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Sample records for kluyveromyces lactis pheromone

  1. Kluyveromyces lactis: An emerging tool in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Spohner, Sebastian C; Schaum, Vivienne; Quitmann, Hendrich; Czermak, Peter

    2016-03-20

    Kluyveromyces lactis has emerged as one of the most important yeast species for research and industrial biotechnology. This Crabtree-negative species is suitable for the production of metabolites and heterologous proteins, and its ability to achieve high levels of protein secretion makes it an attractive alternative for industrial protein production. Since 1991, almost 100 recombinant proteins have been expressed in K. lactis, 20% of which have been produced in the last 2 years. This review provides an overview of the genetic modifications used to accomplish heterologous gene expression in K. lactis, as well as fermentation techniques, and recent examples of industrial proteins produced in this species.

  2. Genome-wide metabolic (re-) annotation of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even before having its genome sequence published in 2004, Kluyveromyces lactis had long been considered a model organism for studies in genetics and physiology. Research on Kluyveromyces lactis is quite advanced and this yeast species is one of the few with which it is possible to perform formal genetic analysis. Nevertheless, until now, no complete metabolic functional annotation has been performed to the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome. Results In this work, a new metabolic genome-wide functional re-annotation of the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome was performed, resulting in the annotation of 1759 genes with metabolic functions, and the development of a methodology supported by merlin (software developed in-house). The new annotation includes novelties, such as the assignment of transporter superfamily numbers to genes identified as transporter proteins. Thus, the genes annotated with metabolic functions could be exclusively enzymatic (1410 genes), transporter proteins encoding genes (301 genes) or have both metabolic activities (48 genes). The new annotation produced by this work largely surpassed the Kluyveromyces lactis currently available annotations. A comparison with KEGG’s annotation revealed a match with 844 (~90%) of the genes annotated by KEGG, while adding 850 new gene annotations. Moreover, there are 32 genes with annotations different from KEGG. Conclusions The methodology developed throughout this work can be used to re-annotate any yeast or, with a little tweak of the reference organism, the proteins encoded in any sequenced genome. The new annotation provided by this study offers basic knowledge which might be useful for the scientific community working on this model yeast, because new functions have been identified for the so-called metabolic genes. Furthermore, it served as the basis for the reconstruction of a compartmentalized, genome-scale metabolic model of Kluyveromyces lactis, which is

  3. RAG4 gene encodes a glucose sensor in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Betina, S; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Wésolowski-Louvel, M

    2001-01-01

    The rag4 mutant of Kluyveromyces lactis was previously isolated as a fermentation-deficient mutant, in which transcription of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1 was affected. The wild-type RAG4 was cloned by complementation of the rag4 mutation and found to encode a protein homologous to Snf3 and Rgt2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These two proteins are thought to be sensors of low and high concentrations of glucose, respectively. Rag4, like Snf3 and Rgt2, is predicted to have the transmembrane structure of sugar transporter family proteins as well as a long C-terminal cytoplasmic tail possessing a characteristic 25-amino-acid sequence. Rag4 may therefore be expected to have a glucose-sensing function. However, the rag4 mutation was fully complemented by one copy of either SNF3 or RGT2. Since K. lactis appears to have no other genes of the SNF3/RGT2 type, we suggest that Rag4 of K. lactis may have a dual function of signaling high and low concentrations of glucose. In rag4 mutants, glucose repression of several inducible enzymes is abolished. PMID:11404320

  4. Electroinduced extraction of beta-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Ganeva, V; Galutzov, B; Eynard, N; Teissié, J

    2001-08-01

    A new methodology for the extraction of beta-galactosidase from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis was obtained by electropulsation. The application of a series of electric pulses (2 ms duration, 1 Hz frequency, and 4-4.5 kV/cm field strength) to fresh cells suspended in deionized water, followed by incubation in PBS, led to a spontaneous slow release of enzyme at a yield of 75-80% without any further treatment. Most of the enzyme was extracted within 8 h after electropulsation. This release was dependent on the growth phase. The specific activity of beta-galactosidase in the supernatant of pulsed cells was higher by a factor of 1.5-1.7 in comparison with crude extract.

  5. Genome wide distribution of illegitimate recombination events in Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kegel, Andreas; Martinez, Paula; Carter, Sidney D.; Åström, Stefan U.

    2006-01-01

    Illegitimate recombination (IR) is the process by which two DNA molecules not sharing homology to each other are joined. In Kluyveromyces lactis, integration of heterologous DNA occurred very frequently therefore constituting an excellent model organism to study IR. IR was completely dependent on the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and we detected no other pathways capable of mediating IR. NHEJ was very versatile, capable of repairing both blunt and non-complementary ends efficiently. Mapping the locations of genomic IR-events revealed target site preferences, in which intergenic regions (IGRs) and ribosomal DNA were overrepresented six-fold compared to open reading frames (ORFs). The IGR-events occurred predominantly within transcriptional regulatory regions. In a rad52 mutant strain IR still preferentially occurred at IGRs, indicating that DSBs in ORFs were not primarily repaired by homologous recombination (HR). Introduction of ectopic DSBs resulted in the efficient targeting of IR to these sites, strongly suggesting that IR occurred at spontaneous mitotic DSBs. The targeting efficiency was equal when ectopic breaks were introduced in an ORF or an IGR. We propose that spontaneous DSBs arise more frequently in transcriptional regulatory regions and in rDNA and such DSBs can be mapped by analyzing IR target sites. PMID:16549875

  6. Genome wide distribution of illegitimate recombination events in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Andreas; Martinez, Paula; Carter, Sidney D; Aström, Stefan U

    2006-01-01

    Illegitimate recombination (IR) is the process by which two DNA molecules not sharing homology to each other are joined. In Kluyveromyces lactis, integration of heterologous DNA occurred very frequently therefore constituting an excellent model organism to study IR. IR was completely dependent on the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and we detected no other pathways capable of mediating IR. NHEJ was very versatile, capable of repairing both blunt and non-complementary ends efficiently. Mapping the locations of genomic IR-events revealed target site preferences, in which intergenic regions (IGRs) and ribosomal DNA were overrepresented six-fold compared to open reading frames (ORFs). The IGR-events occurred predominantly within transcriptional regulatory regions. In a rad52 mutant strain IR still preferentially occurred at IGRs, indicating that DSBs in ORFs were not primarily repaired by homologous recombination (HR). Introduction of ectopic DSBs resulted in the efficient targeting of IR to these sites, strongly suggesting that IR occurred at spontaneous mitotic DSBs. The targeting efficiency was equal when ectopic breaks were introduced in an ORF or an IGR. We propose that spontaneous DSBs arise more frequently in transcriptional regulatory regions and in rDNA and such DSBs can be mapped by analyzing IR target sites.

  7. The yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as an efficient host for heterologous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, B W; van Ooyen, A J; Bonekamp, F J

    Several different yeast species have been developed into systems for efficient heterologous gene expression. In this paper we review foreign gene expression in the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. This yeast presents several advantageous properties in comparison to other yeast species. These include its impressive secretory capacities, its excellent fermentation characteristics on large scale, its food grade status and the availability of both episomal and integrative expression vectors. Moreover, in contrast to the methylotrophic yeasts that are frequently used for the expression of foreign genes, K. lactis does not require explosion-proof fermentation equipment. Here, we present an overview of the available tools for heterologous gene expression in K. lactis (available promoters, vector systems, etc). Also, the production of prochymosin, human serum albumin and pancreatic phospholipase by K. lactis is discussed in more detail, and used to rate the achievements of K. lactis with respect to other micro-organisms in which these proteins have been produced.

  8. Yeast on the milky way: genetics, physiology and biotechnology of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2013-05-01

    The milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis has a life cycle similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and can be employed as a model eukaryote using classical genetics, such as the combination of desired traits, by crossing and tetrad analysis. Likewise, a growing set of vectors, marker cassettes and tags for fluorescence microscopy are available for manipulation by genetic engineering and investigating its basic cell biology. We here summarize these applications, as well as the current knowledge regarding its central metabolism, glucose and extracellular stress signalling pathways. A short overview on the biotechnological potential of K. lactis concludes this review.

  9. Production of squalene by lactose-fermenting yeast Kluyveromyces lactis with reduced squalene epoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Drozdíková, E; Garaiová, M; Csáky, Z; Obernauerová, M; Hapala, I

    2015-07-01

    Utilization of yeast as squalene source for commercial use is limited by relatively high production costs. The ability of Kluyveromyces lactis to grow on cheap lactose-containing diary industry wastes could improve the economy of the production process. We therefore tested the potential of this yeast for squalene production. Accumulation of squalene was induced by partial inhibition of squalene epoxidase by a specific inhibitor terbinafine. Kluyveromyces lactis cultivated on glucose and lactose media showed similar growth sensitivity to terbinafine as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The effect of terbinafine on neutral lipid pattern was tested at concentrations with low, moderate and strong growth inhibition (2·5, 5 and 7·5 μg ml(-1) , respectively). Compared to S. cerevisiae, treatment with subinhibitory terbinafine doses had a weaker effect on steryl ester levels and total ergosterol levels in K. lactis. Quantification of squalene levels in terbinafine-treated K. lactis cells revealed high accumulation of squalene particularly in cells treated with 7·5 μg ml(-1) terbinafine in lactose medium. Terbinafine treatment stimulated the development of lipid droplets as lipid storage organelles and this effect was different in K. lactis grown on glucose or lactose media. Present report is the first attempt to utilize lactose-fermenting yeast K. lactis for production of a high-value lipid and it proves squalene epoxidase as a promising target for squalene overproduction in this yeast. Squalene is a natural substance with wide applications in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutic industries. The suitability of lactose-fermenting yeast Kluyveromyces lactis for the production of squalene was tested in the study. Partial inhibition of squalene epoxidase by specific inhibitor terbinafine resulted in high accumulation of squalene in K. lactis grown on glucose or lactose comparable to values found in terbinafine-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results prove that K. lactis is a

  10. Nisin production by a mixed-culture system consisting of Lactococcus lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Mizuguchi, T; Tanaka, E; Shioya, S

    1999-07-01

    To control the pH during antimicrobial peptide (nisin) production by a lactic acid bacterium, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (ATCC11454), a novel method involving neither addition of alkali nor a separation system such as a ceramic membrane filter and electrodialyzer was developed. A mixed culture of L. lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus, which was isolated from kefir grains, was utilized in the developed system. The interaction between lactate production by L. lactis and its assimilation by K. marxianus was used to control the pH. To utilize the interaction of these microorganisms to maintain high-level production of nisin, the kinetics of growth of, and production of lactate, acetate, and nisin by, L. lactis were investigated. The kinetics of growth of and lactic acid consumption by K. marxianus were also investigated. Because the pH of the medium could be controlled by the lactate consumption of K. marxianus and the specific lactate consumption rate of K. marxianus could be controlled by changing the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, a cascade pH controller coupled with DO control was developed. As a result, the pH was kept constant because the lactate level was kept low and nisin accumulated in the medium to a high level compared with that attained using other pH control strategies, such as with processes lacking pH control and those in which pH is controlled by addition of alkali.

  11. Nisin Production by a Mixed-Culture System Consisting of Lactococcus lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Mizuguchi, Taiji; Tanaka, Eiji; Shioya, Suteaki

    1999-01-01

    To control the pH during antimicrobial peptide (nisin) production by a lactic acid bacterium, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (ATCC11454), a novel method involving neither addition of alkali nor a separation system such as a ceramic membrane filter and electrodialyzer was developed. A mixed culture of L. lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus, which was isolated from kefir grains, was utilized in the developed system. The interaction between lactate production by L. lactis and its assimilation by K. marxianus was used to control the pH. To utilize the interaction of these microorganisms to maintain high-level production of nisin, the kinetics of growth of, and production of lactate, acetate, and nisin by, L. lactis were investigated. The kinetics of growth of and lactic acid consumption by K. marxianus were also investigated. Because the pH of the medium could be controlled by the lactate consumption of K. marxianus and the specific lactate consumption rate of K. marxianus could be controlled by changing the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, a cascade pH controller coupled with DO control was developed. As a result, the pH was kept constant because the lactate level was kept low and nisin accumulated in the medium to a high level compared with that attained using other pH control strategies, such as with processes lacking pH control and those in which pH is controlled by addition of alkali. PMID:10388714

  12. Ethanol tolerance and membrane fatty acid adaptation in adh multiple and null mutants of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Heipieper, H J; Isken, S; Saliola, M

    2000-11-01

    The effects of ethanol and 1-octanol on growth and fatty acid composition of different strains of Kluyveromyces lactis containing a mutation in the four different alcohol dehydrogenase (KlADH) genes were investigated. In the presence of ethanol and 1-octanol K. lactis reduced the fluidity of its lipids by decreasing the unsaturation index (UI) of its membrane fatty acids. In this way, a direct correlation between nonlethal ethanol concentrations and the decrease in the UI could be observed. At concentrations which totally inhibited cell growth no reaction occurred. These adaptive modifications of the fatty acid pattern of K. lactis to ethanol contrasted with those reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Whereas these two yeasts increased the fluidity of their membrane lipids in the presence of ethanol, K. lactis reduced the fluidity (UI) of its lipids. Among the different isogenic adh negative strains tested, the strain containing no ADH (adh0) and that containing only KlADH1 were the most alcohol-sensitive. The strain with only KlADH2 showed nearly the same tolerance as reference strain CBS 2359/152 containing all four ADH genes. This suggests that the KlADH2 product could play an important role in the adaptation/detoxification reactions of K. lactis to high ethanol concentrations.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Rodríguez, Ángel; Fernández-Leiro, Rafael; González Siso, M. Isabel; Cerdán, M. Esperanza; Becerra, Manuel; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2010-01-01

    β-Galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis catalyses the hydrolysis of the β-­galactosidic linkage in lactose. Owing to its many industrial applications, the biotechnological potential of this enzyme is substantial. This protein has been expressed in yeast and purified for crystallization trials. However, optimization of the best crystallization conditions yielded crystals with poor diffraction quality that precluded further structural studies. Finally, the crystal quality was improved using the streak-seeding technique and a complete diffraction data set was collected at 2.8 Å resolution. PMID:20208165

  14. Glucoamylase by recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis cells: production and modelling of a fed batch bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Paciello, Lucia; Romano, Franca; de Alteriis, Elisabetta; Parascandola, Palma; Romano, Vittorio

    2010-05-01

    A cultural system, aimed at the production of glucoamylase with cells of a non-conventional yeast transformed for the enzyme expression, Kluyveromyces lactis JA6-GAA was realised. Glucoamylase production was accomplished in a reactor operating in fed batch mode to avoid limitations with respect to oxygen transfer, and achieve high cell density. A mathematical model able to describe batch and fed batch operations was developed. The theoretical and experimental approach permitted to catch sight of possible physiological changes in the producer strain and set up a suitable fed-batch run to achieve a higher cell density.

  15. The major facilitator superfamily transporter Knq1p modulates boron homeostasis in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Svrbicka, Alexandra; Toth Hervay, Nora; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2016-03-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for living cells, yet its excess causes toxicity. To date, the mechanisms of boron toxicity are poorly understood. Recently, the ScATR1 gene has been identified encoding the main boron efflux pump in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the ScATR1 ortholog in Kluyveromyces lactis--the KNQ1 gene, to understand whether it participates in boron stress tolerance. We found that the KNQ1 gene, encoding a permease belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, is required for K. lactis boron tolerance. Deletion of the KNQ1 gene led to boron sensitivity and its overexpression increased K. lactis boron tolerance. The KNQ1 expression was induced by boron and the intracellular boron concentration was controlled by Knq1p. The KNQ1 promoter contains two putative binding motifs for the AP-1-like transcription factor KlYap1p playing a central role in oxidative stress defense. Our results indicate that the induction of the KNQ1 expression requires the presence of KlYap1p and that Knq1p like its ortholog ScAtr1p in S. cerevisiae functions as a boron efflux pump providing boron resistance in K. lactis.

  16. Improved Secretory Production of the Sweet-Tasting Protein, Brazzein, in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Cho-Rong; Kong, Ji-Na; Chung, Ju-Hee; Kim, Myung-Chul; Kong, Kwang-Hoon

    2016-08-17

    Brazzein is an intensely sweet protein with high stability over a wide range of pH values and temperatures, due to its four disulfide bridges. Recombinant brazzein production through secretory expression in Kluyveromyces lactis is reported, but is inefficient due to incorrect disulfide formation, which is crucial for achieving the final protein structure and stability. Protein disulfide bond formation requires protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and Ero1p. Here, we overexpressed KlPDI in K. lactis or treated the cells with dithiothreitol to overexpress KlERO1 and improve brazzein secretion. KlPDI and KlERO1 overexpression independently increased brazzein secretion in K. lactis by 1.7-2.2- and 1.3-1.6-fold, respectively. Simultaneous overexpression of KlPDI and KlERO1 accelerated des-pE1M-brazzein secretion by approximately 2.6-fold compared to the previous system. Moreover, intracellular misfolded/unfolded recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein was significantly decreased. In conclusion, increased KlPDI and KlERO1 expression favors brazzein secretion, suggesting that correct protein folding may be crucial to brazzein secretion in K. lactis.

  17. A vital function for mitochondrial DNA in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Clark-Walker, G D; Chen, X J

    1996-10-28

    Petite-negative yeasts do not form viable respiratory-deficient mutants on treatment with DNA-targeting drugs that readily eliminate the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from petite-positive yeasts. However, in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, specific mutations in the nuclear genes MG12 and MG15 encoding the alpha- and gamma-subunits of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase, allow mtDNA to be lost. In this study we show that wild-type K. lactis does not survive in the absence of its mitochondrial genome and that the function of mgi mutations is to suppress lethality caused by loss of mtDNA. Firstly, we find that loss of a multicopy plasmid bearing a mgi allele readily occurs from a wild-type strain with functional mtDNA but is not tolerated in the absence of mtDNA. Secondly, we cloned the K. lactis homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome maintenance gene MGM101, and disrupted one of the two copies in a diploid. Following sporulation, we find that segregants containing the disrupted gene form minicolonies containing 6-8000 inviable cells. By contrast, disruption of MGM101 is not lethal in a haploid mgi strain with a specific mutation in a subunit of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase. These observations suggest that mtDNA in K. lactis encodes a vital function which may reside in one of the three mitochondrially encoded subunits of Fo.

  18. Kinetics and regulation of lactose transport and metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis JA6.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M; Silveira, W B; Fietto, L G; Brandão, R L; Castro, I M

    2014-07-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis strains are able to assimilate lactose. They have been used industrially to eliminate this sugar from cheese whey and in other industrial products. In this study, we investigated specific features and the kinetic parameters of the lactose transport system in K. lactis JA6. In lactose grown cells, lactose was transported by a system transport with a half-saturation constant (K s) of 1.49 ± 0.38 mM and a maximum velocity (V max) of 0.96 ± 0.12 mmol. (g dry weight)(-1) h(-1) for lactose. The transport system was constitutive and energy-dependent. Results obtained by different approaches showed that the lactose transport system was regulated by glucose at the transcriptional level and by glucose and other sugars at a post-translational level. In K. lactis JA6, galactose metabolization was under glucose control. These findings indicated that the regulation of lactose-galactose regulon in K. lactis was similar to the regulation of galactose regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  19. Sugar metabolism, redox balance and oxidative stress response in the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    González-Siso, M Isabel; García-Leiro, Ana; Tarrío, Nuria; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    A lot of studies have been carried out on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an yeast with a predominant fermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, which allows exploring the complex response induced by oxidative stress. S. cerevisiae is considered a eukaryote model for these studies. We propose Kluyveromyces lactis as a good alternative model to analyse variants in the oxidative stress response, since the respiratory metabolism in this yeast is predominant under aerobic conditions and it shows other important differences with S. cerevisiae in catabolic repression and carbohydrate utilization. The knowledge of oxidative stress response in K. lactis is still a developing field. In this article, we summarize the state of the art derived from experimental approaches and we provide a global vision on the characteristics of the putative K. lactis components of the oxidative stress response pathway, inferred from their sequence homology with the S. cerevisiae counterparts. Since K. lactis is also a well-established alternative host for industrial production of native enzymes and heterologous proteins, relevant differences in the oxidative stress response pathway and their potential in biotechnological uses of this yeast are also reviewed. PMID:19715615

  20. [Production and partial characterization of beta-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis grown in deproteinized whey].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Matheus, Alejandra O; Rivas, Nilo

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to optimize the beta-galactosidase production by Kluyveromyces lactis, applying the Surface Response Methodology (SRM) and using deproteinized whey as fermentation medium. An Orthogonal Central Compound Design (OCCD) was used without repetition, with four factors: temperature, pH, agitation speed and fermentation time. Then, enzyme activity (U/ml) as response variable was used. Thirty trials in twenty-five treatments, with six repetitions at the central point, were carried out, in a New Brunswick Bioflo 2000 fermentor with a volume of 2 liters. The deproteinized whey obtained by thermocoagulation was chemically analyzed. The results were: moisture 93.83%, total solids 6.17%, protein 0.44%, lactose 4.85%, acidity 0.43% and pH 4.58. The best conditions in the enzyme production were: temperature 30.3 degrees C, pH 4.68, agitation speed 191 r.p.m. and fermentation time 18.5 h. with an enzyme production of 8.3 U/ml. The degree of purification obtained was 7.4 times and the yield was 50.8%. The purified enzyme had an optimum temperature of 60 degrees C and a pH of 6.2. This work shows that the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis grown in deproteinized whey is able to produce the enzyme beta-galactosidase and SRM can be used in the fermentology processes, specifically in determining the best suitable operation conditions.

  1. Recyclable Strategy for the Production of High-Purity Galacto-oligosaccharides by Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaisheng; You, Shengping; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-20

    A recyclable strategy for the production of high-purity (>95%) galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) was developed using Kluyveromyces lactis in both the synthesis and purification steps. For the synthesis of GOS, ethanol-permeabilized cells (p-cells) of K. lactis were used because the enhanced permeability facilitated the mass transfer of the substrate and the release of oligosaccharide products. For the purification of GOS, non-permeabilized K. lactis cells (np-cells) were preferred as a result of their intrinsic cell membrane barrier toward GOS, which led to the selective consumption of carbohydrate. In this way, undesired glucose, galactose, and lactose in the raw GOS solution can be completely removed. This strategy is recyclable not only because of the high stability and reusability of p-cells and np-cells but also because the ethanol, which is simultaneously generated during the purification, can be reused for the preparation of p-cells. The strategy proposed in this study is a promising candidate for the efficient production of high-purity GOS.

  2. Mutations in Mgi Genes Convert Kluyveromyces Lactis into a Petite-Positive Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. J.; Clark-Walker, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    Following targeted disruption of the unique CYC1 gene, the petite-negative yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, was found to grow fermentatively in the absence of cytochrome c-mediated respiration. This observation encouraged us to seek mitochondrial mutants by treatment of K. lactis with ethidium bromide at the highest concentration permitting survival. By this technique, we isolated four mtDNA mutants, three lacking mtDNA and one with a deleted mitochondrial genome. In the three isolates lacking mtDNA, a nuclear mutation is present that permits petite formation. The three mutations occur at two different loci, designated MGI1 and MGI2 (for Mitochondrial Genome Integrity). The mgi mutations convert K. lactis into a petite-positive yeast. Like bakers' yeast, the mgi mutants spontaneously produce petites with deletions in mtDNA and lose this genome at high frequency on treatment with ethidium bromide. We suggest that the MGI gene products are required for maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome and that, petite-positive yeasts may be naturally altered in one or other of these genes. PMID:8454202

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Elongator mutations confer resistance to the Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin

    PubMed Central

    Frohloff, Frank; Fichtner, Lars; Jablonowski, Daniel; Breunig, Karin D.; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2001-01-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis killer strains secrete a zymocin complex that inhibits proliferation of sensitive yeast genera including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In search of the putative toxin target (TOT), we used mTn3:: tagging to isolate zymocin-resistant tot mutants from budding yeast. Of these we identified the TOT1, TOT2 and TOT3 genes (isoallelic with ELP1, ELP2 and ELP3, respectively) coding for the histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-associated Elongator complex of RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Other than the typical elp ts-phenotype, tot phenocopies hypersensitivity towards caffeine and Calcofluor White as well as slow growth and a G1 cell cycle delay. In addition, TOT4 and TOT5 (isoallelic with KTI12 and IKI1, respectively) code for components that associate with Elongator. Intriguingly, strains lacking non-Elongator HATs (gcn5Δ, hat1Δ, hpa3Δ and sas3Δ) or non-Elongator transcription elongation factors TFIIS (dst1Δ) and Spt4p (spt4Δ) cannot confer resistance towards the K.lactis zymocin, thus providing evidence that Elongator equals TOT and that Elongator plays an important role in signalling toxicity of the K.lactis zymocin. PMID:11296232

  4. Glycolic acid production in the engineered yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycolic acid is a C2 hydroxy acid that is a widely used chemical compound. It can be polymerised to produce biodegradable polymers with excellent gas barrier properties. Currently, glycolic acid is produced in a chemical process using fossil resources and toxic chemicals. Biotechnological production of glycolic acid using renewable resources is a desirable alternative. Results The yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis are suitable organisms for glycolic acid production since they are acid tolerant and can grow in the presence of up to 50 g l-1 glycolic acid. We engineered S. cerevisiae and K. lactis for glycolic acid production using the reactions of the glyoxylate cycle to produce glyoxylic acid and then reducing it to glycolic acid. The expression of a high affinity glyoxylate reductase alone already led to glycolic acid production. The production was further improved by deleting genes encoding malate synthase and the cytosolic form of isocitrate dehydrogenase. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced up to about 1 g l-1 of glycolic acid in a medium containing d-xylose and ethanol. Similar modifications in K. lactis resulted in a much higher glycolic acid titer. In a bioreactor cultivation with d-xylose and ethanol up to 15 g l-1 of glycolic acid was obtained. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of engineering yeast to produce glycolic acid. Prior to this work glycolic acid production through the glyoxylate cycle has only been reported in bacteria. The benefit of a yeast host is the possibility for glycolic acid production also at low pH, which was demonstrated in flask cultivations. Production of glycolic acid was first shown in S. cerevisiae. To test whether a Crabtree negative yeast would be better suited for glycolic acid production we engineered K. lactis in the same way and demonstrated it to be a better host for glycolic acid production. PMID:24053654

  5. Inducible Amplification of Gene Copy Number and Heterologous Protein Production in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Morlino, Giovanni B.; Tizzani, Lorenza; Fleer, Reinhard; Frontali, Laura; Bianchi, Michele M.

    1999-01-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1β, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system. PMID:10543790

  6. Inducible amplification of gene copy number and heterologous protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Morlino, G B; Tizzani, L; Fleer, R; Frontali, L; Bianchi, M M

    1999-11-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1beta, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system.

  7. Attraction of Coffee Bean Weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus, to Volatiles from the Industrial Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuai; Mei, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Li, Yao-Fa; She, Dongmei; Zhang, Tao; Ning, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The coffee bean weevil (CBW), Araecerus fasciculatus (De Geer, 1775) (Coleoptera: Anthribidae) is an important pest of stored products such as grains, coffee beans, cassava, and traditional Chinese medicine materials. In China, CBW causes large losses of Daqu, a traditional Chinese liquor fermentation starter, and, unfortunately, the use of conventional insecticides against CBW is not suitable in Daqu storage. We found CBW to be highly attracted to fermenting yeast cultures, such as Kluyveromyces lactis. Eight volatile compounds, produced by fermenting cultures and not by sterile samples, were identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Five of these substances elicited significant responses in Y-tube behavioral bioassays. Field trapping experiments revealed 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate to be crucial for attraction of CBW. Results show that yeast volatiles play an important role in host location, and that 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate could be utilized as potential attractants in monitoring and control systems against this important pest.

  8. Developing a xylanase XYNZG from Plectosphaerella cucumerina for baking by heterologously expressed in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fei Xiang; Wang, Qin Hong; Jiang, Si Jing; Zhou, Yu Ling; Zhang, Gui Min; Ma, Yan He

    2014-12-16

    Xylanase can replace chemical additives to improve the volume and sensory properties of bread in the baking. Suitable baking xylanase with improved yield will promote the application of xylanase in baking industry. The xylanase XYNZG from the Plectosphaerella cucumerina has been previously characterized by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. However, P. pastoris is not a suitable host for xylanase to be used in the baking process since P. pastoris does not have GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) status and requires large methanol supplement during the fermentation in most conditions, which is not allowed to be used in the food industry. Kluyveromyces lactis, as another yeast expression host, has a GRAS status, which has been successfully used in food and feed applications. No previous work has been reported concerning the heterologous expression of xylanase gene xynZG in K. lactis with an aim for application in baking. The xylanase gene xynZG from the P. cucumerina was heterologously expressed in K. lactis. The recombinant protein XYNZG in K. lactis presented an approximately 19 kDa band on SDS-PAGE and zymograms analysis. Transformant with the highest halo on the plate containing the RBB-xylan (Remazol Brilliant Blue-xylan) was selected for the flask fermentation in different media. The results indicated that the highest activity of 115 U/ml at 72 h was obtained with the YLPU medium. The mass spectrometry analysis suggested that the hydrolytic products of xylan by XYNZG were mainly xylobiose and xylotriose. The results of baking trials indicated that the addition of XYNZG could reduce the kneading time of dough, increase the volume of bread, improve the texture, and have more positive effects on the sensory properties of bread. Xylanase XYNZG is successfully expressed in K. lactis, which exhibits the highest activity among the published reports of the xylanase expression in K. lactis. The recombinant XYNZG can be used to improve the volume and sensory

  9. Two mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activities of Kluyveromyces lactis are differently expressed during respiration and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    1995-12-20

    The lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is an essentially aerobic organism in which both respiration and fermentation can coexist depending on the sugar concentration. Despite a low fermentative capacity as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four structural genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities are present in this yeast. Two of these activities, namely K1ADH III and K1ADH IV, are located within mitochondria and their presence is dependent on the carbon sources in the medium. In this paper we demonstrate by transcription and activity analysis that KlADH3 is expressed in the presence of low glucose concentrations and in the presence of respiratory carbon sources other than ethanol. Indeed ethanol acts as a strong repressor of this gene. On the other hand, KlADH4 is induced by the presence of ethanol and not by other respiratory carbon sources. We also demonstrate that the presence of KLADH III and KLADH IV in K. lactis cells is dependent on glucose concentration, glucose uptake and the amount of ethanol produced. As a consequence, these activities can be used as markers for the onset of respiratory and fermentative metabolism in this yeast.

  10. Quantitative comparison of transient growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces kluyveri, and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Christoph; Von Stockar, Urs

    2003-03-30

    A multitude of metabolic regulations occur in yeast, particularly under dynamic process conditions, such as under sudden glucose excess. However, quantification of regulations and classification of yeast strains under these conditions have yet to be elucidated, which requires high-frequency and consistent quantification of the metabolic response. The present study aimed at quantifying the dynamic regulation of the central metabolism of strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. kluyveri, and Kluyveromyces lactis upon sudden glucose excess, accomplished by a shift-up in dilution rate inside of the oxidative region using a small metabolic flux model. It was found that, under transient growth conditions, S. kluyveri behaved like K. lactis, while classification using steady-state conditions would position S. kluyveri close to S. cerevisiae. For transient conditions and based on the observation whether excess glucose is initially used for catabolism (energy) or anabolism (carbon), we propose to classify strains into energy-driven, such as S. cerevisiae, and carbon-driven, such as S. kluyveri and K. lactis, strains. Furthermore, it was found that the delayed onset of fermentative catabolism in carbon-driven strains is a consequence of low catabolic flux and the initial shunt of glucose in non-nitrogen-containing biomass constituents. The MFA model suggests that energy limitation forced the cell to ultimately increase catabolic flux, while the capacity of oxidative catabolism is not sufficient to process this flux oxidatively. The combination of transient experiments and its exploitation with reconciled intrinsic rates using a small metabolic model could corroborate earlier findings of metabolic regulations, such as tight glucose control in carbon-driven strains and transient changes in biomass composition, as well as explore new regulations, such as assimilation of ethanol before glucose. The benefit from using small metabolic flux models is the richness of information and the

  11. Efficient secretory expression of the sweet-tasting protein brazzein in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyun-Joo; Noh, Jin-Seok; Kong, Kwang-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    Brazzein is an intensely sweet-tasting protein with high water solubility, heat stability, and taste properties resembling those of carbohydrate sweeteners. In the present study, we describe the expression of the synthetic gene encoding brazzein, a sweet protein in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The synthetic brazzein gene was designed based on the biased codons of the yeast, so as to optimize its expression, as well as on the extracellular secretion for expression in an active, soluble form. The synthesized brazzein gene was cloned into the secretion vector pKLAC2, which contains the yeast prepropeptide signal from the Saccharomycescerevisiae α-mating factor. The constructed plasmid pKLAC2-des-pE1M-brazzein was introduced into the yeast K. lactis GG799. The yeast transformants were cultured for high-yield secretion of the recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein in YPGal medium for 96 h at 30°C. The expressed recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein was purified by CM-Sepharose column chromatography and approximately 104 mg/L was obtained. The purity and conformational state of the recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein were confirmed using SDS-PAGE, HPLC, and circular dichroism. The identity of the recombinant protein was also confirmed by N-terminal amino acid analysis and taste testing. The purified recombinant des-pE1M-brazzein had an intrinsic sweetness in its minor form, approximately 2130 times sweeter than sucrose on a weight basis. These results demonstrate that the K. lactis expression system is useful for producing the recombinant brazzein in active form at a high yield with attributes useful in the food industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enzymatic synthesis and characterization of hydroquinone galactoside using Kluyveromyces lactis lactase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Go-Eun; Lee, Jin-Ha; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Seo, Eun-Seong; Jin, Sheng-De; Kim, Ghahyun J; Cha, Jaeho; Kim, Eui-Joong; Park, Ki-Deok; Kim, Doman

    2010-09-08

    Hydroquinone galactoside (HQ-Gal) as a potential skin whitening agent was synthesized by the reaction of lactase (beta-galactosidase) from Kluyveromyces lactis, Aspergillus oryzae, Bacillus circulans, and Thermus sp. with lactose as a donor and HQ as an acceptor. Among these lactases, the acceptor reaction involving HQ and lactose with K. lactis lactase showed a higher conversion ratio to HQ-Gal (60.27%). HQ-Gal was purified using butanol partitioning and silica gel column chromatography. The structure of the purified HQ-Gal was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance, and the ionic product was observed at m/z 295 (C12H16O7Na)+ using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. HQ-Gal was identified as 4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside. The optimum conditions for HQ-Gal synthesis by K. lactis determined using response surface methodology were 50 mM HQ, 60 mM lactose, and 20 U mL(-1) lactase. These conditions produced a yield of 2.01 g L(-1) HQ-Gal. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of diphenylpicrylhydrazyl scavenging activity was 3.31 mM, indicating a similar antioxidant activity compared to beta-arbutin (IC50=3.95 mM). The Ki value of HQ-Gal (0.75 mM) against tyrosinase was smaller than that of beta-arbutin (Ki=1.97 mM), indicating its superiority as an inhibitor. HQ-Gal inhibited (23%) melanin synthesis without being significantly toxic to the cells, while beta-arbutin exhibited only 8% reduction of melanin synthesis in B16 melanoma cells compared with the control. These results indicate that HQ-Gal may be a suitable functional component in the cosmetics industry.

  13. SOD1, a New Kluyveromyces lactis Helper Gene for Heterologous Protein Secretion▿

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, S.; Zanni, E.; Talora, C.; Rossi, M.; Palleschi, C.; Uccelletti, D.

    2008-01-01

    Bottlenecks in protein expression and secretion often limit the development of industrial processes. By manipulating chaperone and foldase levels, improvements in yeast secretion were found for a number of proteins. Recently, sustained endoplasmic reticulum stress, occurring due to recombinant protein production, was reported to cause oxidative stress in yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are able to trigger an adaptive response to oxidative-stress conditions, resulting in the upregulation of both primary and secondary antioxidant defenses. SOD1 encodes for a superoxide dismutase that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions (O2−) into oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. It is a Cu2+/Zn2+ metalloenzyme and represents an important antioxidant defense in nearly all aerobic and aerotolerant organisms. We found that overexpression of the Kluyveromyces lactis SOD1 (KlSOD1) gene was able to increase the production of two different heterologous proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and glucoamylase from Arxula adeninivorans. In addition, KlSOD1 overexpression led to a significant decrease in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that originated during protein production. The yield of HSA also increased when K. lactis cells were grown in the presence of the antioxidant agent ascorbic acid and decreased when cells were challenged with menadione, a ROS generator compound. Moreover, we observed that, in high-osmolarity medium, cells overexpressing KlSOD1 showed higher growth rates than control cells. Our results thus further support the notion that the production of some heterologous proteins may be improved by manipulating genes involved in general stress responses. PMID:18836000

  14. How recombinant swollenin from Kluyveromyces lactis affects cellulosic substrates and accelerates their hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to generate biofuels, insoluble cellulosic substrates are pretreated and subsequently hydrolyzed with cellulases. One way to pretreat cellulose in a safe and environmentally friendly manner is to apply, under mild conditions, non-hydrolyzing proteins such as swollenin - naturally produced in low yields by the fungus Trichoderma reesei. To yield sufficient swollenin for industrial applications, the first aim of this study is to present a new way of producing recombinant swollenin. The main objective is to show how swollenin quantitatively affects relevant physical properties of cellulosic substrates and how it affects subsequent hydrolysis. Results After expression in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the resulting swollenin was purified. The adsorption parameters of the recombinant swollenin onto cellulose were quantified for the first time and were comparable to those of individual cellulases from T. reesei. Four different insoluble cellulosic substrates were then pretreated with swollenin. At first, it could be qualitatively shown by macroscopic evaluation and microscopy that swollenin caused deagglomeration of bigger cellulose agglomerates as well as dispersion of cellulose microfibrils (amorphogenesis). Afterwards, the effects of swollenin on cellulose particle size, maximum cellulase adsorption and cellulose crystallinity were quantified. The pretreatment with swollenin resulted in a significant decrease in particle size of the cellulosic substrates as well as in their crystallinity, thereby substantially increasing maximum cellulase adsorption onto these substrates. Subsequently, the pretreated cellulosic substrates were hydrolyzed with cellulases. Here, pretreatment of cellulosic substrates with swollenin, even in non-saturating concentrations, significantly accelerated the hydrolysis. By correlating particle size and crystallinity of the cellulosic substrates with initial hydrolysis rates, it could be shown that the swollenin

  15. Proteomic and functional consequences of hexokinase deficiency in glucose-repressible Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Mates, Nadia; Kettner, Karina; Heidenreich, Falk; Pursche, Theresia; Migotti, Rebekka; Kahlert, Günther; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Breunig, Karin D; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hoflack, Bernard; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of glucose signaling in the Crabtree-positive eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has disclosed a dual role of its hexokinase ScHxk2, which acts as a glycolytic enzyme and key signal transducer adapting central metabolism to glucose availability. In order to identify evolutionarily conserved characteristics of hexokinase structure and function, the cellular response of the Crabtree-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to rag5 null mutation and concomitant deficiency of its unique hexokinase KlHxk1 was analyzed by means of difference gel electrophoresis. In total, 2,851 fluorescent spots containing different protein species were detected in the master gel representing all of the K. lactis proteins that were solubilized from glucose-grown KlHxk1 wild-type and mutant cells. Mass spectrometric peptide analysis identified 45 individual hexokinase-dependent proteins related to carbohydrate, short-chain fatty acid and tricarboxylic acid metabolism as well as to amino acid and protein turnover, but also to general stress response and chromatin remodeling, which occurred as a consequence of KlHxk1 deficiency at a minimum 3-fold enhanced or reduced level in the mutant proteome. In addition, three proteins exhibiting homology to 2-methylcitrate cycle enzymes of S. cerevisiae were detected at increased concentrations, suggesting a stimulation of pyruvate formation from amino acids and/or fatty acids. Experimental validation of the difference gel electrophoresis approach by post-lysis dimethyl labeling largely confirmed the abundance changes detected in the mutant proteome via the former method. Taking into consideration the high proportion of identified hexokinase-dependent proteins exhibiting increased proteomic levels, KlHxk1 is likely to have a repressive function in a multitude of metabolic pathways. The proteomic alterations detected in the mutant classify KlHxk1 as a multifunctional enzyme and support the view of evolutionary conservation of

  16. Expression and secretion of recombinant ovine beta-lactoglobulin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, T L; Paterson, G; Crimmins, K; Boyd, A; Sawyer, L; Fothergill-Gilmore, L A

    1996-01-01

    High expression and secretion of recombinant ovine beta-lactoglobulin has been achieved in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The yield of beta-lactoglobulin is 40-50 mg per litre of culture supernatant and accounts for approx. 72% of the total secreted protein. Constitutive expression is under the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoglycerate kinase promoter from an intronless version of the beta-lactoglobulin gene. Secretion is specified by the ovine protein's own signal sequence. this system, coupled to an efficient and novel recovery protocol, allows 30 mg of pure protein to be isolated from a typical 1 litre culture. The protein is virtually indistinguishable from beta-lactoglobulin conventionally purified from sheep milk by its behaviour in native PAGE and SDS/PAGE, reactivity to antibodies, CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and N-terminal sequencing. Attempts to achieve a similar expression and secretion system in the yeast S. cerevisiae met with only limited success, although it was found that heat-shock treatment modestly increased the yield up to approx. 3-4 mg per litre of culture supernatant. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that secretion in S. cerevisiae depended upon correct formation of the two disulphide bonds present in beta-lactoglobulin. PMID:8611177

  17. The Role Of Nonhomologous End-Joining Components in Telomere Metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sidney D.; Iyer, Shilpa; Xu, Jianing; McEachern, Michael J.; Åström, Stefan U.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between telomeres and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is paradoxical, as NHEJ proteins are part of the telomere cap, which serves to differentiate telomeres from DNA double-strand breaks. We explored these contradictory functions for NHEJ proteins by investigating their role in Kluyveromyces lactis telomere metabolism. The ter1-4LBsr allele of the TER1 gene resulted in the introduction of sequence altered telomeric repeats and subsequent telomere–telomere fusions (T–TFs). In this background, Lig4 and Ku80 were necessary for T–TFs to form. Nej1, essential for NHEJ at internal positions, was not. Hence, T–TF formation was mediated by an unusual NHEJ mechanism. Rad50 and mre11 strains exhibited stable short telomeres, suggesting that Rad50 and Mre11 were required for telomerase recruitment. Introduction of the ter1-4LBsr allele into these strains failed to result in telomere elongation as normally observed with the ter1-4LBsr allele. Thus, the role of Rad50 and Mre11 in the formation of T–TFs was unclear. Furthermore, rad50 and mre11 mutants had highly increased subtelomeric recombination rates, while ku80 and lig4 mutants displayed moderate increases. Ku80 mutant strains also contained extended single-stranded 3′ telomeric overhangs. We concluded that NHEJ proteins have multiple roles at telomeres, mediating fusions of mutant telomeres and ensuring end protection of normal telomeres. PMID:17237517

  18. Evaluation of the performance of Torulaspora delbrueckii, Williopsis saturnus, and Kluyveromyces lactis in lychee wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dai; Yap, Zhi Yin; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2015-08-03

    This study evaluated the effects of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts, namely Torulaspora delbrueckii PRELUDE, Williopsis saturnus NCYC22, and Kluyveromyces lactis KL71 on lychee juice fermentation. The fermentation performance of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts was significantly different. T. delbrueckii PRELUDE had the fastest rate of growth and high sugar consumption. W. saturnus NCYC22 used the lowest amount of sugars, but consumed the highest amount of nitrogen. Correspondingly, strain PRELUDE produced the highest level of ethanol (7.6% v/v), followed by strain KL71 (3.4% v/v) and strain NCYC22 (0.8% v/v). Aroma character-impact terpenes and terpenoids could be partially retained in all lychee wines, with higher odour activity values (OAVs) of geraniol and citronellol in strain KL71. However, strain KL71 and strain NCYC22 over-produced ethyl acetate. Strain PRELUDE had a better ability to generate high levels of ethanol, isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenylethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate and retained high OAVs of lychee aroma-character compounds cis-rose oxide (16.5) and linalool (3.5). Thus, it is deemed to be a promising non-Saccharomyces yeast for lychee wine fermentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kluyveromyces lactis killer plasmid pGKL2: molecular analysis of an essential gene, ORF5.

    PubMed

    Schaffrath, R; Meacock, P A

    1995-06-15

    The ORF5 of Kluyveromyces lactis killer plasmid pGKL2 (k2) is capable of encoding a small neutral protein of 18 kDa of as yet unassigned function. Although this ORF is located between two larger ORFs, 4 and 6, which it overlaps, RNA analysis showed that it is transcribed monocistronically. One-step gene disruption of ORF5, via in vivo homologous recombination between native plasmid k2 and a transfer vector employing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene fused to the k2 UCS5 element, yielded Leu+ transformants at high frequencies. The transformants were found to carry a new recombinant form of k2 with ORF5 replaced by the LEU2 marker, termed rk2, in addition to the wild-type plasmids k1 and k2. Northern analysis detected a plasmid-dependent LEU2 transcript distinct in size and regulation from its nuclear counterpart. Recombinant plasmid, rk2, was unable to displace native k2 during Leu+ selective growth; however rk2 was displaced by k2 during non-selective growth. Thus, ORF5 appears to be an essential gene for plasmid integrity and/or maintenance. The ORF5 product was detected by over-expression of an epitope-tagged allele in the baculovirus system. Western analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for the epitope tag identified a protein band with apparent molecular weight of 20 kDa, corresponding in size to the predicted product.

  20. Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with linear DNA killer plasmids from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Gunge, N; Murata, K; Sakaguchi, K

    1982-01-01

    Protoplasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were mixed with linear DNA plasmids, pGKl1 and pGKl2, isolated from a Kluyveromyces lactis killer strain and treated with polyethylene glycol. Out of 2,000 colonies regenerated on a nonselective medium, two killer transformants were obtained. The pGKl plasmids and the killer character were stably maintained in one (Pdh-1) of them. Another transformant, Pdl-1, was a weak killer, and the subclones consisted of a mixture of weak and nonkiller cells. The weak killers were characterized by the presence of pGKl1 in a decreased amount, and nonkillers were characterized by the absence of pGKl1. The occurrence of two new plasmids which migrated faster than pGKl1 in an agarose gel was observed in Pdl-1 and its subclones, whether weak or nonkillers. Staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole revealed that the pGKl plasmids exist in the cytosol of transformant cells with numerous copy numbers. Images PMID:7045080

  1. Feedback Regulation of Glucose Transporter Gene Transcription in Kluyveromyces lactis by Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Milkowski, C.; Krampe, S.; Weirich, J.; Hasse, V.; Boles, E.; Breunig, K. D.

    2001-01-01

    In the respirofermentative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, only a single genetic locus encodes glucose transporters that can support fermentative growth. This locus is polymorphic in wild-type isolates carrying either KHT1 and KHT2, two tandemly arranged HXT-like genes, or RAG1, a low-affinity transporter gene that arose by recombination between KHT1 and KHT2. Here we show that KHT1 is a glucose-induced gene encoding a low-affinity transporter very similar to Rag1p. Kht2p has a lower Km (3.7 mM) and a more complex regulation. Transcription is high in the absence of glucose, further induced by low glucose concentrations, and repressed at higher glucose concentrations. The response of KHT1 and KHT2 gene regulation to high but not to low concentrations of glucose depends on glucose transport. The function of either Kht1p or Kht2p is sufficient to mediate the characteristic response to high glucose, which is impaired in a kht1 kht2 deletion mutant. Thus, the KHT genes are subject to mutual feedback regulation. Moreover, glucose repression of the endogenous β-galactosidase (LAC4) promoter and glucose induction of pyruvate decarboxylase were abolished in the kht1 kht2 mutant. These phenotypes could be partially restored by HXT gene family members from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results indicate that the specific responses to high but not to low glucose concentrations require a high rate of glucose uptake. PMID:11514503

  2. Evaluation of pKD1-based plasmid systems for heterologous protein production in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Panuwatsuk, W; Da Silva, N A

    2002-02-01

    The stability of pKD1-based vectors was evaluated during the synthesis of intracellular and extracellular gene products in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The Escherichia coli lacZ and MFalpha1 leader-BPTI (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor) cassettes were placed under the control of the inducible K. lactis LAC4 promoter and inserted into the pKD1-based plasmids. To induce gene expression while maintaining inducer level, a gratuitous gal1-209 K. lactis strain was employed. Selective medium containing 5 g glucose/l and 0.5 g galactose (inducer)/l allowed optimum expression and secretion of heterologous products without a significant effect on the growth of the recombinant cells. During long-term sequential batch cultures (60 generations), plasmid instability was mainly the result of structural instability. The expression and secretion of BPTI resulted in greater structural instability relative to the intracellular beta-galactosidase. For both products, vectors carrying the pKD1 replication origin and the cis-acting stability locus (partial-pKD1 vectors) were more stable than vectors carrying the full pKD1 sequence (full-pKD1 vectors). However, after 55 generations, the beta-galactosidase and BPTI activities were still higher with the full-pKD1 vectors. This was due to the significantly higher initial beta-galactosidase and BPTI activities for the full-pKD1 vectors (approximately 85% and 47% higher, respectively) relative to the partial-pKDI vectors. Southern blots confirmed that these increases were due to the higher copy number of the vectors carrying the full pKD1 sequence. In contrast to our previously reported results for the secretion of invertase, full-pKD1 vectors were preferred for the expression/secretion of beta-galactosidase and BPTI for at least 55 generations. Due to their structural stability, partial-pKD1 vectors will be advantageous for very long cultivation times.

  3. Protective Vaccination against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus with Whole Recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis Yeast Expressing the Viral VP2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Marina; Durairaj, Vijay; Mundt, Egbert; Schulze, Katja; Breunig, Karin D.; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Here we report on vaccination approaches against infectious bursal disease (IBD) of poultry that were performed with complete yeast of the species Kluyveromyces lactis (K. lactis). Employing a genetic system that enables the rapid production of stably transfected recombinant K. lactis, we generated yeast strains that expressed defined quantities of the virus capsid forming protein VP2 of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Both, subcutaneous as well as oral vaccination regiments with the heat-inactivated but otherwise untreated yeast induced IBDV-neutralizing antibodies in mice and chickens. A full protection against a subsequent IBDV infection was achieved by subcutaneous inoculation of only milligram amounts of yeast per chicken. Oral vaccination also generated protection: while mortality was observed in control animals after virus challenge, none of the vaccinees died and ca. one-tenth were protected as indicated by the absence of lesions in the bursa of Fabricius. Recombinant K. lactis was thus indicated as a potent tool for the induction of a protective immune response by different applications. Subcutaneously applied K. lactis that expresses the IBDV VP2 was shown to function as an efficacious anti-IBD subunit vaccine. PMID:23024743

  4. Proteomic and Functional Consequences of Hexokinase Deficiency in Glucose-repressible Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Nadia; Kettner, Karina; Heidenreich, Falk; Pursche, Theresia; Migotti, Rebekka; Kahlert, Günther; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Breunig, Karin D.; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hoflack, Bernard; Kriegel, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of glucose signaling in the Crabtree-positive eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has disclosed a dual role of its hexokinase ScHxk2, which acts as a glycolytic enzyme and key signal transducer adapting central metabolism to glucose availability. In order to identify evolutionarily conserved characteristics of hexokinase structure and function, the cellular response of the Crabtree-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to rag5 null mutation and concomitant deficiency of its unique hexokinase KlHxk1 was analyzed by means of difference gel electrophoresis. In total, 2,851 fluorescent spots containing different protein species were detected in the master gel representing all of the K. lactis proteins that were solubilized from glucose-grown KlHxk1 wild-type and mutant cells. Mass spectrometric peptide analysis identified 45 individual hexokinase-dependent proteins related to carbohydrate, short-chain fatty acid and tricarboxylic acid metabolism as well as to amino acid and protein turnover, but also to general stress response and chromatin remodeling, which occurred as a consequence of KlHxk1 deficiency at a minimum 3-fold enhanced or reduced level in the mutant proteome. In addition, three proteins exhibiting homology to 2-methylcitrate cycle enzymes of S. cerevisiae were detected at increased concentrations, suggesting a stimulation of pyruvate formation from amino acids and/or fatty acids. Experimental validation of the difference gel electrophoresis approach by post-lysis dimethyl labeling largely confirmed the abundance changes detected in the mutant proteome via the former method. Taking into consideration the high proportion of identified hexokinase-dependent proteins exhibiting increased proteomic levels, KlHxk1 is likely to have a repressive function in a multitude of metabolic pathways. The proteomic alterations detected in the mutant classify KlHxk1 as a multifunctional enzyme and support the view of evolutionary conservation of

  5. Crystal Structure of Hexokinase KlHxk1 of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kettner, Karina; Keim, Antje; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Volke, Daniela; Singer, David; Hoffmann, Ralf; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Sträter, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Crystal structures of the unique hexokinase KlHxk1 of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis were determined using eight independent crystal forms. In five crystal forms, a symmetrical ring-shaped homodimer was observed, corresponding to the physiological dimer existing in solution as shown by small-angle x-ray scattering. The dimer has a head-to-tail arrangement such that the small domain of one subunit interacts with the large domain of the other subunit. Dimer formation requires favorable interactions of the 15 N-terminal amino acids that are part of the large domain with amino acids of the small domain of the opposite subunit, respectively. The head-to-tail arrangement involving both domains of the two KlHxk1 subunits is appropriate to explain the reduced activity of the homodimer as compared with the monomeric enzyme and the influence of substrates and products on dimer formation and dissociation. In particular, the structure of the symmetrical KlHxk1 dimer serves to explain why phosphorylation of conserved residue Ser-15 may cause electrostatic repulsions with nearby negatively charged residues of the adjacent subunit, thereby inducing a dissociation of the homologous dimeric hexokinases KlHxk1 and ScHxk2. Two complex structures of KlHxk1 with bound glucose provide a molecular model of substrate binding to the open conformation and the subsequent classical domain closure motion of yeast hexokinases. The entirety of the novel data extends the current concept of glucose signaling in yeast and complements the induced-fit model by integrating the events of N-terminal phosphorylation and dissociation of homodimeric yeast hexokinases. PMID:20943665

  6. Structural and biochemical studies of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Bozzi, A; Saliola, M; Falcone, C; Bossa, F; Martini, F

    1997-04-25

    The cytosolic and mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenases from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlADHs) were purified and characterised. Both the N-terminally blocked cytosolic isozymes, KlADH I and KlADH II, were strictly NAD-dependent and exhibited catalytic properties similar to those previously reported for other yeast ADHs. Conversely, the mitochondrial isozymes, KlADH III and KlADH IV, displayed Ala and Asn, respectively, as N-termini and were able to oxidise at an increased rate primary alcohols with aliphatic chains longer than ethanol, such as propanol, butanol, pentanol and hexanol. Interestingly, the mitochondrial KlADHs, at variance with cytosolic isozymes and the majority of ADHs from other sources, were capable of accepting as a cofactor, and in some case almost equally well, either NAD or NADP. Since Asp-223 of horse liver ADH, thought to be responsible for the selection of NAD as coenzyme, is strictly conserved in all the KlADH isozymes, this amino-acid residue should not be considered critical for the coenzyme discrimination with respect to the other residues lining the coenzyme binding pocket of the mitochondrial isozymes. The relatively low specificity of the mitochondrial KlADHs both toward the alcohols and the cofactor could be explained on the basis of an enhanced flexibility of the corresponding catalytic pockets. An involvement of the mitochondrial KlADH isozymes in the physiological reoxidation of the cytosolic NADPH was also hypothesized. Moreover, both cytosolic and KlADH IV isozymes have an additional cysteine, not involved in zinc binding, that could be responsible for the increased activity in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol.

  7. Hypoxia and iron requirements are the main drivers in transcriptional adaptation of Kluyveromyces lactis during wine aerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tronchoni, Jordi; Rodrigues, Alda J; Curiel, Jose Antonio; Morales, Pilar; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2017-04-04

    The respiratory metabolism of yeast species alternative to Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been explored in recent years as a tool to reduce ethanol content in grape wine. The efficacy of this strategy has been previously proven for mixed cultures of non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae strains. In this work, we perform a transcriptomic analysis of the Crabtree-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis under tightly controlled growth conditions in order to better understand physiology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts during the fermentation of grape must under aerated conditions. Transcriptional changes in K. lactis are mainly driven by oxygen limitation, iron requirement, and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress appears as a consequence of the hypoxic conditions achieved by K. lactis once oxygen supply is no longer sufficient to sustain fully respiratory metabolism. This species copes with low oxygen and iron availability by repressing iron consuming pathways and activating iron transport mechanisms. Most of the physiological and transcriptomic features of K. lactis in aerobic wine fermentation are not shared with the Crabtree-positive yeast S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. An alternative, arginase-independent pathway for arginine metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis involves guanidinobutyrase as a key enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, G; Verhoeven, M D; Mans, R; Fleury Rey, Y; Bel-Rhlid, R; van den Broek, M; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; Thompson, M; Müller, V; Wahl, S A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2014-01-01

    Most available knowledge on fungal arginine metabolism is derived from studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which arginine catabolism is initiated by releasing urea via the arginase reaction. Orthologues of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the first three enzymes in the arginase pathway were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis and shown to functionally complement the corresponding deletion in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, deletion of the single K. lactis arginase gene KlCAR1 did not completely abolish growth on arginine as nitrogen source. Growth rate of the deletion mutant strongly increased during serial transfer in shake-flask cultures. A combination of RNAseq-based transcriptome analysis and 13C-15N-based flux analysis was used to elucidate the arginase-independent pathway. Isotopic 13C15N-enrichment in γ-aminobutyrate revealed succinate as the entry point in the TCA cycle of the alternative pathway. Transcript analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements indicated increased expression in the Klcar1Δ mutant of a guanidinobutyrase (EC.3.5.3.7), a key enzyme in a new pathway for arginine degradation. Expression of the K. lactis KLLA0F27995g (renamed KlGBU1) encoding guanidinobutyrase enabled S. cerevisiae to use guanidinobutyrate as sole nitrogen source and its deletion in K. lactis almost completely abolish growth on this nitrogen source. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this enzyme activity is widespread in fungi. PMID:24912400

  9. Role of the Sln1-phosphorelay pathway in the response to hyperosmotic stress in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Miriam; Kawasaki, Laura; Velázquez-Zavala, Nancy; Domínguez-Martín, Eunice; Trejo-Medecigo, Abraham; Martagón, Natalia; Espinoza-Simón, Emilio; Vázquez-Ibarra, Araceli; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Georgellis, Dimitris; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc; Coria, Roberto

    2017-03-13

    The Kluyveromyces lactis SLN1 phosphorelay system includes the osmosensor histidine kinase Sln1, the phosphotransfer protein Ypd1 and the response regulator Ssk1. Here we show that K. lactis has a functional phosphorelay system. In vitro assays, using a heterolougus histidine kinase, show that the phosphate group is accepted by KlYpd1 and transfer to KlSsk1. Upon hyperosmotic stress the phosphorelay is inactivated, KlYpd1 is dephosphorylated in a KlSln1 dependent manner, and only the version of KlSsk1 that lacks the phosphate group interacts with the MAPKKK KlSsk2. Interestingly, inactivation of the KlPtp2 phosphatase in a ΔKlsln1 mutant did not lead to KlHog1 constitutive phosphorylation. KlHog1 can replace ScHog1p and activate the hyperosmotic response in S. cereviseae, and when ScSln1 is inactivated, KlHog1 becomes phosphorylated and induces cell lethality. All these observations indicate that the phosphorelay negatively regulates KlHog1. Nevertheless, in the absence of KlSln1 or KlYpd1, no constitutive phosphorylation is detected and cells are viable, suggesting that a strong negative feedback that is independent of KlPtp2 operates in K. lactis. Compared to S. cereviseae, K. lactis has only a moderate accumulation of glycerol and fails to produce trehalose under hyperosmotic stress, indicating that regulation of osmolyte production is different in K. lactis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Study of the influence of yeast inoculum concentration (Yarrowia lipolytica and Kluyveromyces lactis) on blue cheese aroma development using microbiological models.

    PubMed

    Price, Elliott J; Linforth, Robert S T; Dodd, Christine E R; Phillips, Carol A; Hewson, Louise; Hort, Joanne; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2014-02-15

    Yarrowia lipolytica and Kluyveromyces lactis occur as part of Stilton cheese microflora yet are not controlled during production. This study investigated the influence of their inoculum concentration on aroma production. Models of Y. lipolytica and K. lactis, with Penicillium roqueforti, were analysed using instrumental and sensory analysis. Different concentrations of Y. lipolytica produced important changes in the aroma profiles of microbiological models, analysed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME GC-MS). Sensory analysis with discrimination tests showed differences were detectable via human perception but did not concern the similarity to blue cheese odour. Increasing the inoculum concentration of K. lactis resulted in decreased variation between replicates. Partial least squares (PLS) regression on Flash profile data showed models inoculated with low concentrations of K. lactis exhibited blue cheese-related attributes, associated with increased ketone production. Results suggest that controlling the amount of Y. lipolytica and K. lactis during production offers potential to manipulate blue cheese aroma development.

  11. Improved ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed cultures with Kluyveromyces lactis on high-sugar fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Chizuru; Kurita, Osamu; Kubo, Tomoko

    2014-12-01

    The influence of non-Saccharomyces yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, on metabolite formation and the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed cultures was examined on synthetic minimal medium containing 20% glucose. In the late stage of fermentation after the complete death of K. lactis, S. cerevisiae in mixed cultures was more ethanol-tolerant than that in pure culture. The chronological life span of S. cerevisiae was shorter in pure culture than mixed cultures. The yeast cells of the late stationary phase both in pure and mixed cultures had a low buoyant density with no significant difference in the non-quiescence state between both cultures. In mixed cultures, the glycerol contents increased and the alanine contents decreased when compared with the pure culture of S. cerevisiae. The distinctive intracellular amino acid pool concerning its amino acid concentrations and its amino acid composition was observed in yeast cells with different ethanol tolerance in the death phase. Co-cultivation of K. lactis seems to prompt S. cerevisiae to be ethanol tolerant by forming opportune metabolites such as glycerol and alanine and/or changing the intracellular amino acid pool.

  12. Improved bioethanol production in an engineered Kluyveromyces lactis strain shifted from respiratory to fermentative metabolism by deletion of NDI1.

    PubMed

    González-Siso, María Isabel; Touriño, Alba; Vizoso, Ángel; Pereira-Rodríguez, Ángel; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Becerra, Manuel; Cerdán, María Esperanza

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report the metabolic engineering of the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis by construction and characterization of a null mutant (Δklndi1) in the single gene encoding a mitochondrial alternative internal dehydrogenase. Isolated mitochondria of the Δklndi1 mutant show unaffected rate of oxidation of exogenous NADH, but no oxidation of matrix NADH; this confirms that KlNdi1p is the only internal NADH dehydrogenase in K. lactis mitochondria. Permeabilized cells of the Δklndi1 mutant do not show oxidation of matrix NADH, which suggests that shuttle systems to transfer the NADH from mitochondrial matrix to cytosol, for being oxidized by external dehydrogenases, are not functional. The Δklndi1 mutation decreases the chronological life span in absence of nutrients. The expression of KlNDI1 is increased by glutathione reductase depletion. The Δklndi1 mutation shifts the K. lactis metabolism from respiratory to fermentative: the Δklndi1 strain shows reduced respiration rate and increased ethanol production from glucose, while it does not grow in non-fermentable carbon sources such as lactate. The biotechnological benefit of the Δklndi1 mutant for bioethanol production from waste cheese whey lactose was proved.

  13. Improved bioethanol production in an engineered Kluyveromyces lactis strain shifted from respiratory to fermentative metabolism by deletion of NDI1

    PubMed Central

    González-Siso, María Isabel; Touriño, Alba; Vizoso, Ángel; Pereira-Rodríguez, Ángel; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Becerra, Manuel; Cerdán, María Esperanza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the metabolic engineering of the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis by construction and characterization of a null mutant (Δklndi1) in the single gene encoding a mitochondrial alternative internal dehydrogenase. Isolated mitochondria of the Δklndi1 mutant show unaffected rate of oxidation of exogenous NADH, but no oxidation of matrix NADH; this confirms that KlNdi1p is the only internal NADH dehydrogenase in K. lactis mitochondria. Permeabilized cells of the Δklndi1 mutant do not show oxidation of matrix NADH, which suggests that shuttle systems to transfer the NADH from mitochondrial matrix to cytosol, for being oxidized by external dehydrogenases, are not functional. The Δklndi1 mutation decreases the chronological life span in absence of nutrients. The expression of KlNDI1 is increased by glutathione reductase depletion. The Δklndi1 mutation shifts the K. lactis metabolism from respiratory to fermentative: the Δklndi1 strain shows reduced respiration rate and increased ethanol production from glucose, while it does not grow in non-fermentable carbon sources such as lactate. The biotechnological benefit of the Δklndi1 mutant for bioethanol production from waste cheese whey lactose was proved. PMID:25186243

  14. Disruption of the OCH1 and MNN1 genes decrease N-glycosylation on glycoprotein expressed in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Gong, Xin; Chang, Shaohong; Yang, Yili; Song, Miao; Duan, Demin; Wang, Lina; Ma, Qingjun; Wu, Jun

    2009-08-20

    Glycoproteins secreted by the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis are usually modified by the addition at asparagines-linked glycosylation sites of heterogeneous mannan residues. The secreted glycoproteins in K. lactis that become hypermannosylated will bear a non-human glycosylation pattern and can adversely affect the half-life, tissue distribution and immunogenicity of a therapeutic protein. Here, we describe engineering a K. lactis strain to produce non-hypermannosylated glycoprotein, decreasing the outer-chain mannose residues of N-linked oligosaccharides. We investigated and developed the method of two-step homologous recombination to knockout the OCH1 gene, encoding alpha1,6-mannosyltransferase and MNN1 gene, which is homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MNN1, encoding a putative alpha1,3-mannosyltransferase. We found the Kloch1 mutant strain has a defect in hyperglycosylation, inability in adding mannose to the core oligosaccharide. The N-linked oligosaccharides assembled on a secretory glycoprotein, HSA/GM-CSF in Kloch1 mutant, contained oligosaccharide Man(13-14)GlcNAc(2), and in Kloch1 mnn1 mutant, contained oligosaccharide Man(9-11)GlcNAc(2), whereas those in the wild-type strain, consisted of oligosaccharides with heterogeneous sizes, Man(>30)GlcNAc(2). Taken together, these results indicated that KlOch1p plays a key role in the outer-chain mannosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides in K. lactis. The KlMnn1p, was proved to be certain contribution to the outer hypermannosylation, most possibly encodes alpha1,3-mannosyltransferase. Therefore, the Kloch1 and Kloch1 mnn1 mutants can be used as a foundational host to produce glycoproteins lacking the outer-chain hypermannoses and further maybe applicable to be a promising system for yeast therapeutic protein production.

  15. Rapid differentiation of the closely related Kluyveromyces lactis var. lactis and K. marxianus strains isolated from dairy products using selective media and PCR/RFLP of the rDNA non transcribed spacer 2.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H V; Pulvirenti, A; Gaillardin, C

    2000-12-01

    PCR/RFLP of the NTS2 (IGS2) of rDNA was applied to differentiate two closely related yeast species, Kluyveromyces lactis var. lactis (referred to as K. lactis) and K. marxianus. Using specific primers, the NTS2 region was amplified from DNA of both K. lactis and K. marxianus type and collection strains. AluI restriction of amplified fragments generated patterns characteristic for each species. The NTS2 region from K. lactis var. drosophilarum and related species K. aestuarii, K. africanus, K. dobzhanskii, and K. wickerhamii could also be amplified with the same primers, but AluI patterns generated were clearly different. PCR/RFLP of the NTS2 appears thus to be a convenient method for rapid identification of K. lactis and K. marxianus, frequently found in dairy products. This test was validated therefore on K. lactis and K. marxianus from natural habitats. We showed that all yeast strains collected from whey samples and scoring blue on X-gal glucose plates were either K. lactis or K. marxianus. For application purposes, we propose here an approach for quickly screening for K. lactis/marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in dairy products using X-gal coloured and lysine growth media.

  16. A novel, lactase-based selection and strain improvement strategy for recombinant protein expression in Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Crabtree-negative yeast species Kluyveromyces lactis has been established as an attractive microbial expression system for recombinant proteins at industrial scale. Its LAC genes allow for utilization of the inexpensive sugar lactose as a sole source of carbon and energy. Lactose efficiently induces the LAC4 promoter, which can be used to drive regulated expression of heterologous genes. So far, strain manipulation of K. lactis by homologous recombination was hampered by the high rate of non-homologous end-joining. Results Selection for growth on lactose was applied to target the insertion of heterologous genes downstream of the LAC4 promoter into the K. lactis genome and found to yield high numbers of positive transformants. Concurrent reconstitution of the β-galactosidase gene indicated the desired integration event of the expression cassette, and β-galactosidase activity measurements were used to monitor gene expression for strain improvement and fermentation optimization. The system was particularly improved by usage of a cell lysis resistant strain, VAK367-D4, which allowed for protein accumulation in long-term fermentation. Further optimization was achieved by increased gene dosage of KlGAL4 encoding the activator of lactose and galactose metabolic genes that led to elevated transcription rates. Pilot experiments were performed with strains expressing a single-chain antibody fragment (scFvox) and a viral envelope protein (BVDV-E2), respectively. scFvox was shown to be secreted into the culture medium in an active, epitope-binding form indicating correct processing and protein folding; the E2 protein could be expressed intracellularly. Further data on the influence of protein toxicity on batch fermentation and potential post-transcriptional bottlenecks in protein accumulation were obtained. Conclusions A novel Kluyveromyces lactis host-vector system was developed that places heterologous genes under the control of the chromosomal LAC4 promoter

  17. A positive regulatory element is involved in the induction of the beta-galactosidase gene from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S; Breunig, K D; Hollenberg, C P

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of the LAC4 gene encoding beta-galactosidase in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis has been studied. The expression of cloned LAC4 gene present on autonomously replicating plasmids was normally regulated by lactose or galactose as inducers. The LAC4 transcription initiation sites were mapped on two plasmids, PTY75-LAC4 and pKL2. The sites were found to be dependent on the level of gene expression and on the plasmid used. Under induced conditions, the normal cluster of initiation sites was used on both plasmids, whereas under non-induced conditions LAC4 on pKL2 showed additional sites. Deletion mapping of the 5' regulatory region of the LAC4 gene revealed a DNA element required for induction, presumably for the binding of a positive regulator. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 6. PMID:3924596

  18. CTAB-mediated, single-step preparation of competent Escherichia coli, Bifidobacterium sp. and Kluyveromyces lactis cells.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Kammara; Singh, Praveen Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Siddiqui, Kaneez Fatima

    2014-12-01

    An efficient and reproducible method for transformation depends on the competency of the organism. We have developed a simple method for the preparation of competent Escherichia coli, Kluyveromyces lactis, and Bifidobacterium sp. by using a buffer containing cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and permits efficient uptake of plasmid DNA and ligation-reaction products. Cells are harvested, washed, mixed with 1-10 μg/ml CTAB, incubated, and followed by a buffer wash. For long-term storage of competent cells, bacteria may be frozen in 10% glycerol without the addition of other components. The transformation process is very simple; plasmid DNA and the cells are mixed and incubated for 5-60 min at 4 °C; no heat pulse is required, and the duration of incubation at 4 °C is not crucial.

  19. Cloning, Production, and Functional Expression of the Bacteriocin Enterocin A, Produced by Enterococcus faecium T136, by the Yeasts Pichia pastoris, Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, and Arxula adeninivorans

    PubMed Central

    Borrero, Juan; Kunze, Gotthard; Jiménez, Juan J.; Böer, Erik; Gútiez, Loreto; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriocin enterocin A (EntA) produced by Enterococcus faecium T136 has been successfully cloned and produced by the yeasts Pichia pastoris X-33EA, Kluyveromyces lactis GG799EA, Hansenula polymorpha KL8-1EA, and Arxula adeninivorans G1212EA. Moreover, P. pastoris X-33EA and K. lactis GG799EA produced EntA in larger amounts and with higher antimicrobial and specific antimicrobial activities than the EntA produced by E. faecium T136. PMID:22685156

  20. Recombination Can Cause Telomere Elongations as Well as Truncations Deep within Telomeres in Wild-Type Kluyveromyces lactis Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bechard, Laura H.; Jamieson, Nathan; McEachern, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role of recombination at the telomeres of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. We demonstrated that an abnormally long and mutationally tagged telomere was subject to high rates of telomere rapid deletion (TRD) that preferentially truncated the telomere to near-wild-type size. Unlike the case in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, there was not a great increase in TRD in meiosis. About half of mitotic TRD events were associated with deep turnover of telomeric repeats, suggesting that telomeres were often cleaved to well below normal length prior to being reextended by telomerase. Despite its high rate of TRD, the long telomere showed no increase in the rate of subtelomeric gene conversion, a highly sensitive test of telomere dysfunction. We also showed that the long telomere was subject to appreciable rates of becoming elongated substantially further through a recombinational mechanism that added additional tagged repeats. Finally, we showed that the deep turnover that occurs within normal-length telomeres was diminished in the absence of RAD52. Taken together, our results suggest that homologous recombination is a significant process acting on both abnormally long and normally sized telomeres in K. lactis. PMID:21148753

  1. Reaction kinetics and galactooligosaccharide product profiles of the β-galactosidases from Bacillus circulans, Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huifang; Bultema, Jelle B; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van Leeuwen, Sander S

    2017-06-15

    β-Galactosidase enzymes are used in the dairy industry to convert lactose into galactooligosaccharides (GOS) that are added to infant formula to mimic the molecular sizes and prebiotic functions of human milk oligosaccharides. Here we report a detailed analysis of the clearly different GOS profiles of the commercial β-galactosidases from Bacillus circulans, Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae. Also the GOS yields of these enzymes differed, varying from 48.3% (B. circulans) to 34.9% (K. lactis), and 19.5% (A. oryzae). Their incubation with lactose plus the monosaccharides Gal or Glc resulted in altered GOS profiles. Experiments with (13)C6 labelled Gal and Glc showed that both monosaccharides act as acceptor substrates in the transgalactosylation reactions. The data shows that the lactose isomers β-d-Galp-(1→2)-d-Glcp, β-d-Galp-(1→3)-d-Glcp and β-d-Galp-(1→6)-d-Glcp are formed from acceptor reactions with free Glc and not by rearrangement of Glc in the active site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient Homolactic Fermentation by Kluyveromyces lactis Strains Defective in Pyruvate Utilization and Transformed with the Heterologous LDH Gene†

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Michele M.; Brambilla, Luca; Protani, Francesca; Liu, Chi-Li; Lievense, Jefferson; Porro, Danilo

    2001-01-01

    A high yield of lactic acid per gram of glucose consumed and the absence of additional metabolites in the fermentation broth are two important goals of lactic acid production by microrganisms. Both purposes have been previously approached by using a Kluyveromyces lactis yeast strain lacking the single pyruvate decarboxylase gene (KlPDC1) and transformed with the heterologous lactate dehydrogenase gene (LDH). The LDH gene was placed under the control the KlPDC1 promoter, which has allowed very high levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, due to the absence of autoregulation by KlPdc1p. The maximal yield obtained was 0.58 g g−1, suggesting that a large fraction of the glucose consumed was not converted into pyruvate. In a different attempt to redirect pyruvate flux toward homolactic fermentation, we used K. lactis LDH transformant strains deleted of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) E1α subunit gene. A great process improvement was obtained by the use of producing strains lacking both PDH and pyruvate decarboxylase activities, which showed yield levels of as high as 0.85 g g−1 (maximum theoretical yield, 1 g g−1), and with high LDH activity. PMID:11722915

  3. Pyrimidine motif triple helix in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA pseudoknot is essential for function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cash, Darian D; Cohen-Zontag, Osnat; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Shefer, Kinneret; Brown, Yogev; Ulyanov, Nikolai B; Tzfati, Yehuda; Feigon, Juli

    2013-07-02

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that extends the 3' ends of linear chromosomes. The specialized telomerase reverse transcriptase requires a multidomain RNA (telomerase RNA, TER), which includes an integral RNA template and functionally important template-adjacent pseudoknot. The structure of the human TER pseudoknot revealed that the loops interact with the stems to form a triple helix shown to be important for activity in vitro. A similar triple helix has been predicted to form in diverse fungi TER pseudoknots. The solution NMR structure of the Kluyveromyces lactis pseudoknot, presented here, reveals that it contains a long pyrimidine motif triple helix with unexpected features that include three individual bulge nucleotides and a C(+)•G-C triple adjacent to a stem 2-loop 2 junction. Despite significant differences in sequence and base triples, the 3D shape of the human and K. lactis TER pseudoknots are remarkably similar. Analysis of the effects of nucleotide substitutions on cell growth and telomere lengths provides evidence that this conserved structure forms in endogenously assembled telomerase and is essential for telomerase function in vivo.

  4. Production of human lysozyme in biofilm reactor and optimization of growth parameters of Kluyveromyces lactis K7.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2013-07-01

    Lysozyme (1,4-β-N-acetylmuramidase) is a lytic enzyme, which degrades the bacterial cell wall. Lysozyme has been of interest in medicine, cosmetics, and food industries because of its anti-bactericidal effect. Kluyveromyces lactis K7 is a genetically modified organism that expresses human lysozyme. There is a need to improve the human lysozyme production by K. lactis K7 to make the human lysozyme more affordable. Biofilm reactor provides high biomass by including a solid support, which microorganisms grow around and within. Therefore, the aim of this study was to produce the human lysozyme in biofilm reactor and optimize the growth conditions of K. lactis K7 for the human lysozyme production in biofilm reactor with plastic composite support (PCS). The PCS, which includes polypropylene, soybean hull, soybean flour, bovine albumin, and salts, was selected based on biofilm formation on PCS (CFU/g), human lysozyme production (U/ml), and absorption of lysozyme inside the support. To find the optimum combination of growth parameters, a three-factor Box-Behnken design of response surface method was used. The results suggested that the optimum conditions for biomass and lysozyme productions were different (27 °C, pH 6, 1.33 vvm for biomass production; 25 °C, pH 4, no aeration for lysozyme production). Then, different pH and aeration shift strategies were tested to increase the biomass at the first step and then secrete the lysozyme after the shift. As a result, the lysozyme production amount (141 U/ml) at 25 °C without pH and aeration control was significantly higher than the lysozyme amount at evaluated pH and aeration shift conditions (p < 0.05).

  5. Cloning and characterization of Kluyveromyces lactis SEC14, a gene whose product stimulates Golgi secretory function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Salama, S R; Cleves, A E; Malehorn, D E; Whitters, E A; Bankaitis, V A

    1990-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SEC14 gene encodes a cytosolic factor that is required for secretory protein movement from the Golgi complex. That some conservation of SEC14p function may exist was initially suggested by experiments that revealed immunoreactive polypeptides in cell extracts of the divergent yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have cloned and characterized the K. lactis SEC14 gene (SEC14KL). Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that SEC14KL encoded the K. lactis structural homolog of SEC14p. In agreement with those results, nucleotide sequence analysis of SEC14KL revealed a gene product of 301 residues (Mr, 34,615) and 77% identity to SEC14p. Moreover, a single ectopic copy of SEC14KL was sufficient to render S. cerevisiae sec14-1(Ts) mutants, or otherwise inviable sec14-129::HIS3 mutant strains, completely proficient for secretory pathway function by the criteria of growth, invertase secretion, and kinetics of vacuolar protein localization. This efficient complementation of sec14-129::HIS3 was observed to occur when the rates of SEC14pKL and SEC14p synthesis were reduced by a factor of 7 to 10 with respect to the wild-type rate of SEC14p synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that the high level of structural conservation between SEC14p and SEC14pKL reflects a functional identity between these polypeptides as well. On the basis of the SEC14p and SEC14pKL primary sequence homology to the human retinaldehyde-binding protein, we suggest that the general function of these SEC14p species may be to regulate the delivery of a hydrophobic ligand to Golgi membranes so that biosynthetic secretory traffic can be supported. Images PMID:2198263

  6. Heterologous complementation of the Klaac null mutation of Kluyveromyces lactis by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAC3 gene encoding the ADP/ATP carrier.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, Flavia; Viola, Anna Maria; Ferrero, Iliana

    2006-05-01

    The KlAAC gene, encoding the ADP/ATP carrier, has been assumed to be a single gene in Kluyveromyces lactis, an aerobic, petite-negative yeast species. The Klaac null mutation, which causes a respiratory-deficient phenotype, was fully complemented by AAC2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae major gene for the ADP/ATP carrier and also by AAC1, a gene that is poorly expressed in S. cerevisiae. In this study, we demonstrate that the Klaac null mutation is partially complemented by the ScAAC3 gene, encoding the hypoxic ADP/ATP carrier isoform, whose expression in S. cerevisiae is prevented by oxygen. Once introduced into K. lactis, the AAC3 gene was expressed both under aerobic and under partial anaerobic conditions but did not support the growth of K. lactis under strict anaerobic conditions.

  7. Gal80 proteins of Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are highly conserved but contribute differently to glucose repression of the galactose regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Zenke, F T; Zachariae, W; Lunkes, A; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-01

    We cloned the GAL80 gene encoding the negative regulator of the transcriptional activator Gal4 (Lac9) from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The deduced amino acid sequence of K. lactis GAL80 revealed a strong structural conservation between K. lactis Gal80 and the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein, with an overall identity of 60% and two conserved blocks with over 80% identical residues. K. lactis gal80 disruption mutants show constitutive expression of the lactose/galactose metabolic genes, confirming that K. lactis Gal80 functions in essentially in the same way as does S. cerevisiae Gal80, blocking activation by the transcriptional activator Lac9 (K. lactis Gal4) in the absence of an inducing sugar. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, in which Gal4-dependent activation is strongly inhibited by glucose even in a gal80 mutant, glucose repressibility is almost completely lost in gal80 mutants of K. lactis. Indirect evidence suggests that this difference in phenotype is due to a higher activator concentration in K. lactis which is able to overcome glucose repression. Expression of the K. lactis GAL80 gene is controlled by Lac9. Two high-affinity binding sites in the GAL80 promoter mediate a 70-fold induction by galactose and hence negative autoregulation by Gal80. Gal80 in turn not only controls Lac9 activity but also has a moderate influence on its rate of synthesis. Thus, a feedback control mechanism exists between the positive and negative regulators. By mutating the Lac9 binding sites of the GAL80 promoter, we could show that induction of GAL80 is required to prevent activation of the lactose/galactose regulon in glycerol or glucose plus galactose, whereas the noninduced level of Gal80 is sufficient to completely block Lac9 function in glucose. Images PMID:8246973

  8. Production of volatile compounds by cheese-ripening yeasts: requirement for a methanethiol donor for S-methyl thioacetate synthesis by Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Arfi, K; Spinnler, H E; Tache, R; Bonnarme, P

    2002-03-01

    Five cheese-ripening yeasts (Geotrichum candidum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Debaryomyces hansenii) were compared with respect to their ability to generate volatile aroma compounds. K. lactis produced a variety of esters - ethylacetate (EA) being the major one - and relatively limited amounts of volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs). Conversely, G. candidum produced significant amounts of VSCs [with the thioester S-methyl thioacetate (MTA) being the most prevalent] and lower quantities of non-sulphur volatile compounds than K. lactis. We suspect that K. lactis is able to produce and/or accumulate acetyl CoA - a common precursor of MTA and EA - but that it produces limited amounts of methanethiol (MTL); both acetyl CoA and MTL are precursors for MTA synthesis. When supplemented with exogenous MTL, MTA production greatly increased in K. lactis cultures whereas it was unchanged in G. candidum cultures, suggesting that MTL is a limiting factor for MTA synthesis in K. lactis but not in G. candidum. Our results are discussed with respect to L-methionine catabolism.

  9. A catalytic and non-catalytic role for the Yen1 nuclease in maintaining genome integrity in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang; Aström, Stefan U

    2012-10-01

    Yen1 is a nuclease identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that cleaves the Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate formed during homologous recombination. Alternative routes to disjoin HJs are performed by the Mus81/Mms4- and Sgs1/Top3/Rmi1-complexes. Here, we investigate the role of the Yen1 protein in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. We demonstrate that both yen1 mus81 and yen1 sgs1 double mutants displayed negative genetic interactions in the presence of DNA-damaging chemicals. To test if these phenotypes required the catalytic activity of Yen1, we introduced point mutations targeting the catalytic site of Yen1, which abolished the nuclease activity in vitro. Remarkably, catalytically inactive Yen1 did not exacerbate the hydroxyurea sensitivity of the sgs1Δ strain, which the yen1Δ allele did. In addition, overexpression of catalytically inactive Yen1 partially rescued the DNA damage sensitivity of both mus81 and sgs1 mutant strains albeit less efficiently than WT Yen1. These results suggest that Yen1 serves both a catalytic and non-catalytic role in its redundant function with Mus81 and Sgs1. Diploids lacking Mus81 had a severe defect in sporulation efficiency and crossover frequency, but diploids lacking both Mus81 and Yen1 showed no further reduction in spore formation. Hence, Yen1 had no evident role in meiosis. However, overexpression of WT Yen1, but not catalytically inactive Yen1 partially rescued the crossover defect in mus81/mus81 mutant diploids. Yen1 is a member of the RAD2/XPG-family of nucleases, but genetic analyses revealed no genetic interaction between yen1 and other family members (rad2, exo1 and rad27). In addition, yen1 mutants had normal nonhomologous end-joining efficiency. We discuss the similarities and differences between K. lactis Yen1 and Yen1/GEN1 from other organisms.

  10. Secretion of Human Serum Albumin by Kluyveromyces lactis Overexpressing KlPDI1 and KlERO1

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Tiziana; Neglia, Barbara; Donnini, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    The control of protein conformation during translocation through the endoplasmic reticulum is often a bottleneck for heterologous protein production. The core pathway of the oxidative folding machinery includes two conserved proteins: Pdi1p and Ero1p. We increased the dosage of the genes encoding these proteins in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis and evaluated the secretion of heterologous proteins. KlERO1, an orthologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ERO1, was cloned by functional complementation of the ts phenotype of an Scero1 mutant. The expression of KlERO1 was induced by treatment of the cells with dithiothreitol and by overexpression of human serum albumin (HSA), a disulfide bond-rich protein. Duplication of either PDI1 or ERO1 led to a similar increase in HSA yield. Duplication of both genes accelerated the secretion of HSA and improved cell growth rate and yield. Increasing the dosage of KlERO1 did not affect the production of human interleukin 1β, a protein that has no disulfide bridges. The results confirm that the ERO1 genes of S. cerevisiae and K. lactis are functionally similar even though portions of their coding sequence are quite different and the phenotypes of mutants overexpressing the genes differ. The marked effects of KlERO1 copy number on the expression of heterologous proteins with a high number of disulfide bridges suggests that control of KlERO1 and KlPDI1 is important for the production of high levels of heterologous proteins of this type. PMID:16085825

  11. An alkali-thermostable xylanase from Bacillus pumilus functionally expressed in Kluyveromyces lactis and evaluation of its deinking efficiency.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Leya; Ushasree, Mrudula V; Pandey, Ashok

    2014-08-01

    This work aimed at studying the recombinant expression of an alkali- and thermo-stable xylanase from Bacillus pumilus in Kluyveromyces lactis and its use in deinking of civic paper waste. Efficient expression with a 3-fold increase in the activity than the native organism was achieved. An inducer concentration of 2.5% and medium pH of 9.0 was the best for enzyme expression. Purified enzyme showed an optimum activity at temperatures 50 and 60°C and pH 9.0 and 10.0, respectively. At pH 12.0, enzyme retained 74% and 26% activity after 2 and 3h of incubation, respectively. After incubation at 50 and 60°C for 1h, the enzyme showed 100% retention of activity, and remained active for 4h at 60°C retaining 23% residual activity. Partially purified recombinant enzyme showed higher deinking efficiency (273%) of laser print waste paper than crude xylanase from Bacillus and commercial acidic enzyme. This xylanase with superior stability characteristics could be a suitable candidate in paper and pulp industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoregulation of GAL4 transcription is essential for rapid growth of Kluyveromyces lactis on lactose and galactose.

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, M; Nagiec, M M; Dickson, R C

    1993-01-01

    Transcriptional induction of genes in the lactose-galactose regulon of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis requires the GAL4 transcription activator protein. Previous data indicated that the concentration of GAL4 was tightly regulated under basal, inducing, and glucose repressing conditions but the mechanisms were unknown. In this paper we demonstrate that transcription of the GAL4 gene (KI-GAL4) increases 3- to 4-fold during induction of the regulon. This increase requires a KI-GAL4 binding site, UASG, in front of the KI-GAL4 gene, indicating that the KI-GAL4 protein autoregulates transcription of its own gene. Our data demonstrate that the autoregulatory circuit is essential for full induction of the lactose-galactose regulon and, hence, for rapid growth on lactose or galactose. Other data indicate that basal transcription of the KI-GAL4 gene is governed by unidentified promoter elements. The existence of the autoregulatory circuit reveals an important difference between the lactose-galactose regulon and its homologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the melibiose-galactose regulon. This difference may have evolved in response to different selective pressures encountered by the two organisms. PMID:8414996

  13. The Mitochondrial Genome Integrity Gene, Mgi1, of Kluyveromyces Lactis Encodes the β-Subunit of F(1)-Atpase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. J.; Clark-Walker, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous report, we found that mutations at the mitochondrial genome integrity locus, MGI1, can convert Kluyveromyces lactis into a petite-positive yeast. In this report, we describe the isolation of the MGI1 gene and show that it encodes the β-subunit of the mitochondrial F(1)-ATPase. The site of mutation in four independently isolated mgi1 alleles is at Arg435, which has changed to Gly in three cases and Ile in the fourth isolate. Disruption of MGI1 does not lead to the production of mitochondrial genome deletion mutants, indicating that an assembled F(1) complex is needed for the ``gain-of-function'' phenotype found in mgi1 point mutants. The location of Arg435 in the β-subunit, as deduced from the three-dimensional structure of the bovine F(1)-ATPase, together with mutational sites in the previously identified mgi2 and mgi5 alleles, suggests that interaction of the β- and α- (MGI2) subunits with the γ-subunit (MGI5) is likely to be affected by the mutations. PMID:8978033

  14. Cell wall synthesis and central carbohydrate metabolism are interconnected by the SNF1/Mig1 pathway in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rippert, Dorthe; Backhaus, Katja; Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2017-01-01

    The trimeric AMP-activated kinase complex (AMPK) is conserved from yeast to humans and is best known for its role in balancing energy metabolism. Additional functions, including the regulation of cell wall biosynthesis, have been proposed for the SNF1 complex, the baker's yeast homolog of AMPK. We here demonstrate that this function is conserved in the Crabtree-negative milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. Deletion mutants in the genes encoding the subunits of the trimeric complex (Klsnf1, Klgal83, Klsnf4) displayed increased sensitivities towards cell wall stress agents and a mutant lacking the kinase subunit had a thinner cell wall in transmission electron micrographs as compared to wild type. Epistasis analyses demonstrated that the KlSNF1 complex acts in parallel to cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling and stress sensitivities of Klsnf1 deletions can be suppressed by additional deletions in glycolytic genes (KlPFK1, KlPFK2, KlPGI1) or by a Klmig1 mutant. Western blot analyses of an HA-tagged KlMig1p revealed its phosphorylation on ethanol medium similar to its S. cerevisiae ortholog, but a substantial amount of protein remained phosphorylated even with high glucose concentrations. Application of cell wall stress shifted this equilibrium towards the non-phosphorylated fraction of KlMig1p. We conclude that KlMig1p may exert a negative regulatory function on cell wall biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Immobilization of β-d-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis on functionalized silicon dioxide nanoparticles: characterization and lactose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Madan Lal; Barrow, Colin James; Kennedy, J F; Puri, Munish

    2012-03-01

    β-D-Galactosidase (BGAL) from Kluyveromyces lactis was covalently immobilized to functionalized silicon dioxide nanoparticles (10-20 nm). The binding of the enzyme to the nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Functionalized nanoparticles showed 87% immobilization yield. Soluble and immobilized enzyme preparation exhibited pH-optima at pH 6.5 and 7.0, respectively, with temperature optima at 35 and 40°C, respectively. Michaelis constant (K(m)) was 4.77 and 8.4mM for free and immobilized BGAL, respectively. V(max) for the soluble and immobilized enzyme was 12.25 and 13.51 U/ml, respectively. Nanoparticle immobilized BGAL demonstrated improved stability after favoring multipoint covalent attachment. Thermal stability of the immobilized enzyme was enhanced at 40, 50 and 65°C. Immobilized nanoparticle-enzyme conjugate retained more than 50% enzyme activity up to the eleventh cycle. Maximum lactose hydrolysis by immobilized BGAL was achieved at 8h. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (KlGAL4) in Kluyveromyces lactis is controlled by autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Zachariae, W; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (KlGAL4) of Kluyveromyces lactis is moderately regulated by the carbon source as is the case for GAL4, its homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of the LAC9 gene is induced about twofold in galactose. This induction is due to autoregulation. The LAC9 gene product binds to a low-affinity binding site in the LAC9 promoter and moderately activates transcription in response to galactose above a basal level. As for the LAC9-controlled metabolic genes, induction of LAC9 is inhibited in the presence of glucose. This inhibition of induction is a prerequisite for glucose repression of the lactose-galactose metabolic pathway. On the other hand, induced LAC9 levels are required for optimal growth on galactose, since mutating the LAC9 binding site in the LAC9 promoter resulted in poor growth and reduced expression of LAC9-controlled genes. Thus, in addition to the GAL80-dependent regulation by protein-protein interaction, the regulation of LAC9 gene expression is an important parameter in determining carbon source control of the LAC-GAL regulon. Although the mode of control is different, the pattern of LAC9 gene regulation resembles that of the S. cerevisiae GAL4 gene, being lower in glucose and glucose-galactose than in galactose. Images PMID:8474461

  17. Growth kinetics and physiological behavior of co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, fermenting carob sugars extracted with whey.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B; Lima-Costa, M E; Constantino, A; Raposo, S; Felizardo, C; Gonçalves, D; Fernandes, T; Dionísio, L; Peinado, J M

    2016-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentation of carob waste sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) extracted with cheese whey, by co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis has been analyzed. Growth and fermentation of S. cerevisiae in the carob-whey medium showed an inhibition of about 30% in comparison with water-extracted carob. The inhibition of K. lactis on carob-whey was greater (70%) when compared with the whey medium alone, due to osmolarity problems. Oxygen availability was a very important factor for K. lactis, influencing its fermentation performance. When K. lactis was grown alone on carob-whey medium, lactose was always consumed first, and glucose and fructose were consumed afterwards, only at high aeration conditions. In co-culture with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis was completely inhibited and, at low aeration, died after 3 days; at high aeration this culture could survive but growth and lactose fermentation were only recovered after S. cerevisiae became stationary. To overcome the osmolarity and K. lactis' oxygen problems, the medium had to be diluted and a sequential fermentative process was designed in a STR-3l reactor. K. lactis was inoculated first and, with low aeration (0.13vvm), consumed all the lactose in 48h. Then S. cerevisiae was inoculated, consuming the total of the carob sugars, and producing ethanol in a fed-batch regime. The established co-culture with K. lactis increased S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerance. This fermentation process produced ethanol with good efficiency (80g/l final concentration and a conversion factor of 0.4g ethanol/g sugar), eliminating all the sugars of the mixed waste. These efficient fermentative results pointed to a new joint treatment of agro-industrial wastes which may be implemented successfully, with economic and environmental sustainability for a bioethanol industrial proposal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by yeasts. [Candida wickerhamii; C. guiliermondii; C. molischiana; Debaryomyces polymorphus; Pichia guilliermondii; Clavispora lusitaniae; Kluyveromyces lactis; Brettanomyces claussenii; Rhodotorula minuta; Dekkera intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, S.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by 14 yeast species or strains was monitored. When grown aerobically, Candida wickerhamii, C. guilliermondii, and C. molischiana metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization 3 to 6. C. wicherhamii and C. molischiana also fermented these substrates, while C. guilliermondii fermented only cellodextrins of degree of polymerization {<=} 3. Debaryomyces polymorphus, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, and one of two strains of Kluyveromyces lactis metabolized glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose when grown aerobically. These yeasts also fermented these substrates, except for K. lactis, which fermented only glucose and cellobiose. The remaining species/strains tested, K. lactis, Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces anomalus, Kluyveromyces dobzhanskii, Rhodotorula minuta, and Dekkera intermedia, both fermented and aerobically metabolized glucose and cellobiose. Crude enzyme preparations from all 14 yeast species or strains were tested for ability to hydrolyze cellotriose and cellotretose. Most of the yeasts produced an enzyme(s) capable of hydrolyzing cellotriose. However, with two exceptions, R. minuta and P. guilliermondii, only the yeasts that metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization >3 produced an enzyme(s) that hydrolyzed cellotretose.

  19. Trehalose-mediated inhibition of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis: dependence on viscosity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, José G; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A; Uribe, Salvador

    2002-08-01

    The effect of increasing trehalose concentrations on the kinetics of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis was studied at different temperatures. At 20 degrees C, increasing concentrations of trehalose (0.2 to 0.8 M) decreased V(max) and increased S(0.5) (substrate concentration when initial velocity equals 0.5 V(max)), mainly at high trehalose concentrations (0.6 to 0.8 M). The quotient V(max)/S(0.5) decreased from 5.76 micromol of ATP mg of protein(-1) x min(-1) x mM(-1) in the absence of trehalose to 1.63 micromol of ATP mg of protein(-1) x min(-1) x mM(-1) in the presence of 0.8 M trehalose. The decrease in V(max) was linearly dependent on solution viscosity (eta), suggesting that inhibition was due to hindering of protein domain diffusional motion during catalysis and in accordance with Kramer's theory for reactions in solution. In this regard, two other viscosity-increasing agents, sucrose and glycerol, behaved similarly, exhibiting the same viscosity-enzyme inhibition correlation predicted. In the absence of trehalose, increasing the temperature up to 40 degrees C resulted in an exponential increase in V(max) and a decrease in enzyme cooperativity (n), while S(0.5) was not modified. As temperature increased, the effect of trehalose on V(max) decreased to become negligible at 40 degrees C, in good correlation with the temperature-mediated decrease in viscosity. The trehalose-mediated increase in S(0.5) was similar at all temperatures tested, and thus, trehalose effects on V(max)/S(0.5) were always observed. Trehalose increased the activation energy for ATP hydrolysis. Trehalose-mediated inhibition of enzymes may explain why yeast rapidly hydrolyzes trehalose when exiting heat shock.

  20. Ume6 Is Required for the MATa/MATα Cellular Identity and Transcriptional Silencing in Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Barsoum, E.; Sjöstrand, J. O. O.; Åström, S. U.

    2010-01-01

    To explore the similarities and differences of regulatory circuits among budding yeasts, we characterized the role of the unscheduled meiotic gene expression 6 (UME6) gene in Kluyveromyces lactis. We found that Ume6 was required for transcriptional silencing of the cryptic mating-type loci HMLα and HMRa. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) suggested that Ume6 acted directly by binding the cis-regulatory silencers of these loci. Unexpectedly, a MATa ume6 strain was mating proficient, whereas a MATα ume6 strain was sterile. This observation was explained by the fact that ume6 derepressed HMLα2 only weakly, but derepressed HMRa1 strongly. Consistently, two a/α-repressed genes (MTS1 and STE4) were repressed in the MATα ume6 strain, but were expressed in the MATa ume6 strain. Surprisingly, ume6 partially suppressed the mating defect of a MATa sir2 strain. MTS1 and STE4 were repressed in the MATa sir2 ume6 double-mutant strain, indicating that the suppression acted downstream of the a1/α2-repressor. We show that both STE12 and the MATa2/HMRa2 genes were overexpressed in the MATa sir2 ume6 strain. Consistent with the idea that this deregulation suppressed the mating defect, ectopic overexpression of Ste12 and a2 in a MATa sir2 strain resulted in efficient mating. In addition, Ume6 served as a block to polyploidy, since ume6/ume6 diploids mated as pseudo a-strains. Finally, Ume6 was required for repression of three meiotic genes, independently of the Rpd3 and Sin3 corepressors. PMID:20139343

  1. Differences in the hydrolysis of lactose and other substrates by beta-D-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Lim, K P; Kim, H S

    1997-10-01

    The hydrolysis of o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside and lactose by beta-D-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis was enhanced by the addition of Mg2+ and Mn2+, but the rates of activation by each metal on both substrates were not the same. The Co2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ activated the o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside-hydrolyzing activity of the enzyme, but these same metals inhibited the lactose-hydrolyzing activity. The addition of Mg2+ and EDTA to the assay buffer increased the hydrolysis of o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside and lactose at different rates. The responses of o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside and lactose to the enzyme activity were different as a function of pH. The hydrolyzing activity toward both substrates also was influenced by the concentration of the phosphate in the assay buffer. However, the profile of the enzyme activity toward each substrate was different as a function of concentration. Because the assay of beta-galactosidase using o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside is fast and convenient, the estimation of lactose-hydrolyzing activity of the enzyme has frequently been made based on the assay of o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside hydrolysis. As shown in this study, a slight change in the conditions of the assay system and the enzyme application may cause changes in the ability of the enzyme to hydrolyze both lactose and o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside. The change in o-nitrophenyl galactopyranoside-hydrolyzing activity is not always consistent with that of the lactose-hydrolyzing activity under the given condition, which may cause an inaccurate estimation of the enzyme activity in the enzyme preparation as well as in actual applications of the enzyme.

  2. Rational mutagenesis by engineering disulphide bonds improves Kluyveromyces lactis beta-galactosidase for high-temperature industrial applications

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Díaz, Agustín; Álvarez-Cao, María-Efigenia; Escuder-Rodríguez, Juan-José; González-Siso, María-Isabel; Cerdán, M. Esperanza; Becerra, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidase (Kl-β-Gal) is one of the most important enzymes in the dairy industry. The poor stability of this enzyme limits its use in the synthesis of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) and other applications requiring high operational temperature. To obtain thermoresistant variants, a rational mutagenesis strategy by introducing disulphide bonds in the interface between the enzyme subunits was used. Two improved mutants, R116C/T270C and R116C/T270C/G818C, had increased half-lives at 45 °C compared to Kl-β-Gal (2.2 and 6.8 fold increases, respectively). Likewise, Tm values of R116C/T270C and R116C/T270C/G818C were 2.4 and 8.5 °C, respectively, higher than Kl-β-Gal Tm. Enrichment in enzymatically active oligomeric forms in these mutant variants also increased their catalytic efficiency, due to the reinforcement of the interface contacts. In this way, using an artificial substrate (p-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside), the Vmax values of the mutants were ~1.4 (R116C/T270C) and 2 (R116C/T270C/G818C) fold higher than that of native Kl-β-Gal. Using the natural substrate (lactose) the Vmax for R116C/T270C/G818C almost doubled the Vmax for Kl-β-Gal. Validation of these mutant variants of the enzyme for their use in applications that depend on prolonged incubations at high temperatures was achieved at the laboratory scale by monitoring their catalytic activity in GOS synthesis. PMID:28361909

  3. A NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of the petit-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis uses the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway for glutamate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, L; Guzmán-León, S; Coria, R; Ramírez, J; Aranda, C; González, A

    1995-10-01

    The activities of the enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis were determined in wild-type and NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) null mutant strains of Kluyveromyces lactis. The specific NADP-GDH activity from K. lactis was fivefold lower than that found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities were similar to those reported in S. cerevisiae. The NADP-GDH null mutant was obtained by transforming the uraA strain MD2/1 with a linearized integrative yeast vector harbouring a 390 bp fragment of the NADP-GDH structural gene. This mutant grew as well as the parent strain on ammonium, but showed GS and GOGAT activities higher that those found in the wild-type strain, implying that the GS-GOGAT pathway could play a leading role in glutamate biosynthesis in K. lactis. Southern blotting analysis of K. lactis chromosomes separated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, indicated that the NADP-GDH structural gene is localized on chromosome VI.

  4. Use of synthetic genes for cloning, production and functional expression of the bacteriocins enterocin A and bacteriocin E 50-52 by Pichia pastoris and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan J; Borrero, Juan; Gútiez, Loreto; Arbulu, Sara; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M; Hernández, Pablo E

    2014-06-01

    The use of synthetic genes may constitute a successful approach for the heterologous production and functional expression of bacterial antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) by recombinant yeasts. In this work, synthetic genes with adapted codon usage designed from the mature amino acid sequence of the bacteriocin enterocin A (EntA), produced by Enterococcus faecium T136, and the mature bacteriocin E 50-52 (BacE50-52), produced by E. faecium NRRL B-32746, were synthesized. The synthetic entA and bacE50-52 were cloned into the protein expression vectors pPICZαA and pKLAC2 for transformation of derived vectors into Pichia pastoris X-33 and Kluyveromyces lactis GG799, respectively. The recombinant vectors were linearized and transformed into competent cells selecting for P. pastoris X-33EAS (entA), P. pastoris X-33BE50-52S (bacE50-52), K. lactis GG799EAS (entA), and K. lactis GG799BE50-52S (bacE50-52). P. pastoris X-33EAS and K. lactis GG799EAS, but not P. pastoris X-33BE50-52S and K. lactis GG799BE50-52S, showed antimicrobial activity in their supernatants. However, purification of the supernatants of the producer yeasts permitted recovery of the bacteriocins EntA and BacE50-52. Both purified bacteriocins were active against Gram-positive bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes but not against Gram-negative bacteria, including Campylobacter jejuni.

  5. Establishing the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as an Expression Host for Production of the Saposin-Like Domain of the Aspartic Protease Cirsin

    PubMed Central

    Curto, Pedro; Lufrano, Daniela; Pinto, Cátia; Custódio, Valéria; Gomes, Ana Catarina; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Bakás, Laura; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra; Faro, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Typical plant aspartic protease zymogens comprise a characteristic and plant-specific insert (PSI). PSI domains can interact with membranes, and a role as a defensive weapon against pathogens has been proposed. However, the potential of PSIs as antimicrobial agents has not been fully investigated and explored yet due to problems in producing sufficient amounts of these domains in bacteria. Here, we report the development of an expression platform for the production of the PSI domain of cirsin in the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. We successfully generated K. lactis transformants expressing and secreting significant amounts of correctly processed and glycosylated PSI, as well as its nonglycosylated mutant. A purification protocol with protein yields of ∼4.0 mg/liter was established for both wild-type and nonglycosylated PSIs, which represents the highest reported yield for a nontagged PSI domain. Subsequent bioactivity assays targeting phytopathogenic fungi indicated that the PSI of cirsin is produced in a biologically active form in K. lactis and provided clear evidence for its antifungal activity. This yeast expression system thereby emerges as a promising production platform for further exploring the biotechnological potential of these plant saposin-like proteins. PMID:24123748

  6. Evidence for an additional base-pairing element between the telomeric repeat and the telomerase RNA template in Kluyveromyces lactis and other yeasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Ru; Guo, Leilei; Chen, Lizhen; McEachern, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    In all telomerases, the template region of the RNA subunit contains a region of telomere homology that is longer than the unit telomeric repeat. This allows a newly synthesized telomeric repeat to translocate back to the 3' end of the template prior to a second round of telomeric repeat synthesis. In the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the telomerase RNA (Ter1) template has 30 nucleotides of perfect homology to the 25-bp telomeric repeat. Here we provide strong evidence that three additional nucleotides at positions -2 through -4 present on the 3' side of the template form base-pairing interactions with telomeric DNA. Mutation of these bases can lead to opposite effects on telomere length depending on the sequence permutation of the template in a manner consistent with whether the mutation increases or decreases the base-pairing potential with the telomere. Additionally, mutations in the -2 and -3 positions that restore base-pairing potential can suppress corresponding sequence changes in the telomeric repeat. Finally, multiple other yeast species were found to also have telomerase RNAs that encode relatively long 7- to 10-nucleotide domains predicted to base pair, often with imperfect pairing, with telomeric DNA. We further demonstrate that K. lactis telomeric fragments produce banded patterns with a 25-bp periodicity. This indicates that K. lactis telomeres have preferred termination points within the 25-bp telomeric repeat.

  7. Prevention of Aerobic Spoilage of Maize Silage by a Genetically Modified Killer Yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, Defective in the Ability To Grow on Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, H. K.; Hasebe, A.; Ohmomo, S.; Suto, E. G.; Muraki, M.; Iimura, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we propose a new process of adding a genetically modified killer yeast to improve the aerobic stability of silage. Previously constructed Kluyveromyces lactis killer strain PCK27, defective in growth on lactic acid due to disruption of the gene coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key enzyme for gluconeogenesis, inhibited the growth of Pichia anomala inoculated as an aerobic spoilage yeast and prevented a rise in pH in a model of silage fermentation. This suppressive effect of PCK27 was not only due to growth competition but also due to the killer protein produced. From these results, we concluded that strain PCK27 can be used as an additive to prolong the aerobic stability of maize silage. In the laboratory-scale experiment of maize silage, the addition of a killer yeast changed the yeast flora and significantly reduced aerobic spoilage. PMID:10508111

  8. A new regulatory element mediates ethanol repression of KlADH3, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene coding for a mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Saliola, Michele; Getuli, Claudia; Mazzoni, Cristina; Fantozzi, Ivana; Falcone, Claudio

    2007-08-01

    KlADH3 is a Kluyveromyces lactis alcohol dehydrogenase gene induced in the presence of all respiratory carbon sources except ethanol, which specifically represses this gene. Deletion analysis of the KlADH3 promoter revealed the presence of both positive and negative elements. However, by site-directed mutagenesis and gel retardation experiments, we identified a 15-bp element responsible for the transcriptional repression of this gene by ethanol. In particular, this element showed putative sites required for the sequential binding of ethanol-induced factors responsible for the repressed conditions, and the binding of additional factors relieved repression. In addition, we showed that the ethanol element was required for in vivo repression of KlAdh3 activity.

  9. Galactokinase encoded by GAL1 is a bifunctional protein required for induction of the GAL genes in Kluyveromyces lactis and is able to suppress the gal3 phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J; Walker-Jonah, A; Hollenberg, C P

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed a GAL1 mutant (gal1-r strain) of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis which lacks the induction of beta-galactosidase and the enzymes of the Leloir pathway in the presence of galactose. The data show that the K. lactis GAL1 gene product has, in addition to galactokinase activity, a function required for induction of the lactose system. This regulatory function is not dependent on galactokinase activity, as it is still present in a galactokinase-negative mutant (gal1-209). Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cervisiae show that K. lactis GAL1 and gal1-209, but not gal1-r, complement the gal3 mutation. We conclude that the regulatory function of GAL1 in K. lactis soon after induction is similar to the function of GAL3 in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1922058

  10. Glucose represses the lactose-galactose regulon in Kluyveromyces lactis through a SNF1 and MIG1- dependent pathway that modulates galactokinase (GAL1) gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, J; Dickson, R C

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the lactose-galactose regulon in Kluyveromyces lactis is induced by lactose or galactose and repressed by glucose. Some components of the induction and glucose repression pathways have been identified but many remain unknown. We examined the role of the SNF1 (KlSNF1) and MIG1 (KlMIG1) genes in the induction and repression pathways. Our data show that full induction of the regulon requires SNF1; partial induction occurs in a Klsnf1 -deleted strain, indicating that a KlSNF1 -independent pathway(s) also regulates induction. MIG1 is required for full glucose repression of the regulon, but there must be a KlMIG1 -independent repression pathway also. The KlMig1 protein appears to act downstream of the KlSnf1 protein in the glucose repression pathway. Most importantly, the KlSnf1-KIMig repression pathway operates by modulating KlGAL1 expression. Regulating KlGAL1 expression in this manner enables the cell to switch the regulon off in the presence of glucose. Overall, our data show that, while the Snf1 and Mig1 proteins play similar roles in regulating the galactose regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and K.lactis , the way in which these proteins are integrated into the regulatory circuits are unique to each regulon, as is the degree to which each regulon is controlled by the two proteins. PMID:9278487

  11. Mutation in the beta subunit of F ATPase allows Kluyveromyces lactis to survive the disruption of the KlPGS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Patrásová, Mária; Kost'anová-Poliaková, Daniela; Simocková, Mária; Sabová, L'udmila

    2010-09-01

    The petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis does not tolerate the loss of phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We demonstrate that the lethality of PG loss is suppressed in strains carrying a mutation in the beta subunit of F(1) ATPase (mgi1-1). Phenotypic characterization shows that the strain lacking the phosphatidylglycerolphosphate synthase gene (KlPGS1) is able to grow only on glucose, but significantly more slowly and to substantially lower densities than the parental mgi1-1 strain. In addition, oxygen consumption in the DeltaKlpgs1 strain is <1% of the parental strain. Western blot analysis of mitochondrial membrane proteins shows that the amounts of some proteins are substantially decreased or even not detectable in this mutant. However, overexpression of the KlPGS1 gene under the inducible GAL1 promoter does not restore the ability of DeltaKlpgs1 cells to grow on galactose, indicating the presence of some other mutations and/or deletions in genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. We also demonstrate that DeltaKlpgs1 cells do not spontaneously lose mtDNA, but are able to survive its loss after ethidium bromide mutagenesis. Deletion of the cardiolipin synthase gene (KlCLS1) in mgi1-1 has only a minimal effect on mitochondrial physiology, and additional experiments show that this deletion is also viable in wild-type K. lactis.

  12. Molecular cloning of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis: a single nucleotide substitution in the gene confers ethidium bromide resistance and deficiency in K+ uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, M; Ramírez, J; Peña, A; Coria, R

    1995-01-01

    A Kluyveromyces lactis strain resistant to ethidium bromide and deficient in potassium uptake was isolated. Studies on the proton-pumping activity of the mutant strain showed that a decreased H(+)-ATPase specific activity was responsible for the observed phenotypes. The putative K. lactis PMA1 gene encoding the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase was cloned by its ability to relieve the potassium transport defect of this mutant and by reversing its resistance to ethidium bromide. Its deduced amino acid sequence predicts a protein 899 residues long that is structurally colinear in its full length to H(+)-ATPases cloned from different yeasts, except for the presence of a variable N-terminal domain. By PCR-mediated amplification, we identified a transition from G to A that rendered the substitution of the fully conserved methionine at position 699 by isoleucine. We attribute to this amino acid change the low capacity of the mutant H(+)-ATPase to pump out protons. PMID:7730265

  13. Molecular cloning of TvDAO1, a gene encoding a D-amino acid oxidase from Trigonopsis variabilis and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    González, F J; Montes, J; Martin, F; López, M C; Fermiñán, E; Catalán, J; Galán, M A; Domínguez, A

    1997-12-01

    The DAO1 gene of Trigonopsis variabilis encoding a D-amino acid oxidase (EC 1.4.3.3) was isolated from genomic clones selected for their specific hybridization to synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes based on regions of the enzyme that have been conserved through evolution. The nucleotide sequence of the gene predicts a protein with similarities to human, pig, rabbit, mouse and Fusarium solani D-amino acid oxidases. The open reading frame of the T. variabilis DAO1 gene was interrupted by an intron. The Dao1p sequence displays two regions, one in the N-terminal section--the FAD binding site--and the other near the C-terminal region that contains conserved signatures found in all the D-amino acid oxidases. The three C-terminal amino acids suggest that the enzyme may be located in peroxisomes. Northern blot experiments showed that no transcriptional activation occurred in the presence of D-methionine. The cDNA encoding Dao1p was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis. Both yeast species are able to synthesize a functional enzyme under the control of the GAL1 promoter. In K. lactis, up to six times more enzyme units per gram of dry weight are produced with a multicopy plasmid in comparison with the wild-type strain of T. variabilis. The yeast expression system we describe may constitute an alternative source for the production of D-amino acid oxidases at industrial level.

  14. RAS/Cyclic AMP and Transcription Factor Msn2 Regulate Mating and Mating-Type Switching in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Barsoum, E.; Rajaei, N.; Åström, S. U.

    2011-01-01

    In response to harsh environmental conditions, ascomycetes produce stress-resistant spores to promote survival. As sporulation requires a diploid DNA content, species with a haploid lifestyle, such as Kluyveromyces lactis, first induce mating in response to stress. In K. lactis, mating and mating-type switching are induced by the DNA-binding protein Mts1. Mts1 expression is known to be upregulated by nutrient limitation, but the mechanism is unknown. We show that a ras2 mutation results in a hyperswitching phenotype. In contrast, strains lacking the phosphodiesterase Pde2 had lower switching rates compared to that of the wild type (WT). As Ras2 promotes cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and Pde2 degrades cAMP, these data suggest that low cAMP levels induce switching. Because the MTS1 regulatory region contains several Msn2 binding sites and Msn2 is a transcription factor that is activated by low cAMP levels, we investigated if Msn2 regulates MTS1 transcription. Consistently with this idea, an msn2 mutant strain displayed lower switching rates than the WT strain. The transcription of MTS1 is highly induced in the ras2 mutant strain. In contrast, an msn2 ras2 double mutant strain displays WT levels of the MTS1 transcript, showing that Msn2 is a critical inducer of MTS1 transcription. Strains lacking Msn2 and Pde2 also exhibit mating defects that can be complemented by the ectopic expression of Mts1. Finally, we show that MTS1 is subjected to negative autoregulation, presumably adding robustness to the mating and switching responses. We suggest a model in which Ras2/cAMP/Msn2 mediates the stress-induced mating and mating-type switching responses in K. lactis. PMID:21890818

  15. Characterization of the transcription factor encoding gene, KlADR1: metabolic role in Kluyveromyces lactis and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Silvia; D'Amici, Sirio; Tassone, Paola; Tramonti, Angela; Uccelletti, Daniela; Mancini, Patrizia; Saliola, Michele

    2016-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Adr1 is a zinc-finger transcription factor involved in the transcriptional activation of ADH2. Deletion of KlADR1, its putative ortholog in Kluyveromyces lactis, led to reduced growth in glycerol, oleate and yeast extract-peptone medium suggesting, as in S. cerevisiae, its requirement for glycerol, fatty acid and nitrogen utilization. Moreover, growth comparison on yeast extract and peptone plates showed in K. lactis a KlAdr1-dependent growth trait not present in S. cerevisiae, indicating different metabolic roles of the two factors in their environmental niches. KlADR1 is required for growth under respiratory and fermentative conditions like KlADH, alcohol dehydrogenase genes necessary for metabolic adaptation during the growth transition. Using in-gel native alcohol dehydrogenase assay, we showed that this factor affected the Adh pattern by altering the balance between these activities. Since the activity most affected by KlAdr1 is KlAdh3, a deletion analysis of the KlADH3 promoter allowed the isolation of a DNA fragment through which KlAdr1 modulated its expression. The expression of the KlADR1-GFP gene allowed the intracellular localization of the factor in K. lactis and S. cerevisiae, suggesting in the two yeasts a common mechanism of KlAdr1 translocation under fermentative and respiratory conditions. Finally, the chimeric Kl/ScADR1 gene encoding the zinc-finger domains of KlAdr1 fused to the transactivating domains of the S. cerevisiae factor activated in Scadr1Δ the transcription of ADH2 in a ScAdr1-dependent fashion.

  16. Key Role of Ser562/661 in Snf1-Dependent Regulation of Cat8p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Charbon, Godefroid; Breunig, Karin D.; Wattiez, Ruddy; Vandenhaute, Jean; Noël-Georis, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Utilization of nonfermentable carbon sources by Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the Snf1p kinase and the Cat8p transcriptional activator, which binds to carbon source-responsive elements of target genes. We demonstrate that KlSnf1p and KlCat8p from K. lactis interact in a two-hybrid system and that the interaction is stronger with a kinase-dead mutant form of KlSnf1p. Of two putative phosphorylation sites in the KlCat8p sequence, serine 661 was identified as a key residue governing KlCat8p regulation. Serine 661 is located in the middle homology region, a regulatory domain conserved among zinc cluster transcription factors, and is part of an Snf1p consensus phosphorylation site. Single mutations at this site are sufficient to completely change the carbon source regulation of the KlCat8p transactivation activity observed. A serine-to-glutamate mutant form mimicking constitutive phosphorylation results in a nearly constitutively active form of KlCat8p, while a serine-to-alanine mutation has the reverse effect. Furthermore, it is shown that KlCat8p phosphorylation depends on KlSNF1. The Snf1-Cat8 connection is evolutionarily conserved: mutation of corresponding serine 562 of ScCat8p gave similar results in S. cerevisiae. The enhanced capacity of ScCat8S562E to suppress the phenotype caused by snf1 strengthens the hypothesis of direct phosphorylation of Cat8p by Snf1p. Unlike that of S. cerevisiae ScCAT8, KlCAT8 transcription is not carbon source regulated, illustrating the prominent role of posttranscriptional regulation of Cat8p in K. lactis. PMID:15121831

  17. Inactivation of the Kluyveromyces lactis KlPDA1 gene leads to loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, impairs growth on glucose and triggers aerobic alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, A M; Luttik, M A; Thiele, C; van Dijken, J P; Pronk, J T; Steensma, H Y

    1998-12-01

    The KlPDA1 gene, encoding the E1alpha subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex was isolated from a Kluyveromyces lactis genomic library by screening with a 1.1 kb internal fragment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PDA1 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by KlPDA1 showed 87% similarity and 79% identity to its S. cerevisiae counterpart. Disruption of KIPDA1 resulted in complete absence of PDH activity in cell extracts. The maximum specific growth rate on glucose of null mutants was 3.5-fold lower than that of the wild-type, whereas growth on ethanol was unaffected. Wild-type K. lactis CBS 2359 exhibits a Crabtree-negative phenotype, i.e. no ethanol was produced in aerobic batch cultures grown on glucose. In contrast, substantial amounts of ethanol and acetaldehyde were produced in aerobic cultures of an isogenic Klpda1 null mutant. A wild-type specific growth rate was restored after introduction of an intact KlPDA1 gene but not, as previously found for S. cerevisiae pda1 mutants, by cultivation in the presence of leucine. The occurrence of aerobic fermentation and slow growth of the Klpda1 null mutant indicate that, although present, the enzymes of the PDH bypass (pyruvate decarboxylase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA synthetase) could not efficiently replace the PDH complex during batch cultivation on glucose. Only at relatively low growth rates (D = 0.10 h(-1)) in aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures, could the PDH bypass completely replace the PDH complex, thus allowing fully respiratory growth. This resulted in a lower biomass yield [g biomass (g glucose)-1] than in the wild-type due to a higher consumption of ATP in the PDH bypass compared to the formation of acetyl-CoA via the PDH complex.

  18. Constitutive expression in gal7 mutants of Kluyveromyces lactis is due to internal production of galactose as an inducer of the Gal/Lac regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, G; Vollenbroich, V; Jeon, M S; de Graaf, A A; Hollenberg, C P

    1997-01-01

    The induction process of the galactose regulon has been intensively studied, but until now the nature of the inducer has remained unknown. We have analyzed a delta gal7 mutant of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, which lacks the galactotransferase activity and is able to express the genes of the Gal/Lac regulon also in the absence of galactose. We found that this expression is semiconstitutive and undergoes a strong induction during the stationary phase. The gal1-209 mutant, which has a reduced kinase activity but retains its positive regulatory function, also shows a constitutive expression of beta-galactosidase, suggesting that galactose is the inducer. A gal10 deletion in delta gal7 or gal1-209 mutants reduces the expression to under wild-type levels. The presence of the inducer could be demonstrated in both delta gal7 crude extracts and culture medium by means of a bioassay using the induction in gal1-209 cells. A mutation in the transporter gene LAC12 decreases the level of induction in gal7 cells, indicating that galactose is partly released into the medium and then retransported into the cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of crude extracts from delta gal7 cells revealed the presence of 50 microM galactose. We conclude that galactose is the inducer of the Gal/Lac regulon and is produced via UDP-galactose through a yet-unknown pathway. PMID:9032299

  19. Glucose repression of lactose/galactose metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis is determined by the concentration of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (K1GAL4) [corrected].

    PubMed

    Zachariae, W; Kuger, P; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-11

    In the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis glucose repression of genes involved in lactose and galactose metabolism is primarily mediated by LAC9 (or K1GAL4) the homologue of the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator GAL4. Phenotypic difference in glucose repression existing between natural strains are due to differences in the LAC9 gene (Breunig, 1989, Mol.Gen.Genet. 261, 422-427). Comparison between the LAC9 alleles of repressible and non-repressible strains revealed that the phenotype is a result of differences in LAC9 gene expression. A two-basepair alteration in the LAC9 promoter region produces a promoter-down effect resulting in slightly reduced LAC9 protein levels under all growth conditions tested. In glucose/galactose medium any change in LAC9 expression drastically affects expression of LAC9 controlled genes e.g. those encoding beta-galactosidase or galactokinase revealing a strong dependence of the kinetics of induction on the LAC9 concentration. We propose that in tightly repressible strains the activator concentration drops below a critical threshold that is required for induction to occur. A model is presented to explain how small differences in activator levels are amplified to produce big changes in expression levels of metabolic genes.

  20. Specific mutations in alpha- and gamma-subunits of F1-ATPase affect mitochondrial genome integrity in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Chen, X J; Clark-Walker, G D

    1995-07-03

    We have shown previously that mutations in nuclear genes, termed MGI, for mitochondrial genome integrity, can convert the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis into a petite-positive form with the ability to produce mitochondrial genome deletion mutants (Chen and Clark-Walker, Genetics, 133, 517-525, 1993). Here we describe that two genes, MGI2 and MGI5, encode the alpha- and gamma-subunits of mitochondrial F1-ATPase. Specific mutations, Phe443-->Ser and Ala333-->Val in MGI2, and Thr275-->Ala in MGI5, confer on cells the ability to produce petite mutants spontaneously with deletions in mitochondrial (mt) DNA and the capacity to lose their mitochondrial genomes upon treatment with ethidium bromide. Structural integrity of the F1 complex seems to be needed for expression of the Mgi- phenotype as null mutations in MGI2 and MGI5 remove the ability to form mtDNA deletions. It is suggested that mgi mutations allow petites to survive because an aberrant F1 complex prevents collapse of the mitochondrial inner membrane potential that normally occurs on loss of mtDNA-encoded F0 subunits.

  1. Specific mutations in alpha- and gamma-subunits of F1-ATPase affect mitochondrial genome integrity in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X J; Clark-Walker, G D

    1995-01-01

    We have shown previously that mutations in nuclear genes, termed MGI, for mitochondrial genome integrity, can convert the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis into a petite-positive form with the ability to produce mitochondrial genome deletion mutants (Chen and Clark-Walker, Genetics, 133, 517-525, 1993). Here we describe that two genes, MGI2 and MGI5, encode the alpha- and gamma-subunits of mitochondrial F1-ATPase. Specific mutations, Phe443-->Ser and Ala333-->Val in MGI2, and Thr275-->Ala in MGI5, confer on cells the ability to produce petite mutants spontaneously with deletions in mitochondrial (mt) DNA and the capacity to lose their mitochondrial genomes upon treatment with ethidium bromide. Structural integrity of the F1 complex seems to be needed for expression of the Mgi- phenotype as null mutations in MGI2 and MGI5 remove the ability to form mtDNA deletions. It is suggested that mgi mutations allow petites to survive because an aberrant F1 complex prevents collapse of the mitochondrial inner membrane potential that normally occurs on loss of mtDNA-encoded F0 subunits. Images PMID:7621839

  2. Glucose repression of lactose/galactose metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis is determined by the concentration of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (K1GAL4) [corrected

    PubMed Central

    Zachariae, W; Kuger, P; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-01

    In the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis glucose repression of genes involved in lactose and galactose metabolism is primarily mediated by LAC9 (or K1GAL4) the homologue of the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator GAL4. Phenotypic difference in glucose repression existing between natural strains are due to differences in the LAC9 gene (Breunig, 1989, Mol.Gen.Genet. 261, 422-427). Comparison between the LAC9 alleles of repressible and non-repressible strains revealed that the phenotype is a result of differences in LAC9 gene expression. A two-basepair alteration in the LAC9 promoter region produces a promoter-down effect resulting in slightly reduced LAC9 protein levels under all growth conditions tested. In glucose/galactose medium any change in LAC9 expression drastically affects expression of LAC9 controlled genes e.g. those encoding beta-galactosidase or galactokinase revealing a strong dependence of the kinetics of induction on the LAC9 concentration. We propose that in tightly repressible strains the activator concentration drops below a critical threshold that is required for induction to occur. A model is presented to explain how small differences in activator levels are amplified to produce big changes in expression levels of metabolic genes. Images PMID:8441621

  3. Maintenance of very long telomeres by recombination in the Kluyveromyces lactis stn1-M1 mutant involves extreme telomeric turnover, telomeric circles, and concerted telomeric amplification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianing; McEachern, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Some cancers utilize the recombination-dependent process of alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to maintain long heterogeneous telomeres. Here, we studied the recombinational telomere elongation (RTE) of the Kluyveromyces lactis stn1-M1 mutant. We found that the total amount of the abundant telomeric DNA in stn1-M1 cells is subject to rapid variation and that it is likely to be primarily extrachromosomal. Rad50 and Rad51, known to be required for different RTE pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were not essential for the production of either long telomeres or telomeric circles in stn1-M1 cells. Circles of DNA containing telomeric repeats (t-circles) either present at the point of establishment of long telomeres or introduced later into stn1-M1 cells each led to the formation of long tandem arrays of the t-circle's sequence, which were incorporated at multiple telomeres. These tandem arrays were extraordinarily unstable and showed evidence of repeated rounds of concerted amplification. Our results suggest that the maintenance of telomeres in the stn1-M1 mutant involves extreme turnover of telomeric sequences from processes including both large deletions and the copying of t-circles.

  4. The nuclear genes encoding the internal (KlNDI1) and external (KlNDE1) alternative NAD(P)H:ubiquinone oxidoreductases of mitochondria from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Tarrío, N; Díaz Prado, S; Cerdán, M E; González Siso, M I

    2005-01-01

    Cloning, sequence and functional analyses of the Kluyveromyces lactis genes KlNDI1 and KlNDE1 are reported. These genes encode for proteins with high homology to the mitochondrial internal (Ndi1p) and external (Nde1p) alternative NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and complement the respective mutations. Analysis of KlNDI1 transcriptional regulation showed that expression of this gene is lower in 2% glucose than in 0.5% glucose or non-fermentable carbon sources. Beta-galactosidase activity values, shown by lacZ fusions of KlNDI1 promoter deletions, suggested that two Adr1p binding sites mediate this carbon source regulation of KlNDI1. The expression of the KlNDE1 gene in S. cerevisiae mutant strains and measurement of respiration with isolated mitochondria showed that the protein encoded by KlNDE1 oxidizes NADPH, this being an important difference with respect to the conventional yeast S. cerevisiae. Moreover, Northern blot experiments using a phosphoglucose isomerase mutant showed that KlNDE1 gene transcription increases with glucose metabolism through the pentose phosphate pathway.

  5. Ineffective Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1p in Response to High Osmotic Stress in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Zavala, Nancy; Rodríguez-González, Miriam; Navarro-Olmos, Rocío; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Kawasaki, Laura; Torres-Quiroz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    When treated with a hyperosmotic stimulus, Kluyveromyces lactis cells respond by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) K. lactis Hog1 (KlHog1) protein via two conserved branches, SLN1 and SHO1. Mutants affected in only one branch can cope with external hyperosmolarity by activating KlHog1p by phosphorylation, except for single ΔKlste11 and ΔKlste50 mutants, which showed high sensitivity to osmotic stress, even though the other branch (SLN1) was intact. Inactivation of both branches by deletion of KlSHO1 and KlSSK2 also produced sensitivity to high salt. Interestingly, we have observed that in ΔKlste11 and ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutants, which exhibit sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress, and contrary to what would be expected, KlHog1p becomes phosphorylated. Additionally, in mutants lacking both MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) present in K. lactis (KlSte11p and KlSsk2p), the hyperosmotic stress induced the phosphorylation and nuclear internalization of KlHog1p, but it failed to induce the transcriptional expression of KlSTL1 and the cell was unable to grow in high-osmolarity medium. KlHog1p phosphorylation via the canonical HOG pathway or in mutants where the SHO1 and SLN1 branches have been inactivated requires not only the presence of KlPbs2p but also its kinase activity. This indicates that when the SHO1 and SLN1 branches are inactivated, high-osmotic-stress conditions activate an independent input that yields active KlPbs2p, which, in turn, renders KlHog1p phosphorylation ineffective. Finally, we found that KlSte11p can alleviate the sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress displayed by a ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutant when it is anchored to the plasma membrane by adding the KlSho1p transmembrane segments, indicating that this chimeric protein can substitute for KlSho1p and KlSsk2p. PMID:26150414

  6. The signal for glucose repression of the lactose-galactose regulon is amplified through subtle modulation of transcription of the Kluyveromyces lactis Kl-GAL4 activator gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzhandaivelu, N; Jones, W K; Martin, A K; Dickson, R C

    1992-01-01

    Induction of the lactose-galactose regulon is strongly repressed by glucose in some but not all strains of Kluyveromyces lactis. We show here that in strongly repressed strains, two to three times less Kl-GAL4 mRNA is synthesized and that expression of structural genes in the regulon such as LAC4, the structural gene for beta-galactosidase, is down regulated 40-fold or more. Comparative analysis of strains having a strong or weak repression phenotype revealed a two-base difference in the promoter of the Kl-GAL4 (also called LAC9) positive regulatory gene. This two-base difference is responsible for the strong versus the weak repression phenotype. The two base changes are symmetrically located in a DNA sequence having partial twofold rotational symmetry (14 of 21 bases). We hypothesize that this region functions as a sensitive regulatory switch, an upstream repressor sequence (URS). According to our model, the presence of glucose in the culture medium signals, by an unidentified pathway, a repressor protein to bind the URS. Binding reduces transcription of the Kl-GAL4 gene so that the concentration of the Kl-GAL4 protein falls below the level needed for induction of LAC4 and other genes in the regulon. For strains showing weak glucose repression, we hypothesize that the two base changes in the URS reduce repressor binding so that the regulon is not repressed. Our results illustrate an important principle of genetic regulation: a small (2- to 3-fold) change in the concentration of a regulatory protein can produce a large (40-fold or greater) change in expression of structural genes. This mechanism of signal amplification could play a role in many biological phenomena that require regulated transcription. Images PMID:1569929

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 Aminotransferases Have Functionally Diverged from the Ancestral-Like Kluyveromyces lactis Orthologous Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Maritrini; Hernández, Fabiola; López, Karla; Quezada, Héctor; González, James; López, Geovani; Aranda, Cristina; González, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene duplication is a key evolutionary mechanism providing material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The fate of duplicated gene copies has been amply discussed and several models have been put forward to account for duplicate conservation. The specialization model considers that duplication of a bifunctional ancestral gene could result in the preservation of both copies through subfunctionalization, resulting in the distribution of the two ancestral functions between the gene duplicates. Here we investigate whether the presumed bifunctional character displayed by the single branched chain amino acid aminotransferase present in K. lactis has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae, and whether this conservation has impacted S. cerevisiae metabolism. Principal Findings Our results show that the KlBat1 orthologous BCAT is a bifunctional enzyme, which participates in the biosynthesis and catabolism of branched chain aminoacids (BCAAs). This dual role has been distributed in S. cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 paralogous proteins, supporting the specialization model posed to explain the evolution of gene duplications. BAT1 is highly expressed under biosynthetic conditions, while BAT2 expression is highest under catabolic conditions. Bat1 and Bat2 differential relocalization has favored their physiological function, since biosynthetic precursors are generated in the mitochondria (Bat1), while catabolic substrates are accumulated in the cytosol (Bat2). Under respiratory conditions, in the presence of ammonium and BCAAs the bat1Δ bat2Δ double mutant shows impaired growth, indicating that Bat1 and Bat2 could play redundant roles. In K. lactis wild type growth is independent of BCAA degradation, since a Klbat1Δ mutant grows under this condition. Conclusions Our study shows that BAT1 and BAT2 differential expression and subcellular relocalization has resulted in the distribution of the biosynthetic and catabolic

  8. Mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 9 is not required for viability of the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Clark-Walker, G D; Francois, F; Chen, X J; Vieira Da Silva, M R; Claisse, M L

    1997-06-01

    Specific mutations in nuclear MGI genes encoding the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of the mitochondrial inner membrane F1-ATPase complex allow mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to be lost from K. lactis. In the absence of a mutation in any of these three nuclear genes, loss of mtDNA is lethal. These results imply that mtDNA encodes a gene that is essential. Likely candidates for such an essential role are the ATP6, 8 and 9 genes coding for proteins of the ATP synthase-F0 component. The present study removes ATP9 from contention as a vital mitochondrial gene because in a respiratory deficient mutant, Gly- 3. 9, lacking a nuclear mgi mutation, we have found that a rearrangement in mtDNA has deleted 22 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the 75 amino-acid subunit-9 protein. Rearrangement in mtDNA has occurred by recombination at a 23-bp repeated sequence in the introns of the ATP9 and large ribosomal RNA (LSU) subunit genes. These two introns, of 394 (ATP9) and 410 (LSU) nucleotides, both belong to group 1.

  9. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food.

    PubMed

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  10. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food

    PubMed Central

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  11. Extranuclear expression of the bacterial xylose isomerase (xylA) and the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (hasB) genes in yeast with Kluyveromyces lactis linear killer plasmids as vectors.

    PubMed

    Schründer, J; Gunge, N; Meinhardt, F

    1996-11-01

    On the basis of the linear killer plasmid pGKL1 from Kluyveromyces lactis, two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed. One of these, pRSC126, carried the xylA gene from Streptomyces rubiginosus encoding the xylose isomerase. The other linear hybrid molecule, pRSC128, carried the hasB gene of Streptococcus pyogenes encoding the UDP glucose dehydrogenase. Construction was performed in a way that the putative cytoplasmic promoter element of ORF5 of pGKL2 was fused to the coding region of the heterologous genes. After transformation, in vivo recombination led to the establishment of linear hybrid vectors. Though efficiency of expression was low when compared with bacterial systems, cytoplasmic expression of both genes was clearly demonstrated.

  12. Positive regulation of the beta-galactosidase gene from Kluyveromyces lactis is mediated by an upstream activation site that shows homology to the GAL upstream activation site of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ruzzi, M; Breunig, K D; Ficca, A G; Hollenberg, C P

    1987-01-01

    In contrast to the Escherichia coli lac operon, the yeast beta-galactosidase gene is positively regulated. In the 5'-noncoding region of the Kluyveromyces lactis LAC4 gene, we mapped an upstream activation site (UAS) that is required for induction. This sequence, located between positions -435 and -326 from the start of translation, functions irrespective of its orientation and can confer lactose regulation to the heterologous CYC1 promoter. It is composed of at least two subsequences that must act in concert. One of these subsequences showed a strong homology to the UAS consensus sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL genes (E. Giniger, S. M. Varnum, and M. Ptashne, Cell 40:767-774, 1985). We propose that this region of homology located at about position -426 is a binding site for the product of the regulatory gene LAC9 which probably induces transcription of the LAC4 gene in a manner analogous to that of the GAL4 protein. PMID:3104772

  13. Analysis of a eukaryotic beta-galactosidase gene: the N-terminal end of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis protein shows homology to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, K D; Dahlems, U; Das, S; Hollenberg, C P

    1984-01-01

    The LAC4 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis, encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase was mapped on a cloned DNA fragment and the sequence of the 5' end was determined. This sequence includes the 5' regulatory region involved in the induction by lactose and the N-terminal end of the protein coding region. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of this eukaryotic enzyme with the N-terminal end of the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase revealed substantial homology. Two major RNA initiation sites were mapped at -115 and -105. A number of structural peculiarities of the 5'non-coding region are discussed as in comparison to Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes. Images PMID:6324114

  14. KlAft, the Kluyveromyces lactis Ortholog of Aft1 and Aft2, Mediates Activation of Iron-Responsive Transcription Through the PuCACCC Aft-Type Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Conde e Silva, Natalia; Gonçalves, Isabelle R.; Lemaire, Marc; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Camadro, Jean Michel; Blaiseau, Pierre Louis

    2009-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in fungi is regulated at the transcriptional level by two different mechanisms. It is mediated by a conserved GATA-type repressor in most fungi except in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where it is controlled by the transcription activators Aft1 and Aft2. These activators are encoded by the paralogous genes AFT1 and AFT2, which result from the whole-genome duplication. Here, we explore regulation of iron homeostasis in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that diverged from S. cerevisiae before this event. We identify an ortholog of AFT1/AFT2, designated KlAFT, whose deletion leads to the inability to grow under iron limitation. We show with quantitative real-time PCR analysis that KlAft activates the transcription of all homologs of the Aft1-target genes involved in the iron transport at the cell surface in response to iron limitation. However, homologs of Aft2-specific target genes encoding intracellular iron transporters are regulated neither by KlAft nor by iron. Both bioinformatic and DNA binding and transcription analyses demonstrate that KlAft activates iron-responsive gene expression through the PuCACCC Aft-type sequence. Thus, K. lactis is the first documented species with a positive iron-transcriptional control mediated by only one copy of the Aft-type regulator. This indicates that this function was acquired before the whole-genome duplication and was then diversified into two regulators in S. cerevisiae. PMID:19581449

  15. Functional homology between the yeast regulatory proteins GAL4 and LAC9: LAC9-mediated transcriptional activation in Kluyveromyces lactis involves protein binding to a regulatory sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, K D; Kuger, P

    1987-01-01

    As shown previously, the beta-galactosidase gene of Kluyveromyces lactis is transcriptionally regulated via an upstream activation site (UASL) which contains a sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M. Ruzzi, K.D. Breunig, A.G. Ficca, and C.P. Hollenberg, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:991-997, 1987). Here we demonstrate that the region of homology specifically binds a K. lactis regulatory protein. The binding activity was detectable in protein extracts from wild-type cells enriched for DNA-binding proteins by heparin affinity chromatography. These extracts could be used directly for DNase I and exonuclease III protection experiments. A lac9 deletion strain, which fails to induce the beta-galactosidase gene, did not contain the binding factor. The homology of LAC9 protein with GAL4 (J.M. Salmeron and S. A. Johnston, Nucleic Acids Res. 14:7767-7781, 1986) strongly suggests that LAC9 protein binds directly to UASL and plays a role similar to that of GAL4 in regulating transcription. Images PMID:2830492

  16. Unsaturated fatty acids-dependent linkage between respiration and fermentation revealed by deletion of hypoxic regulatory KlMGA2 gene in the facultative anaerobe-respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Ottaviano, Daniela; Montanari, Arianna; De Angelis, Lorenzo; Santomartino, Rosa; Visca, Andrea; Brambilla, Luca; Rinaldi, Teresa; Bello, Cristiano; Reverberi, Massimo; Bianchi, Michele M

    2015-08-01

    In the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the inactivation of structural or regulatory glycolytic and fermentative genes generates obligate respiratory mutants which can be characterized by sensitivity to the mitochondrial drug antimycin A on glucose medium (Rag(-) phenotype). Rag(-) mutations can occasionally be generated by the inactivation of genes not evidently related to glycolysis or fermentation. One such gene is the hypoxic regulatory gene KlMGA2. In this work, we report a study of the many defects, in addition to the Rag(-) phenotype, generated by KlMGA2 deletion. We analyzed the fermentative and respiratory metabolism, mitochondrial functioning and morphology in the Klmga2Δ strain. We also examined alterations in the regulation of the expression of lipid biosynthetic genes, in particular fatty acids, ergosterol and cardiolipin, under hypoxic and cold stress and the phenotypic suppression by unsaturated fatty acids of the deleted strain. Results indicate that, despite the fact that the deleted mutant strain had a typical glycolytic/fermentative phenotype and KlMGA2 is a hypoxic regulatory gene, the deletion of this gene generated defects linked to mitochondrial functions suggesting new roles of this protein in the general regulation and cellular fitness of K. lactis. Supplementation of unsaturated fatty acids suppressed or modified these defects suggesting that KlMga2 modulates membrane functioning or membrane-associated functions, both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial.

  17. The Golgi α-1,6 mannosyltransferase KlOch1p of Kluyveromyces lactis is required for Ca2+/calmodulin-based signaling and for proper mitochondrial functionality

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein N-glycosylation is a relevant metabolic pathway in eukaryotes and plays key roles in cell processes. In yeasts, outer chain branching is initiated in the Golgi apparatus by the alpha-1,6-mannosyltransferase Och1p. Results Here we report that, in Kluyveromyces lactis, this glycosyltransferase is also required to maintain functional mitochondria and calcium homeostasis. Cells carrying a mutation in KlOCH1 gene showed altered mitochondrial morphology, increased accumulation of ROS and reduced expression of calcium signalling genes such as calmodulin and calcineurin. Intracellular calcium concentration was also reduced in the mutant cells with respect to the wild type counterparts. Phenotypes that occur in cells lacking the alpha-1,6-mannosyltransferase, including oxidative stress and impaired mitochondria functionality, were suppressed by increased dosage of KlCmd1p. This, in turn, acts through the action of calcineurin. Conclusions Proper functioning of the alpha-1,6-mannosyltransferase in the N-glycosylation pathway of K. lactis is required for maintaining normal calcium homeostasis; this is necessary for physiological mitochondria dynamics and functionality. PMID:20003441

  18. Coregulation of the Kluyveromyces lactis lactose permease and beta-galactosidase genes is achieved by interaction of multiple LAC9 binding sites in a 2.6 kbp divergent promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Gödecke, A; Zachariae, W; Arvanitidis, A; Breunig, K D

    1991-01-01

    The coregulated genes LAC4 and LAC12 encoding beta-galactosidase and lactose permease, respectively, are responsible for the ability of the milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to utilise lactose. They are divergently transcribed and separated by an unusually large intergenic region of 2.6 kbp. Mapping of the upstream border of the beta-galactosidase gene (LAC4) promoter by introduction of mutations at the chromosomal locus showed that LAC4 and LAC12 share the same upstream activation sites (UAS). The UASs represent binding sites for the trans-activator LAC9, a K. lactis homologue of GAL4, conforming to the consensus sequence 5'-CGG(N5)A/T(N5)CCG-3'. Two binding sites are located in front of each of the genes at almost symmetrical positions. beta-galactosidase activity measurements as well as quantitation of LAC4 and LAC12 mRNA levels demonstrated that all four sites are required for full induction. LAC4 proximal and a LAC12 proximal sites cooperate in activating transcription of both genes. These sites are more than 1.7 kbp apart and the distal site is located more than 2.3 kbp upstream of the respective start of transcription. Thus, the distance between interacting sites is larger than in any of the well characterised yeast promoters. The contribution to gene activation differs for individual binding sites and correlates with the relative affinity of LAC9 for these sites in vitro suggesting that LAC9 binding is a rate limiting step for LAC promoter function. Images PMID:1923819

  19. Pheromone Signalling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Adam G.

    2011-01-01

    Pheromones are chemicals used to communicate with members of the same species. First described in insects, pheromones are often used to attract mates but in social insects, such as ants and bees, pheromone use is much more sophisticated. For example, ants use pheromones to make foraging trails and the chemical and physical properties of the…

  20. Pheromone Signalling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Adam G.

    2011-01-01

    Pheromones are chemicals used to communicate with members of the same species. First described in insects, pheromones are often used to attract mates but in social insects, such as ants and bees, pheromone use is much more sophisticated. For example, ants use pheromones to make foraging trails and the chemical and physical properties of the…

  1. Kluyveromyces: systematics since 1970.

    PubMed

    Lachance, M A

    1993-02-01

    The taxonomy of Kluyveromyces has been the object of intense study since van der Walt's (1970) monograph. This is an account of the major developments and the classification to be adopted in the 4th edition of The Yeasts, a Taxonomic Study. The guiding principles that will be followed in eventual revisions of the genus are presented.

  2. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors.

  3. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  4. Aphid pheromones.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Sarah Y; Pickett, John A; Hardie, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are the main insect pests of agricultural crops in temperate regions causing major economic losses. Although broad-spectrum insecticides are available for control, alternative and more targeted methods are needed due to insecticide resistance and increasing environmental pressures. An alternative control method for aphids is to exploit their pheromones, which have been extensively studied in recent years. For example, aphids release alarm pheromones in response to natural enemy attack and these could be used to deter aphids from the crops. Sex pheromones have also been identified which could be used to interfere males locating conspecific females (oviparae), as well as for manipulating natural enemies. Several hypotheses relating to how species integrity is maintained via the aphid sex pheromone have been proposed. The composition and behavioral activity of these pheromones, and how their use could be implemented in integrated pest management systems to control aphids, is discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of oligosaccharide synthesis from lactose and lactulose using β-galactosidases from Kluyveromyces isolated from artisanal cheeses.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; Ruiz-Matute, Ana I; Belloch, Carmela; Cardelle-Cobas, Alejandra; Corzo, Nieves; Manzanares, Paloma

    2012-05-23

    The β-galactosidase activity of 15 Kluyveromyces strains isolated from cheese belonging to Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus species was tested for the production of oligosaccharides derived from lactose (GOS) and lactulose (OsLu). All Kluyveromyces crude cell extracts (CEEs) produced GOS, such as 6-galactobiose and 3'-, 4'-, and 6'-galactosyl-lactose. At 4 h of reaction, the main trisaccharide formed was 6'-galactosyl-lactose (20 g/100 g of total carbohydrates). The formation of OsLu was also observed by all CEEs tested, with 6-galactobiose, 6'-galactosyl-lactulose, and 1-galactosyl-lactulose being found in all of the reaction mixtures. The synthesis of trisaccharides predominated over other oligosaccharides. K. marxianus strain O3 produced the highest yields of GOS and OsLu after 4 h of reaction, reaching 42 g/100 g of total carbohydrates (corresponding to 80% lactose hydrolysis) and 45 g/100 g of total carbohydrates (corresponding to 87% lactulose hydrolysis), respectively. Therefore, the present study contributes to a better insight into dairy Kluyveromyces β-galactosidases and shows the feasibility of these enzymes to transglycosylate lactose and lactulose, producing high yields of prebiotic oligosaccharides.

  6. What is a pheromone? Mammalian pheromones reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Lisa; Marton, Tobias F

    2005-06-02

    Pheromone communication is a two-component system: signaling pheromones and receiving sensory neurons. Currently, pheromones remain enigmatic bioactive compounds, as only a few have been identified, but classical bioassays have suggested that they are nonvolatile, activate vomeronasal sensory neurons, and regulate innate social behaviors and neuroendocrine release. Recent discoveries of potential pheromones reveal that they may be more structurally and functionally diverse than previously defined.

  7. Production of lactulose oligosaccharides by isomerisation of transgalactosylated cheese whey permeate obtained by β-galactosidases from dairy Kluyveromyces.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; Frau, Florencia; Ruiz-Matute, Ana Isabel; Montilla, Antonia; Belloch, Carmela; Manzanares, Paloma; Corzo, Nieves

    2015-08-01

    β-Galactosidases from Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from artisanal ewes' milk cheeses, were used to transgalactosylate lactose from cheese whey permeate (WP). The content of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) obtained by transgalactosylation was comparable with that formed using pure lactose as substrate. In order to obtain a mixture with higher prebiotic oligosaccharide content, isomerisation of the transgalactosylated WP was carried out using sodium aluminate as catalyst. The transgalactosylated mixtures at 6 h of reaction contained amounts of prebiotic carbohydrates (tagatose, lactulose, GOS and oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, OsLu) close to 50 g/100 g of total carbohydrates for all the strains tested, corresponding to 322 g prebiotics/kg whey permeate. Thus, the suitability of this methodology to produce mixtures of dietary non-digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties from WP has been demonstrated, which is interesting for the food industry since it increases the value and the applicability of this by-product from cheese manufacture.

  8. Impact of coculturing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis HN019 with yeasts on microbial viability and metabolite formation.

    PubMed

    Toh, M; Liu, S-Q

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of coculturing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis HN019 with yeasts on microbial viability and metabolite production. Monocultures and bacteria-yeast cocultures of B. lactis HN019 and 10 different yeast strains belonging to different species in skim milk media were fermented at 37°C. The presence of yeasts enhanced the growth rate and metabolic activities of B. lactis HN019, which might be attributed to their antioxidative properties. The viability of yeasts, when cocultured with bifidobacteria, was either unaffected or suppressed, depending on the strain. When the B. lactis HN019 monoculture and cocultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC-1118, Pichia kluyveri FrootZen and Kluyveromyces lactis KL71 were fermented to pH 4·7, there were no significant differences in their organic acid composition. On the other hand, cocultures produced significantly higher quantities of alcohols and/or esters than the monoculture. Coculturing B. lactis HN019 with yeasts did not improve the viability of the probiotic during storage at 10°C for 8 weeks, as the bifidobacteria itself demonstrated satisfactory survival in the fermented SMM. Coculturing B. lactis HN019 with yeasts accelerated the growth of the bifidobacteria and increased the production aroma-active volatile metabolites. This study demonstrates the potential of utilizing specific yeast species as starter or adjunct cultures to simultaneously improve the growth of fastidious bifidobacteria and modulate the organoleptic properties of fermented food products. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Role of Snf1p in Regulation of Intracellular Sorting of the Lactose and Galactose Transporter Lac12p in Kluyveromyces lactis†

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemuth, Christian; Breunig, Karin D.

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase Snf1/AMPK plays a central role in carbon and energy homeostasis in yeasts and higher eukaryotes. To work out which aspects of the Snf1-controlled regulatory network are conserved in evolution, the Snf1 requirement in galactose metabolism was analyzed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. Whereas galactose induction was only delayed, K. lactis snf1 mutants failed to accumulate the lactose/galactose H+ symporter Lac12p in the plasma membran,e as indicated by Lac12-green fluorescent protein fusions. In contrast to wild-type cells, the fusion protein was mostly intracellular in the mutant. Growth on galactose and galactose uptake could be restored by the KHT3 gene, which encodes a new transporter of the HXT subfamily of major facilitators These findings indicate a new role of Snf1p in regulation of sugar transport in K. lactis. PMID:15821131

  10. Pheromones cause disease: pheromone/odourant transduction.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B

    2001-09-01

    This paper compares two models of the sense of smell and demonstrates that the new model has advantages over the accepted model with implications for medical research. The accepted transduction model had an odourant or pheromone contacting an aqueous sensory lymph then movement through it to a receptor membrane beneath. If the odourant or pheromone were non-soluble, the odourant/pheromone supposedly would be bound to a soluble protein in the lymph to be carried across. Thus, an odourant/carrier protein complex physically moved through the receptor lymph/mucus to interact with a membrane bound receptor. After the membranous receptor interaction, the molecule would be deactivated and any odourant/pheromone-binding protein recycled. This new electrical chemosensory model being proposed here has the pheromone or other odourant generating an electrical event in the extra-cellular mucus. Before the pheromone arrives, proteins of the 'carrier class' dissolved in the receptor mucus slowly and continuously sequester ions. A sensed pheromonal chemical species sorbs to the mucus and immediately binds to the now ion-holding dissolved protein. The binding of the pheromone to the protein causes a measurable conformational change in the pheromone/odourant-binding protein, desequestering ions. Releasing the bound ions changes the potential differences across a nearby super-sensitive dendritic membrane resulting in dendrite excitation. Pheromones will be implicated in the aetiology of the infectious, psychiatric and autoimmune diseases. This is the third article in a series of twelve to systematically explore this contention (see references 1-9). Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  11. Polymorphisms in the LAC12 gene explain lactose utilisation variability in Kluyveromyces marxianus strains.

    PubMed

    Varela, Javier A; Montini, Noemi; Scully, Damhan; Van der Ploeg, Ralph; Oreb, Mislav; Boles, Eckhard; Hirota, Junya; Akada, Rinji; Hoshida, Hisashi; Morrissey, John P

    2017-05-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus is a safe yeast used in the food and biotechnology sectors. One of the important traits that sets it apart from the familiar yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is its capacity to grow using lactose as a carbon source. Like in its close relative, Kluyveromyces lactis, this requires lactose transport via a permease and intracellular hydrolysis of the disaccharide. Given the importance of the trait, it was intriguing that most, but not all, strains of K. marxianus are reported to consume lactose efficiently. In this study, primarily through heterologous expression in S. cerevisiae and K. marxianus, it was established that a single gene, LAC12, is responsible for lactose uptake in K. marxianus. Strains that failed to transport lactose showed variation in 13 amino acids in the Lac12p protein, rendering the protein non-functional for lactose transport. Genome analysis showed that the LAC12 gene is present in four copies in the subtelomeric regions of three different chromosomes but only the ancestral LAC12 gene encodes a functional lactose transporter. Other copies of LAC12 may be non-functional or have alternative substrates. The analysis raises some interesting questions regarding the evolution of sugar transporters in K. marxianus. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Characterization of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from surface waters.

    PubMed

    Svec, P; Sedlácek, I

    2008-01-01

    A group of nine presumptive enterococci was isolated on enterococcal selective media Slanetz-Bartley agar and/or kanamycin-esculin-azide agar during a screening of Enterococcus spp. in surface waters. All strains formed a homogeneous cluster separated from all enterococcal species using rep-PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)5 primer but they matched fingerprints revealed by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis representatives. Further identification using extensive biotyping and automated ribotyping with EcoRI (RiboPrinter microbial characterization system) confirmed all strains as L. lactis subsp. lactis in full correspondence with the (GTG)5-PCR. We demonstrated that L. lactis subsp. lactis strains occur in different surface waters and can be confused with enterococci due to their positive growth on selective enterococcal media as well as positive results in tests commonly used for identification of the genus Enterococcus (esculin hydrolysis, acetoin and pyrrolidonyl arylamidase production, growth at 10 degrees C and in 6.5% NaCl). The (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting was revealed as a reliable and fast method for the identification of L. lactis subsp lactis while automated ribotyping with EcoRI proved to be a good tool for intrasubspecies typing purposes.

  13. From pheromones to behavior.

    PubMed

    Tirindelli, Roberto; Dibattista, Michele; Pifferi, Simone; Menini, Anna

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, considerable progress has been achieved in the comprehension of the profound effects of pheromones on reproductive physiology and behavior. Pheromones have been classified as molecules released by individuals and responsible for the elicitation of specific behavioral expressions in members of the same species. These signaling molecules, often chemically unrelated, are contained in body fluids like urine, sweat, specialized exocrine glands, and mucous secretions of genitals. The standard view of pheromone sensing was based on the assumption that most mammals have two separated olfactory systems with different functional roles: the main olfactory system for recognizing conventional odorant molecules and the vomeronasal system specifically dedicated to the detection of pheromones. However, recent studies have reexamined this traditional interpretation showing that both the main olfactory and the vomeronasal systems are actively involved in pheromonal communication. The current knowledge on the behavioral, physiological, and molecular aspects of pheromone detection in mammals is discussed in this review.

  14. Mating pheromones of heterobasidiomycetous yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Y.; Sakurai, A.

    1981-03-01

    Two mating pheromones, which induce mating tube formation, were isolated from Rhodosporidium toruloides (rhodotorucine A) and Tremella mesenterica (tremerogen A-10). These mating pheromones are lipophilic oligopeptides having S-alkylated cysteine at the C-terminus but different amino acid sequences. Synthetic analogues of these pheromones revealed the structure-activity relationships. Metabolism of rhodotorucine A was also studied by using labeled pheromones.

  15. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis as Potential Functional
Starter Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cvrtila, Jelena; Topić, Ivana; Delaš, Frane; Markov, Ksenija

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study is to identify and characterise potential autochthonous functional starter cultures in homemade horsemeat sausage. The dominant microflora in the samples of horsemeat sausage were lactic acid bacteria (LAB), followed by micrococci. Among the LAB, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species, and since the first is not common in fermented sausages, we characterised it as a potential functional starter culture. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis produced a significant amount of lactic acid, displayed good growth capability at 12, 18 and 22 °C, growth in the presence of 5% NaCl, good viability after lyophilisation and in simulated gastric and small intestinal juice, antimicrobial activity against test pathogens, and good adhesive properties in vitro. PMID:27904322

  16. Stereochemical studies on pheromonal communications

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Pheromonal communications are heavily dependent on the stereochemistry of pheromones. Their enantioselective syntheses could establish the absolute configuration of the naturally occurring pheromones, and clarified the unique relationships between absolute configuration and bioactivity. For example, neither the (R)- nor (S)-enantiomer of sulcatol, the aggregation pheromone of an ambrosia beetle, is behaviorally active, while their mixture is bioactive. Recent results as summarized in the present review further illustrate the unique and diverse relationships between stereochemistry and bioactivity of pheromones. PMID:25504227

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strain YF11

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhui; Song, Lifu; Feng, Wenjing; Pei, Guangsheng; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Zhichao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain YF11 is a food preservative bacterium with a high capacity to produce nisin. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YF11 (2,527,433 bp with a G+C content of 34.81%). PMID:23929487

  18. Pheromone reception in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bigiani, A; Mucignat-Caretta, C; Montani, G; Tirindelli, R

    2005-01-01

    Pheromonal communication is the most convenient way to transfer information regarding gender and social status in animals of the same species with the holistic goal of sustaining reproduction. This type of information exchange is based on pheromones, molecules often chemically unrelated, that are contained in body fluids like urine, sweat, specialized exocrine glands, and mucous secretions of genitals. So profound is the relevance of pheromones over the evolutionary process that a specific peripheral organ devoted to their recognition, namely the vomeronasal organ of Jacobson, and a related central pathway arose in most vertebrate species. Although the vomeronasal system is well developed in reptiles and amphibians, most mammals strongly rely on pheromonal communication. Humans use pheromones too; evidence on the existence of a specialized organ for their detection, however, is very elusive indeed. In the present review, we will focus our attention on the behavioral, physiological, and molecular aspects of pheromone detection in mammals. We will discuss the responses to pheromonal stimulation in different animal species, emphasizing the complicacy of this type of communication. In the light of the most recent results, we will also discuss the complex organization of the transduction molecules that underlie pheromone detection and signal transmission from vomeronasal neurons to the higher centers of the brain. Communication is a primary feature of living organisms, allowing the coordination of different behavioral paradigms among individuals. Communication has evolved through a variety of different strategies, and each species refined its own preferred communication medium. From a phylogenetic point of view, the most widespread and ancient way of communication is through chemical signals named pheromones: it occurs in all taxa, from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The release of specific pheromones into the environment is a sensitive and definite way to send messages to

  19. Pheromone Transduction in Moths

    PubMed Central

    Stengl, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Calling female moths attract their mates late at night with intermittent release of a species-specific sex-pheromone blend. Mean frequency of pheromone filaments encodes distance to the calling female. In their zig-zagging upwind search male moths encounter turbulent pheromone blend filaments at highly variable concentrations and frequencies. The male moth antennae are delicately designed to detect and distinguish even traces of these sex pheromones amongst the abundance of other odors. Its olfactory receptor neurons sense even single pheromone molecules and track intermittent pheromone filaments of highly variable frequencies up to about 30 Hz over a wide concentration range. In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta brief, weak pheromone stimuli as encountered during flight are detected via a metabotropic PLCβ-dependent signal transduction cascade which leads to transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Strong or long pheromone stimuli, which are possibly perceived in direct contact with the female, activate receptor-guanylyl cyclases causing long-term adaptation. In addition, depending on endogenous rhythms of the moth's physiological state, hormones such as the stress hormone octopamine modulate second messenger levels in sensory neurons. High octopamine levels during the activity phase maximize temporal resolution cAMP-dependently as a prerequisite to mate location. Thus, I suggest that sliding adjustment of odor response threshold and kinetics is based upon relative concentration ratios of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide levels which gate different ion channels synergistically. In addition, I propose a new hypothesis for the cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channel formed by insect olfactory receptor/coreceptor complexes. Instead of being employed for an ionotropic mechanism of odor detection it is proposed to control subthreshold membrane potential oscillation of sensory neurons, as a basis for temporal encoding of odors. PMID:21228914

  20. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-galactoside galactohydrase (CAS Reg. No. CBS 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is... in § 170.3(o)(9) of this chapter to convert lactose to glucose and galactose. (2) The ingredient...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is prepared from yeast that has been grown... chapter to convert lactose to glucose and galactose. (2) The ingredient is used in food at levels not...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-galactoside galactohydrase (CAS Reg. No. CBS 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is... in § 170.3(o)(9) of this chapter to convert lactose to glucose and galactose. (2) The ingredient...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-galactoside galactohydrase (CAS Reg. No. CBS 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is... in § 170.3(o)(9) of this chapter to convert lactose to glucose and galactose. (2) The ingredient...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-galactoside galactohydrase (CAS Reg. No. CBS 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is... in § 170.3(o)(9) of this chapter to convert lactose to glucose and galactose. (2) The ingredient...

  5. The Synthesis of Lepidoptera Pheromones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveeva, Elena D.; Kurts, A. L.; Bundel', Yurii G.

    1986-07-01

    The review surveys the data in numerous publications of the synthesis of the pheromones of scale-winged insects (Lepidoptera). Attention is concentrated on problems of the sterospecific synthesis of pheromones. The bibliography includes 217 references.

  6. Laboratory Syntheses of Insect Pheromones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier, Russell A.; Hoban, James N.

    1984-01-01

    Provides background information and procedures for the multi-step synthesis of tiger moth and boll weevil pheromones (sex attractants). These syntheses require several laboratory periods. The tiger moth pheromone synthesis is suitable for introductory organic chemistry while the boll weevil pheromone is recommended for an advanced laboratory…

  7. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  8. Laboratory Syntheses of Insect Pheromones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier, Russell A.; Hoban, James N.

    1984-01-01

    Provides background information and procedures for the multi-step synthesis of tiger moth and boll weevil pheromones (sex attractants). These syntheses require several laboratory periods. The tiger moth pheromone synthesis is suitable for introductory organic chemistry while the boll weevil pheromone is recommended for an advanced laboratory…

  9. Pheromone production in bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Gary J; Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Aw, Mory; Song, Minmin; Gorzalski, Andrew; Abbott, Nicole L; Chang, Eric; Tittiger, Claus

    2010-10-01

    The first aggregation pheromone components from bark beetles were identified in 1966 as a mixture of ipsdienol, ipsenol and verbenol. Since then, a number of additional components have been identified as both aggregation and anti-aggregation pheromones, with many of them being monoterpenoids or derived from monoterpenoids. The structural similarity between the major pheromone components of bark beetles and the monoterpenes found in the host trees, along with the association of monoterpenoid production with plant tissue, led to the paradigm that most if not all bark beetle pheromone components were derived from host tree precursors, often with a simple hydroxylation producing the pheromone. In the 1990 s there was a paradigm shift as evidence for de novo biosynthesis of pheromone components began to accumulate, and it is now recognized that most bark beetle monoterpenoid aggregation pheromone components are biosynthesized de novo. The bark beetle aggregation pheromones are released from the frass, which is consistent with the isoprenoid aggregation pheromones, including ipsdienol, ipsenol and frontalin, being produced in midgut tissue. It appears that exo-brevocomin is produced de novo in fat body tissue, and that verbenol, verbenone and verbenene are produced from dietary α-pinene in fat body tissue. Combined biochemical, molecular and functional genomics studies in Ips pini yielded the discovery and characterization of the enzymes that convert mevalonate pathway intermediates to pheromone components, including a novel bifunctional geranyl diphosphate synthase/myrcene synthase, a cytochrome P450 that hydroxylates myrcene to ipsdienol, and an oxidoreductase that interconverts ipsdienol and ipsdienone to achieve the appropriate stereochemistry of ipsdienol for pheromonal activity. Furthermore, the regulation of these genes and their corresponding enzymes proved complex and diverse in different species. Mevalonate pathway genes in pheromone producing male I. pini

  10. Pheromones in social wasps.

    PubMed

    Claudia, Bruschini; Rita, Cervo; Stefano, Turillazzi

    2010-01-01

    Social wasps need an efficient communication system to coordinate their members in the numerous activities of the colony. In this regard, the chemical channel is the most utilized by social wasps to transfer information in intraspecific (pheromones) and interspecific (allomones) communication. In this chapter, we reviewed the main chemical substances which mediate recognition between colony members and coordinate nest defense, alarm and recruitment. Due to their central role in the colonial life, the majority of pheromones have been identified and their functions have been deeply investigated in many species. On the contrary, sex pheromones which are the most studied in insects, have been quite neglected in social wasps. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pheromone Autodetection: Evidence and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Holdcraft, Robert; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory communication research with insects utilizing sex pheromones has focused on the effects of pheromones on signal receivers. Early pheromone detection studies using the silkworm moth, Bombyx mori L., and Saturniids led to the assumption that emitters, especially females, are unable to detect their own pheromone. Pheromone anosmia, i.e., the inability of females to detect their conspecific sex pheromone, was often assumed, and initially little attention was paid to female behaviors that may result from autodetection, i.e., the ability of females to detect their sex pheromone. Detection of conspecific pheromone plumes from nearby females may provide information to improve chances of mating success and progeny survival. Since the first documented example in 1972, numerous occurrences of autodetection have been observed and verified in field and laboratory studies. We summarize here a significant portion of research relating to autodetection. Electrophysiological and behavioral investigations, as well as expression patterns of proteins involved in pheromone autodetection are included. We discuss problems inherent in defining a boundary between sex and aggregation pheromones considering the occurrence of autodetection, and summarize hypothesized selection pressures favoring autodetection. Importance of including autodetection studies in future work is emphasized by complications arising from a lack of knowledge combined with expanding the use of pheromones in agriculture. PMID:27120623

  12. Isolation of halotolerant Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis from intestinal tract of coastal fish.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Shiro; Abe, Takeshi; Washio, Sayaka; Ikuno, Erika; Kanomata, Yuna; Sugita, Haruo

    2008-01-15

    We isolated lactic acid bacteria from the intestinal tract of the pufferfish Takifugu niphobles caught in Shimoda, Shizuoka, Japan by using MRS broth prepared with 50% seawater. Additional screening was carried out using phenotypic tests such as Gram staining, cell morphology, catalase, oxidase and fermentation of glucose. Subsequently 227 isolates screened by the phenotypic tests were subjected to species-specific PCR for Lactococcus lactis, resulting in four positive isolates. The 16S rRNA gene sequences from three isolates were highly similar to that of L. lactis subsp. lactis (DNA database accession number M58837), while that of one isolate was identical to that of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (AB023246). These isolates were characterized by API 50 CH for carbohydrate fermentation and other phenotypic criteria for salt tolerance, and the characteristics were compared with those of L. lactis subsp. lactis from a cheese starter culture. The carbohydrate fermentation profiles of these isolates were characteristic of L. lactis subsp. lactis strains, whereas the tolerance of these isolates to salt was higher than that of L. lactis subsp. lactis from the cheese starter culture: the new L. lactis isolates showed high salt tolerance in MRS-agar plates containing 200% seawater or 6% sodium chloride. This is the first report of the isolation of halotolerant strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis from a marine environment.

  13. The evolution of pheromonal communication.

    PubMed

    Swaney, William T; Keverne, Eric B

    2009-06-25

    Small-brained rodents have been the principle focus for pheromonal research and have provided comprehensive insights into the chemosensory mechanisms that underpin pheromonal communication and the hugely important roles that pheromones play in behavioural regulation. However, pheromonal communication does not start or end with the mouse and the rat, and work in amphibians reveals much about the likely evolutionary origins of the chemosensory systems that mediate pheromonal effects. The dual olfactory organs (the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ), their receptors and their separate projection pathways appear to have ancient evolutionary origins, appearing in the aquatic ancestors of all tetrapods during the Devonian period and so pre-dating the transition to land. While the vomeronasal organ has long been considered an exclusively pheromonal organ, accumulating evidence indicates that it is not the sole channel for the transduction of pheromonal information and that both olfactory systems have been co-opted for the detection of different pheromone signals over the course of evolution. This has also led to great diversity in the vomeronasal and olfactory receptor families, with enormous levels of gene diversity and inactivation of genes in different species. Finally, the evolution of trichromacy as well as huge increases in social complexity have minimised the role of pheromones in the lives of primates, leading to the total inactivation of the vomeronasal system in catarrhine primates while the brain increased in size and behaviour became emancipated from hormonal regulation.

  14. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-02

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption.

  15. Pheromones in the fruit fly.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jacqueline S R; Yew, Joanne Y

    2013-01-01

    The identification of pheromones (chemical communication cues) is critical to our understanding of complex social behavior in insects and other animals. In this chapter, we describe analytical methods for the purification of lipid pheromones by thin layer chromatography and the quantification and determination of their elemental composition by mass spectrometry.

  16. A plant factory for moth pheromone production

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Hofvander, Per; Wang, Hong-Lei; Durrett, Timothy P.; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Moths depend on pheromone communication for mate finding and synthetic pheromones are used for monitoring or disruption of pheromone communication in pest insects. Here we produce moth sex pheromone, using Nicotiana benthamiana as a plant factory, by transient expression of up to four genes coding for consecutive biosynthetic steps. We specifically produce multicomponent sex pheromones for two species. The fatty alcohol fractions from the genetically modified plants are acetylated to mimic the respective sex pheromones of the small ermine moths Yponomeuta evonymella and Y. padella. These mixtures are very efficient and specific for trapping of male moths, matching the activity of conventionally produced pheromones. Our long-term vision is to design tailor-made production of any moth pheromone component in genetically modified plants. Such semisynthetic preparation of sex pheromones is a novel and cost-effective way of producing moderate to large quantities of pheromones with high purity and a minimum of hazardous waste. PMID:24569486

  17. A plant factory for moth pheromone production.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Hofvander, Per; Wang, Hong-Lei; Durrett, Timothy P; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-02-25

    Moths depend on pheromone communication for mate finding and synthetic pheromones are used for monitoring or disruption of pheromone communication in pest insects. Here we produce moth sex pheromone, using Nicotiana benthamiana as a plant factory, by transient expression of up to four genes coding for consecutive biosynthetic steps. We specifically produce multicomponent sex pheromones for two species. The fatty alcohol fractions from the genetically modified plants are acetylated to mimic the respective sex pheromones of the small ermine moths Yponomeuta evonymella and Y. padella. These mixtures are very efficient and specific for trapping of male moths, matching the activity of conventionally produced pheromones. Our long-term vision is to design tailor-made production of any moth pheromone component in genetically modified plants. Such semisynthetic preparation of sex pheromones is a novel and cost-effective way of producing moderate to large quantities of pheromones with high purity and a minimum of hazardous waste.

  18. Histidine biosynthesis genes in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, C; Ehrlich, S D; Renault, P

    1992-01-01

    The genes of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis involved in histidine biosynthesis were cloned and characterized by complementation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis mutants and DNA sequencing. Complementation of E. coli hisA, hisB, hisC, hisD, hisF, hisG, and hisIE genes and the B. subtilis hisH gene (the E. coli hisC equivalent) allowed localization of the corresponding lactococcal genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 11.5-kb lactococcal region revealed 14 open reading frames (ORFs), 12 of which might form an operon. The putative operon includes eight ORFs which encode proteins homologous to enzymes involved in histidine biosynthesis. The operon also contains (i) an ORF encoding a protein homologous to the histidyl-tRNA synthetases but lacking a motif implicated in synthetase activity, which suggests that it has a role different from tRNA aminoacylation, and (ii) an ORF encoding a protein that is homologous to the 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferases but does not confer antibiotic resistance. The remaining ORFs specify products which have no homology with proteins in the EMBL and GenBank data bases. PMID:1400209

  19. Characterizing yeast promoters used in Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Hu, Shenglin; Zhu, Songli; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2015-10-01

    Fermentation at higher temperatures can potentially reduce the cooling cost in large-scale fermentation and reduce the contamination risk. Thus, the thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, which can grow and ferment at elevated temperatures, is a promising biotechnological tool for future applications. However, the promoters used in K. marxianus are not well characterized, especially at elevated temperatures, which is important in efficient metabolic pathway construction. In this study, six constitutive promoters (P(TDH3), P(PGK), and P(ADH1) from both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and K. marxianus) were evaluated in K. marxianus through the heterologous expression of the KlLAC4, GUSA, and SH BLE genes at various temperatures, with various carbon sources and oxygen conditions. The expression was evaluated at the transcription and protein level using real-time PCR and protein activity determination to eliminate the effect of heterologous protein stability. While the transcription of all the promoters decreased at higher temperatures, the order of their promoting strength at various temperatures with glucose as the carbon source was P(KmPGK) > P(KmTDH3) > P(ScPGK) > P(ScTDH3) > P(KmADH1) > P(ScADH1). When glycerol or xylose was supplied as the carbon source at 42 °C, the order of promoter strength was P(KmPGK) > P(ScPGK) > P(KmADH1) > P(ScADH1) > P(ScTDH3) > P(KmTDH3). The promoter activity of P TDH3 decreased significantly, while the promoter activity of both of the P(ADH1) promoters increased. Oxygen conditions had non-significant effect. The results of this study provide important information for fine-tuned pathway construction for the metabolic engineering of K. marxianus.

  20. The joy of sex pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Benton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Sex pheromones provide an important means of communication to unite individuals for successful reproduction. Although sex pheromones are highly diverse across animals, these signals fulfil common fundamental roles in enabling identification of a mating partner of the opposite sex, the appropriate species and of optimal fecundity. In this review, we synthesize both classic and recent investigations on sex pheromones in a range of species, spanning nematode worms, insects and mammals. These studies reveal comparable strategies in how these chemical signals are produced, detected and processed in the brain to regulate sexual behaviours. Elucidation of sex pheromone communication mechanisms both defines outstanding models to understand the molecular and neuronal basis of chemosensory behaviours, and reveals how similar evolutionary selection pressures yield convergent solutions in distinct animal nervous systems. EMBO reports advance online publication 13 September 2013; doi:10.1038/embor.2013.140 PMID:24030282

  1. The joy of sex pheromones.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Benton, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Sex pheromones provide an important means of communication to unite individuals for successful reproduction. Although sex pheromones are highly diverse across animals, these signals fulfil common fundamental roles in enabling identification of a mating partner of the opposite sex, the appropriate species and of optimal fecundity. In this review, we synthesize both classic and recent investigations on sex pheromones in a range of species, spanning nematode worms, insects and mammals. These studies reveal comparable strategies in how these chemical signals are produced, detected and processed in the brain to regulate sexual behaviours. Elucidation of sex pheromone communication mechanisms both defines outstanding models to understand the molecular and neuronal basis of chemosensory behaviours, and reveals how similar evolutionary selection pressures yield convergent solutions in distinct animal nervous systems.

  2. Oviposition pheromones in haematophagous insects.

    PubMed

    Seenivasagan, T; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2010-01-01

    Pheromones influencing oviposition behavior in females of haematophagous insects have been the interest of recent past by many group of scientists working on oviposition pheromones. Finding and choosing a good site for oviposition is a challenging task for females of haematophagous insects, especially in those insects which does not have the parental care. Their decisions have far-reaching and profound consequences for the life history of the offspring. In such blood feeding insects, the choice of oviposition site is affected by pheromones, which may function either as deterrents or stimulants in short range, while they may also act as repellents or attractants in long range perception. During the location of a suitable oviposition site for egg laying or a potential host for blood feeding, haematophagous insects mainly use olfactory and visual cues. These pheromones are produced by the ovipositing female or by conspecific larvae co-occurring with gravid females. Adult females detect oviposition pheromones by odor receptors on the antennae, as well as by contact chemoreceptors on tarsi, mouthparts and antennae. Different cues exploited by gravid females from a diversified arena include egg, larva, habitat, microbes, infusions and plant produced volatiles influence the oviposition behavior. Traps baited with pheromones, infusions, and insecticides shall be promising tools for monitoring and control of target insect using integrated vector management strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chiral methyl-branched pheromones.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tetsu; Yamakawa, Rei

    2015-07-01

    Insect pheromones are some of the most interesting natural products because they are utilized for interspecific communication between various insects, such as beetles, moths, ants, and cockroaches. A large number of compounds of many kinds have been identified as pheromone components, reflecting the diversity of insect species. While this review deals only with chiral methyl-branched pheromones, the chemical structures of more than one hundred non-terpene compounds have been determined by applying excellent analytical techniques. Furthermore, their stereoselective syntheses have been achieved by employing trustworthy chiral sources and ingenious enantioselective reactions. The information has been reviewed here not only to make them available for new research but also to understand the characteristic chemical structures of the chiral pheromones. Since biosynthetic studies are still limited, it might be meaningful to examine whether the structures, particularly the positions and configurations of the branched methyl groups, are correlated with the taxonomy of the pheromone producers and also with the function of the pheromones in communication systems.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis A12, a Strain Isolated from Wheat Sourdough

    PubMed Central

    Guellerin, Maéva; Passerini, Delphine; Fontagné-Faucher, Catherine; Robert, Hervé; Gabriel, Valérie; Loux, Valentin; Klopp, Christophe; Le Loir, Yves; Coddeville, Michèle; Daveran-Mingot, Marie-Line; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain A12, a strain isolated from sourdough. The circular chromosome and the four plasmids reveal genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism that are potentially required for the persistence of this strain in such a complex ecosystem. PMID:27634985

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis A12, a Strain Isolated from Wheat Sourdough.

    PubMed

    Guellerin, Maéva; Passerini, Delphine; Fontagné-Faucher, Catherine; Robert, Hervé; Gabriel, Valérie; Loux, Valentin; Klopp, Christophe; Le Loir, Yves; Coddeville, Michèle; Daveran-Mingot, Marie-Line; Ritzenthaler, Paul; Le Bourgeois, Pascal

    2016-09-15

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain A12, a strain isolated from sourdough. The circular chromosome and the four plasmids reveal genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism that are potentially required for the persistence of this strain in such a complex ecosystem.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M. Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain—isolated from a traditional cheese—produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  7. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  8. Olfaction, pheromones and life.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E E

    2013-12-01

    From an evolutionary standpoint, olfaction is one of the oldest senses, and one that affects all aspects of life. This review discusses the influence of olfaction and pheromones on life. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), The Cochrane Library (1993-2013) and Ovid (1966-2012). Olfaction plays an important role in life, from infancy through to adulthood and declining health in old age. Culture, memories and emotions, which add to life's complexity and overall enjoyment, are also influenced by olfaction. Olfaction has a chronological influence on life, affecting all aspects from the cradle to the grave; it plays a role in the quality of life as a key ingredient of human evolution, survival and enjoyment.

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of 24 Lactococcus lactis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Lennart; Wels, Michiel; Boekhorst, Jos; Dijkstra, Annereinou R.; Beerthuyzen, Marke; Kelly, William J.; Siezen, Roland J.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is widely used for the production of fermented dairy products. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of 24 L. lactis strains isolated from different environments and geographic locations. PMID:28360177

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of 11 Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Strains

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Lennart; Boekhorst, Jos; Dijkstra, Annereinou; Beerthuyzen, Marke; Siezen, Roland J.; Bachmann, Herwig; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is widely used for the fermentation of dairy products. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of 11 L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains isolated from different environments. PMID:28302789

  11. Lipid-Enhanced Ethanol Production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Jacques H.; Burris, Neil; Woodward, Anne; Bailey, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 h to less than 60 h. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production were determined. PMID:16346208

  12. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Burris, N.; Woodward, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 h to less than 60 h. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production was determined.

  13. Plasmid transfer via transduction from Streptococcus thermophilus to Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Andreas; Neve, Horst; Geis, Arnold; Heller, Knut J

    2008-04-01

    Using Streptococcus thermophilus phages, plasmid transduction in Lactococcus lactis was demonstrated. The transduction frequencies were 4 orders of magnitude lower in L. lactis than in S. thermophilus. These results are the first evidence that there is phage-mediated direct transfer of DNA from S. thermophilus to L. lactis. The implications of these results for phage evolution are discussed.

  14. Spider pheromones - a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Spiders use pheromones for sexual communication, as do other animals such as insects. Nevertheless, knowledge about their chemical structure, function, and biosynthesis is only now being unraveled. Many studies have shown the existence of spider pheromones, but the responsible compounds have been elucidated in only a few cases. This review focuses on a structural approach because we need to know the involved chemistry if we are to understand fully the function of a pheromonal communication system. Pheromones from members of the spider families Pholcidae, Araneidae, Linyphiidae, Agenelidae, and Ctenidae are currently being identified and will be discussed in this review. Some of these compounds belong to compound classes not known from other arthropod pheromones, such as citric acid derivatives or acylated amino acids, whereas others originate from more common fatty acid metabolism. Their putative biosynthesis, their function, and the identification methods used will be discussed. Furthermore, other semiochemicals and the chemistry of apolar surface lipids that potentially might be used by spiders for communication are described briefly.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Velly, H.; Abraham, A.-L.; Loux, V.; Delacroix-Buchet, A.; Fonseca, F.; Bouix, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

  16. Human pheromones and sexual attraction.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Karl; Fink, Bernhard; Neave, Nick

    2005-02-01

    Olfactory communication is very common amongst animals, and since the discovery of an accessory olfactory system in humans, possible human olfactory communication has gained considerable scientific interest. The importance of the human sense of smell has by far been underestimated in the past. Humans and other primates have been regarded as primarily 'optical animals' with highly developed powers of vision but a relatively undeveloped sense of smell. In recent years this assumption has undergone major revision. Several studies indicate that humans indeed seem to use olfactory communication and are even able to produce and perceive certain pheromones; recent studies have found that pheromones may play an important role in the behavioural and reproduction biology of humans. In this article we review the present evidence of the effect of human pheromones and discuss the role of olfactory cues in human sexual behaviour.

  17. Sex Pheromone of Anastrepha striata.

    PubMed

    Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Malo, Edi A; Rojas, Julio C

    2015-05-01

    The guava fruit fly, Anastrepha striata, is a pest of several cultivated species of Myrtaceae in the American tropics and subtropics. During calling, A. striata males release numerous volatiles. This study was conducted to identify which of the male volatiles function as the A. striata sex pheromone and to investigate the effects of age and time of day on the emission of pheromone components. Analysis of the volatiles from males collected by solid phase microextraction using gas chromatography coupled to electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) showed that three volatile compounds elicited repeatable responses from the antennae of females. The EAD-active compounds were identified by GC/mass spectrometry as ethyl hexanoate, linalool, and ethyl octanoate. In two-choice tests using Multilure traps placed in field cages, traps baited with live males, ethyl hexanoate, or the three-component blend captured more females than unbaited traps. However, there was no difference in catches when traps baited with live males were compared against traps baited with ethyl hexanoate. Although traps baited with the three-component blend caught more females than traps baited with live males, the difference was not significant. Analyses of pheromonal components released by A. striata males 8 to 26 days old showed that there was an effect of age on pheromone production and also a significant effect of time of day on pheromone emission. Release of the volatile compounds occurred from 14.00 to 18.00 hr, although traces of linalool were detected from 08.00 hr. Peak emission of pheromone compounds occurred at 14.00 hr.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain

    PubMed Central

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S.; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain.

    PubMed

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio; Magni, Christian

    2016-02-04

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. Copyright © 2016 Zuljan et al.

  20. Alcohol from whey permeate: strain selection, temperature, and medium optimization. [Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces fragilis, and K. lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Vienne, P.; Von Stockar, U.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of shaken flask cultures of some yeast strains capable of fermenting lactose showed no significant differences in alcohol yield among the four best strains. Use of whey permeate concentrated three times did not affect the yields. An optimal growth temperature of 38/sup 0/C was determined for K. fragilis NRRL 665. Elemental analysis of both the permeate and the dry cell mass of two strains indicated the possibility of a stoichiometric limitation by nitrogen. Batch cultures in laboratory fermentors confirmed this finding and revealed in addition the presence of a limitation due to growth factors. Both types of limitations could be overcome by adding yeast extract. The maximum productivity of continuous cultures could thus be improved to 5.1 g/l-h. The maximum specific growth rate was of the order of 0.310 h/sup -1/. 15 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  1. Production of 1-lactulose and lactulose using commercial β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis in the presence of fructose.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiao; Yang, Ruijin; Shen, Qiuyun; Ye, Fayin; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhao, Wei

    2013-04-15

    Production of 1-lactulose and lactulose using commercial β-galactosidase DSM Maxilact® 5000 in the presence of fructose was investigated. Experiments were performed at 40 °C and pH 7.5. Lactose starting concentration was constantly 250 g/l. A novel transgalactosylation product 1-lactulose was detected besides lactulose. Effects of fructose concentration, reaction time and enzyme concentration on transgalactosylation reactions were discussed. In all reactions, the yield ratio 1-lactulose:lactulose was close to 3:1 due to the regioselectivity of β-galactosidase. The maximum production of 1-lactulose and lactulose was approximately 22 and 8 g/l, respectively, when fructose concentration was increased to 100 g/l. Lactose hydrolysis was significantly retarded since fructose strongly attracted water molecules. Higher enzyme concentration can accelerate transgalactosylation reactions without affecting the maximum production of transgalactosylation products. Fructose was a more preferred galactosyl acceptor than lactose, since the synthesis of galactooligosacchairdes was found to be absolutely inhibited in the presence of fructose. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Characterization of the bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  3. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: characterization of the bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality.

  4. Purification and partial characterization of bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis LL171.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Archana; Akkoç, Nefise; Akçelik, Mustafa

    2012-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are possessing ability to synthesize antimicrobial compounds (like bacteriocin) during their growth. In this regard, novel bacteriocin compound secreting capability of LAB isolated from Tulum Cheese in Turkey was demonstrated. The synthesized bacteriocin was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis and gel filtration. The molecular weight (≈3.4 kDa) of obtained bacteriocin was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, which revealed single peptide band. Molecular identification of LAB strain isolated from Tulum Cheese was conducted using 16S rDNA gene sequencing as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis LL171. The amino acid sequences (KKIDTRTGKTMEKTEKKIELSLKNMKTAT) of the bacteriocin from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis LL171 was found unique and novel than reported bacteriocins. Further, the bacteriocin was possessed the thermostable property and active at wide range of pH values from 1 to 11. Thus, bacteriocin reported in this study has the potential applications property as food preservative agent.

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Lactococcus lactis HY 449 on Cariogenic Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2016-11-28

    Dental caries is caused by cariogenic biofilm, an oral biofilm including Streptococcus mutans. Recently, the prevention of dental caries using various probiotics has been attempted. Lactococcus lactis HY 449 is a probiotic bacterium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of L. lactis HY 449 on cariogenic biofilm and to analyze its inhibitory mechanisms. Cariogenic biofilm was formed in the presence or absence of L. lactis HY 449 and L. lactis ATCC 19435, and analyzed with a confocal laser microscope. The formation of cariogenic biofilm was reduced in cultures spiked with both L. lactis strains, and L. lactis HY 449 exhibited more inhibitory effects than L. lactis ATCC 19435. In order to analyze and to compare the inhibitory mechanisms, the antibacterial activity of the spent culture medium from both L. lactis strains against S. mutans was investigated, and the expression of glucosyltransferases (gtfs) of S. mutans was then analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, the sucrose fermentation ability of both L. lactis strains was examined. Both L. lactis strains showed antibacterial activity and inhibited the expression of gtfs, and the difference between both strains did not show. In the case of sucrose-fermenting ability, L. lactis HY 449 fermented sucrose but L. lactis ATCC 19435 did not. L. lactis HY 449 inhibited the uptake of sucrose and the gtfs expression of S. mutans, whereby the development of cariogenic biofilm may be inhibited. In conclusion, L. lactis HY 449 may be a useful probiotic for the prevention of dental caries.

  6. Vomeronasal organ and human pheromones.

    PubMed

    Trotier, D

    2011-09-01

    For many organisms, pheromonal communication is of particular importance in managing various aspects of reproduction. In tetrapods, the vomeronasal (Jacobson's) organ specializes in detecting pheromones in biological substrates of congeners. This information triggers behavioral changes associated, in the case of certain pheromones, with neuroendocrine correlates. In human embryos, the organ develops and the nerve fibers constitute a substrate for the migration of GnRH-secreting cells from the olfactory placode toward the hypothalamus. After this essential step for subsequent secretion of sex hormones by the anterior hypophysis, the organ regresses and the neural connections disappear. The vomeronasal cavities can still be observed by endoscopy in some adults, but they lack sensory neurons and nerve fibers. The genes which code for vomeronasal receptor proteins and the specific ionic channels involved in the transduction process are mutated and nonfunctional in humans. In addition, no accessory olfactory bulbs, which receive information from the vomeronasal receptor cells, are found. The vomeronasal sensory function is thus nonoperational in humans. Nevertheless, several steroids are considered to be putative human pheromones; some activate the anterior hypothalamus, but the effects observed are not comparable to those in other mammals. The signaling process (by neuronal detection and transmission to the brain or by systemic effect) remains to be clearly elucidated. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Pheromones and exocrine glands in Isoptera.

    PubMed

    Costa-Leonardo, Ana Maria; Haifig, Ives

    2010-01-01

    Termites are eusocial insects that have a peculiar and intriguing system of communication using pheromones. The termite pheromones are composed of a blend of chemical substances and they coordinate different social interactions or activities, including foraging, building, mating, defense, and nestmate recognition. Some of these sociochemicals are volatile, spreading in the air, and others are contact pheromones, which are transmitted by trophallaxis and grooming. Among the termite semiochemicals, the most known are alarm, trail, sex pheromones, and hydrocarbons responsible for the recognition of nestmates. The sources of the pheromones are exocrine glands located all over the termite body. The principal exocrine structures considered pheromone-producing glands in Isoptera are the frontal, mandibular, salivary or labial, sternal, and tergal glands. The frontal gland is the source of alarm pheromone and defensive chemicals, but the mandibular secretions have been little studied and their function is not well established in Isoptera. The secretion of salivary glands involves numerous chemical compounds, some of them without pheromonal function. The worker saliva contains a phagostimulating pheromone and probably a building pheromone, while the salivary reservoir of some soldiers contains defensive chemicals. The sternal gland is the only source of trail-following pheromone, whereas sex pheromones are secreted by two glandular sources, the sternal and tergal glands. To date, the termite semiochemicals have indicated that few molecules are involved in their chemical communication, that is, the same compound may be secreted by different glands, different castes and species, and for different functions, depending on the concentration. In addition to the pheromonal parsimony, recent studies also indicate the occurrence of a synergic effect among the compounds involved in the chemical communication of Isoptera. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaporation rate of emulsion and oil-base emulsion pheromones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of pheromone evaporation rate is critical to distribute pheromone containers effectively in the forest, orchard and field. There are several factors influencing the pheromone evaporation rate that include wind speed, container size and porosity, release area, temperature, humidity, pherom...

  9. Hormones and pheromones in regulation of insect behavior

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both pheromones and hormones are well recognized regulators of insect biology. However, the interactions between hormones and pheromones in coordinating insect biology are less well understood. We have studied the interactions between juvenile hormone, its precursor methyl farnesoate, and pheromon...

  10. Production of inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus using dahlia tuber extract

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sumat Chand; Jain, P.C.; Kango, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    Various carbon sources were evaluated for production of inulinase by yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus MTCC 3995. Highest inulinase activity was observed with Dahlia extract (25.3 nkat mL-1) as carbon source. The enzyme activity was 1.4 folds higher than that observed in media containing pure chicory inulin (17.8 nkat mL-1). The yeast showed good growth on a simple medium containing dahlia extract (20% w/v) and yeast extract (2%w/v) as carbon and nitrogen source respectively, in 96 h. at 28°C and 120 rpm. Lowest inulinase yield (4.8 nkat mL-1) was seen in the medium containing glucose as C-source. Although varied inulinase levels were noticed on different C- sources, Inulinase: Sucrase (I/S) ratios were noticed to be similar. Among various protein sources tested, yeast extract was found to be the best source followed by beef extract (17.9 nkat mL-1) and peptone (13.8 nkat mL-1). The enzyme was optimally active at pH (4.0) and 50°C. TLC analysis of end product revealed that inulinase hydrolyzed inulin exclusively into fructose. Results suggest that the dahlia extract induced exoinulinase synthesis in Kluyveromyces marxianus and can be utilized as a potential substrate for inulinase production. PMID:24031804

  11. Synthesis and metabolism of pheromones and pheromone analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.

    1987-01-01

    (9, 10-/sup 3/H/sub 2/)Z9-14:Ac was synthesized at high specific activity (/sup 3/H, 58 Ci/mmole) by partial tritiation of the corresponding alkyne and was converted to the labeled Z9-14:OH and Z9-14:Al to study tissue specificity of acetate esterase (E), alcohol oxidase (OX), and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in male and female Heliothis virescens. Soluble and membrane-associated enzyme activities were determined by radio-TLC assays. Compounds of the tritium-labeled Z11-16 series were synthesized and their in vitro fates examined as well. In order to achieve an alternative approach in which (1) pheromone receptor proteins would be stoichiometrically and irreversibly modified, or (2) pheromone-catabolizing enzymes are inactivated by tight-binding or irreversible inhibitors, we have designed analogues of pheromones of lepidopterous insect pests and assayed their biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Various fluorinated molecules such as acyl fluorides, fluoroolefins, 2-fluoro aldehydes, 2,2-difluoro aldehydes and trifluoromethyl ketones were synthesized. The synthesis of some other functional groups such as cyclopropanones, cyclopropanols, cyclopropyl carbinols, cyclopropyl aldehydes and Michael acceptors will also be discussed.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named Streptococcus lactis). The preparation contains the enzyme... preparation is produced by pure culture fermentation. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications for...

  13. pSEUDO, a genetic integration standard for Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Joao P C; Zeyniyev, Araz; Karsens, Harma; Trip, Hein; Lolkema, Juke S; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kok, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Plasmid pSEUDO and derivatives were used to show that llmg_pseudo_10 in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and its homologous locus in L. lactis IL1403 are suitable for chromosomal integrations. L. lactis MG1363 and IL1403 nisin-induced controlled expression (NICE) system derivatives (JP9000 and IL9000) and two general stress reporter strains (NZ9000::PhrcA-GFP and NZ9000::PgroES-GFP) enabling in vivo noninvasive monitoring of cellular fitness were constructed.

  14. Novel Antibacterial Activity of Lactococcus Lactis Subspecies Lactis Z11 Isolated from Zabady

    PubMed Central

    Enan, Gamal; Abdel-Shafi, Seham; Ouda, Sahar; Negm, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize a probiotic bacterium with distinctive antimicrobial activities. In this respect, Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis Z11 (L. lactis Z11) isolated from Zabady (Arabian yoghurt) inhibited other strains of lactic acid bacteria and some food-born pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of cell free supernatant (CFS) of L. lactis Z11 isolated from zabady was lost by proteolytic enzymes, heat resistant. Consequently, the active substance(s) of CFS was characterized as a bacteriocin. This bacteriocin has been shown to consist of protein but has no lipidic or glucidic moieties in its active molecule. Its activity was stable in the pH range 2.0 to 7.0 and was not affected by organic solvents. The L. lactis Z11 bacteriocin was produced in CFS throughout the mide to the late exponential phase of growth of the producer organism and maximum bacteriocin production was obtained at initial pH 6.5 at incubation temperature of about 30°C. PMID:24151453

  15. Brain abscess caused by Lactococcus lactis cremoris in a child.

    PubMed

    Topçu, Yasemin; Akıncı, Gülçin; Bayram, Erhan; Hız, Semra; Türkmen, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis cremoris infections are very rare in humans. It is recognized as a commensal organism of mucocutaneous surfaces of cattle, and is occasionally isolated from human mucocutaneous surfaces. We report a brain abscess caused by L. lactis cremoris in an immunocompetent child. A 19-month-old female patient was admitted with fever and vomiting. Brain computed tomography (CT) revealed brain abscess. L. lactis cremoris was isolated from culture of the abscess material. The patient was treated with pus drainage from brain abscess and antibiotics including vancomycin and meropenem. The patient recovered completely. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a L. lactis cremoris infection in children.

  16. [Kluyveromyces blattae sp. n., a new multispored yeast for Blatta orientalis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Henninger, W; Windisch, S

    1976-08-01

    A new hitherto undescribed species of yeast of the genus Kluyveromyces has been isolated for the intestinal tract of the oriental cockroach (Blatta orientalis). A description of the new species including latin diagnosis is given.

  17. Pheromones and pheromone receptors are required for proper sexual development in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Severine; Weber, Jan M; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2006-03-01

    The homothallic, filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora is self-fertile and produces sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) without a mating partner. Even so, S. macrospora transcriptionally expresses two pheromone-precursor genes (ppg1 and ppg2) and two pheromone-receptor genes (pre1 and pre2). The proteins encoded by these genes are similar to alpha-factor-like and a-factor-like pheromones and to G-protein-coupled pheromone receptors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has been suggested that in S. macrospora, PPG1/PRE2 and PPG2/PRE1 form two cognate pheromone-receptor pairs. To investigate their function, we deleted (delta) pheromone-precursor genes (delta ppg1, delta ppg2) and receptor genes (delta pre1, delta pre2) and generated single- as well as double-knockout strains. No effect on vegetative growth, fruiting-body, and ascospore development was seen in the single pheromone-mutant and receptor-mutant strains, respectively. However, double-knockout strains lacking any compatible pheromone-receptor pair (delta pre2/delta ppg2, delta pre1/delta ppg1) and the double-pheromone mutant (delta ppg1/delta ppg2) displayed a drastically reduced number of perithecia and sexual spores, whereas deletion of both receptor genes (delta pre1/delta pre2) completely eliminated fruiting-body and ascospore formation. The results suggest that pheromones and pheromone receptors are required for optimal sexual reproduction of the homothallic S. macrospora.

  18. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  19. Hyaluronic acid production by recombinant Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Chien, Liang-Jung; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2007-11-01

    Microbial hyaluronic acid (HA), commonly produced by pathogenic Streptococcus, was made possible to be produced by a generally recognized as safe Lactococcus lactis by coexpressing HA synthase and uridine diphosphate-glucose dehydrogenase (UDP-GlcDH) of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in a nisin-controlled expression (NICE) system. With scarce expressed HA synthase alone, the constructed recombinant L. lactis (LL-NA) strain could produce HA with a concentration about 0.08 g/l in the M17 medium supplemented with 1% (w/v) glucose. In contrast to HA synthase, UDP-GlcDH of Streptococcus could be overexpressed in the NICE system. With coexpression of heterologous UDP-GlcDH with HA synthase, the constructed LL-NAB strain grew slightly slower to a concentration about 10% lower that of the LL-NA strain. However, the HA concentration produced was enhanced about eightfold to 0.65 g/l.

  20. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Evaluation of the probiotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties. PMID:25477942

  1. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: evaluation of the probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties.

  2. TRPC channels in pheromone sensing.

    PubMed

    Kiselyov, Kirill; van Rossum, Damian B; Patterson, Randen L

    2010-01-01

    Pheromone recognition relies on an amplification cascade that is triggered by pheromone binding to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). The first step in translation of GPCR activation by pheromones in the vomeronasal organ and main olfactory epithelium (MOE) into a cellular response is the activation of a transient receptor potential (TRP) family member, TRPC2 [Zufall, F., Ukhanov, K., Lucas, P., Liman, E. R., and Leinders-Zufall, T. (2005). Neurobiology of TRPC2: From gene to behavior. Pflugers Arch.451, 61-71; Yildirim, E., and Birnbaumer, L. (2007). TRPC2: Molecular biology and functional importance. Handb. Exp. Pharmacol. 53-75]. The members of the canonical (TRPC) family of TRP channels mediate membrane permeability, specifically, Ca(2+) influx into the cytoplasm in response to activation of GPCR and tyrosine kinase receptors by hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors [Nilius, B. (2007). TRP channels in disease. Biochim. Biophys. Acta1772, 805-812; Venkatachalam, K., and Montell, C. (2007). TRP channels. Annu. Rev. Biochem.76, 387-417]. Mechanisms of their activation have been the focus of intense interest during the last decade. The data obtained from studies of TRPC2 have resulted in a better understanding of ion channel physiology and led to novel paradigms in modern cell biology [Lucas, P., Ukhanov, K., Leinders-Zufall, T., and Zufall, F. (2003). A diacylglycerol-gated cation channel in vomeronasal neuron dendrites is impaired in TRPC2 mutant mice: Mechanism of pheromone transduction. Neuron40, 551-561; Stowers, L., Holy, T. E., Meister, M., Dulac, C., and Koentges, G. (2002). Loss of sex discrimination and male-male aggression in mice deficient for TRP2. Science295, 1493-1500; Leypold, B. G., Yu, C. R., Leinders-Zufall, T., Kim, M. M., Zufall, F., and Axel, R. (2002). Altered sexual and social behaviors in trp2 mutant mice. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA99, 6376-6381]. Although TRPC2 activation by pheromones presents one of the most straightforward

  3. Regulatory phenotyping reveals important diversity within the species Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Herwig; Starrenburg, Marjo J C; Dijkstra, Annereinou; Molenaar, Douwe; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Rademaker, Jan L W; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T

    2009-09-01

    The diversity in regulatory phenotypes among a collection of 84 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from dairy and nondairy origin was explored. The specific activities of five enzymes were assessed in cell extracts of all strains grown in two different media, a nutritionally rich broth and a relatively poor chemically defined medium. The five investigated enzymes, branched chain aminotransferase (BcaT), aminopeptidase N (PepN), X-prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase (PepX), alpha-hydroxyisocaproic acid dehydrogenase (HicDH), and esterase, are involved in nitrogen and fatty acid metabolism and catalyze key steps in the production of important dairy flavor compounds. The investigated cultures comprise 75 L. lactis subsp. lactis isolates (including 7 L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis isolates) and 9 L. lactis subsp. cremoris isolates. All L. lactis subsp. cremoris and 22 L. lactis subsp. lactis (including 6 L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis) cultures originated from a dairy environment. All other cultures originated from (fermented) plant materials and were isolated at different geographic locations. Correlation analysis of specific enzyme activities revealed significantly different regulatory phenotypes for dairy and nondairy isolates. The enzyme activities in the two investigated media were in general poorly correlated and revealed a high degree of regulatory diversity within this collection of closely related strains. To the best of our knowledge, these results represent the most extensive diversity analysis of regulatory phenotypes within a single bacterial species to date. The presented findings underline the importance of the availability of screening procedures for, e.g., industrially relevant enzyme activities in models closely mimicking application conditions. Moreover, they corroborate the notion that regulatory changes are important drivers of evolution.

  4. Field Comparison of Spruce Budworm Pheromone Lures

    Treesearch

    David G. Grimble; David G. Grimble

    1987-01-01

    Four types of spruce budworm pheromone lures were tested to compare field longevity and efficiency. Biolures with three different pheromone release rates and Silk-PVC lures all caught male budworm moths throughout the moth flight period in proportion to the different release rates. Fumigant strips in traps to kill trapped moths were necessary.

  5. Sensing odorants and pheromones with chemosensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Touhara, Kazushige; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2009-01-01

    Olfaction is a critical sensory modality that allows living things to acquire chemical information from the external world. The olfactory system processes two major classes of stimuli: (a) general odorants, small molecules derived from food or the environment that signal the presence of food, fire, or predators, and (b) pheromones, molecules released from individuals of the same species that convey social or sexual cues. Chemosensory receptors are broadly classified, by the ligands that activate them, into odorant or pheromone receptors. Peripheral sensory neurons expressing either odorant or pheromone receptors send signals to separate odor- and pheromone-processing centers in the brain to elicit distinct behavioral and neuroendocrinological outputs. General odorants activate receptors in a combinatorial fashion, whereas pheromones activate narrowly tuned receptors that activate sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the brain. We review recent progress on chemosensory receptor structure, function, and circuitry in vertebrates and invertebrates from the point of view of the molecular biology and physiology of these sensory systems.

  6. Kluyveromyces marxianus as a host for heterologous protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; Madeira, José Valdo; Cerdán, María-Esperanza; González-Siso, María-Isabel

    2016-07-01

    The preferentially respiring and thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is an emerging host for heterologous protein synthesis, surpassing the traditional preferentially fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in some important aspects: K . marxianus can grow at temperatures 10 °C higher than S. cerevisiae, which may result in decreased costs for cooling bioreactors and reduced contamination risk; has ability to metabolize a wider variety of sugars, such as lactose and xylose; is the fastest growing eukaryote described so far; and does not require special cultivation techniques (such as fed-batch) to avoid fermentative metabolism. All these advantages exist together with a high secretory capacity, performance of eukaryotic post-translational modifications, and with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status. In the last years, replication origins from several Kluyveromyces spp. have been used for the construction of episomal vectors, and also integrative strategies have been developed based on the tendency for non-homologous recombination displayed by K. marxianus. The recessive URA3 auxotrophic marker and the dominant Kan(R) are mostly used for selection of transformed cells, but other markers have been made available. Homologous and heterologous promoters and secretion signals have been characterized, with the K. marxianus INU1 expression and secretion system being of remarkable functionality. The efficient synthesis of roughly 50 heterologous proteins has been demonstrated, including one thermophilic enzyme. In this mini-review, we summarize the physiological characteristics of K. marxianus relevant for its use in the efficient synthesis of heterologous proteins, the efforts performed hitherto in the development of a molecular toolbox for this purpose, and some successful examples.

  7. Candidate pheromone receptors provide the basis for the response of distinct antennal neurons to pheromonal compounds.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Gohl, Thomas; Bouché, Elisabeth; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    Males of the moth species Heliothis virescens are able to detect the female-released pheromone with remarkable sensitivity and specificity, distinguishing between highly related pheromonal compounds. In the past, electrophysiological studies succeeded in assigning sensory hairs to identified compounds revealing three functional types of long sensilla trichodea housing neurons specifically responding to distinct semiochemicals. The specific responsiveness implies that the sensory neurons express different receptor types tuned to pheromone components. In this study we demonstrate that heterologously expressed candidate pheromone receptors from Heliothis responded to several pheromonal compounds, including the major sex-pheromone component Z-11-hexadecenal indicating a limited specificity of each receptor type. Nonetheless, based on functional analysis and in situ hybridization studies the analysed receptor types could tentatively be assigned to types of long sensilla trichodea, containing the pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) HvirPBP1 and HvirPBP2 in the sensillum lymph. Substituting organic solvent with PBPs to solubilize the hydrophobic pheromone compounds in functional assays revealed an increase in sensitivity and especially specificity. It was found that in the presence of HvirPBP2, cells expressing the receptor type HR13 specifically responded to the main component of the sex pheromone blend only. The data provide further evidence that a combination of a distinct receptor type and binding protein underlie the specific response observed in the detection of a pheromone component in vivo.

  8. A Deficiency in Aspartate Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 Causes Slow Milk Coagulation†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Yu, Weizhu; Coolbear, Tim; O’Sullivan, Dan; McKay, Larry L.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of fast milk-coagulating (Fmc+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2, designated L. lactis KB4, was identified. Although possessing the known components essential for utilizing casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase (PrtP) activity and oligopeptide, di- and tripeptide, and amino acid transport systems, KB4 exhibited a slow milk coagulation (Fmc−) phenotype. When the amino acid requirements of L. lactis C2 were compared with those of KB4 by use of a chemically defined medium, it was found that KB4 was unable to grow in the absence of aspartic acid. This aspartic acid requirement could also be met by aspartate-containing peptides. The addition of aspartic acid to milk restored the Fmc+ phenotype of KB4. KB4 was found to be defective in pyruvate carboxylase and thus was deficient in the ability to form oxaloacetate and hence aspartic acid from pyruvate and carbon dioxide. The results suggest that when lactococci are propagated in milk, aspartate derived from casein is unable to meet fully the nutritional demands of the lactococci, and they become dependent upon aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:9572935

  9. Detection and viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout cheese ripening.

    PubMed

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Dolci, Paola; Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese.

  10. Detection and Viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout Cheese Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese. PMID:25503474

  11. Pheromone communication in amphibians and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Houck, Lynne D

    2009-01-01

    This selective review considers herpetological papers that feature the use of chemical cues, particularly pheromones involved in reproductive interactions between potential mates. Primary examples include garter snake females that attract males, lacertid lizards and the effects of their femoral gland secretions, aquatic male newts that chemically attract females, and terrestrial salamander males that chemically persuade a female to mate. Each case study spans a number of research approaches (molecular, biochemical, behavioral) and is related to sensory processing and the physiological effects of pheromone delivery. These and related studies show that natural pheromones can be identified, validated with behavioral tests, and incorporated in research on vomeronasal functional response.

  12. Chemical analysis of aquatic pheromones in fish.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael; Baker, Cindy F; Sorensen, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    Pheromones are chemicals that pass between members of the same species that have inherent meaning. In the case of fish, pheromones are water-soluble and found in low concentrations. As such, sensitive and selective methods are needed to separate and analyze these pheromones from an environmental matrix that may contain many other chemicals. This chapter describes a generic method used to concentrate and identify these chemicals and two extremely sensitive and selective methods for analysis, namely, mass spectrometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

  13. Fungal Mating Pheromones: Choreographing the Dating Game

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen K.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Pheromones are ubiquitous from bacteria to mammals - a testament to their importance in regulating inter-cellular communication. In fungal species, they play a critical role in choreographing interactions between mating partners during the program of sexual reproduction. Here, we describe how fungal pheromones are synthesized, their interactions with G protein-coupled receptors, and the signals propagated by this interaction, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a reference point. Divergence from this model system is compared amongst the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, which reveals the wealth of information that has been gleaned from studying pheromone-driven processes across a wide spectrum of the fungal kingdom. PMID:21496492

  14. The effect of lactose, NaCl and an aero/anaerobic environment on the tyrosine decarboxylase activity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Buňková, Leona; Buňka, František; Pollaková, Eva; Podešvová, Tereza; Dráb, Vladimír

    2011-05-27

    The aim of this work was to study, under model conditions, combined effects of the concentration of lactose (0-1% w/v), NaCl (0-2% w/v) and aero/anaerobiosis on the growth and tyramine production in 3 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 2 strains of L. lactis subsp. cremoris. The levels of the factors tested were chosen with respect to the conditions which can occur during the real process of natural cheese production, including the culture temperature (10 ± 1°C). In all strains tested, tyrosine decarboxylation was most influenced by NaCl concentration; the highest production of tyramine was obtained within the culture with the highest (2% w/v) salt concentration applied. Two of the strains L. lactis subsp. lactis produced tyramine only in broth with the highest NaCl concentration tested. In the remaining 3 strains of L. lactis, tyramine was detected under all conditions applied. The tested concentration of lactose and aero/anaerobiosis had a less significant effect on tyramine decarboxylation. However, it was also found that at the same concentrations of NaCl and lactose, a higher amount of tyramine was detected under anaerobic conditions. In all strains tested, tyramine decarboxylation started during the active growth phase of the cells.

  15. Heterologous inducible expression of Enterococcus faecalis pCF10 aggregation substance asc10 in Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus gordonii contributes to cell hydrophobicity and adhesion to fibrin.

    PubMed

    Hirt, H; Erlandsen, S L; Dunny, G M

    2000-04-01

    Aggregation substance proteins encoded by the sex pheromone plasmid family of Enterococcus faecalis have been shown previously to contribute to the formation of a stable mating complex between donor and recipient cells and have been implicated in the virulence of this increasingly important nosocomial pathogen. In an effort to characterize the protein further, prgB, the gene encoding the aggregation substance Asc10 on pCF10, was cloned in a vector containing the nisin-inducible nisA promoter and its two-component regulatory system. Expression of aggregation substance after nisin addition to cultures of E. faecalis and the heterologous bacteria Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus gordonii was demonstrated. Electron microscopy revealed that Asc10 was presented on the cell surfaces of E. faecalis and L. lactis but not on that of S. gordonii. The protein was also found in the cell culture supernatants of all three species. Characterization of Asc10 on the cell surfaces of E. faecalis and L. lactis revealed a significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity upon expression of the protein. Heterologous expression of Asc10 on L. lactis also allowed the recognition of its binding ligand (EBS) on the enterococcal cell surface, as indicated by increased transfer of a conjugative transposon. We also found that adhesion of Asc10-expressing bacterial cells to fibrin was elevated, consistent with a role for the protein in the pathogenesis of enterococcal endocarditis. The data demonstrate that Asc10 expressed under the control of the nisA promoter in heterologous species will be an useful tool in the detailed characterization of this important enterococcal conjugation protein and virulence factor.

  16. Male rats respond to their own alarm pheromone.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Pheromones are defined as substances released from an individual (donor) that influence a second individual (recipient) of the same species. However, it is unclear whether mammalian pheromones can affect the donor itself. To address this question, the effect of self-exposure to an alarm pheromone was examined. Exposure to the alarm pheromone resulted in an enhanced anxiety response, which was not different between recipients that perceived their own pheromone and those that perceived another individual's pheromone. The present results suggest that the alarm pheromone influences the emotional system of the recipient as well as induces similar anxiogenic effects on the donor rat that released the alarm pheromone. This is the first evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of mammalian pheromone self-exposure.

  17. Interactions between Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in tequila must type medium fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Claudia Lorena Fernandez; Beaufort, Sandra; Brandam, Cédric; Taillandier, Patricia

    2014-08-01

    Traditional tequila fermentation is a complex microbial process performed by different indigenous yeast species. Usually, they are classified in two families: Saccharomyces and Non-Saccharomyces species. Using mixed starter cultures of several yeasts genera and species is nowadays considered to be beneficial to enhance the sensorial characteristics of the final products (taste, odor). However, microbial interactions occurring in such fermentations need to be better understood to improve the process. In this work, we focussed on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast couple. Indirect interactions due to excreted metabolites, thanks to the use of a specific membrane bioreactor, and direct interaction due to cell-to-cell contact have been explored. Comparison of pure and mixed cultures was done in each case. Mixed cultures in direct contact showed that both yeast were affected but Saccharomyces rapidly dominated the cultures whereas Kluyveromyces almost disappeared. In mixed cultures with indirect contact the growth of Kluyveromyces was decreased compared to its pure culture but its concentration could be maintained whereas the growth of Saccharomyces was enhanced. The loss of viability of Kluyveromyces could not be attributed only to ethanol. The sugar consumption and ethanol production in both cases were similar. Thus the interaction phenomena between the two yeasts are different in direct and indirect contact, Kluyveromyces being always much more affected than Saccharomyces.

  18. Stimulation of respiratory immunity by oral administration of Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Villena, Julio; Medina, Marcela; Vintiñi, Elisa; Alvarez, Susana

    2008-08-01

    This work demonstrates that non-recombinant Lactococcus lactis NZ, administered by the oral route at the proper dose, is able to improve resistance against pneumococcal infection. Lactococcus lactis NZ oral administration was able to improve pathogen lung clearance, increased survival of infected mice, and reduced lung injuries. This effect was related to an upregulation of the respiratory innate and specific immune responses. Administration of L. lactis NZ improved production of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid TNF-alpha, enhanced recruitment of neutrophils into the alveolar spaces, and induced a higher activation of BAL phagocytes compared with the control group. Lactococcus lactis NZ administered orally stimulated the IgA cycle, increased IgA+ cells in intestine and bronchus, and improved production of BAL IL-4 and IL-10 during infection. Moreover, mice treated with L. lactis NZ showed higher levels of BAL anti-pneumococcal IgA and IgG. Taking into consideration that orally administered L. lactis NZ stimulates both the innate and the specific immune responses in the respiratory tract and that bacterial and viral antigens have been efficiently produced in this strain, L. lactis NZ is an excellent candidate for the development of an effective pneumococcal oral vaccine.

  19. Pheromone detection by a pheromone emitter: a small sex pheromone-specific processing system in the female American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Masazumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2011-03-01

    Many animals depend on pheromone communication for successful mating. Sex pheromone in insects is usually released by females to attract males. In American cockroaches, the largest glomerulus (B-glomerulus) in the male antennal lobe (first-order olfactory center) processes the major component of sex pheromone. Using intracellular recordings combined with fine neuroanatomical techniques, we provide evidence that the female homolog of the male B-glomerulus also acts as a sex pheromone-specific detector. Whereas ordinary glomeruli that process normal environmental odors are innervated by single projection neurons (PNs), the B-glomerulus in both sexes is innervated by multiple PNs, one of which possesses a thicker axon, termed here B-PN. Both soma size and axon diameter were smaller on B-PNs from females compared with B-PNs from males. The female B-PNs also produce fewer terminal arborizations in the protocerebrum than male B-PNs. Termination fields in the lateral protocerebrum of the female B-PN are mostly segregated from those formed by other uniglomerular PNs innervating ordinary glomeruli. Female B-PN activity was greatest in response to sex pheromone but lower than that in the male B-PN. This specific detection system suggests that sex pheromone affects the behavior and/or endocrine system of female cockroaches.

  20. Do perfume additives termed human pheromones warrant being termed pheromones?

    PubMed

    Winman, Anders

    2004-09-30

    Two studies of the effects of perfume additives, termed human pheromones by the authors, have conveyed the message that these substances can promote an increase in human sociosexual behaviour [Physiol. Behav. 75 (2003) R1; Arch. Sex. Behav. 27 (1998) R2]. The present paper presents an extended analysis of this data. It is shown that in neither study is there a statistically significant increase in any of the sociosexual behaviours for the experimental groups. In the control groups of both studies, there are, however, moderate but statistically significant decreases in the corresponding behaviour. Most notably, there is no support in data for the claim that the substances increase the attractiveness of the wearers of the substances to the other sex. It is concluded that more research using matched homogenous groups of participants is needed.

  1. Rewiring Lactococcus lactis for Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Dehli, Tore; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their high tolerance toward organic acids and alcohols (R. S. Gold, M. M. Meagher, R. Hutkins, and T. Conway, J. Ind. Microbiol. 10:45–54, 1992) and could potentially serve as platform organisms for production of these compounds. In this study, we attempted to redirect the metabolism of LAB model organism Lactococcus lactis toward ethanol production. Codon-optimized Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) was introduced and expressed from synthetic promoters in different strain backgrounds. In the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 growing on glucose, only small amounts of ethanol were obtained after introducing PDC, probably due to a low native alcohol dehydrogenase activity. When the same strains were grown on maltose, ethanol was the major product and lesser amounts of lactate, formate, and acetate were formed. Inactivating the lactate dehydrogenase genes ldhX, ldhB, and ldh and introducing codon-optimized Z. mobilis alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHB) in addition to PDC resulted in high-yield ethanol formation when strains were grown on glucose, with only minor amounts of by-products formed. Finally, a strain with ethanol as the sole observed fermentation product was obtained by further inactivating the phosphotransacetylase (PTA) and the native alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE). PMID:23377945

  2. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.

    1987-09-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate (/sup 14/C)ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exist of (/sup 14/C)ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and new decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of (/sup 14/C)ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis.

  3. Rewiring Lactococcus lactis for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Solem, Christian; Dehli, Tore; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their high tolerance toward organic acids and alcohols (R. S. Gold, M. M. Meagher, R. Hutkins, and T. Conway, J. Ind. Microbiol. 10:45-54, 1992) and could potentially serve as platform organisms for production of these compounds. In this study, we attempted to redirect the metabolism of LAB model organism Lactococcus lactis toward ethanol production. Codon-optimized Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) was introduced and expressed from synthetic promoters in different strain backgrounds. In the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 growing on glucose, only small amounts of ethanol were obtained after introducing PDC, probably due to a low native alcohol dehydrogenase activity. When the same strains were grown on maltose, ethanol was the major product and lesser amounts of lactate, formate, and acetate were formed. Inactivating the lactate dehydrogenase genes ldhX, ldhB, and ldh and introducing codon-optimized Z. mobilis alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHB) in addition to PDC resulted in high-yield ethanol formation when strains were grown on glucose, with only minor amounts of by-products formed. Finally, a strain with ethanol as the sole observed fermentation product was obtained by further inactivating the phosphotransacetylase (PTA) and the native alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE).

  4. Identification and characterization of pheromone receptors and interplay between receptors and pheromone binding proteins in the diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengjing; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B; Liu, Chengcheng; Lin, Kejian; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhou, Jingjiang; Wang, Guirong

    2013-01-01

    Moths depend on olfactory cues such as sex pheromones to find and recognize mating partners. Pheromone receptors (PRs) and Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) are thought to be associated with olfactory signal transduction of pheromonal compounds in peripheral olfactory reception. Here six candidate pheromone receptor genes in the diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella were identified and cloned. All of the six candidate PR genes display male-biased expression, which is a typical characteristic of pheromone receptors. In the Xenopus-based functional study and in situ hybridization, PxylOR4 is defined as another pheromone receptor in addition to the previously characterized PxylOR1. In the study of interaction between PRs and PBPs, PxylPBPs could increase the sensitivity of the complex expressing oocyte cells to the ligand pheromone component while decreasing the sensitivity to pheromone analogs. We deduce that activating pheromone receptors in olfactory receptor neurons requires some role of PBPs to pheromone/PBP complex. If the chemical signal is not the pheromone component, but instead, a pheromone analog with a similar structure, the complex would have a decreased ability to activate downstream pheromone receptors.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Pheromone Receptors and Interplay between Receptors and Pheromone Binding Proteins in the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xyllostella

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mengjing; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B.; Liu, Chengcheng; Lin, Kejian; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhou, Jingjiang; Wang, Guirong

    2013-01-01

    Moths depend on olfactory cues such as sex pheromones to find and recognize mating partners. Pheromone receptors (PRs) and Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) are thought to be associated with olfactory signal transduction of pheromonal compounds in peripheral olfactory reception. Here six candidate pheromone receptor genes in the diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella were identified and cloned. All of the six candidate PR genes display male-biased expression, which is a typical characteristic of pheromone receptors. In the Xenopus-based functional study and in situ hybridization, PxylOR4 is defined as another pheromone receptor in addition to the previously characterized PxylOR1. In the study of interaction between PRs and PBPs, PxylPBPs could increase the sensitivity of the complex expressing oocyte cells to the ligand pheromone component while decreasing the sensitivity to pheromone analogs. We deduce that activating pheromone receptors in olfactory receptor neurons requires some role of PBPs to pheromone/PBP complex. If the chemical signal is not the pheromone component, but instead, a pheromone analog with a similar structure, the complex would have a decreased ability to activate downstream pheromone receptors. PMID:23626773

  6. Bed bug aggregation pheromone finally identified.

    PubMed

    Gries, Regine; Britton, Robert; Holmes, Michael; Zhai, Huimin; Draper, Jason; Gries, Gerhard

    2015-01-19

    Bed bugs have become a global epidemic and current detection tools are poorly suited for routine surveillance. Despite intense research on bed bug aggregation behavior and the aggregation pheromone, which could be used as a chemical lure, the complete composition of this pheromone has thus far proven elusive. Here, we report that the bed bug aggregation pheromone comprises five volatile components (dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, 2-hexanone), which attract bed bugs to safe shelters, and one less-volatile component (histamine), which causes their arrestment upon contact. In infested premises, a blend of all six components is highly effective at luring bed bugs into traps. The trapping of juvenile and adult bed bugs, with or without recent blood meals, provides strong evidence that this unique pheromone bait could become an effective and inexpensive tool for bed bug detection and potentially their control.

  7. Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

    2012-12-01

    We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

  8. Do human menstrual-cycle pheromones exist?

    PubMed

    Schank, Jeffrey C

    2006-12-01

    Research over the past 15 years indicates, contrary to earlier results, that women do not synchronize their menstrual cycles. If women do not synchronize their cycles, this implies there is no mechanism for synchronizing cycles. Since a pheromone mechanism of synchronization is the only plausible mechanism that has been proposed, it follows that that there are no pheromones that modulate the length of menstrual cycles. To test this hypothesis, eight studies were reviewed that reported pheromone effects on menstrual cycles, other behavior, or physiological correlates in women. The prediction was that serious problems would be found in each of these studies. As predicted, serious problems were found in all eight studies. Taken together, these results cast doubt on the existence of pheromones that modulate the length of menstrual cycles.

  9. A lactose fermentation product produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, acetate, inhibits the motility of flagellated pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Kudo, Seishi

    2015-04-01

    Many strains of lactic acid bacteria have been used for the production of probiotics. Some metabolites produced by lactic acid bacteria impair the motilities of pathogenic bacteria. Because bacterial motility is strongly associated with virulence, the metabolic activities of lactic acid bacteria are effective for suppressing bacterial infections. Here we show that lactose fermentation by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis inhibits the motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. A single-cell tracking and rotation assay for a single flagellum showed that the swimming behaviour of Salmonella was severely but transiently impaired through disruption of flagellar rotation on exposure to media cultivated with Lac. lactis. Using a pH-sensitive fluorescent protein, we observed that the intracellular pH of Salmonella was decreased because of some fermentation products of Lac. lactis. We identified acetate as the lactose fermentation product of Lac. lactis triggering the paralysis of Salmonella flagella. The motilities of Pseudomonas, Vibrio and Leptospira strains were also severely disrupted by lactose utilization by Lac. lactis. These results highlight the potential use of Lac. lactis for preventing infections by multiple bacterial species.

  10. Influence of carbohydrate starvation and arginine on culturability and amino acid utilization of lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Stuart, M R; Chou, L S; Weimer, B C

    1999-02-01

    Two strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis were used to determine the influence of lactose and arginine on viability and amino acid use during carbohydrate starvation. Lactose provided energy for logarithmic-phase growth, and amino acids such as arginine provided energy after carbohydrate exhaustion. Survival time, cell numbers, and ATP concentrations increased with the addition of arginine to the basal medium. By the onset of lactose exhaustion, the concentrations of glycine-valine and glutamate had decreased by as much as 67% in L. lactis ML3, whereas the serine concentration increased by 97% during the same period. When no lactose was added, the concentrations of these amino acids remained constant. Similar trends were observed for L. lactis 11454. Without lactose or arginine, L. lactis ML3 was nonculturable on agar but was viable after 2 days, as measured by fluorescent viability stains and intracellular ATP levels. However, L. lactis 11454 without lactose or arginine remained culturable for at least 14 days. These data suggest that lactococci become viable but nonculturable in response to carbohydrate depletion. Additionally, these data indicate that amino acids other than arginine facilitate the survival of L. lactis during carbohydrate starvation.

  11. Behavioral analysis of pheromones in fish.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    Pheromones are chemicals that pass between members of the same species which have inherent meaning. Because most fish pheromones are mixtures, and their actions can be complex, behavioral assays are required to identify them. This chapter describes a few strategies and two specific methods (one for measuring attraction and another for sexual arousal) that can serve this purpose in fishes that live in nonflowing water such as the carps.

  12. Biosynthesis of the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer pheromone.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Rebecca A; Ragains, Justin R; Li, Weiqing; Ruvkun, Gary; Clardy, Jon; Mak, Ho Yi

    2009-02-10

    To sense its population density and to trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage, Caenorhabditis elegans uses the dauer pheromone, which consists of ascaroside derivatives with short, fatty acid-like side chains. Although the dauer pheromone has been studied for 25 years, its biosynthesis is completely uncharacterized. The daf-22 mutant is the only known mutant defective in dauer pheromone production. Here, we show that daf-22 encodes a homolog of human sterol carrier protein SCPx, which catalyzes the final step in peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. We also show that dhs-28, which encodes a homolog of the human d-bifunctional protein that acts just upstream of SCPx, is also required for pheromone production. Long-term daf-22 and dhs-28 cultures develop dauer-inducing activity by accumulating less active, long-chain fatty acid ascaroside derivatives. Thus, daf-22 and dhs-28 are required for the biosynthesis of the short-chain fatty acid-derived side chains of the dauer pheromone and link dauer pheromone production to metabolic state.

  13. Antioxidant activity of phosphorylated exopolysaccharide produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuxing; Pan, Daodong; Sun, Yangying; Xin, Lingying; Li, Hua; Zeng, Xiaoqun

    2013-09-12

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was isolated and purified from MRS culture broth. Phosphorylated exopolysaccharide (P-EPS) was synthesized by using the purified EPS and sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP). The in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity of EPS and P-EPS was analyzed. Both EPS and P-EPS displayed superoxide anion (O(2-•)), hydroxyl radical (OH•) and DPPH scavenging activity. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity increased in serum and the livers of mice treated with EPS and P-EPS, while malondialdehyde (MDA) levels decreased. P-EPS was shown to prevent the progression of D-galactose-induced oxidative stress in hepatocytes in vivo. P-EPS showed stronger in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity than EPS.

  14. Inflammation-related pro-apoptotic activity of exopolysaccharides isolated from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z; Wang, G; Pan, D; Guo, Y; Zeng, X; Sun, Y; Cao, J

    2016-11-30

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) have attracted attention recently for possible use in suppressing early stage breast cancer. In this study, a mannan EPS produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was found to affect the production of inflammatory cytokines. EPS (300 μg/ml) can significantly enhance tumour necrosis factor alpha and inducible NO synthase release in MCF-7 cells compared to control cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Also the intracellular calcium level was found to increase with the concentration of EPS. After EPS-treatment, a significant reduction in mitochondrial potential was observed, as was nuclear condensation and cell shrinkage. These results may be helpful in further understanding the anti-tumour properties of lactic acid bacteria.

  15. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology. [Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol.

  16. Xylitol production at high temperature by engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Several recombinant Kluyveromyces marxianus strains were constructed through overexpressing the Neurospora crassa xylose reductase genes. YZJ015, which maintained the original xylitol dehydrogenase gene, produced xylitol with the highest productivity (1.49 g L(-1) h(-1)) from 100 g L(-1) xylose at 42 °C. Even at 45 °C, YZJ015 was still able to produce 60.03 g L(-1) xylitol from 100 g L(-1) xylose with a productivity of 1.25 g L(-1)h(-1). In addition, for 20 rounds of cell recycling at 42 °C, YZJ015 produced 71.35 g L(-1) xylitol from 100 g L(-1) xylose with a productivity of 4.43 g L(-1) h(-1) per cycle. YZJ017, in which the xylitol dehydrogenase gene was disrupted, produced 100.02 g L(-1) xylitol at a yield of 1.01 g g(-1) from 100 g L(-1) xylose with 40 g L(-1) glycerol as co-substrate at 42 °C. These engineered strains provide an excellent foundation for xylitol production at elevated temperatures.

  17. Aggregation Pheromone System: A Real-parameter Optimization Algorithm using Aggregation Pheromones as the Base Metaphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyosi

    This paper proposes an aggregation pheromone system (APS) for solving real-parameter optimization problems using the collective behavior of individuals which communicate using aggregation pheromones. APS was tested on several test functions used in evolutionary computation. The results showed APS could solve real-parameter optimization problems fairly well. The sensitivity analysis of control parameters of APS is also studied.

  18. Genetic transformation of intact Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis by high-voltage electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.A.; Harlander, S.K. )

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a system for electroporating intact cells of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LM0230 (previously designated Streptococcus lactis LM0230) with a commercially available electroporation unit. Parameters which influenced the efficiency of transformation included growth phase and final concentration of cells, ionic strength of the suspending medium, concentration of plasmid DNA, and the amplitude and duration of the pulse. Washed suspensions of intact cells suspended in deionized distilled water were subjected to one high-voltage electric pulse varying in voltage (300 to 900 V corresponding to field strengths of 5 to 17 kV/cm) and duration (100 {mu}s to 1 s). Transformation efficiencies of 10{sup 3} transformants per {mu}g of DNA were obtained when dense suspensions (final concentration, 5 {times} 10{sup 10} CFU/ml) of stationary-phase cells were subjected to one pulse with a peak voltage of 900 V (field strength, 17 kV/cm) and a pulse duration of 5 ms in the presence of plasmid DNA. Dilution of porated cells in broth medium followed by an expression period of 2 h at 30{degree}C was beneficial in enhancing transformation efficiencies. Plasmids ranging in size from 9.8 to 30.0 kilobase pairs could be transformed by this procedure.

  19. DNA Macroarray Profiling of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 Gene Expression during Environmental Stresses†

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Chou, Lan-szu; Cutler, Adele; Weimer, Bart

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the use of an oligonucleotide macroarray to profile the expression of 375 genes in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 during heat, acid, and osmotic stress. A set of known stress-associated genes in IL1403 was used as the internal control on the array. Every stress response was accurately detected using the macroarray, compared to data from previous reports. As a group, the expression patterns of the investigated metabolic genes were significantly altered by heat, acid, and osmotic stresses. Specifically, 13 to 18% of the investigated genes were differentially expressed in each of the environmental stress treatments. Interestingly, the methionine biosynthesis pathway genes (metA-metB1 and metB2-cysK) were induced during heat shock, but methionine utilization genes, such as metK, were induced during acid stress. These data provide a possible explanation for the differences between acid tolerance mechanisms of L. lactis strains IL1403 and MG1363 reported previously. Several groups of transcriptional responses were common among the stress treatments, such as repression of peptide transporter genes, including the opt operon (also known as dpp) and dtpT. Reduction of peptide transport due to environmental stress will have important implications in the cheese ripening process. Although stress responses in lactococci were extensively studied during the last decade, additional information about this bacterium was gained from the use of this metabolic array. PMID:15528540

  20. Chemistry of the pheromones of mealybug and scale insects.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yunfan; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2015-07-01

    This article comprehensively reviews the syntheses of all known sex pheromones of scales and mealybugs, describes how they were identified, and how the synthetic pheromones are used in insect management.

  1. Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones.

    PubMed

    Mast, Joshua D; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Alborn, Hans T; Lavis, Luke D; Stern, David L

    2014-12-12

    Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors, including navigation and aggregation. Several studies have suggested that behavior during the immature larval stages of Drosophila development is influenced by pheromones, but none of these compounds or the pheromone-receptor neurons that sense them have been identified. Here we report a larval pheromone-signaling pathway. We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae. We identified a single larval chemosensory neuron that detects these molecules. Two members of the pickpocket family of DEG/ENaC channel subunits (ppk23 and ppk29) are required to respond to these pheromones. This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae. Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects.

  2. Membrane Protein Production in Lactococcus lactis for Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Seigneurin-Berny, Daphne; King, Martin S; Sautron, Emiline; Moyet, Lucas; Catty, Patrice; André, François; Rolland, Norbert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Frelet-Barrand, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, expression and study of membrane proteins in heterologous systems remains difficult. Among the bacterial systems available, the Gram-positive lactic bacterium, Lactococcus lactis, traditionally used in food fermentations, is nowadays widely used for large-scale production and functional characterization of bacterial and eukaryotic membrane proteins. The aim of this chapter is to describe the different possibilities for the functional characterization of peripheral or intrinsic membrane proteins expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

  3. Analysis of hemin effect on lactate reduction in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Nagayasu, Machiko; Wardani, Agustin Krisna; Nagahisa, Keisuke; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2007-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a facultative anaerobic microorganism that produces lactate as the major product, and acetate and acetoin as by-products; some strains of this species produce an antimicrobial compound, nisin. Lactate has a strong inhibitory effect on L. lactis growth. On the other hand, hemin has a suppressive effect on lactate production during L. lactis growth under aerobic condition. To achieve the optimum effect of hemin on lactate amount reduction in L. lactis ATCC11454, cultures entailing various conditions were performed with and without hemin. In the culture with hemin, L. lactis growth and lactate reduction improved compared with those in the culture without hemin; that is, lactate production was suppressed by 1.8- and 1.3-fold under batch and fed-batch cultures, respectively. In microaerobic fed-batch culture with hemin, lactate production was sufficiently suppressed. This result suggests that microaerobic fed-batch culture could be applied to the maintenance of the low lactate amount. Under this condition, metabolic shift was observed from lactate to acetoin and acetate. However, no increase in nisin production was observed even though lactate production could significantly decrease in L. lactis ATCC11454.

  4. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL(-1) and 0.6-0.7 ng mL(-1), respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces.

  5. Characterization of two nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains isolated from a commercial sauerkraut fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, L J; Fleming, H P; Klaenhammer, T R

    1992-01-01

    Two Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains, NCK400 and LJH80, isolated from a commercial sauerkraut fermentation were shown to produce nisin. LJH80 was morphologically unstable and gave rise to two stable, nisin-producing (Nip+) derivatives, NCK318-2 and NCK318-3. NCK400 and derivatives of LJH80 exhibited identical morphological and metabolic characteristics, but could be distinguished on the basis of plasmid profiles and genomic hybridization patterns to a DNA probe specific for the iso-ISS1 element, IS946. NCK318-2 and NCK318-3 harbored two and three plasmids, respectively, which hybridized with IS946. Plasmid DNA was not detected in NCK400, and DNA from this strain failed to hybridize with IS946. Despite the absence of detectable plasmid DNA in NCK400, nisin-negative derivatives (NCK402 and NCK403) were isolated after repeated transfer in broth at 37 degrees C. Nisin-negative derivatives concurrently lost the ability to ferment sucrose and became sensitive to nisin. A 4-kbp HindIII fragment containing the structural gene for nisin (spaN), cloned from L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454, was used to probe genomic DNA of NCK318-2, NCK318-3, NCK400, and NCK402 digested with EcoRI or HindIII. The spaN probe hybridized to an 8.8-kbp EcoRI fragment and a 10-kbp HindIII fragment in the Nip+ sauerkraut isolates, but did not hybridize to the Nip- derivative, NCK402. A different hybridization pattern was observed when the same probe was used against Nip+ L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 and ATCC 7962. These phenotypic and genetic data confirmed that unique Nip+ L. lactis subsp. lactis strains were isolated from fermenting sauerkraut. Images PMID:1622214

  6. Utilization of pheromones in the population management of moth pests.

    PubMed Central

    Cardé, R T

    1976-01-01

    Pheromones are substances emitted by one individual of a species and eliciting a specific response in a second individual of the same species. In moths (Lepidoptera) generally females lure males for mating by emission of a sex attractant pheromone comprised of either one or more components. Since 1966 the identification of the pheromone blends of many moth pests has allowed investigations into the use of these messengers for population manipulation. Pheromone-baited traps may be used both to detect pest presence and to estimate population density, so that conventional control tactics can be employed only as required and timed precisely for maximum effectiveness. Attractant traps also can be utilized for direct population suppression when the traps are deployed at a density effective in reducing mating success sufficiently to achieve control. A third use pattern of pheromones and related compounds is disruption of pheromone communication via atmospheric permeation with synthetic disruptants. The behavioral modifications involved in disruption of communication may include habituation of the normal response sequence (alteration of the pheromone response threshold) and "confusion" (inability of the organism to perceive and orient to the naturally emitted lure). Disruption of communication employing the natural pheromone components as the disruptant has been most successful, although nonattractant behavioral modifiers structurally similar to the pheromone components also may prove useful. Possible future resistance to direct pheromone manipulation may be expected to involve the evolution of behavioral and sensory changes that minimize the informational overlap between the natural pheromone system and the pheromone control technique. PMID:789060

  7. Ant Trail Pheromone Biosynthesis Is Triggered by a Neuropeptide Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  8. Neuropeptide-mediated stimulation of pheromone biosynthesis in an ant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pheromones are well known to initiate behavioral or physiological responses in members of the same species. The chemistry and behaviors elicited by pheromones have advanced tremendously in the 50+ years since the first pheromone identification from the silkworm moth. However, the regulation of phero...

  9. Incidence of nisin Z production in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TFF 221 isolated from Thai fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2008-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria isolated from various Thai fermented foods were screened for the presence of nisin gene by using PCR with primers specific to nisin A structural gene. Only one strain, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TFF 221, isolated from kung jom, a traditional shrimp paste, was found to carry a nisin gene. The TFF 221 nisin had antimicrobial activity against not only closely related lactic acid bacteria but also some foodborne pathogens. It was heat stable and inactivated by alpha-chymotrypsin and proteinase K. Some characteristics of TFF 221 nisin were found to be very similar to those of nisin A produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2111. Both of them had the same antimicrobial spectrum and MICs against all indicator bacteria. However, when assayed with indicator organisms, in all cases the TFF 221 nisin produced larger zones of inhibition in agar diffusion assays than the nisin A did. Sequencing of the TFF 221 nisin gene showed that it was the natural nisin variant, nisin Z, as indicated by the substitution of asparagine residue instead of histidine at position 27. The nisin determinant in strain TFF 221 was found to be located on a conjugative transposon residing in the chromosome. The ability of the nisin produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis TFF 221 to inhibit a wide range of foodborne pathogens may be useful in improving the food safety of the fermented product, especially in the Thai environment, which suffers from perennial problems of poor food hygiene.

  10. Lactococcus lactis spp lactis infection in infants with chronic diarrhea: two cases report and literature review in children.

    PubMed

    Karaaslan, Ayse; Soysal, Ahmet; Kepenekli Kadayifci, Eda; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Akkoc, Gulsen; Atici, Serkan; Sarmis, Abdurrahman; Ulger Toprak, Nurver; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-03-31

    Lactococcus lactis is a gram-positive, facultative anaerobic coccus that is occasionally isolated from human mucocutaneous surfaces such as the intestines. It is used in the dairy industry for milk acidification and is mostly nonpathogenic in immunocompetent humans, however a number of cases of infection with L. lactis have been reported in recent years. In this article, we describe two cases of infection due to L. lactis in patients with chronic diarrhea. The first case is a five-month-old boy who was operated on for volvulus on his first day of life and had ileostomy with subsequent diagnosis of chronic diarrhea and bacteremia due to L. Lactis. The second case is a six-month-old girl with the diagnosis of chronic diarrhea that developed after a catheter-related bloodstream infection. Both of the infections due to L. Lactis spp lactis were successfully treated with intravenous vancomycin therapy. Although Lactococcus species is mostly known as nonpathogenic, it should be kept in mind as a potential pathogen, especially in patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  11. Thermal adaptability of Kluyveromyces marxianus in recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kluyveromyces marxianus combines the ease of genetic manipulation and fermentation with the ability to efficiently secrete high molecular weight proteins, performing eukaryotic post-translational modifications. It is able to grow efficiently in a wide range of temperatures. The secretion performances were analyzed in the host K. marxianus L3 in the range between 5°C and 40°C by means of 3 different reporter proteins, since temperature appears a key parameter for production and secretion of recombinant proteins. Results The recombinant strains were able to grow up to 40°C and, along the tested temperature interval (5-40°C), the specific growth rates (μ) were generally lower as compared to those of the untransformed strain. Biomass yields were slightly affected by temperature, with the highest values reached at 15°C and 30°C. The secretion of the endogenous β-fructofuranosidase, used as an internal control, was efficient in the range of the tested temperature, as evaluated by assaying the enzyme activity in the culture supernatants. The endogenous β-fructofuranosidase production was temperature dependent, with the highest yield at 30°C. The heterologous proteins HSA, GAA and Sod1p were all successfully produced and secreted between 5°C and 40°C, albeit each one presented a different optimal production temperature (15, 40, 5-30°C for HSA, GAA and Sod1p, respectively). Conclusions K. marxianus L3 has been identified as a promising and flexible cell factory. In a sole host, the optimization of growth temperatures for the efficient secretion of each individual protein can be carried out over a wide range of temperatures. PMID:23587421

  12. Pheromones in the life of insects.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Ingolf; Schmolz, Erik; Schricker, Burkhard

    2008-09-01

    Life in insect societies asks for a permanent flow of information, often carried by rather simple organic molecules. Some originate from plants as odours of blossoms or exudates from trees. Especially important are the intra- and interspecific combinations of compounds produced by the insects themselves. These are called pheromones or ecto-hormones and serve a variety of tasks. The paper deals mainly with honeybee pheromones, but takes also into consideration those of wasps and hornets. Effects of pheromones are monitored ethologically by direct observation and filming as well as in a more quantitative manner with using direct and indirect calorimetry. In all experimental set-ups alarm pheromones were used as controls. They show an up to fourfold increase of activity after a few seconds, determined for small groups of insects as well as for a whole hornet nest placed in a 25-l calorimeter. A variety of cosmetics like soaps, shampoos, lotions and perfumes are included in the investigations because of repeated reports about unwarranted insect attacks which are said to be provoked by such products. None of the applied substances provoked a significant reaction of the bees (p > 0.05). A short appendix discusses the still questionable existence of pheromones in man, which were confirmed under laboratory conditions, but not yet for daily life.

  13. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Laura C; Federle, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Laura C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. PMID:24118108

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399

    PubMed Central

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Felis, Giovanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  16. Unraveling the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) signal transduction cascade that regulates sex pheromone production in moths

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies over the past three decades have demonstrated that female moths usually produce sex pheromones as multi-component blends in which the ratios of the individual components are precisely controlled, making it possible to generate species-specific pheromone blends. Most moth pheromone component...

  17. Dual recombinant Lactococcus lactis for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccine reporter plasmid pPERDBY.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Sharma, Drashya; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2017-03-04

    Food grade Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) has been widely used as an antigen and DNA delivery vehicle. We had previously reported the use of non-invasive L. lactis for the delivery of newly constructed immunostimulatory DNA vaccine reporter plasmid, pPERDBY. In the present report, we outline the construction of dual recombinant L. lactis expressing Internalin A of Listeria monocytogenes and harbouring pPERDBY (LL InlA+ pPERDBY) to enhance the DNA delivery efficiency of L. lactis. After confirmation and validation of LL InlA+ pPERDBY, its DNA delivery potential was compared with previously developed non-invasive r- L. lactis::pPERDBY. The use of invasive L. lactis resulted in around three fold increase in number of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein expressing Caco- cells. Thus, these findings reinforce the prospective application of invasive strain of L. lactis in delivery of DNA/RNA and antigens.

  18. Are pheromones detected through the main olfactory epithelium?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenshan; Nudelman, Aaron; Storm, Daniel R

    2007-06-01

    A major sensory organ for the detection of pheromones by animals is the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Although pheromones control the behaviors of various species, the effect of pheromones on human behavior has been controversial because the VNO is not functional in adults. However, recent genetic, biochemical, and electrophysiological data suggest that some pheromone-based behaviors, including male sexual behavior in mice, are mediated through the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and are coupled to the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) and a cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channel. These recent discoveries suggest the provocative hypothesis that human pheromones may signal through the MOE.

  19. Will climate change affect insect pheromonal communication?

    PubMed

    Boullis, Antoine; Detrain, Claire; Francis, Frédéric; Verheggen, François J

    2016-10-01

    Understanding how climate change will affect species interactions is a challenge for all branches of ecology. We have only limited understanding of how increasing temperature and atmospheric CO2 and O3 levels will affect pheromone-mediated communication among insects. Based on the existing literature, we suggest that the entire process of pheromonal communication, from production to behavioural response, is likely to be impacted by increases in temperature and modifications to atmospheric CO2 and O3 levels. We argue that insect species relying on long-range chemical signals will be most impacted, because these signals will likely suffer from longer exposure to oxidative gases during dispersal. We provide future directions for research programmes investigating the consequences of climate change on insect pheromonal communication.

  20. Pheromones: a new ergogenic aid in sport?

    PubMed

    Papaloucas, Marios; Kyriazi, Kyriaki; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, antidoping laboratories are improving detection methods to confirm the use of forbidden substances. These tests are based both on direct identification of new substances or their metabolites and on indirect evaluation of changes in gene, protein, or metabolite patterns (genomics, proteomics, or metabolomics). The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) officially monitors anabolic steroids, hormones, growth factors, β-agonists, hormone and metabolic modulators, masking agents, street drugs, manipulation of blood and blood components, chemical and physical manipulation, gene doping, stimulants, narcotics, glucocorticosteroids, and β-blockers. However, several other substances are under review by WADA. Pheromones accomplish the structure and function of life from its first step, while they have an impact on the body's performance. Both testosterone and pheromones have an ergogenic effect that could potentially affect an athlete's performance. The authors share their questions concerning the potential impact of pheromones in sports.

  1. Pheromone independent unisexual development in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rachana; Zhao, Youbao; Lin, Jianfeng; Fan, Yumeng; Xu, Xinping; Upadhyay, Srijana; Lin, Xiaorong

    2017-05-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans can undergo a-α bisexual and unisexual reproduction. Completion of both sexual reproduction modes requires similar cellular differentiation processes and meiosis. Although bisexual reproduction generates equal number of a and α progeny and is far more efficient than unisexual reproduction under mating-inducing laboratory conditions, the α mating type dominates in nature. Population genetic studies suggest that unisexual reproduction by α isolates might have contributed to this sharply skewed distribution of the mating types. However, the predominance of the α mating type and the seemingly inefficient unisexual reproduction observed under laboratory conditions present a conundrum. Here, we discovered a previously unrecognized condition that promotes unisexual reproduction while suppressing bisexual reproduction. Pheromone is the principal stimulus for bisexual development in Cryptococcus. Interestingly, pheromone and other components of the pheromone pathway, including the key transcription factor Mat2, are not necessary but rather inhibitory for Cryptococcus to complete its unisexual cycle under this condition. The inactivation of the pheromone pathway promotes unisexual reproduction despite the essential role of this pathway in non-self-recognition during bisexual reproduction. Nonetheless, the requirement for the known filamentation regulator Znf2 and the expression of hyphal or basidium specific proteins remain the same for pheromone-dependent or independent sexual reproduction. Transcriptome analyses and an insertional mutagenesis screen in mat2Δ identified calcineurin being essential for this process. We further found that Znf2 and calcineurin work cooperatively in controlling unisexual development in this fungus. These findings indicate that Mat2 acts as a repressor of pheromone-independent unisexual development while serving as an activator for a-α bisexual development. The bi-functionality of Mat2 might have allowed

  2. Pheromone independent unisexual development in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Rachana; Zhao, Youbao; Fan, Yumeng; Xu, Xinping; Lin, Xiaorong

    2017-01-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans can undergo a-α bisexual and unisexual reproduction. Completion of both sexual reproduction modes requires similar cellular differentiation processes and meiosis. Although bisexual reproduction generates equal number of a and α progeny and is far more efficient than unisexual reproduction under mating-inducing laboratory conditions, the α mating type dominates in nature. Population genetic studies suggest that unisexual reproduction by α isolates might have contributed to this sharply skewed distribution of the mating types. However, the predominance of the α mating type and the seemingly inefficient unisexual reproduction observed under laboratory conditions present a conundrum. Here, we discovered a previously unrecognized condition that promotes unisexual reproduction while suppressing bisexual reproduction. Pheromone is the principal stimulus for bisexual development in Cryptococcus. Interestingly, pheromone and other components of the pheromone pathway, including the key transcription factor Mat2, are not necessary but rather inhibitory for Cryptococcus to complete its unisexual cycle under this condition. The inactivation of the pheromone pathway promotes unisexual reproduction despite the essential role of this pathway in non-self-recognition during bisexual reproduction. Nonetheless, the requirement for the known filamentation regulator Znf2 and the expression of hyphal or basidium specific proteins remain the same for pheromone-dependent or independent sexual reproduction. Transcriptome analyses and an insertional mutagenesis screen in mat2Δ identified calcineurin being essential for this process. We further found that Znf2 and calcineurin work cooperatively in controlling unisexual development in this fungus. These findings indicate that Mat2 acts as a repressor of pheromone-independent unisexual development while serving as an activator for a-α bisexual development. The bi-functionality of Mat2 might have allowed

  3. [Biosynthesis and endocrine regulation of sex pheromones in moth].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Lin, Xin-da; Du, Yong-jun

    2015-10-01

    The crucial importance of sex pheromones in driving mating behaviors in moths has been well demonstrated in the process of sexual communication between individuals that produce and recognize species specific pheromones. Sex-pheromone molecules from different moth species are chemically characteristic, showing different terminal functional groups, various carbon chain lengths, different position and configuration of double bond system. This review summarized information on the biosynthetic pathways and enzymes involved in producing pheromone molecules in different moths. Then we listed the components and their ratios in the sex pheromones of 15 moth species belonging to different subfamilies in Noctuidae. We also discussed the various viewpoints regarding how sex pheromones with specific ratios are produced. In the discussion we attempted to classify the pheromone molecules based on their producers, characteristics of their functional groups and carbon chain lengths. In particular, composition and ratio variations of pheromones in closely related species or within a species were compared, and the possible molecular mechanisms for these variations and their evolutionary significance were discussed. Finally, we reviewed the endocrine regulation and signal transduction pathways, in which the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) is involved. Comparing the biosynthetic pathways of sex pheromones among different species, this article aimed to reveal the common principles in pheromone biosynthesis among moth species and the characteristic features associated with the evolutionary course of individual species. Subsequently, some future research directions were proposed.

  4. Pheromones in marine algae: A technical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, G.; Müller, D. G.; Fritz, P.

    1995-03-01

    It is now well known that many marine organisms use low-molecular volatile substances as signals, in order to coordinate activities between different individuals. The study of such pheromones requires the isolation and enrichment of the secretions from undisturbed living cells or organisms over extended periods of time. The Grob-Hersch extraction device, which we describe here, avoids adverse factors for the biological materials such as strong water currents, rising gas bubbles or chemical solvents. Furthermore, the formation of sea-water spray is greatly reduced. The application of this technique for the isolation of pheromones of marine algae and animals is described.

  5. Effect of ph and salt gradient on the autolysis of Lactococcus lactis strains.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Nuñez, Jennifer; Romero-Medrano, Ruth; Nevárez-Moorillón, Guadalupe V; Gutiérrez-Méndez, Néstor

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to assess in-vitro the effect of pH and salt concentration on the rate of autolysis in L. lactis strains. Regardless autolysis variation among L. lactis strains, statistical analysis showed evidence of increase of autolysis in L. lactis under low salt concentration and acidic conditions.

  6. Sex in the night: fatty acid-derived sex pheromones and corresponding membrane pheromone receptors in insects.

    PubMed

    Koutroumpa, Fotini A; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2014-12-01

    The moth sex pheromone communication is one of the most striking examples of chemical communication in the animal kingdom. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of pheromone biosynthesis in the female pheromone gland and of pheromone reception in the male antennae not only defines new concepts in signalling research but also opens new perspectives for insect control. In this mini-review, we use the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis as a guideline to illustrate the recent advances gained in the understanding of moth sex pheromone communication.

  7. Sex pheromone biology and behavior of the cowpea weevilCallosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Qi, Y T; Burkholder, W E

    1982-02-01

    Female cowpea weevils,Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), emitted a pheromone which excited males. Pheromone release began soon after emergence and continued for one week. Synchronization of pheromone release with calling behavior was demonstrated. Mating reduced pheromone release but not male response. Pheromone obtained by aeration collection was utilized for determining a quantitative dose-response relationship.

  8. Cerambycid Beetle Species with Similar Pheromones are Segregated by Phenology and Minor Pheromone Components.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert F; Reagel, Peter F; Wong, Joseph C H; Meier, Linnea R; Silva, Weliton Dias; Mongold-Diers, Judith; Millar, Jocelyn G; Hanks, Lawrence M

    2015-05-01

    Recent research has shown that volatile sex and aggregation-sex pheromones of many species of cerambycid beetles are highly conserved, with sympatric and synchronic species that are closely related (i.e., congeners), and even more distantly related (different subfamilies), using the same or similar pheromones. Here, we investigated mechanisms by which cross attraction is averted among seven cerambycid species that are native to eastern North America and active as adults in spring: Anelaphus pumilus (Newman), Cyrtophorus verrucosus (Olivier), Euderces pini (Olivier), Neoclytus caprea (Say), and the congeners Phymatodes aereus (Newman), P. amoenus (Say), and P. varius (F.). Males of these species produce (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one as their dominant or sole pheromone component. Our field bioassays support the hypothesis that cross attraction between species is averted or at least minimized by differences among species in seasonal phenology and circadian flight periods of adults, and/or by minor pheromone components that act as synergists for conspecifics and antagonists for heterospecifics.

  9. Impact of osmotic stress on protein diffusion in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Schavemaker, Paul E; Krasnikov, Victor; Poolman, Bert

    2014-11-01

    We measured translational diffusion of proteins in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis and probed the effect of osmotic upshift. For cells in standard growth medium the diffusion coefficients for cytosolic proteins (27 and 582 kDa) and 12-transmembrane helix membrane proteins are similar to those in Escherichia coli. The translational diffusion of GFP in L. lactis drops by two orders of magnitude when the medium osmolality is increased by ∼ 1.9 Osm, and the decrease in mobility is partly reversed in the presence of osmoprotectants. We find a large spread in diffusion coefficients over the full population of cells but a smaller spread if only sister cells are compared. While in general the diffusion coefficients we measure under normal osmotic conditions in L. lactis are similar to those reported in E. coli, the decrease in translational diffusion upon osmotic challenge in L. lactis is smaller than in E. coli. An even more striking difference is that in L. lactis the GFP diffusion coefficient drops much more rapidly with volume than in E. coli. We discuss these findings in the light of differences in turgor, cell volume, crowding and cytoplasmic structure of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Physical and genetic map of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 chromosome: comparison with that of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL 1403 reveals a large genome inversion.

    PubMed Central

    Le Bourgeois, P; Lautier, M; van den Berghe, L; Gasson, M J; Ritzenthaler, P

    1995-01-01

    A physical and genetic map of the chromosome of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris reference strain MG1363 was established. The physical map was constructed for NotI, ApaI, and SmaI enzymes by using a strategy that combines creation of new rare restriction sites by the random-integration vector pRL1 and ordering of restriction fragments by indirect end-labeling experiments. The MG1363 chromosome appeared to be circular and 2,560 kb long. Seventy-seven chromosomal markers were located on the physical map by hybridization experiments. Integration via homologous recombination of pRC1-derived plasmids allowed a more precise location of some lactococcal genes and determination of their orientation on the chromosome. The MG1363 chromosome contains six rRNA operons; five are clustered within 15% of the chromosome and transcribed in the same direction. Comparison of the L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 physical map with those of the two L. lactis subsp. lactis strains IL1403 and DL11 revealed a high degree of restriction polymorphism. At the genetic organization level, despite an overall conservation of gene organization, strain MG1363 presents a large inversion of half of the genome in the region containing the rRNA operons. PMID:7751295

  11. Sex pheromones in mate assessment: analysis of nutrient cost of sex pheromone production by females of the moth Heliothis virescens.

    PubMed

    Foster, Stephen P; Anderson, Karin G

    2015-04-15

    It has been postulated that sex pheromones, in addition to their role in mate recognition and/or finding, may also serve a role in assessment of mate quality. For this, a sex pheromone must give honest information about a signaler's quality, with honesty ensured by a direct metabolic or indirect fitness cost to the signaler. Using a stable isotope tracer-tracee method, we characterized the nutrient pools that fuel sex pheromone production in females of the moth Heliothis virescens, as well as the relative importance of larval- and adult-acquired nutrients to this process. Females used three pools for de novo biosynthesis of sex pheromone, hemolymph trehalose, glycogen (via trehalose) and fat, and produced ca. 25% of pheromone directly from stored (previously synthesized) precursor fatty acids. Pheromone was produced roughly equally from carbohydrate and fat. Adult feeding was very important for pheromone biosynthesis, with a maximum of 65% of de novo biosynthesized pheromone produced from a single adult feed (carbohydrate). Although these nutrient pools are shared with other reproductive physiologies, notably oocyte production, it is unlikely that pheromone production imposes a significant metabolic cost on females, because (i) the amount of nutrients used for pheromone production is negligible compared with that available, (ii) the hemolymph trehalose pool is readily replaceable throughout the adult life, and (iii) in mated females, carbohydrate shortages result in reduced allocation to pheromone.

  12. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis Subsp. Lactis (B. lactis) Strain BB-12-Supplemented Yogurt in Healthy Children.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tina P; Ba, Zhaoyong; Sanders, Mary E; D'Amico, Frank J; Roberts, Robert F; Smith, Keisha H; Merenstein, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that may provide health benefits to the individual when consumed in sufficient quantities. For studies conducted on health or disease endpoints on probiotics in the United States, the Food and Administration has required those studies to be conducted as investigational new drugs. This phase I, double-blinded, randomized, controlled safety study represents the first requirement of this pathway. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of children. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of BB-12-supplemented yogurt on the gut microbiota of the children. Sixty children ages 1 to 5 years were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12-supplemented yogurt or nonsupplemented control yogurt daily for 10 days. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, as determined by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 186 nonserious adverse events were reported, with no significant differences between the control and BB-12 groups. No significant changes due to probiotic treatment were observed in the gut microbiota of the study cohort. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well-tolerated when consumed by healthy children. The present study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in different disease states.

  13. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  14. Variable volume fed-batch fermentation for nisin production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis W28.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoliang; Wang, Lin; Jing, Yingjun; Li, Xueliang; Zhao, Yanli

    2009-03-01

    A feeding technology that was suitable for improving the nisin production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis W28 was established. The effects of initial sucrose concentration (ISC) in the fermentation broth, feeding time, and feeding rate on the fermentation were studied. It was observed that a fed-batch culture (ISC = 10 g l(-1)) with 100 ml sucrose solution (190 g l(-1)) being evenly fed (9-10 ml h(-1)) into the fermenter after 3-h fermentation gave the best performance in terms of biomass and nisin yield. Under these conditions, the total biomass and the total nisin yield were approximately 23% and 51% higher than those in batch fermentation, respectively. When the sucrose concentration was controlled at 5-10 g l(-1) in variable volume intermittent fed-batch fermentation (VVIF) with ISC = 10 g l(-1), the total biomass and the total nisin yield were 29% and 60% above those in batch fermentation, respectively. The VVIF proved to be effective to eliminate the substrate inhibition by maintaining sucrose at appropriate levels. It is also easy to be scaled up, since various parameters involved in industrial production were taken into account.

  15. [Characteristics and identification of bacteriocins produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 194-K].

    PubMed

    Ustiugova, E A; Timofeeva, A V; Stoianova, L G; Netrusov, A I; Katrukha, G S

    2012-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 194-K strain has been established to be able to produce two bacteriocins, one of which was identified as the known lantibiotic nisin A, and the other 194-D bacteriocin represents a polypeptide with a 2589-Da molecular mass and comprises 20 amino acid residues. Both bacteriocins were produced in varying proportions in all of the studied nutrient media, which support the growth of the producer. Depending on the cultivation medium, the nisin A content was 380- to 1123-fold lower in the 194-K stain culture fluid than that of the 194-D peptide. In comparision to to nisin A Bacteriocin 194-D possessed a wide range of antibacterial activity and suppressed the growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. An optimal medium for 194-D bacteriocin synthesis was shown to be a fermentation medium which contained yeast extract, casein hydrolysate, and potassium phosphate. The biosynthesis ofbacteriocin 194-D by the 194-K strain in these media occurred parallel to producer growth, and its maximal accumulation in the culture fluid was observed at 14-20 h of the strain's growth.

  16. The effect of nisin from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis on refrigerated patin fillet quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adilla, S. N.; Utami, R.; Nursiwi, A.; Nurhartadi, E.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of nisin from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis with spraying method application on quality of patin fillet during refrigerated storage (4±1°C) was investigated. The quality of patin fillet based on total plate count (TPC), pH, TVB-N, and TBA values during 16 days at 4±1°C. Completely Randomized Design (CDR) was used in one factor (nisin activity) at 0 IU/ml, 500 IU/ml, 1000 IU/ml, and 2000 IU/ml. The observation was done at 0, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 16th days of storage. The result showed that variation of nisin activity significantly affected the quality of fillet according to TPC, pH, and TVB-N values, however no significant difference on the obtained of TBA value. Nisin in 500 IU/ml, 1000 IU/ml, and 2000 IU/ml could extend the shelf-life of fillet until 4th, 8th, and 12th days respectively based on standard in all parameters.

  17. A new class of mealybug pheromones: a hemiterpene ester in the sex pheromone of Crisicoccus matsumotoi.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Jun; Narai, Yutaka; Sawamura, Nobuo; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Sugie, Hajime

    2012-07-01

    Mealybugs, which include several agricultural pests, are small sap feeders covered with a powdery wax. They exhibit clear sexual dimorphism; males are winged but fragile and short lived, whereas females are windless and less mobile. Thus, sex pheromones emitted by females facilitate copulation and reproduction by serving as a key navigation tool for males. Although the structures of the hitherto known mealybug pheromones vary among species, they have a common structural motif; they are carboxylic esters of monoterpene alcohols with irregular non-head-to-tail linkages. However, in the present study, we isolated from the Matsumoto mealybug, Crisicoccus matsumotoi (Siraiwa), a pheromone with a completely different structure. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified the pheromone as 3-methyl-3-butenyl 5-methylhexanoate. Its attractiveness to males was confirmed in a series of field trapping experiments involving comparison between the isolated natural product and a synthetic sample. This is the first report of a hemiterpene mealybug pheromone. In addition, the acid moiety (5-methylhexanoate) appears to be rare in insect pheromones.

  18. Pheromone binding proteins enhance the sensitivity of olfactory receptors to sex pheromones in Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hetan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Pelosi, Paolo; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2015-08-27

    Sexual communication in moths offers a simplified scenario to model and investigate insect sensory perception. Both PBPs (pheromone-binding proteins) and PRs (pheromone receptors) are involved in the detection of sex pheromones, but the interplay between them still remains largely unknown. In this study, we have measured the binding affinities of the four recombinant PBPs of Chilo suppressalis (CsupPBPs) to pheromone components and analogs and characterized the six PRs using the Xenopus oocytes expression system. Interestingly, when the responses of PRs were recorded in the presence of PBPs, we measured in several combinations a dramatic increase in signals as well as in sensitivity of such combined systems. Furthermore, the discrimination ability of appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs was improved compared with the performance of PBPs or PRs alone. Besides further supporting a role of PBPs in the pheromone detection and discrimination, our data shows for the first time that appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs improved the discrimination ability of PBPs or PRs alone. The variety of responses measured with different pairing of PBPs and PRs indicates the complexity of the olfaction system, which, even for the relatively simple task of detecting sex pheromones, utilises a highly sophisticated combinatorial approach.

  19. Pheromone binding proteins enhance the sensitivity of olfactory receptors to sex pheromones in Chilo suppressalis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hetan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Pelosi, Paolo; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Sexual communication in moths offers a simplified scenario to model and investigate insect sensory perception. Both PBPs (pheromone-binding proteins) and PRs (pheromone receptors) are involved in the detection of sex pheromones, but the interplay between them still remains largely unknown. In this study, we have measured the binding affinities of the four recombinant PBPs of Chilo suppressalis (CsupPBPs) to pheromone components and analogs and characterized the six PRs using the Xenopus oocytes expression system. Interestingly, when the responses of PRs were recorded in the presence of PBPs, we measured in several combinations a dramatic increase in signals as well as in sensitivity of such combined systems. Furthermore, the discrimination ability of appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs was improved compared with the performance of PBPs or PRs alone. Besides further supporting a role of PBPs in the pheromone detection and discrimination, our data shows for the first time that appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs improved the discrimination ability of PBPs or PRs alone. The variety of responses measured with different pairing of PBPs and PRs indicates the complexity of the olfaction system, which, even for the relatively simple task of detecting sex pheromones, utilises a highly sophisticated combinatorial approach. PMID:26310773

  20. A new class of mealybug pheromones: a hemiterpene ester in the sex pheromone of Crisicoccus matsumotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Jun; Narai, Yutaka; Sawamura, Nobuo; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Sugie, Hajime

    2012-07-01

    Mealybugs, which include several agricultural pests, are small sap feeders covered with a powdery wax. They exhibit clear sexual dimorphism; males are winged but fragile and short lived, whereas females are windless and less mobile. Thus, sex pheromones emitted by females facilitate copulation and reproduction by serving as a key navigation tool for males. Although the structures of the hitherto known mealybug pheromones vary among species, they have a common structural motif; they are carboxylic esters of monoterpene alcohols with irregular non-head-to-tail linkages. However, in the present study, we isolated from the Matsumoto mealybug, Crisicoccus matsumotoi (Siraiwa), a pheromone with a completely different structure. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified the pheromone as 3-methyl-3-butenyl 5-methylhexanoate. Its attractiveness to males was confirmed in a series of field trapping experiments involving comparison between the isolated natural product and a synthetic sample. This is the first report of a hemiterpene mealybug pheromone. In addition, the acid moiety (5-methylhexanoate) appears to be rare in insect pheromones.

  1. Characterization of a cadmium resistance Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain by antioxidant assays and proteome profiles methods.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yao; Yang, Xuan; Lian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Boyang; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination poses a major threat to the environment and human health for their potential toxicity and non-biodegradable properties. At present, some probiotics bacteria are reported to have great potential to eliminate heavy metals from food and water. In this study, resistance properties of a newly isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis for cadmium were studied by antioxidant assays and proteomics analysis. Antioxidant capacity of this strain was significantly activated under cadmium stress indicated by Fenton reaction, DPPH assay, SOD assay and GSH assay. Intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and catalase were suggested to play vital roles in the activated antioxidant capacity. The up-regulated cadA was associated with the activated P-type ATPases that plays an important role in cadmium resistance. Proteomics analysis identified 12 over-expressed proteins under 50mg/L cadmium stress and these proteins are abundant in oxidative stress response and energy metabolism regulation, which were considered as consequences as cadmium resistance of the strain. Thus, the probiotics Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis may resist cadmium stress through antioxidant approach and enhanced energy metabolism. The food grade lactis strain may be applied in metal decontamination in environment and food/feed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Secretory expression of a heterologous nattokinase in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Lixin; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-05-01

    Nattokinase has been reported as an oral health product for the prevention of atherosclerosis. We developed a novel strategy to express a nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis in a live delivery vehicle, Lactococcus lactis. Promoter P( nisZ) and signal peptide SP(Usp) were used for inducible and secretory expression of nattokinase in L. lactis. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that nattokinase was successfully expressed, and about 94% of the enzyme was secreted to the culture. The recombinant nattokinase showed potent fibrinolytic activity, equivalent to 41.7 urokinase units per milliliter culture. Expression and delivery of such a fibrinolytic enzyme in the food-grade vehicle L. lactis would facilitate the widespread application of nattokinase in the control and prevention of thrombosis diseases.

  3. Insect Control (1): Use of Pheromones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research relating to the use of pheromones as a means of controlling insect pests. These chemicals, which are secreted by insects to affect the behavior of other individuals of the same species, may be used to eliminate pests without destroying their predators and other beneficial insects. (JR)

  4. Evolution of Moth Sex Pheromone Desaturases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Moth sex pheromone communication has evolved to make use of complex blends of relatively simple long-chain fatty acid precursors. Species specificity is derived from the unique stereochemistry of double bonds introduced into exact locations along the hydrocarbon backbone of fatty acids, which are r...

  5. Moth pheromone receptors and deceitful parapheromones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The insect’s olfactory system is so selective that male moths, for example, can discriminate female-produced sex pheromones from compounds with minimal structural modifications. Yet, there is an exception for this “lock-and-key” tight selectivity. Formate analogs can be used as replacement for less ...

  6. Insect Control (1): Use of Pheromones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research relating to the use of pheromones as a means of controlling insect pests. These chemicals, which are secreted by insects to affect the behavior of other individuals of the same species, may be used to eliminate pests without destroying their predators and other beneficial insects. (JR)

  7. Regulation of ovulation by human pheromones.

    PubMed

    Stern, K; McClintock, M K

    1998-03-12

    Pheromones are airborne chemical signals that are released by an individual into the environment and which affect the physiology or behaviour of other members of the same species. The idea that humans produce pheromones has excited the imagination of scientists and the public, leading to widespread claims for their existence, which, however, has remained unproven. Here we investigate whether humans produce compounds that regulate a specific neuroendocrine mechanism in other people without being consciously detected as odours (thereby fulfilling the classic definition of a pheromone). We found that odourless compounds from the armpits of women in the late follicular phase of their menstrual cycles accelerated the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone of recipient women and shortened their menstrual cycles. Axillary (underarm) compounds from the same donors which were collected later in the menstrual cycle (at ovulation) had the opposite effect: they delayed the luteinizing-hormone surge of the recipients and lengthened their menstrual cycles. By showing in a fully controlled experiment that the timing of ovulation can be manipulated, this study provides definitive evidence of human pheromones.

  8. Encapsulated Lactococcus lactis with enhanced gastrointestinal survival for the development of folate enriched functional foods.

    PubMed

    Divya, Jayakumar Beena; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from cow's milk were identified as Lactococcus lactis strains and designated as L. lactis CM22 and L. lactis CM28. They were immobilised by co-encapsulation using alginate and mannitol and by hybrid entrapment with skim milk, glycerol, CaCO3 and alginate. The encapsulated cells survived better in simulated gastrointestinal conditions compared to the free cells. The percentage survival of probiotics encapsulated by hybrid entrapment method was 62.74% for L. lactis CM22 and 68% for L. lactis CM28. Studies to check their efficacy in fermentative fortification of skim milk and ice cream revealed an enhancement in folate level.

  9. Male–male pheromone signalling in a lekking Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Widemo, Fredrik; Johansson, Björn G

    2005-01-01

    Interest in sex pheromones has mainly been focused on mate finding, while relatively little attention has been given to the role of sex pheromones in mate choice and almost none to competition over mates. Here, we study male response to male pheromones in the lekking Drosophila grimshawi, where males deposit long-lasting pheromone streaks that attract males and females to the leks and influence mate assessment. We used two stocks of flies and both stocks adjusted their pheromone depositing behaviour in response to experimental manipulation, strongly indicating male ability to distinguish between competitors from qualitative differences in pheromone streaks alone. This is the first example of an insect distinguishing between individual odour signatures. Pheromone signalling influenced competition over mates, as males adjusted their investment in pheromone deposition in response to foreign pheromone streaks. Both sexes adapt their behaviour according to information from olfactory cues in D. grimshawi, but the relative benefits from male–female, as compared to male–male signalling, remain unknown. It seems likely that the pheromone signalling system originally evolved for attracting females to leks. The transition to a signalling system for conveying information about individuals may well, however, at least in part have been driven by benefits from male–male signalling. PMID:16608691

  10. From Genome to Phenotype: An Integrative Approach to Evaluate the Biodiversity of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Laroute, Valérie; Tormo, Hélène; Couderc, Christel; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel; Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Daveran-Mingot, Marie-Line

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is one of the most extensively used lactic acid bacteria for the manufacture of dairy products. Exploring the biodiversity of L. lactis is extremely promising both to acquire new knowledge and for food and health-driven applications. L. lactis is divided into four subspecies: lactis, cremoris, hordniae and tructae, but only subsp. lactis and subsp. cremoris are of industrial interest. Due to its various biotopes, Lactococcus subsp. lactis is considered the most diverse. The diversity of L. lactis subsp. lactis has been assessed at genetic, genomic and phenotypic levels. Multi-Locus Sequence Type (MLST) analysis of strains from different origins revealed that the subsp. lactis can be classified in two groups: “domesticated” strains with low genetic diversity, and “environmental” strains that are the main contributors of the genetic diversity of the subsp. lactis. As expected, the phenotype investigation of L. lactis strains reported here revealed highly diverse carbohydrate metabolism, especially in plant- and gut-derived carbohydrates, diacetyl production and stress survival. The integration of genotypic and phenotypic studies could improve the relevance of screening culture collections for the selection of strains dedicated to specific functions and applications. PMID:28534821

  11. Gene inactivation in Lactococcus lactis: histidine biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, C; Godon, J J; Ehrlich, S D; Renault, P

    1993-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains from dairy and nondairy sources were tested for the ability to grow in the absence of histidine. Among 60 dairy strains tested, 56 required histidine, whereas only 1 of 11 nondairy strains had this requirement. Moreover, 10 of the 56 auxotrophic strains were able to grow in the presence of histidinol (Hol+), the immediate histidine precursor. This indicates that adaptation to milk often results in histidine auxotrophy. The histidine operon was detected by Southern hybridization in eight dairy auxotrophic strains tested. A large part of the histidine operon (8 kb, containing seven histidine biosynthetic genes and three unrelated open reading frames [ORFs]) was cloned from an auxotroph, which had an inactive hisD gene, as judged by its inability to grow on histidinol. Complementation analysis of three genes, hisA, hisB, and hisG, in Escherichia coli showed that they also were inactive. Sequence analysis of the cloned histidine region, which revealed 98.6% overall homology with that of the previously analyzed prototrophic strain, showed the presence of frameshift mutations in three his genes, hisC, hisG, and hisH, and two genes unrelated to histidine biosynthesis, ORF3 and ORF6. In addition, several mutations were detected in the promoter region of the operon. Northern (RNA) hybridization analysis showed a much lower amount of the his transcript in the auxotrophic strain than in the prototrophic strain. The mutations detected account for the histidine auxotrophy of the analyzed strain. Certain other dairy auxotrophic strains carry a lower number of mutations, since they were able to revert either to a Hol+ phenotype or to histidine prototrophy. Images PMID:7687248

  12. Impact on growth and aflatoxin B1 accumulation by Kluyveromyces isolates at different water activity conditions.

    PubMed

    Penna, Mariángeles La; Etcheverry, Miriam

    2006-11-01

    This study showed the impact on germination, mycelial growth and aflatoxin B(1) accumulation when interacting Aspergillus aflatoxigenic strains with Kluyveromyces isolates and the effect of water activity on this relationship. Isolates Y(14) and Y(16) reduced the percentage of germination of all Aspergillus strains and decrease germ tube elongation rate at majority of water activity assayed. Similarly they produced an increase of germination lag phase and lag phase of growth beside decreased growth rate of all Aspergillus strains. At water activities 0.994, 0.982, 0.955 and 0.937, no aflatoxins were produced in paired cultures with isolates Y(25,) Y(22), Y(16), and Y(14), and Kluyveromyces isolates Y(14) and Y(16) impact both growth and aflatoxin accumulation at wide range of water activity.

  13. Radar detection of drones responding to honeybee queen pheromone.

    PubMed

    Loper, G M; Wolf, W W; Taylor, O R

    1993-09-01

    The response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drones to queen pheromone(s) (either natural from a mated queen, or synthetic from a lure) was recorded using an X-band, ground-based radar. The distribution of drones (insect targets on the radar screen) changed from a scattered distribution to a line concentration (downwind) when the pheromone was released. Displacement within the line concentration was toward the pheromone. This response was seen as far as 800±15 m downwind from a lure with 10 mg of synthetic 9-oxodec-trans-2-enoic acid (9-ODA) and as far as 420±15 m from a mated queen. These studies demonstrate that queen pheromone can be detected by drones at much greater distances than previously believed and illustrate how X-band radar may be used to establish the distances at which insects of similar or larger size respond to pheromones.

  14. Pheromone reception in moths: from molecules to behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Walker, William B; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Male moths detect and find their mates using species-specific sex pheromones emitted by conspecific females. Olfaction plays a vital role in this behavior. Since the first discovery of an insect sex pheromone from the silkmoth Bombyx mori, great efforts have been spent on understanding the sensing of the pheromones in vivo. Much progress has been made in elucidating the molecular mechanisms that mediate chemoreception in insects in the past few decades. In this review, we focus on pheromone reception and detection in moths, from the molecular to the behavioral level. We trace the information pathway from the capture of pheromone by male antennae, binding and transportation to olfactory receptor neurons, receptor activation, signal transduction, molecule inactivation, through brain processing and behavioral response. We highlight the impact of recent studies and also provide our insights into pheromone processing.

  15. Pheromone antagonism in the European corn borer moth Ostrinia nubilalis.

    PubMed

    Gemeno, César; Sans, Albert; López, Carmen; Albajes, Ramon; Eizaguirre, Matilde

    2006-05-01

    Mixing the sex pheromones of the Mediterranean corn borer, Sesamia nonagrioides, and the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, results in significantly lower captures of O. nubilalis when compared to traps loaded with its pheromone alone. Rubber septa loaded with a constant concentration of the pheromone of O. nubilalis and different percentages of the S. nonagrioides pheromone (from 1 to 100%) causes dose-dependent antagonism in the field. Electroantennograms of O. nubilalis males showed high antennal responses to its own pheromone components, followed by smaller responses to the major, [(Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate (Z11-16:Ac)], and two minor components [dodecyl acetate (12:Ac) and (Z)-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald)] of the S. nonagrioides pheromone. There was almost no response to the S. nonagrioides minor component (Z)-11-hexadecenol (Z11-16:OH). Field tests that used traps baited with the O. nubilalis pheromone plus individual components of S. nonagrioides showed that Z11-16:Ald causes the antagonism. Adding 1% Z11-16:Ald to the pheromone of O. nubilalis reduced oriented flight and pheromone source contact in the wind tunnel by 26% and 83%, respectively, and trap captures in the field by 90%. The other three pheromone components of S. nonagrioides inhibited pheromone source contact but not oriented flight of O. nubilalis males and did not inhibit capture in the field. Cross-adaptation electroantennogram suggests that Z11-16:Ald stimulates a different odor receptor neuron than the pheromone components of O. nubilalis. We conclude that Z11-16:Ald is a potent antagonist of the behavioral response of O. nubilalis.

  16. Molecular switches for pheromone release from a moth pheromone-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Wei; Leal, Walter S.

    2008-08-08

    Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) are involved in the uptake of pheromones from pores on the antennae, transport through an aqueous environment surrounding the olfactory receptor neurons, and fast delivery to pheromone receptors. We tested the hypothesis that a C-terminal segment and a flexible loop are involved in the release of pheromones to membrane-bound receptors. We expressed in Escherichia coli 11 mutants of the PBP from the silkworm moth, BmorPBP, taking into consideration structural differences between the forms with high and low binding affinity. The N-terminus was truncated and His-69, His-70 and His-95 at the base of a flexible loop, and a cluster of acidic residues at the C-terminus were mutated. Binding assays and circular dichroism analyses support a mechanism involving protonation of acidic residues Asp-132 and Glu-141 at the C-terminus and histidines, His-70 and His-95, in the base of a loop covering the binding pocket. The former leads to the formation of a new {alpha}-helix, which competes with pheromone for the binding pocket, whereas positive charge repulsion of the histidines opens the opposite side of the binding pocket.

  17. Nisin-Producing Lactococcus lactis Strains Isolated from Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Shea S.; Saris, Per E. J.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing, ribotyping, and green fluorescent protein-based nisin bioassay revealed that 6 of 20 human milk samples contained nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis bacteria. This suggests that the history of humans consuming nisin is older than the tradition of consuming fermented milk products. PMID:15294850

  18. Prophage-Cured Derivatives of Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris

    PubMed Central

    Gasson, Michael J.; Davies, F. Lyndon

    1980-01-01

    Prophage curing was achieved in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris, and the cured derivatives were shown to be indicators for their temperate bacteriophages. Relysogenization of these cured derivatives completed the first formal demonstration of the lysogenic state in lactic streptococci. Images PMID:16345661

  19. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis fails to secrete bovine chymosine

    PubMed Central

    Luerce, Tessália Diniz; Azevedo, Marcela Santiago Pacheco; LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Pontes, Daniela Santos

    2014-01-01

    Bovine chymosin is an important milk-clotting agent used in the manufacturing of cheeses. Currently, the production of recombinant proteins by genetically modified organisms is widespread, leading to greatly reduced costs. Lactococcus (L.) lactis, the model lactic acid bacterium, was considered a good candidate for heterologous chymosin production for the following reasons: (1) it is considered to be a GRAS (generally regarded as safe) microorganism, (2) only one protease is present on its surface, (3) it can secrete proteins of different sizes, and (4) it allows for the direct production of protein in fermented food products. Thus, three genetically modified L. lactis strains were constructed to produce and target the three different forms of bovine chymosin, prochymosin B, chymosin A and chymosin B to the extracellular medium. Although all three proteins were stably produced in L. lactis, none of the forms were detected in the extracellular medium or showed clotting activity in milk. Our hypothesis is that this secretion deficiency and lack of clotting activity can be explained by the recombinant protein being attached to the cell envelope. Thus, the development of other strategies is necessary to achieve both production and targeting of chymosin in L. lactis, which could facilitate the downstream processing and recovery of this industrially important protein. PMID:25482140

  20. Specificity of Milk Peptide Utilization by Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Juillard, Vincent; Guillot, Alain; Le Bars, Dominique; Gripon, Jean-Claude

    1998-01-01

    To study the substrate specificity of the oligopeptide transport system of Lactococcus lactis for its natural substrates, the growth of L. lactis MG1363 was studied in a chemically defined medium containing milk peptides or a tryptic digest of αs2-casein as the source of amino acids. Peptides were separated into acidic, neutral, and basic pools by solid-phase extraction or by cation-exchange liquid chromatography. Their ability to sustain growth and the time course of their utilization demonstrated the preferential use of hydrophobic basic peptides with molecular masses ranging between 600 and 1,100 Da by L. lactis MG1363 and the inability to use large, acidic peptides. These peptide utilization preferences reflect the substrate specificity of the oligopeptide transport system of the strain, since no significant cell lysis was inferred. Considering the free amino acid content of milk and these findings on peptide utilization, it was demonstrated that the cessation of growth of L. lactis MG1363 in milk was due to deprivation of leucine and methionine. PMID:9546157

  1. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis fails to secrete bovine chymosine.

    PubMed

    Luerce, Tessália Diniz; Azevedo, Marcela Santiago Pacheco; LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Pontes, Daniela Santos

    2014-01-01

    Bovine chymosin is an important milk-clotting agent used in the manufacturing of cheeses. Currently, the production of recombinant proteins by genetically modified organisms is widespread, leading to greatly reduced costs. Lactococcus (L.) lactis, the model lactic acid bacterium, was considered a good candidate for heterologous chymosin production for the following reasons: (1) it is considered to be a GRAS (generally regarded as safe) microorganism, (2) only one protease is present on its surface, (3) it can secrete proteins of different sizes, and (4) it allows for the direct production of protein in fermented food products. Thus, three genetically modified L. lactis strains were constructed to produce and target the three different forms of bovine chymosin, prochymosin B, chymosin A and chymosin B to the extracellular medium. Although all three proteins were stably produced in L. lactis, none of the forms were detected in the extracellular medium or showed clotting activity in milk. Our hypothesis is that this secretion deficiency and lack of clotting activity can be explained by the recombinant protein being attached to the cell envelope. Thus, the development of other strategies is necessary to achieve both production and targeting of chymosin in L. lactis, which could facilitate the downstream processing and recovery of this industrially important protein.

  2. A review on Lactococcus lactis: from food to factory.

    PubMed

    Song, Adelene Ai-Lian; In, Lionel L A; Lim, Swee Hua Erin; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2017-04-04

    Lactococcus lactis has progressed a long way since its discovery and initial use in dairy product fermentation, to its present biotechnological applications in genetic engineering for the production of various recombinant proteins and metabolites that transcends the heterologous species barrier. Key desirable features of this gram-positive lactic acid non-colonizing gut bacteria include its generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status, probiotic properties, the absence of inclusion bodies and endotoxins, surface display and extracellular secretion technology, and a diverse selection of cloning and inducible expression vectors. This have made L. lactis a desirable and promising host on par with other well established model bacterial or yeast systems such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella cerevisiae and Bacillus subtilis. In this article, we review recent technological advancements, challenges, future prospects and current diversified examples on the use of L. lactis as a microbial cell factory. Additionally, we will also highlight latest medical-based applications involving whole-cell L. lactis as a live delivery vector for the administration of therapeutics against both communicable and non-communicable diseases.

  3. A yeast pheromone-based inter-species communication system.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefan; Clemens, André; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

    2015-02-01

    We report on a pheromone-based inter-species communication system, allowing for a controlled cell-cell communication between the two species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a proof of principle. It exploits the mating response pathways of the two yeast species employing the pheromones, α- or P-factor, as signaling molecules. The authentic and chimeric pheromone-encoding genes were engineered to code for the P-factor in S. cerevisiae and the α-factor in S. pombe. Upon transformation of the respective constructs, cells were enabled to express the mating pheromone of the opposite species. The supernatant of cultures of S. pombe cells expressing α-factor were able to induce a G1 arrest in the cell cycle, a change in morphology to the typical shmoo effect and expression driven by the pheromone-responsive FIG1 promoter in S. cerevisiae. The supernatant of cultures of S. cerevisiae cells expressing P-factor similarly induced cell cycle arrest in G1, an alteration in morphology typical for mating as well as the activation of the pheromone-responsive promoters of the rep1 and sxa2 genes in a pheromone-hypersensitive reporter strain of S. pombe. Apparently, both heterologous pheromones were correctly processed and secreted in an active form by the cells of the other species. Our data clearly show that the species-specific pheromone systems of yeast species can be exploited for a controlled inter-species communication.

  4. Neural regulation of sex pheromone biosynthesis in Heliothis moths

    PubMed Central

    Teal, P. E. A.; Tumlinson, J. H.; Oberlander, H.

    1989-01-01

    Pheromone biosynthesis in females of Heliothis zea is regulated endogenously by a neuropeptide produced in the subesophageal ganglion. We have found that the ventral nerve cord must be intact for normal induction of pheromone biosynthesis and that pheromonotropic activity is associated with extracts of the abdominal nerve cord, but only during the period when pheromone is produced. We did not find evidence of pheromonotropic activity in hemolymph obtained from females that were producing pheromone. Extracts of the brain—subesophageal ganglion complex, which contain pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN), induced pheromone biosynthesis when applied to the terminal abdominal ganglion only if nerves from this ganglion to the pheromone gland were intact. Brain—subesophageal ganglion extracts did not induce biosynthesis when applied directly to the pheromone glands in vitro. From our results, we conclude that the target site of PBAN is not the pheromone gland but the terminal abdominal ganglion, and we hypothesize that the abdominal nerve cord transports PBAN to the terminal abdominal ganglion. PMID:16594023

  5. The Trail Pheromone of the Venomous Samsum Ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis

    PubMed Central

    Mashaly, Ashraf Mohamed Ali; Ahmed, Ashraf Mohamed; Al—Abdullah, Mosa Abdullah; Al—Khalifa, Mohamed Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Ant species use branching networks of pheromone trails for orientation between nest and resources. The current study demonstrated that workers of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), employ recruitment trail pheromones discharged from the Dufour's gland. Secretions of other abdomen complex glands, as well as hindgut gland secretions, did not evoke trail following. The optimum concentration of trail pheromone was found to be 0.1 gland equivalent/40 cm trail. This concentration demonstrated effective longevity for about one hour. This study also showed that P. sennaarensis and Tapinoma simrothi each respond to the trail pheromones of the other species as well as their own. PMID:21529253

  6. ASYMMETRY IN SEXUAL PHEROMONES IS NOT REQUIRED FOR ASCOMYCETE MATING

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Murray, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background We investigated the determinants of sexual identity in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The higher fungi are divided into the Ascomycetes and the Basidiomycetes. Most Ascomycetes have two mating types: one (called α in yeasts and MAT1-1 in filamentous fungi) produces a small, unmodified, peptide pheromone, and the other (a in yeasts and MAT1-2 in filamentous fungi) produces a peptide pheromone conjugated to a C terminal farnesyl group that makes it very hydrophobic. In the Basidiomycetes, all pheromones are lipid-modified, and this difference is a distinguishing feature between the phyla. We asked whether the asymmetry in pheromone modification is required for successful mating in Ascomycetes. Results We cloned receptor and pheromone genes from a filamentous Ascomycete and a Basidiomycete and expressed these in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to generate novel, alternative mating pairs. We find that two yeast cells can mate even when both cells secrete a-like or α-like peptides. Importantly, this is true regardless of whether the cells express the a- or α-mating type loci, which control the expression of other, sex-specific genes, in addition to the pheromones and pheromone receptors. Conclusions We demonstrate that the asymmetric pheromone modification is not required for successful mating of ascomycete fungi and confirm that, in budding yeast, the primary determinants of mating are the specificity of the receptors and their corresponding pheromones. PMID:21835624

  7. Asymmetry in sexual pheromones is not required for ascomycete mating.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Murray, Andrew

    2011-08-23

    We investigated the determinants of sexual identity in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The higher fungi are divided into the ascomycetes and the basidiomycetes. Most ascomycetes have two mating types: one (called α in yeasts and MAT1-1 in filamentous fungi) produces a small, unmodified, peptide pheromone, and the other (a in yeasts and MAT1-2 in filamentous fungi) produces a peptide pheromone conjugated to a C-terminal farnesyl group that makes it very hydrophobic. In the basidiomycetes, all pheromones are lipid-modified, and this difference is a distinguishing feature between the phyla. We asked whether the asymmetry in pheromone modification is required for successful mating in ascomycetes. We cloned receptor and pheromone genes from a filamentous ascomycete and a basidiomycete and expressed these in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to generate novel, alternative mating pairs. We find that two yeast cells can mate even when both cells secrete a-like or α-like peptides. Importantly, this is true regardless of whether the cells express the a- or α-mating-type loci, which control the expression of other, sex-specific genes, in addition to the pheromones and pheromone receptors. We demonstrate that the asymmetric pheromone modification is not required for successful mating of ascomycete fungi and confirm that, in budding yeast, the primary determinants of mating are the specificity of the receptors and their corresponding pheromones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains.

  9. Is androstadienone a putative human pheromone?

    PubMed

    Marazziti, D; Torri, P; Baroni, S; Catena Dell'Osso, M; Consoli, G; Boncinelli, V

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of different evidences, androstadienone, a steroid compound produced in the armpit, has been proposed as a human pheromone, although its physiological levels appear too low to induce a response under experimental conditions. For this reason, the majority of researchers in this area puts into question the "legitimacy" of androstadienone, and prefers to consider the axillary extracts in its entirety, like a sort of "medicinal tea", the components of which still remain to be identified, but that taken together may induce a response, or function as a carrier of other active substances. Another option is that androstadienone acts with varying degrees of potency and, at lower concentrations, according to the context and to specific behavioral situations. The aim of this paper is to review all relevant data regarding androstadienone, in order to ascertain whether it may be considered a physiological pheromone and, as such, a possible target of future modulators of some human behaviors.

  10. Statistical optimization of cell disruption techniques for releasing intracellular X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Üstün-Aytekin, Özlem; Arısoy, Sevda; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Yıldız, Ece

    2016-03-01

    X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepX) is an intracellular enzyme from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis NRRL B-1821, and it has commercial importance. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of several cell disruption methods on the activity of PepX. Statistical optimization methods were performed for two cavitation methods, hydrodynamic (high-pressure homogenization) and acoustic (sonication), to determine the more appropriate disruption method. Two level factorial design (2FI), with the parameters of number of cycles and pressure, and Box-Behnken design (BBD), with the parameters of cycle, sonication time, and power, were used for the optimization of the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods, respectively. In addition, disruption methods, consisting of lysozyme, bead milling, heat treatment, freeze-thawing, liquid nitrogen, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Triton-X, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, and antibiotics, were performed and compared with the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods. The optimized values of high-pressure homogenization were one cycle at 130 MPa providing activity of 114.47 mU ml(-1), while sonication afforded an activity of 145.09 mU ml(-1) at 28 min with 91% power and three cycles. In conclusion, sonication was the more effective disruption method, and its optimal operation parameters were manifested for the release of intracellular enzyme from a L. lactis spp. lactis strain, which is a Gram-positive bacterium.

  11. Odor and pheromone sensing via chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionally, chemosensation is an ancient but yet enigmatic sense. All organisms ranging from the simplest unicellular form to the most advanced multicellular creature possess the capability to detect chemicals in the surroundings. Conversely, all living things emit some forms of smells, either as communicating signals or as by-products of metabolism. Many species (from worms, insects to mammals) rely on the olfactory systems which express a large number of chemoreceptors to locate food and mates and to avoid danger. Most chemoreceptors expressed in olfactory organs are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and can be classified into two major categories: odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors, which principally detect general odors and pheromones, respectively. In vertebrates, these two types of receptors are often expressed in two distinct apparatuses: The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), respectively. Each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) in the MOE typically expresses one type of OR from a large repertoire. General odors activate ORs and their host OSNs (ranging from narrowly- to broadly-tuned) in a combinatorial manner and the information is sent to the brain via the main olfactory system leading to perception of smells. In contrast, pheromones stimulate relatively narrowly-tuned receptors and their host VNO neurons and the information is sent to the brain via the accessory olfactory system leading to behavioral and endocrinological changes. Recent studies indicate that the functional separation between these two systems is blurred in some cases and there are more subsystems serving chemosensory roles. This chapter focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying odor and pheromone sensing in rodents, the best characterized vertebrate models.

  12. Basidiomycete Mating Type Genes and Pheromone Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Kothe, Erika

    2010-01-01

    The genome sequences of the basidiomycete Agaricomycetes species Coprinopsis cinerea, Laccaria bicolor, Schizophyllum commune, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Postia placenta, as well as of Cryptococcus neoformans and Ustilago maydis, are now publicly available. Out of these fungi, C. cinerea, S. commune, and U. maydis, together with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been investigated for years genetically and molecularly for signaling in sexual reproduction. The comparison of the structure and organization of mating type genes in fungal genomes reveals an amazing conservation of genes regulating the sexual reproduction throughout the fungal kingdom. In agaricomycetes, two mating type loci, A, coding for homeodomain type transcription factors, and B, encoding a pheromone/receptor system, regulate the four typical mating interactions of tetrapolar species. Evidence for both A and B mating type genes can also be identified in basidiomycetes with bipolar systems, where only two mating interactions are seen. In some of these fungi, the B locus has lost its self/nonself discrimination ability and thus its specificity while retaining the other regulatory functions in development. In silico analyses now also permit the identification of putative components of the pheromone-dependent signaling pathways. Induction of these signaling cascades leads to development of dikaryotic mycelia, fruiting body formation, and meiotic spore production. In pheromone-dependent signaling, the role of heterotrimeric G proteins, components of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and cyclic AMP-dependent pathways can now be defined. Additionally, the pheromone-dependent signaling through monomeric, small GTPases potentially involved in creating the polarized cytoskeleton for reciprocal nuclear exchange and migration during mating is predicted. PMID:20190072

  13. How much is a pheromone worth?

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Jose Mauricio S.; Parra, Jose Roberto P.; de Miranda, Silvia H. G.; Adami, Andrea C. O.; Vilela, Evaldo F.; Leal, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-baited traps have been widely used in integrated pest management programs, but their economic value for growers has never been reported.  We analyzed the economic benefits of long-term use of traps baited with the citrus fruit borer Gymnandrosoma aurantianum sex pheromone in Central-Southern Brazil. Our analysis show that from 2001 to 2013 citrus growers avoided accumulated pest losses of 132.7 million to 1.32 billion USD in gross revenues, considering potential crop losses in the range of 5 to 50%. The area analyzed, 56,600 to 79,100 hectares of citrus (20.4 to 29.4 million trees), corresponds to 9.7 to 13.5% of the total area planted with citrus in the state of São Paulo. The data show a benefit-to-cost ratio of US$ 2,655 to US$ 26,548 per dollar spent on research with estimated yield loss prevented in the range of 5-50%, respectively. This study demonstrates that, in addition to the priceless benefits for the environment, sex pheromones are invaluable tools for growers as their use for monitoring populations allows rational and reduced use of insecticides, a win-win situation. PMID:27583133

  14. How much is a pheromone worth?

    PubMed

    Bento, Jose Mauricio S; Parra, Jose Roberto P; de Miranda, Silvia H G; Adami, Andrea C O; Vilela, Evaldo F; Leal, Walter S

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-baited traps have been widely used in integrated pest management programs, but their economic value for growers has never been reported.  We analyzed the economic benefits of long-term use of traps baited with the citrus fruit borer Gymnandrosoma aurantianum sex pheromone in Central-Southern Brazil. Our analysis show that from 2001 to 2013 citrus growers avoided accumulated pest losses of 132.7 million to 1.32 billion USD in gross revenues, considering potential crop losses in the range of 5 to 50%. The area analyzed, 56,600 to 79,100 hectares of citrus (20.4 to 29.4 million trees), corresponds to 9.7 to 13.5% of the total area planted with citrus in the state of São Paulo. The data show a benefit-to-cost ratio of US$ 2,655 to US$ 26,548 per dollar spent on research with estimated yield loss prevented in the range of 5-50%, respectively. This study demonstrates that, in addition to the priceless benefits for the environment, sex pheromones are invaluable tools for growers as their use for monitoring populations allows rational and reduced use of insecticides, a win-win situation.

  15. Odor and pheromone detection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean P

    2007-08-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has proven to be a useful model system to probe the mechanisms underlying the detection, discrimination, and perception of volatile odorants. The relatively small receptor repertoire of 62 odorant receptors makes the goal of understanding odor responses from the total receptor repertoire approachable in this system, and recent work has been directed toward this goal. In addition, new work not only sheds light but also raises more questions about the initial steps in odor perception in this system. Odorant receptor genes in Drosophila are predicted to encode seven transmembrane receptors, but surprising data suggest that these receptors may be inverted in the plasma membrane compared to classical G-protein coupled receptors. Finally, although some Drosophila odorant receptors are activated directly by odorant molecules, detection of a volatile pheromone, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate requires an extracellular adapter protein called LUSH for activation of pheromone sensitive neurons. Because pheromones are used by insects to trigger mating and other behaviors, these insights may herald new approaches to control behavior in pathogenic and agricultural pest insects.

  16. Nature and perception of barnacle settlement pheromones.

    PubMed

    Clare, A S; Matsumura, K

    2000-01-01

    It is now almost 50 years since the gregarious settlement of barnacles and its chemical basis was first described. Although originally noted for Elminius modestus, mechanistic studies of gregariousness have focused on two species, Semibalanus balanoides and Balanus amphitrite. By virtue of its ease of study and its economic importance as a fouling organism, the latter species has assumed increasing importance in recent years. This paper will provide an overview of studies on settlement pheromones and their perception. An adult glycoprotein, arthropodin (now known as settlement-inducing protein complex or SIPC), was once thought to be the sole pheromone involved in the induction of cypris larval settlement. At least two other pheromones are now known to be involved, a waterborne cue originating from the adult and the cypris temporary adhesive. The latter is related, immunologically, to SIPC. In keeping with many other examples of chemical communication, the available evidence suggests that barnacle settlement induction involves receptor-ligand interactions and a signal transduction pathway(s) that translates into attachment and metamorphosis. Similar findings have been reported for some, but not all, marine invertebrate larvae examined thus far and the implications for antifoulant development are discussed.

  17. Chirality determines pheromone activity for flour beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, H. Z.; Mori, K.

    1983-04-01

    Olfactory perception and orientation behaviour of female and male flour beetles ( Tribolium castaneum, T. confusum) to single stereoisomers of their aggregation pheromone revealed maximal receptor potentials and optimal attraction in response to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, whereas its optical antipode 4S,8S-(+)-dimethyldecanal was found to be inactive in this respect. Female flour beetles of both species were ≈ 103 times less attracted to 4R,8S-(+)- and 4S,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal than to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, while male flour beetles failed to respond to the R,S-(+)- and S,R-(-)-stereoisomers. Pheromone extracts of prothoracic femora from unmated male flour beetles elicited higher receptor potentials in the antennae of females than in those of males. The results suggest that the aggregation pheromone emitted by male T. castaneum as well as male T. confusum has the stereochemical structure of 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyl-decanal, which acts as sex attractant for the females and as aggregant for the males of both species.

  18. Effect of Potential Probiotic Lactococcus lactis Subsp. lactis on Growth Performance, Intestinal Microbiota, Digestive Enzyme Activities, and Disease Resistance of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Adel, Milad; El-Sayed, Abdel-Fattah M; Yeganeh, Sakineh; Dadar, Maryam; Giri, Sib Sankar

    2016-11-07

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis on the growth, intestinal microbiota, digestive enzyme activity, and disease resistance of Litopenaeus vannamei. Diets containing four different concentrations of L. lactis (0 [basal diet], 10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) CFU g(-1)) were fed to white shrimps L. vannamei (average weight 5.89 ± 0.36 g) for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, shrimps were immersed in Caspian Seawater (10.8 ppt) contaminated with 10(6) CFU ml(-1) pathogenic V. anguillarum for 2 h. Results revealed that growth rate, survival, and body protein level were increased with dietary supplementation of L. lactis. The activities of digestive enzymes (cellulose, lipase, amylase, and protease) were significantly higher in the groups fed with diets containing 10(7) or 10(8) CFU g(-1) L. lactis than those in the control. The Lactobacillus and Bacillus counts were higher (P < 0.05) in the intestine of shrimps fed with L. lactis-supplemented diets. In addition, higher level of L. lactis supplementation decreased the Vibrio counts. Moreover, L. vannamei fed diet supplemented with 10(8) CFU g(-1) of L. lactis exhibited significantly the highest hematocyte count and post-challenge survival rate (79.2 %). Collectively, these results suggest that dietary supplementation of L. lactis subsp. lactis at 10(8) CFU g(-1) can promote growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, and disease resistance of L. vannamei.

  19. Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Joshua D; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Alborn, Hans T; Lavis, Luke D; Stern, David L

    2014-01-01

    Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors, including navigation and aggregation. Several studies have suggested that behavior during the immature larval stages of Drosophila development is influenced by pheromones, but none of these compounds or the pheromone-receptor neurons that sense them have been identified. Here we report a larval pheromone-signaling pathway. We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae. We identified a single larval chemosensory neuron that detects these molecules. Two members of the pickpocket family of DEG/ENaC channel subunits (ppk23 and ppk29) are required to respond to these pheromones. This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae. Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04205.001 PMID:25497433

  20. Sex pheromone components of Indian gypsy moth, Lymantria obfuscata.

    PubMed

    Gries, Regine; Schaefer, Paul W; Hahn, Roger; Khaskin, Grigori; Ramaseshiah, Gujjandadu; Singh, Balbir; Hehar, Gagandeep K; Gries, Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    The Indian gypsy moth, Lymantria obfuscata (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), has been recognized as a distinct species since 1865 but closely resembles a diminutive form of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. We tested the hypothesis that the sex pheromones of L. obfuscata and L. dispar are similar. In laboratory mate acceptance studies, very few male L. dispar made copulatory attempts when paired with female L. obfuscata, suggesting that female L. obfuscata emit one or more pheromone components antagonistic to male L. dispar. In coupled gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) analyses of pheromone gland extract of female L. obfuscata, (Z)-2-methyloctadec-7-ene (2Me-7Z-18Hy) and (7R,8S)-cis-7,8-epoxy-2-methyloctadecane [(+)-disparlure] were most abundant and elicited the strongest responses from male L. obfuscata antennae. In field experiments near Solan (Himachal Pradesh, India), 2Me-7Z-18Hy and (+)-disparlure in combination attracted more male L. obfuscata than did either component alone. This two-component sex pheromone contrasts with the single-component sex pheromone [(+)-disparlure] of L. dispar. The contrasting composition of the lymantriid communities inhabited by L. obfuscata and L. dispar may explain why 2Me-7Z-18Hy is a pheromone component in L. obfuscata and a pheromone antagonist in L. dispar and why (-)-disparlure reduces pheromonal attraction of male L. dispar but not male L. obfuscata.

  1. Anatomical localization and stereoisomeric composition of Tribolium castaneum aggregation pheromones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report that the abdomen and associated tissues are the predominant sources of male-produced pheromones in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and for the first time describe the stereoisomeric composition of the natural blend of isomers of the aggregation pheromone 4,8-dimethyldecanal (DMD...

  2. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients.

    PubMed

    Muller, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu; Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other.

  3. Evolutionary ecology of pheromone signaling in Dendroctonus frontalis

    Treesearch

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Brian T. Sullivan; Matthew P. Ayres

    2007-01-01

    Although studies of pheromone production in the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) extend back to the dawn of chemical ecology, it is only recently that instrumentation has become sufficiently sensitive to measure pheromone production of individual beetles. Now, recent studies have revealed surprisingly high variation among individuals in...

  4. Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors in both adult and immature stages. Multiple pheromones and neural pathways that underlie adult social behavior have been described in the genetic model organism, Drosophila melanogaster, but there is no...

  5. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other. PMID:27077831

  6. Evidence for a pheromone in the locust borer

    Treesearch

    Jimmy R. Galford

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory studies have suggested the existence of a pheromone in the locust borer. Male beetles spent more time on bolts of wood exposed to virgin females than on control bolts. The females apparently deposited the pheromone on the bolts of wood and filter paper.

  7. Using pheromones in the management of bark beetle outbreaks

    Treesearch

    Alf Bakke

    1991-01-01

    Identification of aggregation pheromones and field experiments using synthetic components have given scientists a better understanding of the behavior of many bark beetles. They have also yielded more effective weapons with which to control outbreaks of aggressive pest species. Synthetic pheromone components are commercially available for control of many species (...

  8. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A.; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  9. Isolation of a pyrazine alarm pheromone component from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alarm pheromones in social insects are an essential part of a complex of pheromone interactions that contribute to the maintenance of colony integrity and sociality. The alarm pheromones of ants were among the first chemical ecology examples, primarily due to the large amount of pheromone produced a...

  10. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  11. Characterization of a Wild, Novel Nisin A-Producing Lactococcus Strain with an L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotype and an L. lactis subsp. lactis Phenotype, Isolated from Greek Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    Parapouli, Maria; Delbès-Paus, Céline; Kakouri, Athanasia; Koukkou, Anna-Irini; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular taxonomic studies have revealed that many natural (wild) Lactococcus lactis strains of dairy origin which are phenotypically representative of the L. lactis subspecies lactis cluster genotypically within subspecies cremoris and vice versa. Recently, we isolated two wild nisin-producing (Nis+) L. lactis strains, M78 and M104, of the lactis phenotype from Greek raw milk (J. Samelis, A. Lianou, A. Kakouri, C. Delbès, I. Rogelj, B. B. Matijašic, and M. C. Montel, J. Food Prot. 72:783–790, 2009); strain M78 possess a novel nisin A sequence (GenBank accession number HM219853). In this study, the actual subspecies identity of M78 and M104 isolates was elucidated, using 16S rRNA and acmA (encoding lactococcal N-acetylmuramidase) gene and histidine biosynthesis operon polymorphisms and 16S rRNA and ldh (encoding lactate dehydrogenase) gene phylogenies. Except the acmA gene analysis, molecular tools revealed that isolates M78 and M104 clustered with strains of the cremoris genotype, including the LMG 6897T strain, while they were distant from strains of the lactis genotype, including the LMG 6890T strain. The two wild isolates had identical repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), plasmid, and whole-cell protein profiles and shared high 16S rRNA (99.9%) and ldh (100%) gene sequence homologies. In contrast, they exhibited identical sugar fermentation and enzymatic patterns which were similar to those of the subspecies lactis LMG 6890T strain. To our knowledge, this is the first complete identification report on a wild L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype of the lactis phenotype which is capable of nisin A production and, thus, has strong potential for use as a novel dairy starter and/or protective culture. PMID:23542625

  12. Evidence that insect herbivores are deterred by ant pheromones.

    PubMed Central

    Offenberg, Joachim; Nielsen, Mogens Gissel; MacIntosh, Donald J; Havanon, Sopon; Aksornkoae, Sanit

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that ants can protect plants against insect herbivores, but the underlying mechanisms remain almost undocumented. We propose and test the pheromone avoidance hypothesis--an indirect mechanism where insect herbivores are repelled not only by ants but also by ant pheromones. Herbivores subjected to ant predation will experience a selective advantage if they evolve mechanisms enabling them to avoid feeding within ant territories. Such a mechanism could be based on the ability to detect and evade ant pheromones. Field observations and data from the literature showed that the ant Oecophylla smaragdina distributes persistent pheromones throughout its territory. In addition, a laboratory test showed that the beetle Rhyparida wallacei, which this ant preys on, was reluctant to feed on leaves sampled within ant territories compared with leaves sampled outside territories. Thus, this study provides an example of an ant-herbivore system conforming to the pheromone avoidance hypothesis. PMID:15801596

  13. Efficient Management of Fruit Pests by Pheromone Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  14. Uncoupling primer and releaser responses to pheromone in honey bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozinger, Christina M.; Fischer, Patrick; Hampton, Jacob E.

    2007-05-01

    Pheromones produce dramatic behavioral and physiological responses in a wide variety of species. Releaser pheromones elicit rapid responses within seconds or minutes, while primer pheromones produce long-term changes which may take days to manifest. Honeybee queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) elicits multiple distinct behavioral and physiological responses in worker bees, as both a releaser and primer, and thus produces responses on vastly different time scales. In this study, we demonstrate that releaser and primer responses to QMP can be uncoupled. First, treatment with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene leaves a releaser response (attraction to QMP) intact, but modulates QMP’s primer effects on sucrose responsiveness. Secondly, two components of QMP (9-ODA and 9-HDA) do not elicit a releaser response (attraction) but are as effective as QMP at modulating a primer response, downregulation of foraging-related brain gene expression. These results suggest that different responses to a single pheromone may be produced via distinct pathways.

  15. Insect pheromones: An overview of function, form, and discovery.

    PubMed

    Yew, Joanne Y; Chung, Henry

    2015-07-01

    For many species of insects, lipid pheromones profoundly influence survival, reproduction, and social organization. Unravelling the chemical language of insects has been the subject of intense research in the field of chemical ecology for the past five decades. Characterizing the forms, functions, and biosynthesis of lipid pheromones has led not only to the development of strategies for controlling agricultural pests but has also provided insights into fundamental questions in evolutionary biology. Despite the enormous variety of chemical structures that are used as pheromones, some common themes in function and biosynthetic pathways have emerged across studies of diverse taxa. This review will offer a general overview of insect lipid pheromone function and biochemical synthesis, describe analytical methods for pheromone discovery, and provide perspectives on the contribution of chemical ecology to pest control and understanding evolutionary processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Roles of sex and gonadal steroids in mammalian pheromonal communication.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michael J; Bakker, Julie

    2013-10-01

    A brain circuit (the accessory olfactory system) that originates in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and includes the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) plus additional forebrain regions mediates many of the effects of pheromones, typically comprised of a variety of non-volatile and volatile compounds, on aspects of social behavior. A second, parallel circuit (the main olfactory system) that originates in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and includes the main olfactory bulb (MOB) has also been shown to detect volatile pheromones from conspecifics. Studies are reviewed that point to specific roles of several different steroids and their water-soluble metabolites as putative pheromones. Other studies are reviewed that establish an adult, 'activational' role of circulating sex hormones along with sex differences in the detection and/or processing of non-steroidal pheromones by these two olfactory circuits. Persisting questions about the role of sex steroids in pheromonal processing are posed for future investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Physico-chemical properties of the female sex pheromone of Heterodera schachtii (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    PubMed

    Aumann, J; Dietsche, E; Rutencrantz, S; Ladehoff, H

    1998-11-01

    Several physico-chemical properties of the female sex pheromone of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii were elucidated. At least one component of the pheromone can be extracted from aqueous solutions with diethyl ether. However, the pheromone has a higher solubility in water, as most of the pheromone activity remained in the water fraction. Ion exchange chromatography revealed that the pheromone or at least one of its components is positively charged, whereas another pheromone component may be negatively charged. Fractional distillation of pheromone extracts showed that it is, indeed, composed of at least two components. These components may interact additively rather than synergistically.

  18. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... derived from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named... fermentation. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... derived from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named... fermentation. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... derived from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named... fermentation. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... derived from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named... fermentation. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals...

  2. Sex and Aggregation-Sex Pheromones of Cerambycid Beetles: Basic Science and Practical Applications.

    PubMed

    Hanks, Lawrence M; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2016-07-01

    Research since 2004 has shown that the use of volatile attractants and pheromones is widespread in the large beetle family Cerambycidae, with pheromones now identified from more than 100 species, and likely pheromones for many more. The pheromones identified to date from species in the subfamilies Cerambycinae, Spondylidinae, and Lamiinae are all male-produced aggregation-sex pheromones that attract both sexes, whereas all known examples for species in the subfamilies Prioninae and Lepturinae are female-produced sex pheromones that attract only males. Here, we summarize the chemistry of the known pheromones, and the optimal methods for their collection, analysis, and synthesis. Attraction of cerambycids to host plant volatiles, interactions between their pheromones and host plant volatiles, and the implications of pheromone chemistry for invasion biology are discussed. We also describe optimized traps, lures, and operational parameters for practical applications of the pheromones in detection, sampling, and management of cerambycids.

  3. Pheromone interruption of pine engraver, Ips pini, by pheromones of mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Miller; John H. Borden

    2000-01-01

    The effect of pheromones of Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins on the attraction of Ips pini (Say) to its pheromone, ipsdienol, was investigated in stands of lodgepole pine. The mixture of cis- and trans-verbenol significantly reduced catches of I. pini in traps baited with...

  4. Pheromone-based disruption of Eucosma sonomana and Rhyacionia zozana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) using aerially applied microencapsulated pheromone

    Treesearch

    Nancy E. Gillette; John D. Stein; Donald R. Owen; Jeffrey N. Webster; Sylvia R. Mori

    2006-01-01

    Two aerial applications of microencapsulated pheromone were conducted on five 20.2 ha plots to disrupt western pine shoot borer (Eucosma sonomana Kearfott) and ponderosa pine tip moth (Rhyacionia zowna (Kearfott): Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) orientation to pheromones and oviposition in ponderosa pine plantations in 2002 and 2004...

  5. Plasminogen-dependent proteolytic activity in Bifidobacterium lactis.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Miccoli, Giacomo; Bergmann, Simone; Turroni, Silvia; Vitali, Beatrice; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2008-08-01

    Bifidobacteria represent one of the most important health-promoting bacterial groups of the intestinal microbiota. The binding of plasminogen to species of Bifidobacterium has been recently reported. To further explore the interaction between bifidobacteria and plasminogen, we investigated the role of Bifidobacterium lactis BI07 plasminogen-dependent proteolytic activity in the degradation of host-specific substrates. Our experimental data demonstrate that the recruitment of plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface and its subsequent conversion into plasmin by host-derived plasminogen activators provide B. lactis BI07 with a surface-associated plasmin activity effective in degradation of physiological substrates such as extracellular matrix, fibronectin and fibrinogen. The ability of bifidobacteria to intervene in the host plasminogen/plasmin system may contribute to facilitating colonization of the host gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Proteomic Signature of Lactococcus lactis NCDO763 Cultivated in Milk†

    PubMed Central

    Gitton, Christophe; Meyrand, Mickael; Wang, Juhui; Caron, Christophe; Trubuil, Alain; Guillot, Alain; Mistou, Michel-Yves

    2005-01-01

    We have compared the proteomic profiles of L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 growing in the synthetic medium M17Lac, skim milk microfiltrate (SMM), and skim milk. SMM was used as a simple model medium to reproduce the initial phase of growth of L. lactis in milk. To widen the analysis of the cytoplasmic proteome, we used two different gel systems (pH ranges of 4 to 7 and 4.5 to 5.5), and the proteins associated with the cell envelopes were also studied by two-dimensional electrophoresis. In the course of the study, we analyzed about 800 spots and identified 330 proteins by mass spectrometry. We observed that the levels of more than 50 and 30 proteins were significantly increased upon growth in SMM and milk, respectively. The large redeployment of protein synthesis was essentially associated with an activation of pathways involved in the metabolism of nitrogenous compounds: peptidolytic and peptide transport systems, amino acid biosynthesis and interconversion, and de novo biosynthesis of purines. We also showed that enzymes involved in reactions feeding the purine biosynthetic pathway in one-carbon units and amino acids have an increased level in SMM and milk. The analysis of the proteomic data suggested that the glutamine synthetase (GS) would play a pivotal role in the adaptation to SMM and milk. The analysis of glnA expression during growth in milk and the construction of a glnA-defective mutant confirmed that GS is an essential enzyme for the development of L. lactis in dairy media. This analysis thus provides a proteomic signature of L. lactis, a model lactic acid bacterium, growing in its technological environment. PMID:16269754

  7. Expanding the recombinant protein quality in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Rueda, Fabian L; Sànchez-García, Laura; Ruiz-Ávila, Luis; Bosser, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena

    2014-12-04

    Escherichia coli has been a main host for the production of recombinant proteins of biomedical interest, but conformational stress responses impose severe bottlenecks that impair the production of soluble, proteolytically stable versions of many protein species. In this context, emerging Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) bacterial hosts provide alternatives as cell factories for recombinant protein production, in which limitations associated to the use of Gram-negative microorganisms might result minimized. Among them, Lactic Acid Bacteria and specially Lactococcus lactis are Gram-positive GRAS organisms in which recombinant protein solubility is generically higher and downstream facilitated, when compared to E. coli. However, deep analyses of recombinant protein quality in this system are still required to completely evaluate its performance and potential for improvement. We have explored here the conformational quality (through specific fluorescence emission) and solubility of an aggregation-prone GFP variant (VP1GFP) produced in L. lactis. In this context, our results show that parameters such as production time, culture conditions and growth temperature have a dramatic impact not only on protein yield, but also on protein solubility and conformational quality, that are particularly favored under fermentative metabolism. Metabolic regime and cultivation temperature greatly influence solubility and conformational quality of an aggregation-prone protein in L. lactis. Specifically, the present study proves that anaerobic growth is the optimal condition for recombinant protein production purposes. Besides, growth temperature plays an important role regulating both protein solubility and conformational quality. Additionally, our results also prove the great versatility for the manipulation of this bacterial system regarding the improvement of functionality, yield and quality of recombinant proteins in this species. These findings not only confirm L. lactis as an

  8. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Bacteriophage Resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Anne M.; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Romero, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins), which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB), none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II) in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes. PMID:23240053

  9. Genes but Not Genomes Reveal Bacterial Domestication of Lactococcus Lactis

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Delphine; Beltramo, Charlotte; Coddeville, Michele; Quentin, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Methodology/Principal Findings The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content) did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST) differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. Conclusion/Significance The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between “environmental” strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and “domesticated” strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the “domesticated” strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable genome

  10. Microbiology neutralization of zearalenone using Lactococcus lactis and Bifidobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Król, A; Pomastowski, P; Rafińska, K; Railean-Plugaru, V; Walczak, J; Buszewski, B

    2017-08-29

    The aim of the study was to neutralize zearalenone by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactococcus lactis and Bifidobacterium sp. and investigate the mechanism of zearalenone (ZEA) binding. Neutralization of ZEA by LAB was confirmed by identification of binding kinetics and spectroscopic studies such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The obtained results showed that the kinetic process of zearalenone binding to L. lactis is not homogeneous but is expressed with an initial rapid stage with about 90% of ZEA biosorption and with a much slower second step. In case of Bifidobacterium sp., the neutralization process is homogeneous; the main stage can be described with about 88% of ZEA biosorption. MALDI-TOF-MS measurements and FTIR analysis confirmed the uptake of zearalenone molecules by bacterial species. Moreover, the assessment of dead and live lactic acid bacteria cells after zearalenone treatment was performed using fluorescence microscopy. Graphical abstract Microbiology neutralization of zearalenone using Lactococcus lactis and Bifidobacterium sp. was confirmed by identification of binding kinetics and spectroscopic studies such as FT-IR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF-MS spectrometry. The mechanism of ZEA binding was also investigated.

  11. Uptake and metabolism of sucrose by Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J; Chassy, B M

    1981-08-01

    Transport and metabolism of sucrose in Streptococcus lactis K1 have been examined. Starved cells of S. lactis K1 grown previously on sucrose accumulated [14C]sucrose by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) (sucrose-PTS; Km, 22 microM; Vmax, 191 mumol transported min-1 g of dry weight of cells-1). The product of group translocation was sucrose 6-phosphate (6-O-phosphoryl-D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside). A specific sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase was identified which cleaved the disaccharide phosphate (Km, 0.10 mM) to glucose 6-phosphate and fructose. The enzyme did not cleave sucrose 6'-phosphate(D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside-6'-phosphate). Extracts prepared from sucrose-grown cells also contained an ATP-dependent mannofructokinase which catalyzed the conversion of fructose to fructose 6-phosphate (Km, 0.33 mM). The sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase activities were coordinately induced during growth on sucrose. Mannofructokinase appeared to be regulated independently of the sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase, since expression also occurred when S. lactis K1 was grown on non-PTS sugars. Expression of the mannofructokinase may be negatively regulated by a component (or a derivative) of the PTS.

  12. Uptake and metabolism of sucrose by Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Chassy, B M

    1981-01-01

    Transport and metabolism of sucrose in Streptococcus lactis K1 have been examined. Starved cells of S. lactis K1 grown previously on sucrose accumulated [14C]sucrose by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) (sucrose-PTS; Km, 22 microM; Vmax, 191 mumol transported min-1 g of dry weight of cells-1). The product of group translocation was sucrose 6-phosphate (6-O-phosphoryl-D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside). A specific sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase was identified which cleaved the disaccharide phosphate (Km, 0.10 mM) to glucose 6-phosphate and fructose. The enzyme did not cleave sucrose 6'-phosphate(D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside-6'-phosphate). Extracts prepared from sucrose-grown cells also contained an ATP-dependent mannofructokinase which catalyzed the conversion of fructose to fructose 6-phosphate (Km, 0.33 mM). The sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase activities were coordinately induced during growth on sucrose. Mannofructokinase appeared to be regulated independently of the sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase, since expression also occurred when S. lactis K1 was grown on non-PTS sugars. Expression of the mannofructokinase may be negatively regulated by a component (or a derivative) of the PTS. PMID:6267012

  13. Facts, fallacies, fears, and frustrations with human pheromones.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Charles J; Preti, George

    2004-11-01

    Among primates in general, pheromones are of variable importance to social communication. Data on humans have generated the greatest controversy regarding the existence of pheromonal communication. In this review, the likelihood of pheromonal communication in humans is assessed with a discussion of chemical compounds produced by the axilla that may function as pheromones; the likelihood that the vomeronasal organ (VNO), a putative pheromone receptor organ in many other mammals, is functional in humans; and the possible ways pheromones operate in humans. In the human axilla, the interactions between the cutaneous microflora and axillary secretions render this region analogous to scent glands found in other primates. Both the chemistry of axillary secretions and their effects on conspecifics in humans appear to be analogous to other mammalian pheromone systems. Whichever chemical compounds serve a pheromonal function in humans, another unknown is the receptor. Although the VNO has been implicated in the reception of pheromones in many vertebrates, it is not the only pathway through which such information has access to the central nervous system; there is ample evidence to support the view that the olfactory epithelium can respond to pheromones. Furthermore, if a chemical activates receptors within the VNO, this does not necessarily mean that the compound is a pheromone. An important caveat for humans is that critical components typically found within the functioning VNO of other, nonprimate, mammals are lacking, suggesting that the human VNO does not function in the way that has been described for other mammals. In a broader perspective, pheromones can be classified as primers, signalers, modulators, and releasers. There is good evidence to support the presence of the former three in humans. Examples include affects on the menstrual cycle (primer effects); olfactory recognition of newborn by its mother (signaler); individuals may exude different odors based on mood

  14. Effect of sugar concentration in Jerusalem artichoke extract on Kluyveromyces marxianus growth and ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1983-02-01

    The effect of inulin sugars concentration on the growth and ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was studied. A maximum ethanol concentration of 102 g/liter was obtained from 250 g of sugars per liter initial concentration. The maximum specific growth rate varied from 0.44 h/sup -1/ at 50 g of sugar per liter to 0.13 h/sup -1/ at 300 g of sugar per liter, whereas the ethanol yield remained almost constant at 0.45 g of ethanol per g of sugars utilized.

  15. Effect of Sugar Concentration in Jerusalem Artichoke Extract on Kluyveromyces marxianus Growth and Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Margaritis, Argyrios; Bajpai, Pratima

    1983-01-01

    The effect of inulin sugars concentration on the growth and ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was studied. A maximum ethanol concentration of 102 g/liter was obtained from 250 g of sugars per liter initial concentration. The maximum specific growth rate varied from 0.44 h−1 at 50 g of sugar per liter to 0.13 h−1 at 300 g of sugar per liter, whereas the ethanol yield remained almost constant at 0.45 g of ethanol per g of sugars utilized. PMID:16346222

  16. Direct Fermentation of d-Xylose to Ethanol by Kluyveromyces marxianus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Margaritis, Argyrios; Bajpai, Pratima

    1982-01-01

    Eight strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus were screened, and all of them were found to ferment the aldopentose d-xylose directly to ethanol under aerobic conditions. One of these strains, K. marxianus SUB-80-S, was grown in a medium containing 20 g of d-xylose per liter, and the following results were obtained: maximum ethanol concentration, 5.6 g/liter; ethanol yield, 0.28 g of ethanol per g of d-xylose (55% of theoretical); maximum specific growth rate, 0.12 h−1; 100% d-xylose utilization was completed in 48 h. PMID:16346128

  17. The utilization of 4-aminobutylphosphonate as sole nitrogen source by a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis.

    PubMed

    Ternan, N G; McMullan, G

    2000-03-15

    A strain of the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis was screened for its ability to utilize a range of synthetic and natural organophosphonate compounds as the sole source of phosphorus, nitrogen or carbon. Only 4-aminobutylphosphonate was utilized as sole nitrogen source with protein yields increasing proportionally with substrate concentrations up to 10 mM. No 4-aminobutylphosphonate metabolizing enzyme activity was detectable in cell-free extracts prepared from K. fragilis pregrown on 2.5 mM 4-aminobutylphosphonate. None of the organophosphonates tested served as a source of carbon or phosphorus for K. fragilis.

  18. Sensitivity and specificity in Drosophila pheromone perception.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard

    2007-10-01

    How the brain perceives volatile chemicals in the environment to evoke the appropriate behaviour is a fundamental question in sensory neuroscience. The olfactory system of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a powerful model system to address this problem. Recent analysis of the molecular, neuroanatomical and physiological properties of the olfactory circuits that detect the sex and social aggregation pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate now provides one of the most comprehensive outlines for the neural basis of odour perception. This review describes these latest advances, discusses what they reveal about where stimulus sensitivity and specificity is encoded in olfactory circuits, and considers future questions.

  19. Pheromone-inducible conjugation in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowicz, Briana K.; Dworkin, Martin; Dunny, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    Pheromone-inducible transfer of the plasmid pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis is regulated using a complicated network of proteins and RNAs. The plasmid itself has been assembled from parts garnered from a variety of sources, and many aspects of the system resemble a biological kluge. Recently several new functions of various pCF10 gene products that participate in regulation of plasmid transfer have been identified. The results indicate that selective pressures controlling the evolution of the plasmid have produced a highly complex regulatory network with multiple biological functions that may serve well as a model for the evolution of biological complexity. PMID:16503196

  20. Identification and characterization of the alpha-acetolactate synthase gene from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis.

    PubMed Central

    Marugg, J D; Goelling, D; Stahl, U; Ledeboer, A M; Toonen, M Y; Verhue, W M; Verrips, C T

    1994-01-01

    The conversion of 3-13C-labelled pyruvate in an acetoin-producing clone from a Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis strain DSM 20384 plasmid bank in Escherichia coli was studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The results showed that alpha-acetolactate was the first metabolic product formed from pyruvate, whereas acetoin appeared at a much slower rate and reached only low concentrations. This alpha-acetolactate production shows that the cells express the gene for alpha-acetolactate synthase (als). Nucleotide sequence analysis identified an open reading frame encoding a protein of 554 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibits extensive similarities to those of known alpha-acetolactate synthases from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The als gene is expressed on a monocistronic transcriptional unit, which is transcribed from a promoter located just upstream of the coding region. Images PMID:8017926

  1. Catalytic activity of tripeptidase from Lactococcus lactis to which amino acid substitution was introduced according to natural mutation.

    PubMed

    Mori, Sumiko; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2004-05-01

    Four mutations observed between tripeptidases from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and subsp. cremoris were introduced one by one to the corresponding points in wild-type tripeptidase from L. lactis subsp. lactis. The k(cat) values of four resultant mutants were analyzed and discussed in stereographical terms. Change in catalytic activity appeared to be related to the sequential and steric location of mutation point within the enzyme protein, even though no drastic change was observed with one point mutation.

  2. Tolerance to high osmolality of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and cremoris is related to the activity of a betaine transport system.

    PubMed

    Obis, D; Guillot, A; Mistou, M Y

    2001-08-07

    Lactococcus lactis strains from the subsp. cremoris are described as more sensitive to osmotic stress than subsp. lactis strains. We examined the relation between osmotic tolerance and the activity of the betaine transporter BusA among 34 strains of L. lactis. The cremoris strains that showed reduced growth at high osmolality failed to accumulate betaine. The nature of the defect was found to vary among cremoris strains: lack of the busA encoding region, absence of synthesis or synthesis of an inactive form of BusA. The results suggest that the selection of strains well fitted to the dairy production lead to the loss of an otherwise efficient adaptation mechanism.

  3. Lactolisterin BU, a novel Class II broad spectrum bacteriocin from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis BGBU1-4.

    PubMed

    Lozo, Jelena; Mirkovic, Nemanja; O'Connor, Paula M; Malesevic, Milka; Miljkovic, Marija; Polovic, Natalija; Jovcic, Branko; Cotter, Paul D; Kojic, Milan

    2017-08-25

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis BGBU1-4 produces a novel bacteriocin, lactolisterin BU, with strong antimicrobial activity against many species of Gram-positive bacteria, including important food spoilage and food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus sp. and streptococci. Lactolisterin BU was extracted from the cell surface of BGBU1-4 by propan-2-ol and purified to homogeneity by C18 solid phase extraction and reversed phase HPLC. The molecular mass of the purified lactolisterin BU was 5160.94 Da and an internal fragment, AVSWAWQH, as determined by N-terminal sequencing, showed low level similarity with existing antimicrobial peptides. Curing and transformation experiments revealed the presence of a corresponding bacteriocin operon on the smallest plasmid pBU6 (6.2 kb) of strain BGBU1-4. Analysis of the bacteriocin operon revealed a leaderless bacteriocin of 43 amino acids that exhibited similarity to bacteriocin BHT-B (63%), from Streptococcus ratti, a bacteriocin with analogy to aureocin A.IMPORTANCE Lactolisterin BU, broad spectrum leaderless bacteriocin produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis BGBU1-4 strain, expresses strong antimicrobial activity against food spoilage and food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus sp. and streptococci. Lactolisterin BU showed highest similarity with aureocin like bacteriocins produced by different bacteria. Operon for synthesis is plasmid located on the smallest plasmid pBU6 (6.2 kb) of strain BGBU1-4, indicating possible horizontal transfer among producers. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Production, active staining and gas chromatography assay analysis of recombinant aminopeptidase P from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis DSM 20481

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aminopeptidase P (PepP, EC 3.4.11.9) gene from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis DSM 20481 was cloned, sequenced and expressed recombinantly in E. coli BL21 (DE3) for the first time. PepP is involved in the hydrolysis of proline-rich proteins and, thus, is important for the debittering of protein hydrolysates. For accurate determination of PepP activity, a novel gas chromatographic assay was established. The release of L-leucine during the hydrolysis of L-leucine-L-proline-L-proline (LPP) was examined for determination of PepP activity. Sufficient recombinant PepP production was achieved via bioreactor cultivation at 16 °C, resulting in PepP activity of 90 μkatLPP Lculture-1. After automated chromatographic purification by His-tag affinity chromatography followed by desalting, PepP activity of 73.8 μkatLPP Lculture-1 was achieved. This was approximately 700-fold higher compared to the purified native PepP produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis NCDO 763 as described in literature. The molecular weight of PepP was estimated to be ~ 40 kDa via native-PAGE together with a newly developed activity staining method and by SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters Km and Vmax were determined for PepP using three different tripeptide substrates. The purified enzyme showed a pH optimum between 7.0 and 7.5, was most active between 50°C and 60°C and exhibited reasonable stability at 0°C, 20°C and 37°C over 15 days. PepP activity could be increased 6-fold using 8.92 mM MnCl2 and was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. PMID:22853547

  5. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-02

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular biology of peptide pheromone production and reception in mice.

    PubMed

    Touhara, Kazushige

    2007-01-01

    Intraspecies communication via pheromones plays an important role in social and sexual behaviors, which are critical for survival and reproduction in many animal species. In mice, pheromonal signals are processed by the parallel action of two olfactory systems: the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal pathway. Pheromones are recognized by chemosensory receptors expressed in the main olfactory epithelium and by V1R- and V2R-type receptors expressed in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Mice take advantage of the chemical properties of both types of pheromones (i.e., volatile/nonvolatile) to precisely control the spatial and temporal transmission of their individual signals. The recent discovery of the exocrine gland-secreting peptide (ESP) family, which appears to encode a VNO-specific ligand repertoire, should open a new avenue to understanding peptide pheromone-mediated communication via the vomeronasal pathway in mice. In this chapter, I will review the current knowledge on genetic and molecular aspects of peptide pheromones and their receptors, by focusing primarily on the mouse VNO system. It is also an intriguing aspect to discuss peptide pheromones in the context of the evolutionary importance of species-specific chemical communication.

  7. Analysis of Male Pheromones That Accelerate Female Reproductive Organ Development

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Kelly A.; Webb, William; Stowers, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Male odors can influence a female's reproductive physiology. In the mouse, the odor of male urine results in an early onset of female puberty. Several volatile and protein pheromones have previously been reported to each account for this bioactivity. Here we bioassay inbred BALB/cJ females to study pheromone-accelerated uterine growth, a developmental hallmark of puberty. We evaluate the response of wild-type and mutant mice lacking a specialized sensory transduction channel, TrpC2, and find TrpC2 function to be necessary for pheromone-mediated uterine growth. We analyze the relative effectiveness of pheromones previously identified to accelerate puberty through direct bioassay and find none to significantly accelerate uterine growth in BALB/cJ females. Complementary to this analysis, we have devised a strategy of partial purification of the uterine growth bioactivity from male urine and applied it to purify bioactivity from three different laboratory strains. The biochemical characteristics of the active fraction of all three strains are inconsistent with that of previously known pheromones. When directly analyzed, we are unable to detect previously known pheromones in urine fractions that generate uterine growth. Our analysis indicates that pheromones emitted by males to advance female puberty remain to be identified. PMID:21347429

  8. Analysis of male pheromones that accelerate female reproductive organ development.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Kelly A; Webb, William; Stowers, Lisa

    2011-02-08

    Male odors can influence a female's reproductive physiology. In the mouse, the odor of male urine results in an early onset of female puberty. Several volatile and protein pheromones have previously been reported to each account for this bioactivity. Here we bioassay inbred BALB/cJ females to study pheromone-accelerated uterine growth, a developmental hallmark of puberty. We evaluate the response of wild-type and mutant mice lacking a specialized sensory transduction channel, TrpC2, and find TrpC2 function to be necessary for pheromone-mediated uterine growth. We analyze the relative effectiveness of pheromones previously identified to accelerate puberty through direct bioassay and find none to significantly accelerate uterine growth in BALB/cJ females. Complementary to this analysis, we have devised a strategy of partial purification of the uterine growth bioactivity from male urine and applied it to purify bioactivity from three different laboratory strains. The biochemical characteristics of the active fraction of all three strains are inconsistent with that of previously known pheromones. When directly analyzed, we are unable to detect previously known pheromones in urine fractions that generate uterine growth. Our analysis indicates that pheromones emitted by males to advance female puberty remain to be identified.

  9. Pheromonal influences on sociosexual behavior in young women.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Norma L; Pitino, Lisa

    2002-03-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a synthesized putative female pheromone was conducted with regularly menstruating, university women (N=36, mean age=27.8). The pheromone formula was derived from earlier work investigating the underarm secretions of fertile, sexually active, heterosexual women. A vial of either synthesized pheromone or placebo was selected blindly and added to a subject's perfume. Subjects recorded seven sociosexual behaviors and reported them weekly across three menstrual cycles. Beginning with Day 8 of each cycle, the first cycle contained a 2-week baseline period followed by an experimental period of as many as 3 weeks each from the next two cycles for a maximum of 6 weeks. The 19 pheromone and 17 placebo subjects did not differ significantly in age, weight, body mass index, dating status or ethnicity nor in reported accuracy, back-filling data, perception of a positive effect or perfume use. Placebo subjects were significantly taller than pheromone subjects. Except for male approaches, subjects did not differ significantly at baseline in average weekly sociosexual behaviors. A significantly greater proportion of pheromone users compared with placebo users increased over baseline in frequency of sexual intercourse, sleeping next to a partner, formal dates and petting/affection/kissing but not in frequency of male approaches, informal dates or masturbation. Three or more sociosexual behaviors increased over baseline for 74% of pheromone users compared with 23% of placebo users. We conclude that this synthesized pheromone formula acted as a sex attractant pheromone and increased the sexual attractiveness of women to men.

  10. Isolation of the trail recruitment pheromone ofSolenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Vander Meer, R K; Alvarez, F; Lofgren, C S

    1988-03-01

    TheSolenopsis invicta trail pheromone is synthesized by the Dufour's gland and is released through the sting apparatus. The recruitment subcategory of theS. invicta trail pheromone was shown to be composed of a mixture of the orientation pheromone, (Z,E)-α-farnesene and an unidentified homosesquiterpene consisting of three rings and one double bond (C-1). C-1 is present in worker Dufour's glands at only 75 pg per worker equivalent. This is the first report that demonstrates that different exocrine products from the same gland control different subcategories of behavior related to mass recruitment.

  11. Worker honey bee pheromone regulation of foraging ontogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankiw, Tanya

    The evolution of sociality has configured communication chemicals, called primer pheromones, which play key roles in regulating the organization of social life. Primer pheromones exert relatively slow effects that fundamentally alter developmental, physiological, and neural systems. Here, I demonstrate how substances extracted from the surface of foraging and young pre-foraging worker bees regulated age at onset of foraging, a developmental process. Hexane-extractable compounds washed from foraging workers increased foraging age compared with controls, whereas extracts of young pre-foraging workers decreased foraging age. This represents the first known direct demonstration of primer pheromone activity derived from adult worker bees.

  12. Isolation of a respiratory-deficient Kluyveromyces fragilis mutant for the production of ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Bourgi, J.; Stervinou, M.; Claisse, M.; Galzy, P.

    1987-05-01

    A respiratory-deficient mutant of Kluyveromyces fragilis was isolated using a ethidium bromide mutagenesis. It was characterized by a loss of cytochromes a + a3 and by an improvement of its inulinase activity. Under anaerobic conditions this mutant was always better than the wild strain for ethanol production especially from Jerusalem artichoke extracts containing large amounts of high polyfructosans (early extracts).

  13. Kluyveromyces aestuarii, a potential environmental quality indicator yeast for mangroves in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, F.V.; Hagler, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    Kluyveromyces aestuarii was found in sediments from 7 of 8 mangroves in Rio de Janeiro; and absent only at one site with heavy plastic bag pollution. Its presence suggests influence in other habitats from a mangrove and its absence in a mangrove suggests some non- fecal pollution or other habitat alteration. PMID:24031711

  14. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  15. Pheromone signaling during sexual reproduction in algae.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Johannes; Vyverman, Wim; Pohnert, Georg

    2014-08-01

    Algae are found in all aquatic and many terrestrial habitats. They are dominant in phytoplankton and biofilms thereby contributing massively to global primary production. Since algae comprise photosynthetic representatives of the various protoctist groups their physiology and appearance is highly diverse. This diversity is also mirrored in their characteristic life cycles that exhibit various facets of ploidy and duration of the asexual phase as well as gamete morphology. Nevertheless, sexual reproduction in unicellular and colonial algae usually has as common motive that two specialized, sexually compatible haploid gametes establish physical contact and fuse. To guarantee mating success, processes during sexual reproduction are highly synchronized and regulated. This review focuses on sex pheromones of algae that play a key role in these processes. Especially, the diversity of sexual strategies as well as of the compounds involved are the focus of this contribution. Discoveries connected to algal pheromone chemistry shed light on the role of key evolutionary processes, including endosymbiotic events and lateral gene transfer, speciation and adaptation at all phylogenetic levels. But progress in this field might also in the future provide valid tools for the manipulation of aquaculture and environmental processes.

  16. Palm Weevil Pheromones - Discovery and Use.

    PubMed

    Oehlschlager, A C

    2016-07-01

    Male-produced aggregation pheromones of seven major pest species of weevils in the subfamily Rhynchophorinae have been identified as a closely related set of methyl-branched secondary alcohols. Although the weevils produce only one stereoisomer of these alcohols, no instances of isomeric inhibition have been observed, enabling stereoisomeric mixtures to be used in traps. Addition of fermenting plant material to traps synergizes attraction of weevils to the pheromones. The weevils are large, have long life cycles, and are strong fliers. These characteristics make mass trapping a suitable tactic to add to existing management strategies. When coupled with good phytosanitary practices, mass trapping of Rhynchophorus palmarum at 1 trap/5-ha significantly lowered the incidence of red ring nematode infection vectored by the weevil in commercial oil palm plantations in the Americas. Similarly, trap densities of 1-10 traps/ha have significantly lowered R. ferrugineus infestation of date palm throughout the Middle East. Although management of R. ferrugineus in urban areas is more problematic, trapping is an integral part of most programs aimed at protection of ornamental Canary palms in Europe. Overall, semiochemically-based management of these large weevils is now a mature and usually economically feasible control technology.

  17. Pheromones in birds: myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Samuel P.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Birds are anosmic or at best microsmatic… This misbelief persisted until very recently and has strongly influenced the outcome of communication studies in birds, with olfaction remaining neglected as compared to acoustic and visual channels. However, there is now clear empirical evidence showing that olfaction is perfectly functional in birds and birds use olfactory information in a variety of ethological contexts. Although the existence of pheromones has never been formally demonstrated in this vertebrate class, different groups of birds, such as petrels, auklets and ducks have been shown to produce specific scents that could play a significant role in within-species social interactions. Behavioral experiments have indeed demonstrated that these odors influence the behavior of conspecifics. Additionally, in quail, deprivation of olfactory inputs decreases neuronal activation induced by sexual interactions with a female. It seems therefore well established that birds enjoy a functional sense of smell and a fast growing body of experimental evidence suggests that they use this channel of olfactory communication to control their social life. The unequivocal identification of an avian pheromone is, however, still ahead of us but there are now many exciting opportunities to unravel the behavioral and physiological particularities of chemical communication in birds. PMID:20490809

  18. Genome Sequence of a Lactococcus lactis Strain Isolated from Salmonid Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Rafael; Gajardo, Felipe; Ruiz, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a common inhabitant of the intestinal microbiota of salmonids, especially those in aquaculture systems. Here, we present a genome sequence of a Lactococcus lactis strain isolated from the intestinal contents of rainbow trout reared in Chile. PMID:27563049

  19. An in vitro investigation of Lactococcus lactis antagonizing cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Zhou, Lin; Li, Jie; Kuang, Rong; Lin, Yuan; Ni, Longxing

    2012-04-01

    The present study tested the antagonism between Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus mutans and evaluated the feasibility of the application of L. lactis for the inhibition of S. mutans in the oral cavity. Competition assays on plates were employed to determine whether L. lactis antagonises S. mutans under different nutritional conditions, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to evaluate the effects of metabolites of S. mutans on the bacteriocin nisin genes in L. lactis. Furthermore, the colonisation and effects of L. lactis on the surface of a tooth were examined by scanning electron microscopy. L. lactis competitively inhibited S. mutans growth under nutritional deficiency, and the metabolites of S. mutans, including several exogenous molecular signals, enhanced the expression of genes related to nisin synthesis, nisA, nisB and nisI. Additionally, L. lactis effectively colonised the surface of tooth enamel, which showed substantially less decay with L. lactis adhesion compared to S. mutans adhesion. These findings suggest avenues of research into a new strategy to reduce major cariogenic S. mutans adhesion on the surfaces of teeth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Increasing the Heme-Dependent Respiratory Efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by Inhibition of Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Daniele; Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Pedersen, Martin B.; Pedersen, Per Dedenroth; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of heme-induced respiration in Lactococcus lactis has radically improved the industrial processes used for the biomass production of this species. Here, we show that inhibition of the lactate dehydrogenase activity of L. lactis during growth under respiration-permissive conditions can stimulate aerobic respiration, thereby increasing not only growth efficiency but also the robustness of this organism. PMID:23064338

  1. Antihypertensive and hypolipidemic effect of milk fermented by specific Lactococcus lactis strains.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C; González-Córdova, A F; Astiazaran-García, H; Hernández-Mendoza, A; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2013-07-01

    The antihypertensive and hypolipidemic effects of milk fermented by specific Lactococcus lactis strains in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were investigated. The SHR were fed ad libitum milk fermented by Lc. lactis NRRL B-50571, Lc. lactis NRRL B-50572, Captopril (40mg/kg of body weight, Sigma-Aldrich Co., St. Louis, MO) or purified water for 4 wk. Results suggested that Lc. lactis fermented milks presented a significant blood pressure-lowering effect. No significant difference was noted among milk fermented by Lc. lactis NRRL B-50571 and Captopril by the second and third week of treatment. Additionally, milk fermented by Lc. lactis strains modified SHR lipid profiles. Milk fermented by Lc. lactis NRRL B-50571 and B-50572 were able to reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride contents. Thus, milk fermented by Lc. lactis strains may be a coadjuvant in the reduction of hypertension and hyperlipidemia and may be used as a functional food for better cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. New insights into honey bee (Apis mellifera) pheromone communication. Is the queen mandibular pheromone alone in colony regulation?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In social insects, the queen is essential to the functioning and homeostasis of the colony. This influence has been demonstrated to be mediated through pheromone communication. However, the only social insect for which any queen pheromone has been identified is the honey bee (Apis mellifera) with its well-known queen mandibular pheromone (QMP). Although pleiotropic effects on colony regulation are accredited to the QMP, this pheromone does not trigger the full behavioral and physiological response observed in the presence of the queen, suggesting the presence of additional compounds. We tested the hypothesis of a pheromone redundancy in honey bee queens by comparing the influence of queens with and without mandibular glands on worker behavior and physiology. Results Demandibulated queens had no detectable (E)-9-oxodec-2-enoic acid (9-ODA), the major compound in QMP, yet they controlled worker behavior (cell construction and queen retinue) and physiology (ovary inhibition) as efficiently as intact queens. Conclusions We demonstrated that the queen uses other pheromones as powerful as QMP to control the colony. It follows that queens appear to have multiple active compounds with similar functions in the colony (pheromone redundancy). Our findings support two hypotheses in the biology of social insects: (1) that multiple semiochemicals with synonymous meaning exist in the honey bee, (2) that this extensive semiochemical vocabulary exists because it confers an evolutionary advantage to the colony. PMID:20565874

  3. Disruption of pheromone communication of Choristoneura rosaceana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) using microencapsulated sex pheromones formulated with horticultural oil.

    PubMed

    Wins-Purdy, A H; Judd, G J R; Evenden, M L

    2007-10-01

    Sprayable, microencapsulated (MEC) sex pheromone formulations represent a promising tool for achieving mating disruption, yet often lack sustained effectiveness in the field, making repeated applications necessary. This study evaluated the impact of adding Purespray Green horticultural oil as an adjuvant to 3M MEC-LR, an MEC formulation of (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate, on disruption of mate-finding behavior in Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) in small-plot trials in experimental apple orchards. Treatments consisting of MEC-LR in water, MEC-LR in water + 2% (vol:vol) Purespray Green, and a water control were applied to plots of apple using an airblast sprayer at a rate of 100 g of pheromone/ha. Disruption caused by foliar treatments was evaluated over a 7-wk period using mark-release recapture experiments in the field and concurrent bioassays in a flight tunnel. Disruption of orientation to 2-d-old, calling, virgin females was used as a measure of treatment effect in all experiments. Both pheromone alone and pheromone + oil treatments significantly disrupted male mate-finding behavior for a period of > or =21 d in flight tunnel assays and > or =42 d in mark-recapture field trials. The addition of oil did not significantly enhance the disruption activity nor increase the longevity of the MEC pheromone formulation. Our results show the compatibility of spraying MEC pheromone with a horticultural oil, and techniques for applying an oil-pheromone formulation to maximize the control impact of this combination are discussed.

  4. Yeast pheromone pathway modeling using Petri nets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our environment is composed of biological components of varying magnitude. The relationships between the different biological elements can be represented as a biological network. The process of mating in S. cerevisiae is initiated by secretion of pheromone by one of the cells. Our interest lies in one particular question: how does a cell dynamically adapt the pathway to continue mating under severe environmental changes or under mutation (which might result in the loss of functionality of some proteins known to participate in the pheromone pathway). Our work attempts to answer this question. To achieve this, we first propose a model to simulate the pheromone pathway using Petri nets. Petri nets are directed graphs that can be used for describing and modeling systems characterized as concurrent, asynchronous, distributed, parallel, non-deterministic, and/or stochastic. We then analyze our Petri net-based model of the pathway to investigate the following: 1) Given the model of the pheromone response pathway, under what conditions does the cell respond positively, i.e., mate? 2) What kinds of perturbations in the cell would result in changing a negative response to a positive one? Method In our model, we classify proteins into two categories: core component proteins (set ψ) and additional proteins (set λ). We randomly generate our model's parameters in repeated simulations. To simulate the pathway, we carry out three different experiments. In the experiments, we simply change the concentration of the additional proteins (λ) available to the cell. The concentration of proteins in ψ is varied consistently from 300 to 400. In Experiment 1, the range of values for λ is set to be 100 to 150. In Experiment 2, it is set to be 151 to 200. In Experiment 3, the set λ is further split into σ and ς, with the idea that proteins in σ are more important than those in ς. The range of values for σ is set to be between 151 to 200 while that of ς is 100 to 150

  5. Acquisition of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus from unpasteurised milk by a kefir grain enhances kefir quality.

    PubMed

    Gethins, Loughlin; Rea, Mary C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Kilcawley, Kieran; O'Sullivan, Maurice; Crotty, Suzanne; Morrissey, John P

    2016-08-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk beverage consumed for nutritional and health tonic benefits in many parts of the world. It is produced by the fermentation of milk with a consortium of bacteria and yeast embedded within a polysaccharide matrix. This consortium is not well defined and can vary substantially between kefir grains. There are little data on the microbial stability of kefir grains, nor on interactions between microbes in the grain and in the milk. To study this, a grain was split, with one half of each stored at -20°C and the other half passaged repeatedly in whole unpasteurised milk. Grains passaged in the unpasteurised milk recovered vigour and acquired the yeast Kluyveromyces marxainus from the milk which was confirmed to be the same strain by molecular typing. Furthermore, these passaged grains produced kefir that was distinguished chemically and organoleptically from the stored grains. Some changes in ultrastructure were also observed by scanning electron microscopy. The study showed that kefir grains can acquire yeast from their environment and the final product can be influenced by these newly acquired yeasts. Kluyveromyces marxianus is considered to be responsible for some of the most important characteristics of kefir so the finding that this yeast is part of the less stable microbiota is significant. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Encapsulated whey-native yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus as a feed additive for animal production.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vergara, Ladislao; Pereyra, Carina Maricel; Montenegro, Mariana; Pena, Gabriela Alejandra; Aminahuel, Carla Ayelen; Cavaglieri, Lilia R

    2017-03-06

    Whey is the main byproduct of the cheese industry. While the composition is variable, it retains up to 55% of milk nutrients. The beneficial features of whey indicates a promising source of new potentially probiotic strains for the development of food additives destined for animal production. The aim of this study was to identify Kluyveromyces spp. isolated from whey, to study some probiotic properties and to select the best strain to be encapsulated using derivatised chitosan. Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (VM003, VM004 and VM005) were isolated from whey and identified by phenotypic and molecular techniques. These three yeast strains were able to survive under gastrointestinal conditions. Moreover, they exhibited weak auto-aggregation and co-aggregation with pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella sp., Serratia sp., Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium). In general the K. marxianus strains had a strong antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria. The potential probiotic K. marxianus VM004 strain was selected for derivatised-chitosan encapsulation. Material treated with native chitosan exhibited a strong antimicrobial activity of K. marxianus, showing a total growth inhibition at 10 min exposure. However, derivatised-chitosan encapsulation showed a reduced antimicrobial activity. This is the first study to show some probiotic properties of whey-native K. marxianus, in vitro. An encapsulation strategy was applied using derivatised chitosan.

  7. Continuous ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. I. Use of free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-07-01

    The continuous fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke juice to ethanol by free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 has been studied in a continuous-stirred tank bioreactor at 35 degrees C and pH 4.6. A maximum ethanol yield of 90% of the theoretical was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.05/h. About 95% of the sugars were utilized at dilution rates lower than 0.15/h. Volumetric ethanol productivity and volumetric biomass productivity reached maximum values of 7 g EtOH/L/h and 0.6 g dry wt/L/h, respectively, at a dilution rate of 0.2h. The maintenance energy coefficient for Kluyveromyces marxianus culture was found to be 0.46 g sugar/g biomass/h. Oscillatory behavior was observed following a change in dilution rate from a previous steady state and from batch to continuous culture. Values of specific ethanol production rate and specific sugar uptake were found to increase almost linearly with the increase of the dilution rate. The maximum specific ethanol production rate and maximum specific sugar uptake rate were found to be 2.6 g ethanol/g cell/h and 7.9 sugars/g cell/h, respectively. Washout occurred at a dilution rate of 0.41/h. (Refs. 21).

  8. Performance evaluation of Pichia kluyveri, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in industrial tequila fermentation.

    PubMed

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Herrera-López, E J; Arrizon, Javier; Arellano-Plaza, M; Gschaedler, A

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, industrial tequila production has used spontaneous fermentation or Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains. Despite the potential of non-Saccharomyces strains for alcoholic fermentation, few studies have been performed at industrial level with these yeasts. Therefore, in this work, Agave tequilana juice was fermented at an industrial level using two non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Pichia kluyveri and Kluyveromyces marxianus) with fermentation efficiency higher than 85 %. Pichia kluyveri (GRO3) was more efficient for alcohol and ethyl lactate production than S. cerevisiae (AR5), while Kluyveromyces marxianus (GRO6) produced more isobutanol and ethyl-acetate than S. cerevisiae (AR5). The level of volatile compounds at the end of fermentation was compared with the tequila standard regulation. All volatile compounds were within the allowed range except for methanol, which was higher for S. cerevisiae (AR5) and K. marxianus (GRO6). The variations in methanol may have been caused by the Agave tequilana used for the tests, since this compound is not synthesized by these yeasts.

  9. European corn borer sex pheromone : Inhibition and elicitation of behavioral response by analogs.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Klun, J A; Uebel, E C

    1990-05-01

    The male sexual behavior-stimulating and inhibiting properties of a series of analogs of the European corn borer sex pheromone were determined in a flight tunnel. The structural requirements for inhibition of pheromonal response were far less restrictive than those for elicitation of that response. Analogs that by themselves elicited upwind flight response from males at a low dose were generally less inhibitory to male response than many of the analogs that had no pheromonal activity. These findings suggest that many pheromone analogs bind to pheromone receptors without provoking behavioral response and possibly undergo slower degradation on the antenna than pheromonally active compounds. The disparity of response to analogs by two pheromonal types of the European corn borer indicates that the pheromone receptor and pheromone catabolic systems are biochemically very different in the two types.

  10. Acute behavioral responses to pheromones in C. elegans (adult behaviors: attraction, repulsion).

    PubMed

    Jang, Heeun; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2013-01-01

    The pheromone drop test is a simple and robust behavioral assay to quantify acute avoidance of pheromones in C. elegans, and the suppression of avoidance by attractive pheromones. In the pheromone drop test, water-soluble C. elegans pheromones are individually applied to animals that are freely moving on a large plate. Upon encountering a repellent, each C. elegans animal may or may not try to escape by making a long reversal. The fraction of animals that make a long reversal response indicates the repulsiveness of a given pheromone to a specific genotype/strain of C. elegans. Performing the drop test in the presence of bacterial food enhances the avoidance response to pheromones. Attraction to pheromones can be assayed by the suppression of reversals to repulsive pheromones or by the suppression of the basal reversal rate to buffer.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly L-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR fingerprint characterization of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactococcus garvieae isolated from bovine intramammary infections.

    PubMed

    Plumed-Ferrer, C; Barberio, A; Franklin-Guild, R; Werner, B; McDonough, P; Bennett, J; Gioia, G; Rota, N; Welcome, F; Nydam, D V; Moroni, P

    2015-09-01

    In total, 181 streptococci-like bacteria isolated from intramammary infections (IMI) were submitted by a veterinary clinic to Quality Milk Production Services (QMPS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY). The isolates were characterized by sequence analysis, and 46 Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and 47 Lactococcus garvieae were tested for susceptibility to 17 antibiotics. No resistant strains were found for β-lactam antibiotics widely used in clinical practice (penicillin, ampicillin, and amoxicillin), and all minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were far from the resistance breakpoints. Eight strains had MIC intermediate to cefazolin. The random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR fingerprint patterns showed a slightly higher heterogeneity for Lc. lactis ssp. lactis isolates than for Lc. garvieae isolates.

  13. Partial characterization of an rpoD-like gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 with a polymerase chain reaction-based approach.

    PubMed

    Gansel, X; Dutreix, M; Hartke, A; Boutibonnes, P; Auffray, Y

    1993-11-01

    With degenerated oligonucleotide primers for conserved regions of bacterial sigma factor proteins, a 117-bp internal DNA fragment of an rpoD-like gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA sequence of this PCR product was determined by cycle sequencing, and the deduced amino acid sequence of this internal fragment showed an extensive homology with the known sigma factor sequences from six other microorganisms and present a 13-amino acid region corresponding to the typical "RpoD box" of primary sigma factors. This PCR product was used as a probe to specifically detect sigma homologs in Pediococcus acidilactici, Leuconostoc lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris. These data are consistent with the existence of a high similarity between the primary sigma factors from diverse Gram-positive microorganisms.

  14. Assessment of the Diversity of Dairy Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Isolates by an Integrated Approach Combining Phenotypic, Genomic, and Transcriptomic Analyses ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tan-a-ram, Punthip; Cardoso, Tamara; Daveran-Mingot, Marie-Line; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn; Loubière, Pascal; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2011-01-01

    The intrasubspecies diversity of six strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was investigated at the genomic level and in terms of phenotypic and transcriptomic profiles in an ultrafiltration cheese model. The six strains were isolated from various sources, but all exhibited a dairy phenotype (growth in ultrafiltration cheese model and high acidification rate). The six strains exhibited similar behaviors in terms of growth during cheese ripening, while different acidification capabilities were detected. Even if all strains displayed large genomic similarities, sharing a large core genome of almost 2,000 genes, the expression of this core genome directly in the cheese matrix revealed major strain-specific differences that potentially could account for the observed different acidification capabilities. This work demonstrated that significant transcriptomic polymorphisms exist even among Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains with the same dairy origin. PMID:21131529

  15. Comparison of expression systems in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hansenula polymorpha, Klyveromyces lactis, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Yarrowia lipolytica. Cloning of two novel promoters from Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Müller, S; Sandal, T; Kamp-Hansen, P; Dalbøge, H

    1998-10-01

    We have compared expression systems based on autonomously replicating vectors in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha and Yarrowia lipolytica in order to identify a more suitable host organism for use in the expression cloning method (Dalbøge and Heldt-Hansen, 1994) in which S. cerevisiae has traditionally been used. The capacity of the expression systems to secrete active forms of six fungal genes encoding the enzymes galactanase, lipase, polygalacturonase, xylanase and two cellulases was examined, as well as glycosylation pattern, plasmid stability and transformation frequency. All of the examined alternative hosts were able to secrete more active enzyme than S. cerevisiae but the relative expression capacity of the individual hosts varied significantly in a gene-dependent manner. One of the most attractive of the alternative host organisms, Y. lipolytica, yielded an increase which ranged from 4.5 times to more than two orders of magnitude. As the initially employed Y. lipolytica XPR2 promoter is unfit in the context of expression cloning, two novel promoter sequences for highly expressed genes present in only one copy on the genome were isolated. Based on sequence homology, the genes were identified as TEF, encoding translation elongation factor-1 alpha and RPS7, encoding ribosomal protein S7. Using the heterologous cellulase II (celII) and xylanase I (xylI) as reporter genes, the effect of the new promoters was measured in qualitative and quantitative assays. Based on the present tests of the new promoters. Y. lipolytica appears as a highly attractive alternative to S. cerevisiae as a host organism for expression cloning.

  16. Cholate Resistance in Lactococcus lactis Is Mediated by an ATP-Dependent Multispecific Organic Anion Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Atsushi; Veenstra, Marloes; Kurdi, Peter; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Konings, Wil N.

    2000-01-01

    The cholate-resistant Lactococcus lactis strain C41-2, derived from wild-type L. lactis MG1363 through selection for growth on cholate-containing medium, displayed a reduced accumulation of cholate due to an enhanced active efflux. However, L. lactis C41-2 was not cross resistant to deoxycholate or cationic drugs, such as ethidium and rhodamine 6G, which are typical substrates of the multidrug transporters LmrP and LmrA in L. lactis MG1363. The cholate efflux activity in L. lactis C41-2 was not affected by the presence of valinomycin plus nigericin, which dissipated the proton motive force. In contrast, cholate efflux in L. lactis C41-2 was inhibited by ortho-vanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPases and ATP-binding cassette transporters. Besides ATP-dependent drug extrusion by LmrA, two other ATP-dependent efflux activities have previously been detected in L. lactis, one for the artificial pH probe 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5(and 6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and the other for the artificial pH probe N-(fluorescein thio-ureanyl)-glutamate (FTUG). Surprisingly, the efflux rate of BCECF, but not that of FTUG, was significantly enhanced in L. lactis C41-2. Further experiments with L. lactis C41-2 cells and inside out membrane vesicles revealed that cholate and BCECF inhibit the transport of each other. These data demonstrate the role of an ATP-dependent multispecific organic anion transporter in cholate resistance in L. lactis. PMID:10960105

  17. Short communication: Genotypic and phenotypic identification of environmental streptococci and association of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis with intramammary infections among different dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Werner, B; Moroni, P; Gioia, G; Lavín-Alconero, L; Yousaf, A; Charter, M E; Carter, B Moslock; Bennett, J; Nydam, D V; Welcome, F; Schukken, Y H

    2014-11-01

    Lactococcus species are counted among a large and closely related group of environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria that include bovine mastitis pathogenic Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Aerococcus species. Phenotypic and biochemical identification methods can be inaccurate and unreliable for species within this group, particularly for Lactococcus spp. As a result, the incidence of Lactococcus spp. on the farm may have been historically underreported and consequently little is known about the clinical importance of this genus as a mastitis pathogen. We used molecular genetic identification methods to accurately differentiate 60 environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria isolated from cows with high somatic cell count and chronic intramammary infection (IMI; >2 somatic cell scores above 4) among 5 geographically distinct farms in New York and Minnesota that exhibited an observed increase in IMI. These isolates were phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus spp. Genetic methods identified 42 isolates (70%) as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, including all 10 isolates originally phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis. Antibiotic inhibition testing of all Lc. lactis ssp. lactis showed that 7 isolates were resistant to tetracycline. In the present study, a predominance of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis was identified in association with chronic, clinical bovine IMI among all 5 farms and characterized antimicrobial resistance for treatment therapies. Routine use by mastitis testing labs of molecular identification methods for environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria can further define the role and prevalence of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis in association with bovine IMI and may lead to more targeted therapies. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Candidate pheromone receptors of codling moth Cydia pomonella respond to pheromones and kairomones

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Alberto Maria; Gonzalez, Francisco; Bengtsson, Jonas M.; Corey, Elizabeth A.; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Montagné, Nicolas; Salvagnin, Umberto; Walker, William B.; Witzgall, Peter; Anfora, Gianfranco; Bobkov, Yuriy V.

    2017-01-01

    Olfaction plays a dominant role in the mate-finding and host selection behaviours of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella), an important pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. Antennal transcriptome analysis revealed a number of abundantly expressed genes related to the moth olfactory system, including those encoding the olfactory receptors (ORs) CpomOR1, CpomOR3 and CpomOR6a, which belong to the pheromone receptor (PR) lineage, and the co-receptor (CpomOrco). Using heterologous expression, in both Drosophila olfactory sensory neurones and in human embryonic kidney cells, together with electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging, we characterize the basic physiological and pharmacological properties of these receptors and demonstrate that they form functional ionotropic receptor channels. Both the homomeric CpomOrco and heteromeric CpomOrco + OR complexes can be activated by the common Orco agonists VUAA1 and VUAA3, as well as inhibited by the common Orco antagonists amiloride derivatives. CpomOR3 responds to the plant volatile compound pear ester ethyl-(E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate, while CpomOR6a responds to the strong pheromone antagonist codlemone acetate (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-yl acetate. These findings represent important breakthroughs in the deorphanization of codling moth pheromone receptors, as well as more broadly into insect ecology and evolution and, consequently, for the development of sustainable pest control strategies based on manipulating chemosensory communication. PMID:28117454

  19. Candidate pheromone receptors of codling moth Cydia pomonella respond to pheromones and kairomones.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Alberto Maria; Gonzalez, Francisco; Bengtsson, Jonas M; Corey, Elizabeth A; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Montagné, Nicolas; Salvagnin, Umberto; Walker, William B; Witzgall, Peter; Anfora, Gianfranco; Bobkov, Yuriy V

    2017-01-24

    Olfaction plays a dominant role in the mate-finding and host selection behaviours of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella), an important pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. Antennal transcriptome analysis revealed a number of abundantly expressed genes related to the moth olfactory system, including those encoding the olfactory receptors (ORs) CpomOR1, CpomOR3 and CpomOR6a, which belong to the pheromone receptor (PR) lineage, and the co-receptor (CpomOrco). Using heterologous expression, in both Drosophila olfactory sensory neurones and in human embryonic kidney cells, together with electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging, we characterize the basic physiological and pharmacological properties of these receptors and demonstrate that they form functional ionotropic receptor channels. Both the homomeric CpomOrco and heteromeric CpomOrco + OR complexes can be activated by the common Orco agonists VUAA1 and VUAA3, as well as inhibited by the common Orco antagonists amiloride derivatives. CpomOR3 responds to the plant volatile compound pear ester ethyl-(E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate, while CpomOR6a responds to the strong pheromone antagonist codlemone acetate (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-yl acetate. These findings represent important breakthroughs in the deorphanization of codling moth pheromone receptors, as well as more broadly into insect ecology and evolution and, consequently, for the development of sustainable pest control strategies based on manipulating chemosensory communication.

  20. Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Keith

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

  1. Automated selection of appropriate pheromone representations in ant colony optimization.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, James; Randall, Marcus; Hendtlass, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Ant colony optimization (ACO) is a constructive metaheuristic that uses an analogue of ant trail pheromones to learn about good features of solutions. Critically, the pheromone representation for a particular problem is usually chosen intuitively rather than by following any systematic process. In some representations, distinct solutions appear multiple times, increasing the effective size of the search space and potentially misleading ants as to the true learned value of those solutions. In this article, we present a novel system for automatically generating appropriate pheromone representations, based on the characteristics of the problem model that ensures unique pheromone representation of solutions. This is the first stage in the development of a generalized ACO system that could be applied to a wide range of problems with little or no modification. However, the system we propose may be used in the development of any problem-specific ACO algorithm.

  2. New pheromone components of the grapevine moth Lobesia botrana.

    PubMed

    Witzgall, Peter; Tasin, Marco; Buser, Hans-Ruedi; Wegner-Kiss, Gertrud; Mancebón, Vicente S Marco; Ioriatti, Claudio; Bäckman, Anna-Carin; Bengtsson, Marie; Lehmann, Lutz; Francke, Wittko

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of extracts of sex pheromone glands of grapevine moth females Lobesia botrana showed three previously unidentified compounds, (E)-7-dodecenyl acetate and the (E,E)- and (Z,E)-isomers of 7,9,11-dodecatrienyl acetate. This is the first account of a triply unsaturated pheromone component in a tortricid moth. The monoenic acetate (E)-7-dodecenyl acetate and the trienic acetate (7Z,9E,11)-dodecatrienyl acetate significantly enhanced responses of males to the main pheromone compound, (7E,9Z)-7,9-dodecadienyl acetate, in the wind tunnel. The identification of sex pheromone synergists in L. botrana may be of practical importance for the development of integrated pest management systems.

  3. Mating pheromones of Nematoda: olfactory signaling with physiological consequences.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Daniel Hw; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    Secreted pheromones have long been known to influence mating in the phylum Nematoda. The study of nematode sexual behavior has greatly benefited in the last decade from the genetic and neurobiological tools available for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as from the chemical identification of many pheromones secreted by this species. The discovery that nematodes can influence one another's physiological development and stress responsiveness through the sharing of pheromones, in addition to simply triggering sexual attraction, is particularly striking. Here we review recent research on nematode mating pheromones, which has been conducted predominantly on C. elegans, but there are beginning to be parallel studies in other species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Directional Bias and Pheromone for Discovery and Coverage on Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-11

    Natural multi-agent systems often rely on “correlated random walks” (random walks that are biased toward a current heading) to distribute their agents over a space (e.g., for foraging, search, etc.). Our contribution involves creation of a new movement and pheromone model that applies the concept of heading bias in random walks to a multi-agent, digital-ants system designed for cyber-security monitoring. We examine the relative performance effects of both pheromone and heading bias on speed of discovery of a target and search-area coverage in a two-dimensional network layout. We found that heading bias was unexpectedly helpful in reducing search time and that it was more influential than pheromone for improving coverage. We conclude that while pheromone is very important for rapid discovery, heading bias can also greatly improve both performance metrics.

  5. Pheromone-based mating disruption in Wisconsin cranberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pheromone-based mating disruption is a promising method of pest control in cranberries. Three moth species, cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), Sparganothis fruitworm, Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and black-headed fireworm, Rhopobota...

  6. Contact sex pheromone components of the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Satoshi; Shimomura, Kenji; Honda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Izuru; Ohsawa, Kanju

    2007-05-01

    The cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus, is a major pest of stored pulses. Females of this species produce a contact sex pheromone that elicits copulation behavior in males. Pheromone was extracted from filter-paper shelters taken from cages that housed females. Crude ether extract stimulated copulation in male C. maculatus. Initial fractionation showed behavioral activity in acidic and neutral fractions. Furthermore, bioassay-guided fractionation and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis of active fractions revealed that the active components of the acidic fraction were 2,6-dimethyloctane-1,8-dioic acid and nonanedioic acid. These components along with the hydrocarbon fraction, a mixture of C(27)-C(35) straight chain and methyl branched hydrocarbons, had a synergistic effect on the behavior of males. Glass dummies treated with an authentic pheromone blend induced copulation behavior in males. The potential roles of the contact sex pheromone of C. maculatus are discussed.

  7. Pheromonal contest between honeybee workers ( Apis mellifera capensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, R. F. A.; Simon, U. E.; Crewe, R. M.

    2000-10-01

    Queenless workers of the Cape honeybee ( Apis mellifera capensis) can develop into reproductives termed pseudoqueens. Although they morphologically remain workers they become physiologically queenlike, produce offspring, and secrete mandibular gland pheromones similar to those of true queens. However, after queen loss only very few workers gain pseudoqueen status. A strong intracolonial selection governs which workers start oviposition and which remain sterile. The "queen substance", 9-keto-2(E)-decenoic acid (9-ODA), the dominant compound of the queen's mandibular gland pheromones, suppresses the secretion of queenlike mandibular gland pheromones in workers. It may act as an important signal in pseudoqueen selection. By analysing the mandibular gland pheromones of workers kept in pairs, we found that A. m. capensis workers compete to produce the strongest queen-like signal.

  8. Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Keith

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

  9. Cell growth and resistance of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161 following freezing, drying and freeze-dried storage are differentially affected by fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Velly, H; Fonseca, F; Passot, S; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Bouix, M

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of fermentation parameters on the cell growth and on the resistance to each step of the freeze-drying process of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, a natural cheese isolate, using a response surface methodology. Cells were cultivated at different temperatures (22, 30 and 38°C) and pH (5·6, 6·2 and 6·8) and were harvested at different growth phases (0, 3 and 6 h of stationary phase). Cultivability and acidification activity losses of Lc. lactis were quantified after freezing, drying, 1 and 3 months of storage at 4 and 25°C. Lactococcus lactis was not damaged by freezing but was sensitive to drying and to ambient temperature storage. Moreover, the fermentation temperature and the harvesting time influenced the drying resistance of Lc. lactis. Lactococcus lactis cells grown in a whey-based medium at 32°C, pH 6·2 and harvested at late stationary phase exhibited both an optimal growth and the highest resistance to freeze-drying and storage. A better insight on the individual and interaction effects of fermentation parameters made it possible the freeze-drying and storage preservation of a sensitive strain of technological interest. Evidence on the particularly damaging effect of the drying step and the high-temperature storage is presented. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Regulatory Role of PBAN in Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis of Heliothine Moths

    PubMed Central

    Jurenka, Russell; Rafaeli, Ada

    2011-01-01

    Both males and females of heliothine moths utilize sex-pheromones during the mating process. Females produce and release a sex pheromone for the long–range attraction of males for mating. Production of sex pheromone in females is controlled by the peptide hormone (pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide, PBAN). This review will highlight what is known about the role PBAN plays in controlling pheromone production in female moths. Male moths produce compounds associated with a hairpencil structure associated with the aedaegus that are used as short-range aphrodisiacs during the mating process. We will discuss the role that PBAN plays in regulating male production of hairpencil pheromones. PMID:22654810

  11. The role of pheromones and biostimulation in animal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Rekwot, P I; Ogwu, D; Oyedipe, E O; Sekoni, V O

    2001-03-30

    It is now known that pheromonal communication plays an important role in mammalian behaviour and reproductive processes. Chemical communication with pheromones is one means of transmitting such information. In mammals, signalling and priming pheromones are thought to act either singly or in combination through olfaction, auditory, visual (sight) or tactile stimuli. Pheromones are air-borne chemical substances ("signals") released in the urine or feces of animals or secreted from cutaneous glands that are perceived by the olfactory system and that elicit both behavioural and endocrine responses in conspecifics. Extensive studies in insects, rodents, swine, sheep, goats and cattle have established the importance of pheromones in the strong influence exerted by the male on reproductive activity in the female. There is a pheromone produced by the queen honey bee, which has two functions: inhibition of queen rearing and suppression of oogenesis in workers and in addition attracts drones during nuptial flight. It has also been demonstrated that the urine of male mice, rats, feral species and other wild rodents contains a priming pheromone that is responsible for hastening puberty in the females. Pheromones in the wool, wax and urine of a ram are sufficient to stimulate ewes to ovulate, while the buck has a strong characteristic seasonal odor and a buck jar containing the odor of the buck can be used as an aid in the detection of oestrus in does. The mere presence of the boar at the time of insemination of the sow improves sperm transport and ovulation, while the presence of the vasectomised bull has been reported to hasten the onset of puberty in heifers and also early resumption of ovarian activity in cattle following parturition. The role of pheromones in bovine reproduction is not as clearly defined as in sheep, goats and swine. Pheromones and other allelomimetic cues can exert profound effects on reproductive activity via the hypothalamic system that generates pulses

  12. The Active Space of Mexican Rice Borer Pheromone Traps.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Blake E; Beuzelin, Julien M; Allison, Jeremy D; Reagan, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    The Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is an invasive pest of sugarcane, Saccharum spp., rice, Oryza sativa L., and other graminaceous crops in the United States. Traps baited with the synthetic female sex pheromone of E. loftini are used for monitoring and management of this invasive pest. However, the active space, or radius of attraction, of these traps is not known. Two field experiments examined the effect of intertrap distance on trap captures with hexagonal arrays of traps deployed in rice stubble habitat in Texas (2011) and Louisiana (2013). Trap capture increased with increasing intertrap distance. Trap interference occurred at intertrap distances ≤50 m in the 2011 experiment. Results from the experiment conducted in 2013 indicate that trap interference occurs at intertrap distances of 50 m, but not at distances ≥100 m. These results suggest that under field conditions, E. loftini pheromone traps attract males from distances of 50-100 m. The active space of pheromone traps also was examined under controlled wind conditions by direct observation of male response to detection of the female sex pheromone. Eoreuma loftini males responded to the pheromone blend by becoming active, fanning their wings, and rapidly walking in circles. The mean distance from the pheromone source at which males responded was 47.6 m. This work provides the first documentation of active space for traps baited with female sex pheromone for a crambid species, and these data will improve pheromone trap deployment strategies for E. loftini monitoring and management.

  13. The highly efficient sex-inducing pheromone system of Volvox.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, A; Godl, K; Wenzl, S; Sumper, M

    1998-05-01

    The green alga Volvox is one of the simplest multicellular organisms and is capable of both asexual and sexual reproduction. Sexual development is initiated by a glycoprotein pheromone that acts at a concentration below 10(-16) M. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play a key role in signal amplification: several ECM proteins contain a domain with homology to the sex-inducing pheromone.

  14. Engineering trehalose synthesis in Lactococcus lactis for improved stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Cardoso, Filipa S; Bohn, Andreas; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2011-06-01

    Trehalose accumulation is a common cell defense strategy against a variety of stressful conditions. In particular, our team detected high levels of trehalose in Propionibacterium freudenreichii in response to acid stress, a result that led to the idea that endowing Lactococcus lactis with the capacity to synthesize trehalose could improve the acid tolerance of this organism. To this end, we took advantage of the endogenous genes involved in the trehalose catabolic pathway of L. lactis, i.e., trePP and pgmB, encoding trehalose 6-phosphate phosphorylase and β-phosphoglucomutase, respectively, which enabled the synthesis of trehalose 6-phosphate. Given that L. lactis lacks trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatase, the respective gene, otsB, from the food-grade organism P. freudenreichii was used to provide the required activity. The trehalose yield was approximately 15% in resting cells and in mid-exponential-phase cells grown without pH control. The intracellular concentration of trehalose reached maximal values of approximately 170 mM, but at least 67% of the trehalose produced was found in the growth medium. The viability of mutant and control strains was examined after exposure to heat, cold or acid shock, and freeze-drying. The trehalose-producing strains showed improved tolerance (5- to 10-fold-higher survivability) to acid (pH 3) and cold shock (4°C); there was also a strong improvement in cell survival in response to heat shock (45°C), and no protection was rendered against dehydration. The insight provided by this work may help the design of food-grade strains optimized for the dairy industry as well as for oral drug delivery.

  15. Strain-Dependent Transcriptome Signatures for Robustness in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Annereinou R.; Alkema, Wynand; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Bron, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that fermentation conditions have a strong impact on subsequent survival of Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 during heat and oxidative stress, two important parameters during spray drying. Moreover, employment of a transcriptome-phenotype matching approach revealed groups of genes associated with robustness towards heat and/or oxidative stress. To investigate if other strains have similar or distinct transcriptome signatures for robustness, we applied an identical transcriptome-robustness phenotype matching approach on the L. lactis strains IL1403, KF147 and SK11, which have previously been demonstrated to display highly diverse robustness phenotypes. These strains were subjected to an identical fermentation regime as was performed earlier for strain MG1363 and consisted of twelve conditions, varying in the level of salt and/or oxygen, as well as fermentation temperature and pH. In the exponential phase of growth, cells were harvested for transcriptome analysis and assessment of heat and oxidative stress survival phenotypes. The variation in fermentation conditions resulted in differences in heat and oxidative stress survival of up to five 10-log units. Effects of the fermentation conditions on stress survival of the L. lactis strains were typically strain-dependent, although the fermentation conditions had mainly similar effects on the growth characteristics of the different strains. By association of the transcriptomes and robustness phenotypes highly strain-specific transcriptome signatures for robustness towards heat and oxidative stress were identified, indicating that multiple mechanisms exist to increase robustness and, as a consequence, robustness of each strain requires individual optimization. However, a relatively small overlap in the transcriptome responses of the strains was also identified and this generic transcriptome signature included genes previously associated with stress (ctsR and lplL) and novel genes, including nan

  16. Strain-Dependent Transcriptome Signatures for Robustness in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Annereinou R; Alkema, Wynand; Starrenburg, Marjo J C; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Bron, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that fermentation conditions have a strong impact on subsequent survival of Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 during heat and oxidative stress, two important parameters during spray drying. Moreover, employment of a transcriptome-phenotype matching approach revealed groups of genes associated with robustness towards heat and/or oxidative stress. To investigate if other strains have similar or distinct transcriptome signatures for robustness, we applied an identical transcriptome-robustness phenotype matching approach on the L. lactis strains IL1403, KF147 and SK11, which have previously been demonstrated to display highly diverse robustness phenotypes. These strains were subjected to an identical fermentation regime as was performed earlier for strain MG1363 and consisted of twelve conditions, varying in the level of salt and/or oxygen, as well as fermentation temperature and pH. In the exponential phase of growth, cells were harvested for transcriptome analysis and assessment of heat and oxidative stress survival phenotypes. The variation in fermentation conditions resulted in differences in heat and oxidative stress survival of up to five 10-log units. Effects of the fermentation conditions on stress survival of the L. lactis strains were typically strain-dependent, although the fermentation conditions had mainly similar effects on the growth characteristics of the different strains. By association of the transcriptomes and robustness phenotypes highly strain-specific transcriptome signatures for robustness towards heat and oxidative stress were identified, indicating that multiple mechanisms exist to increase robustness and, as a consequence, robustness of each strain requires individual optimization. However, a relatively small overlap in the transcriptome responses of the strains was also identified and this generic transcriptome signature included genes previously associated with stress (ctsR and lplL) and novel genes, including nan

  17. Benefits of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Probiotic in Experimental Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luiz F F; Salvador, Sérgio L; Silva, Pedro H F; Furlaneto, Flávia A C; Figueiredo, Luciene; Casarin, Renato; Ervolino, Edilson; Palioto, Daniela B; Souza, Sérgio L S; Taba, Mario; Novaes, Arthur B; Messora, Michel R

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluates effects of topical administration of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium on experimental periodontitis (EP) in rats. Thirty-two rats were divided into groups C (control; without EP), EP (EP only), C-HN019 (control+probiotic), and EP-HN019 (EP+probiotic). On day 0 of the experiment, animals of groups EP and EP-HN019 received cotton ligatures around mandibular first molars (MFMs). In groups C-HN019 and EP-HN019, 1 mL of suspensions containing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) HN019 was topically administered in the subgingival region of MFMs on days 0, 3, and 7. In groups C and EP, topical administrations were performed using a sham suspension (without probiotic). All animals were euthanized at day 14. Gingival tissue, hemimandibles, and oral biofilm were collected. Data were statistically analyzed (P <0.05). Group EP presented greater bone porosity, trabecular separation, and connective tissue attachment loss (CTAL) as well as reduced bone volume than all other groups (P <0.05). In group EP-HN019, there were greater proportions of Actinomyces and Streptococcus-like species and lower proportions of Veillonella parvula, Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, and Prevotella intermedia-like species than group EP. Group EP-HN019 presented greater expressions of osteoprotegerin and β-defensins than group EP (P <0.05). Group EP presented greater levels of interleukin-1β and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand than group EP-HN019 (P <0.05). Topical use of B. lactis HN019 promotes a protective effect against alveolar bone loss and CTALs attributable to EP in rats, modifying immunoinflammatory and microbiologic parameters.

  18. Pheromones of milkweed bugs (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae) attract wayward plant bugs: Phytocoris mirid sex pheromone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-He; Aldrich, Jeffrey R

    2003-08-01

    The synthetic aggregation pheromone of the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (Lygaeinae), also attracted males of the plant bug, Phytocoris difficilis Knight (Miridae). Field testing partial blends against the six-component blend comprising the Oncopeltus pheromone showed that cross-attraction of P. difficilis males was due to synergism between (E)-2-octenyl acetate and (E,E)-2,4-hexadienyl acetate. Hexyl acetate was abundant in the metathoracic scent gland (MSG) secretion of P. difficilis males, but because female P. difficilis could not initially be found in the field, further combinatorial tests were guided by prior research on the pheromones of two Phytocoris species in the western United States. The combination of hexyl, (E)-2-hexenyl, and (E)-2-octenyl acetates was as attractive to P. difficilis males as the milkweed bug pheromone, yet no milkweed bugs were drawn to this blend. Gas chromatographic (GC)-electroantennographic detection (EAD) and GC-mass spectrometric (MS) analyses of female P. difficilis MSGs determined that their secretion contained predominantly hexyl, (E)-2-hexenyl, and (E)-2-octenyl acetates (all strongly EAD-active)-the latter two compounds found only in trace amounts from males-plus five minor female-specific compounds, three of which were EAD-active. (E,E)-2,4-Hexadienyl acetate was not detected from P. difficilis females or males. The blend of the three major components, hexyl, (E)-2-hexenyl, and (E)-2-octenyl acetates (2:1.5:1 by volume), was as attractive as the blend of all six EAD-active compounds identified from females, indicating that this ternary blend constitutes the sex pheromone of P. difficilis. Hexyl acetate with (E)-2-octenyl acetate also attracted males of another species, P. breviusculus Reuter, but addition of (E)-2-hexenyl acetate and/or (E,E)-2,4-hexadienyl acetate inhibited attraction of P. breviusculus males. Attraction of P. difficilis males occurred mainly during the first half of scotophase. The

  19. Phenotypic plasticity in sex pheromone production in Bicyclus anynana butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Emilie; Monteiro, Antónia; Yew, Joanne Y.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity refers to the environmental control of phenotypes. Cues experienced during development (developmental plasticity) or during adulthood (acclimatization) can both affect adult phenotypes. Phenotypic plasticity has been described in many traits but examples of developmental plasticity in physiological traits, in particular, remain scarce. We examined developmental plasticity and acclimatization in pheromone production in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana in response to rearing temperature. B. anynana lives in the African tropics where warm rearing temperatures of the wet season produce active males that court and females that choose, whereas cooler temperatures of the dry season lead to choosy less active males and courting females. We hypothesized that if male pheromone production is costly, it should be reduced in the dry season form. After describing the ultrastructure of pheromone producing cells, we showed that dry season males produced significantly less sex pheromones than wet season males, partly due to acclimatization and partly due to developmental plasticity. Variation in levels of one of the compounds is associated with differential regulation of a pheromone biosynthetic enzyme gene. This plasticity might be an adaptation to minimize pheromone production costs during the stressful dry season. PMID:27966579

  20. Bumblebee size polymorphism and worker response to queen pheromone.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Queen pheromones are chemical signals produced by reproductive individuals in social insect colonies. In many species they are key to the maintenance of reproductive division of labor, with workers beginning to reproduce individually once the queen pheromone disappears. Recently, a queen pheromone that negatively affects worker fecundity was discovered in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris, presenting an exciting opportunity for comparisons with analogous queen pheromones in independently-evolved eusocial lineages such as honey bees, ants, wasps and termites. I set out to replicate this discovery and verify its reproducibility. Using blind, controlled experiments, I found that n-pentacosane (C25) does indeed negatively affect worker ovary development. Moreover, the pheromone affects both large and small workers, and applies to workers from large, mature colonies as well as young colonies. Given that C25 is readily available and that bumblebees are popular study organisms, I hope that this replication will encourage other researchers to tackle the many research questions enabled by the discovery of a queen pheromone.

  1. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  2. Trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail formation and foraging.

    PubMed

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Peck, Robert W; Stringer, Lloyd D; Snook, Kirsten; Banko, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2–3 m s−1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments.

  3. Identification of an ant queen pheromone regulating worker sterility

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Luke; Jørgensen, Charlotte G.; Nielsen, John; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    The selective forces that shape and maintain eusocial societies are an enduring puzzle in evolutionary biology. Ordinarily sterile workers can usually reproduce given the right conditions, so the factors regulating reproductive division of labour may provide insight into why eusociality has persisted over evolutionary time. Queen-produced pheromones that affect worker reproduction have been implicated in diverse taxa, including ants, termites, wasps and possibly mole rats, but to date have only been definitively identified in the honeybee. Using the black garden ant Lasius niger, we isolate the first sterility-regulating ant queen pheromone. The pheromone is a cuticular hydrocarbon that comprises the majority of the chemical profile of queens and their eggs, and also affects worker behaviour, by reducing aggression towards objects bearing the pheromone. We further show that the pheromone elicits a strong response in worker antennae and that its production by queens is selectively reduced following an immune challenge. These results suggest that the pheromone has a central role in colony organization and support the hypothesis that worker sterility represents altruistic self-restraint in response to an honest quality signal. PMID:20591861

  4. A novel class of peptide pheromone precursors in ascomycetous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schmoll, Monika; Seibel, Christian; Tisch, Doris; Dorrer, Marcel; Kubicek, Christian P

    2010-01-01

    Recently, sexual development in the heterothallic ascomycete Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) has been achieved and thus initiated attempts to elucidate regulation and determinants of this process. While the α-type pheromone of this fungus fits the consensus known from other fungi, the assumed a-type peptide pheromone precursor shows remarkably unusual characteristics: it comprises three copies of the motif (LI)GC(TS)VM thus constituting a CAAX domain at the C-terminus and two Kex2-protease sites. This structure shares characteristics of both a- and α-type peptide pheromone precursors. Presence of hybrid-type peptide pheromone precursor 1 (hpp1) is essential for male fertility, thus indicating its functionality as a peptide pheromone precursor, while its phosphorylation site is not relevant for this process. However, sexual development in a female fertile background is not perturbed in the absence of hpp1, which rules out a higher order function in this process. Open reading frames encoding proteins with similar characteristics to HPP1 were also found in Fusarium spp., of which Fusarium solani still retains a putative a-factor-like protein, but so far in no other fungal genome available. We therefore propose the novel class of h-type (hybrid) peptide pheromone precursors with H. jecorina HPP1 as the first member of this class. PMID:20735770

  5. Trail Pheromone Disruption of Argentine Ant Trail Formation and Foraging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Stringer, L.D.; Snook, K.; Banko, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2-3 m s-1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010.

  6. Unexpected plant odor responses in a moth pheromone system

    PubMed Central

    Rouyar, Angéla; Deisig, Nina; Dupuy, Fabienne; Limousin, Denis; Wycke, Marie-Anne; Renou, Michel; Anton, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Male moths rely on olfactory cues to find females for reproduction. Males also use volatile plant compounds (VPCs) to find food sources and might use host-plant odor cues to identify the habitat of calling females. Both the sex pheromone released by conspecific females and VPCs trigger well-described oriented flight behavior toward the odor source. Whereas detection and central processing of pheromones and VPCs have been thought for a long time to be highly separated from each other, recent studies have shown that interactions of both types of odors occur already early at the periphery of the olfactory pathway. Here we show that detection and early processing of VPCs and pheromone can overlap between the two sub-systems. Using complementary approaches, i.e., single-sensillum recording of olfactory receptor neurons, in vivo calcium imaging in the antennal lobe, intracellular recordings of neurons in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) and flight tracking in a wind tunnel, we show that some plant odorants alone, such as heptanal, activate the pheromone-specific pathway in male Agrotis ipsilon at peripheral and central levels. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a plant odorant with no chemical similarity to the molecular structure of the pheromone, acting as a partial agonist of a moth sex pheromone. PMID:26029117

  7. Phenotypic plasticity in sex pheromone production in Bicyclus anynana butterflies.

    PubMed

    Dion, Emilie; Monteiro, Antónia; Yew, Joanne Y

    2016-12-14

    Phenotypic plasticity refers to the environmental control of phenotypes. Cues experienced during development (developmental plasticity) or during adulthood (acclimatization) can both affect adult phenotypes. Phenotypic plasticity has been described in many traits but examples of developmental plasticity in physiological traits, in particular, remain scarce. We examined developmental plasticity and acclimatization in pheromone production in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana in response to rearing temperature. B. anynana lives in the African tropics where warm rearing temperatures of the wet season produce active males that court and females that choose, whereas cooler temperatures of the dry season lead to choosy less active males and courting females. We hypothesized that if male pheromone production is costly, it should be reduced in the dry season form. After describing the ultrastructure of pheromone producing cells, we showed that dry season males produced significantly less sex pheromones than wet season males, partly due to acclimatization and partly due to developmental plasticity. Variation in levels of one of the compounds is associated with differential regulation of a pheromone biosynthetic enzyme gene. This plasticity might be an adaptation to minimize pheromone production costs during the stressful dry season.

  8. Pheromones and their effect on women's mood and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Verhaeghe, J; Gheysen, R; Enzlin, P

    2013-01-01

    Pheromones are substances which are secreted to the outside by an individual and received by a second individual of the same species. Many examples exist in animals but their role in humans remains uncertain since adults have no functioning vomeronasal organ, which processes pheromone signals in animals. Yet pheromones can be detected by the olfactory system although humans under develop and underrate their smelling sense. Pheromones may be present in all bodily secretions but most attention has been geared toward axillary sweat which contains the odorous 16-androstenes. One of these steroidal compounds, androstadienone, is present at much higher concentrations in male sweat and can be detected by women, albeit with wide variation in sensitivity. Upper-lip application of a pharmacological dose of androstadienonein women results in improved mood and heightened focus - particularly to capture emotional information. A positive mood is known to facilitate women's sexual response, and -increased focus improves sexual satisfaction. Indeed, some studies showed a beneficial effect of androstadienone on sexual desire and arousal. However, these effects were dependent on the context of the experiment, for example, on the presence of a male attendant. Pheromones may also play a role in mate selection which is "disassortative" regarding the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-genotype. Preliminary evidence suggests that exposure to androstadienone in women promotes attractiveness ratings of potential mates. In conclusion, some data indicate that 16-androstene pheromones, in particular androstadienone, play a beneficial role in women's mood, focus and sexual response, and perhaps also in mate selection.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans pheromones regulate multiple complex behaviors.

    PubMed

    Edison, Arthur S

    2009-08-01

    A family of small molecules called ascarosides act as pheromones to control multiple behaviors in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. At picomolar concentrations, a synergistic mixture of at least three ascarosides produced by hermaphrodites causes male-specific attraction. At higher concentrations, the same ascarosides, perhaps in a different mixture, induce the developmentally arrested stage known as dauer. The production of ascarosides is strongly dependent on environmental conditions, although relatively little is known about the major variables and mechanisms of their regulation. Thus, male mating and dauer formation are linked through a common set of small molecules whose expression is sensitive to a given microenvironment, suggesting a model by which ascarosides regulate the overall life cycle of C. elegans.

  10. [Pheromones: an underestimated communication signal in humans].

    PubMed

    Frey, J

    2003-01-01

    The pheromones are molecules, mainly aliphatic acids, with or without perceptible odor, recognized by specific receptors, the stimulation of which induces neuroendocrine reactions and affects the individual behavior. Olfactory receptors are underexpressed in human, 70 % of genes have become nonfunctional pseudogenes. But the remaining function was tested and is able to induce emotional reactions corresponding to a non-verbal signal of social interactions. In the present study, we review the actual knowledge on the olfactory receptors. They belong to the G-protein-coupled-receptors. Their signal is transduced to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Some HLA-based olfactory cues are shown with reference to recent experiments. The pathophysiological hypotheses are considered with respect to studies in anorexia nervosa and Alzheimer' disease.

  11. Pheromones mediating copulation and attraction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dweck, Hany K. M.; Ebrahim, Shimaa A. M.; Thoma, Michael; Mohamed, Ahmed A. M.; Keesey, Ian W.; Trona, Federica; Lavista-Llanos, Sofia; Svatoš, Aleš; Sachse, Silke; Knaden, Markus; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific olfactory signals known as pheromones play important roles in insect mating systems. In the model Drosophila melanogaster, a key part of the pheromone-detecting system has remained enigmatic through many years of research in terms of both its behavioral significance and its activating ligands. Here we show that Or47b-and Or88a-expressing olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect the fly-produced odorants methyl laurate (ML), methyl myristate, and methyl palmitate. Fruitless (fruM)-positive Or47b-expressing OSNs detect ML exclusively, and Or47b- and Or47b-expressing OSNs are required for optimal male copulation behavior. In addition, activation of Or47b-expressing OSNs in the male is sufficient to provide a competitive mating advantage. We further find that the vigorous male courtship displayed toward oenocyte-less flies is attributed to an oenocyte-independent sustained production of the Or47b ligand, ML. In addition, we reveal that Or88a-expressing OSNs respond to all three compounds, and that these neurons are necessary and sufficient for attraction behavior in both males and females. Beyond the OSN level, information regarding the three fly odorants is transferred from the antennal lobe to higher brain centers in two dedicated neural lines. Finally, we find that both Or47b- and Or88a-based systems and their ligands are remarkably conserved over a number of drosophilid species. Taken together, our results close a significant gap in the understanding of the olfactory background to Drosophila mating and attraction behavior; while reproductive isolation barriers between species are created mainly by species-specific signals, the mating enhancing signal in several Drosophila species is conserved. PMID:25964351

  12. The Yeast ATF1 Acetyltransferase Efficiently Acetylates Insect Pheromone Alcohols: Implications for the Biological Production of Moth Pheromones.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Lager, Ida; Bansal, Sunil; Durrett, Timothy P; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-04-01

    Many moth pheromones are composed of mixtures of acetates of long-chain (≥10 carbon) fatty alcohols. Moth pheromone precursors such as fatty acids and fatty alcohols can be produced in yeast by the heterologous expression of genes involved in insect pheromone production. Acetyltransferases that subsequently catalyze the formation of acetates by transfer of the acetate unit from acetyl-CoA to a fatty alcohol have been postulated in pheromone biosynthesis. However, so far no fatty alcohol acetyltransferases responsible for the production of straight chain alkyl acetate pheromone components in insects have been identified. In search for a non-insect acetyltransferase alternative, we expressed a plant-derived diacylglycerol acetyltransferase (EaDAcT) (EC 2.3.1.20) cloned from the seed of the burning bush (Euonymus alatus) in a yeast system. EaDAcT transformed various fatty alcohol insect pheromone precursors into acetates but we also found high background acetylation activities. Only one enzyme in yeast was shown to be responsible for the majority of that background activity, the acetyltransferase ATF1 (EC 2.3.1.84). We further investigated the usefulness of ATF1 for the conversion of moth pheromone alcohols into acetates in comparison with Ea DAcT. Overexpression of ATF1 revealed that it was capable of acetylating these fatty alcohols with chain lengths from 10 to 18 carbons with up to 27- and 10-fold higher in vivo and in vitro efficiency, respectively, compared to Ea DAcT. The ATF1 enzyme thus has the potential to serve as the missing enzyme in the reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathway of insect acetate pheromones from precursor fatty acids in yeast.

  13. Hydrolysis of Agave fourcroydes Lemaire (henequen) leaf juice and fermentation with Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbon sources for biofuel production are wide-ranging and their availability depends on the climate and soil conditions of the land where the production chain is located. Henequen (Agave fourcroydes Lem.) is cultivated in Yucatán, Mexico to produce natural fibers from the leaves, and a juice containing fructans is produced during this process. Fructans can be hydrolyzed to fructose and glucose and metabolized into ethanol by appropriate yeasts. In Mexico, different Agave species provide the carbon source for (distilled and non-distilled) alcoholic beverage production using the stem of the plant, whilst the leaves are discarded. In this work, we investigated the effect of thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis of the juice on the amount of reducing sugars released. Growth curves were generated with the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus and fermentations were then carried out with Kluyveromyces marxianus to determine alcohol yields. Results With thermal acid hydrolysis, the greatest increase in reducing sugars (82.6%) was obtained using 5% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. Statistically similar results can be obtained using the same acid concentration at a lower temperature and with a shorter reaction time (60°C, 15 min), or by using 1% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. In the case of enzymatic hydrolysis, the use of 5.75, 11.47 and 22.82 U of enzyme did not produce significant differences in the increase in reducing sugars. Although both hydrolysis processes obtained similar results, the difference was observed after fermentation. Ethanol yields were 50.3 ± 4 and 80.04 ± 5.29% of the theoretical yield respectively. Conclusions Final reducing sugars concentrations obtained with both thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis were similar. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a good ethanol producer, did not grow in the hydrolysates. Only Kluyveromyces marxianus was able to grow in them, giving a higher ethanol

  14. Hydrolysis of Agave fourcroydes Lemaire (henequen) leaf juice and fermentation with Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Silva, Pablo A; Toledano-Thompson, Tanit; Canto-Canché, Blondy B; Larqué-Saavedra, Alfonso; Barahona-Pérez, Luis F

    2014-02-14

    Carbon sources for biofuel production are wide-ranging and their availability depends on the climate and soil conditions of the land where the production chain is located. Henequen (Agave fourcroydes Lem.) is cultivated in Yucatán, Mexico to produce natural fibers from the leaves, and a juice containing fructans is produced during this process. Fructans can be hydrolyzed to fructose and glucose and metabolized into ethanol by appropriate yeasts. In Mexico, different Agave species provide the carbon source for (distilled and non-distilled) alcoholic beverage production using the stem of the plant, whilst the leaves are discarded. In this work, we investigated the effect of thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis of the juice on the amount of reducing sugars released. Growth curves were generated with the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus and fermentations were then carried out with Kluyveromyces marxianus to determine alcohol yields. With thermal acid hydrolysis, the greatest increase in reducing sugars (82.6%) was obtained using 5% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. Statistically similar results can be obtained using the same acid concentration at a lower temperature and with a shorter reaction time (60°C, 15 min), or by using 1% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. In the case of enzymatic hydrolysis, the use of 5.75, 11.47 and 22.82 U of enzyme did not produce significant differences in the increase in reducing sugars. Although both hydrolysis processes obtained similar results, the difference was observed after fermentation. Ethanol yields were 50.3 ± 4 and 80.04 ± 5.29% of the theoretical yield respectively. Final reducing sugars concentrations obtained with both thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis were similar. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a good ethanol producer, did not grow in the hydrolysates. Only Kluyveromyces marxianus was able to grow in them, giving a higher ethanol yield with the enzymatic

  15. The mating-type locus B alpha 1 of Schizophyllum commune contains a pheromone receptor gene and putative pheromone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, J; Vaillancourt, L J; Hegner, J; Lengeler, K B; Laddison, K J; Specht, C A; Raper, C A; Kothe, E

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the multispecific B alpha mating-type locus of Schizophyllum commune provided evidence that pheromones and pheromone receptors govern recognition of self versus non-self and sexual development in this homobasidiomycetous fungus. Four subclones of an 8.2 kb genomic fragment carrying B alpha 1 specificity induced B-regulated sexual morphogenesis when introduced into a strain with one of the eight compatible B alpha specificities that are known to exist in nature. One of these clones, which activated all other B alpha specificities, contains a gene termed bar1. The predicted protein product of bar1, as well as that of bar2, a homologous gene isolated from a B alpha 2 strain, has significant homology to known fungal pheromone receptor proteins in the rhodopsin-like superfamily of G protein-linked receptors. The other three active B alpha 1 clones were subcloned further to identify the minimal active element in each clone. Every active subclone contains a putative pheromone gene ending in a signal for possible isoprenylation. A message of approximately 600 bp was observed for one of these genes, bap1(1). This paper presents the first evidence for a system of multiple pheromones and pheromone receptors as a basis for multispecific mating types in a fungus. Images PMID:7489716

  16. Conditional Deletion of ERK5 MAP Kinase in the Nervous System Impairs Pheromone Information Processing and Pheromone-Evoked Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhui; Storm, Daniel R.; Xia, Zhengui

    2013-01-01

    ERK5 MAP kinase is highly expressed in the developing nervous system but absent in most regions of the adult brain. It has been implicated in regulating the development of the main olfactory bulb and in odor discrimination. However, whether it plays an essential role in pheromone-based behavior has not been established. Here we report that conditional deletion of the Mapk7 gene which encodes ERK5 in mice in neural stem cells impairs several pheromone-mediated behaviors including aggression and mating in male mice. These deficits were not caused by a reduction in the level of testosterone, by physical immobility, by heightened fear or anxiety, or by depression. Using mouse urine as a natural pheromone-containing solution, we provide evidence that the behavior impairment was associated with defects in the detection of closely related pheromones as well as with changes in their innate preference for pheromones related to sexual and reproductive activities. We conclude that expression of ERK5 during development is critical for pheromone response and associated animal behavior in adult mice. PMID:24130808

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Prototype Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363▿

    PubMed Central

    Wegmann, Udo; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Zomer, Aldert; Buist, Girbe; Shearman, Claire; Canchaya, Carlos; Ventura, Marco; Goesmann, Alexander; Gasson, Michael J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Kok, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is of great importance for the nutrition of hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This paper describes the genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363, the lactococcal strain most intensively studied throughout the world. The 2,529,478-bp genome contains 81 pseudogenes and encodes 2,436 proteins. Of the 530 unique proteins, 47 belong to the COG (clusters of orthologous groups) functional category “carbohydrate metabolism and transport,” by far the largest category of novel proteins in comparison with L. lactis subsp. lactis IL1403. Nearly one-fifth of the 71 insertion elements are concentrated in a specific 56-kb region. This integration hot-spot region carries genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids and a repeat sequence specifically found on plasmids and in the “lateral gene transfer hot spot” in the genome of Streptococcus thermophilus. Although the parent of L. lactis MG1363 was used to demonstrate lysogeny in Lactococcus, L. lactis MG1363 carries four remnant/satellite phages and two apparently complete prophages. The availability of the L. lactis MG1363 genome sequence will reinforce its status as the prototype among lactic acid bacteria through facilitation of further applied and fundamental research. PMID:17307855

  18. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the biosynthesis gene cluster of putrescine-producing Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ladero, Victor; Rattray, Fergal P; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2011-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a prokaryotic microorganism with great importance as a culture starter and has become the model species among the lactic acid bacteria. The long and safe history of use of L. lactis in dairy fermentations has resulted in the classification of this species as GRAS (General Regarded As Safe) or QPS (Qualified Presumption of Safety). However, our group has identified several strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris that are able to produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. Putrescine is a biogenic amine that confers undesirable flavor characteristics and may even have toxic effects. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed of a putative regulatory gene, aguR, followed by the genes (aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC) encoding the catabolic enzymes. These genes are transcribed as an operon that is induced in the presence of agmatine. In some strains, an insertion (IS) element interrupts the transcription of the cluster, which results in a non-putrescine-producing phenotype. Based on this knowledge, a PCR-based test was developed in order to differentiate nonproducing L. lactis strains from those with a functional AGDI cluster. The analysis of the AGDI cluster and their flanking regions revealed that the capacity to produce putrescine via the AGDI pathway could be a specific characteristic that was lost during the adaptation to the milk environment by a process of reductive genome evolution.

  19. Adhesion and immunomodulatory effects of Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 on intestinal epithelial cells INT-407

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zhuo-Yang; Dong, Ke; Guo, Xiao-Kui

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the adherence and immunomodulatory properties of a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium lactis (B. lactis) HN019. METHODS: Adhesion assays of B. lactis HN019 and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) ATCC 14028 to INT-407 cells were carried out by detecting copies of species-specific genes with real-time polymerase chain reaction. Morphological study was further conducted by transmission electron microscopy. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) gene expression were assessed while enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect IL-8 protein secretion. RESULTS: The attachment of S. typhimurium ATCC 14028 to INT407 intestinal epithelial cells was inhibited significantly by B. lactis HN019. B. lactis HN019 could be internalized into the INT-407 cells and attenuated IL-8 mRNA level at both baseline and S. typhimurium-induced pro-inflammatory responses. IL-8 secretion was reduced while IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression level remained unchanged at baseline after treated with B. lactis HN019. CONCLUSION: B. lactis HN019 does not up-regulate the intestinal epithelium expressed pro-inflammatory cytokine, it showed the potential to protect enterocytes from an acute inflammatory response induced by enteropathogen. PMID:20458767

  20. Adhesion and immunomodulatory effects of Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 on intestinal epithelial cells INT-407.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zhuo-Yang; Dong, Ke; Guo, Xiao-Kui

    2010-05-14

    To elucidate the adherence and immunomodulatory properties of a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium lactis (B. lactis) HN019. Adhesion assays of B. lactis HN019 and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) ATCC 14028 to INT-407 cells were carried out by detecting copies of species-specific genes with real-time polymerase chain reaction. Morphological study was further conducted by transmission electron microscopy. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) gene expression were assessed while enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect IL-8 protein secretion. The attachment of S. typhimurium ATCC 14028 to INT407 intestinal epithelial cells was inhibited significantly by B. lactis HN019. B. lactis HN019 could be internalized into the INT-407 cells and attenuated IL-8 mRNA level at both baseline and S. typhimurium-induced pro-inflammatory responses. IL-8 secretion was reduced while IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA expression level remained unchanged at baseline after treated with B. lactis HN019. B. lactis HN019 does not up-regulate the intestinal epithelium expressed pro-inflammatory cytokine, it showed the potential to protect enterocytes from an acute inflammatory response induced by enteropathogen.

  1. Diversity Analysis of Dairy and Nondairy Lactococcus lactis Isolates, Using a Novel Multilocus Sequence Analysis Scheme and (GTG)5-PCR Fingerprinting▿

    PubMed Central

    Rademaker, Jan L. W.; Herbet, Hélène; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; Naser, Sabri M.; Gevers, Dirk; Kelly, William J.; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Swings, Jean; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of a collection of 102 lactococcus isolates including 91 Lactococcus lactis isolates of dairy and nondairy origin was explored using partial small subunit rRNA gene sequence analysis and limited phenotypic analyses. A subset of 89 strains of L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis isolates was further analyzed by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting and a novel multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme. Two major genomic lineages within L. lactis were found. The L. lactis subsp. cremoris type-strain-like genotype lineage included both L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis isolates. The other major lineage, with a L. lactis subsp. lactis type-strain-like genotype, comprised L. lactis subsp. lactis isolates only. A novel third genomic lineage represented two L. lactis subsp. lactis isolates of nondairy origin. The genomic lineages deviate from the subspecific classification of L. lactis that is based on a few phenotypic traits only. MLSA of six partial genes (atpA, encoding ATP synthase alpha subunit; pheS, encoding phenylalanine tRNA synthetase; rpoA, encoding RNA polymerase alpha chain; bcaT, encoding branched chain amino acid aminotransferase; pepN, encoding aminopeptidase N; and pepX, encoding X-prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase) revealed 363 polymorphic sites (total length, 1,970 bases) among 89 L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis isolates with unique sequence types for most isolates. This allowed high-resolution cluster analysis in which dairy isolates form subclusters of limited diversity within the genomic lineages. The pheS DNA sequence analysis yielded two genetic groups dissimilar to the other genotyping analysis-based lineages, indicating a disparate acquisition route for this gene. PMID:17890345

  2. The use of the sex pheromone as an evolutionary solution to food source selection in caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Poivet, Erwan; Rharrabe, Kacem; Monsempes, Christelle; Glaser, Nicolas; Rochat, Didier; Renou, Michel; Marion-Poll, Frédéric; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Sex pheromones are released by adults of a species to elicit a sexual interaction with the other sex of the same species. Here we report an unexpected effect of a moth sex pheromone on the caterpillars of the same species. We demonstrate that larvae of the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis are attracted by the moth sex pheromone and that this phenomenon is independent of sex determination. In addition, we show that the olfactory sensilla carried by the caterpillar antennae are sensitive to the pheromone and that the caterpillar sensilla express pheromone-binding proteins that are used by adult antennae to bind pheromone components. Finally, we demonstrate that the larvae are preferentially attracted to a food source when it contains the sex pheromone main component. A possible interpretation of these results is that the sex pheromone is used to promote food search in caterpillars, opening potential new routes for insect pest management.

  3. Transcriptional analysis of oligosaccharide utilization by Bifidobacterium lactis Bl-04

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Probiotic bifidobacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates have documented positive effects on human health regarding gastrointestinal disorders and improved immunity, however the selective routes of uptake remain unknown for most candidate prebiotics. The differential transcriptomes of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04, induced by 11 potential prebiotic oligosaccharides were analyzed to identify the genetic loci involved in the uptake and catabolism of α- and β-linked hexoses, and β-xylosides. Results The overall transcriptome was modulated dependent on the type of glycoside (galactosides, glucosides or xylosides) utilized. Carbohydrate transporters of the major facilitator superfamily (induced by gentiobiose and β-galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (upregulated by cellobiose, GOS, isomaltose, maltotriose, melibiose, panose, raffinose, stachyose, xylobiose and β-xylo-oligosaccharides) were differentially upregulated, together with glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 13, 36, 42, 43 and 77. Sequence analysis of the identified solute-binding proteins that determine the specificity of ABC transporters revealed similarities in the breadth and selectivity of prebiotic utilization by bifidobacteria. Conclusion This study identified the differential gene expression for utilization of potential prebiotics highlighting the extensive capabilities of Bifidobacterium lactis Bl-04 to utilize oligosaccharides. Results provide insights into the ability of this probiotic microbe to utilize indigestible carbohydrates in the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23663691

  4. Transcriptional analysis of oligosaccharide utilization by Bifidobacterium lactis Bl-04.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Joakim M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Abou Hachem, Maher; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Goh, Yong Jun; Svensson, Birte; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-05-10

    Probiotic bifidobacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates have documented positive effects on human health regarding gastrointestinal disorders and improved immunity, however the selective routes of uptake remain unknown for most candidate prebiotics. The differential transcriptomes of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04, induced by 11 potential prebiotic oligosaccharides were analyzed to identify the genetic loci involved in the uptake and catabolism of α- and β-linked hexoses, and β-xylosides. The overall transcriptome was modulated dependent on the type of glycoside (galactosides, glucosides or xylosides) utilized. Carbohydrate transporters of the major facilitator superfamily (induced by gentiobiose and β-galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (upregulated by cellobiose, GOS, isomaltose, maltotriose, melibiose, panose, raffinose, stachyose, xylobiose and β-xylo-oligosaccharides) were differentially upregulated, together with glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 13, 36, 42, 43 and 77. Sequence analysis of the identified solute-binding proteins that determine the specificity of ABC transporters revealed similarities in the breadth and selectivity of prebiotic utilization by bifidobacteria. This study identified the differential gene expression for utilization of potential prebiotics highlighting the extensive capabilities of Bifidobacterium lactis Bl-04 to utilize oligosaccharides. Results provide insights into the ability of this probiotic microbe to utilize indigestible carbohydrates in the human gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Prophage induction in Lactococcus lactis by the bacteriocin Lactococcin 972.

    PubMed

    Madera, Carmen; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana; Suárez, Juan E; Martínez, Beatriz

    2009-01-31

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a non-pore forming bacteriocin with a narrow spectrum of activity restricted to Lactococcus. Lcn972 inhibits the incorporation of cell wall precursors in the septum area, thereby inhibiting cell division. In this work, an additional inhibitory effect is described, namely, the induction of the lytic cycle of resident prophages in the lysogenic strain L. lactis IPLA 513. Lcn972 triggered the release of prophages in a concentration-dependent fashion. The extent of prophage induction was influenced by the physiological status of the cultures, being maximal at the early exponential growth phase. A microtiter based protocol was designed and the induction ability of several antimicrobials was compared. Prophages were activated by all cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors tested, although the levels of induction were lower than those obtained after activation of the SOS response. As far as we know, this is the first report of prophage induction by an antimicrobial peptide. Since Lcn972 is active against L. lactis strains currently used in commercial starters, promising applications for dairy fermentations are discussed.

  6. A reverse transcriptase PCR technique for the detection and viability assessment of Kluyveromyces marxianus in yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, María Belén; Martin, Rosario; Hernández, Pablo E; González, Isabel; García, Teresa

    2006-09-01

    A fast and sensitive reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection of viable Kluyveromyces marxianus in yoghurt. Yeast-specific primers were used with the RT-PCR to evaluate the suitability of 18S rRNA as a target for the detection of viable yeasts in pure culture and yoghurt. The RT-PCR assay was able to detect down to 10(2) CFU ml(-1) in yoghurt samples contaminated with viable yeast cells. Application of the RT-PCR method to commercial yoghurt samples demonstrated the utility of this technique for detection of low concentrations of viable yeast cells in naturally contaminated dairy products. The 18S rRNA molecule is an appropriate target for cell viability assessment because of its limited persistence after cell death and the resultant high level of sensitivity of the assay.

  7. Decolorization of Remazol Black-B using a thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3.

    PubMed

    Meehan, C; Banat, I M; McMullan, G; Nigam, P; Smyth, F; Marchant, R

    2000-08-01

    The ability of Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 to decolorize Remazol Black-B dye was investigated. The effect of environmental conditions, such as pH and temperature were examined. No noticeable effects on decolorization were observed when pH varied from 3.0-5.5. Maximum colour removal, 98%, was achieved at 37 degrees C. Little or no colour removal was detected when K. marxianus IMB3 was incubated under anaerobic conditions. Further investigation, in which decolorization was monitored under extreme temperatures and low pH (to inhibit growth) and using ten fold dense inoculum, revealed that decolorization was due to biosorption to the yeast cells and not due to a metabolic reaction.

  8. A growth kinetic model of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultures on cheese whey as substrate.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Luís G S; Luvizetto, Débora J; Ferreira, Luciane S; Rech, Rosane; Ayub, Marco A Z; Secchi, Argimiro R

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a multi-route, non-structured kinetic model for determination of microbial growth and substrate consumption in an experimental batch bioreactor in which beta-galactosidase is produced by Kluyveromyces marxianus growing on cheese whey. The main metabolic routes for lactose, and oxygen consumption, cell growth, and ethanol production are derived based on experimental data. When these individual rates are combined into a single growth rate, by rewriting the model equations, the model re-interpretation has a complexity similar to that of the usual variations of the Monod kinetic model, available in the literature. Furthermore, the proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data for different growth temperatures, being acceptable for dynamic simulations, processes optimization, and implementations of model-based control technologies.

  9. Alcohol and single-cell protein production by Kluyveromyces in concentrated whey permeates with reduced ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, M.M.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five Kluyveromyces yeasts were grown in concentrated whey permeates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce single-cell protein and ethanol. K. fragilis NRRL Y2415 produced the highest yield of alcohol, 9.1%, and K. bulgaricus ATCC 1605 gave the highest yield of biomass, 13.5 mg/mL. High ash, apparently through Na and K effects, inhibited production of biomass and alcohol. A 0.77% ash was optimum. Lactose utilization was more rapid under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and urea supplementation were without effect on yeast growth or were slightly inhibitory. A 1% peptone inclusion gave the highest biomass yield with minimum alcohol production.

  10. Bioflavour production from tomato and pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Güneşer, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Karagül Yüceer, Yonca; Özmen Toğay, Sine; İşleten Hoşoğlu, Müge; Elibol, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Bioflavours are called natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds which are produced using metabolic pathway of the microorganism and/or plant cells or their enzyme systems with bioengineering approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate bioflavour production from tomato and red pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii. Obtained specific growth rates of K. marxianus and D. hansenii in tomato pomace were 0.081/h and 0.177/h, respectively. The bioflavour profile differed between the yeasts. Both yeasts can produce esters and alcohols such as phenyl ethyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, isoamyl acetate, phenyl ethyl acetate and isovaleric acid. "Tarhana" and "rose" were descriptive flavour terms for tomato and pepper pomaces fermented by K. marxianus, respectively. Tomato pomace fermented by D. hansenii had the most intense "green bean" flavour while "fermented vegetable" and "storage/yeast" were defined as characteristic flavour terms for pepper pomaces fermented by D. hansenii.

  11. Relevance of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis plasminogen binding activity in the human gastrointestinal microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Centanni, Manuela; Fiori, Jessica; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2011-10-01

    Human plasmin(ogen) is regarded as a component of the molecular cross talk between the probiotic species Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and the human host. However, up to now, only in vitro studies have been reported. Here, we demonstrate that the probiotic strain B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 is capable of recruiting plasmin(ogen) present at physiological concentrations in crude extracts from human feces. Our results provide evidence that supports the significance of the B. lactis-plasmin(ogen) interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Relevance of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Plasminogen Binding Activity in the Human Gastrointestinal Microenvironment ▿

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Centanni, Manuela; Fiori, Jessica; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    Human plasmin(ogen) is regarded as a component of the molecular cross talk between the probiotic species Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and the human host. However, up to now, only in vitro studies have been reported. Here, we demonstrate that the probiotic strain B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 is capable of recruiting plasmin(ogen) present at physiological concentrations in crude extracts from human feces. Our results provide evidence that supports the significance of the B. lactis-plasmin(ogen) interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21821753

  13. pSEUDO, a Genetic Integration Standard for Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Joao P. C.; Zeyniyev, Araz; Karsens, Harma; Trip, Hein; Lolkema, Juke S.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid pSEUDO and derivatives were used to show that llmg_pseudo_10 in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and its homologous locus in L. lactis IL1403 are suitable for chromosomal integrations. L. lactis MG1363 and IL1403 nisin-induced controlled expression (NICE) system derivatives (JP9000 and IL9000) and two general stress reporter strains (NZ9000::PhrcA-GFP and NZ9000::PgroES-GFP) enabling in vivo noninvasive monitoring of cellular fitness were constructed. PMID:21764949

  14. Hormonal Interference with Pheromone Systems in Parasitic Acarines, Especially Ixodid Ticks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    1980. Sex pheromone gland of the Gypsy Moth Parasitoid, Apanteles melanoscelus. Revaluation and ultrastructural Survey. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Amer. 73...the noctuid moth Trichoplusia ni (Hubner), the sex pheromone gland is an eversible sac of glandular epi- thelium composed of tall columnar cells filled...pheromone is thought to pass, since no secretory ducts were found. In the red-banded leaf roller moth Argyro- taenia velutinana (Walker), the sex pheromone

  15. Pheromone lures to monitor sparse populations of spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Treesearch

    David G. Grimble

    1988-01-01

    Four types of spruce budworm pheromone lures were field-tested in sparse spruce budworm populations in Maine. BioLures® with constant pheromone emission rates less than 1.0, ca. 1.0-1.5, and ca. 15.0 micrograms of pheromone per day were compared to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) lures with rapidly decreasing pheromone emission rates. Mean trap catch was roughly proportional...

  16. Temperature limits trail following behaviour through pheromone decay in ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oudenhove, Louise; Billoir, Elise; Boulay, Raphaël; Bernstein, Carlos; Cerdá, Xim

    2011-12-01

    In Mediterranean habitats, temperature affects both ant foraging behaviour and community structure. Many studies have shown that dominant species often forage at lower temperature than subordinates. Yet, the factors that constrain dominant species foraging activity in hot environments are still elusive. We used the dominant ant Tapinoma nigerrimum as a model species to test the hypothesis that high temperatures hinder trail following behaviour by accelerating pheromone degradation. First, field observations showed that high temperatures (> 30°C) reduce the foraging activity of T. nigerrimum independently of the daily and seasonal rhythms of this species. Second, we isolated the effect of high temperatures on pheromone trail efficacy from its effect on worker physiology. A marked substrate was heated during 10 min (five temperature treatments from 25°C to 60°C), cooled down to 25°C, and offered in a test choice to workers. At hot temperature treatments (>40°C), workers did not discriminate the previously marked substrate. High temperatures appeared therefore to accelerate pheromone degradation. Third, we assessed the pheromone decay dynamics by a mechanistic model fitted with Bayesian inference. The model predicted ant choice through the evolution of pheromone concentration on trails as a function of both temperature and time since pheromone deposition. Overall, our results highlighted that the effect of high temperatures on recruitment intensity was partly due to pheromone evaporation. In the Mediterranean ant communities, this might affect dominant species relying on chemical recruitment, more than subordinate ant species, less dependent on chemical communication and less sensitive to high temperatures.

  17. Identification of protein pheromones that promote aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Chamero, Pablo; Marton, Tobias F; Logan, Darren W; Flanagan, Kelly; Cruz, Jason R; Saghatelian, Alan; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Stowers, Lisa

    2007-12-06

    Mice use pheromones, compounds emitted and detected by members of the same species, as cues to regulate social behaviours such as pup suckling, aggression and mating. Neurons that detect pheromones are thought to reside in at least two separate organs within the nasal cavity: the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). Each pheromone ligand is thought to activate a dedicated subset of these sensory neurons. However, the nature of the pheromone cues and the identity of the responding neurons that regulate specific social behaviours are largely unknown. Here we show, by direct activation of sensory neurons and analysis of behaviour, that at least two chemically distinct ligands are sufficient to promote male-male aggression and stimulate VNO neurons. We have purified and analysed one of these classes of ligand and found its specific aggression-promoting activity to be dependent on the presence of the protein component of the major urinary protein (MUP) complex, which is known to comprise specialized lipocalin proteins bound to small organic molecules. Using calcium imaging of dissociated vomeronasal neurons (VNs), we have determined that the MUP protein activates a sensory neuron subfamily characterized by the expression of the G-protein Galpha(o) subunit (also known as Gnao) and Vmn2r putative pheromone receptors (V2Rs). Genomic analysis indicates species-specific co-expansions of MUPs and V2Rs, as would be expected among pheromone-signalling components. Finally, we show that the aggressive behaviour induced by the MUPs occurs exclusively through VNO neuronal circuits. Our results substantiate the idea of MUP proteins as pheromone ligands that mediate male-male aggression through the accessory olfactory neural pathway.

  18. Expression of Helicobacter pylori hspA Gene in Lactococcus lactis NICE System and Experimental Study on Its Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Feng, Shu-Ying; Li, Zhi-Tao; Feng, Yan-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to develop an oral Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Methods. After L. lactis NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA was constructed, growth curves were plotted to study whether the growth of recombinant L. lactis was affected after hspA was cloned into L. lactis and whether the growth of empty bacteria, empty plasmid bacteria, and recombinant L. lactis was affected by different concentrations of Nisin; SDS-PAGE and Western blot were adopted, respectively, to detect the HspA expressed by recombinant L. lactis and its immunoreactivity. Results. There was no effect observed from the growth curve after exogenous gene hspA was cloned into L. lactis NZ3900; different concentrations of Nisin did not affect the growth of NZ3900 and NZ3900/pNZ8110, while different concentrations of Nisin inhibited the growth of NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA except 10 ng/mL Nisin. No HspA strip was observed from SDS-PAGE. Western blot analysis showed that HspA expressed by recombinant bacteria had favorable immunoreactivity. Conclusion. The growth of recombinant L. lactis was suppressed even though a small amount of HspA had been induced to express. Therefore recombinant L. lactis only express HspA which was not suitable to be oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori. PMID:25977689

  19. Activation of the Diacetyl/Acetoin Pathway in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264 by Acidic Growth▿ †

    PubMed Central

    García-Quintáns, Nieves; Repizo, Guillermo; Martín, Mauricio; Magni, Christian; López, Paloma

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains are aroma-producing organisms used in starter cultures for the elaboration of dairy products. This species is essentially a fermentative microorganism, which cometabolizes glucose and citrate to yield aroma compounds through the diacetyl/acetoin biosynthetic pathway. Our previous results have shown that under acidic growth Lactococcus bv. diacetylactis CRL264 expresses coordinately the genes responsible for citrate transport and its conversion into pyruvate. In the present work the impact of acidic growth on glucose, citrate, and pyruvate metabolism of Lactococcus bv. diacetylactis CRL264 has been investigated by proteomic analysis. The results indicated that acid growth triggers the conversion of citrate, but not glucose, into α-acetolactate via pyruvate. Moreover, they showed that low pH has no influence on levels of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase. Therefore, the influence of external pH on regulation of the diacetyl/acetoin biosynthetic pathway in Lactococcus bv. diacetylactis CRL264 has been analyzed at the transcriptional level. Expression of the als, aldB, aldC, and butBA genes encoding the enzymes involved in conversion of pyruvate into aroma compounds has been investigated by primer extension, reverse transcription-PCR analysis, and transcriptional fusions. The results support that this biosynthetic pathway is induced at the transcriptional level by acidic growth conditions, presumably contributing to lactococcal pH homeostasis by synthesis of neutral compounds and by decreasing levels of pyruvate. PMID:18245243

  20. Isolation and properties of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis CNRZ 483 mutants producing diacetyl and acetoin from glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Boumerdassi, H; Monnet, C; Desmazeaud, M; Corrieu, G

    1997-01-01

    Following treatment with the mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, three mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis CNRZ 483 that produced diacetyl and acetoin from glucose were isolated. The lactate dehydrogenase activity of these mutants was strongly attenuated, and the mutants produced less lactate than the parental strain. The kinetic properties of lactate dehydrogenase of strain CNRZ 483 and the mutants revealed differences in the affinity of the enzyme for pyruvate, NADH, and fructose-1,6-diphosphate. When cultured aerobically, strain CNRZ 483 transformed 2.3% of glucose to acetoin and produced no diacetyl or 2,3-butanediol. Under the same conditions, mutants 483L1, 483L2, and 483L3 transformed 42.0, 78.9, and 75.8%, respectively, of glucose to C4 compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol). Anaerobically, strain CNRZ 483 produced no C4 compounds, while mutants 483L1, 483L2, and 483L3 transformed 2.0, 37.0, and 25.8% of glucose to acetoin and 2,3-butanediol. In contrast to the parental strain, the NADH balance showed that the mutants regenerated most of the NAD via NADH oxidase under aerobic conditions and by ethanol production under anaerobic conditions. PMID:9172349

  1. Isolation and properties of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis CNRZ 483 mutants producing diacetyl and acetoin from glucose.

    PubMed

    Boumerdassi, H; Monnet, C; Desmazeaud, M; Corrieu, G

    1997-06-01

    Following treatment with the mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, three mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis CNRZ 483 that produced diacetyl and acetoin from glucose were isolated. The lactate dehydrogenase activity of these mutants was strongly attenuated, and the mutants produced less lactate than the parental strain. The kinetic properties of lactate dehydrogenase of strain CNRZ 483 and the mutants revealed differences in the affinity of the enzyme for pyruvate, NADH, and fructose-1,6-diphosphate. When cultured aerobically, strain CNRZ 483 transformed 2.3% of glucose to acetoin and produced no diacetyl or 2,3-butanediol. Under the same conditions, mutants 483L1, 483L2, and 483L3 transformed 42.0, 78.9, and 75.8%, respectively, of glucose to C4 compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol). Anaerobically, strain CNRZ 483 produced no C4 compounds, while mutants 483L1, 483L2, and 483L3 transformed 2.0, 37.0, and 25.8% of glucose to acetoin and 2,3-butanediol. In contrast to the parental strain, the NADH balance showed that the mutants regenerated most of the NAD via NADH oxidase under aerobic conditions and by ethanol production under anaerobic conditions.

  2. Antilisterial Activity of Nisin-Like Bacteriocin-Producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Isolated from Traditional Sardinian Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Sofia; Fadda, Maria Elisabetta; Deplano, Maura; Melis, Roberta; Pomata, Rita; Pisano, Maria Barbara

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of selecting LAB strains with antilisterial activity to be used as protective cultures to enhance the safety of dairy products, the antimicrobial properties of 117 Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from artisanal Sardinian dairy products were evaluated, and six strains were found to produce bacteriocin-like substances. The capacity of these strains to antagonize Listeria monocytogenes during cocultivation in skimmed milk was evaluated, showing a reduction of L. monocytogenes counts of approximately 4 log units compared to the positive control after 24 h of incubation. In order for a strain to be used as bioprotective culture, it should be carefully evaluated for the presence of virulence factors, to determine what potential risks might be involved in its use. None of the strains tested was found to produce biogenic amines or to possess haemolytic activity. In addition, all strains were sensitive to clinically important antibiotics such as ampicillin, tetracycline, and vancomycin. Our results suggest that these bac+ strains could be potentially applied in cheese manufacturing to control the growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:22536018

  3. High individual variation in pheromone production by tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Brian T. Sullivan; Matthew P. Ayres

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation via pheromone signaling is essential for tree-killing bark beetles to overcome tree defenses and reproduce within hosts. Pheromone production is a trait that is linked to fitness, so high individual variation is paradoxica1. One explanation is that the technique of measuring static pheromone pools overestimates true variation among individuals. An...

  4. Isolation of a pyrazine alarm pheromone component from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Vander Meer, Robert K; Preston, Catherine A; Choi, Man-Yeon

    2010-02-01

    Alarm pheromones in social insects are an essential part of a complex of pheromone interactions that contribute to the maintenance of colony integrity and sociality. The alarm pheromones of ants were among the first examples of animal pheromones identified, primarily because of the large amount of chemical produced and the distinctive responses of ants to the pheromone. However, the alarm pheromone of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, eluded identification for over four decades. We identified 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine as an alarm pheromone component of S. invicta. Worker fire ants detect the pyrazine alarm pheromone at 30 pg/ml, which is comparable to alarm pheromone sensitivities reported for other ant species. The source of this alarm pheromone are the mandibular glands, which, in fire ants, are not well developed and contain only about 300 pg of the compound, much less than the microgram quantities of alarm pheromones reported for several other ant species. Female and male sexuals and workers produce the pyrazine, which suggests that it may be involved in fire ant mating flight initiation, as well as the typical worker alarm response. This is the first report of 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine from a Solenopsis species and the first example of this alkaloid functioning as an alarm pheromone.

  5. Relative abundance and flight phenology of two pheromone types of Acrobasis nuxvorella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Hartfield, E A; Harris, M K; Medina, R F

    2011-08-01

    Two synthetic sex pheromones have been developed and are currently used to detect the flight of the pecan nut casebearer, Acrobasis nuxvorella Neunzig, the most damaging pest of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. One pheromone (referred to as standard) is attractive to moths in the southern United States, but not in Mexico. The other pheromone (referred to as Mexican) is attractive to moths in the southern United States and in Mexico. These two pheromones have been implemented by producers as an important tool in monitoring the activity of this pest and have allowed for more efficient pesticide use. In the future, these pheromones could be used as a means of population reduction through pheromone based control methods. Trapping data taken over a 3-yr period were used to determine if phenological differences exist between pheromone types of pecan nut casebearer. The relative abundance of each pheromone type at several locations in the United States also was evaluated. Results of this study indicate that no phenological differences exist between the two pheromone types studied in the United States and that significantly more males are attracted to field-deployed pheromone traps baited with the standard pheromone than to traps baited with the Mexican pheromone.

  6. Synthetic pheromones disrupt male Dioryctria spp. moths in a loblolly pine seed orchard

    Treesearch

    Gary L. DeBarr; James L. Hanula; Christine G. Niwa; John C Nord

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic sex pheromones released in a loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L. (Pinaceae), seed orchard interfered with the ability of male coneworm moths, Dioryctria Zeller spp. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), to locate traps baited with sex pheromones or live females. Pherocon 1 C® traps baited with synthetic pheromones or live conspecific...

  7. Peripheral, Central and Behavioral Responses to the Cuticular Pheromone Bouquet in Drosophila melanogaster Males

    PubMed Central

    Inoshita, Tsuyoshi; Martin, Jean-René; Marion-Poll, Frédéric; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Pheromonal communication is crucial with regard to mate choice in many animals including insects. Drosophila melanogaster flies produce a pheromonal bouquet with many cuticular hydrocarbons some of which diverge between the sexes and differently affect male courtship behavior. Cuticular pheromones have a relatively high weight and are thought to be — mostly but not only — detected by gustatory contact. However, the response of the peripheral and central gustatory systems to these substances remains poorly explored. We measured the effect induced by pheromonal cuticular mixtures on (i) the electrophysiological response of peripheral gustatory receptor neurons, (ii) the calcium variation in brain centers receiving these gustatory inputs and (iii) the behavioral reaction induced in control males and in mutant desat1 males, which show abnormal pheromone production and perception. While male and female pheromones induced inhibitory-like effects on taste receptor neurons, the contact of male pheromones on male fore-tarsi elicits a long-lasting response of higher intensity in the dedicated gustatory brain center. We found that the behavior of control males was more strongly inhibited by male pheromones than by female pheromones, but this difference disappeared in anosmic males. Mutant desat1 males showed an increased sensitivity of their peripheral gustatory neurons to contact pheromones and a behavioral incapacity to discriminate sex pheromones. Together our data indicate that cuticular hydrocarbons induce long-lasting inhibitory effects on the relevant taste pathway which may interact with the olfactory pathway to modulate pheromonal perception. PMID:21625481

  8. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and (Z)-4...

  9. Ontogeny of Alarm pheromone production in the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alarm pheromones are an essential part of a complex of pheromone interactions that contribute to the maintenance of colony integrity and sociality in social insects. Recently, we identified 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine as an alarm pheromone component of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We continued...

  10. Molecular and neural mechanisms of sex pheromone reception and processing in the silkmoth Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    Male moths locate their mates using species-specific sex pheromones emitted by conspecific females. One striking feature of sex pheromone recognition in males is the high degree of specificity and sensitivity at all levels, from the primary sensory processes to behavior. The silkmoth Bombyx mori is an excellent model insect in which to decipher the underlying mechanisms of sex pheromone recognition due to its simple sex pheromone communication system, where a single pheromone component, bombykol, elicits the full sexual behavior of male moths. Various technical advancements that cover all levels of analysis from molecular to behavioral also allow the systematic analysis of pheromone recognition mechanisms. Sex pheromone signals are detected by pheromone receptors expressed in olfactory receptor neurons in the pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea on male antennae. The signals are transmitted to the first olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe (AL), and then are processed further in the higher centers (mushroom body and lateral protocerebrum) to elicit orientation behavior toward females. In recent years, significant progress has been made elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the detection of sex pheromones. In addition, extensive studies of the AL and higher centers have provided insights into the neural basis of pheromone processing in the silkmoth brain. This review describes these latest advances, and discusses what these advances have revealed about the mechanisms underlying the specific and sensitive recognition of sex pheromones in the silkmoth. PMID:24744736

  11. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the... pheromone Z-2-isopropenyl-1-methylcyclobutaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl-Δ1,β-cyclohexaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in § 152.25(b) of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the... pheromone Z-2-isopropenyl-1-methylcyclobutaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl-Δ1,β-cyclohexaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in § 152.25(b) of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in § 152.25(b) of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in § 152.25(b) of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the... pheromone Z-2-isopropenyl-1-methylcyclobutaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl-Δ1,β-cyclohexaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the... pheromone Z-2-isopropenyl-1-methylcyclobutaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl-Δ1,β-cyclohexaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and (Z)-4...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the... pheromone Z-2-isopropenyl-1-methylcyclobutaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl-Δ1,β-cyclohexaneethanol; Z-3,3-dimethyl...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in § 152.25(b) of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized...

  5. Role of plant volatiles and hetero-specific pheromone components in the wind tunnel response of male Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) to modified sex pheromone blends.

    PubMed

    Ammagarahalli, B; Chianella, L; Gomes, P; Gemeno, C

    2017-10-01

    Female Grapholita molesta (Busck) release a pheromone blend composed of two stereoisomeric acetates (Z8-12:Ac and E8-12:Ac), which in a 100:6 ratio stimulate maximum conspecific male approach. Z8-12:OH is described as a third pheromone component that increases responses to the acetate blend. Departures from the optimal pheromone blend ratio, or too high or low pheromone doses of the optimal blend ratio, result in lower male response. In a previous study, we show that plant volatiles synergize male response to a suboptimal-low pheromone concentration. In the present study, we show that the plant blend does not synergize male response to a suboptimal-high pheromone dose. The plant blend, however, synergized male response to pheromone blends containing unnatural Z:E-acetate isomer ratios. We revisited the role of alcohols in the pheromone response of G. molesta by replacing Z8-12:OH with conspecific and heterospecific pheromone alcohols or with plant odors. Codlemone, the alcohol sex pheromone of Cydia pomonella L., E8, E10-12:OH, did supplant the role of Z8-12:OH, and so did the plant volatile blend. Dodecenol (12:OH), which has been described as a fourth pheromone component of G. molesta, also increased responses, but not as much as Z8-12:OH, codlemone or the plant blend. Our results reveal new functions for plant volatiles on moth sex pheromone response under laboratory conditions, and shed new light on the role of alcohol ingredients in the pheromone blend of G. molesta.

  6. Quantitative PCR for the specific quantification of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus paracasei and its interest for Lactococcus lactis in cheese samples.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Christine; Berthier, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    The first objective of this work was to develop real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to quantify two species of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria technologically active in food fermentation, including cheese making: Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus paracasei. The second objective was to compare qPCR and plate counts of these two species in cheese samples. Newly designed primers efficiently amplified a region of the tuf gene from the target species. Sixty-three DNA samples from twenty different bacterial species, phylogenetically related or commonly found in raw milk and dairy products, were selected as positive and negative controls. Target DNA was successfully amplified showing a single peak on the amplicon melting curve; non-target DNA was not amplified. Quantification was linear over 5 log units (R(2) > 0.990), down to 22 gene copies/μL per well for Lc. lactis and 73 gene copies/μL per well for Lb. paracasei. qPCR efficiency ranged from 82.9% to 93.7% for Lc. lactis and from 81.1% to 99.5% for Lb. paracasei. At two stages of growth, Lc. lactis was quantified in 12 soft cheeses and Lb. paracasei in 24 hard cooked cheeses. qPCR proved to be useful for quantifying Lc. lactis, but not Lb. paracasei.

  7. Kluyveromyces marxianus-based platform for direct ethanol fermentation and recovery from cellulosic materials under air-ventilated conditions.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Chiaki; Nakagawa, Akira; Koyanagi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kojiro; Minami, Hiromichi; Tamaki, Hisanori; Katayama, Takane; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2012-05-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing represents an attractive approach to converting cellulosic materials into bioethanol, yet is practically unavailable. We developed a ventilation-mediated, simultaneous ethanol fermentation and recovery system. Running the system under air-supplied conditions, apparently pure ethanol (28g) was recovered from cellobiose (100g) by growing recombinant Kluyveromyces marxianus expressing β-glucosidase. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The mothematics of female pheromone signaling: strategies for aging virgins.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Symonds, Matthew R E; Kokko, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Although females rarely experience strong mate limitation, delays or lifelong problems of mate acquisition are detrimental to female fitness. In systems where males search for females via pheromone plumes, it is often difficult to assess whether female signaling is costly. Direct costs include the energetics of pheromone production and attention from unwanted eavesdroppers, such as parasites, parasitoids, and predators. Suboptimal outcomes are also possible from too many or too few mating events or near-simultaneous arrival of males who make unwanted mating attempts (even if successfully thwarted). We show that, in theory, even small costs can lead to a scenario where young females signal less intensely (lower pheromone concentration and/or shorter time spent signaling) and increase signaling effort only as they age and gather evidence (while still virgin) on whether sperm limitation threatens their reproductive success. Our synthesis of the empirical data available on Lepidoptera supports this prediction for one frequently reported component of signaling-time spent calling (often reported as the time of onset of calling at night)-but not for another, pheromone titer. This difference is explicable under the plausible but currently untested assumption that signaling earlier than other females each night is a more reliable way of increasing the probability of acquiring at least one mate than producing a more concentrated pheromone plume.

  9. Origin and diversification of a salamander sex pheromone system.

    PubMed

    Janssenswillen, Sunita; Vandebergh, Wim; Treer, Dag; Willaert, Bert; Maex, Margo; Van Bocxlaer, Ines; Bossuyt, Franky

    2015-02-01

    Sex pheromones form an important facet of reproductive strategies in many organisms throughout the Animal Kingdom. One of the oldest known sex pheromones in vertebrates are proteins of the Sodefrin Precursor-like Factor (SPF) system, which already had a courtship function in early salamanders. The subsequent evolution of salamanders is characterized by a diversification in courtship and reproduction, but little is known on how the SPF pheromone system diversified in relation to changing courtship strategies. Here, we combined transcriptomic, genomic, and phylogenetic analyses to investigate the evolution of the SPF pheromone system in nine salamandrid species with distinct courtship displays. First, we show that SPF originated from vertebrate three-finger proteins and diversified through multiple gene duplications in salamanders, while remaining a single copy in frogs. Next, we demonstrate that tail-fanning newts have retained a high phylogenetic diversity of SPFs, whereas loss of tail-fanning has been associated with a reduced importance or loss of SPF expression in the cloacal region. Finally, we show that the attractant decapeptide sodefrin is cleaved from larger SPF precursors that originated by a 62 bp insertion and consequent frameshift in an ancestral Cynops lineage. This led to the birth of a new decapeptide that rapidly evolved a pheromone function independently from uncleaved proteins.

  10. Revisiting fifty years of research on pheromone signaling in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Luporini, Pierangelo; Pedrini, Bill; Alimenti, Claudio; Vallesi, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Among protists, pheromones have been identified in a great variety of algal species for their activity in driving gamete-gamete interactions for fertilization. Analogously in ciliates, pheromones have been identified for their activity in inducing the sexual phenomenon of conjugation. Although this identification was pioneered by Kimball more than fifty years ago, an effective isolation and chemical characterization of ciliate pheromones has remained confined to species of Blepharisma, Dileptus and Euplotes. In Euplotes species, in which the molecular structures have been determined, pheromones form species-specific families of structurally homologous helical, cysteine-rich, highly-stable proteins. Being structurally homologous, they can bind cells in competition with one another, raising interesting functional analogies with the families of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell differentiation and development in higher organisms. In addition to inducing conjugation by binding cells in heterologous fashion, Euplotes pheromones act also as autocrine growth factors by binding to, and promoting the vegetative reproduction of the same cells from which they originate. This autocrine activity is most likely primary, providing a concrete example of how the original function of a molecule can be obscured during evolution by the acquisition of a new one.

  11. Mating and male pheromone kill Caenorhabditis males through distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Cheng; Runnels, Alexi M; Murphy, Coleen T

    2017-01-01

    Differences in longevity between sexes is a mysterious yet general phenomenon across great evolutionary distances. To test the roles of responses to environmental cues and sexual behaviors in longevity regulation, we examined Caenorhabditis male lifespan under solitary, grouped, and mated conditions. We find that neurons and the germline are required for male pheromone-dependent male death. Hermaphrodites with a masculinized nervous system secrete male pheromone and are susceptible to male pheromone killing. Male pheromone-mediated killing is unique to androdioecious Caenorhabditis, and may reduce the number of males in hermaphroditic populations; neither males nor females of gonochoristic species are susceptible to male pheromone killing. By contrast, mating-induced death, which is characterized by germline-dependent shrinking, glycogen loss, and ectopic vitellogenin expression, utilizes distinct molecular pathways and is shared between the sexes and across species. The study of sex- and species-specific regulation of aging reveals deeply conserved mechanisms of longevity and population structure regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23493.001 PMID:28290982

  12. Pheromonal Communication in the European House Dust Mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, Johannes L.M.; Barcari, Elena; Hradecky, Marc; Trefz, Simone; Tolasch, Till; Gantert, Cornelia; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Despite the sanitary importance of the European house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart, 1897), the pheromonal communication in this species has not been sufficiently studied. Headspace analysis using solid phase micro extraction (SPME) revealed that nerol, neryl formate, pentadecane, (6Z,9Z)-6,9-heptadecadiene, and (Z)-8-heptadecene are released by both sexes whereas neryl propionate was released by males only. Tritonymphs did not produce any detectable volatiles. In olfactometer experiments, pentadecane and neryl propionate were attractive to both sexes as well as to tritonymphs. (Z)-8-heptadecene was only attractive to male mites. Therefore it is discussed that pentadecane and neryl propionate are aggregation pheromones and (Z)-8-heptadecene is a sexual pheromone of the European house dust mite D. pteronyssinus. To study the potential use of pheromones in dust mite control, long-range olfactometer experiments were conducted showing that mites can be attracted to neryl propionate over distances of at least 50 cm. This indicates that mite pheromones might be useable to monitor the presence or absence of mites in the context of control strategies. PMID:26462831

  13. Pheromones and Other Semiochemicals for Monitoring Rare and Endangered Species.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mattias C

    2016-09-01

    As global biodiversity declines, biodiversity and conservation have become ever more important research topics. Research in chemical ecology for conservation purposes has not adapted to address this need. During the last 10-15 years, only a few insect pheromones have been developed for biodiversity and conservation studies, including the identification and application of pheromones specifically for population monitoring. These investigations, supplemented with our knowledge from decades of studying pest insects, demonstrate that monitoring with pheromones and other semiochemicals can be applied widely for conservation of rare and threatened insects. Here, I summarize ongoing conservation research, and outline potential applications of chemical ecology and pheromone-based monitoring to studies of insect biodiversity and conservation research. Such applications include monitoring of insect population dynamics and distribution changes, including delineation of current ranges, the tracking of range expansions and contractions, and determination of their underlying causes. Sensitive and selective monitoring systems can further elucidate the importance of insect dispersal and landscape movements for conservation. Pheromone-based monitoring of indicator species will also be useful in identifying biodiversity hotspots, and in characterizing general changes in biodiversity in response to landscape, climatic, or other environmental changes.

  14. Male Courtship Pheromones Induce Cloacal Gaping in Female Newts (Salamandridae).

    PubMed

    Janssenswillen, Sunita; Bossuyt, Franky

    2016-01-01

    Pheromones are an important component of sexual communication in courting salamanders, but the number of species in which their use has been demonstrated with behavioral evidence remains limited. Here we developed a behavioral assay for demonstrating courtship pheromone use in the aquatically courting Iberian ribbed newt Pleurodeles waltl. By performing an in-depth study of the courtship behavior, we show that females invariably open their cloaca (cloacal gaping) before engaging in pinwheel behavior, the circling movement that is the prelude to spermatophore uptake. In contrast, cloacal gaping was not observed in failed courtships, where females escaped or displayed thanatosis. Since gaping mainly occurred during male amplexus and cloacal imposition, which is the obvious period of pheromone transfer, we next investigated whether male courtship water (i.e., water holding courtship pheromones) alone was able to induce this reaction in females. These tests showed that courtship water induced cloacal gaping significantly more than water, even in the absence of a male. Cloacal gaping thus provides a simple and robust test for demonstrating courtship pheromone use in the Iberian ribbed newt. Since opening the cloaca is an essential prerequisite for spermatophore pick-up in all internally fertilizing salamanders, we hypothesize that variations on this assay will also be useful in several other species.

  15. Predicted taxonomic patterns in pheromone production by longhorned beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Ann M.; Lacey, Emerson S.; Hanks, Lawrence M.

    2006-11-01

    Males of five species of three tribes in the longhorned beetle subfamily Cerambycinae produce volatile pheromones that share a structural motif (hydroxyl or carbonyl groups at carbons two and three in straight-chains of six, eight, or ten carbons). Pheromone gland pores are present on the prothoraces of males, but are absent in females, suggesting that male-specific gland pores could provide a convenient morphological indication that a species uses volatile pheromones. In this article, we assess the taxonomic distribution of gland pores within the Cerambycinae by examining males and females of 65 species in 24 tribes using scanning electron microscopy. Gland pores were present in males and absent in females of 49 species, but absent in both sexes of the remaining 16 species. Pores were confined to indentations in the cuticle. Among the species that had male-specific gland pores were four species already known to produce volatile compounds consistent with the structural motif. These findings support the initial assumption that gland pores are associated with the production of pheromones by males. There were apparently no taxonomic patterns in the presence of gland pores. These findings suggest that volatile pheromones play an important role in reproduction for many species of the Cerambycinae, and that the trait is evolutionarily labile.

  16. Male Courtship Pheromones Induce Cloacal Gaping in Female Newts (Salamandridae)

    PubMed Central

    Janssenswillen, Sunita; Bossuyt, Franky

    2016-01-01

    Pheromones are an important component of sexual communication in courting salamanders, but the number of species in which their use has been demonstrated with behavioral evidence remains limited. Here we developed a behavioral assay for demonstrating courtship pheromone use in the aquatically courting Iberian ribbed newt Pleurodeles waltl. By performing an in-depth study of the courtship behavior, we show that females invariably open their cloaca (cloacal gaping) before engaging in pinwheel behavior, the circling movement that is the prelude to spermatophore uptake. In contrast, cloacal gaping was not observed in failed courtships, where females escaped or displayed thanatosis. Since gaping mainly occurred during male amplexus and cloacal imposition, which is the obvious period of pheromone transfer, we next investigated whether male courtship water (i.e., water holding courtship pheromones) alone was able to induce this reaction in females. These tests showed that courtship water induced cloacal gaping significantly more than water, even in the absence of a male. Cloacal gaping thus provides a simple and robust test for demonstrating courtship pheromone use in the Iberian ribbed newt. Since opening the cloaca is an essential prerequisite for spermatophore pick-up in all internally fertilizing salamanders, we hypothesize that variations on this assay will also be useful in several other species. PMID:26771882

  17. CXCR4(+)-targeted protein nanoparticles produced in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Saccardo, Paolo; Roldán, Mònica; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Cubarsi, Rafael; Vázquez, Esther; Mangues, Ramon; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a Gram-positive (endotoxin-free) food-grade bacteria exploited as alternative to Escherichia coli for recombinant protein production. We have explored here for the first time the ability of this platform as producer of complex, self-assembling protein materials. Biophysical properties, cell penetrability and in vivo biodistribution upon systemic administration of tumor-targeted protein nanoparticles produced in L. lactis have been compared with the equivalent material produced in E. coli. Protein nanoparticles have been efficiently produced in L. lactis, showing the desired size, internalization properties and biodistribution. In vitro and in vivo data confirm the potential and robustness of the production platform, pointing out L. lactis as a fascinating cell factory for the biofabrication of protein materials intended for therapeutic applications.

  18. Comparative Genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Reveals a Strict Monophyletic Bifidobacterial Taxon

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  19. The Transcriptional and Gene Regulatory Network of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 during Growth in Milk

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Anne; Hansen, Morten E.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kilstrup, Mogens; Kok, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we examine the changes in the expression of genes of Lactococcus lactis subspecies cremoris MG1363 during growth in milk. To reveal which specific classes of genes (pathways, operons, regulons, COGs) are important, we performed a transcriptome time series experiment. Global analysis of gene expression over time showed that L. lactis adapted quickly to the environmental changes. Using upstream sequences of genes with correlated gene expression profiles, we uncovered a substantial number of putative DNA binding motifs that may be relevant for L. lactis fermentative growth in milk. All available novel and literature-derived data were integrated into network reconstruction building blocks, which were used to reconstruct and visualize the L. lactis gene regulatory network. This network enables easy mining in the chrono-transcriptomics data. A freely available website at http://milkts.molgenrug.nl gives full access to all transcriptome data, to the reconstructed network and to the individual network building blocks. PMID:23349698

  20. Lactococcus lactis Metabolism and Gene Expression during Growth on Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations. PMID:25384484