partnership launched in the US in 2000, to develop and market ezetimibe. In August and September 2001, Credit Suisse First Boston predicted ezetimibe sales of US $420 million in 2003 and US $959 million in 2004. Analysts at Salomon Smith Barney predicted in November 2001 that the product would be launched in 2003.

  11. Assertion and validation of the performance of the B3LYP(sup [small star, filled]) functional for the first transition metal row and the G2 test set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Oliver; Reiher, Markus; Hess, Bernd Artur

    2002-09-01

    The exact exchange part in hybrid density functionals is analyzed with respect to the prediction of ground state multiplicities. It has been found [M. Reiher, O. Salomon, and B. A. Hess, Theor. Chem. Acc., 107, 48 (2001)] that pure and hybrid density functionals yield energy splittings between high-spin and low-spin states of Fe-sulfur complexes that differ by more than 100 kJ/mol and thus fail to reliably predict the correct multiplicity of the ground state. This deviation can lead to meaningless reaction energetics for metal-catalyzed reactions. The finding that the energy splitting depends linearly on the exact exchange admixture parameter led to a new parametrization of the B3LYP functional which was dubbed B3LYP(sup [small star, filled]). In the present paper we investigate the generality and transferability of this functional. We study the extent to which the exact exchange admixture affects the thermochemistry validated with respect to the reference data set of molecules from the G2 test set. Metallocenes and bis(benzene) metal complexes of the first transition metal period are chosen to test the transferability of the findings for Fe-sulfur complexes. Moreover, the slope of the linear dependence of the energy splitting of high-spin and low-spin states on the amount of admixture of exact exchange is studied in detail.

  12. Defect Dynamics and Zipping of 2D Colloidal Crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowley, Chris; Smullin, Sylvia; Ling, Xinsheng

    1998-03-01

    We use video microscopy to study defect dynamics in 2D colloidal (charged polystyrene microspheres) crystallites formed at the water-air interface. For small 2D crystallites, one might expect to see free edge dislocations in such small systems since the cost of forming such defects scales logarithmically with the size of the crystallite. But we found that as soon as an edge dislocation forms, it quickly moves to the edge of the crystallite and disappears. This is due to an attraction with an image dislocation outside the edge. As a result, most crystallites are defect-free during most of the time. Interesting things happen when two crystallites try to bind to each other, or zip together. A sharp transition occurs at the shared edge of the two crystallites during the zipping process. This is clearly manifested by a sudden change in the relative velocity between two drifting crystallites or a sudden re-orientation of one of the crystallites relative to the other. This work was supported by the startup funds and a Richard Salomon Faculty Research Award from Brown University.

  13. Predictions for collisional frequency shifts of ultracold rubidium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkelmans, S. J. J. M. F.; Verhaar, B. J.; Heinzen, D. J.; Gibble, K.

    1997-04-01

    A few years ago atomic fountains using cold ^133Cs atoms led to a breakthrough in the field of atomic frequency standards(A. Clairon, C. Salomon, S. Guellati, and W. D. Phillips, Europhys. Lett. 16), 165 (1991); K. Gibble and S. Chu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1771 (1993).. It was soon found that the frequency shifts induced by collisions between atoms during their fountain orbit stand in the way to drawing the full benefits from this development. A possible way out is to switch to another atomic species(K. Gibble and B.J. Verhaar, Phys. Rev. A 52), 3370 (1995).. Recent experiments have made it possible to determine cold collision parameters for pairs of rubidium atoms with unprecedented accuracy(J.M. Vogels, C.C. Tsai, R.S. Freeland, S.J.J.M.F. Kokkelmans, B.J. Verhaar, and D.J. Heinzen (submitted).). Making use of these parameters we predict the collisional frequency shifts for a ^87Rb and a ^85Rb laser-cooled clock. Our results show the prospects for new atomic clocks based on ultracold rubidium to be promising.

  14. Extracting Equation of State of a Trapped Gas from the Frequency of its Collective Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchanyi, Maxim; Perrin, Hélène

    2013-05-01

    We address the question of a relationship between frequency of small collective excitations of an unknown trapped cold gas and its Equation of State (EoS). In particular, we compare the frequency-EoS relationship obtained using a nonlinear double amplitude-coordinate perturbative expansion [M. Olshanii, H. Perrin, V. Lorent, PRL 105, 095302 (2010)] with the formula resulting from a scaling variational anzats [G.E. Astrakharchik, R. Combescot, X. Leyronas, S. Stringari, PRL 95, 030404 (2005)] and show that for power-law EoS's, the two agree exactly. We further compare predictions of both methods with ab initio numerical results. We argue that the frequencies of collective excitations represent a new reliable second thermodynamical axis, to complement the existing one, based on density profiles [N. Navon, S. Nascimbène, F. Chevy, C. Salomon, Science 328, 729 (2010)]. Supported by ONR, NSF, and IFRAF. Laboratoire de physique des lasers is UMR 7538 of CNRS and Paris 13 University.

  15. Measurements and simulation of stratospheric NO3 at mid and high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J.-B.; Taupin, F. G.; RivièRe, E. D.; Pirre, M.; Huret, N.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Chartier, M.; Pepe, F.; George, M.

    2001-12-01

    Simultaneous measurements of NO3, along with those of O3, NO2, and aerosol extinction coefficient, have been performed during the night by the AMON instrument since 1992 at high and midlatitudes and by the SALOMON instrument since 1998 at midlatitude. Observations are conducted using the stellar and lunar occultation methods, respectively. Vertical profiles of NO3 are obtained after inversion of the optical depth spectra recorded from 650 to 670 nm, including the 662-nm absorption line. Five profiles at midlatitude and two profiles at high latitude are presented. Comparisons with a box model constrained with measured ozone and temperatures (and NO2 at high latitude) have been performed, taking into account the uncertainties in the rate constants of the reactions leading to NO3 equilibrium. The modeling results can reproduce part of the observations, taking into account possible errors in the rate constants, temperature, or NO3 absorption cross sections. Some disagreements nevertheless remain between observations and modeling outputs. In the middle stratosphere they could result from gradients of temperature. Below 30 km, other phenomena could be invoked to explain the disagreements. At high latitude the presence of solid polar aerosols induces an artifact in the data reduction. At midlatitude, large increases observed in the NO3 concentration profiles obtained between 1992 and 1994 are real. A speculative hypothesis involving volcanic aerosols is proposed.

  16. Experimental Studies of Pinning Effects in 2D Colloidal Crystals Using Microstructured Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullin, Sylvia; Gerritsen, H. J.; Ling, Xinsheng

    1998-03-01

    We use microstructured substrates as tunable quenched symmetry-breaking fields to study the pinning effects in 2D colloidal crystals. The colloids are monodisperse charged polystyrene microspheres in pure water. In the sealed sample cell, the colloids are confined by two glass slides. A patterned plastic grating is glued on one side of the confining slides. The corrugated surface of the plastic grating becomes charged in water and exerts a periodic electric field on the charged microspheres, tunable by adjusting the confinement distance. We show that, for the first time, by using video microscopy one can observe in real time the novel effects due to the competing interactions. For example, with a square grating we have observed the Novaco-McTague rotation in a floating phase and the Pokrovsky-Talapov domain wall superlattice in a pinned phase. The results from a rough plastic substrate which simulates a random potential (in an attempt to search for a colloidal Bragg glass phase) will also be discussed. This work was supported by the startup funds and a Richard Salomon Faculty Research Award from Brown.

  17. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. II. Comparison of extinction, reflectance, polarization, and counting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Pirre, Michel; Brogniez, Colette; Herman, Maurice; Verwaerde, Christian; Balois, Jean-Yves; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Ovarlez, Henri; Crespin, Jacques; Deshler, Terry

    2002-12-01

    The physical properties of stratospheric aerosols can be retrieved from optical measurements involving extinction, radiance, polarization, and counting. We present here the results of measurements from the balloonborne instruments AMON, SALOMON, and RADIBAL, and from the French Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique and the University of Wyoming balloonborne particle counters. A cross comparison of the measurements was made for observations of background aerosols conducted during the polar winters of February 1997 and January-February 2000 for various altitudes from 13 to 19 km. On the one hand, the effective radius and the total amount of background aerosols derived from the various sets of data are similar and are in agreement with pre-Pinatubo values. On the other hand, strong discrepancies occur in the shapes of the bimodal size distributions obtained from analysis of the raw measurements of the various instruments. It seems then that the log-normal assumption cannot fully reproduce the size distribution of background aerosols. The effect of the presence of particular aerosols on the measurements is discussed, and a new strategy for observations is proposed.

  18. Is blunted cardiovascular reactivity in depression mood-state dependent? A comparison of major depressive disorder remitted depression and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Kristen; Bylsma, Lauren M; White, Kristi E; Panaite, Vanessa; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Prior work has repeatedly demonstrated that people who have current major depression exhibit blunted cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors (e.g., Salomon et al., 2009). A key question regards the psychobiological basis for these deficits, including whether such deficits are depressed mood-state dependent or whether these effects are trait-like and are observed outside of depression episodes in vulnerable individuals. To examine this issue, we assessed cardiovascular reactivity to a speech stressor task and a forehead cold pressor in 50 individuals with current major depressive disorder (MDD), 25 with remitted major depression (RMD), and 45 healthy controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and impedance cardiography were assessed and analyses controlled for BMI and sex. Significant group effects were found for SBP, HR, and PEP for the speech preparation period and HR, CO, and PEP during the speech. For each of these parameters, only the MDD group exhibited attenuated reactivity as well as impaired SBP recovery. Reactivity and recovery in the RMD group more closely resembled the healthy controls. Speeches given by the MDD group were rated as less persuasive than the RMD or healthy controls' speeches. No significant differences were found for the cold pressor. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity and impaired recovery in current major depression may be mood-state dependent phenomena and may be more reflective of motivational deficits than deficits in the physiological integrity of the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gepirone. Organon.

    PubMed

    Leslie, R A

    2001-08-01

    Gepirone, a pyridinyl piperazine 5-HT1A receptor agonist, has been developed by Fabre-Kramer as an antidepressant. Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) outlicensed the compound to Fabre-Kramer in 1993 and is no longer involved in its development [337393]. In May 1998, NV Organon (a subsidiary of Akzo Nobel) licensed the rights to the drug product for further development and marketing from Fabre-Kramer and, by October 1999, had submitted the drug for approval in the US [347133]. In December 2000, the company expected US and European launches in 2002 and 2003, respectively [402686]. Mechanism of action studies have demonstrated that gepirone, compared to buspirone, possesses a much greater selectivity for 5-HT1A receptors over dopamine D2 receptors. Long-term studies have shown that gepirone has a differential action at presynaptic (agonist) and post-synaptic (partial agonist) 5-HT1A receptors. However, further studies are still required to determine the relative contribution of pre- and post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors to the therapeutic action of gepirone and related compounds. In March 2001, according to Schroder Salomon Smith Barney, Akzo Nobel targeted peak sales of Euro 300 million for gepirone [409013]. This amount was reiterated in an April 2001 report by HSBC Securities, which stated that gepirone was expected to achieve this figure in 2009 or 2010 [409014].

  20. Functional hierarchy of two L domains in porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) that influence release and infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucci, Katherine T. Martina, Yuri Harrison, Frank Wilson, Carolyn A. Salomon, Daniel R.

    2008-06-05

    The porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) Gag protein contains two late (L) domain motifs, PPPY and P(F/S)AP. Using viral release assays we demonstrate that PPPY is the dominant L domain involved in PERV release. PFAP represents a novel retroviral L domain variant and is defined by abnormal viral assembly phenotypes visualized by electron microscopy and attenuation of early PERV release as measured by viral genomes. PSAP is functionally dominant over PFAP in early PERV release. PSAP virions are 3.5-fold more infectious in vitro by TCID{sub 50} and in vivo results in more RNA positive tissues and higher levels of proviral DNA using our human PERV-A receptor (HuPAR-2) transgenic mouse model [Martina, Y., Marcucci, K.T., Cherqui, S., Szabo, A., Drysdale, T., Srinivisan, U., Wilson, C.A., Patience, C., Salomon, D.R., 2006. Mice transgenic for a human porcine endogenous retrovirus receptor are susceptible to productive viral infection. J. Virol. 80 (7), 3135-3146]. The functional hierarchies displayed by PERV L domains, demonstrates that L domain selection in viral evolution exists to promote efficient viral assembly, release and infectivity in the virus-host context.

  1. NFP Investor Conference. Growth is back in sight.

    PubMed

    Haugh, Richard

    2002-06-01

    In a whirlwind of high-stakes meetings in New York City in mid-May, two dozen of the nation's largest hospitals and health systems strutted their stuff with a single goal: securing their future. Their message was clear: back-to-basics works, and now it's time to grow the business. Executives from 23 providers outlined their work on increasing revenue, boosting margins and shoring up balance sheets. They presented their market positions, strategic initiatives and financial results for investment analysts, credit raters and bond traders. The third annual Non-Profit Healthcare Investor Conference was co-sponsored by the American Hospital Association, Health Forum, the Healthcare Financial Management Association and Salomon Smith Barney. The focus on growth doesn't come without challenges Several common themes emerged from the presentations, among them pressure on reimbursement, workforce shortages, liability insurance issues and capacity constraints. Yet executives agree: it all comes down to the basics, and building the strength to keep their missions alive. As Thomas Meier, vice president and treasurer of Oakland, Calif.-based Kaiser Permanente, put it: "No margin, no mission, no más."

  2. Recoil-induced Resonances as All-optical Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, F. A.; Desavage, S. A.; Gordon, K. H.; Duncan, D. L.; Welch, G. R.; Davis, J. P.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured recoil-induced resonances (RIR) [1,2] in our system of laser-cooled 85Rb atoms. Although this technique has been demonstrated to be useful for the purpose of extracting the cloud temperature [3], our aim was to demonstrate an all optical switch based on recoil-induced resonances. In addition to a very narrow ``free-space'' recoil-induced resonance of approximately 15 kHz, we also discovered a much broader resonance (˜30 MHz), caused by standing waves established by our trapping fields. We compare and contrast the switching dynamics of these two resonances and demonstrate optical switching using both resonances. Finally, we consider the applicability of the narrow, free-space resonance to the slowing of a weak probe field. [1] J. Guo, P.R. Berman, B. Dubetsky and G. Grynberg PRA, 46, 1426 (1992). [2] (a) P. Verkerk, B. Loumis, C. Salomon, C. Cohen-Tannoudji, J. Courtois PRL, 68, 3861 (1992). (b) G. Grynberg, J-Y Courtois, B. Lounis, P. Verkerk PRL, 72, 3017 (1994). [3] (a) T. Brzozowski, M. Brzozowska, J. Zachorowski, M. Zawada, W. Gawlik PRA, 71, 013401 (2005). (b) M. Brzozowska, T. Brzozowski J. Zachorowski, W. Gawlik PRA, 72, 061401(R), (2005).

  3. Is blunted cardiovascular reactivity in depression mood-state dependent? A comparison of major depressive disorder remitted depression and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Kristen; Bylsma, Lauren M.; White, Kristi E.; Panaite, Vanessa; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has repeatedly demonstrated that people who have current major depression exhibit blunted cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors (e.g., Salomon et al., 2009). A key question regards the psychobiological basis for these deficits, including whether such deficits are depressed mood-state dependent or whether these effects are trait-like and are observed outside of depression episodes invulnerable individuals. To examine this issue, we assessed cardiovascular reactivity to a speech stressor task and a forehead cold pressor in 50 individuals with current major depressive disorder (MDD), 25 with remitted major depression (RMD), and 45 healthy controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and impedance cardiography were assessed and analyses controlled for BMI and sex. Significant group effects were found for SBP, HR, and PEP for the speech preparation period and HR, CO, and PEP during the speech. For each of these parameters, only the MDD group exhibited attenuated reactivity as well as impaired SBP recovery. Reactivity and recovery in the RMD group more closely resembled the healthy controls. Speeches given by the MDD group were rated as less persuasive than the RMD or healthy controls' speeches. No significant differences were found for the cold pressor. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity and impaired recovery in current major depression may be mood-state dependent phenomena and may be more reflective of motivational deficits than deficits in the physiological integrity of the cardiovascular system. PMID:23756147

  4. INVITED SPEAKERS Invited Speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Alain AspectPalaiseau Markus AspelmeyerVienna Vanderlei BagnatoSão Paulo Victor BalykinMoscow Kristian BaumannZürich Jim BergquistNIST, Boulder Frédéric ChevyENS, Paris John CloseCanberra Claude Cohen-TannoudjiENS, Paris Jean DalibardENS, Paris Eugene DemlerHarvard Michael DoserCERN Markus DrescherHamburg Francesca FerlainoInnsbruck Victor FlambaumSydney Chiara FortFlorence Elisabeth GiacobinoENS, Paris Philippe GrangierPalaiseau Chris GreeneJILA, Boulder Markus GreinerHarvard Eric HesselsToronto Hidetoshi KatoriTokyo Wolfgang KetterleMIT Michael KohlCambridge Wu-Ming LiuBeijing Francesco MinardiFlorence Holger MüllerBerkeley Karim MurrGarching Hanns-Christoph NägerlInnsbruck Jeremy O'BrienBristol Silke OspelkausJILA, Boulder Krzysztof PachuckiWarsaw Bill PhillipsGaithersburg Randolf PohlGarching Eugene PolzikCopenhagen Cindy RegalJILA, Boulder Jakob ReichelENS, Paris Helmut RitschInnsbruck Christian RoosInnsbruck Mark SaffmanWisconsin Christophe SalomonENS, Paris Gora ShlyapnikovOrsay Richard TaiebParis Masahito UedaTokyo Chris ValeMelbourne Andreas WallraffZürich Matthias WeidemüllerHeidelberg Martin WeitzBonn Artur WideraBonn David WinelandNIST, Boulder

  5. Nebular emission and the Lyman continuum photon escape fraction in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kehrig, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Ziegler, B.; Sánchez, S. F.; Husemann, B.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; García-Benito, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; del Olmo, A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Marquez, I.; Mollá, M.; Mast, D.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.

    2013-07-01

    We use deep integral field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey to study the warm interstellar medium (wim) over the entire extent and optical spectral range of 32 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). We find that faint nebular emission is extended in all cases, and its surface brightness decreases roughly as ∝ r-α. The large standard deviation in the derived α (1.09 ± 0.67) argues against a universal power-law index for the radial drop-off of nebular emission in ETGs. Judging from the properties of their extranuclear component, our sample ETGs span a broad, continuous sequence with respect to their α, Hα equivalent width (EW) and Lyman continuum (Lyc) photon leakage fraction (plf). We propose a tentative subdivision into two groups: Type i ETGs are characterized by rather steep Hα profiles (α ≃ 1.4), comparatively large (≳1 Å), nearly radially constant EWs, and plf ≃ 0. Photoionization by post-AGB stars appears to be the main driver of extended nebular emission in these systems, with nonthermal sources being potentially important only in their nuclei. Typical properties of type II ETGs are shallower Hα profiles (α ≃ 0.8), very low (≲0.5 Å) EWs with positive radial gradients, and a mean plf ≳ 0.7, rising to ≳0.9 in their centers. Such properties point to a low, and inwardly decreasing wim density and/or volume filling factor. We argue that, because of extensive Lyc photon leakage, emission-line luminosities and EWs are reduced in type II ETG nuclei by at least one order of magnitude. Consequently, the line weakness of these ETGs is by itself no compelling evidence for their containing merely "weak"(sub-Eddington accreting) active galactic nuclei (AGN). In fact, Lyc photon escape, which has heretofore not been considered, may constitute a key element in understanding why many ETGs with prominent signatures of AGN activity in radio continuum and/or X-ray wavelengths show only faint emission lines and weak signatures of AGN activity in

  6. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of On-Road Diesel Truck Emissions in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, B.; Harley, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Heavy-duty diesel-powered trucks comprise a relatively small fraction of total traffic, typically less than 10% nationally. However, as light-duty gasoline vehicle emissions have been controlled over time, diesel trucks have become a major source of emissions of pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and fine particulate matter (PM). In the past, spatially resolved emission inventories for trucks have often been mapped either by (1) assuming a constant truck fraction and applying that value to gridded estimates of total vehicle miles traveled throughout the area of interest, or (2) using surrogates (e.g., miles of highway available in each grid square) to apportion top-down estimates of diesel emissions. Unfortunately, such simplified descriptions of truck traffic are inaccurate. Goods movement-related traffic differs markedly from passenger vehicle travel in many ways, and truck traffic does not make equal use of all available highways. Here we develop new inventories that reflect observed spatial patterns and day of week, seasonal, and decadal changes in diesel truck emissions. High-resolution (4 km) gridded emission inventories have been developed in this study for diesel trucks in California. Fuel consumption and associated CO2 emissions were calculated for each segment of highway from census counts of truck traffic that span the entire highway network. This captures the majority of truck travel and on-road diesel fuel consumption in California. Remaining truck traffic on other roadways (e.g., urban arterials) is estimated by difference using statewide taxable diesel fuel sales and fuel economy survey data. Fuel-based emission factors measured in roadside remote sensing and tunnel studies were applied to CO2 emissions to estimate NOx. Air basin-specific temporal patterns in diesel truck activity and emissions are derived from 75 Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) traffic count sites located on major highways throughout the state. WIM sensors count and classify vehicles by

  7. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X

  8. Hydro-mechanical simulations of well abandonment at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage verify wellbore system integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Victoria; Kempka, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    simulation time step and verified by a comparison of calculated and observed bottomhole pressures for the operational phase. Well abandonment was simulated by stepwise filling of the wellbore with Schlumberger Evercrete and Class G cements considering the specific mechanical cement properties as a function of time to account for stress changes and displacements in the wellbore system and its surrounding. Our simulation results indicate, that taking into account available site-specific data, failure of the wellbore system is unlikely to occur during site operation and subsequent abandonment. The implemented hydro-mechanical model can be consequently applied for investigation of different hypothetical scenarios including varying stress regimes, low-quality cementation jobs as well as casing corrosion. Furthermore, coupling with hydro-chemical simulations would allow for a long-term assessment of wellbore integrity and reservoir fluid leakage. Kempka, T., Klapperer, S., Norden, B. Coupled hydro-mechanical simulations demonstrate system integrity at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage, Germany (2014) Rock Engineering and Rock Mechanics: Structures in and on Rock Masses - Proceedings of EUROCK 2014, ISRM European Regional Symposium, pp. 1317-1322.

  9. ZOONET: perspectives on the evolution of animal form. Meeting report.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Antje H L; Arboleda, Enrique; Egger, Bernhard; Hilbrant, Maarten; McGregor, Alistair P; Cole, Alison G; Daley, Allison C

    2009-11-15

    What drives evolution? This was one of the main questions raised at the final ZOONET meeting in Budapest, Hungary, in November 2008. The meeting marked the conclusion of ZOONET, an EU-funded Marie-Curie Research Training Network comprising nine research groups from all over Europe (Max Telford, University College London; Michael Akam, University of Cambridge; Detlev Arendt, EMBL Heidelberg; Maria Ina Arnone, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Napoli; Michalis Averof, IMBB Heraklion; Graham Budd, Uppsala University; Richard Copley, University of Oxford; Wim Damen, University of Cologne; Ernst Wimmer, University of Göttingen). ZOONET meetings and practical courses held during the past four years provided researchers from diverse backgrounds--bioinformatics, phylogenetics, embryology, palaeontology, and developmental and molecular biology--the opportunity to discuss their work under a common umbrella of evolutionary developmental biology (Evo Devo). The Budapest meeting emphasized in-depth discussions of the key concepts defining Evo Devo, and bringing together ZOONET researchers with external speakers who were invited to present their views on the evolution of animal form. The discussion sessions addressed four main topics: the driving forces of evolution, segmentation, fossils and phylogeny, and the future of Evo Devo.

  10. The Contribution of Ionizing Starts to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way: Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo Around the W4 Chimney/Supershell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Normandeau have proposed that W4 is a galactic chimney, the only chimney to-date identified in our Galaxy. Using the recent approx. 1 min resolution IGA (Infrared Galaxy Atlas) and DRAO (Dominion Royal Astrophysical Observatory) CGPS (Canadian Galactic Plane Survey) galactic plane surveys we analyze the far-infrared and radio structure of the W 4 chimney/supershell. We show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis of the dust column density establishes there is dense interstellar material below the shell, directly showing the dense material which caused the lower shell expansion to stall. Due to much lower densities above the Galactic plane, the upper W4 shell achieved 'breakout' to form a Galactic chimney. Although the shell appears ionization bounded, it is very inhomogenous and an ionized halo provides evidence of significant Lyman continuum leakage. A large fraction of the OCl 352 cluster photons escape to large distances and are available to ionize the WIM (warm ionized medium) component of the interstellar medium.

  11. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  12. A Feasibility Study of an Integral PWR for Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grandis, S. De; Finzi, E.; Lombardi, C.V.; Mandelli, D.; Padovani, E.; Passoni, M.; Ricotti, M.E.; Santini, L.

    2004-07-01

    Fission space power systems are well suited to provide safe, reliable, economic and robust energy sources, in the order of 100 KWe. A preliminary feasibility study of a nuclear fission reactor is here presented with the following requirements: i) high reliability, ii) R and D program of moderate cost, iii) to be deployed within a reasonable period of time (e.g. 2015), iv) to be operated and controlled for a long time (10 years) without human intervention, v) possibly to be also used as a byproduct for some particular terrestrial application (or at least to share common technologies), vi) to start with stationary application. The driving idea is to extend as much as possible the PWR technology, by recurring to an integral type reactor. Two options are evaluated for the electricity production: a Rankine steam cycle and a Rankine organic fluid cycle. The neutronics calculation is based on WIMS code benchmarked with MCNP code. The reactivity control is envisaged by changing the core geometry. The resulting system appears viable and of reasonable size, well fit to the present space vector capabilities. Finally, a set of R and D needs has been identified: cold well, small steam turbines, fluid leakage control, pumps, shielding, steam generator in low-gravity conditions, self pressurizer, control system. A R and D program of reasonable extent may yield the needed answers, and some demanding researches are of interest for the new generation Light Water Reactors. (authors)

  13. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  14. Developpement d'une methode hybride pour le suivi du coeur et la gestion du combustible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenette, Eric

    The nuclear industry of CANDU reactors uses neutron physics methodologies (core follow-up, fuel management) that are considered out of date and do not reflect the latest developments in the field of neutronics. For instance, the software used by the reactor physics team in Gentilly-2, HQSIMEX 3, uses macroscopic cross sections ("grid-based" approach) calculated by two methods: (1) The "four factors" formula, an obsolete technique used in 1950; (2) The WIMS software, based on a microscopic cross section library. Among other method, the history-based approach is considered more precise but requires greater computing time. Processing a whole CANDU core follow-up through the history-based approach is not possible as of today with the actual computers, due to computing cost issues. The main goal of this research is to come up with a new strategy that will combine the interpolation technique of the "grid-based approach" with the isotopic depletion follow-up of the "history-based" approach.

  15. Components of Particle Emissions from Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Vehicles with Varying Aromatic Content and Octane Rating in Gasoline.

    PubMed

    Short, Daniel Z; Vu, Diep; Durbin, Thomas D; Karavalakis, Georgios; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2015-09-01

    Typical gasoline consists of varying concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons and octane ratings. However, their impacts on particulate matter (PM) such as black carbon (BC) and water-soluble and insoluble particle compositions are not well-defined. This study tests seven 2012 model year vehicles, which include one port fuel injection (PFI) configured hybrid vehicle, one PFI vehicle, and six gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles. Each vehicle was driven on the Unified transient testing cycle (UC) using four different fuels. Three fuels had a constant octane rating of 87 with varied aromatic concentrations at 15%, 25%, and 35%. A fourth fuel with higher octane rating, 91, contained 35% aromatics. BC, PM mass, surface tension, and water-soluble organic mass (WSOM) fractions were measured. The water-insoluble mass (WIM) fraction of the vehicle emissions was estimated. Increasing fuel aromatic content increases BC emission factors (EFs) of transient cycles. BC concentrations were higher for the GDI vehicles than the PFI and hybrid vehicles, suggesting a potential climate impact for increased GDI vehicle production. Vehicle steady-state testing showed that the hygroscopicity of PM emissions at high speeds (70 mph; κ > 1) are much larger than emissions at low speeds (30 mph; κ < 0.1). Iso-paraffin content in the fuels was correlated to the decrease in WSOM emissions. Both aromatic content and vehicle speed increase the amount of hygroscopic material found in particle emissions.

  16. Reliability assessment of long span bridges based on structural health monitoring: application to Yonghe Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shunlong; Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping; Li, Hongwei

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents the reliability estimation studies based on structural health monitoring data for long span cable stayed bridges. The data collected by structural health monitoring system can be used to update the assumptions or probability models of random load effects, which would give potential for accurate reliability estimation. The reliability analysis is based on the estimated distribution for Dead, Live, Wind and Temperature Load effects. For the components with FBG strain sensors, the Dead, Live and unit Temperature Load effects can be determined by the strain measurements. For components without FBG strain sensors, the Dead and unit Temperature Load and Wind Load effects of the bridge can be evaluated by the finite element model, updated and calibrated by monitoring data. By applying measured truck loads and axle spacing data from weight in motion (WIM) system to the calibrated finite element model, the Live Load effects of components without FBG sensors can be generated. The stochastic process of Live Load effects can be described approximately by a Filtered Poisson Process and the extreme value distribution of Live Load effects can be calculated by Filtered Poisson Process theory. Then first order reliability method (FORM) is employed to estimate the reliability index of main components of the bridge (i.e. stiffening girder).

  17. Improvement of Modeling HTGR Neutron Physics by Uncertainty Analysis with the Use of Cross-Section Covariance Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Grol, A. V.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Ternovykh, M. Yu

    2017-01-01

    This work is aimed at improvement of HTGR neutron physics design calculations by application of uncertainty analysis with the use of cross-section covariance information. Methodology and codes for preparation of multigroup libraries of covariance information for individual isotopes from the basic 44-group library of SCALE-6 code system were developed. A 69-group library of covariance information in a special format for main isotopes and elements typical for high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) was generated. This library can be used for estimation of uncertainties, associated with nuclear data, in analysis of HTGR neutron physics with design codes. As an example, calculations of one-group cross-section uncertainties for fission and capture reactions for main isotopes of the MHTGR-350 benchmark, as well as uncertainties of the multiplication factor (k∞) for the MHTGR-350 fuel compact cell model and fuel block model were performed. These uncertainties were estimated by the developed technology with the use of WIMS-D code and modules of SCALE-6 code system, namely, by TSUNAMI, KENO-VI and SAMS. Eight most important reactions on isotopes for MHTGR-350 benchmark were identified, namely: 10B(capt), 238U(n,γ), ν5, 235U(n,γ), 238U(el), natC(el), 235U(fiss)-235U(n,γ), 235U(fiss).

  18. Full core analysis of IRIS reactor by using MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Amin, E A; Bashter, I I; Hassan, Nabil M; Mustafa, S S

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes neutronic analysis for fresh fuelled IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor by MCNPX code. The analysis included criticality calculations, radial power and axial power distribution, nuclear peaking factor and axial offset percent at the beginning of fuel cycle. The effective multiplication factor obtained by MCNPX code is compared with previous calculations by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, modified CORD-2 nodal calculations and SAS2H/KENO-V code systems. It is found that k-eff value obtained by MCNPX is closer to CORD-2 value. The radial and axial powers are compared with other published results carried out using SAS2H/KENO-V code. Moreover, the WIMS-D5 code is used for studying the effect of enriched boron in form of ZrB2 on the effective multiplication factor (K-eff) of the fuel pin. In this part of calculation, K-eff is calculated at different concentrations of Boron-10 in mg/cm at different stages of burnup of unit cell. The results of this part are compared with published results performed by HELIOS code.

  19. Observing Red Tide Algal Blooms From Satellite Ocean Color Imagery: West Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, E. T.; Jose, F.

    2016-12-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) from Karenia brevis occur along the west Florida shelf (WFS) almost every year, producing a brevetoxin that is harmful to birds, fish, marine mammals, shellfish, and humans. These HABs are commonly known as "red tide" from the reddish discoloration in the water, but color can vary from yellow to deep brown depending on other parameters. Ocean color data is a viable tool for monitoring the outbreak and persistence of these ecological phenomena. Also, the spatial extend of this outbreak could be evaluated effectively from satellite imagery. Chlorophyll (Chl) and sea surface temperature (SST) data from four satellites during the period from 2010 to 2013 were analyzed, and compared the monthly composite data with in situ observation on K. brevis cell counts collected by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Remote sensing data were extracted from the NASA Ocean Color data servers and were processed using WimSoft, a Windows-based remote sensing data analysis program. Based on the comparison of data from 26 transects from the WFS, which were extended from nearshore to 400 km offshore, highest Chl concentrations were observed in the sector from St. Petersburg to Sanibel Island. FWC data also showed that highest K. brevis cell counts were concentrated in this region during the 2011 to 2012 period. Additionally, a high Chl concentration was observed for the Big Bend region, particularly during the spring and early summer. The inter-annual variability of Chl, SST, and red tide occurrence are also discussed in this study.

  20. A Special Fiber Optic Sensor for Measuring Wheel Loads of Vehicles on Highways.

    PubMed

    Malla, Ramesh B; Sen, Amlan; Garrick, Norman W

    2008-04-11

    This paper presents results from an investigation on a special optical fiber as a load sensor for application in Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) systems to measure wheel loads of vehicles traveling at normal speed on highways. The fiber used has a unique design with two concentric light guiding regions of different effective optical path lengths, which has the potential to enable direct measurement of magnitudes as well as locations of forces acting at multiple points along a single fiber. The optical characteristic of the fiber for intended sensing purpose was first assessed by a simple fiber bending experiment and by correlating the bend radii with the output light signal intensities. A simple laboratory load transmitting/fiber bending device was then designed and fabricated to appropriately bend the optical fiber under applied loads in order to make the fiber work as load sensor. The device with the optical fiber was tested under a universal loading machine and an actual vehicle wheel in the laboratory. The test results showed a good relationship between the magnitude of the applied load and the output optical signal changes. The results also showed a good correlation between the time delay between the inner and outer core light pulses and the distance of the applied load as measured from the output end of the fiber.

  1. Dutch chemical producers pledge emissions cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, E.; Schoenmakers, J.

    1993-02-24

    Dutch chemical producers have negotiated a long-term agreement with government ministries to reduce emissions of a wide range of chemicals. Industry association Vereniging van de Nederlandse Chemische Industrie (VNCI; Leidschendam) says implementing the commitment will cost companies Dfl 10 billion ($5.4 billion) between 1993 and 2000. VNCI technical director Wim Quik welcomes the accord, which he describes as a management contract, saying, Rather than have legislation, there is a certain adjustment available. Peter Santen, managing director of midsized chemicals player Cindu Chemicals (Uithoorn, the Netherlands) voices some concern about the details of the accord, but adds, we are flexible in trying to agree with the contents of the covenant [it] is better than having new rules from law. The Dutch government, traditionally eager for consensus, has struck a number of such deals with Dutch industries - including packaging, metal, and tire - to reduce emissions and set up environmental management programs. The effort is based on the government's National Environmental Policy Plans - NMP and NMP Plus. Targets for emissions reduction by the chemical industry were provided by a government-funded environmental research institute.

  2. Outcomes of Capsular Dissection Technique with Use of Bipolar Electrocautery in Total Thyroidectomy: A Rural Tertiary Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, S.B.; Priyadarshini, V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Total thyroidectomy is one of the most routinely performed head and neck surgical procedures with extremely low mortality. This procedure has been associated with two major complications such as recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and hypocalcaemia due to parathyroid insufficiency. The use of bipolar electrocautery has not been widely accepted in view of thermal damage to adjacent structures. Aim To study the outcomes and complications of capsular dissection technique along with use of bipolar electrocautery in total thyroidectomy. Materials and Methods The study was conducted from May 2013 to May 2016. The study was performed at Department of ENT Otorhinolayngology, DM WIMS Hospital, Wayanad, Kerala, India. This retrospective descriptive study analysed the outcome of 130 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy by capsular dissection technique along with use of bipolar electrocautery for cauterization of vascular pedicles, at our institution over a 3 year period. Results The incidence of permanent unilateral vocal cord palsy was 1.5% and permanent hypocalcaemia was 2.3%. There was no case of haemorrhage or haematoma in this study. Conclusion Total thyroidectomy by capsular dissection technique along with the use of bipolar electrocautery has very low incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid injury, as per our data. Hence, we recommend this technique along with routine use of bipolar electrocautery for total thyroidectomy. PMID:28208891

  3. Prerana: a success story.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Prerana-Associate CEDPA, a women- and youth-focused community organization headquartered in New Delhi, has expanded its program activities with recent grants from two leading donors, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. CEDPA provides important support through grants from The Xerox Foundation, The Turner Foundation, World Bank, and the US Agency for International Development. Founded in 1976, Prerana--whose name means "Inspiration" in Hindi--has grown steadily as knowledge of its comprehensive community-based program has spread. The organization conducts the CEDPA Better Life Options health, education, and vocational skills programs for girls and young women, maternal and child health services, and integrated community-based family planning. A parallel Better Life Options program for boys and young men was recently started. With almost 20 years of experience in the private sector, Prerana provides training and assistance to other private organizations. Prerana's Better Life Options program received international recognition in UNFPA's "The State of World Population 1994." The publication featured an article by a young Indian woman who participated in the program and as a result was able to develop life skills, improve her self-esteem, and, with her husband, decide to delay parenthood. "This success story," said Prerana Executive Director Dr. Uma Agarwal (WIM 29), "is being repeated by many other girls who find support at Prerana."

  4. Radar Model with Terrain Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    bd U) 11 4wH 1-4 44 tD - =) m u n a W- M W*IM r’. 0-04-00 -4(N =’-U0 VI-.4 MVY04 wqheNa *.r U -= 0. - .- = * a * 0 - A e’ . .- An s w- * amsk 6 % Okv...E4 " U V45.4Mu I~-Hamm w" MI, .0 .- -40 .446 0 M a04𔃾O 0* E4’ H 0 tD 14.4 ..31414 E4 -. As w =..air-U m -- i OU. .1%a4- 0344 CAH . -3’ E4 t- 4a~1 M...a. EUq 04 C4 .4 O 0 -a ON4 04 Pa 0a H a.4 /20 ad 40 I- U) U) LA0 . 3c W) a) V) 0wn PQ = 0 a rd "a0 E-4 H N* U)0 0 0 1 .4 in. Q 4$Am *w i o ai HO in

  5. SVM-dependent pairwise HMM: an application to Protein pairwise alignments.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Gabriele; Raimondi, Daniele; Khan, Taushif; Lenaerts, Tom; Vranken, Wim

    2017-06-28

    Methods able to provide reliable protein alignments are crucial for many bioinformatics applications. In the last years many different algorithms have been developed and various kinds of information, from sequence conservation to secondary structure, have been used to improve the alignment performances. This is especially relevant for proteins with highly divergent sequences. However, recent works suggest that different features may have different importance in diverse protein classes and it would be an advantage to have more customizable approaches, capable to deal with different alignment definitions. Here we present Rigapollo, a highly flexible pairwise alignment method based on a pairwise HMM-SVM that can use any type of information to build alignments. Rigapollo lets the user decide the optimal features to align their protein class of interest. It outperforms current state of the art methods on two well known benchmark datasets when aligning highly divergent sequences. A Python implementation of the algorithm is available at http://ibsquare.be/rigapollo. wim.vranken@vub.be. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Analysis of Yearly Traffic Fluctuation on Latvian Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimanis, A.; Paeglı¯tis, A.

    2015-11-01

    Average annual daily traffic and average annual truck traffic are two most used metrics for road management decisions. They are calculated from data gathered by continuous counting stations embedded in road pavement, manual counting sessions or mobile counting devices. Last two usually do not last longer than a couple of weeks so the information gathered is influenced by yearly traffic fluctuations. Data containing a total of 8,186,871 vehicles or 1989 days from 4 WIM stations installed on highways in Latvia were used in this study. Each of the files was supposed to contain data from only 1 day and additional data were deleted. No other data cleaning steps were performed, which increased the number of vehicles as counting systems sometimes split vehicles into two. Weekly traffic and weekly truck traffic was normalized against respective average values. Each weekly value was then plotted against its number in a year for better visual perception. Weekly traffic amplitudes were used to assess differences between different locations and standard deviations for fluctuation comparison of truck and regular traffic at the same location. Results show that truck traffic fluctuates more than regular traffic during a year, especially around holidays. Differences between counting locations were larger for regular traffic than truck traffic. These results show that average annual daily traffic could be influenced more if short term counting results are adjusted by factors derived from unsuitable continuous counting stations, but truck traffic is more influenced by the time of year in which counting is done.

  7. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place, and Contractor, Fiscal Year 1985. Part 20 (Antilles - Israel).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    10-4 U4 so IOl 000 60010 JIL) r-l 1 0 60 Q 4 0U in IL) m1 2: c go I In-r I i 00 .0 Z.. m 0 C( 01 04 < 0 , i I ~ m0 I Ocn IC4I a n I e c0 -41 to -0lO ’o...0 401ca -(105- I o 41 0l co U5I 40 ’a0-40 a Y I - *~ 00.1 sta- rt 1 - " - . . . . wi, "Z .. 4c.1 wooi CI m oI Z Z 1I0 4-4~ In4 on 4r In I : , 10-( 01 0... 01 0 ca( -~I4 I Co Wn 0:In ON x ( I I as as as a It-C( C1 4 Z0 0 -1- OC 49 C-4 N on In 0 wim 4’ I0 ICl 0 0 ’ m(.4 0 ɘ m0 06 4 Ia( -C 4I 00. 0N 0 ( 0

  8. A Special Fiber Optic Sensor for Measuring Wheel Loads of Vehicles on Highways

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Ramesh B.; Sen, Amlan; Garrick, Norman W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from an investigation on a special optical fiber as a load sensor for application in Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) systems to measure wheel loads of vehicles traveling at normal speed on highways. The fiber used has a unique design with two concentric light guiding regions of different effective optical path lengths, which has the potential to enable direct measurement of magnitudes as well as locations of forces acting at multiple points along a single fiber. The optical characteristic of the fiber for intended sensing purpose was first assessed by a simple fiber bending experiment and by correlating the bend radii with the output light signal intensities. A simple laboratory load transmitting/fiber bending device was then designed and fabricated to appropriately bend the optical fiber under applied loads in order to make the fiber work as load sensor. The device with the optical fiber was tested under a universal loading machine and an actual vehicle wheel in the laboratory. The test results showed a good relationship between the magnitude of the applied load and the output optical signal changes. The results also showed a good correlation between the time delay between the inner and outer core light pulses and the distance of the applied load as measured from the output end of the fiber. PMID:27879835

  9. Outcomes of Capsular Dissection Technique with Use of Bipolar Electrocautery in Total Thyroidectomy: A Rural Tertiary Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Das, Amal T; Prakash, S B; Priyadarshini, V

    2016-12-01

    Total thyroidectomy is one of the most routinely performed head and neck surgical procedures with extremely low mortality. This procedure has been associated with two major complications such as recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and hypocalcaemia due to parathyroid insufficiency. The use of bipolar electrocautery has not been widely accepted in view of thermal damage to adjacent structures. To study the outcomes and complications of capsular dissection technique along with use of bipolar electrocautery in total thyroidectomy. The study was conducted from May 2013 to May 2016. The study was performed at Department of ENT Otorhinolayngology, DM WIMS Hospital, Wayanad, Kerala, India. This retrospective descriptive study analysed the outcome of 130 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy by capsular dissection technique along with use of bipolar electrocautery for cauterization of vascular pedicles, at our institution over a 3 year period. The incidence of permanent unilateral vocal cord palsy was 1.5% and permanent hypocalcaemia was 2.3%. There was no case of haemorrhage or haematoma in this study. Total thyroidectomy by capsular dissection technique along with the use of bipolar electrocautery has very low incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid injury, as per our data. Hence, we recommend this technique along with routine use of bipolar electrocautery for total thyroidectomy.

  10. Laboratory spectroscopy of Mars Analogue materials and latest field results from Iceland and Eifel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    We have established a collection of samples, and measured them in the laboratory towards a spectrometric database that could be used as a reference for future orbital or in situ measurements. We are using systematically for all samples UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers, and sporadically a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and a Raman laser spectrometer on control samples. We also used a documented set of Moon-Mars relevant minerals curated at VU Amsterdam, as well as samples retrieved from Mars analogue campaigns in Utah (Foing et al., 2011, 2016), Iceland (Mid-Atlantic ridge spreading and magma-ice interaction), La Réunion hot spot volcano and Eifel volcanic region (mixed hotspot and melt-ascent through crust fractures) from recent campaigns in 2015 and 2016.. We discuss samples spectral diagnostics of volcanic processes and hydrous alterations that can inform recent or upcoming measurements from Mars orbit or in situ rovers. Acknowledgements: we thank Dominic Doyle for ESTEC optical lab support, Euan Monaghan (Leiden U) for FTIR measurement support, Wim van Westrenen for access to VU samples, Oscar Kamps (Utrecht U), Aidan Cowley (EAC) and Matthias Sperl (DLR) for support discussions

  11. Trapped Hydrogen Spectroscopy: Fundamental Constants and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmann, Lorenz

    2002-05-01

    Ultra high resolution spectroscopy was an essential ingredient in the realisation and observation of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic hydrogen(D.G. Fried, T. Killian, L. Willmann, D. Landhuis, S. Moss, D. Kleppner, and T. Greytak, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81), 3807 (1998). That experiment is a good starting point to explore the possibilities for future spectroscopy of trapped ultracold hydrogen. Of particular interest are two aspects. Firstly, the exploitation of the intrinsically small linewidth of the 1S-2S transition of only 1.3 Hz as an optical frequency standard. Secondly, the precision determination of the 2S-nS energy splittings in hydrogen, which can be used to determine the Rydberg constant, the Lamb shift or the proton charge radius. We will combine these two aspects in the experiment. The absolut value of the hydrogen 1S-2S transition frequency(M. Niering, R. Holzwarth, J. Reichert, P. Pokasov, Th. Udem, M. Weitz, T. W. Hänsch, P. Lemonde, G. Santarelli, M. Abgrall, P. Laurent, C. Salomon, and A. Clairon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84), 5496 (2000) serves as an optical frequency standard for the measurements of the 2S-nS transition frequencies. The frequencies will be linked by a frequency comb generated by a mode locked laser. Currently, a femto second laser is being set up in collaboration with the group of F. Kärtner at MIT. The source of trapped atoms in the metastable 2S state is laser excitation of the 1S-2S transition, thus the 2S-nS spectroscopy can be done at the same time and in the same trapping field to reduce systematic effects.

  12. Survey of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dova, T.; Pierre Auger Observatory Collaboration

    The question of the origin and nature of cosmic ray particles with energies exceeding the predicted GZK spectral cutoff is one of the present great challenges of astroparticle physics. The Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, is a broadly based international effort to explore the upper-end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum. The PAO is the first experiment designed to work in a hybrid detection mode. The combination of two complementary detection techniques -water Cerenkov tank arrays overlooked by atmospheric fluorescence detectorsto observe extensive air showers guarantees high-quality and statistically significant data. An updated overview of the science prospects for the PAO is presented. The concept of the experiment as well as the current status is described. 1 Physics motivation for the Pierre Auger Observatory The puzzle set by the existence of cosmic rays with energies above 1020 eV (Lawrence et al., 1991; Hayashida et al., 1994; Bird et al., 1995; Abu-Zayyad et al, 1999), which may be an indication of new physics or exotic particles, is at present one of the hot topics in high energy astroparticle physics. The underlying problem in trying to explain the origin of these extremely high energy cosmic rays (EHECR) is the well-known GZK (Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin) effect: if the cosmic rays are extragalactic in origin, then a sharp cutoff at around several times 1019 eV in the observed spectrum is expected due to energy degradation of the cosmic ray particles through interaction with photons of the microwave background radiation (Greisen, 1965; Zatsepin and Kuzmin, 1966). This process limits the distance of the sources of particles with energies above 1020 eV to less than 100 Mpc from the Earth (Aharonian and Cronin, 1994; Puget et al., 1976; Stecker and Salomon, 1999; Berezinsky, 1970; Protheroe and Biermann, 1996). Since the energy loss mechanism depends on

  13. Solitons in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2003-05-01

    The stationary form, dynamical properties, and experimental criteria for creation of matter-wave bright and dark solitons, both singly and in trains, are studied numerically and analytically in the context of Bose-Einstein condensates [1]. The full set of stationary solutions in closed analytic form to the mean field model in the quasi-one-dimensional regime, which is a nonlinear Schrodinger equation equally relevant in nonlinear optics, is developed under periodic and box boundary conditions [2]. These solutions are extended numerically into the two and three dimensional regimes, where it is shown that dark solitons can be used to create vortex-anti-vortex pairs under realistic conditions. Specific experimental prescriptions for creating viable dark and bright solitons in the quasi-one-dimensional regime are provided. These analytic methods are then extended to treat the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a generalized lattice potential, which models a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in the potential generated by a standing light wave. A novel solution family is developed and stability criterion are presented. Experiments which successfully carried out these ideas are briefly discussed [3]. [1] Dissertation research completed at the University of Washington Physics Department under the advisorship of Prof. William P. Reinhardt. [2] L. D. Carr, C. W. Clark, and W. P. Reinhardt, Phys. Rev. A v. 62 p. 063610-1--10 and Phys. Rev. A v.62, p.063611-1--10 (2000). [3] L. Khaykovich, F. Schreck, T. Bourdel, J. Cubizolles, G. Ferrari, L. D. Carr, Y. Castin, and C. Salomon, Science v. 296, p.1290--1293 (2002).

  14. Remote-sensing measurements in the polar vortex: Comparison to in situ observations and implications for the simultaneous retrievals and analysis of the NO2 and OClO species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Catoire, V.; Chartier, M.; Robert, C.; Huret, N.; Coquelet, F.; Bourgeois, Q.; RivièRe, E. D.; Barret, B.; LefèVre, F.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2007-11-01

    Nighttime remote-sensing balloon observations conducted by the SALOMON instrument in the arctic polar vortex in January 2006 reveal high amounts of stratospheric NO2 in the lower stratosphere similarly to previously published profiles. NO2 concentration enhancements are also present in the vertical profiles observed by the GOMOS instrument on board the Envisat satellite and obtained coincidently to the balloon measurements. Such quantities are not present in in situ observations obtained by the SPIRALE instrument in similar geophysical conditions. While OClO amounts are acceptably reproduced by Chemistry Transport Model (CTM) calculations, NO2 simulated values are well below the observed quantities. The examination of the slant column densities of NO2 obtained at float altitude highlights unexpected strong enhancements with respect to the elevation angle and displacement of the balloon. It is shown that these fluctuations result from NO2 spatial inhomogeneities located above the balloon float altitude. Potential vorticity maps reveal the presence of midlatitude NO2-rich air in the upper stratosphere or lower mesosphere as a result of the perturbed dynamical situation of the vortex. The presence of spatial inhomogeneities crossed by the lines of sight leads to artificial high concentration values of NO2 in the vertical profile retrieved from the slant column densities assuming spatial homogeneity. A direct implication is that the differences previously observed between measurements of NO2 and OClO and model results are probably mostly due to the improper inversion of NO2 in the presence of perturbed dynamical conditions or when mesospheric NOx production events occur. The dynamical situation will have to be systematically analyzed in future studies involving remote-sensing observations.

  15. GOMOS serendipitous data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussen, D.; Gomos Team

    The GOMOS experiment on board ENVISAT has been measuring more than 200 000 star occultations through the Earth's limb since March 2002. With 4 spectrometers, the wavelength coverage of 245 nm to 942 nm allows to monitor ozone, H2O, NO2, NO3, BrO, OClO, air, aerosols, O2 and the temperature profiles. During the commissioning phase, GOMOS turned out to be a successful remote sounder of the Earth's atmosphere between 10 and 120 km. On the other hand, an intensive statistical processing of a large data set (about 5000 occultations) has produced high quality transmittance spectra. A preliminary investigation allowed the discovery of extremely interesting spectral signatures in the GOMOS spectra. Keeping in mind that all possible instrument artefacts should be carefully checked, we nevertheless obtained the following results that may become unexpected GOMOS data products in a near future: the excited oxygen "green line" (O(1S)->O(3P)) at 557.7 nm has been clearly identified and will be inverted the D2 sodium absorption at 589.1 nm is easily recognized in the mesosphere. The inversion of the slant path optical thickness (about 0.0025) has produced the first GOMOS Na vertical profile, in close agreement with the local climatological lidar data of Fort Collins a few possible emission or absorption lines are under investigation and need more statistical tests. However a spectral signature at 280 nm and h=˜ 103 km might probably be attributed to a mesospheric Mg+ layer a group of not yet identified stratospheric emission lines between 390 and 400 nm has been detected. Interestingly, the same lines seem to have also been observed by the SALOMON balloon borne experiment operated in night time conditions.

  16. Energy-Level Related Nuclear-Spin Effects and Super-Hyperfine Spectral Patterns: how Molecules do Self-Nmr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, William; Mitchell, Justin

    2009-06-01

    At several points in his defining works on molecular spectroscopy, Herzberg notes that ``because nuclear moments ldots are so very slight ldots transitions between species ldots are very strictly forbiddenldots '' Herzberg's most recent statement of such selection rules pertained to spherical top spin-species. It has since been shown that spherical top species (as well as those of lower symmetry molecules) converge exponentially with momentum quanta J and K to degenerate level clusters wherein even ``very slight'' nuclear fields and moments cause pervasive resonance and total spin species mixing. Ultra-high resolution spectra of Borde, et .al and Pfister et .al shows how SF_6 and SiF_4 Fluorine nuclear spin levels rearrange from total-spin multiplets to NMR-like patterns as their superfine structure converges. Similar super-hyperfine effects are anticipated for lower symmetry molecules exhibiting converging superfine level-clusters. Examples include PH_3 molecules and asymmetric tops. Following this we consider models that treat nuclear spins as coupled rotors undergoing generalized Hund-case transitions from spin-lab-momentum coupling to various spin-rotor correlations. G. A. Herzberg, Electronic Spectra of Polyatomic Molecules, (Von Norstrand Rheinhold 1966) p. 246. W G. Harter and C. W Patterson, Phys. Rev. A 19, 2277 (1979) W. G. Harter, Phys. Rev. A 24, 192 (1981). Ch. J. Borde, J. Borde, Ch. Breant, Ch. Chardonnet, A. Van Lerberghe, and Ch. Salomon, in Laser Spectroscopy VII, T. W Hensch and Y. R. Shen, eds. (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1985). O. Pfister, F. Guernet, G. Charton, Ch. Chardonnet, F. Herlemont, and J. Legrand, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 10, 1521 (1993). O. Pfister, Ch. Chardonnet, and Ch. J. Bordè, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 4516 (1996) S. N. Yurchenko, W. Thiel, S. Patchkovskii, and P. Jensen, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.7, 573 (2005)

  17. Long duration flights of stratospheric balloons in the frame of the Taranis project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Catoire, Valery; Huret, Nathalie

    The satellite instrument TARANIS will be dedicated to the study of the Transient Luminous Events (TLE) above storms, and of the energy transfers between the Earth atmosphere and space. Such phenomena can affect the atmospheric chemistry. Stratospheric balloon instruments can be used for the detection of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen chemistry perturbations induced by these high energy phenomena. Obviously, it is difficult to know in advance when such phenomena can occur and then to be ready for opportune launching of a stratospheric balloon. Then, we propose to use long duration balloons that can reside in the lower and middle stratosphere for more than one week. Open stratospheric balloons could be used for such purpose. Some tests have shown that these balloons could stay several days in the middle stratosphere (around an altitude of 30 km) and can carry heavy gondolas, typically up to 200 kg. Such balloon can flown over large storms and cloud expanses without any risk. In the frame of the TARANIS project, we propose to use such balloons with gondolas carrying different kinds of instruments. Ozone and NO2 measurements can be conducted using remote sensing techniques, using Moon and Sun as light source (SALOMON-type instrument). The integrated path length of the measurements is between tens and few hundreds of km. Following the motion of the balloon (carried by winds) and the motion of the Moon and Sun, a part of the stratosphere above the balloon float motion can be sampled. On the other hand, the estimation of the position of the NO2 enhancements cannot be accurately determined. The second technique involves in situ measurements (SPIRIT-type instrument). In this case, the location of the enhancements can be accurately determined, as well as the absolute values of the species concentrations. On the other hand, the probability of detection is smaller than with remote sensing techniques. Finally, instruments dedicated to the detection of atmospheric "terrestrial

  18. Hepatic signaling by the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2)

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.; Demirkan, Gokhan; Boylan, Joan M.; Mihaylova, Maria M.; Peng, Tao; Ferreira, Jonathan; Neretti, Nicola; Salomon, Arthur; Sabatini, David M.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) exists in two complexes that regulate diverse cellular processes. mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), the canonical target of rapamycin, has been well studied, whereas the physiological role of mTORC2 remains relatively uncharacterized. In mice in which the mTORC2 component Rictor is deleted in liver [Rictor-knockout (RKO) mice], we used genomic and phosphoproteomic analyses to characterize the role of hepatic mTORC2 in vivo. Overnight food withdrawal followed by refeeding was used to activate mTOR signaling. Rapamycin was administered before refeeding to specify mTORC2-mediated events. Hepatic mTORC2 regulated a complex gene expression and post-translational network that affects intermediary metabolism, ribosomal biogenesis, and proteasomal biogenesis. Nearly all changes in genes related to intermediary metabolic regulation were replicated in cultured fetal hepatocytes, indicating a cell-autonomous effect of mTORC2 signaling. Phosphoproteomic profiling identified mTORC2-related signaling to 144 proteins, among which were metabolic enzymes and regulators. A reduction of p38 MAPK signaling in the RKO mice represents a link between our phosphoproteomic and gene expression results. We conclude that hepatic mTORC2 exerts a broad spectrum of biological effects under physiological conditions. Our findings provide a context for the development of targeted therapies to modulate mTORC2 signaling.—Lamming, D. W., Demirkan, G., Boylan, J. M., Mihaylova, M. M., Peng, T., Ferreira, J., Neretti, N., Salomon, A., Sabatini, D. M., Gruppuso, P. A. Hepatic signaling by the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2). PMID:24072782

  19. Uptake Study of Acetone On Ice Using A Vertical Coated Wall Flow Tube. Atmos Pheric Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peybernès, N.; Le Calvé, S.; Mirabel, Ph.

    The upper troposphere defines a region of the atmosphere (between 8 and 12 km) characterised by its low temperatures (-45 to -85 °C) and where cirrus clouds cover a substantial portion (~25 %) of the earth's surface . Some measurements in the upper troposphere showed the presence of high acetone concentrations (up to 3000 pptv) which lead to an enhanced abundance of HOX and likely modify the ozone cycles in this region of the atmosphere. The goal of this work is then to measure uptake coefficients of acetone on ice and to determine its surface coverage. The low pressure and low temperature flow tube (1-5 Torr) has been adapted to study the gas-ice interactions of atmospheric interest. By using this technique, it is possible to study kinetics of chemical reactions on ice which can be doped by adding chemical species 3, 4. This new set-up is coupled with a Mass Spectrometer which allows product identification and quantification. The vertical flow tube has a movable injector which permits to change the reaction distance and then the reaction time. The ice surface is prepared by totally wetting the inner wall of the flow tube with pure water which is then rapidly cooled down to ­20°C. The ice temperature is then regulated between -40°C and -80°C by circulating cool ethanol through a double jacket surrounding the flow tube. Our results permit to estimate the ratio of acetone molecules adsorbed by ice surface to the number of acetone molecules in the gas phase. One can then estimate the influence of its adsorption on ice on its atmospheric lifetime in the upper troposphere. 1Salomon et al., J. Geophys. Res. 102, 21411, (1997). 2S.A. Mckeen et al. Geophys. res. Lett. 24, 3177, (1997). 3 J.P.D. Abbatt et al., J. Geophys. Res. 97, 15819, (1992). 4 D.R. Hanson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 96, 2682, (1992).

  20. Use of KNN technique to improve the efficiency of SCE-UA optimisation method applied to the calibration of HBV Rainfall-Runoff model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakhlaoui, H.; Bargaoui, Z.

    2007-12-01

    The Calibration of Rainfall-Runoff models can be viewed as an optimisation problem involving an objective function that measures the model performance expressed as a distance between observed and calculated discharges. Effectiveness (ability to find the optimum) and efficiency (cost expressed in number of objective function evaluations to reach the optimum) are the main criteria of choose of the optimisation method. SCE-UA is known as one of the most effective and efficient optimisation method. In this work we tried to improve the SCE-UA efficiency, in the case of the calibration of HBV model by using KNN technique to estimate the objective function. In fact after a number of iterations by SCE-UA, when objective function is evaluated by model simulation, a data base of parameter explored and respective objective function values is constituted. Within this data base it is proposed to estimate the objective function in further iterations, by an interpolation using nearest neighbours in a normalised parameter space with weighted Euclidean distance. Weights are chosen proportional to the sensitivity of parameter to objective function that gives more importance to sensitive parameter. Evaluation of model output is done through the objective function RV=R2- w |RD| where R2 is Nash Sutcliffe coefficient related to discharges, w : a weight and RD the relative bias. Applied to theoretical and practical cases in several catchments under different climatic conditions : Rottweil (Germany) and Tessa, Barbra, and Sejnane (Tunisia), the hybrid SCE-UA presents efficiency better then that of initial SCE-UA by about 20 to 30 %. By using other techniques as parameter space transformation and SCE-UA modification (2), we may obtain an algorithm two to three times faster. (1) Avi Ostfeld, Shani Salomons, "A hybrid genetic-instance learning algorithm for CE*QAL-W2 calibration", Journal of Hydrology 310 (2005) 122-125 (2) Nitin Mutil and Shie-Yui Liong, "Improved robustness and Efficiency

  1. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  2. Restoration Materials and Secondary Caries Using an In Vitro Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, F.H.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; de Soet, J.J.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.J.N.M.

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated whether restoration materials and adhesives influence secondary caries formation in gaps using a short-term in vitro biofilm model. Sixty enamel–dentin blocks were restored with 6 different restoration materials with or without adhesives (n = 10 per group) with a gap: 1) Clearfil AP-X composite, 2) Clearfil AP-X composite + SE Bond, 3) Clearfil AP-X composite + ProtectBond, 4) Filtek Silorane composite, 5) Filtek Silorane composite + Silorane System adhesive, or 6) Tytin amalgam. Specimens were subjected to an intermittent 1% sucrose biofilm model for 20 days to create artificial caries lesions. Lesion progression in the enamel–dentin next to the different materials was measured in lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) using transversal wavelength independent microradiography (T-WIM). A regression analysis was used to compare the LD and ML of the different restoration materials at 4 measurement locations: 1 location at the surface of the enamel, 1 location at the wall of the enamel, and 2 locations at the wall of the dentin. A statistically significant effect of AP-X composite with Protect Bond was found for LD and ML at the WallDentin1 location, leading to less advanced wall lesions. An additional finding was that gap size was also statistically significant at the 2 wall locations in dentin, leading to increasing lesion progression with wider gaps. In conclusion, adhesives can influence wall lesion development in gaps. Protect Bond showed significantly less caries progression compared to bare restoration materials or other adhesives in this short-term in vitro biofilm model. PMID:25297114

  3. Sensitivity of modelled snow cover to turbulent flux parameterization and forcing data: a case study in a high altitude basin of the dry Andes, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnard, C.; Irarrazaval, I.; Campos, C.; Gascoin, S.; MacDonell, S.; Macdonell, S.; Herrero, J.

    2016-12-01

    Snow cover in the central-northern Andes of Chile is the main runoff source, providing water for the irrigation of cultures in the fertile valleys downstream. The prospect of adverse climate warming impacts on the hydrological cycle calls for a better understanding of the snow cover dynamics in response to climate, an aspect that has been little studied in the dry Andes. The heterogeneous and often thin snow cover, as well as the paucity of long-term hydrometeorological data makes snow modelling a challenging task in these regions. In this work we applied a physically-based, spatially-distributed snow model (Wimmed) to the La Laguna headwater catchment in the dry Andes (30°S, 70°W) during three hydrological years (2010-2013) when forcing data was available. Model testing at the point scale revealed a large sensitivity of simulated snow depths to the choice of snow roughness parameter (z0), which controls turbulent fluxes, while wind-induced snow erosion at the station in 2010 and 2011 complicated model validation. The inclusion of a mean wind speed map from a previous simulation with the WRF atmospheric model was found to improve the simulation results, while excluding the highest mountain ridge weather station had detrimental effects on the results. A snow roughness (z0) of 1 mm yielded the best comparison between the simulated and observed snow depth at the reference weather station, and between the simulated and MODIS-derived snow cover at the catchment scale. The simulation resulted in large sublimation losses (up to 4 mm day-1), corresponding to more than 80% of snow ablation in the catchment. While such high sublimation rates have been reported before in this region, remaining uncertainties in precipitation data and snow compaction processes call for more detailed studies and increased instrumentation in order to improve future modelling efforts.

  4. The effect of long-term disinfection procedures on hardness property of resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Campanha, Nara Hellen; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lucia; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of long-term disinfection procedures on the Vickers hardness (VHN) of acrylic resin denture teeth. Five acrylic resin denture teeth (Vipi Dent Plus-V, Trilux-T, Biolux-B, Postaris-P and Artiplus-A) and one composite resin denture teeth (SR-Orthosit-O) were embedded in heat-polymerised acrylic resin within polyvinylchloride tubes. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 48 h. Measurements of hardness were taken after the following disinfection procedures: immersion for 7 days in 4% chlorhexidine gluconate or in 1% sodium hypochlorite (CIm and HIm group, respectively) and seven daily cycles of microwave sterilisation at 650 W for 6 min (MwS group). In the WIm group, specimens were maintained in water during the time used to perform the disinfection procedures (7 days). Data were analysed with anova followed by the Bonferroni procedure (α = 0.01). Microwave disinfection decreased the hardness of all acrylic resin denture teeth (p < 0.001). Immersion for 7 days in 4% chlorhexidine gluconate or distilled water had significant effect on the hardness of the acrylic resin denture teeth A (p < 0.01), and 1% sodium hypochlorite on teeth T (p < 0.01). All disinfection procedures decrease the hardness of the composite resin denture teeth (p < 0.01). Teeth O exhibited the highest and teeth V the lowest hardness values in the control group (p < 0.01). Disinfection procedures changed the hardness of resin denture teeth. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Critical period for menarche derived by the wavelet interpolation method from changes in BMI with age in South Korean girls.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Tanaka, Nozomi

    2010-12-01

    Recently, few studies regarding the changes in BMI with age have been reported. In the present study, the wavelet interpolation method (WIM) was applied to the changes in BMI with age from the first grade of elementary school until the second year of high school in Korean girls, and the relationship between age at the maximum peak velocity (MPV) of BMI and age at menarche was confirmed by determining the age at MPV of BMI. Age at menarche and activity status were obtained from questionnaires given to 263 second grade high school girls in the Pusan area of South Korea. Moreover, longitudinal growth data on height and weight from the first grade of elementary school until the second year of high school (from 1997 to 2008) were obtained from health examination records. BMI was calculated from height and weight values from the first grade of elementary school until the second year of high school, and wavelet interpolation was applied to the distances of BMI in each grade. The change curve of BMI with age was determined by wavelet interpolation, and the age at MPV of BMI was determined from the changes in the velocity curve with age as the differentiation curve. Age at MPV of BMI was found to be 12.76 +/- 1.6 years, and age at menarche to be 12.34 +/- 1.1 years. The interval in age at the two times was -0.42 +/- 1.6 years, and a significant difference was seen between age at menarche and age at MPV of BMI. The reason that the age at menarche was a little earlier than the age at MPV of BMI is hypothesized to be abnormal melatonin levels influenced by lack of sleep in Korean school girls. However, it is proposed that the age at MPV of BMI is valid as the critical period for the age at menarche.

  6. Highlights lecture EANM 2014: "Gimme gimme gimme those nuclear Super Troupers".

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marion; Van Laere, Koen

    2015-04-01

    The EANM Congress 2014 took place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from 18 to 22 October under the presidency of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. Prof. Peter Gjertsson chaired the Local Organizing Committee, according to the standardized EANM congress structure. The meeting was a highlight for the multidisciplinary community that forms the heart and soul of nuclear medicine; attendance was exceptionally high. In total almost 5,300 participants came to Gothenburg, and 1,397 colleagues participated via the EANM LIVE sessions ( http://eanmlive.eanm.org/index.php ). Participants from all continents were presented with an excellent programme consisting of symposia, scientific and featured sessions, CME sessions, and plenary lectures. These lectures were devoted to nuclear medicine therapy, hybrid imaging and molecular life sciences. Two tracks were included in the main programme, clustering multi-committee involvement: the 5th International Symposium on Targeted Radionuclide-therapy and Dosimetry (ISTARD) and the first Molecules to Man (M2M) track, an initiative of the EANM Committees for Translational Molecular Imaging, Radiopharmacy and Drug Development. The industry made a substantial contribution to the success of the congress demonstrating the latest technology and innovations in the field. During the closing Highlights Lecture, a selection of the best-rated abstracts was presented including diverse areas of nuclear medicine: physics and instrumentation, radiopharmacy, preclinical imaging, oncology (with a focus on the clinical application of newly developed tracers) and radionuclide therapy, cardiology and neurosciences. This Highlights Lecture could only be a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the meeting, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as Volume 41, Supplement 2 of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging in October 2014.

  7. Analyses of Weapons-Grade MOX VVER-1000 Neutronics Benchmarks: Pin-Cell Calculations with SCALE/SAS2H

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.J.

    2001-01-11

    A series of unit pin-cell benchmark problems have been analyzed related to irradiation of mixed oxide fuel in VVER-1000s (water-water energetic reactors). One-dimensional, discrete-ordinates eigenvalue calculations of these benchmarks were performed at ORNL using the SAS2H control sequence module of the SCALE-4.3 computational code system, as part of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) of the US DOE. Calculations were also performed using the SCALE module CSAS to confirm the results. The 238 neutron energy group SCALE nuclear data library 238GROUPNDF5 (based on ENDF/B-V) was used for all calculations. The VVER-1000 pin-cell benchmark cases modeled with SAS2H included zero-burnup calculations for eight fuel material variants (from LEU UO{sub 2} to weapons-grade MOX) at five different reactor states, and three fuel depletion cases up to high burnup. Results of the SAS2H analyses of the VVER-1000 neutronics benchmarks are presented in this report. Good general agreement was obtained between the SAS2H results, the ORNL results using HELIOS-1.4 with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data, and the results from several Russian benchmark studies using the codes TVS-M, MCU-RFFI/A, and WIMS-ABBN. This SAS2H benchmark study is useful for the verification of HELIOS calculations, the HELIOS code being the principal computational tool at ORNL for physics studies of assembly design for weapons-grade plutonium disposition in Russian reactors.

  8. The Production of Polyclonal Antibodies in Laboratory Animals. The Report and Recommendations of ECVAM Workshop 35.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, P P; Hendriksen, C F; de Leeuw, W A; Carat, F; Delahaut, P; Fischer, R; Halder, M; Hanly, W C; Hartinger, J; Hau, J; Lindblad, E B; Nicklas, W; Outschoorn, I M; Stewart-Tull, D E

    1999-01-01

    This is the report of the thirty-fifth of a series of workshops organised by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM). ECVAM's main goal, as defined in 1993 by its Scientific Advisory Committee, is to promote the scientific and regulatory acceptance of alternative methods which are of importance to the biosciences and which reduce, refine or replace the use of laboratory animals. One of the first priorities set by ECVAM was the implementation of procedures which would enable it to become well informed about the state-of-the-art of non-animal test development and validation, and the potential for the possible incorporation of alternative tests into regulatory procedures. It was decided that this would be best achieved by the organisation of ECVAM workshops on specific topics, at which small groups of invited experts would review the current status of various types of in vitro tests and their potential uses, and make recommendations about the best ways forward (1). This joint ECVAM/FELASA (Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations) workshop on The Immunisation of Laboratory Animals for the Production of Polyclonal Antibodies was held in Utrecht (The Netherlands), on 20-22 March 1998, under the co-chairmanship of Coenraad Hendriksen (RIVM, Bilthoven, The Netherlands) and Wim de Leeuw (Inspectorate for Health Protection, The Netherlands). The participants, all experts in the fields of immunology, laboratory animal science, or regulation, came from universities, industry and regulatory bodies. The aims of the workshop were: a) to discuss and evaluate current immunisation procedures for the production of polyclonal antibodies (including route of injection, animal species and adjuvant ); and b) to draft recommendations and guidelines to improve the immunisation procedures, with regard both to animal welfare and to the optimisation of immunisation protocols. This report summarises the outcome of the discussions and includes

  9. Vapour-liquid interfacial properties of square-well chains from density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, Francisco José; Blas, Felipe J; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A Ignacio; Míguez, José Manuel; MacDowell, Luis G

    2017-05-17

    The statistical associating fluid theory for attractive potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR) density functional theory (DFT) developed by [Gloor et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 121, 12740-12759] is used to predict the interfacial behaviour of molecules modelled as fully-flexible square-well chains formed from tangentially-bonded monomers of diameter σ and potential range λ = 1.5σ. Four different model systems, comprising 4, 8, 12, and 16 monomers per molecule, are considered. In addition to that, we also compute a number of interfacial properties of molecular chains from direct simulation of the vapour-liquid interface. The simulations are performed in the canonical ensemble, and the vapour-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using the wandering interface (WIM) method, a technique based on the thermodynamic definition of surface tension. Apart from surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, vapour pressures, and critical temperature and density, paying particular attention to the effect of the chain length on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the chain length (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as the molecular chains get longer. The interfacial thickness and surface tension appear to exhibit an asymptotic limiting behaviour for long chains. A similar behaviour is also observed for the coexistence densities and critical properties. Agreement between theory and simulation results indicates that SAFT-VR DFT is only able to predict qualitatively the interfacial properties of the model. Our results are also compared with simulation data taken from the literature, including the vapour-liquid coexistence densities, vapour pressures, and surface tension.

  10. Preliminary Analysis of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) with PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Connaway, H. M.; Lee, C. H.

    2015-11-30

    The neutron transport code PROTEUS has been used to perform preliminary simulations of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). TREAT is an experimental reactor designed for the testing of nuclear fuels and other materials under transient conditions. It operated from 1959 to 1994, when it was placed on non-operational standby. The restart of TREAT to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s resumption of transient testing is currently underway. Both single assembly and assembly-homogenized full core models have been evaluated. Simulations were performed using a historic set of WIMS-ANL-generated cross-sections as well as a new set of Serpent-generated cross-sections. To support this work, further analyses were also performed using additional codes in order to investigate particular aspects of TREAT modeling. DIF3D and the Monte-Carlo codes MCNP and Serpent were utilized in these studies. MCNP and Serpent were used to evaluate the effect of geometry homogenization on the simulation results and to support code-to-code comparisons. New meshes for the PROTEUS simulations were created using the CUBIT toolkit, with additional meshes generated via conversion of selected DIF3D models to support code-to-code verifications. All current analyses have focused on code-to-code verifications, with additional verification and validation studies planned. The analysis of TREAT with PROTEUS-SN is an ongoing project. This report documents the studies that have been performed thus far, and highlights key challenges to address in future work.

  11. The behaviour of transuranic mixed oxide fuel in a Candu-900 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Morreale, A. C.; Ball, M. R.; Novog, D. R.; Luxat, J. C.

    2012-07-01

    The production of transuranic actinide fuels for use in current thermal reactors provides a useful intermediary step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Extraction of actinides reduces the longevity, radiation and heat loads of spent material. The burning of transuranic fuels in current reactors for a limited amount of cycles reduces the infrastructure demand for fast reactors and provides an effective synergy that can result in a reduction of as much as 95% of spent fuel waste while reducing the fast reactor infrastructure needed by a factor of almost 13.5 [1]. This paper examines the features of actinide mixed oxide fuel, TRUMOX, in a CANDU{sup R}* nuclear reactor. The actinide concentrations used were based on extraction from 30 year cooled spent fuel and mixed with natural uranium in 3.1 wt% actinide MOX fuel. Full lattice cell modeling was performed using the WIMS-AECL code, super-cell calculations were analyzed in DRAGON and full core analysis was executed in the RFSP 2-group diffusion code. A time-average full core model was produced and analyzed for reactor coefficients, reactivity device worth and online fuelling impacts. The standard CANDU operational limits were maintained throughout operations. The TRUMOX fuel design achieved a burnup of 27.36 MWd/kg HE. A full TRUMOX fuelled CANDU was shown to operate within acceptable limits and provided a viable intermediary step for burning actinides. The recycling, reprocessing and reuse of spent fuels produces a much more sustainable and efficient nuclear fuel cycle. (authors)

  12. Laboratory and Field Spectroscopy of Moon analogue material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    Samples derived from terrestrial analogue sites are studied to gain insight into lunar processes in their geological context (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011). For this study samples from the volcanic region of the Eifel, Germany collected during our latest field campaigns in November 2015 and February 2016 (Foing et al., 2010), are analyzed with a variety of spectrometers. The aim is to obtain a database of analyzed samples that could be used as a reference for future in situ measurements. We also use a documented set of Moon-Mars relevant minerals curated at VU Amsterdam. We are using systematically for all samples UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers, and sporadically a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and a Raman laser spectrometer on control samples. Calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers is the main focus of this research in order to obtain the clearest spectra. The calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers requires the use of a good light source as well as suitable optical fibers to create a signal that covers the widest range in wavelengths available. To eliminate noise towards the edges of this range, multiple measurements are averaged and data is processed by dividing the signal by reference spectra. Obtained spectra can be tested for accuracy by comparing them with stationary laboratory spectrometers such as the FTIR spectrometer. The Raman, UV-VIS and NIR are also used in combination with the ExoGeoLab mock-up lander during field campaigns (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011) also brought again to Eifel in February 2016, to prove the applicability of the equipment in the field. Acknowledgements: we thank Dominic Doyle for ESTEC optical lab support, Euan Monaghan (Leiden U) for FTIR measurement support, Wim van Westrenen for access to VU samples, Oscar Kamps (Utrecht U./ESTEC), Aidan Cowley (EAC) and Matthias Sperl (DLR) for support discussions

  13. Formal definition and dating of the GSSP (Global Stratotype Section and Point) for the base of the Holocene using the Greenland NGRIP ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, S. O.

    2009-04-01

    The Greenland ice core from NorthGRIP (NGRIP) contains a proxy climate record across the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary of unprecedented clarity and resolution. Analysis of an array of physical and chemical parameters within the ice enables the base of the Holocene, as reflected in the first signs of climatic warming at the end of the Younger Dryas/Greenland Stadial 1 cold phase, to be located with a high degree of precision. This climatic event is most clearly reflected in an abrupt shift in deuterium excess values, accompanied by more gradual changes in ^18O, dust concentration, a range of chemical species, and annual layer thickness. A timescale based on multi-parameter annual layer counting provides an age of 11,700 calendar yr b2k (before AD 2000) for the base of the Holocene, with a maximum counting error of 99 yr. A proposal that an archived core from this unique sequence should constitute the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Holocene Series/Epoch (Quaternary System/Period) has been ratified by the International Union of Geological Sciences. The results have been published in Journal of Quaternary Science vol. 24(1), pp. 3-17, 2009 by an author team consisting of Mike Walker, Sigfus Johnsen, Sune Olander Rasmussen, Trevor Popp, Jørgen-Peder Steffensen, Phil Gibbard, Wim Hoek, John Lowe, John Andrews, Svante Björck, Les C. Cwynar, Konrad Hughen, Peter Kershaw, Bernd Kromer, Thomas Litt, David J. Lowe, Takeshi Nakagawa, Rewi Newnham, and Jakob Schwander. The poster presents the definition and the underlying data.

  14. Confirmation of delayed menarche based on regression evaluation of age at menarche for age at MPV of height in female ball game players.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Demura, Schinichi

    2005-01-01

    A general delay in menarche in female athletes has been confirmed based on comparisons of mean ages between athletes and non-athletes; however, it has not been possible to judge such delays individually. If delayed menarche could be evaluated for an individual, the athlete could be advised as to necessary precautions. In this study, the age at maximum peak velocity (MPV) of height, adopted as an index of physical maturation, was identified by the wavelet interpolation method (WIM). The relationship between the age at menarche and age at MPV of height in female athletes and non-athletes was then examined. For the athlete group, health examination records of 90 female ball game players in the first year of university in the Tokai area, all of whom had participated in national level competitions, were reviewed for the period from the first grade of elementary school until the final year of high school (from 1985 to 1996). A similar examination was conducted for the control group, among whom a final group of 78 female non-athletes were selected. The age at menarche was determined by questionnaires, and the longitudinal data for height and weight were obtained from the health examination records. Based on a comparison of the difference between the age at MPV of height and age at menarche in ball game players and the control group, a tendency was seen for the difference between the two ages to narrow as the age at MPV of height rose. A corrected regression evaluation of age at menarche against age at MPV of height was derived in the control group, and the evaluation system was applied to ball game players. The delay in menarche in ball game players could be individually evaluated.

  15. Characterizing the Dust-Correlated Anomalous Emission in LDN 1622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kieran; Casassus, Simon; Dickinson, Clive; Lawrence, Charles; Sakon, Itsuki

    2008-03-01

    The search for 'dust-correlated microwave emission' was started by the surprising excess correlation of COBE-DMR maps, at 31.5, 53 and 91GHz, with DIRBE dust emission at 140 microns. It was first thought to be Galactic free-free emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM). However, Leitch et al. (1997) ruled out a link with free-free by comparing with Halpha templates and first confirmed the anomalous nature of this emission. Since then, this emission has been detected by a number of experiments in the frequency range 5-60 GHz. The most popular explanation is emission from ultra-small spinning dust grains (first postulated by Erickson, 1957), which is expected to have a spectrum that is highly peaked at about 20 GHz. Spinning dust models appear to be broadly consistent with microwave data at high latitudes, but the data have not been conclusive, mainly due to the difficulty of foreground separation in CMB data. LDN 1622 is a dark cloud that lies within the Orion East molecular cloud at a distance of 120 pc. Recent cm-wave observations, in combination with WMAP data, have verified the detection of anomalous dust-correlated emission in LDN 1622. This mid-IR-cm correlation in LDN 1622 is currently the only observational evidence that very small grains VSG emit at GHz frequencies. We propose a programme of spectroscopic observations of LDN 1622 with Spitzer IRS to address the following questions: (i) Are the IRAS 12 and 25 microns bands tracing VSG emission in LDN 1622? (ii) What Mid-IR features and continuum bands best correlate with the cm-wave emission? and (iii) How do the dust properties vary with the cm-wave emission? These questions have important implications for high-sensitivity CMB experiments.

  16. Massive Stars and the Ionization of the Diffuse Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Lauren E.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    2015-08-01

    Diffuse ionized Gas (DIG, sometimes called the warm ionized medium or WIM) has been recognized as a major component of the interstellar medium (ISM) in disk galaxies. A general understanding of the characteristics of the DIG is emerging, but several questions remain unanswered. One of these is the ionization mechanism for this gas, believed to be connected to OB stars and HII regions. Using 5-band (NUV (2750 A), U, V, B, and I) photometric imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Legacy Extragalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS) and ground-based Halpha data from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey and HST Halpha data from LEGUS, we will investigate the photoionization of HII regions and DIG in nearly 50 galaxies. The 5-band photometry will enable us to determine properties of the most massive stars and reddening corrections for specific regions within a galaxy. Luminosities and ages for groups and clusters will be obtained from SED-fitting of photometric data. For individual stars ages will be determined from isochrone-fitting using reddening-corrected color-magnitude diagrams. We can then obtain estimates of the ionizing luminosities by matching these photometric properties for massive stars and clusters to various stellar atmosphere models. We will compare these predictions to the inferred Lyman continuum production rates from reddening-corrected ground- and HST-based Halpha data for HII regions and DIG. This particular presentation will demonstrate the above process for a set of selected regions in galaxies within the LEGUS sample. It will subsequently be expanded to cover the full LEGUS sample, with the overall goals of obtaining a better understanding of the radiative energy feedback from massive stars on the ISM, particularly their ability to ionize the surrounding ISM over a wide range of spatial scales and SFR surface densities, and to connect the ionization of the ISM to HII region morphologies.

  17. Planetary Transmission Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G. (Technical Monitor); Samuel, Paul D.; Conroy, Joseph K.; Pines, Darryll J.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a methodology for detecting and diagnosing gear faults in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission. This diagnostic technique is based on the constrained adaptive lifting algorithm. The lifting scheme, developed by Wim Sweldens of Bell Labs, is a time domain, prediction-error realization of the wavelet transform that allows for greater flexibility in the construction of wavelet bases. Classic lifting analyzes a given signal using wavelets derived from a single fundamental basis function. A number of researchers have proposed techniques for adding adaptivity to the lifting scheme, allowing the transform to choose from a set of fundamental bases the basis that best fits the signal. This characteristic is desirable for gear diagnostics as it allows the technique to tailor itself to a specific transmission by selecting a set of wavelets that best represent vibration signals obtained while the gearbox is operating under healthy-state conditions. However, constraints on certain basis characteristics are necessary to enhance the detection of local wave-form changes caused by certain types of gear damage. The proposed methodology analyzes individual tooth-mesh waveforms from a healthy-state gearbox vibration signal that was generated using the vibration separation (synchronous signal-averaging) algorithm. Each waveform is separated into analysis domains using zeros of its slope and curvature. The bases selected in each analysis domain are chosen to minimize the prediction error, and constrained to have the same-sign local slope and curvature as the original signal. The resulting set of bases is used to analyze future-state vibration signals and the lifting prediction error is inspected. The constraints allow the transform to effectively adapt to global amplitude changes, yielding small prediction errors. However, local wave-form changes associated with certain types of gear damage are poorly adapted, causing a significant change in the

  18. System design of the compact IR space imaging system MIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Lee, Dae-Hee; Park, Youngsik; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Ree, Chang-Hee; Moon, Bongkon; Cha, Sang-Mok; Park, Sung-Joon; Park, Jang-Hyun; Nam, Uk-Won; Ka, Nung Hyun; Lee, Mi Hyun; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Seon, Kwang-Il; Lee, Duk-Hang; Yang, Sun Choel; Rhee, Seung-Woo; Park, Jong-Oh; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2010-07-01

    Multi-purpose Infra-Red Imaging System (MIRIS) is the main payload of the Korea Science and Technology Satellite-3 (STSAT-3), which is being developed by Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute (KASI). MIRIS is a small space telescope mainly for astronomical survey observations in the near infrared wavelengths of 0.9~2 μm. A compact wide field (3.67 x 3.67 degree) optical design has been studied using a 256 x 256 Teledyne PICNIC FPA IR sensor with a pixel scale of 51.6 arcsec. The passive cooling technique is applied to maintain telescope temperature below 200 K with a cold shutter in the filter wheel for accurate dark calibration and to reach required sensitivity, and a micro stirling cooler is employed to cool down the IR detector array below 100K in a cold box. The science mission of the MIRIS is to survey the Galactic plane in the emission line of Paschen-α (Paα, 1.88 μm) and to detect the cosmic infrared background (CIB) radiation. Comparing the Paα map with the Hα data from ground-based surveys, we can probe the origin of the warm-ionized medium (WIM) of the Galaxy. The CIB is being suspected to be originated from the first generation stars of the Universe and we will test this hypothesis by comparing the fluctuations in I (0.9~1.2 um) and H (1.2~2.0 um) bands to search the red shifted Lyman cutoff signature. Recent progress of the MIRIS imaging system design will be presented.

  19. Combining modelling and monitoring to determine fluxes of water, dissolved and particulate metals through the Dover Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandle, D.; Ballard, G.; Flatt, D.; Harrison, A. J.; Jones, S. E.; Knight, P. J.; Loch, S.; McManus, J.; Player, R.; Tappin, A.

    1996-02-01

    Contaminant fluxes in a shelf sea system are determined from a series of interrelated studies involving monitoring, modelling and theoretical development. Year-long measurements of currents through the Dover Strait were made in 1990-1991 using both shore-based high frequency (HF) radar and a bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). These measurements were combined to determine both the residual component of tidal flow and the wind-forced residual flow resulting in an estimate of the net long term flow into the North Sea of 94,000 m 3 s -1—a value in close agreement with the most recent high resolution modelling of Salomon et al. (1993). The temporal variability in these radar and ADCP observations are compared with synoptic wind, tide gauge and numerical model data. The fluxes of the dissolved metals Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn through the Straits are then calculated using concentrations in the Strait derived from a study by McManus and Prandle (1994). The latter involved multiple regression of model simulations of dispersion (with the model flow through the Dover Strait corresponding to the above monitored value) against data from four surveys in the southern North Sea carried out in 1988-1989 as part of the North Sea Project. The mean concentrations determined from this inverse modelling technique depend directly on the net water flux through the Strait. Thus, since it is shown here that the results for the more conservative metals Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn agree closely with direct measurements by Statham et al. (1993), this lends further confidence to this new estimate of net flow derived from monitoring. The flux of suspended sediments is calculated using time and cross-sectionally averaged suspended sediment concentrations obtained during a cruise in June 1990 (Jones et al., 1993). The particulate metal fluxes are calculated by combining these suspended sediment concentrations with the dissolved metal concentrations and publised Kd (partitioning

  20. Seasonal Variability of Current Anomaly, Temperature and Chlorophyll North of New Guinea Island Inferred from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radenac, M.; Léger, F.; Dutrieux, P.; Menkes, C.; Eldin, G.

    2012-12-01

    , cool and phytoplankton rich surface water does not go through Vitiaz Strait and seems to be advected in the Bismarck Sea. During austral winter, the NGCC (and the coastal current anomaly) flows northwestward, advecting cold water from the Salomon Sea along the coast from Vitiaz Strait to 142°E-141°E. No westward advection of phytoplankton rich surface water is observed.

  1. The ACES Mission: System Tests Results and Development Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapuoti, Luigi

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) testing fundamental laws of physics with high-performance atomic clocks1 . Operated on-board the International Space Station, the ACES payload will distribute a clock signal with fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy of 1·10-16 . This frequency reference is resulting from the medium-term stability of an active hydrogen maser (SHM) and the long-term stability and accuracy of a primary standard based on samples of laser cooled Cs atoms (PHARAO). The ACES clocks are combined by two servo-loops, the first stabilizing the PHARAO local oscillator on SHM, the second controlling the long-term instabilities of SHM using the error signal generated by the PHARAO Cesium resonator. A link in the microwave domain (MWL) and an optical link (ELT) will make the ACES clock signal available to ground laboratories equipped with atomic clocks, connecting them in a worldwide network. Space-to-ground and ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards will be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity including a precision measurement of the gravitational red-shift, a search for time variations of fundamental constants, and Lorentz Invariance tests. Applications in geodesy, optical time transfer, and ranging will also be supported. The ACES main instruments and subsystems have now reached an advanced status of devel-opment, demonstrated by the completion and the successful test of their engineering models. In particular, a dedicated test campaign has recently verified the performance of the ACES system, where PHARAO and SHM, locked together via the ACES servo loops, are operated as a unique oscillator to generate the ACES frequency reference. The test campaign conducted 1 Luigi Cacciapuoti and Christophe Salomon, Space Clocks and Fundamental Tests: The ACES Experiment, EPJ Special topics 172, 57 (2009). at CNES premises in Toulouse between July and November 2009 concluded

  2. Vertical distribution of the different types of aerosols in the stratosphere: Detection of solid particles and analysis of their spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Brogniez, Colette; Berthet, GwenaëL.; Bourgeois, Quentin; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Chartier, Michel; Balois, Jean-Yves; Verwaerde, Christian; Auriol, FréDéRique; Francois, Philippe; Daugeron, Daniel; Engrand, CéCile

    2008-11-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. In the past, it was assumed that only liquid droplets are present in the stratosphere. Nevertheless, a few lidar measurements have shown that sudden enhancement of aerosol content in the middle stratosphere could be due to meteoritic debris. Aircraft measurements have shown that solid particles can be found in the lower stratosphere; these particles are mainly soot, but also include some interplanetary material. In order to better document the various characteristics of aerosols in the unperturbed stratosphere (i.e., free of volcanic aerosols), we have performed observations using different balloon-borne instruments (Stratospheric and Tropospheric Aerosol Counter (STAC), Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (SALOMON), and Micro Radiomètre Ballon (MicroRADIBAL)) and also some satellite data (Global ozone monitoring by occultation of stars Envisat (GOMOS-Envisat)). These instruments allow us to obtain the number of particles in different size classes, the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction, and the radiance of the light scattered by aerosols. Combining all the data together, it appears that significant amounts of particles are ubiquitous in the middle stratosphere, above the canonical sulfate aerosol layer. "Background" interplanetary dusts in low concentration are likely present in the stratosphere. Above 30 km, interplanetary dust and largest grains from meteoroid disintegration dominate. Although the disintegration of meteoroids occurs in the upper stratosphere or in the mesosphere at all latitudes, these solid aerosols can be transported to the polar regions by the general circulation and can descend into the middle and lower stratosphere during winter mesospheric descents. Between about 22 km and 30 km, soot particles contribute to the population of aerosols at all latitudes. These soot, likely originating from biomass burning at

  3. Photochemical properties of the flavin mononucleotide-binding domains of the phototropins from Arabidopsis, rice, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Swartz, Trevor E; Olney, Margaret A; Onodera, Akihiko; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Asamizu, Erika; Tabata, Satoshi; Kanegae, Hiromi; Takano, Makoto; Christie, John M; Nagatani, Akira; Briggs, Winslow R

    2002-06-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2, formerly designated nph1 and npl1) are blue-light receptors that mediate phototropism, blue light-induced chloroplast relocation, and blue light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Phototropins contain two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains at their N termini (LOV1 and LOV2), each a binding site for the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Their C termini contain a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. Here, we examine the kinetic properties of the LOV domains of Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2, rice (Oryza sativa) phot1 and phot2, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phot. When expressed in Escherichia coli, purified LOV domains from all phototropins examined bind FMN tightly and undergo a self-contained photocycle, characterized by fluorescence and absorption changes induced by blue light (T. Sakai, T. Kagawa, M. Kasahara, T.E. Swartz, J.M. Christie, W.R. Briggs, M. Wada, K. Okada [2001] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98: 6969-6974; M. Salomon, J.M. Christie, E. Knieb, U. Lempert, W.R. Briggs [2000] Biochemistry 39: 9401-9410). The photocycle involves the light-induced formation of a cysteinyl adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the FMN chromophore, which subsequently breaks down in darkness. In each case, the relative quantum efficiencies for the photoreaction and the rate constants for dark recovery of LOV1, LOV2, and peptides containing both LOV domains are presented. Moreover, the data obtained from full-length Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 expressed in insect cells closely resemble those obtained for the tandem LOV-domain fusion proteins expressed in E. coli. For both Arabidopsis and rice phototropins, the LOV domains of phot1 differ from those of phot2 in their reaction kinetic properties and relative quantum efficiencies. Thus, in addition to differing in amino acid sequence, the phototropins can be distinguished on the basis of the photochemical cycles of their LOV domains. The LOV domains of C. reinhardtii phot also undergo light

  4. Facts and fiction surrounding the discovery of the venous valves.

    PubMed

    Scultetus, A H; Villavicencio, J L; Rich, N M

    2001-02-01

    Venous valves are delicate structures, the integrity of which is crucial for the normal function of the venous system. Their abnormalities lead to widespread disorders, ranging from chronic venous insufficiency to life-threatening thromboembolic phenomena. The discovery of the venous valves, however, has been the subject of hot controversy. Even though Fabricius ab Aquapendente is credited with the discovery by most historians, we demonstrate in this paper that other anatomists described them many years before Fabricius ab Aquapendente publicly demonstrated them in Padua in 1579. A thorough review of the historical literature surrounding the discovery of the venous valves was carried out from 1545 to the present under the supervision of the Medical History Department of our institution. Research was performed at the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine and through MEDLINE access to the medical literature. The Parisian Charles Estienne first mentioned the venous valves in his 1545 publication when he described "apophyses membranarum" in the veins of the liver. Lusitanus and Canano publicly demonstrated them in the azygos vein during cadaver dissections performed in Ferrera, Italy. The Parisian Jacques Sylvius described valves in the veins of the extremities in 1555. The work of these anatomists, however, could not achieve full recognition, because Andreas Vesalius, the leading anatomist at that time, was unable to confirm their findings and strongly denied the existence of venous valves. Vesalius's influence was so powerful that research on the subject was idle until 1579, when Fabricius ab Aquapendente "discovered" the venous valves. About the same time, the German Salomon Alberti published the first drawings of a venous valve (in 1585). William Harvey, a disciple of Fabricius ab Aquapendente, finally postulated the function of the venous valves, providing anatomical support for one of the greatest discoveries in medicine: the blood

  5. [Rehabilitation outcomes of terror victims with multiple trauma: the experience in Hadassah University Hospital 2000-2004].

    PubMed

    Meiner, Zeev; Tuchner, Maya; Shiri, Shimon; Tsenter, Jeanna; Shochina, Mara; Shoshan, Yigal; Katz-Leurer, Michal; Schwartz, Isabella

    2008-11-01

    From late September 2000 until 2005, the State of Israel was attacked by continuing acts of terrorism known as the Al Aqsa Intifada. During this period the number of terror victims treated in rehabilitation facilities has escalated significantly. The city of Jerusalem has a unique place in the heart of the Israel-Palestinian conflict and, therefore, almost 20% of national atrocities have been carried out in Jerusalem. Between September.2000 and September 2004, 72 terror victims were treated in the department of rehabilitation in Hadassah University Hospital. Among them, 47 (65%) suffered from multiple trauma without CNS involvment, 19 (26%) suffered from traumatic brain injury and 6 (8%) suffered from spinal cord injury. The rehabilitation outcomes of terror victims was compared to the rehabilitation outcomes of non-terror multiple trauma patients treated in the same rehabilitation facility over the same period. The rehabilitation outcomes were evaluted using the following parameters: length of hospitalization (LOH) in acute care departments, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation departments, functional outcome (Functional Independence Measurement, FIM), occupational outcome (returning to previous occupation) and psychological outcome (Salomon PTSD questionnaire). The mean LOH of terror victims was 218 +/- 131 days as opposed to 152 +/- 114 days for the non-terror group (p < 0.01). The difference between FIM value at entry and discharge (delta FIM) was significantlly higher in terror victims as compared to controls (41.1 +/- 21.6 vs. 30.8 +/- 21.8, p = 0.002). The rate of PTSD was higher among terror victims than non-terror control (40.9% vs. 24.2%, p = 0.04). The rate of returning to previous occupation was similar between terror and non-terror victims (53% vs. 46.9% respectively). Long term study showed that terror victims still suffer from lower quality of life and life satisfaction 2 years after the insult. In summary, terror victims spent longer periods in

  6. EDITORIAL: CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2010-09-01

    QED. Another rapidly growing research field (although its origin can be traced to the beginning of the 1980s) is the quantum control of evolution at the microscopic level. These examples show that quantum non-stationary systems continue to be a living and very interesting part of quantum physics, uniting researchers from many different areas. Thus it is no mere chance that several special scientific meetings devoted to these topics have been organized recently. One was the international seminar 'Time-Dependent Phenomena in Quantum Mechanics' organized by Manfred Kleber and Tobias Kramer in 2007 at Blaubeuren, Germany. The proceedings of that event were published in 2008 as volume 99 of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Another recent meeting was the International Workshop on Quantum Non-Stationary Systems, held on 19-23 October 2009 at the International Center for Condensed Matter Physics (ICCMP) in Brasilia, Brazil. It was organized and directed by Victor Dodonov (Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, Brazil), Vladimir Man'ko (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia) and Salomon Mizrahi (Physics Department, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil). This event was accompanied by a satellite workshop 'Quantum Dynamics in Optics and Matter', organized by Salomon Mizrahi and Victor Dodonov on 25-26 October 2009 at the Physics Department of the Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil. These two workshops, supported by the Brazilian federal agencies CAPES and CNPq and the local agencies FAP-DF and FAPESP, were attended by more than 120 participants from 16 countries. Almost 50 invited talks and 20 poster presentations covered a wide area of research in quantum mechanics, quantum optics and quantum information. This special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta contains contributions presented by some invited speakers and participants of the workshop in Brasilia. Although they do not cover all of the wide spectrum of problems related to quantum non

  7. Scale effects on the evapotranspiration estimation over a water-controlled Mediterranean ecosystem and its influence on hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpintero, Elisabet; González-Dugo, María P.; José Polo, María; Hain, Christopher; Nieto, Héctor; Gao, Feng; Andreu, Ana; Kustas, William; Anderson, Martha

    2017-04-01

    the dehesa (38 ° 12 'N, 4 ° 17' W, 736 m a.s.l.). The results supported the ability of ALEXI/DisALEXI model to accurately estimate turbulent and radiative fluxes over this complex landscape, both at 1 Km and at 30 m spatial resolution. The application of the STARFM model gave significant improvement in capturing the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of ET over the different seasons, compared with traditional interpolation methods using MODIS and Landsat ET data. At basin scale, the physically-based distributed hydrological model WiMMed has been applied to evaluate ET estimates. This model focuses on the spatial interpolation of the meteorological variables and the physical modelling of the daily water balance at the cell and watershed scale, using daily streamflow rates measured at the watershed outlet for final comparison.

  8. The near boiling reactor: Conceptual design of a small inherently safe nuclear reactor to extend the operational capability of the Victoria Class submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Christopher J. P.

    Nuclear power has several unique advantages over other air independent energy sources for nuclear combat submarines. An inherently safe, small nuclear reactor, capable of supply the hotel load of the Victoria Class submarines, has been conceptually developed. The reactor is designed to complement the existing diesel electric power generation plant presently onboard the submarine. The reactor, rated at greater than 1 MW thermal, will supply electricity to the submarine's batteries through an organic Rankine cycle energy conversion plant at 200 kW. This load will increase the operational envelope of the submarine by providing up to 28 continuous days submerged, allowing for an enhanced indiscretion ratio (ratio of time spent on the surface versus time submerged) and a limited under ice capability. The power plant can be fitted into the existing submarine by inserting a 6 m hull plug. With its simplistic design and inherent safety features, the reactor plant will require a minimal addition to the crew. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles for increased safety. The light water coolant remains at atmospheric pressure, exiting the core at 96°C. Burn-up control and limiting excess reactivity is achieved through movable reflector plates. Shut down and regulatory control is achieved through the thirteen hafnium control rods. Inherent safety is achieved through the negative prompt and delayed temperature coefficients, as well as the negative void coefficient. During a transient, the boiling of the moderator results in a sudden drop in reactivity, essentially shutting down the reactor. It is this characteristic after which the reactor has been named. The design of the reactor was achieved through modelling using computer codes such as MCNP5, WIMS-AECL, FEMLAB, and MicroShield5, in addition to specially written software for kinetics, heat transfer and fission product poisoning calculations. The work has covered a broad area of research and has highlighted additional areas

  9. Molybdenite Re-Os, zircon U-Pb dating and Lu-Hf isotopic analysis of the Xiaerchulu Au deposit, Inner Mongolia Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-xin; Nie, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Xue-ni; Jiang, Si-hong

    2016-09-01

    The Xiaerchulu Au deposit, located in the Southern Orogenic Belt (SOB) of Western Inner Mongolia (WIM), is hosted in an Early Permian (271-261 Ma) volcanic-plutonic sequence. Mineralization took place in silicified biotite granites or along the contact zone between the Neoproterozoic Baiyinbaolage Group and the biotite granite. In order to constrain the timing of the Xiaerchulu mineralization and discuss the petrogenesis of the hosting granites, molybdenite Re-Os, and zircon U-Pb and, Lu-Hf, and REE, geochemical, and Sr-Nd isotopic studies were completed in this study. We measured Re-Os isotopes of six molybdenite samples from the main ore body, which yielded a weighted average model age of 261.7 ± 1.5 Ma with a MSWD of 0.55, indicating that the time of mineralization was at ca. 262 Ma. High precision U-Pb dating for the studied granites yields Permian 206Pb/238U ages ranging from 271 to 269 Ma. These age data confirm that both the intrusion and related mineralization were initiated in Early Permian period. These granites are strongly peraluminous with A/CNK = 1.11-1.12, high SiO2-K2O contents, as well as containing biotite and muscovite, indicating a petrogenesis of typical S-type granites, the above consideration is also consistent with the result of discrimination diagrams. The Re contents of molybdenite, εNd(t), and zircon εHf(t), as well as the 176Hf/177Hf values of the granites, fall into the ranges from 1.153 to 2.740 μg/g, - 11.1 to - 9.3, - 8.8 to - 0.9, and 0.282358 to 0.282688, respectively. All of this evidence suggests that the metals were derived from a predominantly crustal source, the granites originated from crust in an extensional setting, and the rejuvenation of the continent may have play an important role during the ore-forming processes of the Early Permian epoch.

  10. Flood-inundation map library for the Licking River and South Fork Licking River near Falmouth, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2016-09-19

    Digital flood inundation maps for a 17-mile reach of Licking River and 4-mile reach of South Fork Licking River near Falmouth, Kentucky, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Pendleton County and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers–Louisville District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://wim.usgs.gov/FIMI/FloodInundationMapper.html, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Licking River at Catawba, Ky., (station 03253500) and the USGS streamgage on the South Fork Licking River at Hayes, Ky., (station 03253000). Current conditions (2015) for the USGS streamgages may be obtained online at the USGS National Water Information System site (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis). In addition, the streamgage information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The flood hydrograph forecasts provided by the NWS are usually collocated with USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the NWS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.In this study, flood profiles were computed for the Licking River reach and South Fork Licking River reach by using a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current (2015) stage-discharge relations for the Licking River at Catawba, Ky., and the South Fork Licking River at Hayes, Ky., USGS streamgages. The calibrated model was then used to calculate 60 water-surface profiles for a sequence of flood stages, at 2-foot intervals, referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from an elevation near bankfull to the elevation associated with a major flood that

  11. The Effect on Soil Erosion of Different Tillage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gür, Kazım

    2016-04-01

    The Effects on Soil Erosion of Different Tillage Applications Kazım Gür1, Kazim Çarman2 and Wim M.Cornelis3 1Bahri Daǧdaş International Agricultural Research Instıtute, 42020 Konya, Turkey 2Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Machinery, University of Selçuk, 42031 Konya, Turkey 3Department of Soil Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, 653 Coupure Links, 9000 Gent, Belgium Traditional soil cultivation systems, with excessive and inappropriate soil tillage, will generally lead to soil degradation and loss of soil by wind erosion. Continuous reduced tillage and no-till maintaining soil cover with plant residues called Conservation Agriculture that is considered as effective in reducing erosion. There exist a wide variety of practices using different tools that comply with reduced tillage principles. However, few studies have compared the effect of several of such tools in reducing wind erosion and related soil and surface properties. We therefore measured sediment transport rates over bare soil surfaces (but with under stubbles of wheat, Triticum aestivum L.) subjected to three tillage practices using two pulling type machines and one type of power takeoff movable machines and generated with a portable field wind tunnel. At 10 ms-1, sediment transport rates varied from 107 to 573 gm-1h-1, and from 176 to 768 gm-1h-1 at 13 ms-1. The lowest transport rates were observed for N(no-tillage) and the highest for Rr(L-type rototiller). After tillage, surface roughness, mean weighted diameter, wind erodible fraction, mechanical stability and soil water content were measured as well and varied from 5.0 to 15.9%, 6.9 to 13.8 mm, 14.3 to 29.7%, 79.5 to 93.4% and 8.6 to 15.1%, respectively, with again N is being the most successful practice. In terms of conservation soil tillage technique, it can be said that the applications compared with each other; direct sowing machine is more appropriate and cause to the less erosion.

  12. Probabilistic flood forecasting tool for Andalusia (Spain). Application to September 2012 disaster event in Vera Playa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Darío; Baquerizo, Asunción; Ortega, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Ángel Losada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Torrential and heavy rains are frequent in Andalusia (Southern Spain) due to the characteristic Mediterranean climate (semi-arid areas). This, in combination with a massive occupation of floodable (river sides) and coastal areas, produces severe problems of management and damage to the population and social and economical activities when extreme events occur. Some of the most important problems are being produced during last years in Almería (Southeastern Andalusia). Between 27 and 28 September 2012 rainstorms characterized by 240mm in 24h (exceeding precipitation for a return period of 500 years) occurred. Antas River and Jático creek, that are normally dry, became raging torrents. The massive flooding of occupied areas resulted in eleven deaths and two missing in Andalucía, with a total estimated cost of all claims for compensation on the order of 197 million euros. This study presents a probabilistic flood forecasting tool including the effect of river and marine forcings. It is based on a distributed, physically-based hydrological model (WiMMed). For Almería the model has been calibrated with the largest event recorded in Cantoria gauging station (data since 1965) on 19 October 1973. It was then validated with the second strongest event (26 October 1977). Among the different results of the model, it can provide probability floods scenarios in Andalusia with up 10 days weather forecasts. The tool has been applied to Vera, a 15.000 inhabitants town located in the east of Almería along the Antas River at an altitude of 95 meters. Its main economic resource is the "beach and sun" based-tourism, which has experienced an enormous growth during last decades. Its coastal stretch has been completely built in these years, occupying floodable areas and constricting the channel and rivers mouths. Simulations of the model in this area for the 1973 event and published in March 2011 on the internet event already announced that the floods of September 2012 may occur.

  13. Involving regional expertise in nationwide modeling for adequate prediction of climate change effects on different demands for fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, W. J.

    2014-05-01

    Wim J. de Lange, Geert F. Prinsen, Jacco H. Hoogewoud, Ab A Veldhuizen, Joachim Hunink, Erik F.W. Ruijgh, Timo Kroon Nationwide modeling aims to produce a balanced distribution of climate change effects (e.g. harm on crops) and possible compensation (e.g. volume fresh water) based on consistent calculation. The present work is based on the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI, www.nhi.nu), which is a national, integrated, hydrological model that simulates distribution, flow and storage of all water in the surface water and groundwater systems. The instrument is developed to assess the impact on water use on land-surface (sprinkling crops, drinking water) and in surface water (navigation, cooling). The regional expertise involved in the development of NHI come from all parties involved in the use, production and management of water, such as waterboards, drinking water supply companies, provinces, ngo's, and so on. Adequate prediction implies that the model computes changes in the order of magnitude that is relevant to the effects. In scenarios related to drought, adequate prediction applies to the water demand and the hydrological effects during average, dry, very dry and extremely dry periods. The NHI acts as a part of the so-called Deltamodel (www.deltamodel.nl), which aims to predict effects and compensating measures of climate change both on safety against flooding and on water shortage during drought. To assess the effects, a limited number of well-defined scenarios is used within the Deltamodel. The effects on demand of fresh water consist of an increase of the demand e.g. for surface water level control to prevent dike burst, for flushing salt in ditches, for sprinkling of crops, for preserving wet nature and so on. Many of the effects are dealt with by regional and local parties. Therefore, these parties have large interest in the outcome of the scenario analyses. They are participating in the assessment of the NHI previous to the start of the analyses

  14. Evaluation of snow dynamics modelling on a pixel scale using terrestrial photography and Ensemble Transform Kalman Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Rafael; José Pérez-Palazón, María; Herrero, Javier; José Polo, María

    2016-04-01

    Snow plays a crucial role in the hydrological regime in mountainous catchments, which increases in semiarid regions, where the recurrence of drought period makes it necessary to accurate the determination of the water availability from the snowpack. Physically based approaches constitute one of the best ways to reproduce the snow dynamics over these highly variable conditions. Moreover, they allow further understanding the processes involved, the snowpack behaviour and evolution. However, in some cases the complexity of the modelled process and the non-availability of all the required data for such models, avoid a correct representation of certain aspects. In these cases, data assimilation techniques can help to improve model performance and may also act as an indirect tool to understand the represented processes. This work assesses snow dynamics on a pixel scale (30x30m) in a Mediterranean site (Sierra Nevada Mountain, southern Spain) combining physical snow modelling (WiMMed, a physically based hydrological model developed for Mediterranean environments), ground sensing information (terrestrial photography) and data assimilation techniques (Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter), throughout a study period of two hydrological years: 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Snow cover fraction and averaged snow depth were obtained from the terrestrial photography images and used as observations in the assimilation scheme. The model performance was evaluated using different combinations of the variables assimilated: 1) only snow cover fraction, 2) only snow depth, 3) and both variables. The results show how the assimilation enhances the model performance. This improvement is higher if the variable assimilated is snow depth, with RMSE= 0.14 m2m-2and RMSE=12.16 mm for snow cover and snow depth respectively. However, this enhancement varies throughout the study period. During short snowmelt cycles, for example, the assimilation of the snow cover fraction is the most efficient. Nevertheless

  15. Soil moisture trends in mountainous areas: a 50-yr analysis of modelled soil moisture over Sierra Nevada Mountains (Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Pérez-Palazón, María; Pimentel, Rafael; Herrero, Javier; José Polo, María

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture conditions the energy and water fluxes through the ground surface and constitutes a major hydrological state variable in the analysis of environmental processes. Detecting potential changes in soil moisture and analyzing their trend over a long period of study can help to understand its evolution in other similar areas and to estimate its future role. In mountainous areas, the snow distribution highly conditions soil water content and its implications on the local water cycle. Sierra Nevada, Southern Spain, is a linear mountain range, with altitude higher than 3000 m.a.s.l., where Mediterranean and alpine climates coexist. The snow dynamics dominates the hydrological regime, and the medium and long term trends observed in the snow persistence constitute one of the main potential drivers for soil moisture changes both on a seasonal and annual basis. This work presents a 50-yr study of the soil moisture trends in Sierra Nevada (SN); the distributed monthly mean soil moisture evolution during the recent past (1960-2010) is simulated and its relationship with meteorological variables (precipitation and temperature) analyzed in the five head river basins that the SN area comprises. For this, soil water content is simulated throughout the area by means of WiMMed, a distributed and physically based hydrological model developed for Mediterranean regions that includes snow modelling, which had been previously calibrated and validated in the study area. The analysis of soil moisture shows a globally decreasing annual rate, with a mean value of 0.0011 mmṡmm-1ṡyear-1 during the study period averaged over the whole study area, which locally ranges between 0.174 mmṡmm-1ṡyear-1 and 0.0014 mmṡmm-1ṡyear-1. As previous studies reported, the observed trend in precipitation is more influent than temperature on the snowfall regime change; therefore, as expected, the estimated trends of soil moisture are more related to this variable. Moreover, an increase of

  16. Quantifying loss and damage from anthropogenic climate change - Bridging the gap between two research communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, F. E. L.

    2015-12-01

    The science of attribution of meteorological events to anthropogenic causes has for the first time been included in the latest assessment of the Physical Science Basis of the Climate, (WGI), of the Fifth IPCC Assessment Report AR5 (Stocker et al., 2013). At the same time there is a very rapidly growing body of literature on climate change and its impact on economy, society and environment but apart from very few exemptions no link is made to the causes of these changes. Observed changes in hydrological variables, agriculture, biodiversity and the built environment have been attributed to a changing climate, whether these changes are the result of natural variability or external forcings (Cramer et al., 2014). While the research community represented in WGI assesses whether, and to what extent, recent extreme weather events can be attributed to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, the research community of impact specialists asks how climatic changes lead to different impacts largely independent of the causes of such changes. This distinction becomes potentially very relevant with respect to the 2013 established the Warsaw International Mechanism (WIM) to address loss and damage from the impacts of climate change in developing countries under the UNFCCC climate change negotiations. Currently there is no discussion what consists of loss and damage and the reasons for this inexistence of a definition are not primarily scientific but political however, the absence of a definition could potentially lead to absurd consequences if funds in the context of loss and damage would be redistributed, as e.g. suggested, for all low risk high impact events. Here we present the implications of discussed definitions of loss and damage (Huggel et al. 2015) and how scientific evidence could be included. Cramer et al. (2014) Detection and Attribution of Observed Impacts. In: Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability Contribution of WG 2 to AR5 of

  17. Earth Science community support in the EGI-Inspire Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwichtenberg, H.

    2012-04-01

    be accessed from EGI resources to enable future research activities by this HUC. The international climate community for IPCC has created the Earth System Grid (ESG) to store and share climate data. There is a need to interface ESG with EGI for climate studies - parametric, regional and impact aspects. Critical points concern the interoperability of security mechanism between both "organisations", data protection policy, data transfer, data storage and data caching. Presenter: Horst Schwichtenberg Co-Authors: Monique Petitdidier (IPSL), Andre Gemünd (SCAI), Wim Som de Cerff (KNMI), Michael Schnell (SCAI)

  18. Decadal trend of precipitation and temperature patterns and impacts on snow-related variables in a semiarid region, Sierra Nevada, Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Pérez-Palazón, María; Pimentel, Rafael; Herrero, Javier; José Polo, María

    2016-04-01

    In the current context of global change, mountainous areas constitute singular locations in which these changes can be traced. Early detection of significant shifts of snow state variables in semiarid regions can help assess climate variability impacts and future snow dynamics in northern latitudes. The Sierra Nevada mountain range, in southern Spain, is a representative example of snow areas in Mediterranean-climate regions and both monitoring and modelling efforts have been performed to assess this variability and its significant scales. This work presents a decadal trend analysis throughout the 50-yr period 1960-2010 performed on some snow-related variables over Sierra Nevada, in Spain, which is included in the global climate change observatories network around the world. The study area comprises 4583 km2 distributed throughout the five head basins influenced by these mountains, with altitude values ranging from 140 to 3479 m.a.s.l., just 40 km from the Mediterranean coastline. Meteorological variables obtained from 44 weather stations from the National Meteorological Agency were studied and further used as input to the distributed hydrological model WiMMed (Polo et al., 2010), operational at the study area, to obtain selected snow variables. Decadal trends were obtained, together with their statistical significance, over the following variables, averaged over the whole study area: (1) annual precipitation; (2) annual snowfall; annual (3) mean, (4) maximum and (5) minimum daily temperature; annual (6) mean and (7) maximum daily fraction of snow covered areas; (8) annual number of days with snow cover; (9) mean and (10) maximum daily snow water equivalent; (11) annual number of extreme precipitation events; and (12) mean intensity of the annual extreme precipitation events. These variables were also studied over each of the five regions associated to each basin in the range. Globally decreasing decadal trends were obtained for all the meteorological variables

  19. The Glinka Memorial Soil Monolith Collection: a treasure of Soil Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggler, C. C.; Spaargaren, O.; Hartemink, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    The first World Congress of Soil Science, held in 1927 in Washington DC, USA, had as one of its highlights the exposition of soils from all over the world. The Russian delegation had planned the presentation of 50 soil monoliths. The soil profiles were collected under the supervision of Konstantin D. Glinka, then director of the Leningrad Agricultural Institute. The soil profiles included a geographical sequence form St Petersburg to the Caucasus and soils from Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, the Amu Darya region and the Siberian Far East. Due to shipping problems they did not arrive on time for the congress, and ended up in an USDA storage facility, where they remained untouched in their original wooden boxes. At first congress Glinka gave a lecture on Dokuchaev's ideas and the Russian developments on soil science, and joined the transcontinental field trip of 30 days that followed the congress. At that congress, Glinka was elected president of the International Soil Science Society, and was in charge to organize the next congress in Russia. However, he passed away a few months after the congress. In the 1970s, after a consultation with Wim Sombroek, then director of the International Soil Museum (ISM) in the Netherlands, the collection was donated to ISRIC by the US Soil Conservation Service. The soil profiles were shipped over in 1980 to become part of the collection of the Museum. The collection was named as "Glinka Memorial Collection" in agreement with the Dokuchaev Soil Institute, Moscow and the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Washington. The monoliths were treated with a sugar solution by the Russians before shipment to the USA, this way keeping a good preservation quality. They were aimed for a single exhibition and for that they were poorly documented and lacked additional samples. In the early 1990s a project for revisit the sites was set up and six sites around St Petersburg were sampled for a comparative study of the soils within a time span of 70

  20. The Effect of Pitch, Burnup, and Absorbers on a TRIGA Spent-Fuel Pool Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Logar, Marjan; Jeraj, Robert; Glumac, Bogdan

    2003-02-15

    It has been shown that supercriticality might occur for some postulated accident conditions at the TRIGA spent-fuel pool. However, the effect of burnup was not accounted for in previous studies. In this work, the combined effect of fuel burnup, pitch among fuel elements, and number of uniformly mixed absorber rods for a square arrangement on the spent-fuel pool k{sub eff} is investigated.The Monte Carlo computer code MCNP4B with the ENDF-B/VI library and detailed three dimensional geometry was used. The WIMS-D code was used to model the isotopic composition of the standard TRIGA and FLIP fuel for 5, 10, 20 and 30% burnup level and 2- and 4-yr cooling time.The results show that out of the three studied effects, pitch from contact (3.75 cm) up to rack design pitch (8 cm), number of absorbers from zero to eight, and burnup up to 30%, the pitch has the greatest influence on the multiplication factor k{sub eff}. In the interval in which the pitch was changed, k{sub eff} decreased for up to {approx}0.4 for standard and {approx}0.3 for FLIP fuel. The number of absorber rods affects the multiplication factor much less. This effect is bigger for more compact arrangements, e.g., for contact of standard fuel elements with eight absorber rods among them, k{sub eff} values are smaller for {approx}0.2 ({approx}0.1 for FLIP) than for arrangements without absorber rods almost regardless of the burnup. The effect of burnup is the smallest. For standard fuel elements, it is {approx}0.1 for almost all pitches and numbers of absorbers. For FLIP fuel, it is smaller for a factor of 3, but increases with the burnup for compact arrangements. Cooling time of fuel has just a minor effect on the k{sub eff} of spent-fuel pool and can be neglected in spent-fuel pool design.

  1. INSTAR: simulating the biological cycle of a forest pest in Mediterranean pine stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Muñoz, María; Bonet García, Francisco J.; Hódar, José A.

    2017-04-01

    The pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa) is a typically Mediterranean forest pest feeding on pine needles during its larval stages. The outbreaks of this pest cause important landscape impacts and public health problems (i.e. larvae are very urticant). Larvae feed during winter months and cold temperature is the main limiting factor in their development. Therefore, rising temperatures are thought to benefit this species. Indeed, observations suggest that outbreaks are becoming more frequent and populations are shifting uphill. The objective of this work is to simulate the biological cycle of T. pityocampa to make predictions about where and when outbreaks will occur. Thus, we have created a model called INSTAR that will help to identify hotspots and foresee massive defoliation episodes. This will enhance the information available for the control of this pest. INSTAR is an Agent-Based Model, which allows the inclusion of important characteristics of the system: emergence, feedback (i.e. interaction between agents and their environment), adaptation (i.e. decision based on the mentioned interactions) and path dependence (i.e. possibilities at one time point are determined by past conditions). These characteristics arise from a set of functions simulating pine growth, processionary development, mortality and movement. These functions are easily extrapolable to other similar biological processes and therefore INSTAR aims at serving of example for other forest pest models. INSTAR is the first comprehensive approach to simulate the biological cycle of T pityocampa. It simulates the pest development in a given area, from which elevation and pine trees are considered. Moreover, it is also a good example of integrating environmental information into a population dynamic model: meteorological variables and soil moisture are obtained from a hydrological model (WiMMed, Herrero et al. 2009) executed for the area of interest. These variables are the inputs of the

  2. anisotropic microseismic focal mechanism inversion by waveform imaging matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Chang, X.; Wang, Y.; Xue, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The focal mechanism is one of the most important parameters in source inversion, for both natural earthquakes and human-induced seismic events. It has been reported to be useful for understanding stress distribution and evaluating the fracturing effect. The conventional focal mechanism inversion method picks the first arrival waveform of P wave. This method assumes the source as a Double Couple (DC) type and the media isotropic, which is usually not the case for induced seismic focal mechanism inversion. For induced seismic events, the inappropriate source and media model in inversion processing, by introducing ambiguity or strong simulation errors, will seriously reduce the inversion effectiveness. First, the focal mechanism contains significant non-DC source type. Generally, the source contains three components: DC, isotropic (ISO) and the compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD), which makes focal mechanisms more complicated. Second, the anisotropy of media will affect travel time and waveform to generate inversion bias. The common way to describe focal mechanism inversion is based on moment tensor (MT) inversion which can be decomposed into the combination of DC, ISO and CLVD components. There are two ways to achieve MT inversion. The wave-field migration method is applied to achieve moment tensor imaging. This method can construct elements imaging of MT in 3D space without picking the first arrival, but the retrieved MT value is influenced by imaging resolution. The full waveform inversion is employed to retrieve MT. In this method, the source position and MT can be reconstructed simultaneously. However, this method needs vast numerical calculation. Moreover, the source position and MT also influence each other in the inversion process. In this paper, the waveform imaging matching (WIM) method is proposed, which combines source imaging with waveform inversion for seismic focal mechanism inversion. Our method uses the 3D tilted transverse isotropic (TTI) elastic

  3. Blending Pan-European and local hydrological models for water resource assessment in Mediterranean areas: lessons learnt from a mountainous catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Polo, María; José Pérez-Palazón, María; Saénz de Rodrigáñez, Marta; Pimentel, Rafael; Arheimer, Berit

    2017-04-01

    global values and an additional correction was performed based on the relative anomalies obtained instead of the absolute values. This approach was used to derive the future projections of selected local indicators for each end-user in the area under different climate change scenarios. Despite the spatial scale conflicts, the SWICCA river flow indicators (simulated by the E-HYPEv3.1.2 model) succeeded in approximating the observations during the reference period 1970-2000 when provided on a catchment scale, once local transfer functions and further anomaly correction were performed. Satisfactory results were obtained on a monthly scale for river flow in the main stream of the watershed, and on a daily scale for the headwater streams. The accessibility to the hydrological model WiMMed, which includes a snow module, locally validated in the study area has been crucial to downscale the SWICCA results and prove their usefulness.

  4. Flood-inundation maps for the West Branch Delaware River, Delhi, New York, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coon, William F.; Breaker, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5-mile reach of the West Branch Delaware River through the Village and part of the Town of Delhi, New York, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Village of Delhi, the Delaware County Soil and Water Conservation District, and the Delaware County Planning Department. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the Federal Flood Inundation Mapper Web site at http://wim.usgs.gov/FIMI/FloodInundationMapper.html, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) referenced to the USGS streamgage at West Branch Delaware River upstream from Delhi, N.Y. (station number 01421900). In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model that had been used to produce the flood insurance rate maps for the most recent flood insurance study for the Town and Village of Delhi. This hydraulic model was used to compute 10 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 7 ft or near bankfull to 16 ft, which exceeds the stages that correspond to both the estimated 0.2-percent annual-exceedance-probability flood (500-year recurrence interval flood) and the maximum recorded peak flow. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model, which was derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data with a 1.2-ft (0.61-ft root mean squared error) vertical accuracy and 3.3-ft (1-meter) horizontal resolution, to delineate the area flooded at each water level. A map that was produced using this method to delineate the inundated area for the flood that occurred on August 28, 2011, agreed well with highwater marks that had been located in the field using a

  5. Flood-inundation maps for the Flatrock River at Columbus, Indiana, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coon, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5-mile reach of the Flatrock River on the western side of Columbus, Indiana, from County Road 400N to the river mouth at the confluence with Driftwood River, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the Federal Flood Inundation Mapper Web site at http://wim.usgs.gov/FIMI/FloodInundationMapper.html, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Flatrock River at Columbus (station number 03363900). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service, which also presents the USGS data, at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/. Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Flatrock River streamgage, high-water marks that were surveyed following the flood of June 7, 2008, and water-surface profiles from the current flood-insurance study for the City of Columbus. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 9 ft or near bankfull to 20 ft, which exceeds the stages that correspond to both the estimated 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood (500-year recurrence interval flood) and the maximum recorded peak flow. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data having a 0.37 ft

  6. "Assessment of identity during adolescence using daily diary methods: Measurement invariance across time and sex": Correction to Becht et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "Assessment of Identity During Adolescence Using Daily Diary Methods: Measurement Invariance Across Time and Sex" by Andrik I. Becht, Susan J. T. Branje, Wilma A. M. Vollebergh, Dominique F. Maciejewski, Pol A. C. van Lier, Hans M. Koot, Jaap J. A. Denissen and Wim H. J. Meeus (Psychological Assessment, Advanced Online Publication, Aug 10, 2015, np). In the article the participants should have been reported as N = 494. No differences were found in the results upon reanalyzing the data with the correct number of participants. Additionally, the last sentence of the first full paragraph in the Invariance Across Boys and Girls subsection of the Method section should read "In the fourth model, strict invariance was examined, in which the residual variances were constrained to be equal for boys and girls." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-36246-001.) The aim of this study was to assess measurement invariance of adolescents' daily reports on identity across time and sex. Adolescents (N = 497; mean age = 13.32 years at Time 1, 56.7% boys) from the general population reported on their identity commitments, exploration in depth and reconsideration on a daily basis for 3 weeks within 1 year across 5 years. We used the single-item version of the Utrecht Management of Identity Commitments Scale (UMICS; Klimstra et al., 2010), a broad measure of identity-formation processes covering both interpersonal and educational identity domains. This study tested configural, metric, scalar, and strict measurement invariance across days within weeks, across sex, across weeks within years, and across years. Results indicated that daily diary reports show strict measurement invariance across days, across weeks within years, across years, and across boys and girls. These results support the use of daily diary methods to assess identity at various time intervals ranging from days to years and across sex. Results are discussed with

  7. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT NUCLEAR RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR SNM ATTRIBUTION AND NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Sternat, M.; Beals, D.; Webb, R.; Nichols, T.

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle. The

  8. Stratospheric aerosols from the Sarychev volcano eruption in the 2009 Arctic summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégou, F.; Berthet, G.; Brogniez, C.; Renard, J.-B.; François, P.; Haywood, J. M.; Jones, A.; Bourgeois, Q.; Lurton, T.; Auriol, F.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Guimbaud, C.; Krysztofiak, G.; Gaubicher, B.; Chartier, M.; Clarisse, L.; Clerbaux, C.; Balois, J. Y.; Verwaerde, C.

    2013-02-01

    Aerosols from the Sarychev volcano eruption (Kuril Islands, northeast of Japan) were observed in the Arctic lower stratosphere a few days after the strongest SO2 injection which occurred on 15 and 16 June 2009. From the observations provided by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) an estimated 0.9 Tg of sulphur dioxide was injected into the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS). The resultant stratospheric sulphate aerosols were detected by the Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) limb sounder and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite instruments. By the first week of July the aerosol plume had spread out over the entire Arctic region. The Sarychev-induced stratospheric aerosol over the Kiruna region (north of Sweden) was measured by the Stratospheric and Tropospheric Aerosol Counter (STAC) during eight balloon flights planned in August and September 2009. During this balloon campaign the Micro RADIomètre BALlon (MicroRADIBAL) and the Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (SALOMON) remote-sensing instruments also observed these aerosols. Aerosol concentrations returned to near-background levels by spring 2010. The effective radius, the Surface Area Density (SAD), the aerosol extinction, and the total sulphur mass from STAC in situ measurements are enhanced with mean values in the range 0.15-0.21 μm, 5.5-14.7 μm2 cm-3, 5.5-29.5×10-4 km-1, and 4.9-12.6×10-10 kg [S] kg-1 [air], respectively, between 14 km and 18 km. The observed and modelled e-folding time of sulphate aerosols from the Sarychev eruption is around 70-80 days, a value much shorter than the 12-14 months calculated for aerosols from the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The OSIRIS stratospheric Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 750 nm is enhanced by a factor of 6 with a value of 0.02 in late July compared to 0.0035 before the eruption. The HadGEM2 and MIMOSA model outputs

  9. Stratospheric aerosols from the Sarychev volcano eruption in the 2009 Arctic summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégou, F.; Berthet, G.; Brogniez, C.; Renard, J.-B.; François, P.; Haywood, J. M.; Jones, A.; Bourgeois, Q.; Lurton, T.; Auriol, F.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Guimbaud, C.; Krysztofiak, G.; Gaubicher, B.; Chartier, M.; Clarisse, L.; Clerbaux, C.; Balois, J. Y.; Verwaerde, C.; Daugeron, D.

    2013-07-01

    Aerosols from the Sarychev volcano eruption (Kuril Islands, northeast of Japan) were observed in the Arctic lower stratosphere a few days after the strongest SO2 injection which occurred on 15 and 16 June 2009. From the observations provided by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) an estimated 0.9 Tg of sulphur dioxide was injected into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The resultant stratospheric sulphate aerosols were detected from satellites by the Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) limb sounder and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and from the surface by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes (NDACC) lidar deployed at OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France). By the first week of July the aerosol plume had spread out over the entire Arctic region. The Sarychev-induced stratospheric aerosol over the Kiruna region (north of Sweden) was measured by the Stratospheric and Tropospheric Aerosol Counter (STAC) during eight balloon flights planned in August and September 2009. During this balloon campaign the Micro Radiomètre Ballon (MicroRADIBAL) and the Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (SALOMON) remote-sensing instruments also observed these aerosols. Aerosol concentrations returned to near-background levels by spring 2010. The effective radius, the surface area density (SAD), the aerosol extinction, and the total sulphur mass from STAC in situ measurements are enhanced with mean values in the range 0.15-0.21 μm, 5.5-14.7 μm2 cm-3, 5.5-29.5 × 10-4 km-1, and 4.9-12.6 × 10-10 kg[S] kg-1[air], respectively, between 14 km and 18 km. The observed and modelled e-folding time of sulphate aerosols from the Sarychev eruption is around 70-80 days, a value much shorter than the 12-14 months calculated for aerosols from the 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo. The OSIRIS stratospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD

  10. Long-term subsidence, cooling, and exhumation history along the South Atlantic passive continental margin in NW-Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Daniel; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Salomon, Eric; Hackspacher, Peter Christian; Schneider, Gabi

    2016-04-01

    has been estimated to ~ 2.7 km in the northeastern and ~ 4 km in the western Kaoko Belt. References 1. Miller, R.McG. Becker, T., 2008. The Geology of Namibia: Ministry of Mines and Energy, Geological Survey (Namibia). 2. Stollhofen, H., 1999. Karoo Synrift-Sedimentation und ihre tektonische Kontrolle am entstehenden Kontinentalrand Namibias: Z.dt.geol.Ges. 149: 519-632. 3. Renne, P.R., Glen, J.M., Milner, S.C., Duncan, A.R., 1996. Age of Etendeka flood volcanism and associated intrusions in southwestern Africa: Geology 24 (7): 659- 662. 4. Salomon, E., Koehn, D., Passchier, C., 2014. Brittle reactivation of ductile shear zones in NW Namibia in relation to South Atlantic rifting: Tectonics 34, 70-85.

  11. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  12. New developments in digital pathology: from telepathology to virtual pathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Klaus; Kayser, Gian; Radziszowski, Dominik; Oehmann, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    To analyse the present status and future development of computerized diagnostic pathology in terms of work-flow integrative telepathology and virtual laboratory. Telepathology has left its childhood. The technical development of telepathology is mature, in contrast to that of virtual pathology. Two kinds of virtual pathology laboratories are emerging: a) those with distributed pathologists and distributed (>=1) laboratories associated to individual biopsy stations/surgical theatres, and b) distributed pathologists working in a centralized laboratory. Both are under technical development. Telepathology can be used for e-learning and e-training in pathology, as exemplarily demonstrated on Digital Lung Pathology Pathology (www.pathology-online.org). A virtual pathology institution (mode a) accepts a complete case with the patient's history, clinical findings, and (pre-selected) images for first diagnosis. The diagnostic responsibility is that of a conventional institution. The internet serves as platform for information transfer, and an open server such as the iPATH (http://telepath.patho.unibas.ch) for coordination and performance of the diagnostic procedure. The size of images has to be limited, and usual different magnifications have to be used. A group of pathologists is "on duty", or selects one member for a predefined duty period. The diagnostic statement of the pathologist(s) on duty is retransmitted to the sender with full responsibility. First experiences of a virtual pathology institution group working with the iPATH server (Dr. L. Banach, Dr. G. Haroske, Dr. I. Hurwitz, Dr. K. Kayser, Dr. K.D. Kunze, Dr. M. Oberholzer,) working with a small hospital of the Salomon islands are promising. A centralized virtual pathology institution (mode b) depends upon the digitalisation of a complete slide, and the transfer of large sized images to different pathologists working in one institution. The technical performance of complete slide digitalisation is still under

  13. Disability weights for the Global Burden of Disease 2013 study.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Joshua A; Haagsma, Juanita A; Davis, Adrian; de Noordhout, Charline Maertens; Polinder, Suzanne; Havelaar, Arie H; Cassini, Alessandro; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Speybroeck, Niko; Murray, Christopher J L; Vos, Theo

    2015-11-01

    ]; GBD 2013 0·296 [0·198-0·414]; neck level: GBD 2010 0·369 [0·243-0·513]; GBD 2013 0·589 [0·415-0·748]). Survey responses to paired comparison questions were insensitive to whether the comparisons were framed in terms of temporary or chronic outcomes (Pearson's r 0·981 [0·973-0·987]). This study substantially expands the empirical basis for assessment of non-fatal outcomes in the GBD study. Findings from this study substantiate the notion that disability weights are sensitive to particular details in descriptions of health states, but robust to duration of outcomes. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Copyright © 2015 Salomon et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY-NC-ND. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term subsidence, cooling, and exhumation history along the South Atlantic passive continental margin in NW-Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Daniel; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Salomon, Eric; Hackspacher, Peter Christian; Schneider, Gabi

    2017-04-01

    amount of denudation in the last 130 Ma has been estimated to 1.7 km in the northeastern and 3.3 km in the southwestern Kaoko Belt. References 1. Miller, R.McG. Becker, T., 2008. The Geology of Namibia: Ministry of Mines and Energy, Geological Survey (Namibia). 2. Stollhofen, H., 1999. Karoo Synrift-Sedimentation und ihre tektonische Kontrolle am entstehenden Kontinentalrand Namibias: Z.dt.geol.Ges. 149: 519-632. 3. Renne, P.R., Glen, J.M., Milner, S.C., Duncan, A.R., 1996. Age of Etendeka flood volcanism and associated intrusions in southwestern Africa: Geology 24 (7): 659- 662. 4. Salomon, E., Koehn, D., Passchier, C., 2014. Brittle reactivation of ductile shear zones in NW Namibia in relation to South Atlantic rifting: Tectonics 34, 70-85.

  15. PREFACE: Seventh International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zande, Wim J.

    2009-09-01

    possible by generous sponsors, whom we thank wholeheartedly: The Radboud University Nijmegen, The Institute for Molecules and Materials of the Radboud University Nijmegen, The Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (Stichting FOM), The Foundation PHYSICA (Stichting Physica), and The Netherlands Royal Academy of Sciences (KNAW). The organisational support by Erna Gouwens van Oss before and during the conference was essential for its success. The help of Thanja Lambrechts and Vitali Zhaunerchyk during the preparation of the proceedings is greatly appreciated. The delay in the publication of these proceedings is entirely caused by the editor. The authors of the contributions are thanked for the quality of their contributions, Wim J van der Zande, Editor Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands Email: w.vanderzande@science.ru.nl Conference photograph Participants of the 7th International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications, taken in front of d'Amelander Kaap, the conference venue in Ameland, one of the Wadden Islands in the North of the Netherlands. 1. Dror Shafir21. Annemieke Petrignani41. Oumanou Motopan 2. Ioan Scheider22. Johanna Roos42. Max Berg 3. Nigel Adams23. Erna Gouwens van Oss43. Henrik Buhr 4. Hajime Tanuma24. Natalie de Ruette44. Ilya Fabrikant 5. Jonathan Tennyson25. Francois Wameu Tamo45. Claude Krantz 6. Vitali Zhaunerchyk26. Rainer Johnsen46. Michael Stenrup 7. Robert Continetti27. Viatcheslav Kokoouline47. Xavier Urbain 8. Stefan Rosén28. Hidekazu Takagi48. Evelyne Roueff 9. Erik Vigren29. Hans-Jakob Wörner49. Dirk Schwalm 10. Magdalena Kaminska30. Oskar Asvany50. Valery Ngassam 11. Chris Greene31. Lutz Lammich51. Julien Lecointre 12. Steffen Novotny32. Brandon Jordon-Thaden52. Ann Orel 13. Amy Schumak33. Wolf Diettrich Geppert53. Ihor Korolov 14. Gerard van Rooij34. Alexander Faure54. Romain Guerot 15. Wim van der Zande35. Mathias

  16. Evolution of the persistence of snow over Sierra Nevada Mountain (southern, Spain) in the last 55 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Rafael; José Pérez-Palazón, María; Herrero, Javier; José Polo, María

    2016-04-01

    Snow plays a crucial role in mountainous areas, not only as water resources for human supply, irrigation and energy production, but also for the ecosystem, flora and fauna, over these areas. Sierra Nevada Mountains, southern Spain, constitutes a rich reservoir of endemic wildlife species, and it is considered the most important center of biodiversity in the wester Mediterranean region. The highest regions of the range were declared UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, Natural and National Parks. Climate trends over the last decades put a lot of pressure on both snowfall occurrence and snow persistence; this poses a risk for biodiversity and has led to its inclusion in the Global Change Observatory Network. This work quantifies the evolution of the persistence of snow over the Sierra Nevada area during the last fifty-five years (1960-2015) as a basis to assess the vulnerability of its ecosystem services. For this, the spatial distribution of the annual number of days with snow, SDS, was analyzed over a study area of 4583 km2 (140-3479 m.a.s.l.), which comprises the head of the five basins in these mountains. The following indicator variables were studied over the whole area and each one of the five head regions identified: 1) the trend of SDS; 2) the annual area where SDS exceeded selected percentiles in its distribution; and 3) the annual minimum altitude where SDS exceeded those percentiles. SDS was obtained during the study period by means of the snow module in WiMMed (Watershed Integrated Model in Mediterranean Environment), a physically-based hydrological model developed, calibrated and validated in the area; the model is based on an energy-mass balance over the snowpack that is spatially distributed through the use of depletion curves, and is operational at hourly and daily scales. A general decreasing trend of SDS (0.25 days year-1) was found over the whole study area for the study period. This value is higher in the more humid basins (0.45 and 0.41 days year-1) than in

  17. The Impact of Company-Level ART Provision to a Mining Workforce in South Africa: A Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Pienaar, Jan; Brink, Brian; van Zyl, Andrew; Muirhead, Debbie; Grant, Alison; Churchyard, Gavin; Watts, Charlotte; Vickerman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    HIV impacts heavily on the operating costs of companies in sub-Saharan Africa, with many companies now providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in the workplace. A full cost-benefit analysis of workplace ART provision has not been conducted using primary data. We developed a dynamic health-state transition model to estimate the economic impact of HIV and the cost-benefit of ART provision in a mining company in South Africa between 2003 and 2022. A dynamic health-state transition model, called the Workplace Impact Model (WIM), was parameterised with workplace data on workforce size, composition, turnover, HIV incidence, and CD4 cell count development. Bottom-up cost analyses from the employer perspective supplied data on inpatient and outpatient resource utilisation and the costs of absenteeism and replacement of sick workers. The model was fitted to workforce HIV prevalence and separation data while incorporating parameter uncertainty; univariate sensitivity analyses were used to assess the robustness of the model findings. As ART coverage increases from 10% to 97% of eligible employees, increases in survival and retention of HIV-positive employees and associated reductions in absenteeism and benefit payments lead to cost savings compared to a scenario of no treatment provision, with the annual cost of HIV to the company decreasing by 5% (90% credibility interval [CrI] 2%-8%) and the mean cost per HIV-positive employee decreasing by 14% (90% CrI 7%-19%) by 2022. This translates into an average saving of US$950,215 (90% CrI US$220,879-US$1.6 million) per year; 80% of these cost savings are due to reductions in benefit payments and inpatient care costs. Although findings are sensitive to assumptions regarding incidence and absenteeism, ART is cost-saving under considerable parameter uncertainty and in all tested scenarios, including when prevalence is reduced to 1%-except when no benefits were paid out to employees leaving the workforce and when absenteeism

  18. Climate change impacts on the fluvial regime in a Mediterranean mountainous area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Pérez-Palazón, María; Pimentel, Rafael; Herrero, Javier; José Polo, María

    2016-04-01

    The water flow regime in Mediterranean basins is greatly influenced by the high variability of the meteorological patterns, with recurrent drought periods, and the heterogeneity of both terrain physical properties and land uses. These aspects together with the simultaneous demands of water resources for human consumption, irrigation and energy production make it crucial to have a continuous flow series on control points along the river network. In the current context of Global Warming, mountainous semiarid watersheds, where Mediterranean and alpine climates coexist, constitute singular places to evaluate its effects on the river flow regime. Sierra Nevada Mountain area (SN) (southern Spain), with altitudes ranging from 2000 to 3500 m.a.s.l., is a clear example of snow regions in a semiarid environment. Due to its special climate conditions, SN is part of the global climate change observatories network. The aim of this work is to estimate the influence of climate change on the flow regime over several control points along the main channel of the Guadalfeo River (in the South face of SN), by means of analysing the observed trends and focusing in the occurrence of drought period and extreme flood events. For this, the flow regime at three selected points in the river was simulated by using WiMMed, a physically-based hydrological model developed for Mediterranean regions, which includes flow routing calculations. The model was calibrated and validated from observations at a gauge station point, from which the flow series were obtained at upstream. Precipitation and temperature datasets from the reference period (1960-2000) and two different scenarios (A2, B1) for a future period (2046-2100) proposed by the Fourth Assessment Report of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) were used as forcing meteorological variables. The comparison was performed over different flow indicator variables: 1) annual mean daily flow; 2) annual maximum daily flow; 3) annual number

  19. Consolidation and Centralization of Waste Operations Business Systems - 12319

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, D. Dean

    2012-07-01

    This abstract provides a comprehensive plan supporting the continued development and integration of all waste operations and waste management business systems. These include existing systems such as ATMS (Automated Transportation Management System), RadCalc, RFITS (Radio Frequency Identification Transportation System) Programs as well as incorporating key components of existing government developed waste management systems and COTS (Computer Off The Shelf) applications in order to deliver a truly integrated waste tracking and management business system. Some of these existing systems to be integrated include IWTS at Idaho National Lab, WIMS at Sandia National Lab and others. The aggregation of data and consolidation into a single comprehensive business system delivers best practices in lifecycle waste management processes to be delivered across the Department of Energy facilities. This concept exists to reduce operational costs to the federal government by combining key business systems into a centralized enterprise application following the methodology that as contractors change, the tools they use to manage DOE's assets do not. IWITS is one efficient representation of a sound architecture currently supporting multiple DOE sites from a waste management solution. The integration of ATMS, RadCalc and RFITS and the concept like IWITS into a single solution for DOE contractors will result in significant savings and increased efficiencies for DOE. Building continuity and solving collective problems can only be achieved through mass collaboration, resulting in an online community that DOE contractors and subcontractors access common applications, allowing for the collection of business intelligence at an unprecedented level. This is a fundamental shift from a solely 'for profit' business model to a 'for purpose' business model. To the conventional-minded, putting values before profit is an unfamiliar and unnatural way for a contractor to operate - unless however; your

  20. How much can disaster and climate science contribute to loss and damage mechanisms in international climate policy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian; Allen, Simon; Eicken, Hajo; Hansen, Gerrit; Stone, Dáithí

    2015-04-01

    As the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently has shown, there is increasing evidence of observed impacts of climate change on natural and human systems. Some of these impacts are negative and result in damage and loss of lives and assets. In international climate policy negotiations under the UNFCCC the discussions on loss and damage have gained significant traction during the past negotiation rounds. At COP 19 the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage (WIM) was created as an institutional arrangement to address this issue. Thereby, loss and damage (L&D) are typically defined as the residual damage and loss that occur beyond mitigation and adaptation efforts. This implies that effective mitigation and adaptation policy can substantially reduce L&D. While there is wide agreement that knowledge and understanding needs to be strengthened on how L&D due to climate change affects countries, in particular highly vulnerable countries and populations, there is still substantial disagreement on several aspects. In fact, after COP20 in Lima a number of options are on the table, including whether L&D should be located under the adaptation framework or form a separate institutional arrangement, or whether a compensation regime should be established to support developing countries. Similarly, the scientific framework for a clear L&D concept, its application in real-world cases, and implications for international climate policy, in particular with respect to questions of responsibility, liability, compensation and financing, is still evolving. Earlier proposals, for instance, have included a threshold concept, with payments released upon crossing of certain thresholds of climate (related) parameters, similar to insurance procedures. The threshold would be defined as a departure of the parameter from baseline conditions, for instance a rainfall event that is more intense than a certain baseline based threshold. Further

  1. Disruptions in adaptation of sudden-onset and slow-onset risks: insights from a local case in the Andes of Peru for global policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian; Carey, Mark; Frey, Holger; Jurt, Christine; Mechler, Reinhard; Motschmann, Alina; Vicuña, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Climatic changes involve emergence and changes of both sudden-onset and slow-onset risks. In the field of disaster risk reduction a solid range of strategies and measures has been developed to address sudden-onset risks such as floods, mass movements or storms. Comparably less experience is available for management of slow-onset risks. While, for instance, drought prone regions do have important knowledge how to cope with such conditions in other regions where climatic changes have induced new challenges and risks there is limited experience about how to adapt to slow-onset processes and risks. Examples are impacts of sea level rise in coastal regions or glacier shrinkage in mountain regions. The lack of understanding of how to address impacts from slow-onset processes has recently also been highlighted by the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) acting under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). In climate change science, practice and policy it is often assumed that risk management and climate change adaptation would see a seamless continuum when addressing both sudden-onset and slow-onset risks. Here we draw on recent experiences from the Andes of Peru showing that management of, and adaptation to combined sudden-onset and slow-onset impacts of climate change may involve serious social disruption. Carhuaz, a city in the Cordillera Blanca of Peru with a number of local communities pertaining to it, is affected by multiple effects of climate change and glacier shrinkage. After a flood event from glacier lake 513 a flood early warning system has been developed and installed. Multiple use and demand of glacier melt water makes water resource management a challenge and conflicts arise especially during the dry season when water is scarce. The drought at the end of 2016 over much of the tropical Andes has resulted in a situation where local communities started to vigorously and violently turn

  2. Temporal trend of the snow-related variables in Sierra Nevada in the last years: An analysis combining Earth Observation and hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Luque, Antonio J.; Herrero, Javier; Bonet, Francisco J.; Pérez-Pérez, Ramón

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is causing declines in snow-cover extent and duration in European mountain ranges. This is especially important in Mediterranean mountain ranges where the observed trends towards precipitation and higher temperatures can provoke problems of water scarcity. In this work, we analyzed temporal trends (2000 to 2014) of snow-related variables obtained from satellite and modelling data in Sierra Nevada, a Mediterranean high-mountain range located in Southern Spain, at 37°N. Snow cover indicators (snow-cover duration, snow-cover onset dates and snow-cover melting dates) were obtained by processing images of MOD10A2 MODIS product using an automated workflow. Precipitation data were obtained using WiMMed, a complete and fully distributed hydrological model that is used to map the annual rainfall and snowfall with a resolution of 30x30 m over the whole study area. It uses expert algorithms to interpolate precipitation and temperature at an hourly scale, and simulates partition of precipitation into snowfall with several methods. For each snow-related indicator (snow-covers and snowfall), a trend analysis was applied at the MODIS pixel scale during the study period (2000-2014). We applied Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen slope estimation in each of the pixels comprising Sierra Nevada. The trend analysis assesses the intensity, magnitude and degree of statistical significance during the period analysed. The spatial pattern of these trends was explored according to elevation ranges. Finally, we explored the relationship between trends of snow-cover related indicators and precipitation trends. Our results show that snow-cover has undergone significant changes in the last 14 years. 80 % of the pixels covering Sierra Nevada showed a negative trend in the duration of snow-cover. We also observed a delay in the snow-cover onset date (68.03 % pixels showing a positive trend in the snow-cover onset date) and an advance in the melt date (80.72 % of pixels followed a

  3. a Bayesian Approach for Calibration of Trmm 3B42 Over North Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linguet, L.; Marie-Joseph, I.; Becker, M.; Seyler, F.

    2013-12-01

    . Detailed time-series analysis is presented and shows the effectiveness of the model assumed for observation data. Statistical performances show that monthly and daily bias and RMSE are notably reduced. The developed method connects global and local dynamics of rainfall in a Bayesian framework and provides improved estimates of TRMM 3B42 data. This method can be used for real-time estimates at the surface. Future works need to be pursued on a global scale and under various climate. [1] Arulampalam, S. Maskell, N. Gordon and T. Clapp, A tutorial on particle filters for online nonlinear/non-Gaussian Bayesian tracking IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 50, 2002 [2] L. Linguet, J. Atif, A Bayesian approach for solar resource potential assessment using satellite images, 35th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE35, China, April 2013 [3] M. Jehanseb Masud Cheema and G.M. Wim, 'Local calibration of remotely sensed rainfall from the TRMM satellite for different periods and spatial scales in the Indus Bassin,' International Journal of Remote Sensing, Taylor and Francis, London, October 2012. [4] L. Linguet, P. Audois, Calibration of TRMM 3B42 with geographical differential analysis over north Amazonia, Geoscience and Remote Sensing IEEE International Symposium - IGARSS, Australia, 2013

  4. The Impact of Company-Level ART Provision to a Mining Workforce in South Africa: A Cost–Benefit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Pienaar, Jan; Brink, Brian; van Zyl, Andrew; Muirhead, Debbie; Grant, Alison; Churchyard, Gavin; Watts, Charlotte; Vickerman, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV impacts heavily on the operating costs of companies in sub-Saharan Africa, with many companies now providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in the workplace. A full cost–benefit analysis of workplace ART provision has not been conducted using primary data. We developed a dynamic health-state transition model to estimate the economic impact of HIV and the cost–benefit of ART provision in a mining company in South Africa between 2003 and 2022. Methods and Findings A dynamic health-state transition model, called the Workplace Impact Model (WIM), was parameterised with workplace data on workforce size, composition, turnover, HIV incidence, and CD4 cell count development. Bottom-up cost analyses from the employer perspective supplied data on inpatient and outpatient resource utilisation and the costs of absenteeism and replacement of sick workers. The model was fitted to workforce HIV prevalence and separation data while incorporating parameter uncertainty; univariate sensitivity analyses were used to assess the robustness of the model findings. As ART coverage increases from 10% to 97% of eligible employees, increases in survival and retention of HIV-positive employees and associated reductions in absenteeism and benefit payments lead to cost savings compared to a scenario of no treatment provision, with the annual cost of HIV to the company decreasing by 5% (90% credibility interval [CrI] 2%–8%) and the mean cost per HIV-positive employee decreasing by 14% (90% CrI 7%–19%) by 2022. This translates into an average saving of US$950,215 (90% CrI US$220,879–US$1.6 million) per year; 80% of these cost savings are due to reductions in benefit payments and inpatient care costs. Although findings are sensitive to assumptions regarding incidence and absenteeism, ART is cost-saving under considerable parameter uncertainty and in all tested scenarios, including when prevalence is reduced to 1%—except when no benefits were paid out to employees

  5. Preliminary neutronic studies for the liquid-salt-cooled very hightemperature reactor (LS-VHTR).

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Yang, W. S.

    2005-10-05

    Preliminary neutronic studies have been performed in order to provide guidelines to the design of a liquid-salt cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) using Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) as coolant and a solid cylindrical core. The studies were done using the lattice codes (WIMS8 and DRAGON) and the linear reactivity model to estimate the core reactivity balance, fuel composition, discharge burnup, and reactivity coefficients. An evaluation of the lattice codes revealed that they give very similar accuracy as the Monte Carlo MCNP4C code for the prediction of the fuel element multiplication factor (kinf) and the double heterogeneity effect of the coated fuel particles in the graphite matrix. The loss of coolant from the LS-VHTR core following coolant voiding was found to result in a positive reactivity addition, due primarily to the removal of the strong neutron absorber Li-6. To mitigate this positive reactivity addition and its impact on reactor design (positive void reactivity coefficient), the lithium in the coolant must be enriched to greater than 99.995% in its Li-7 content. For the reference LS-VHTR considered in this work, it was found that the magnitude of the coolant void reactivity coefficient (CVRC) is quite small (less than $1 for 100% voiding). The coefficient was found to become more negative or less positive with increase in the lithium enrichment (Li-7 content). It was also observed that the coefficient is positive at the beginning of cycle and becomes more negative with increasing burnup, indicating that by using more than one fuel batch, the coefficient could be made negative at the beginning of cycle. It might, however, still be necessary at the beginning of life to design for a negative CVRC value. The study shows that this can be done by using burnable poisons (erbium is a leading candidate) or by changing the reference assembly design (channel dimensions) in order to modify the neutron spectrum. Parametric studies have been performed to

  6. EDITORIAL Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, Goran; Heenan, Richard

    2010-10-01

    There are 52 papers in these Proceedings. The papers are divided into 10 thematic sections and a section for invited papers and reviews. The sections and the respective section editors are given below. Section Editor(s) Invited Papers and Reviews Peter Griffiths, Wim Bras, Rudolf Winter Beamlines and Instrumentation Elliot Gilbert, Wim Bras, Nigel Rhodes Theory, Data processing and Modelling Jan Skov Pedersen, Carlo Knupp Biological Systems and Membranes Richard Heenan, Cameron Neylon Ceramics, Glasses and Porous Materials Rudolf Winter Colloids and Solutions Peter Griffiths Hierarchical Structures and Fibres Steve Eichhorn, Karen Edler Metallic and Magnetic Systems Armin Hoell Polymers Patrick Fairclough Time resolved Diffraction, Kinetic and Dynamical Studies João Cabral, Christoph Rau We are grateful to all section editors and the many anonymous referees for their invaluable effort which made the publication of the Proceedings possible. The refereeing process was strict and thorough, some papers were rejected and most were improved. The resulting compendium gives a good overview of recent developments in small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering theory, application, methods of analysis and instrumentation. Thus it should be a useful source of reference for a number of years to come. The papers are a good reflection of the material presented at the meeting. Because of the general high quality of the articles, it was difficult to decide which to highlight and be fair to all contributors. The following in particular have caught the attention of the editors. Highlighted papers A statistical survey of publications reporting the application of SAXS and SANS by Aldo Craievich (paper 012003) is recommended reading for anyone needing convincing about the vibrancy of this scientific field and the ever expanding use of these techniques. Two aspects of coherent X-ray scattering, made available by the advent of the 3rd generation synchrotron sources, are discussed in the

  7. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    , University College London, UK Vladimir Lyashuk, ITEP, Russia Radovan Milincic, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA Rolf Nahnhauer, DESY, Zeuthen, Germany Christopher Naumann, University of Erlangen, Germany Valentin Niess, CPPM Jonathan Perkin, University of Sheffield, UK Steve Ralph, University of Sheffield, UK Christopher Rhodes, Imperial College London, UK Carsten Richardt, University of Erlangen, Germany Karsten Salomon, University of Erlangen, Germany Olaf Scholten, KVI/University of Groningen, Netherlands Terry Sloan, University of Lancaster, UK Pierre Sokolsky, University of Utah, USA Lee Thompson, University of Sheffield, UK Omar Veledar, Northumbria University, UK David Waters, UCL, USA Dawn Williams, Pennsylvania State University, USA Igor Zheleznykh, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Conference photograph

  8. Abarelix: abarelix-depot-F, abarelix-depot-M, abarelix-L, PPI 149, R 3827.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    -Synthélabo. However, in October 2001, Sanofi-Synthélabo announced that it had waived its rights to abarelix. Praecis confirmed in December 2000 that it had filed an NDA seeking FDA approval for abarelix in the US. In January 2001, the FDA granted the abarelix application priority review status. However, in June 2001, the FDA rejected the NDA for prostate cancer. The FDA requested that Praecis use existing data from the completed trials to analyse the allergic reactions that occurred in a small subset of patients. The FDA also expressed concerns over the lack of maintenance of testosterone suppression beyond the 3-month timeframe that occurred in a subset of patients. In February 2003, Praecis announced the re-submission of its NDA to the US FDA. The submission seeks approval for the use of abarelix in a defined subpopulation of advanced prostate cancer patients for whom the current hormonal therapies are not appropriate. Praecis plans to submit its regulatory application in Europe during the second quarter of 2003. Following the completion of a phase I/II trial of abarelix-L in prostate gland volume reduction, a phase IIIb study of the depot formulation was initiated in September 2001. The trial is comparing the effects of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy with depot formulations of leuprorelin or abarelix for prostate gland volume reduction. Abarelix-L is no longer mentioned on Praecis' website, suggesting that development of this formulation is no longer being pursued. The Financial Times (ft.com) reported in May 2001 that approximately 12 new anti-cancer agents are expected to be approved by the FDA through to the end of 2002, with the potential to generate total sales of US dollars 2.6 billion--abarelix is one of these products. The paper quoted analysts at Salomon Smith Barney predicting that abarelix could reach sales of US dollars 120 million for the indication of prostate cancer. However, in June 2001 the FDA rejected Praecis Pharmaceuticale FDA rejected Praecis Pharmaceuticals

  9. WE-AB-201-04: The Recommendations of MPPG #5 and Practical Implementation Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Smilowitz, J.

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  10. WE-AB-201-00: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  11. WE-AB-201-02: TPS Commissioning and QA: A Process Orientation and Application of Control Charts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, M.

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  12. WE-AB-201-03: TPS Commissioning and QA: Incorporating the Entire Planning Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mutic, S.

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  13. WE-AB-201-01: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Salomons, G.

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  14. Genomes to Life Project Quarterly Report April 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Martino, Anthony; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Geist, Al; Gorin, Andrey; Xu, Ying; Palenik, Brian

    2006-02-01

    the contributions of: Grant Heffelfinger1*, Anthony Martino2, Brian Palenik6, Andrey Gorin3, Ying Xu10,3, Mark Daniel Rintoul1, Al Geist3, Matthew Ennis1, with Pratul Agrawal3, Hashim Al-Hashimi8, Andrea Belgrano12, Mike Brown1, Xin Chen9, Paul Crozier1, PguongAn Dam10, Jean-Loup Faulon2, Damian Gessler12, David Haaland1, Victor Havin4, C.F. Huang5, Tao Jiang9, Howland Jones1, David Jung3, Katherine Kang14, Michael Langston15, Shawn Martin1, Shawn Means1, Vijaya Natarajan4, Roy Nielson5, Frank Olken4, Victor Olman10, Ian Paulsen14, Steve Plimpton1, Andreas Reichsteiner5, Nagiza Samatova3, Arie Shoshani4, Michael Sinclair1, Alex Slepoy1, Shawn Stevens8, Charlie Strauss5, Zhengchang Su10, Ed Thomas1, Jerilyn Timlin1, WimVermaas13, Xiufeng Wan11, HongWei Wu10, Dong Xu11, Grover Yip8, Erik Zuiderweg8 *Author to whom correspondence should be addressed (gsheffe@sandia.gov) 1. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 2. Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 4. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 5. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 6. University of California, San Diego 7. University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign 8. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 9. University of California, Riverside 10. University of Georgia, Athens 11. University of Missouri, Columbia 12. National Center for Genome Resources, Santa Fe, NM 13. Arizona State University 14. The Institute for Genomic Research 15. University of Tennessee 5 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  15. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    chaired by Henry Hutchinson (RAL, Chilton), and to the Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion journal team (Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol), for their work on this conference. At the 2004 European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics, plenary invited speakers whose talks spanned the entire field were followed, each day, by multiple parallel sessions which also included invited talks. Invited speakers in both these categories were asked to contribute papers to this special issue (the contributed papers at this conference, and at all recent conferences in this series, are archived at http://epsppd.epfl.ch). The Programme Committee is very grateful to the many invited speakers who have responded positively to this request. Invited papers appear here in their order of presentation during the week beginning 28 June 2004; this ordering provides an echo of the character of the conference, as it was experienced by those who took part. Programme Committee 2004 Professor Richard Dendy UKAEA Culham Division, UK Chairman and guest editor Dr Jean-Luc Dorier Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Lausanne, Switzerland (Co-ordinator of dusty plasmas and guest editor) Professor Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany (Co-ordinator of laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics and guest editor) Dr Peter Norreys Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK (Scientific Secretary and guest editor) Dr Emilia R Solano CIEMAT Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Madrid, Spain ( Co-ordinator of magnetic confinement fusion and guest editor) Dr Shalom Eliezer Soreq Nuclear Research Centre, Israel Dr Wim Goedheer FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Rijnhuizen, Netherlands Professor Henry Hutchinson Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK Professor John Kirk Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg, Germany Dr Raymond Koch Ecole Royale Militaire/Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels, Belgium Professor Gerrit Kroesen Technische

  16. PREFACE Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen; Terrill, Nicholas

    2010-10-01

    scientific heart of the conference comprised 10 plenary sessions, interspersed by 39 'themed' parallel sessions, 2 poster sessions, an afternoon tour of Diamond and ISIS, and a week-long exhibition. There were 144 contributed oral presentations and 308 poster presentations across a total of 21 themes. Over half of all presentations fell under 6 themes: biological systems, colloids and solutions, instrumentation, kinetic and time-resolved measurements, polymers, and surfaces and interfaces. The importance of SAS techniques to the study of biology, materials science and soft matter/nanoscience is clear. The plenary presentations, which covered topics as diverse as advanced analysis techniques, biology, green chemistry, materials science and surfaces, were delivered by Frank Bates, Minnesota, USA, Peter Fratzl, MPI Golm, Germany, Buxing Han, Bejing, China, Julia Kornfield, CIT, USA, Jan Skov Pedersen, Aarhus, Denmark, Moonhor Ree, Pohang, Korea, Mitsuhiro Shibayama, Tokyo, Japan, Robert Thomas, Oxford, UK, Jill Trewhella, Sydney, Australia, and Thomas Zemb, ICSM Bagnols, France. Instigated by representatives of the Belgian and Dutch SAS communities one parallel session was dedicated to a tribute for Michel Koch, the pioneer of so many novel applications of SAXS, who retired after 30 years at the EMBL Hamburg in late 2006. With a supporting cast that included Wim Bras, ESRF, France, Tony Ryan, Sheffield, UK and Joe Zaccai, ILL,France, and watched by former colleague André Gabriel, Michel treated the audience to a fascinating - and at times light-hearted - retrospective of the evolution of synchrotron SAXS. Another parallel session was devoted to the work of the canSAS (Collective Action for Nomadic Small-Angle Scatterers) network of large-facility representatives and instrument scientists in areas such as data file formats, intensity calibration and software development. For further information see http://www.smallangles.net/wgwiki/index.php/canSAS_Working_Groups. A total of

  17. PREFACE: The IARU International Scientific Congress on Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions (10-12 March, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    Visbeck Professor Mary Scholes Professor Masahide Kimoto Professor Matthew England Dr Maxwell Boykoff Dr Michael Raupach Professor Nathan Bindoff Professor Nicolas Gruber Professor Niels Elers Koch Professor Ole John Nielsen Professor Ole Wæver Professor Oran Young Dr Pamela Matson Dr Paul Baer Professor Paul Leadley Dr Pep Canadell Professor Pete Smith Professor Peter Gregory Professor Pier Vellinga Dr Rik Leemans Dr Roberto Bertollini Professor Roberto S Rodriguez Professor Scott Denning Dr Sivan Kartha Dr Thomas Downing Dr Tariq Banuri Professor Thomas Heyd Professor Tim Lenton Professor Timmons Roberts Professor Torkil Jønch Clausen Professor Warwick McKibbin Professor Wim C Turkenburg