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Sample records for klli olav ellerme

  1. Disability and Adult Life: Dependence on Social Security among Former Students with Special Educational Needs in Their Late Twenties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Jon Olav

    2013-01-01

    This article, by Jon Olav Myklebust from Volda University, Norway, presents analyses of social security dependence among students with special educational needs in Norway who at the start of upper secondary school had various disabilities--of a somatic, psychological and/or social nature. They were all educated in ordinary schools, in special or…

  2. Short Trips and a Traverse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Cameron joined the Arctic Institute of North America in 1956 to participate in IGY-related activities in Antarctica. He served as Chief Glaciologist at Wilkes Station, on the coast of East Antarctica. This was a joint Navy-civilian operation consisting of 17 Navy personnel and 10 scientists. Specifically, his glaciological team consisted of two colleagues with whom he had worked before - Olav Loken in Norway in the summer of 1953, and John Molholm in Greenland in the summer of 1954. This team spent much of its time at a remote station established 80 kilometers (50 miles) inland, where they conducted both meteorological and glaciological studies. One of the glaciological studies entailed digging a 35-meter (approx.115-foot) vertical pit to study snow densification and stratigraphy. The assignment for the Navy Seabees was to first establish a joint US-NZ base at Cape Hallett and then go along the coast of East Antarctica and set up Wilkes Station.

  3. [Who were the healers in medieval Trondheim?].

    PubMed

    Pape, K; Westin, S

    1998-12-10

    When Trondheim celebrated its millenium in 1997, this also marked a 1000 year-old medical tradition. In medieval times, sick and disabled people made their pilgrimage to the Nidaros cathedral and the grave of Saint Olav (995-1030). Working from the assumption that every organized society develops rituals and rules to deal with disease and death, we have looked for evidence of what kind of healers one would expect there were in medieval Trondheim up to the reformation in 1537. Sources include reports from archaeological excavations, written material of both medieval and more recent origin, buildings and objects, and living traditions. Three kinds of healer traditions can be identified: The popular and "wise" folk healers were based on traditional pre-Christian mythology and belief in natural forces. The charitable clerics emerged with Christianity. The "professional" wound healers evolved from the needs of the military, later to merge with the early barber surgeons. Traces of scientific traditions, the Salerno school and early European university medicine can be found in local texts, but there is no evidence of any university educated doctor practising in Trondheim before the 17th century.

  4. Explaining Fetal Death--What Are the Contributions of Fetal Autopsy and Placenta Examination?

    PubMed

    Opsjøn, Bente Ediassen; Vogt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to categorize fetal deaths by different diagnostic groups and see to what extent an autopsy of a presumably normal fetus contributes to the final diagnosis and how many unexplained fetal deaths remain unexplained after examination of the placenta. We reviewed autopsy reports of 351 fetuses with a gestational age of 12 or more weeks at the Department of Pathology and Medical Genetics at St Olavs Hospital during the years 2001 through 2010. In our records, 38.5% (135 of 351) of the deaths were due to noninfectious placenta causes, 31.6% (111 of 351) were caused by infections, and 29.9% (105 of 351) of the fetal deaths remained unexplained after autopsy. We also found that an inconclusive report was more common early in pregnancy. The incidence of fetal loss due to circulatory disturbances in the placenta increased toward term. Infections were evenly distributed in intrauterine fetal deaths, although in spontaneous abortions, they were more frequent during the second trimester. For both explained and unexplained deaths, we observed a bimodal distribution, with peaks in the early second trimester and late third trimester toward term.

  5. The cartographic application of ERTS/RBV imagery in polar regions. [Alaska and Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, W. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A 1.1,000,000 scale sketch map has been prepared from ERTS imagery of the Prince Olav Coast, Antarctica. This is the first such mapping of the extent of the ice tongues of the Shtrase and Fietta Bay glaciers. Shtrase is of particular interest because the ERTS imagery shows the tongue extending out into the Lutzom-Holm Bay approximately 32 miles further than ever depicted on existing maps. This sketch map and others in work covering coastal areas of the Antarctic continent show many coastal changes when compared to what is believed to be the most current published maps. These sketch maps along with the accompanying mosaics will be a bench mark for future revision to existing maps and charts and also an invaluable source for mew mapping. ERTS imagery is now available over Mt. Siple, Antarctica, and it is expected to provide a source to position Mt. Siple correctly in relation to the Executive Committee Range. A mosaic at 1:500,000 scale is also being compiled that will serve as a source for future revision of 1:250,000 scale maps of the Ellsworth Mountains, change and improve the shape and size of the islands within the Ronne Ice Shelf, and redefine the ice front of the Ronne and Filchner Shelves.

  6. Ethanol and drug findings in women consulting a Sexual Assault Center--associations with clinical characteristics and suspicions of drug-facilitated sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Cecilie T; Helland, Arne; Spigset, Olav; Espnes, Ketil A; Ormstad, Kari; Schei, Berit

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe toxicological findings among women seeking health care after sexual assault, and to assess the relationship with so-called proactive DFSA (drug facilitated sexual assault). We also explored associations between ethanol in blood/urine and background data, assault characteristics, and clinical findings. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of female patients ≥ 12 years of age consulting the Sexual Assault Center at St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. They were examined between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2010, and urine and/or blood were analyzed for ethanol and selected medicinal/recreational drugs. Among the 264 patients included, ethanol and/or drugs were detected in 155 (59%). Of the 50 patients (19%) testing positive for drugs other than ethanol, benzodiazepines/benzodiazepine-like drugs were found in 31, central stimulants in 14, cannabinoids in 13 and opioids in nine. None tested positive for gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). In total, 57 patients (22%) suspected proactive DFSA, but only five had findings of sedative drugs that were not accounted for by self-reported voluntary intake. No cases could unequivocally be attributed to proactive DFSA. Among the 120 patients tested for ethanol within 12 h after the assault, 102 were positive. The median estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at the time of assault was 1.87 g/L. Patients testing positive for ethanol more often reported a public place of assault and a stranger assailant. Higher estimated BAC at the time of assault was associated with higher frequency of suspecting proactive DFSA. Ethanol was the most prevalent toxicological finding in urine/blood from victims of sexual assault, and high ethanol concentrations were often detected. Among the patients suspecting proactive DFSA, very few had sedative drug findings not explained by voluntary intake. It seems like opportunistic DFSA, rather than proactive DFSA dominate among the sexually

  7. Assessment of the time-dependent need for stay in a high dependency unit (HDU) after major surgery by using data from an anesthesia information management system.

    PubMed

    Betten, Jan; Roness, Aleksander Kirkerud; Endreseth, Birger Henning; Trønnes, Håkon; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Klepstad, Pål; Nordseth, Trond

    2016-04-01

    Admittance to a high dependency unit (HDU) is expensive. Patients who receive surgical treatment with 'low anterior resection of the rectum' (LAR) or 'abdominoperineal resection of the rectum' (APR) at our hospital are routinely treated in an HDU the first 16-24 h of the postoperative (PO) period. The aim of this study was to describe the extent of HDU-specific interventions given. We included patients treated with LAR or APR at the St. Olav University Hospital (Trondheim, Norway) over a 1-year period. Physiologic data and HDU-interventions recorded during the PO-period were obtained from the anesthesia information management system (AIMS). HDU-specific interventions were defined as the need for respiratory support, fluid replacement therapy >500 ml/h, vasoactive medications, or a need for high dose opioids (morphine >7.5 mg/h i.v.). Sixty-two patients were included. Most patients needed HDU-specific interventions during the first 6 h of the PO period. After this, one-third of the patients needed one or more of the HDU-specific interventions for shorter periods of time. Another one-third of the patients had a need for HDU-specific therapies for more than ten consecutive hours, primarily an infusion of nor-epinephrine. Most patients treated with LAR or APR was in need of an HDU-specific intervention during the first 6 h of the PO-period, with a marked decline after this time period. The applied methodology, using an AIMS, demonstrates that there is great variability in individual patients' postoperative needs after major surgery, and that these needs are dynamic in their nature. PMID:26013979

  8. Assessment of the time-dependent need for stay in a high dependency unit (HDU) after major surgery by using data from an anesthesia information management system.

    PubMed

    Betten, Jan; Roness, Aleksander Kirkerud; Endreseth, Birger Henning; Trønnes, Håkon; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Klepstad, Pål; Nordseth, Trond

    2016-04-01

    Admittance to a high dependency unit (HDU) is expensive. Patients who receive surgical treatment with 'low anterior resection of the rectum' (LAR) or 'abdominoperineal resection of the rectum' (APR) at our hospital are routinely treated in an HDU the first 16-24 h of the postoperative (PO) period. The aim of this study was to describe the extent of HDU-specific interventions given. We included patients treated with LAR or APR at the St. Olav University Hospital (Trondheim, Norway) over a 1-year period. Physiologic data and HDU-interventions recorded during the PO-period were obtained from the anesthesia information management system (AIMS). HDU-specific interventions were defined as the need for respiratory support, fluid replacement therapy >500 ml/h, vasoactive medications, or a need for high dose opioids (morphine >7.5 mg/h i.v.). Sixty-two patients were included. Most patients needed HDU-specific interventions during the first 6 h of the PO period. After this, one-third of the patients needed one or more of the HDU-specific interventions for shorter periods of time. Another one-third of the patients had a need for HDU-specific therapies for more than ten consecutive hours, primarily an infusion of nor-epinephrine. Most patients treated with LAR or APR was in need of an HDU-specific intervention during the first 6 h of the PO-period, with a marked decline after this time period. The applied methodology, using an AIMS, demonstrates that there is great variability in individual patients' postoperative needs after major surgery, and that these needs are dynamic in their nature.

  9. Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods — Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991–2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10–20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results — At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9–19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23–25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (≤ 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation — Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

  10. Palaeolimnological reconstructions of mid-late Holocene climate change from South Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nieuwenhuyze, Wim; Roberts, Stephen J.; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Verleyen, Elie; Sterken, Mieke; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim

    2014-05-01

    South Georgia's position within the Polar Frontal Zone, the core belt of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds, and between Antarctica and the mid-latitudes makes it a key location for studying the main drivers of past and present-day climate variability. We undertook multi-proxy analyses, including fossil diatom, pigment and μ-XRF analysis, of lake and peat cores from two sites: Annenkov Island, on the southern side of South Georgia, and Prince Olav Harbour on the northern coast of South Georgia to determine: 1) which proxies were most suitable for reconstructing Holocene palaeoclimatic change; 2) whether the climate change signals from these proxies were related to natural lake development, local catchment processes such as changes in ice extent, or regional-global scale climatic change. Deglaciation at both sites was completed by c. 7800 cal. yr. B.P. Low nutrient/low productivity environments, which persisted within lakes at both locations until c. 3500 cal. yr. B.P., are indicative of the relatively slow development of lake ecosystems following deglaciation, and suggest high altitude glaciers or persistent ice-cover remained in both catchments well into the mid Holocene. In contrast, the late Holocene (c. 3500 yr to present) was characterized by initially higher, and then highly variable within-lake biological productivity. On Annenkov Island, the late Holocene diatom composition in Fan Lake was dominated by a single species (Cyclotella stelligera), and we have identified four major phases of increased catchment disturbance (represented by Fragilaria capucina peaks in diatom data), some of which coincide with more numerous meltwater input events (identified from Ti and Sr peaks in μ-XRF data). In this poster we examine the links between these meltwater events, results from other proxies, and changes in the climate of the sub-Antarctic region.

  11. PREFACE: The 6th Nordic Meeting on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhøiden, G.; Thorsteinsen, T. F.; Vaagen, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    Humanities (NAVF), The Norwegian Physical Society, The Community of Karmøy, Hydro Aluminium Karmøy, Statoil, Laborel, Aanderaa Instruments and also by other local firms and institutions. The financial as well as practical support from all of these sources is gratefully acknowledged. We will in particular express our appreciation for the indispensable help from cand. real. Konrad Bardsen and his colleagues at the gymnasium where the daily scientific activity, and also major parts of the social program, took place. The meeting could not have been organized nor carried through without the professional help from Karen-Margrete Hovland, backed by her sister Alice and a team of hard-working graduate students from Bergen: Erling Andersen, Håvard Helstrup, Torbjørn Rogde and Espen Staubo. We thank all of our speakers for a smooth cooperation. * The logo of the meeting, Seidmennene på Skrattaskjaer (Old Norse: seidmann = "shaman", skrattasker = wizard or troll skerry) has resulted in colorful interpretations and comments. The organizing committee noticed, with satisfaction, that the logo had been correctly identified in one of the contributions. The still curious reader may read about this thousand year old historic event in the sagas of the NORSE KINGS by Snorri Sturluson, in the saga of Olav Trygvason.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Micro- and Nanofluidics FOCUS ON MICRO- AND NANOFLUIDICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdari, Armand; Stone, Howard A.

    2009-07-01

    , simulation and theory, in this rapidly developing field. Focus on Micro- and Nanofluidics Contents The anti-lotus leaf effect in nanohydrodynamic bump arrays Keith Morton, Ophelia K C Tsui, Chih-Kuan Tung, James C Sturm, Stephen Y Chou and Robert Austin Transport in nanofluidic systems: a review of theory and applications W Sparreboom, A van den Berg and J C T Eijkel The effects of polymer molecular weight on filament thinning and drop breakup in microchannels P E Arratia, L-A Cramer, J P Gollub and D J Durian Mass transfer and interfacial properties in two-phase microchannel flows Jeffrey D Martin and Steven D Hudson Temporal response of an initially deflected PDMS channel Priyadarshi Panda, Kai P Yuet, Dhananjay Dendukuri, T Alan Hatton and Patrick S Doyle Gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns in rectangular polymeric microchannels: effect of surface wetting properties D Huh, C-H Kuo, J B Grotberg and S Takayama Mixing via thermocapillary generation of flow patterns inside a microfluidic drop María Luisa Cordero, Hans Olav Rolfsnes, Daniel R Burnham, Paul A Campbell, David McGloin and Charles N Baroud Pressure-driven DNA transport across an artificial nanotopography J T Del Bonis-O'Donnell, W Reisner and D Stein Eulerian indicators for predicting and optimizing mixing quality Rob Sturman and Stephen Wiggins Asymmetric flows over symmetric surfaces: capacitive coupling in induced-charge electro-osmosis T S Mansuripur, A J Pascall and T M Squires High-viscosity fluid threads in weakly diffusive microfluidic systems T Cubaud and T G Mason Interfacial mass transport in steady three-dimensional flows in microchannels Joseph D Kirtland, Corey R Siegel and Abraham D Stroock Active connectors for microfluidic drops on demand Jean-Christophe Galas, Denis Bartolo and Vincent Studer Electrokinetic control of sample splitting at a channel bifurcation using isotachophoresis Alexandre Persat and Juan G Santiago Differential inertial focusing of particles in curved low