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Sample records for kluyveromyces marxianus imb3

  1. High-temperature wine making using the thermotolerant yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3.

    PubMed

    Kourkoutas, Y; McErlean, C; Kanellaki, M; Hack, C J; Marchant, R; Banat, I M; Koutinas, A A

    2004-01-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 yeast cells were immobilized on delignified cellulosic material, apple, and quince separately. Both immobilized and free cells were used in high-temperature wine making, and their fermented grape must contained 3 to 4% alcohol. Semisweet wines were produced by the addition of potable alcohol to the fermented must. Preliminary sensory evaluation of the produced semisweet wines showed good flavor and aroma. The final product contained extremely low levels of higher and amyl alcohols while ethyl acetate was at levels usually present in wines. The ferment produced may be blended with other products to improve their quality.

  2. Fermentation of molasses using a thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3: simplex optimisation of media supplements.

    PubMed

    Gough, S; Flynn, O; Hack, C J; Marchant, R

    1996-09-01

    The use of molasses as a substrate for ethanol production by the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus var. marxianus was investigated at 45 degrees C. A maximum ethanol concentration of 7.4% (v/v) was produced from unsupplemented molasses at a concentration of 23% (v/v). The effect on ethanol production of increasing the sucrose concentration in 23% (v/v) molasses was determined. Increased sucrose concentration had a similar detrimental effect on the final ethanol produced as the increase in molasses concentration. This indicated that the effect may be due to increased osmotic activity as opposed to other components in the molasses. The optimum concentration of the supplements nitrogen, magnesium, potassium and fatty acid for maximum ethanol production rate was determined using the Nelder and Mead (Computer J 7:308-313, 1965) simplex optimisation method. The optimum concentration of the supplements were 0.576 g1(-1) magnesium sulphate, 0.288 g1(-1) potassium dihydrogen phosphate and 0.36% (v/v) linseed oil. Added nitrogen in the form of ammonium sulphate did not affect the ethanol production rate.

  3. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Kanlow switchgrass by thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3: the effect of enzyme loading, temperature and higher solid loadings.

    PubMed

    Pessani, Naveen K; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R; Bellmer, Danielle D; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-11-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) was subjected to hydrothermolysis pretreatment and then used to study the effect of enzyme loading and temperature in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with the thermotolerant yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 at 8% solid loading. Various loadings of Accellerase 1500 between 0.1 and 1.1 mL g(-1) glucan were tested in SSF at 45 °C (activity of enzyme was 82.2 FPU mL(-1)). The optimum enzyme loading was 0.7 mL g(-1) glucan based on the six different enzyme loadings tested. SSFs were performed at 37, 41 and 45 °C with an enzyme loading of 0.7 mL g(-1) glucan. The highest ethanol concentration of 22.5 g L(-1) was obtained after 168 h with SSF at 45 °C, which was equivalent to 86% yield. Four different batch and fed-batch strategies were evaluated using a total solid loading of 12% (dry basis). About 32 g L(-1) ethanol was produced with the four strategies, which was equivalent to 82% yield.

  4. Ethanol production through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of switchgrass using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D(5)A and thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB strains.

    PubMed

    Faga, Brian A; Wilkins, Mark R; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2010-04-01

    Hydrothermolysis pretreated switchgrass at 200 degrees C for 10min was used in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process using five thermotolerant yeast strains Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB 1, IMB 2, IMB 3, IMB 4, and IMB 5 at 45 degrees C and Saccharomyces cerevisiae D(5)A at 37 degrees C. SSF was carried out for 7d using 5, 10, and 15FPU/g glucan to determine the effect of decreasing cellulase loading on ethanol yield. The effect of initial pH on SSF by S. cerevisiae D(5)A was also investigated. Fermentation by K. marxianus IMB 1, IMB 2, IMB 4, and IMB 5 ceased by 72 h and fermentation by K. marxianus IMB 3 ceased by 96 h, while fermentation S. cerevisiae D(5)A continued for 7d. At 96 and 120 h, IMB 3 and S. cerevisiae D(5)A had similar ethanol yields while the other K. marxianus strains were lower at a 95% confidence level. Final ethanol yields for IMB 3, IMB 1, IMB 5 strains were similar to one another, however, ethanol yield for S. cerevisiae D(5)A (92% maximum theoretical) was greater than all of the IMB strains except IMB 3 at a 95% confidence level. Reducing enzyme loading reduced ethanol yields for both K. marxianus IMB 3 and S. cerevisiae D(5)A. Reducing buffer pH from 5.5 to 4.8 reduced ethanol yields for S. cerevisiae D(5)A. This study shows that K. marxianus IMB 3 has potential for commercial use for ethanol production from cellulose in SSF processes with further improvement of its thermotolerance.

  5. Kluyveromyces marxianus as a host for heterologous protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; Madeira, José Valdo; Cerdán, María-Esperanza; González-Siso, María-Isabel

    2016-07-01

    The preferentially respiring and thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is an emerging host for heterologous protein synthesis, surpassing the traditional preferentially fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in some important aspects: K . marxianus can grow at temperatures 10 °C higher than S. cerevisiae, which may result in decreased costs for cooling bioreactors and reduced contamination risk; has ability to metabolize a wider variety of sugars, such as lactose and xylose; is the fastest growing eukaryote described so far; and does not require special cultivation techniques (such as fed-batch) to avoid fermentative metabolism. All these advantages exist together with a high secretory capacity, performance of eukaryotic post-translational modifications, and with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status. In the last years, replication origins from several Kluyveromyces spp. have been used for the construction of episomal vectors, and also integrative strategies have been developed based on the tendency for non-homologous recombination displayed by K. marxianus. The recessive URA3 auxotrophic marker and the dominant Kan(R) are mostly used for selection of transformed cells, but other markers have been made available. Homologous and heterologous promoters and secretion signals have been characterized, with the K. marxianus INU1 expression and secretion system being of remarkable functionality. The efficient synthesis of roughly 50 heterologous proteins has been demonstrated, including one thermophilic enzyme. In this mini-review, we summarize the physiological characteristics of K. marxianus relevant for its use in the efficient synthesis of heterologous proteins, the efforts performed hitherto in the development of a molecular toolbox for this purpose, and some successful examples. PMID:27260286

  6. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus and its biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Gustavo Graciano; Heinzle, Elmar; Wittmann, Christoph; Gombert, Andreas K

    2008-06-01

    Strains belonging to the yeast species Kluyveromyces marxianus have been isolated from a great variety of habitats, which results in a high metabolic diversity and a substantial degree of intraspecific polymorphism. As a consequence, several different biotechnological applications have been investigated with this yeast: production of enzymes (beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase, inulinase, and polygalacturonases, among others), of single-cell protein, of aroma compounds, and of ethanol (including high-temperature and simultaneous saccharification-fermentation processes); reduction of lactose content in food products; production of bioingredients from cheese-whey; bioremediation; as an anticholesterolemic agent; and as a host for heterologous protein production. Compared to its congener and model organism, Kluyveromyces lactis, the accumulated knowledge on K. marxianus is much smaller and spread over a number of different strains. Although there is no publicly available genome sequence for this species, 20% of the CBS 712 strain genome was randomly sequenced (Llorente et al. in FEBS Lett 487:71-75, 2000). In spite of these facts, K. marxianus can envisage a great biotechnological future because of some of its qualities, such as a broad substrate spectrum, thermotolerance, high growth rates, and less tendency to ferment when exposed to sugar excess, when compared to K. lactis. To increase our knowledge on the biology of this species and to enable the potential applications to be converted into industrial practice, a more systematic approach, including the careful choice of (a) reference strain(s) by the scientific community, would certainly be of great value. PMID:18427804

  7. Production of inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus using dahlia tuber extract.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sumat Chand; Jain, P C; Kango, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    Various carbon sources were evaluated for production of inulinase by yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus MTCC 3995. Highest inulinase activity was observed with Dahlia extract (25.3 nkat mL(-1)) as carbon source. The enzyme activity was 1.4 folds higher than that observed in media containing pure chicory inulin (17.8 nkat mL(-1)). The yeast showed good growth on a simple medium containing dahlia extract (20% w/v) and yeast extract (2%w/v) as carbon and nitrogen source respectively, in 96 h. at 28°C and 120 rpm. Lowest inulinase yield (4.8 nkat mL(-1)) was seen in the medium containing glucose as C-source. Although varied inulinase levels were noticed on different C- sources, Inulinase: Sucrase (I/S) ratios were noticed to be similar. Among various protein sources tested, yeast extract was found to be the best source followed by beef extract (17.9 nkat mL(-1)) and peptone (13.8 nkat mL(-1)). The enzyme was optimally active at pH (4.0) and 50°C. TLC analysis of end product revealed that inulinase hydrolyzed inulin exclusively into fructose. Results suggest that the dahlia extract induced exoinulinase synthesis in Kluyveromyces marxianus and can be utilized as a potential substrate for inulinase production. PMID:24031804

  8. Thermal adaptability of Kluyveromyces marxianus in recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kluyveromyces marxianus combines the ease of genetic manipulation and fermentation with the ability to efficiently secrete high molecular weight proteins, performing eukaryotic post-translational modifications. It is able to grow efficiently in a wide range of temperatures. The secretion performances were analyzed in the host K. marxianus L3 in the range between 5°C and 40°C by means of 3 different reporter proteins, since temperature appears a key parameter for production and secretion of recombinant proteins. Results The recombinant strains were able to grow up to 40°C and, along the tested temperature interval (5-40°C), the specific growth rates (μ) were generally lower as compared to those of the untransformed strain. Biomass yields were slightly affected by temperature, with the highest values reached at 15°C and 30°C. The secretion of the endogenous β-fructofuranosidase, used as an internal control, was efficient in the range of the tested temperature, as evaluated by assaying the enzyme activity in the culture supernatants. The endogenous β-fructofuranosidase production was temperature dependent, with the highest yield at 30°C. The heterologous proteins HSA, GAA and Sod1p were all successfully produced and secreted between 5°C and 40°C, albeit each one presented a different optimal production temperature (15, 40, 5-30°C for HSA, GAA and Sod1p, respectively). Conclusions K. marxianus L3 has been identified as a promising and flexible cell factory. In a sole host, the optimization of growth temperatures for the efficient secretion of each individual protein can be carried out over a wide range of temperatures. PMID:23587421

  9. Enhanced Xylitol Production by Mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus 36907-FMEL1 Due to Improved Xylose Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Seong; Park, Jae-Bum; Jang, Seung-Won; Ha, Suk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    A directed evolution and random mutagenesis were carried out with thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 for efficient xylitol production. The final selected strain, K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1, exhibited 120 and 39 % improvements of xylitol concentration and xylitol yield, respectively, as compared to the parental strain, K. marxianus ATCC 36907. According to enzymatic assays for xylose reductase (XR) activities, XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 was around twofold higher than that from the parental strain. Interestingly, the ratios of NADH-linked and NADPH-linked XR activities were highly changed from 1.92 to 1.30 when K. marxianus ATCC 36907 and K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 were compared. As results of KmXYL1 genes sequencing, it was found that cysteine was substituted to tyrosine at position 36 after strain development which might cause enhanced XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1.

  10. Xylitol production at high temperature by engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Several recombinant Kluyveromyces marxianus strains were constructed through overexpressing the Neurospora crassa xylose reductase genes. YZJ015, which maintained the original xylitol dehydrogenase gene, produced xylitol with the highest productivity (1.49 g L(-1) h(-1)) from 100 g L(-1) xylose at 42 °C. Even at 45 °C, YZJ015 was still able to produce 60.03 g L(-1) xylitol from 100 g L(-1) xylose with a productivity of 1.25 g L(-1)h(-1). In addition, for 20 rounds of cell recycling at 42 °C, YZJ015 produced 71.35 g L(-1) xylitol from 100 g L(-1) xylose with a productivity of 4.43 g L(-1) h(-1) per cycle. YZJ017, in which the xylitol dehydrogenase gene was disrupted, produced 100.02 g L(-1) xylitol at a yield of 1.01 g g(-1) from 100 g L(-1) xylose with 40 g L(-1) glycerol as co-substrate at 42 °C. These engineered strains provide an excellent foundation for xylitol production at elevated temperatures.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399.

    PubMed

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Torriani, Sandra; Felis, Giovanna E

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399

    PubMed Central

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Felis, Giovanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  13. Combination of Kluyveromyces marxianus and sodium bicarbonate for controlling green mold of citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Meiying; Rizwan-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Lai, Kaiping; Qu, Fei; Zhang, Yanbo

    2011-12-01

    Biocontrol efficacy of an antagonistic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was evaluated individually or in combination with sodium bicarbonate (SBC) against green mold of citrus fruit caused by Penicillium digitatum. Their effects on postharvest quality of citrus fruit were also investigated. The results indicated that the antagonistic activity of K. marxianus at 1×10⁸ CFU/mL on green mold of citrus fruit was enhanced by 2% SBC treatment. In artificial inoculation trials, disease control after 3 and 6 days, respectively, with the mixture of K. marxianus and 2% SBC (18.33%, 58.33%) was significantly improved over that obtained with K. marxianus (41.67%, 70.00%) or SBC (43.33%, 81.67%) alone. The combination of K. marxianus with SBC was as effective as the imazalil treatment in natural infection trials, which gave about 90% control of green mold. Addition of 2% SBC significantly stimulated the growth of K. marxianus in citrus fruit wounds after 72 h. Moreover, K. marxianus, SBC and their combination did not impair quality parameters including weight loss, fruit firmness, total soluble solids, titratable acidity and ascorbic acid at 4 °C for 30 days followed by 20 °C for 15 days. These results suggested that the use of SBC is a useful approach to improve the efficacy of K. marxianus for the postharvest green mold of citrus fruit.

  14. Growth and by-product profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cells immobilized in foamed alginate.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska, Agnieszka; Kregiel, Dorota; Guneser, Onur; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study how the yeast cell immobilization technique influences the growth and fermentation profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultivated on apple/chokeberry and apple/cranberry pomaces. Encapsulation of the cells was performed by droplet formation from a foamed alginate solution. The growth and metabolic profiles were evaluated for both free and immobilized cells. Culture media with fruit waste produced good growth of free as well as immobilized yeast cells. The fermentation profiles of K. marxianus were different with each waste material. The most varied aroma profiles were noted for immobilized yeast cultivated on apple/chokeberry pomace. PMID:25277269

  15. The Thermotolerant Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus Is a Useful Organism for Structural and Biochemical Studies of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hayashi; Shima, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Yuh; Hoshida, Hisashi; Kakuta, Soichiro; Kondo-Kakuta, Chika; Noda, Nobuo N; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Itoh, Takehiko; Akada, Rinji; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is a conserved degradation process in which autophagosomes are generated by cooperative actions of multiple autophagy-related (Atg) proteins. Previous studies using the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided various insights into the molecular basis of autophagy; however, because of the modest stability of several Atg proteins, structural and biochemical studies have been limited to a subset of Atg proteins, preventing us from understanding how multiple Atg proteins function cooperatively in autophagosome formation. With the goal of expanding the scope of autophagy research, we sought to identify a novel organism with stable Atg proteins that would be advantageous for in vitro analyses. Thus, we focused on a newly isolated thermotolerant yeast strain, Kluyveromyces marxianus DMKU3-1042, to utilize as a novel system elucidating autophagy. We developed experimental methods to monitor autophagy in K. marxianus cells, identified the complete set of K. marxianus Atg homologs, and confirmed that each Atg homolog is engaged in autophagosome formation. Biochemical and bioinformatic analyses revealed that recombinant K. marxianus Atg proteins have superior thermostability and solubility as compared with S. cerevisiae Atg proteins, probably due to the shorter primary sequences of KmAtg proteins. Furthermore, bioinformatic analyses showed that more than half of K. marxianus open reading frames are relatively short in length. These features make K. marxianus proteins broadly applicable as tools for structural and biochemical studies, not only in the autophagy field but also in other fields. PMID:26442587

  16. The Thermotolerant Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus Is a Useful Organism for Structural and Biochemical Studies of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hayashi; Shima, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Yuh; Hoshida, Hisashi; Kakuta, Soichiro; Kondo-Kakuta, Chika; Noda, Nobuo N; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Itoh, Takehiko; Akada, Rinji; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is a conserved degradation process in which autophagosomes are generated by cooperative actions of multiple autophagy-related (Atg) proteins. Previous studies using the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided various insights into the molecular basis of autophagy; however, because of the modest stability of several Atg proteins, structural and biochemical studies have been limited to a subset of Atg proteins, preventing us from understanding how multiple Atg proteins function cooperatively in autophagosome formation. With the goal of expanding the scope of autophagy research, we sought to identify a novel organism with stable Atg proteins that would be advantageous for in vitro analyses. Thus, we focused on a newly isolated thermotolerant yeast strain, Kluyveromyces marxianus DMKU3-1042, to utilize as a novel system elucidating autophagy. We developed experimental methods to monitor autophagy in K. marxianus cells, identified the complete set of K. marxianus Atg homologs, and confirmed that each Atg homolog is engaged in autophagosome formation. Biochemical and bioinformatic analyses revealed that recombinant K. marxianus Atg proteins have superior thermostability and solubility as compared with S. cerevisiae Atg proteins, probably due to the shorter primary sequences of KmAtg proteins. Furthermore, bioinformatic analyses showed that more than half of K. marxianus open reading frames are relatively short in length. These features make K. marxianus proteins broadly applicable as tools for structural and biochemical studies, not only in the autophagy field but also in other fields.

  17. Bioflavour production from tomato and pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Güneşer, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Karagül Yüceer, Yonca; Özmen Toğay, Sine; İşleten Hoşoğlu, Müge; Elibol, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Bioflavours are called natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds which are produced using metabolic pathway of the microorganism and/or plant cells or their enzyme systems with bioengineering approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate bioflavour production from tomato and red pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii. Obtained specific growth rates of K. marxianus and D. hansenii in tomato pomace were 0.081/h and 0.177/h, respectively. The bioflavour profile differed between the yeasts. Both yeasts can produce esters and alcohols such as phenyl ethyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, isoamyl acetate, phenyl ethyl acetate and isovaleric acid. "Tarhana" and "rose" were descriptive flavour terms for tomato and pepper pomaces fermented by K. marxianus, respectively. Tomato pomace fermented by D. hansenii had the most intense "green bean" flavour while "fermented vegetable" and "storage/yeast" were defined as characteristic flavour terms for pepper pomaces fermented by D. hansenii. PMID:25614449

  18. Growth inhibition of thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, in hydrolysates from cassava pulp.

    PubMed

    Rugthaworn, Prapassorn; Murata, Yoshinori; Machida, Masashi; Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Hirooka, Akiko; Thanapase, Warunee; Dangjarean, Hatairat; Ushiwaka, Satoru; Morimitsu, Kozo; Kosugi, Akihiko; Arai, Takamitsu; Vaithanomsat, Pilanee

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we report the inhibition of Kluyveromyces marxianus TISTR5925 growth and ethanol fermentation in the presence of furan derivatives and weak acids (acetic acid and lactic acid) at high temperatures. Cassava pulp, obtained as the waste from starch processing, was collected from 14 starch factories located in several provinces of Thailand. At a high temperature (42 °C), the cassava pulp hydrolysate from some starch factories strongly inhibited growth and ethanol production of both K. marxianus (strain TISTR5925) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain K3). HPLC detected high levels of lactic acid and acetic acid in the hydrolysates, suggesting that these weak acids impaired the growth of K. marxianus at high temperature. We isolated Trp-requiring mutants that had reduced tolerance to acetic acid compared to the wild-type. This sensitivity to acetic acid was suppressed by supplementation of the medium with tryptophan.

  19. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus) using Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces rosei

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a source for ethanol and single-cell protein SCP. In addition, experimental results are presented on batch fermentation kinetics employing two strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus and one strain of Saccharomyces rosei grown in the extract derived from the tubers of Jeusalem artichoke. Of the three cultures examined, Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (EST) 55-82 was found to be the best producer of ethanol grown in a simple medium at 35/sup 0/C. The ethanol production was found to be growth-associated haveing a ..mu../sub max/ = 0.41 h/sup -1/ and the ethanol and biomass yields were determined to be Y/sub p///sub = 0.45 (88% of the theoretical) and Y/sub x///sub s/ = 0.04 with 92% of the original sugars utilized. On the basis of carbohydrate yields of Jerusalem artichoke reported in the literature and these batch kinetic studies with K. marxianus, the calculated ethanol yields were found to range from 1400 kg ethanol acre/sup -1/ yr /sup -1/ to a maximum of 2700 kg ethanol acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. The SCP yields for K. marxianus were calculated to range between 130 to 250 kg dry wt cell acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. The potential for developing an integrated process to produce ethanol and SCP is also discussed.

  20. Efficient conversion of xylose to ethanol by stress-tolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus BUNL-21.

    PubMed

    Nitiyon, Sukanya; Keo-Oudone, Chansom; Murata, Masayuki; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Limtong, Savitree; Kosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation ability of thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus BUNL-21 isolated in Laos was investigated. Comparison with thermotolerant K. marxianus DMKU3-1042 as one of the most thermotolerant yeasts isolated previously revealed that the strain possesses stronger ability for conversion of xylose to ethanol, resistance to 2-deoxyglucose in the case of pentose, and tolerance to various stresses including high temperature and hydrogen peroxide. K. marxianus BUNL-21 was found to have ethanol fermentation activity from xylose that is slightly lower and much higher than that of Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) at 30 °C and at higher temperatures, respectively. The lower ethanol production seems to be due to large accumulation of acetic acid. The possible mechanism of acetic acid accumulation is discussed. In addition, it was found that both K. marxianus strains produced ethanol in the presence of 10 mM hydroxymethylfurfural or furfural, at a level almost equivalent to that in their absence. Therefore, K. marxianus BUNL-21 is a highly competent yeast for high-temperature ethanol fermentation with lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:27026881

  1. Performance evaluation of Pichia kluyveri, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in industrial tequila fermentation.

    PubMed

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Herrera-López, E J; Arrizon, Javier; Arellano-Plaza, M; Gschaedler, A

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, industrial tequila production has used spontaneous fermentation or Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains. Despite the potential of non-Saccharomyces strains for alcoholic fermentation, few studies have been performed at industrial level with these yeasts. Therefore, in this work, Agave tequilana juice was fermented at an industrial level using two non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Pichia kluyveri and Kluyveromyces marxianus) with fermentation efficiency higher than 85 %. Pichia kluyveri (GRO3) was more efficient for alcohol and ethyl lactate production than S. cerevisiae (AR5), while Kluyveromyces marxianus (GRO6) produced more isobutanol and ethyl-acetate than S. cerevisiae (AR5). The level of volatile compounds at the end of fermentation was compared with the tequila standard regulation. All volatile compounds were within the allowed range except for methanol, which was higher for S. cerevisiae (AR5) and K. marxianus (GRO6). The variations in methanol may have been caused by the Agave tequilana used for the tests, since this compound is not synthesized by these yeasts.

  2. Performance evaluation of Pichia kluyveri, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in industrial tequila fermentation.

    PubMed

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Herrera-López, E J; Arrizon, Javier; Arellano-Plaza, M; Gschaedler, A

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, industrial tequila production has used spontaneous fermentation or Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains. Despite the potential of non-Saccharomyces strains for alcoholic fermentation, few studies have been performed at industrial level with these yeasts. Therefore, in this work, Agave tequilana juice was fermented at an industrial level using two non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Pichia kluyveri and Kluyveromyces marxianus) with fermentation efficiency higher than 85 %. Pichia kluyveri (GRO3) was more efficient for alcohol and ethyl lactate production than S. cerevisiae (AR5), while Kluyveromyces marxianus (GRO6) produced more isobutanol and ethyl-acetate than S. cerevisiae (AR5). The level of volatile compounds at the end of fermentation was compared with the tequila standard regulation. All volatile compounds were within the allowed range except for methanol, which was higher for S. cerevisiae (AR5) and K. marxianus (GRO6). The variations in methanol may have been caused by the Agave tequilana used for the tests, since this compound is not synthesized by these yeasts. PMID:23329062

  3. Interactions between Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in tequila must type medium fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Claudia Lorena Fernandez; Beaufort, Sandra; Brandam, Cédric; Taillandier, Patricia

    2014-08-01

    Traditional tequila fermentation is a complex microbial process performed by different indigenous yeast species. Usually, they are classified in two families: Saccharomyces and Non-Saccharomyces species. Using mixed starter cultures of several yeasts genera and species is nowadays considered to be beneficial to enhance the sensorial characteristics of the final products (taste, odor). However, microbial interactions occurring in such fermentations need to be better understood to improve the process. In this work, we focussed on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast couple. Indirect interactions due to excreted metabolites, thanks to the use of a specific membrane bioreactor, and direct interaction due to cell-to-cell contact have been explored. Comparison of pure and mixed cultures was done in each case. Mixed cultures in direct contact showed that both yeast were affected but Saccharomyces rapidly dominated the cultures whereas Kluyveromyces almost disappeared. In mixed cultures with indirect contact the growth of Kluyveromyces was decreased compared to its pure culture but its concentration could be maintained whereas the growth of Saccharomyces was enhanced. The loss of viability of Kluyveromyces could not be attributed only to ethanol. The sugar consumption and ethanol production in both cases were similar. Thus the interaction phenomena between the two yeasts are different in direct and indirect contact, Kluyveromyces being always much more affected than Saccharomyces.

  4. Opuntia ficus-indica cladodes as feedstock for ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuloyo, Olukayode O; du Preez, James C; García-Aparicio, Maria del Prado; Kilian, Stephanus G; Steyn, Laurinda; Görgens, Johann

    2014-12-01

    The feasibility of ethanol production using an enzymatic hydrolysate of pretreated cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (prickly pear cactus) as carbohydrate feedstock was investigated, including a comprehensive chemical analysis of the cladode biomass and the effects of limited aeration on the fermentation profiles and sugar utilization. The low xylose and negligible mannose content of the cladode biomass used in this study suggested that the hemicellulose structure of the O. ficus-indica cladode was atypical of hardwood or softwood hemicelluloses. Separate hydrolysis and fermentation and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation procedures using Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 40 and 35 °C, respectively, gave similar ethanol yields under non-aerated conditions. In oxygen-limited cultures K. marxianus exhibited almost double the ethanol productivity compared to non-aerated cultures, although after sugar depletion utilization of the produced ethanol was evident. Ethanol concentrations of up to 19.5 and 20.6 g l(-1) were obtained with K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae, respectively, representing 66 and 70 % of the theoretical yield on total sugars in the hydrolysate. Because of the low xylan content of the cladode biomass, a yeast capable of xylose fermentation might not be a prerequisite for ethanol production. K. marxianus, therefore, has potential as an alternative to S. cerevisiae for bioethanol production. However, the relatively low concentration of fermentable sugars in the O. ficus-indica cladode hydrolysate presents a technical constraint for commercial exploitation.

  5. Lactic acid production by mixed cultures of Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Plessas, S; Bosnea, L; Psarianos, C; Koutinas, A A; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2008-09-01

    Lactic acid production using Kluyveromyces marxianus (IFO 288), Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (ATCC 11842) and Lactobacillus helveticus (ATCC 15009) individually or as mixed culture on cheese whey in stirred or static fermentation conditions was evaluated. Lactic acid production, residual sugar and cell biomass were the main features examined. Increased lactic acid production was observed, when mixed cultures were used in comparison to individual ones. The highest lactic acid concentrations were achieved when K. marxianus yeast was combined with L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and when all the strains were used revealing possible synergistic effects between the yeast and the two lactic acid bacteria. The same synergistic effects were further observed and verified when the mixed cultures were applied in sourdough fermentations, proving that the above microbiological system could be applied in the food fermentations where high lactic acid production is sought.

  6. Effect of sugar concentration in Jerusalem artichoke extract on Kluyveromyces marxianus growth and ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1983-02-01

    The effect of inulin sugars concentration on the growth and ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was studied. A maximum ethanol concentration of 102 g/liter was obtained from 250 g of sugars per liter initial concentration. The maximum specific growth rate varied from 0.44 h/sup -1/ at 50 g of sugar per liter to 0.13 h/sup -1/ at 300 g of sugar per liter, whereas the ethanol yield remained almost constant at 0.45 g of ethanol per g of sugars utilized.

  7. Improved xylose fermentation of Kluyveromyces marxianus at elevated temperature through construction of a xylose isomerase pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongliang; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Biao; Gao, Xiaolian; Wang, Dongmei; Hong, Jiong

    2013-08-01

    To improve the xylose fermentation ability of Kluyveromyces marxianus, a xylose assimilation pathway through xylose isomerase was constructed. The genes encoding xylose reductase (KmXyl1) and xylitol dehydrogenase (KmXyl2) were disrupted in K. marxianus YHJ010 and the resultant strain was named YRL002. A codon-optimized xylose isomerase gene from Orpinomyces was transformed into K. marxianus YRL002 and expressed under GAPDH promoter. The transformant was adapted in the SD medium containing 1 % casamino acid with 2 % xylose as sole carbon source. After 32 times of trans-inoculation, a strain named YRL005, which can grow at a specific growth rate of 0.137/h with xylose as carbon source, was obtained. K. marxianus YRL005 could ferment 30.15 g/l of xylose and produce 11.52 g/l ethanol with a yield of 0.38 g/g, production rate of 0.069 g/l/h at 42 °C, and also could ferment 16.60 g/l xylose to produce 5.21 g/l ethanol with a yield of 0.31 g/g, and production rate of 0.054 g/l h at 45 °C. Co-fermentation with 2 % glucose could not improve the amount and yield of ethanol fermented from xylose obviously, but it could improve the production rate. Furthermore, K. marxianus YRL005 can ferment with the corn cob hydrolysate, which contained 20.04 g/l xylose to produce 8.25 g/l ethanol. It is a good platform to construct thermo-tolerant xylose fermentation yeast.

  8. Improved xylose fermentation of Kluyveromyces marxianus at elevated temperature through construction of a xylose isomerase pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongliang; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Biao; Gao, Xiaolian; Wang, Dongmei; Hong, Jiong

    2013-08-01

    To improve the xylose fermentation ability of Kluyveromyces marxianus, a xylose assimilation pathway through xylose isomerase was constructed. The genes encoding xylose reductase (KmXyl1) and xylitol dehydrogenase (KmXyl2) were disrupted in K. marxianus YHJ010 and the resultant strain was named YRL002. A codon-optimized xylose isomerase gene from Orpinomyces was transformed into K. marxianus YRL002 and expressed under GAPDH promoter. The transformant was adapted in the SD medium containing 1 % casamino acid with 2 % xylose as sole carbon source. After 32 times of trans-inoculation, a strain named YRL005, which can grow at a specific growth rate of 0.137/h with xylose as carbon source, was obtained. K. marxianus YRL005 could ferment 30.15 g/l of xylose and produce 11.52 g/l ethanol with a yield of 0.38 g/g, production rate of 0.069 g/l/h at 42 °C, and also could ferment 16.60 g/l xylose to produce 5.21 g/l ethanol with a yield of 0.31 g/g, and production rate of 0.054 g/l h at 45 °C. Co-fermentation with 2 % glucose could not improve the amount and yield of ethanol fermented from xylose obviously, but it could improve the production rate. Furthermore, K. marxianus YRL005 can ferment with the corn cob hydrolysate, which contained 20.04 g/l xylose to produce 8.25 g/l ethanol. It is a good platform to construct thermo-tolerant xylose fermentation yeast. PMID:23657586

  9. Continuous ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. I. Use of free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-07-01

    The continuous fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke juice to ethanol by free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 has been studied in a continuous-stirred tank bioreactor at 35 degrees C and pH 4.6. A maximum ethanol yield of 90% of the theoretical was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.05/h. About 95% of the sugars were utilized at dilution rates lower than 0.15/h. Volumetric ethanol productivity and volumetric biomass productivity reached maximum values of 7 g EtOH/L/h and 0.6 g dry wt/L/h, respectively, at a dilution rate of 0.2h. The maintenance energy coefficient for Kluyveromyces marxianus culture was found to be 0.46 g sugar/g biomass/h. Oscillatory behavior was observed following a change in dilution rate from a previous steady state and from batch to continuous culture. Values of specific ethanol production rate and specific sugar uptake were found to increase almost linearly with the increase of the dilution rate. The maximum specific ethanol production rate and maximum specific sugar uptake rate were found to be 2.6 g ethanol/g cell/h and 7.9 sugars/g cell/h, respectively. Washout occurred at a dilution rate of 0.41/h. (Refs. 21).

  10. Continuous ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. II. Use of immobilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-07-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 cells were immobilized in Na alginate beads and used in a packed-bed bioreactor system for the continuous production of ethanol from the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers. Volumetric ethanol productivities of 104 and 80 g ethanol/L/h were obtained at 80 and 92% sugar utilization, respectively. The maximum volumetric ethanol productivity of the immobilized cell bioreactor system was found to be 15 times higher than that of an ordinary continuous-stirred-tank (CST) bioreactor using free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus. The immobilized cell bioreactor system was operated continuously at a constant dilution rate of 0.66/h for 12 days resulting in only an 8% loss of the original immobilized cell activity, which corresponds to an estimated half-life of ca. 72 days. The maximum specific ethanol productivity and maximum specific sugar uptake rate of the immobilized cells were found to be 0.55 g ethanol/g biomass/h and 1.21 g sugars/g biomass/h, respectively. (Refs. 27).

  11. Impact of high temperature on ethanol fermentation by Kluyveromyces marxianus immobilized on banana leaf sheath pieces.

    PubMed

    Le, Hoang Du; Thanonkeo, Pornthap; Le, Van Viet Man

    2013-10-01

    Ethanol fermentation was carried out with Kluyveromyces marxianus cells at various temperatures (30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Fermentation performance of the immobilized yeast on banana leaf sheath pieces and the free yeast were evaluated and compared. Generally, ethanol production of the immobilized and free yeast was stable in a temperature range of 30-40 °C. Temperature of 45 °C restricted yeast growth and lengthened the fermentation. The immobilized yeast demonstrated faster sugar assimilation and higher ethanol level in the fermentation broth in comparison with the free yeast at all fermentation temperatures. Change in fatty acid level in cellular membrane was determined to clarify the response of the free and immobilized yeast to thermal stress. The free cells of K. marxianus responded to temperature increase by increasing saturated fatty acid (C16:0 and C18:0) level and by decreasing unsaturated fatty acid (C18:1 and C18:2) level in cellular membrane. For fermentation at 40 °C with immobilized cells of K. marxianus, however, the changes were not observed in both saturated fatty acid (C16:0) and unsaturated fatty acid (C18:1 and C18:2) level.

  12. Respiratory capacity of the Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast isolated from the mezcal process during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Plaza, Melchor; Gschaedler-Mathis, Anne; Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Clemente-Guerrero, Mónica; Manzo-Ávalos, Salvador; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    During the mezcal fermentation process, yeasts are affected by several stresses that can affect their fermentation capability. These stresses, such as thermal shock, ethanol, osmotic and growth inhibitors are common during fermentation. Cells have improved metabolic systems and they express stress response genes in order to decrease the damage caused during the stress, but to the best of our knowledge, there are no published works exploring the effect of oxidants and prooxidants, such as H2O2 and menadione, during growth. In this article, we describe the behavior of Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from spontaneous mezcal fermentation during oxidative stress, and compared it with that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that were also obtained from mezcal, using the W303-1A strain as a reference. S. cerevisiae strains showed greater viability after oxidative stress compared with K. marxianus strains. However, when the yeast strains were grown in the presence of oxidants in the media, K. marxianus exhibited a greater ability to grow in menadione than it did in H2O2. Moreover, when K. marxianus SLP1 was grown in a minibioreactor, its behavior when exposed to menadione was different from its behavior with H2O2. The yeast maintained the ability to consume dissolved oxygen during the 4 h subsequent to the addition of menadione, and then stopped respiration. When exposed to H2O2, the yeast stopped consuming oxygen for the following 8 h, but began to consume oxygen when stressors were no longer applied. In conclusion, yeast isolated from spontaneous mezcal fermentation was able to resist oxidative stress for a long period of time.

  13. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Agave tequilana fructans by Kluyveromyces marxianus yeasts for bioethanol and tequila production.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose-Axel; Gschaedler, Anne; Amaya-Delgado, Lorena; Herrera-López, Enrique J; Arellano, Melchor; Arrizon, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Agave tequilana fructans (ATF) constitute a substrate for bioethanol and tequila industries. As Kluyveromyces marxianus produces specific fructanases for ATF hydrolysis, as well as ethanol, it can perform simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. In this work, fifteen K. marxianus yeasts were evaluated to develop inoculums with fructanase activity on ATF. These inoculums were added to an ATF medium for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. All the yeasts, showed exo-fructanhydrolase activity with different substrate specificities. The yeast with highest fructanase activity in the inoculums showed the lowest ethanol production level (20 g/l). Five K. marxianus strains were the most suitable for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of ATF. The volatile compounds composition was evaluated at the end of fermentation, and a high diversity was observed between yeasts, nevertheless all of them produced high levels of isobutyl alcohol. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of ATF with K. marxianus strains has potential for industrial application.

  14. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Agave tequilana fructans by Kluyveromyces marxianus yeasts for bioethanol and tequila production.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose-Axel; Gschaedler, Anne; Amaya-Delgado, Lorena; Herrera-López, Enrique J; Arellano, Melchor; Arrizon, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Agave tequilana fructans (ATF) constitute a substrate for bioethanol and tequila industries. As Kluyveromyces marxianus produces specific fructanases for ATF hydrolysis, as well as ethanol, it can perform simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. In this work, fifteen K. marxianus yeasts were evaluated to develop inoculums with fructanase activity on ATF. These inoculums were added to an ATF medium for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. All the yeasts, showed exo-fructanhydrolase activity with different substrate specificities. The yeast with highest fructanase activity in the inoculums showed the lowest ethanol production level (20 g/l). Five K. marxianus strains were the most suitable for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of ATF. The volatile compounds composition was evaluated at the end of fermentation, and a high diversity was observed between yeasts, nevertheless all of them produced high levels of isobutyl alcohol. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of ATF with K. marxianus strains has potential for industrial application. PMID:23941710

  15. Hydrolysis of Agave fourcroydes Lemaire (henequen) leaf juice and fermentation with Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbon sources for biofuel production are wide-ranging and their availability depends on the climate and soil conditions of the land where the production chain is located. Henequen (Agave fourcroydes Lem.) is cultivated in Yucatán, Mexico to produce natural fibers from the leaves, and a juice containing fructans is produced during this process. Fructans can be hydrolyzed to fructose and glucose and metabolized into ethanol by appropriate yeasts. In Mexico, different Agave species provide the carbon source for (distilled and non-distilled) alcoholic beverage production using the stem of the plant, whilst the leaves are discarded. In this work, we investigated the effect of thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis of the juice on the amount of reducing sugars released. Growth curves were generated with the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus and fermentations were then carried out with Kluyveromyces marxianus to determine alcohol yields. Results With thermal acid hydrolysis, the greatest increase in reducing sugars (82.6%) was obtained using 5% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. Statistically similar results can be obtained using the same acid concentration at a lower temperature and with a shorter reaction time (60°C, 15 min), or by using 1% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. In the case of enzymatic hydrolysis, the use of 5.75, 11.47 and 22.82 U of enzyme did not produce significant differences in the increase in reducing sugars. Although both hydrolysis processes obtained similar results, the difference was observed after fermentation. Ethanol yields were 50.3 ± 4 and 80.04 ± 5.29% of the theoretical yield respectively. Conclusions Final reducing sugars concentrations obtained with both thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis were similar. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a good ethanol producer, did not grow in the hydrolysates. Only Kluyveromyces marxianus was able to grow in them, giving a higher ethanol

  16. Automated UV-C mutagenesis of Kluyveromyces marxianus NRRL Y-1109 and selection for microaerophilic growth and ethanol production at elevated temperature on biomass sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is a potential microbial catalyst for producing ethanol from lignocellulosic substrates at elevated temperatures. To improve its growth and ethanol yield under anaerobic conditions, K. marxianus NRRL Y-1109 was irradiated with UV-C, and surviving cells were grown a...

  17. Chromosome arrangement, differentiation of growth kinetics and volatile molecule profiles in Kluyveromyces marxianus strains from Italian cheeses.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Giuseppe; Tofalo, Rosanna; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Schirone, Maria; Patrignani, Francesca; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Grazia, Luigi; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    Thirty-nine strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus from Pecorino di Farindola cheese in comparison with 3 strains from Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, 1 from fermented milk, 3 from cow whey and two type strains K. marxianus CBS 834(T) and Kluyveromyces lactis CBS 683(T) were tested for genetic and metabolic characteristics. Intraspecific diversity of chromosome arrangements was evaluated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Among K. marxianus strains chromosome polymorphisms were evident with 11 patterns that differed in size and number of the chromosomal bands. The number of the bands varied from 4 to 7 with sizes ranging from about 1.0 to 2.7 Mb. Twelve strains were selected for determining their growth capacity and volatile compound production in two wheys (raw cheese whey and ricotta cheese whey) under limited oxygen availability. The growth kinetics highlighted four different biotypes and the influence of whey composition on K. marxianus development. The main volatile compounds detected after the growth were alcohols, acids, esters, ketones and aldehydes. Ethanol was the most abundant in both wheys. Aldehydes and other minor compounds were produced only when the strains were inoculated in ricotta cheese whey, while esters, butanoic, decanoic and octanoic acids were qualitatively and quantitatively more present in raw cheese whey. This study highlights a great genetic and metabolic biodiversity within Pecorino di Farindola K. marxianus strains and it could be exploited to improve the knowledge of this yeast for biotechnological uses. PMID:26310129

  18. Chromosome arrangement, differentiation of growth kinetics and volatile molecule profiles in Kluyveromyces marxianus strains from Italian cheeses.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Giuseppe; Tofalo, Rosanna; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Schirone, Maria; Patrignani, Francesca; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Grazia, Luigi; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    Thirty-nine strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus from Pecorino di Farindola cheese in comparison with 3 strains from Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, 1 from fermented milk, 3 from cow whey and two type strains K. marxianus CBS 834(T) and Kluyveromyces lactis CBS 683(T) were tested for genetic and metabolic characteristics. Intraspecific diversity of chromosome arrangements was evaluated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Among K. marxianus strains chromosome polymorphisms were evident with 11 patterns that differed in size and number of the chromosomal bands. The number of the bands varied from 4 to 7 with sizes ranging from about 1.0 to 2.7 Mb. Twelve strains were selected for determining their growth capacity and volatile compound production in two wheys (raw cheese whey and ricotta cheese whey) under limited oxygen availability. The growth kinetics highlighted four different biotypes and the influence of whey composition on K. marxianus development. The main volatile compounds detected after the growth were alcohols, acids, esters, ketones and aldehydes. Ethanol was the most abundant in both wheys. Aldehydes and other minor compounds were produced only when the strains were inoculated in ricotta cheese whey, while esters, butanoic, decanoic and octanoic acids were qualitatively and quantitatively more present in raw cheese whey. This study highlights a great genetic and metabolic biodiversity within Pecorino di Farindola K. marxianus strains and it could be exploited to improve the knowledge of this yeast for biotechnological uses.

  19. Ethanol inhibition kinetics of Kluyveromyces marxianus grown on Jerusalem artichoke juice

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, P.; Margaritis, A.

    1982-12-01

    The kinetics of ethanol inhibition on cell growth and ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 were studied during batch growth. The liquid medium contained 10% (weight/volume) inulin-type sugars derived from an extract of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tubers, supplemented with small amounts of Tween 80, oleic acid, and corn steep liquor. Initial ethanol concentrations ranging from 0 to 80 g/liter in the liquid medium were used to study the inhibitory effect of ethanol on the following parameters: maximum specific growth rate (mu max), cell and ethanol yields, and sugar utilization. It was found that as the initial ethanol concentration increased from 0 to 80 g/liter, and maximum specific growth rate of K. marxianus cells decreased from 0.42 to 0.09/hour, whereas the ethanol and cell yields and sugar utilization remained almost constant. A simple kinetic model was used to correlate the mu max results and the rates of cell and ethanol production, and the appropriate constants were evaluated. (Refs. 22).

  20. Studies on the mechanism of synthesis of ethyl acetate in Kluyveromyces marxianus DSM 5422.

    PubMed

    Löser, Christian; Urit, Thanet; Keil, Peter; Bley, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus converts whey-borne sugar into ethyl acetate, an environmentally friendly solvent with many applications. K. marxianus DSM 5422 presumably synthesizes ethyl acetate from acetyl-SCoA. Iron limitation as a trigger for this synthesis is explained by a diminished aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase activity (both enzymes depend on iron) causing diversion of acetyl-SCoA from the tricarboxic acid cycle to ester synthesis. Copper limitation as another trigger for ester synthesis in this yeast refers to involvement of the electron transport chain (all ETC complexes depend on iron and complex IV requires copper). This hypothesis was checked by using several ETC inhibitors. Malonate was ineffective but carboxin partially inhibited complex II and initiated ester synthesis. Antimycin A and cyanide as complexes III and IV inhibitors initiated ester synthesis only at moderate levels while higher concentrations disrupted all respiration and caused ethanol formation. A restricted supply of oxygen (the terminal electron acceptor) also initiated some ester synthesis but primarily forced ethanol production. A switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions nearly stopped ester synthesis and induced ethanol formation. Iron-limited ester formation was compared with anaerobic ethanol production; the ester yield was lower than the ethanol yield but a higher market price, a reduced number of process stages, a faster process, and decreased expenses for product recovery by stripping favor biotechnological ester production. PMID:25487884

  1. Cashew apple bagasse as a source of sugars for ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus CE025.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte; Rodrigues, Tigressa Helena Soares; Melo, Vania M M; Gonçalves, Luciana R B; de Macedo, Gorete Ribeiro

    2011-08-01

    The potential of cashew apple bagasse as a source of sugars for ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus CE025 was evaluated in this work. This strain was preliminarily cultivated in a synthetic medium containing glucose and xylose and was able to produce ethanol and xylitol at pH 4.5. Next, cashew apple bagasse hydrolysate (CABH) was prepared by a diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment and used as fermentation media. This hydrolysate is rich in glucose, xylose, and arabinose and contains traces of formic acid and acetic acid. In batch fermentations of CABH at pH 4.5, the strain produced only ethanol. The effects of temperature on the kinetic parameters of ethanol fermentation by K. marxianus CE025 using CABH were also evaluated. Maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)), overall yields of ethanol based on glucose consumption [Formula: see text] and based on glucose + xylose consumption (Y ( P/S )), overall yield of ethanol based on biomass (Y ( P/X )), and ethanol productivity (P (E)) were determined as a function of temperature. Best results of ethanol production were achieved at 30°C, which is also quite close to the optimum temperature for the formation of biomass. The process yielded 12.36 ± 0.06 g l(-1) of ethanol with a volumetric production rate of 0.257 ± 0.002 g l(-1) h(-1) and an ethanol yield of 0.417 ± 0.003 g g(-1) glucose.

  2. Studies on the mechanism of synthesis of ethyl acetate in Kluyveromyces marxianus DSM 5422.

    PubMed

    Löser, Christian; Urit, Thanet; Keil, Peter; Bley, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus converts whey-borne sugar into ethyl acetate, an environmentally friendly solvent with many applications. K. marxianus DSM 5422 presumably synthesizes ethyl acetate from acetyl-SCoA. Iron limitation as a trigger for this synthesis is explained by a diminished aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase activity (both enzymes depend on iron) causing diversion of acetyl-SCoA from the tricarboxic acid cycle to ester synthesis. Copper limitation as another trigger for ester synthesis in this yeast refers to involvement of the electron transport chain (all ETC complexes depend on iron and complex IV requires copper). This hypothesis was checked by using several ETC inhibitors. Malonate was ineffective but carboxin partially inhibited complex II and initiated ester synthesis. Antimycin A and cyanide as complexes III and IV inhibitors initiated ester synthesis only at moderate levels while higher concentrations disrupted all respiration and caused ethanol formation. A restricted supply of oxygen (the terminal electron acceptor) also initiated some ester synthesis but primarily forced ethanol production. A switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions nearly stopped ester synthesis and induced ethanol formation. Iron-limited ester formation was compared with anaerobic ethanol production; the ester yield was lower than the ethanol yield but a higher market price, a reduced number of process stages, a faster process, and decreased expenses for product recovery by stripping favor biotechnological ester production.

  3. Acquisition of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus from unpasteurised milk by a kefir grain enhances kefir quality.

    PubMed

    Gethins, Loughlin; Rea, Mary C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Kilcawley, Kieran; O'Sullivan, Maurice; Crotty, Suzanne; Morrissey, John P

    2016-08-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk beverage consumed for nutritional and health tonic benefits in many parts of the world. It is produced by the fermentation of milk with a consortium of bacteria and yeast embedded within a polysaccharide matrix. This consortium is not well defined and can vary substantially between kefir grains. There are little data on the microbial stability of kefir grains, nor on interactions between microbes in the grain and in the milk. To study this, a grain was split, with one half of each stored at -20°C and the other half passaged repeatedly in whole unpasteurised milk. Grains passaged in the unpasteurised milk recovered vigour and acquired the yeast Kluyveromyces marxainus from the milk which was confirmed to be the same strain by molecular typing. Furthermore, these passaged grains produced kefir that was distinguished chemically and organoleptically from the stored grains. Some changes in ultrastructure were also observed by scanning electron microscopy. The study showed that kefir grains can acquire yeast from their environment and the final product can be influenced by these newly acquired yeasts. Kluyveromyces marxianus is considered to be responsible for some of the most important characteristics of kefir so the finding that this yeast is part of the less stable microbiota is significant. PMID:27369085

  4. High-efficiency carbohydrate fermentation to ethanol at temperatures above 40/sup 0/C by Kluyveromyces marxianus var. marxianus isolated from sugar mills

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.J.; NcNeil, K.; Watson, K.

    1986-06-01

    A number of yeast strains, isolated from sugar can mills and identified as strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus var. marxianus, were examined for their ability to ferment glucose and cane syrup to ethanol at high temperatures. Several strains were capable of rapid fermentation at temperatures up to 47/sup 0/C. At 43/sup 0/C, >6% (wt/vol) ethanol was produced after 12 to 14 h of fermentation, concurrent with retention of high cell viability (>80%). Although the type strain (CBS 712) of K. marxianus var. marxianus produced up to 6% (wt/vol) ethanol at 43/sup 0/C, cell viability was low, 30 to 50%, and the fermentation time was 24 to 30 h. On the basis of currently available strains, the authors suggest that it may be possible by genetic engineering to construct yeasts capable of fermenting carbohydrates at temperatures close to 50/sup 0/C to produce 10 to 15% (wt/vol) ethanol in 12 to 18 h with retention of cell viability.

  5. Selection of a thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus strain with potential application for cellulosic ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rafael Cunha A; Roberto, Inês C

    2014-02-01

    The development of technologies for cellulosic ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) depends on the use of microorganisms with high fermentative rates and thermotolerance. In this study, the ability of five Kluyveromyces marxianus strains to produce ethanol from glucose at 45 °C was investigated. The highest fermentative parameters were observed with K. marxianus NRRL Y-6860, which was then further studied. An initial evaluation of the oxygen supply on ethanol production by the selected yeast and a comparison of SSF process from acid pretreated rice straw between K. marxianus NRRL Y-6860 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 30 and 45 °C were carried out. Under the lowest evaluated conditions of aeration and agitation, K. marxianus NRRL Y-6860 produced 21.5 g/L ethanol from 51.3 g/L glucose corresponding to YP/S of 0.44 g/g and QP of 3.63 g/L h. In the SSF experiments, K. marxianus NRRL Y-6860 was more efficient than S. cerevisiae at both evaluated temperatures (30 and 45 °C), attained at the highest temperature an ethanol yield of 0.24 g/g and productivity of 1.44 g/L h.

  6. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rat.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanhong; Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Hui; Xiong, Lixia; Gao, Xiuzhi; Jia, Hui; Lian, Zhengxing; Tong, Nengsheng; Han, Tao

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats, female Wistar rats were fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) for 28 d to generate hyperlipidemic models. Hyperlipidemic rats were assigned to four groups, which were individually treated with three different dosages of K. marxianus M3+HCD or physiological saline+HCD via oral gavage for 28 d. The total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in the serum and liver of the rats were measured using commercially available enzyme kits. In addition, the liver morphology was also examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and optical microscopy. According to our results, the serum and liver TC, TG, LDL-C levels and atherogenic index (AI) were significantly decreased in rats orally administered K. marxianus M3 (p <0.01), and the HDL-C levels and anti atherogenic index (AAI) were significantly increased (p <0.01) compared to the control group. Moreover, K. marxianus M3 treatment also reduced the build-up of lipid droplets in the liver and exhibited normal hepatocytes, suggesting a protective effect of K. marxianus M3 in hyperlipidemic rats.

  7. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rat

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuanhong; Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Hui; Xiong, Lixia; Gao, Xiuzhi; Jia, Hui; Lian, Zhengxing; Tong, Nengsheng; Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus M3 isolated from Tibetan mushrooms on diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats, female Wistar rats were fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) for 28 d to generate hyperlipidemic models. Hyperlipidemic rats were assigned to four groups, which were individually treated with three different dosages of K. marxianus M3+HCD or physiological saline+HCD via oral gavage for 28 d. The total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in the serum and liver of the rats were measured using commercially available enzyme kits. In addition, the liver morphology was also examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and optical microscopy. According to our results, the serum and liver TC, TG, LDL-C levels and atherogenic index (AI) were significantly decreased in rats orally administered K. marxianus M3 (p <0.01), and the HDL-C levels and anti atherogenic index (AAI) were significantly increased (p <0.01) compared to the control group. Moreover, K. marxianus M3 treatment also reduced the build-up of lipid droplets in the liver and exhibited normal hepatocytes, suggesting a protective effect of K. marxianus M3 in hyperlipidemic rats. PMID:26273253

  8. Production of bioethanol from effluents of the dairy industry by Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Zoppellari, Francesca; Bardi, Laura

    2013-09-25

    Whey and scotta are effluents coming from cheese and ricotta processing respectively. Whey contains minerals, lipids, lactose and proteins; scotta contains mainly lactose. Whey can be reused in several ways, such as protein extraction or animal feeding, while nowadays scotta is just considered as a waste; moreover, due to very high volumes of whey produced in the world, it poses serious environmental and disposal problems. Alternative destinations of these effluents, such as biotechnological transformations, can be a way to reach both goals of improving the added value of the agroindustrial processes and reducing their environmental impact. In this work we investigated the way to produce bioethanol from lactose of whey and scotta and to optimize the fermentation yields. Kluyveromyces marxianus var. marxianus was chosen as lactose-fermenting yeast. Batch, aerobic and anaerobic, fermentations and semicontinuous fermentations in dispersed phase and in packed bed reactor were carried out of row whey, scotta and mix 1:1 whey:scotta at a laboratory scale. Different temperatures (28-40°C) were also tested to check whether the thermotolerance of the chosen yeast could be useful to improve the ethanol yield. The best performances were reached at low temperatures (28°C); high temperatures are also compatible with good ethanol yields in whey fermentations, but not in scotta fermentations. Semicontinuous fermentations in dispersed phase gave the best fermentation performances, particularly with scotta. Then both effluents can be considered suitable for ethanol production. The good yields obtained from scotta allow us to transform this waste in a source.

  9. Multilocus analysis reveals large genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus strains isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheeses.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Giuseppe; Barrio, Eladio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna; Belloch, Carmela

    2016-09-16

    In the present study, we have analysed the genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheesemaking environment. Molecular typing methods inter-RTL fingerprint and mtDNA RFLPs, as well as, sequence diversity and heterozygosity in the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes and analysis of the mating locus were applied to 54 K. marxianus strains. Inter-RTL fingerprint revealed a large degree of genetic heterogeneity and clustering allowed differentiation of K. marxianus strains from different geographical origins. In general, inter-LTR profiles were more discriminating than RFLPs of mtDNA; however our results also indicate that both techniques could be complementary unveiling different degrees of genetic diversity. Sequence analysis of the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes revealed 26 variable positions in which a double peak could be observed in the sequence chromatogram. Further analysis revealed the presence of heterozygous strains in the K. marxianus population isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano. On the other hand, all strains isolated from Pecorino di Farindola were homozygous. Two very different groups of haplotypes could be observed as well as mixtures between them. Phylogenetic reconstruction divided K. marxianus dairy strains into two separate populations. A few heterozygous strains in an intermediate position between them could also be observed. Mating type locus analysis revealed a large population of diploid strains containing both MATa and MATα alleles and few haploid strains, most of them presenting the MATα allele. Different scenarios explaining the presence and maintaining of homozygous and heterozygous diploids as well as hybrids between them in the Parmigiano Reggiano K. marxianus population are proposed. A principal component analysis supported the large differences between K. marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola. PMID:27294555

  10. Metals sorption from aqueous solutions by Kluyveromyces marxianus: process optimization, equilibrium modeling and chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rama; Tewari, Saumyata; Rai, Jai P N

    2009-10-01

    The dead Kluyveromyces marxianus biomass, a fermentation industry waste, was used to explore its sorption potential for lead, mercury, arsenic, cobalt, and cadmium as a function of pH, biosorbent dosage, contact time, agitation speed, and initial metal concentration. The equilibrium data fitted the Langmuir model better for cobalt and cadmium, but Freundlich isotherm for all metals tested. At equilibrium, the maximum uptake capacity (Qmax) was highest for lead followed by mercury, arsenic, cobalt, and cadmium. The RL values ranged between 0-1, indicating favorable sorption of all test metals by the biosorbent. The maximum Kf value of Pb showed its efficient removal from the solution. However, multi-metal analysis depicted that sorption of all metals decreased except Pb. The potentiometric titration of biosorbent revealed the presence of functional groups viz. amines, carboxylic acids, phosphates, and sulfhydryl group involved in heavy metal sorption. The extent of contribution of functional groups and lipids to biosorption was in the order: carboxylic>lipids>amines>phosphates. Blocking of sulfhydryl group did not have any significant effect on metal sorption.

  11. Bioethanol production from taro waste using thermo-tolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus K21.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Hao; Hung, Wei-Chun; Lo, Kai-Yin; Chen, Yen-Hui; Wan, Hou-Peng; Cheng, Kuan-Chen

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, evaluation and optimization of taro waste (TW), which was mainly composed of taro peels that contain many starch residues, as the main carbon source in medium were studied. The flask studies showed the optimal medium was using 170g/L of TW which is about 100g/L of glucose and 9g/L of CGM as alternative nitrogen source. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) exhibited higher bioethanol productivity toward separation hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF). The optimal condition of SSF was 5% of Kluyveromyces marxianus K21 inoculum at 40°C resulting in the maximum ethanol concentration (48.98g/L) and productivity (2.23g/L/h) after 22h of cultivation. The scaling up experiment in a 5L bioreactor demonstrated that K21 can still maintain its capability. After 20h of cultivation, 43.78g/L of ethanol (2.19g/L/h of productivity) was achieved corresponding to a 94.2% theoretical ethanol yield.

  12. Polygalacturonase and ethanol production in Kluyveromyces marxianus: potential use of polygalacturonase in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Serrat, Manuel; Bermúdez, Rosa C; Villa, Tomás G

    2004-04-01

    The coproduction of ethanol and polygalacturonase (PG) in a pilot-scale batch fermentor using yeast extract--glucose (YD)--and sugar beet molasses (SBM)-based media was implemented utilizing a new high-PG-producing strain of Kluyveromyces marxianus. A certain growth inhibition was observed in SBM medium, causing ethanol and PG production to be lower. Ethanol productivity and accumulation values of 1.94 g/(L x h) and 40 g/L, respectively, were attained in YD, whereas the best fermentation efficiency (95.1%) was achieved with SBM medium. Maximal PG synthesis occurred at the end of cell growth, with values of 1.08 and 0.46 U/(mg x h) for the YD and SBM media, respectively. When the cultures reached stationary phase, PG production stopped. The highest accumulation level (17 U/mL) occurred in YD medium, in agreement with previous laboratory-scale studies carried out for this strain. The potential applications of the crude enzyme preparations were evaluated with different fruit juices and vegetable slices. The enzyme was able to increase the filtration rate of orange, pear, and apple juices by twofold. Additionally, complete clarification of apple juice was readily accomplished, whereas cucumber, carrot, and banana tissues were macerated to a lesser extent.

  13. Survival of the functional yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus B0399 in fermented milk with added sorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Tabanelli, G; Verardo, V; Pasini, F; Cavina, P; Lanciotti, R; Caboni, M F; Gardini, F; Montanari, C

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the survival of the functional yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus B0399 in an industrially produced fermented milk was evaluated. In particular, the yeast viability was assessed throughout the entire shelf-life of the product (30 d) to ensure the presence of the effective yeast dose (20 million viable cells for each serving of 125 g) while avoiding, by sorbic acid addition, yeast growth, which could affect product quality and stability. To find the best combination of yeast and sorbic acid concentration, 13 different combinations were tested, and then 2 of them were chosen for industrial production. In production at lower concentrations (30 million viable cells, 150 mg/kg of sorbic acid) the effective dose was maintained only at 4 and 6°C, whereas at higher dosages (70 million viable cells, 250 mg/kg of sorbic acid) the effect of temperature was less evident. In all the trials, the concentration of sorbic acid was not affected by microbial metabolism and remained stable throughout the entire shelf-life. PMID:26547644

  14. Production of extracellular exoinulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1 using root tubers of Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Singh, R S; Bhermi, H K

    2008-10-01

    Root tubers of Asparagus officinalis were used as a source of raw inulin for the production of exoinulinase (EC 3.2.1.7) from Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1. Root extract prepared at 10kg/cm2 pressure for 10min showed maximum inulinase production. Medium components and process parameters were standardized to improve the enzyme production. Inulinase yield of 40.2IU/mL in a medium containing raw inulin (3.5%), beef extract (2%), SDS (0.001%), Mn2+ (2.0mM), Mg2+ (1.5mM), Co2+ (2mM) and pH 6.5 has been obtained under agitation (150rpm) after 60h of incubation at 30 degrees C at shake flask level. After optimization, the enzyme production was 4.8 times more than the basal medium. To test the feasibility of raw inulin from A. officinalis for the production of inulinase, trials were also made in a bioreactor (1.5L). Inulinase activity of 50.2IU/mL was obtained from raw inulin (4.0%) under agitation (200rpm) and aeration (0.75vvm) at 30 degrees C after 60h of fermentation. Inulinase yield in bioreactor was almost six times higher than the basal medium used initially in shake flask.

  15. Bioethanol production from taro waste using thermo-tolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus K21.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Hao; Hung, Wei-Chun; Lo, Kai-Yin; Chen, Yen-Hui; Wan, Hou-Peng; Cheng, Kuan-Chen

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, evaluation and optimization of taro waste (TW), which was mainly composed of taro peels that contain many starch residues, as the main carbon source in medium were studied. The flask studies showed the optimal medium was using 170g/L of TW which is about 100g/L of glucose and 9g/L of CGM as alternative nitrogen source. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) exhibited higher bioethanol productivity toward separation hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF). The optimal condition of SSF was 5% of Kluyveromyces marxianus K21 inoculum at 40°C resulting in the maximum ethanol concentration (48.98g/L) and productivity (2.23g/L/h) after 22h of cultivation. The scaling up experiment in a 5L bioreactor demonstrated that K21 can still maintain its capability. After 20h of cultivation, 43.78g/L of ethanol (2.19g/L/h of productivity) was achieved corresponding to a 94.2% theoretical ethanol yield. PMID:26615498

  16. Production of extracellular exoinulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1 using root tubers of Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Singh, R S; Bhermi, H K

    2008-10-01

    Root tubers of Asparagus officinalis were used as a source of raw inulin for the production of exoinulinase (EC 3.2.1.7) from Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1. Root extract prepared at 10kg/cm2 pressure for 10min showed maximum inulinase production. Medium components and process parameters were standardized to improve the enzyme production. Inulinase yield of 40.2IU/mL in a medium containing raw inulin (3.5%), beef extract (2%), SDS (0.001%), Mn2+ (2.0mM), Mg2+ (1.5mM), Co2+ (2mM) and pH 6.5 has been obtained under agitation (150rpm) after 60h of incubation at 30 degrees C at shake flask level. After optimization, the enzyme production was 4.8 times more than the basal medium. To test the feasibility of raw inulin from A. officinalis for the production of inulinase, trials were also made in a bioreactor (1.5L). Inulinase activity of 50.2IU/mL was obtained from raw inulin (4.0%) under agitation (200rpm) and aeration (0.75vvm) at 30 degrees C after 60h of fermentation. Inulinase yield in bioreactor was almost six times higher than the basal medium used initially in shake flask. PMID:18280145

  17. A Kluyveromyces marxianus 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutant with enhanced activity of xylose utilization.

    PubMed

    Suprayogi, Suprayogi; Nguyen, Minh T; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Rodrussamee, Nadchanok; Limtong, Savitree; Kosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Mamoru

    2015-12-01

    Thermotolerant ethanologenic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is capable of fermenting various sugars including xylose but glucose represses to hamper the utilization of other sugars. To acquire glucose repression-defective strains, 33 isolates as 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG)-resistant mutants were acquired from about 100 colonies grown on plates containing 2-DOG, which were derived from an efficient strain DMKU 3-1042. According to the characteristics of sugar consumption abilities and cell growth and ethanol accumulation along with cultivation time, they were classified into three groups. The first group (3 isolates) utilized glucose and xylose in similar patterns along with cultivation to those of the parental strain, presumably due to reduction of the uptake of 2-DOG or enhancement of its export. The second group (29 isolates) showed greatly delayed utilization of glucose, presumably by reduction of the uptake or initial catabolism of glucose. The last group, only one isolate, showed enhanced utilization ability of xylose in the presence of glucose. Further analysis revealed that the isolate had a single nucleotide mutation to cause amino acid substitution (G270S) in RAG5 encoding hexokinase and exhibited very low activity of the enzyme. The possible mechanism of defectiveness of glucose repression in the mutant is discussed in this paper. [Int Microbiol 18(4):235-244 (2015)]. PMID:27611676

  18. Influence of carbon and nitrogen source on production of volatile fragrance and flavour metabolites by the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Gethins, Loughlin; Guneser, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Rea, Mary C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Yuceer, Yonca; Morrissey, John P

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus produces a range of volatile molecules with applications as fragrances or flavours. The purpose of this study was to establish how nutritional conditions influence the production of these metabolites. Four strains were grown on synthetic media, using a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources and volatile metabolites analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The nitrogen source had pronounced effects on metabolite production: levels of the fusel alcohols 2-phenylethanol and isoamyl alcohol were highest when yeast extract was the nitrogen source, and ammonium had a strong repressing effect on production of 2-phenylethyl acetate. In contrast, the nitrogen source did not affect production of isoamyl acetate or ethyl acetate, indicating that more than one alcohol acetyl transferase activity is present in K. marxianus. Production of all acetate esters was low when cells were growing on lactose (as opposed to glucose or fructose), with a lower intracellular pool of acetyl CoA being one explanation for this observation. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis of the known yeast alcohol acetyl transferases ATF1 and ATF2 suggests that the ancestral protein Atf2p may not be involved in synthesis of volatile acetate esters in K. marxianus, and raises interesting questions as to what other genes encode this activity in non-Saccharomyces yeasts. Identification of all the genes involved in ester synthesis will be important for development of the K. marxianus platform for flavour and fragrance production. PMID:25308412

  19. Influence of carbon and nitrogen source on production of volatile fragrance and flavour metabolites by the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Gethins, Loughlin; Guneser, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Rea, Mary C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Yuceer, Yonca; Morrissey, John P

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus produces a range of volatile molecules with applications as fragrances or flavours. The purpose of this study was to establish how nutritional conditions influence the production of these metabolites. Four strains were grown on synthetic media, using a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources and volatile metabolites analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The nitrogen source had pronounced effects on metabolite production: levels of the fusel alcohols 2-phenylethanol and isoamyl alcohol were highest when yeast extract was the nitrogen source, and ammonium had a strong repressing effect on production of 2-phenylethyl acetate. In contrast, the nitrogen source did not affect production of isoamyl acetate or ethyl acetate, indicating that more than one alcohol acetyl transferase activity is present in K. marxianus. Production of all acetate esters was low when cells were growing on lactose (as opposed to glucose or fructose), with a lower intracellular pool of acetyl CoA being one explanation for this observation. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis of the known yeast alcohol acetyl transferases ATF1 and ATF2 suggests that the ancestral protein Atf2p may not be involved in synthesis of volatile acetate esters in K. marxianus, and raises interesting questions as to what other genes encode this activity in non-Saccharomyces yeasts. Identification of all the genes involved in ester synthesis will be important for development of the K. marxianus platform for flavour and fragrance production.

  20. Protein enrichment of an Opuntia ficus-indica cladode hydrolysate by cultivation of Candida utilis and Kluyveromyces marxianus

    PubMed Central

    Akanni, Gabriel B; du Preez, James C; Steyn, Laurinda; Kilian, Stephanus G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (prickly pear cactus) have a low protein content; for use as a balanced feed, supplementation with other protein sources is therefore desirable. We investigated protein enrichment by cultivation of the yeasts Candida utilis and Kluyveromyces marxianus in an enzymatic hydrolysate of the cladode biomass. RESULTS Dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of sun-dried cladodes resulted in a hydrolysate containing (per litre) 45.5 g glucose, 6.3 g xylose, 9.1 g galactose, 10.8 g arabinose and 9.6 g fructose. Even though K. marxianus had a much higher growth rate and utilized l-arabinose and d-galactose more completely than C. utilis, its biomass yield coefficient was lower due to ethanol and ethyl acetate production despite aerobic cultivation. Yeast cultivation more than doubled the protein content of the hydrolysate, with an essential amino acid profile superior to sorghum and millet grains. CONCLUSIONS This K. marxianus strain was weakly Crabtree positive. Despite its low biomass yield, its performance compared well with C. utilis. This is the first report showing that the protein content and quality of O. ficus-indica cladode biomass could substantially be improved by yeast cultivation, including a comparative evaluation of C. utilis and K. marxianus. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25371280

  1. The predominance, biodiversity and biotechnological properties of Kluyveromyces marxianus in the production of Pecorino di Farindola cheese.

    PubMed

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Schirone, Maria; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Pepe, Alessia; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-09-18

    Pecorino di Farindola is a handicraft cheese made by farmers on small scale using raw ewes' milk and pig rennet. In this study, yeast consortia were evaluated during Pecorino di Farindola making and ripening. Molecular identification of 156 isolates was achieved by a combination of PCR-RFLP of the 5.8S ITS rRNA region and sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. Kluyveromyces marxianus was the predominant species, while other species (Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glaebosa and Candida zeylanoides) were present only during the early weeks of ripening. Moreover, the isolates were differentiated both by RAPD-PCR and a sequence alignment of D1/D2 26S rRNA gene, revealing different K. marxianus profiles and variants, and suggesting the role of local selective pressure as the origin of distinctive K. marxianus populations. The strains were characterized also on the basis of different dairy properties such as growth temperature, lactose, galactose, lactate and citrate assimilation at different NaCl concentrations, as well as lipolytic and caseinolytic activities. Moreover, 39 selected K. marxianus strains were inoculated in pasteurized whey to evaluate their growth kinetics, besides lactose, lactate and free amino acids metabolism. The growth kinetics distinguished different biotypes and different metabolic behavior were determined. The general picture of K. marxianus population from Pecorino di Farindola shows a high biodiversity at genetic and phenotypic levels that potentially offers many opportunities for new and advanced knowledge at species level, providing in the meantime a good basis to study the relationship between genetic variability and functional diversities.

  2. The predominance, biodiversity and biotechnological properties of Kluyveromyces marxianus in the production of Pecorino di Farindola cheese.

    PubMed

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Schirone, Maria; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Pepe, Alessia; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-09-18

    Pecorino di Farindola is a handicraft cheese made by farmers on small scale using raw ewes' milk and pig rennet. In this study, yeast consortia were evaluated during Pecorino di Farindola making and ripening. Molecular identification of 156 isolates was achieved by a combination of PCR-RFLP of the 5.8S ITS rRNA region and sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. Kluyveromyces marxianus was the predominant species, while other species (Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glaebosa and Candida zeylanoides) were present only during the early weeks of ripening. Moreover, the isolates were differentiated both by RAPD-PCR and a sequence alignment of D1/D2 26S rRNA gene, revealing different K. marxianus profiles and variants, and suggesting the role of local selective pressure as the origin of distinctive K. marxianus populations. The strains were characterized also on the basis of different dairy properties such as growth temperature, lactose, galactose, lactate and citrate assimilation at different NaCl concentrations, as well as lipolytic and caseinolytic activities. Moreover, 39 selected K. marxianus strains were inoculated in pasteurized whey to evaluate their growth kinetics, besides lactose, lactate and free amino acids metabolism. The growth kinetics distinguished different biotypes and different metabolic behavior were determined. The general picture of K. marxianus population from Pecorino di Farindola shows a high biodiversity at genetic and phenotypic levels that potentially offers many opportunities for new and advanced knowledge at species level, providing in the meantime a good basis to study the relationship between genetic variability and functional diversities. PMID:25038503

  3. Effect of lignocellulosic degradation compounds from steam explosion pretreatment on ethanol fermentation by thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Jose Miguel; Sáez, Felicia; Ballesteros, Ignacio; González, Alberto; Negro, Maria José; Manzanares, Paloma; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2003-01-01

    The filtrate from steam-pretreated poplar was analyzed to identify degradation compounds. The effect of selected compounds on growth and ethanolic fermentation of the thermotolerant yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus CECT 10875 was tested. Several fermentations on glucose medium, containing individual inhibitory compounds found in the hydrolysate, were carried out. The degree of inhibition on yeast strain growth and ethanolic fermentation was determined. At concentrations found in the prehy-drolysate, none of the individual compounds significantly affected the fermentation. For all tested compounds, growth was inhibited to a lesser extent than ethanol production. Lower concentrations of catechol (0.96 g/L) and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (1.02 g/L) were required to produce the 50% reduction in cell mass in comparison to other tested compounds.

  4. Purification and substrate specificities of a fructanase from Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from the fermentation process of Mezcal.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2011-02-01

    A fructanase, produced by a Kluyveromyces marxianus strain isolated during the fermentation step of the elaboration process of "Mezcal de Guerrero" was purified and biochemically characterized. The active protein was a glycosylated dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 250 kDa. The specific enzymatic activity of the protein was determined for different substrates: sucrose, inulin, Agave tequilana fructan, levan and Actilight® and compared with the activity of Fructozyme®. The hydrolysis profile of the different substrates analyzed by HPAEC-PAD showed that the enzyme has different affinities over the substrates tested with a sucrose/inulin enzymatic activity ratio (S/I) of 125. For the hydrolysis of Agave tequilana fructans, the enzyme also showed a higher enzymatic activity and specificity than Fructozyme®, which is important for its potential application in the tequila industry.

  5. Optimization of medium and process parameters for the production of inulinase from a newly isolated Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1.

    PubMed

    Singh, R S; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Puri, Munish

    2007-09-01

    A newly isolated strain of Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1 was used for the production of extra cellular inulinase in a medium containing inulin, meat extract, CaCl2 and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Fermentation medium pH 6.5, cultivation temperature 30 degrees C and 5% (v/v) inoculum of 12 h-old culture were optimal for enzyme production (30.8 IU/ml) with a fermentation time of 72 h at shake flask level. Raw inulin (2%, w/v) extracted from dahlia tubers by processing at 15 kg/cm2 for 10 min was optimum for bioreactor studies. Maximum enzyme production (55.4 IU/ml) was obtained at an agitation rate of 200 rpm and aeration of 0.75 vvm in a stirred tank reactor with a fermentation time of 60 h. PMID:17071081

  6. Purification and substrate specificities of a fructanase from Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from the fermentation process of Mezcal.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2011-02-01

    A fructanase, produced by a Kluyveromyces marxianus strain isolated during the fermentation step of the elaboration process of "Mezcal de Guerrero" was purified and biochemically characterized. The active protein was a glycosylated dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 250 kDa. The specific enzymatic activity of the protein was determined for different substrates: sucrose, inulin, Agave tequilana fructan, levan and Actilight® and compared with the activity of Fructozyme®. The hydrolysis profile of the different substrates analyzed by HPAEC-PAD showed that the enzyme has different affinities over the substrates tested with a sucrose/inulin enzymatic activity ratio (S/I) of 125. For the hydrolysis of Agave tequilana fructans, the enzyme also showed a higher enzymatic activity and specificity than Fructozyme®, which is important for its potential application in the tequila industry. PMID:21067917

  7. Immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells in carboxymethyl cellulose for production of ethanol from cheese whey: experimental and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Roohina, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Maedeh; Najafpour, Ghasem D

    2016-09-01

    Cheese whey fermentation to ethanol using immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells was investigated in batch and continuous operation. In batch fermentation, the yeast cells were immobilized in carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) polymer and also synthesized graft copolymer of CMC with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone, denoted as CMC-g-PVP, and the efficiency of the two developed cell entrapped beads for lactose fermentation to ethanol was examined. The yeast cells immobilized in CMC-g-PVP performed slightly better than CMC with ethanol production yields of 0.52 and 0.49 g ethanol/g lactose, respectively. The effect of supplementation of cheese whey with lactose (42, 70, 100 and 150 g/l) on fermentative performance of K. marxianus immobilized in CMC beads was considered and the results were used for kinetic studies. The first order reaction model was suitable to describe the kinetics of substrate utilization and modified Gompertz model was quite successful to predict the ethanol production. For continuous ethanol fermentation, a packed-bed immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was operated at several hydraulic retention times; HRTs of 11, 15 and 30 h. At the HRT of 30 h, the ethanol production yield using CMC beads was 0.49 g/g which implies that 91.07 % of the theoretical yield was achieved.

  8. Experimental investigation and optimization of process variables affecting the production of extracellular lipase by Kluyveromyces marxianus IFO 0288.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Panagiota-Yiolanda; Foukis, Athanasios; Sklivaniti, Helen; Zacharaki, Paraskevi; Papagianni, Maria; Papamichael, Emmanuel M

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the production and optimization of extracellular lipase from Kluyveromyces marxianus IFO 0288 was investigated by using optimized nutritional and cultural conditions in a yeast medium containing glucose as the carbon source in fully aerobic batch fermentation (150 rpm). The influence of four fermentation parameters (type of lipidic source, initial culture pH, temperature, and length of fermentation) on growth and lipase production was investigated and evaluated using the conventional "one variable at a time" approach and response surface methodology. An 18-fold increase in lipase production during 65 h of fermentation was obtained with optimized nutritional (0.5 % olive oil) and cultivation (pH 6.5, 35 °C) conditions by employing the conventional optimization method. By applying the response surface methodology technique the initial pH value of 6.4 and temperature of 32.5 °C were identified as optimal and led to further improvements (up to 18-fold) of extracellular lipase production. The results provide, for the first time, evidence that K. marxianus has the potential to be used as an efficient producer of extracellular lipase with prospective application in a variety of industrial and biotechnological areas.

  9. Direct ethanol production from cellulosic materials at high temperature using the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus displaying cellulolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Shuhei; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yamada, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2010-09-01

    To exploit cellulosic materials for fuel ethanol production, a microorganism capable of high temperature and simultaneous saccharification-fermentation has been required. However, a major drawback is the optimum temperature for the saccharification and fermentation. Most ethanol-fermenting microbes have an optimum temperature for ethanol fermentation ranging between 28 degrees C and 37 degrees C, while the activity of cellulolytic enzymes is highest at around 50 degrees C and significantly decreases with a decrease in temperature. Therefore, in the present study, a thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, which has high growth and fermentation at elevated temperatures, was used as a producer of ethanol from cellulose. The strain was genetically engineered to display Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase and Aspergillus aculeatus beta-glucosidase on the cell surface, which successfully converts a cellulosic beta-glucan to ethanol directly at 48 degrees C with a yield of 4.24 g/l from 10 g/l within 12 h. The yield (in grams of ethanol produced per gram of beta-glucan consumed) was 0.47 g/g, which corresponds to 92.2% of the theoretical yield. This indicates that high-temperature cellulose fermentation to ethanol can be efficiently accomplished using a recombinant K. marxianus strain displaying thermostable cellulolytic enzymes on the cell surface.

  10. Production of fuel ethanol at high temperature from sugar cane juice by a newly isolated Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Sringiew, Chutima; Yongmanitchai, Wichien

    2007-12-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus DMKU 3-1042, isolated by an enrichment technique in a sugar cane juice medium supplemented with 4% (w/v) ethanol at 35 degrees C, produced high concentrations of ethanol at both 40 and 45 degrees C. Ethanol production by this strain in shaking flask cultivation in sugar cane juice media at 37 degrees C was highest in a medium containing 22% total sugars, 0.05% (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 0.05% KH(2)PO(4), and 0.15% MgSO(4).7H(2)O and having a pH of 5.0; the ethanol concentration reached 8.7% (w/v), productivity 1.45 g/l/h and yield 77.5% of theoretical yield. At 40 degrees C, a maximal ethanol concentration of 6.78% (w/v), a productivity of 1.13 and a yield 60.4% of theoretical yield were obtained from the same medium, except that the pH was adjusted to 5.5. In a study on ethanol production in a 5l jar fermenter with an agitation speed of 300 rpm and an aeration rate of 0.2 vvm throughout the fermentation, K. marxianus DMKU 3-1042 yielded a final ethanol concentration of 6.43% (w/v), a productivity of 1.3g/l/h and a yield of 57.1% of theoretical yield.

  11. Immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells in carboxymethyl cellulose for production of ethanol from cheese whey: experimental and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Roohina, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Maedeh; Najafpour, Ghasem D

    2016-09-01

    Cheese whey fermentation to ethanol using immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells was investigated in batch and continuous operation. In batch fermentation, the yeast cells were immobilized in carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) polymer and also synthesized graft copolymer of CMC with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone, denoted as CMC-g-PVP, and the efficiency of the two developed cell entrapped beads for lactose fermentation to ethanol was examined. The yeast cells immobilized in CMC-g-PVP performed slightly better than CMC with ethanol production yields of 0.52 and 0.49 g ethanol/g lactose, respectively. The effect of supplementation of cheese whey with lactose (42, 70, 100 and 150 g/l) on fermentative performance of K. marxianus immobilized in CMC beads was considered and the results were used for kinetic studies. The first order reaction model was suitable to describe the kinetics of substrate utilization and modified Gompertz model was quite successful to predict the ethanol production. For continuous ethanol fermentation, a packed-bed immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was operated at several hydraulic retention times; HRTs of 11, 15 and 30 h. At the HRT of 30 h, the ethanol production yield using CMC beads was 0.49 g/g which implies that 91.07 % of the theoretical yield was achieved. PMID:27126500

  12. Comparing cell viability and ethanol fermentation of the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on steam-exploded biomass treated with laccase.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Antonio D; Ibarra, David; Ballesteros, Ignacio; González, Alberto; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CECT 10875 was compared to the industrial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ethanol Red for lignocellulosic ethanol production. For it, whole slurry from steam-exploded wheat straw was used as raw material, and two process configurations, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) and presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (PSSF), were evaluated. Compared to S. cerevisiae, which was able to produce ethanol in both process configurations, K. marxianus was inhibited, and neither growth nor ethanol production occurred during the processes. However, laccase treatment of the whole slurry removed specifically lignin phenols from the overall inhibitory compounds present in the slurry and triggered the fermentation by K. marxianus, attaining final ethanol concentrations and yields comparable to those obtained by S. cerevisiae.

  13. Identification of auxotrophic mutants of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus by non-homologous end joining-mediated integrative transformation with genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yarimizu, Tohru; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Junpei; Tokuda, Shuya; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Lorreungsil, Sasithorn; Sutthikhumpha, Surasit; Pukahuta, Charida; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Limtong, Savitree; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-12-01

    The isolation and application of auxotrophic mutants for gene manipulations, such as genetic transformation, mating selection and tetrad analysis, form the basis of yeast genetics. For the development of these genetic methods in the thermotolerant fermentative yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, we isolated a series of auxotrophic mutants with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism. To identify the mutated genes, linear DNA fragments of nutrient biosynthetic pathway genes were amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA and used to directly transform the K. marxianus auxotrophic mutants by random integration into chromosomes through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The appearance of transformant colonies indicated that the specific S. cerevisiae gene complemented the K. marxianus mutant. Using this interspecific complementation approach with linear PCR-amplified DNA, we identified auxotrophic mutations of ADE2, ADE5,7, ADE6, HIS2, HIS3, HIS4, HIS5, HIS6, HIS7, LYS1, LYS2, LYS4, LYS9, LEU1, LEU2, MET2, MET6, MET17, TRP3, TRP4 and TRP5 without the labour-intensive requirement of plasmid construction. Mating, sporulation and tetrad analysis techniques for K. marxianus were also established. With the identified auxotrophic mutant strains and S. cerevisiae genes as selective markers, NHEJ-mediated integrative transformation with PCR-amplified DNA is an attractive system for facilitating genetic analyses in the yeast K. marxianus.

  14. Direct fermentation of raw starch using a Kluyveromyces marxianus strain that expresses glucoamylase and alpha-amylase to produce ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongliang; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Raw starch and raw cassava tuber powder were directly and efficiently fermented at elevated temperatures to produce ethanol using the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus that expresses α-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae as well as α-amylase and glucoamylase from Debaryomyces occidentalis. Among the constructed K. marxianus strains, YRL 009 had the highest efficiency in direct starch fermentation. Raw starch from corn, potato, cassava, or wheat can be fermented at temperatures higher than 40°C. At the optimal fermentation temperature 42°C, YRL 009 produced 66.52 g/L ethanol from 200 g/L cassava starch, which was the highest production among the selected raw starches. This production increased to 79.75 g/L ethanol with a 78.3% theoretical yield (with all cassava starch were consumed) from raw cassava starch at higher initial cell densities. Fermentation was also carried out at 45 and 48°C. By using 200 g/L raw cassava starch, 137.11 and 87.71 g/L sugar were consumed with 55.36 and 32.16 g/L ethanol produced, respectively. Furthermore, this strain could directly ferment 200 g/L nonsterile raw cassava tuber powder (containing 178.52 g/L cassava starch) without additional nutritional supplements to produce 69.73 g/L ethanol by consuming 166.07 g/L sugar at 42°C. YRL 009, which has consolidated bioprocessing ability, is the best strain for fermenting starches at elevated temperatures that has been reported to date.

  15. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity.

  16. The modeling of ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus using whey as substrate in continuous A-Stat bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gabardo, Sabrina; Pereira, Gabriela Feix; Rech, Rosane; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the kinetics of whey bioconversion into ethanol by Kluyveromyces marxianus in continuous bioreactors using the "accelerostat technique" (A-stat). Cultivations using free and Ca-alginate immobilized cells were evaluated using two different acceleration rates (a). The kinetic profiles of these systems were modeled using four different unstructured models, differing in the expressions for the specific growth (μ) and substrate consumption rates (r s), taking into account substrate limitation and product inhibition. Experimental data showed that the dilution rate (D) directly affected cell physiology and metabolism. The specific growth rate followed the dilution rate (μ≈D) for the lowest acceleration rate (a = 0.0015 h(-2)), condition in which the highest ethanol yield (0.52 g g(-1)) was obtained. The highest acceleration rate (a = 0.00667 h(-2)) led to a lower ethanol yield (0.40 g g(-1)) in the system where free cells were used, whereas with immobilized cells ethanol yields increased by 23 % (0.49 g g(-1)). Among the evaluated models, Monod and Levenspiel combined with Ghose and Tyagi models were found to be more appropriate for describing the kinetics of whey bioconversion into ethanol. These results may be useful in scaling up the process for ethanol production from whey.

  17. One step partial purification of beta-D-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces marxianus CDB 002 using STREAMLINE-DEAE.

    PubMed

    Artolozaga, M J; Jonas, R; Schneider, A L; Furlan, S A; Carvalho-Jonas, M de F

    1998-01-01

    The intracellular enzyme beta-D-galactosidase provides interesting applications in the dairy industry, which are able to solve problems related to product processing, or can alleviate lactose intolerance in some populations. In order to obtain a technical enzyme, yeast cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus CDB 002 were disrupted by high pressure homogenization and an innovative chromatographic technique was tested for the recovery of beta-D-galactosidase. A STREAMLINE 25 column, containing 65 ml STREAMLINE-DEAE was equilibrated with 50 mM potassium phosphate buffer pH 7.5 at an upward flow of 250 cmh-1. 100-200 ml cell homogenate were applied onto the expanded gel. After unbound proteins and cellular debris were washed out, the bed was allowed to sediment and beta-D-galactosidase was eluted with a downward flow of 0.2 M NaCl in the same buffer. A 6-fold purification factor was achieved with 63% activity recovery, while removing cell debris at a single step, thus avoiding a centrifugation step. Concentration and volume of the applied sample affected purification and gel performance. The results presented show STREAMLINE-DEAE chromatography to be an interesting method for the production of beta-D-galactosidase as a technical enzyme, since it can also be applied on a large scale without much modification.

  18. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity. PMID:25142154

  19. Increased ethanol production with UV-C mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus capable of anaerobic growth at elevated temperature on pentose and hexose sugars using fermentation strategies with corn pericarp hydrolysates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several novel Kluyveromyces marxianus strains were obtained by irradiation with UV-C (UV-C 234nm) to achieve an 80% mortality rate. The surviving cells were subsequently grown anaerobically for 5 months at 46C and resulted in two mutagenized strains that were able to grow anaerobically at elevated ...

  20. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers at high temperature by newly isolated thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus using consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Charoensopharat, Kanlayani; Thanonkeo, Pornthap; Thanonkeo, Sudarat; Yamada, Mamoru

    2015-07-01

    Thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast strains were successfully isolated in this study. Among the isolated strains, Kluyveromyces marxianus DBKKU Y-102 was found to be the most effective strain for direct ethanol fermentation at high temperature from fresh Jerusalem artichoke (JA) tubers without inulin hydrolysis under consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). The maximum ethanol concentrations produced by this strain under the optimum culture conditions were 104.83 and 97.46 g L(-1) at 37 and 40 °C, respectively. Data from this study clearly demonstrated that the use of thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast K. marxianus for ethanol production from fresh JA tubers in the CBP process not only provided high levels of ethanol, but also could eliminate the addition of external enzyme for inulin hydrolysis, which might lead to the reduction of operating costs. The expression of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in K. marxianus DBKKU Y-102 during ethanol fermentation was investigated by real-time RT-PCR, and the results revealed that expression levels were distinctive depending on the growth phase and growth conditions. However, among the genes tested, adh4 and tdh2 were highly expressed under high temperature conditions in both exponential- and stationary-growth phases, suggesting that these genes might play a crucial role in acquiring thermotolerance ability in this organism under stress conditions.

  1. VNTR fingerprinting of Kluyveromyces marxianus strains WT, 7-1, and 8-1 by using different primer types to give best results in PCR and on electrophorese gel in order to find differentiation of the DNA of the yeast strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (WT, 7-1, 8-1) we wish to find out the variable numbered tandem repeats (VNTR) of each of the DNA strains from the different mutagenized K. marxianus strains. To do this we used Phusion HF Buffer Pack to try and give a clear picture of the VNTR by u...

  2. Simultaneous fermentation of glucose and xylose at elevated temperatures co-produces ethanol and xylitol through overexpression of a xylose-specific transporter in engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Han, Ruixiang; Ding, Rui; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2016-09-01

    Engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus strains were constructed through over-expression of various transporters for simultaneous co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. The glucose was converted into ethanol, whereas xylose was converted into xylitol which has higher value than ethanol. Over-expressing xylose-specific transporter ScGAL2-N376F mutant enabled yeast to co-ferment glucose and xylose and the co-fermentation ability was obviously improved through increasing ScGAL2-N376F expression. The production of glycerol was blocked and acetate production was reduced by disrupting gene KmGPD1. The obtained K. marxianus YZJ119 utilized 120g/L glucose and 60g/L xylose simultaneously and produced 50.10g/L ethanol and 55.88g/L xylitol at 42°C. The yield of xylitol from consumed xylose was over 98% (0.99g/g). Through simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation at 42°C, YZJ119 produced a maximal concentration of 44.58g/L ethanol and 32.03g/L xylitol or 29.82g/L ethanol and 31.72g/L xylitol, respectively, from detoxified or non-detoxified diluted acid pretreated corncob. PMID:27240239

  3. Rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    Conversion of xylose to ethanol by yeasts is a challenge because of the redox imbalances under oxygen-limited conditions. The thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus grows well with xylose as a carbon source at elevated temperatures, but its xylose fermentation ability is weak. In this study, a combination of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) from Neurospora crassa and the NADP(+)-preferring xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) mutant from Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) was constructed. The xylose fermentation ability and redox balance of the recombinant strains were improved significantly by over-expression of several downstream genes. The intracellular concentrations of coenzymes and the reduced coenzyme/oxidized coenzyme ratio increased significantly in these metabolic strains. The byproducts, such as glycerol and acetic acid, were significantly reduced by the disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1). The resulting engineered K. marxianus YZJ088 strain produced 44.95 g/L ethanol from 118.39 g/L xylose with a productivity of 2.49 g/L/h at 42 °C. Additionally, YZJ088 realized glucose and xylose co-fermentation and produced 51.43 g/L ethanol from a mixture of 103.97 g/L xylose and 40.96 g/L glucose with a productivity of 2.14 g/L/h at 42 °C. These promising results validate the YZJ088 strain as an excellent producer of ethanol from xylose through the synthetic xylose assimilation pathway. PMID:26253204

  4. Rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    Conversion of xylose to ethanol by yeasts is a challenge because of the redox imbalances under oxygen-limited conditions. The thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus grows well with xylose as a carbon source at elevated temperatures, but its xylose fermentation ability is weak. In this study, a combination of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) from Neurospora crassa and the NADP(+)-preferring xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) mutant from Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) was constructed. The xylose fermentation ability and redox balance of the recombinant strains were improved significantly by over-expression of several downstream genes. The intracellular concentrations of coenzymes and the reduced coenzyme/oxidized coenzyme ratio increased significantly in these metabolic strains. The byproducts, such as glycerol and acetic acid, were significantly reduced by the disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1). The resulting engineered K. marxianus YZJ088 strain produced 44.95 g/L ethanol from 118.39 g/L xylose with a productivity of 2.49 g/L/h at 42 °C. Additionally, YZJ088 realized glucose and xylose co-fermentation and produced 51.43 g/L ethanol from a mixture of 103.97 g/L xylose and 40.96 g/L glucose with a productivity of 2.14 g/L/h at 42 °C. These promising results validate the YZJ088 strain as an excellent producer of ethanol from xylose through the synthetic xylose assimilation pathway.

  5. Growth and ethanol fermentation ability on hexose and pentose sugars and glucose effect under various conditions in thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Rodrussamee, Nadchanok; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Hirata, Katsushi; Suprayogi; Limtong, Savitree; Kosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Mamoru

    2011-05-01

    Ethanol fermentation ability of the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, which is able to utilize various sugars including glucose, mannose, galactose, xylose, and arabinose, was examined under shaking and static conditions at high temperatures. The yeast was found to produce ethanol from all of these sugars except for arabinose under a shaking condition but only from hexose sugars under a static condition. Growth and sugar utilization rate under a static condition were slower than those under a shaking condition, but maximum ethanol yield was slightly higher. Even at 40°C, a level of ethanol production similar to that at 30°C was observed except for galactose under a static condition. Glucose repression on utilization of other sugars was observed, and it was more evident at elevated temperatures. Consistent results were obtained by the addition of 2-deoxyglucose. The glucose effect was further examined at a transcription level, and it was found that KmGAL1 for galactokinase and KmXYL1 for xylose reductase for galactose and xylose/arabinose utilization, respectively, were repressed by glucose at low and high temperatures, but KmHXK2 for hexokinase was not repressed. We discuss the possible mechanism of glucose repression and the potential for utilization of K. marxianus in high-temperature fermentation with mixed sugars containing glucose.

  6. Differential RNA-seq, Multi-Network Analysis and Metabolic Regulation Analysis of Kluyveromyces marxianus Reveals a Compartmentalised Response to Xylose.

    PubMed

    Schabort, Du Toit W P; Letebele, Precious K; Steyn, Laurinda; Kilian, Stephanus G; du Preez, James C

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the transcriptomic response of a new strain of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, in glucose and xylose media using RNA-seq. The data were explored in a number of innovative ways using a variety of networks types, pathway maps, enrichment statistics, reporter metabolites and a flux simulation model, revealing different aspects of the genome-scale response in an integrative systems biology manner. The importance of the subcellular localisation in the transcriptomic response is emphasised here, revealing new insights. As was previously reported by others using a rich medium, we show that peroxisomal fatty acid catabolism was dramatically up-regulated in a defined xylose mineral medium without fatty acids, along with mechanisms to activate fatty acids and transfer products of β-oxidation to the mitochondria. Notably, we observed a strong up-regulation of the 2-methylcitrate pathway, supporting capacity for odd-chain fatty acid catabolism. Next we asked which pathways would respond to the additional requirement for NADPH for xylose utilisation, and rationalised the unexpected results using simulations with Flux Balance Analysis. On a fundamental level, we investigated the contribution of the hierarchical and metabolic regulation levels to the regulation of metabolic fluxes. Metabolic regulation analysis suggested that genetic level regulation plays a major role in regulating metabolic fluxes in adaptation to xylose, even for the high capacity reactions, which is unexpected. In addition, isozyme switching may play an important role in re-routing of metabolic fluxes in subcellular compartments in K. marxianus. PMID:27315089

  7. Differential RNA-seq, Multi-Network Analysis and Metabolic Regulation Analysis of Kluyveromyces marxianus Reveals a Compartmentalised Response to Xylose

    PubMed Central

    Schabort, Du Toit W. P.; Letebele, Precious K.; Steyn, Laurinda; Kilian, Stephanus G.; du Preez, James C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the transcriptomic response of a new strain of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, in glucose and xylose media using RNA-seq. The data were explored in a number of innovative ways using a variety of networks types, pathway maps, enrichment statistics, reporter metabolites and a flux simulation model, revealing different aspects of the genome-scale response in an integrative systems biology manner. The importance of the subcellular localisation in the transcriptomic response is emphasised here, revealing new insights. As was previously reported by others using a rich medium, we show that peroxisomal fatty acid catabolism was dramatically up-regulated in a defined xylose mineral medium without fatty acids, along with mechanisms to activate fatty acids and transfer products of β-oxidation to the mitochondria. Notably, we observed a strong up-regulation of the 2-methylcitrate pathway, supporting capacity for odd-chain fatty acid catabolism. Next we asked which pathways would respond to the additional requirement for NADPH for xylose utilisation, and rationalised the unexpected results using simulations with Flux Balance Analysis. On a fundamental level, we investigated the contribution of the hierarchical and metabolic regulation levels to the regulation of metabolic fluxes. Metabolic regulation analysis suggested that genetic level regulation plays a major role in regulating metabolic fluxes in adaptation to xylose, even for the high capacity reactions, which is unexpected. In addition, isozyme switching may play an important role in re-routing of metabolic fluxes in subcellular compartments in K. marxianus. PMID:27315089

  8. Comparison of a pectinolytic extract of Kluyveromyces marxianus and a commercial enzyme preparation in the production of Ives (Vitis labrusca) grape juice.

    PubMed

    Piemolini-Barreto, Luciani Tatsch; Antônio, Regina Vasconcellos; Echeverrigaray, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    This study analyses the effect of the crude enzymatic extract produced by Kluyveromyces marxianus (EEB) in the maceration and clarification of juice produced from Ives (Vitis labrusca) grapes compared to the commercial enzyme preparation Pectinex(®)Ultra Color (PEC). Treatments were conducted with a total pectinolytic activity of 1 U/mL of fruit juice, at 40 °C, for 60 min. After the enzymatic treatment, the juices were evaluated with respect to yield, viscosity, and degree of clarification, as well as the effect of the enzymes on polyphenol concentration, anthocyanins, and juice color. The results showed that both EEB and PEC increase yield, reduce viscosity and contribute to the clarification of grape juice. After enzyme treatment with the EEB preparation, the extraction yield increased 28.02 % and decreased 50.70 % in viscosity during the maceration of the pulp. During the juice production process clarification increased 11.91 %. With PEC, higher values for these parameters: 42.36, 63.20, and 26.81 % respectively, were achieved. The addition of EEB resulted in grape juice with better color intensity and extraction of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins. Considering all comparison criteria, the enzymatic extract of K. marxianus NRRL-Y-7571 can potentially be used in the production of juice.

  9. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

  10. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production. PMID:22280963

  11. Novel technology development through thermal drying of encapsulated Kluyveromyces marxianus in micro- and nano-tubular cellulose in lactose fermentation and its evaluation for food production.

    PubMed

    Papapostolou, Harris; Servetas, Yiannis; Bosnea, Loulouda A; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2012-12-01

    A novel technology development based on the production of a low-cost starter culture for ripening of cheeses and baking is reported in the present study. The starter culture comprises thermally dried cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus encapsulated in micro- and nano-tubular cellulose. For production of a low-cost and effective biocatalyst, whey was used as raw material for biomass production and thermal drying methods (convective, conventional, and vacuum) were applied and evaluated at drying temperatures ranging from 35 to 60 °C. The effect of drying temperature of biocatalysts on fermentability of lactose and whey was evaluated. Storage stability and suitability of biocatalysts as a commercial starter cultures was also assessed and evaluated. All thermally dried biocatalysts were found to be active in lactose and whey fermentation. In all cases, there was sugar conversion ranging from 92 to 100 %, ethanol concentration of up to 1.47 % (v/v), and lactic acid concentrations ranged from 4.1 to 5.5 g/l. However, convective drying of the encapsulated cells of K. marxianus in micro- and nano-tubular cellulose was faster and a more effective drying method while drying at 42 °C appear to be the best drying temperature in terms of cell activity, ethanol, and lactic acid formation. Storage of the biocatalysts for 3 months at 4 °C proved maintenance of its activity even though fermentation times increased by 50-100 % compared with the fresh dried ones.

  12. Novel technology development through thermal drying of encapsulated Kluyveromyces marxianus in micro- and nano-tubular cellulose in lactose fermentation and its evaluation for food production.

    PubMed

    Papapostolou, Harris; Servetas, Yiannis; Bosnea, Loulouda A; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2012-12-01

    A novel technology development based on the production of a low-cost starter culture for ripening of cheeses and baking is reported in the present study. The starter culture comprises thermally dried cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus encapsulated in micro- and nano-tubular cellulose. For production of a low-cost and effective biocatalyst, whey was used as raw material for biomass production and thermal drying methods (convective, conventional, and vacuum) were applied and evaluated at drying temperatures ranging from 35 to 60 °C. The effect of drying temperature of biocatalysts on fermentability of lactose and whey was evaluated. Storage stability and suitability of biocatalysts as a commercial starter cultures was also assessed and evaluated. All thermally dried biocatalysts were found to be active in lactose and whey fermentation. In all cases, there was sugar conversion ranging from 92 to 100 %, ethanol concentration of up to 1.47 % (v/v), and lactic acid concentrations ranged from 4.1 to 5.5 g/l. However, convective drying of the encapsulated cells of K. marxianus in micro- and nano-tubular cellulose was faster and a more effective drying method while drying at 42 °C appear to be the best drying temperature in terms of cell activity, ethanol, and lactic acid formation. Storage of the biocatalysts for 3 months at 4 °C proved maintenance of its activity even though fermentation times increased by 50-100 % compared with the fresh dried ones. PMID:23111921

  13. Effect of temperature and pH on ethanol production by free and immobilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus grown on Jerusalem artichoke extract

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, P.; Margaritis, A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of temperature and pH on the kinetics of ethanol production by free and calcium alginate immobilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus grown on Jerusalem artichoke extract was investigated. With the free cells, the ethanol and biomass yields were relatively constant over the temperature range 25-35 degrees C, but dropped sharply beyond 35 degrees C. Other kinetic parameters, specific growth rate, specific ethanol production rate, and specific total sugar uptake rate were maximum at 35 degrees C. However, with the immobilized cells, ethanol yield remained almost constant in the temperatue range 25-45 degrees C, and the specific ethanol production rate and specific total sugar uptake rate attained their maximum values at 40 degrees C. For the pH range between 3 and 7, the free-cell optimum for growth and product formation was found to be circa pH 5. At this pH, the specific growth rate was 0.35/h and specific ethanol production rate was 2.83 g/g/h. At values higher or lower than pH 5, a sharp decrease in specific ethanol production rate as well as specific growth rate was observed. In comparison, the immobilized cells showed a broad optimum pH profile. The best ethanol production rates were observed between pH 4 and 6. (Refs. 22).

  14. Growth, ethanol production, and inulinase activity on various inulin substrates by mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus strains NRRL Y-50798 and NRRL Y-50799.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Leva, Luz Ángela; Hughes, Stephen R; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Jarodsky, Joshua M; Erickson, Adam; Lindquist, Mitchell R; Cox, Elby J; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hoecker, Eric C; Liu, Siqing; Qureshi, Nasib; Jones, Marjorie A

    2016-07-01

    Economically important plants contain large amounts of inulin. Disposal of waste resulting from their processing presents environmental issues. Finding microorganisms capable of converting inulin waste to biofuel and valuable co-products at the processing site would have significant economic and environmental impact. We evaluated the ability of two mutant strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus (Km7 and Km8) to utilize inulin for ethanol production. In glucose medium, both strains consumed all glucose and produced 0.40 g ethanol/g glucose at 24 h. In inulin medium, Km7 exhibited maximum colony forming units (CFU)/mL and produced 0.35 g ethanol/g inulin at 24 h, while Km8 showed maximum CFU/mL and produced 0.02 g ethanol/g inulin at 96 h. At 24 h in inulin + glucose medium, Km7 produced 0.40 g ethanol/g (inulin + glucose) and Km8 produced 0.20 g ethanol/g (inulin + glucose) with maximum CFU/mL for Km8 at 72 h, 40 % of that for Km7 at 36 h. Extracellular inulinase activity at 6 h for both Km7 and Km8 was 3.7 International Units (IU)/mL. PMID:27130462

  15. Growth, ethanol production, and inulinase activity on various inulin substrates by mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus strains NRRL Y-50798 and NRRL Y-50799.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Leva, Luz Ángela; Hughes, Stephen R; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Jarodsky, Joshua M; Erickson, Adam; Lindquist, Mitchell R; Cox, Elby J; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hoecker, Eric C; Liu, Siqing; Qureshi, Nasib; Jones, Marjorie A

    2016-07-01

    Economically important plants contain large amounts of inulin. Disposal of waste resulting from their processing presents environmental issues. Finding microorganisms capable of converting inulin waste to biofuel and valuable co-products at the processing site would have significant economic and environmental impact. We evaluated the ability of two mutant strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus (Km7 and Km8) to utilize inulin for ethanol production. In glucose medium, both strains consumed all glucose and produced 0.40 g ethanol/g glucose at 24 h. In inulin medium, Km7 exhibited maximum colony forming units (CFU)/mL and produced 0.35 g ethanol/g inulin at 24 h, while Km8 showed maximum CFU/mL and produced 0.02 g ethanol/g inulin at 96 h. At 24 h in inulin + glucose medium, Km7 produced 0.40 g ethanol/g (inulin + glucose) and Km8 produced 0.20 g ethanol/g (inulin + glucose) with maximum CFU/mL for Km8 at 72 h, 40 % of that for Km7 at 36 h. Extracellular inulinase activity at 6 h for both Km7 and Km8 was 3.7 International Units (IU)/mL.

  16. Data for rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase–xylitol dehydrogenase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-tolerant NADP(H)-preferring xylose pathway was constructed in Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production with xylose at elevated temperatures (Zhang et al., 2015 [25]). Ethanol production yield and efficiency was enhanced by pathway engineering in the engineered strains. The constructed strain, YZJ088, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose for ethanol and xylitol production, which is a critical step toward enabling economic biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. This study contains the fermentation results of strains using the metabolic pathway engineering procedure. The ethanol-producing abilities of various yeast strains under various conditions were compared, and strain YZJ088 showed the highest production and fastest productivity at elevated temperatures. The YZJ088 xylose fermentation results indicate that it fermented well with xylose at either low or high inoculum size. When fermented with an initial cell concentration of OD600=15 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 200 g/L xylose and produced 60.07 g/L ethanol; when the initial cell concentration was OD600=1 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 98.96 g/L xylose and produced 33.55 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.47 g/L/h. When fermented with 100 g/L xylose at 42 °C, YZJ088 produced 30.99 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.65 g/L/h, which was higher than that produced at 37 °C. PMID:26543879

  17. Data for rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-12-01

    A thermo-tolerant NADP(H)-preferring xylose pathway was constructed in Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production with xylose at elevated temperatures (Zhang et al., 2015 [25]). Ethanol production yield and efficiency was enhanced by pathway engineering in the engineered strains. The constructed strain, YZJ088, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose for ethanol and xylitol production, which is a critical step toward enabling economic biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. This study contains the fermentation results of strains using the metabolic pathway engineering procedure. The ethanol-producing abilities of various yeast strains under various conditions were compared, and strain YZJ088 showed the highest production and fastest productivity at elevated temperatures. The YZJ088 xylose fermentation results indicate that it fermented well with xylose at either low or high inoculum size. When fermented with an initial cell concentration of OD600=15 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 200 g/L xylose and produced 60.07 g/L ethanol; when the initial cell concentration was OD600=1 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 98.96 g/L xylose and produced 33.55 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.47 g/L/h. When fermented with 100 g/L xylose at 42 °C, YZJ088 produced 30.99 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.65 g/L/h, which was higher than that produced at 37 °C. PMID:26543879

  18. Novel transporters from Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enable growth on L-arabinose and D-xylose.

    PubMed

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Vidgren, Virve; Magalhães, Frederico; Jarvis, Eric E; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Genes encoding L-arabinose transporters in Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii were identified by functional complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose growth on L-arabinose was dependent on a functioning L-arabinose transporter, or by screening a differential display library, respectively. These transporters also transport D-xylose and were designated KmAXT1 (arabinose-xylose transporter) and PgAXT1, respectively. Transport assays using L-arabinose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 263 mM and V(max) 57 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 0.13 mM and V(max) 18 nM/mg/min. Glucose, galactose and xylose significantly inhibit L-arabinose transport by both transporters. Transport assays using D-xylose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 27 mM and V(max) 3.8 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 65 mM and V(max) 8.7 nM/mg/min. Neither transporter is capable of recovering growth on glucose or galactose in a S. cerevisiae strain deleted for hexose and galactose transporters. Transport kinetics of S. cerevisiae Gal2p showed K(m) 371 mM and V(max) 341 nM/mg/min for L-arabinose, and K(m) 25 mM and V(max) 76 nM/mg/min for galactose. Due to the ability of Gal2p and these two newly characterized transporters to transport both L-arabinose and D-xylose, one scenario for the complete usage of biomass-derived pentose sugars would require only the low-affinity, high-throughput transporter Gal2p and one additional high-affinity general pentose transporter, rather than dedicated D-xylose or L-arabinose transporters. Additionally, alignment of these transporters with other characterized pentose transporters provides potential targets for substrate recognition engineering.

  19. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus). Using Kluyveromyces marxcianus and Saccharomyces rosei

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a source for ethanol and single-cell protein SCP. In addition, experimental results are presented on batch fermentation kinetics employing two strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus and one strain of Saccharomyces rosei grown on the extract derived from the tubers of Jerusalem artichoke. Of the three cultures examined, Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was found to be the best producer of ethanol grown in a simple medium at 35 degrees C. The ethanol production was found to be growth-associated having a mu max = 0.41/h and the ethanol and biomass yields were determined to be Y p/s = 0.45 (88% of the theoretical) and Y x/s = 0.04 with 92% of the original sugars utilized. On the basis of carbohydrate yields of Jerusalem artichoke reported in the literature and these batch kinetic studies with Kluyveromyces marxianus, the calculated ethanol yields were found to range from 1400 kg ethanol/acre/yr to a maximum of 2700 kg ethanol/acre/yr. The SCP yields for Kluyveromyces marxianus were calculated to range between 130 to 250 kg dry wt cell/acre/yr. The potential for developing an integrated process to produce ethanol and SCP is also discussed. (Refs. 27).

  20. Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as host for expression of the bacterial lipase: cloning and adaptation of the new lipase gene from Serratia sp.

    PubMed

    Šiekštelė, Rimantas; Veteikytė, Aušra; Tvaska, Bronius; Matijošytė, Inga

    2015-10-01

    Many microbial lipases have been successfully expressed in yeasts, but not in industrially attractive Kluyveromyces lactis, which among other benefits can be cultivated on a medium supplemented with whey--cheap and easily available industrial waste. A new bacterial lipase from Serratia sp. was isolated and for the first time expressed into the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis by heterologous protein expression system based on a strong promoter of Kluyveromyces marxianus triosephosphate isomerase gene and signal peptide of Kluyveromyces marxianus endopolygalacturonase gene. In addition, the bacterial lipase gene was synthesized de novo by taking into account a codon usage bias optimal for K. lactis and was expressed into the yeast K. lactis also. Both resulting strains were characterized by high output level of the target protein secreted extracellularly. Secreted lipases were characterized for activity and stability. PMID:26254038

  1. Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two potent deacidifying and volatile-sulphur-aroma-producing microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kagkli, Dafni-Maria; Tâche, Roselyne; Cogan, Timothy M; Hill, Colin; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2006-11-01

    Cheese flavour is the result of complex biochemical transformations attributed to bacteria and yeasts grown on the curd of smear-ripened cheeses. Volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) are responsible for the characteristic aromatic notes of several cheeses. In the present study, we have assessed the ability of Kluyveromyces lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, which are frequently isolated from smear-ripened cheeses, to grow and deacidify a cheese medium and generate VSCs resulting from L-methionine degradation. The Kluyveromyces strains produced a wider variety and higher amounts of VSCs than the S. cerevisiae ones. We have shown that the pathway is likely to be proceeding differently in these two yeast genera. The VSCs are mainly generated through the degradation of 4-methylthio-oxobutyric acid in the Kluyveromyces strains, in contrast to the S. cerevisiae ones which have higher L-methionine demethiolating activity, resulting in a direct conversion of L-methionine to methanethiol. The deacidification activity which is of major importance in the early stages of cheese-ripening was also compared in S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces strains.

  2. Production of lactulose oligosaccharides by isomerisation of transgalactosylated cheese whey permeate obtained by β-galactosidases from dairy Kluyveromyces.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; Frau, Florencia; Ruiz-Matute, Ana Isabel; Montilla, Antonia; Belloch, Carmela; Manzanares, Paloma; Corzo, Nieves

    2015-08-01

    β-Galactosidases from Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from artisanal ewes' milk cheeses, were used to transgalactosylate lactose from cheese whey permeate (WP). The content of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) obtained by transgalactosylation was comparable with that formed using pure lactose as substrate. In order to obtain a mixture with higher prebiotic oligosaccharide content, isomerisation of the transgalactosylated WP was carried out using sodium aluminate as catalyst. The transgalactosylated mixtures at 6 h of reaction contained amounts of prebiotic carbohydrates (tagatose, lactulose, GOS and oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, OsLu) close to 50 g/100 g of total carbohydrates for all the strains tested, corresponding to 322 g prebiotics/kg whey permeate. Thus, the suitability of this methodology to produce mixtures of dietary non-digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties from WP has been demonstrated, which is interesting for the food industry since it increases the value and the applicability of this by-product from cheese manufacture. PMID:26004434

  3. Production of lactulose oligosaccharides by isomerisation of transgalactosylated cheese whey permeate obtained by β-galactosidases from dairy Kluyveromyces.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; Frau, Florencia; Ruiz-Matute, Ana Isabel; Montilla, Antonia; Belloch, Carmela; Manzanares, Paloma; Corzo, Nieves

    2015-08-01

    β-Galactosidases from Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from artisanal ewes' milk cheeses, were used to transgalactosylate lactose from cheese whey permeate (WP). The content of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) obtained by transgalactosylation was comparable with that formed using pure lactose as substrate. In order to obtain a mixture with higher prebiotic oligosaccharide content, isomerisation of the transgalactosylated WP was carried out using sodium aluminate as catalyst. The transgalactosylated mixtures at 6 h of reaction contained amounts of prebiotic carbohydrates (tagatose, lactulose, GOS and oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, OsLu) close to 50 g/100 g of total carbohydrates for all the strains tested, corresponding to 322 g prebiotics/kg whey permeate. Thus, the suitability of this methodology to produce mixtures of dietary non-digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties from WP has been demonstrated, which is interesting for the food industry since it increases the value and the applicability of this by-product from cheese manufacture.

  4. Endless versatility in the biotechnological applications of Kluyveromyces LAC genes.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Texeira, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Most microorganisms adapted to life in milk owe their ability to thrive in this habitat to the evolution of mechanisms for the use of the most abundant sugar present on it, lactose, as a carbon source. Because of their lactose-assimilating ability, Kluyveromyces yeasts have long been used in industrial processes involved in the elimination of this sugar. The identification of the genes conferring Kluyveromyces with a system for permeabilization and intracellular hydrolysis of lactose (LAC genes), along with the current possibilities for their transfer into alternative organisms through genetic engineering, has significantly broadened the industrial profitability of lactic yeasts. This review provides an updated overview of the general properties of Kluyveromyces LAC genes, and the multiple techniques involving their biotechnological utilization. Emphasis is also made on the potential that some of the latest technologies, such as the generation of transgenics, will have for a further benefit in the use of these and related genes. PMID:16289464

  5. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Burris, N.; Woodward, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 h to less than 60 h. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production was determined.

  6. Melanin determination by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for K. marxianus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet light (UV) mutated K. marxianus was found to turn dark brown during a growth assay. This brown color was hypothesized to be melanin overproduction influenced by the UV exposure. Cell cultures were oxidized and HPLC analyzed to determine melanin concentrations. The resulting melanin con...

  7. Growth, ethanol production, and inulinase activity on various inulin substrates by mutant kluyveromyces marxianus strains NRRL Y-50798 and NRRL Y-50799

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economically important plants contain large amounts of inulin. Disposal of waste resulting from their processing presents environmental issues. Finding microorganisms capable of converting inulin waste to biofuel and valuable co-products in a biorefinery at the processing site would have significant...

  8. Accumulation of selenium and changes in the activity of inulinase and catalase in the cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus on pulsed electric field treatment.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, Urszula; Jamroz, Jerzy

    2010-07-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) of 1Hz, 1.5 kV, and 1 ms increased the activities of catalase and inulinase over the whole range of applied Se concentrations compared with the non-treated cultures. A significant effect of selenium concentration (in the range of 5-14 microg/ml) on both intra- and extracellular enzyme activities was noted. At a Se concentration of 10 microg/ml, the activities of intra- and extracellular inulinases and extracellular catalase in the PEF-treated cultures reached the maximum of 71 U/g d.m., 46 U/g d.m., and approx. 8 U/ml, respectively. The maximum activity of intracellular catalase of approx. 6 U/ ml (with and without PEF) was recorded at 5 microg Se/ml. Further increasing of selenium concentration caused a decrease in the activity of the enzymes.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that are..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that are..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that are..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that are..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme...

  13. A Preliminary Study of Europium Uptake by Yeast Cells. The Case of Kluveromyces Marxianus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, V.; Symeopoulos, B.

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the present work is an exploration of a cost effective recovery of lanthanides, either for minimizing the industrial processes losses, or for reasons related to Radioactive Waste Management. Specifically, the uptake of europium from aqueous solutions by Kluveromyces marxianus cells was studied. Moreover, this biotechnological approach turns out to be environmental friendly, considering that cells of Kluveromyces marxianus are readily available as wastes from food fermentation industries. Europium [152Eu+154Eu]-labelled solutions were used providing better accuracy and reproducibility of measurements, mainly in low concentration range. The effect of pH, contact time and europium initial concentration were investigated. Adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich sorption models and Scatchard plots were used to reveal the existence of at least two types of binding sites.

  14. A Preliminary Study of Europium Uptake by Yeast Cells. The Case of Kluveromyces Marxianus

    SciTech Connect

    Anagnostopoulos, V.; Symeopoulos, B.

    2008-08-14

    The objective of the present work is an exploration of a cost effective recovery of lanthanides, either for minimizing the industrial processes losses, or for reasons related to Radioactive Waste Management. Specifically, the uptake of europium from aqueous solutions by Kluveromyces marxianus cells was studied. Moreover, this biotechnological approach turns out to be environmental friendly, considering that cells of Kluveromyces marxianus are readily available as wastes from food fermentation industries. Europium [{sup 152}Eu+{sup 154}Eu]-labelled solutions were used providing better accuracy and reproducibility of measurements, mainly in low concentration range. The effect of pH, contact time and europium initial concentration were investigated. Adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich sorption models and Scatchard plots were used to reveal the existence of at least two types of binding sites.

  15. Heterologous expression of Aspergillus terreus fructosyltransferase in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Spohner, Sebastian C; Czermak, Peter

    2016-06-25

    Fructo-oligosaccharides are prebiotic and hypocaloric sweeteners that are usually extracted from chicory. They can also be produced from sucrose using fructosyltransferases, but the only commercial enzyme suitable for this purpose is Pectinex Ultra, which is produced with Aspergillus aculeatus. Here we used the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to express a secreted recombinant fructosyltransferase from the inulin-producing fungus Aspergillus terreus. A synthetic codon-optimised version of the putative β-fructofuranosidase ATEG 04996 (XP 001214174.1) from A. terreus NIH2624 was secreted as a functional protein into the extracellular medium. At 60°C, the purified A. terreus enzyme generated the same pattern of oligosaccharides as Pectinex Ultra, but at lower temperatures it also produced oligomers with up to seven units. We achieved activities of up to 986.4U/mL in high-level expression experiments, which is better than previous reports of optimised Aspergillus spp. fermentations. PMID:27084521

  16. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology. [Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic, nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis... 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that are generally recognized as safe or...

  18. Dealing with different methods for Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidase purification

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, M; Cerdãn, E

    1998-01-01

    Several micro-scale chromatography-based procedures for purification of the β-galactosidase from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis were assayed. Purified enzyme was suitable to be used as antigen to induce polyclonal antibodies production. Specific staining of non-denaturing PAGE gels with chromogenic substrates allowed the determination of the number of subunits forming the native enzyme. PMID:12734592

  19. [Beta-galactosidase activity of strains of Kluyveromyces spp. and production of ethanol from lactose].

    PubMed

    de Figueroa, L C; Heluane, H; Rintoul, M; Córdoba, P R

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the behavior of yeast of the genus Kluyveromyces (K. fragilis 507, K. lactis 29 and K. lactis 10), which grow on lactose as sole carbon source, since they possess an enzyme system for the utilization of this sugar. We determined the beta-galactosidase activity of these strains, grown in the logarithmic phase in media containing glucose and lactose. On addition of 0 to 12% v/v ethanol to cells treated with toluene, we did not observe inhibition of the enzyme in strain 10 of Kluyveromyces lactis, which showed the greatest activity (704.4 Units). Since there exist the possibility of industrial utilization of concentrated whey (4 times), we performed fermentation tests of the three strains, at 30 C, in media containing initial lactose concentrations of 16.5 and 24.5%. After 48 h the residual lactose concentration was practically zero, and the ethanol concentrations had reached 7.60 and 10.10% v/v. It might be expected that the rate of fermentation of a disaccharide such as lactose would be related to the rate of hydrolysis of the sugar, so that strains having a higher rate of enzymatic hydrolysis should show a higher fermentation rate. However, we did not observe such behavior, as strains of Kluyveromyces having enzymatic activities as different as K. lactis 10 (704.4 U) and K. lactis 29 (189.7 U) did not show any great difference in the production of ethanol from lactose. PMID:2129474

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Rodríguez, Ángel; Fernández-Leiro, Rafael; González Siso, M. Isabel; Cerdán, M. Esperanza; Becerra, Manuel; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2010-01-01

    β-Galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis catalyses the hydrolysis of the β-­galactosidic linkage in lactose. Owing to its many industrial applications, the biotechnological potential of this enzyme is substantial. This protein has been expressed in yeast and purified for crystallization trials. However, optimization of the best crystallization conditions yielded crystals with poor diffraction quality that precluded further structural studies. Finally, the crystal quality was improved using the streak-seeding technique and a complete diffraction data set was collected at 2.8 Å resolution. PMID:20208165

  1. Yeast on the milky way: genetics, physiology and biotechnology of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2013-05-01

    The milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis has a life cycle similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and can be employed as a model eukaryote using classical genetics, such as the combination of desired traits, by crossing and tetrad analysis. Likewise, a growing set of vectors, marker cassettes and tags for fluorescence microscopy are available for manipulation by genetic engineering and investigating its basic cell biology. We here summarize these applications, as well as the current knowledge regarding its central metabolism, glucose and extracellular stress signalling pathways. A short overview on the biotechnological potential of K. lactis concludes this review.

  2. Yeast on the milky way: genetics, physiology and biotechnology of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2013-05-01

    The milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis has a life cycle similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and can be employed as a model eukaryote using classical genetics, such as the combination of desired traits, by crossing and tetrad analysis. Likewise, a growing set of vectors, marker cassettes and tags for fluorescence microscopy are available for manipulation by genetic engineering and investigating its basic cell biology. We here summarize these applications, as well as the current knowledge regarding its central metabolism, glucose and extracellular stress signalling pathways. A short overview on the biotechnological potential of K. lactis concludes this review. PMID:23576126

  3. Isolation of a respiratory-deficient Kluyveromyces fragilis mutant for the production of ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Bourgi, J.; Stervinou, M.; Claisse, M.; Galzy, P.

    1987-05-01

    A respiratory-deficient mutant of Kluyveromyces fragilis was isolated using a ethidium bromide mutagenesis. It was characterized by a loss of cytochromes a + a3 and by an improvement of its inulinase activity. Under anaerobic conditions this mutant was always better than the wild strain for ethanol production especially from Jerusalem artichoke extracts containing large amounts of high polyfructosans (early extracts).

  4. Kluyveromyces aestuarii, a potential environmental quality indicator yeast for mangroves in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, F.V.; Hagler, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    Kluyveromyces aestuarii was found in sediments from 7 of 8 mangroves in Rio de Janeiro; and absent only at one site with heavy plastic bag pollution. Its presence suggests influence in other habitats from a mangrove and its absence in a mangrove suggests some non- fecal pollution or other habitat alteration. PMID:24031711

  5. Kluyveromyces lactis killer system: analysis of cytoplasmic promoters of the linear plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Schickel, J; Helmig, C; Meinhardt, F

    1996-01-01

    All of the 14 genes encoded by the cytoplasmic linear killer plasmids of Kluyveromyces lactis are preceded by upstream conserved sequences (UCSs), cis-acting elements involved in plasmid gene transcription. Using the bacterial glucose-dehydrogenase gene as a reporter, expression driven by seven cytoplasmic promoters was determined. The level of expression ranged from 0.5 to 6 nkat. The highest activity was displayed by UCS 6 of pGKL2 whereas the lowest level was obtained with UCS2 of pGKL2, all other values were in between. Sequences located 5' upstream the UCSs do not influence expression. As exemplified for UCS5 and UCS10, deletion led to an almost complete loss of expression. PMID:8657569

  6. Alcohol and single-cell protein production by Kluyveromyces in concentrated whey permeates with reduced ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, M.M.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five Kluyveromyces yeasts were grown in concentrated whey permeates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce single-cell protein and ethanol. K. fragilis NRRL Y2415 produced the highest yield of alcohol, 9.1%, and K. bulgaricus ATCC 1605 gave the highest yield of biomass, 13.5 mg/mL. High ash, apparently through Na and K effects, inhibited production of biomass and alcohol. A 0.77% ash was optimum. Lactose utilization was more rapid under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and urea supplementation were without effect on yeast growth or were slightly inhibitory. A 1% peptone inclusion gave the highest biomass yield with minimum alcohol production.

  7. The Pasteur effect and catabolite repression in an oxidative yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Royt, P W; MacQuillan, A M

    1979-01-01

    The presence of the Pasteur effect in Kluyveromyces lactis grown in glucose was shown by azide-stimulated glucose fermentation. Extracts from these cells contained ATP-sensitive phosphofructokinase activity. Cells grown on succinate oxidized glucose slowly at first without azide-stimulated rates of fermentation. Phosphofructokinase in these cells was ATP-insensitive. The activity of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase in cell extracts did not require AMP activation. These results suggested the presence of a Pasteur effect in glucose-grown but not in succinate-grown K. lactis, mediated by (a) ATP inhibition of phosphofructokinase (b) possibly via feedback control of glucose transport, but not by AMP activation of isocitrate dehydrogenase. Azide inhibition of the Pasteur effect during growth of the cells did not lead to catabolite repression of respiratory activity. The results therefore suggest that the Pasteur effect does not inhibit the development of a Crabtree effect in oxidative yeasts.

  8. Sugar metabolism, redox balance and oxidative stress response in the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    González-Siso, M Isabel; García-Leiro, Ana; Tarrío, Nuria; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    A lot of studies have been carried out on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an yeast with a predominant fermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, which allows exploring the complex response induced by oxidative stress. S. cerevisiae is considered a eukaryote model for these studies. We propose Kluyveromyces lactis as a good alternative model to analyse variants in the oxidative stress response, since the respiratory metabolism in this yeast is predominant under aerobic conditions and it shows other important differences with S. cerevisiae in catabolic repression and carbohydrate utilization. The knowledge of oxidative stress response in K. lactis is still a developing field. In this article, we summarize the state of the art derived from experimental approaches and we provide a global vision on the characteristics of the putative K. lactis components of the oxidative stress response pathway, inferred from their sequence homology with the S. cerevisiae counterparts. Since K. lactis is also a well-established alternative host for industrial production of native enzymes and heterologous proteins, relevant differences in the oxidative stress response pathway and their potential in biotechnological uses of this yeast are also reviewed. PMID:19715615

  9. Evaluation of the performance of Torulaspora delbrueckii, Williopsis saturnus, and Kluyveromyces lactis in lychee wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dai; Yap, Zhi Yin; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts, namely Torulaspora delbrueckii PRELUDE, Williopsis saturnus NCYC22, and Kluyveromyces lactis KL71 on lychee juice fermentation. The fermentation performance of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts was significantly different. T. delbrueckii PRELUDE had the fastest rate of growth and high sugar consumption. W. saturnus NCYC22 used the lowest amount of sugars, but consumed the highest amount of nitrogen. Correspondingly, strain PRELUDE produced the highest level of ethanol (7.6% v/v), followed by strain KL71 (3.4% v/v) and strain NCYC22 (0.8% v/v). Aroma character-impact terpenes and terpenoids could be partially retained in all lychee wines, with higher odour activity values (OAVs) of geraniol and citronellol in strain KL71. However, strain KL71 and strain NCYC22 over-produced ethyl acetate. Strain PRELUDE had a better ability to generate high levels of ethanol, isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenylethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate and retained high OAVs of lychee aroma-character compounds cis-rose oxide (16.5) and linalool (3.5). Thus, it is deemed to be a promising non-Saccharomyces yeast for lychee wine fermentation.

  10. Evaluation of the performance of Torulaspora delbrueckii, Williopsis saturnus, and Kluyveromyces lactis in lychee wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dai; Yap, Zhi Yin; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts, namely Torulaspora delbrueckii PRELUDE, Williopsis saturnus NCYC22, and Kluyveromyces lactis KL71 on lychee juice fermentation. The fermentation performance of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts was significantly different. T. delbrueckii PRELUDE had the fastest rate of growth and high sugar consumption. W. saturnus NCYC22 used the lowest amount of sugars, but consumed the highest amount of nitrogen. Correspondingly, strain PRELUDE produced the highest level of ethanol (7.6% v/v), followed by strain KL71 (3.4% v/v) and strain NCYC22 (0.8% v/v). Aroma character-impact terpenes and terpenoids could be partially retained in all lychee wines, with higher odour activity values (OAVs) of geraniol and citronellol in strain KL71. However, strain KL71 and strain NCYC22 over-produced ethyl acetate. Strain PRELUDE had a better ability to generate high levels of ethanol, isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenylethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate and retained high OAVs of lychee aroma-character compounds cis-rose oxide (16.5) and linalool (3.5). Thus, it is deemed to be a promising non-Saccharomyces yeast for lychee wine fermentation. PMID:25955287

  11. Environmental effects on growth and ethanol fermentation of immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1988-01-01

    A trickle flow, short column reactor system using a natural sponge as a carrier was used to study the response of the immobilized yeast, Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL 2415, to environmental and nutritional factors. The specific growth rate of adsorbed K. fragilis using a complete medium as feed during the start-up period was 0.0152 hr{sup {minus}1} which was much lower than 0.60 hr{sup {minus}1}, the value for free cells. The transient responses of immobilized cells to changes in lactose concentration and temperature were quick, reaching new steady state values within half an hour. There was little or no detectable CO{sub 2} evolved if the lactose concentration was below 3.8 g/l. The immobilized K. fragilis did not perform well at temperatures over 40{degree}C, although free cells maintained their viability at 40{degree}C. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on immobilized K. fragilis was a nonlinear relationship. The thermotolerance of K. fragilis was significantly reduced by the presence of ethanol. A kinetic model was developed to determine the steady state productivity based upon growth and death rates as a function of temperature and ethanol concentration.

  12. Activity improvement of a Kluyveromyces lactis aldo-keto reductase KlAKR via rational design.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-20

    Optically pure t-butyl 6-cyano-(3R, 5R)-dihydroxyhexanoate ((R)-1b) is the key chiral precursor for atorvastatin calcium, the most widely used cholesterol-lowering drug. Wild-type aldo-keto reductase KlAKR from Kluyveromyces lactis has ideal diastereoselectivity toward t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a, dep>99.5%) but poor activity. A rational engineering was used to improve the KlAKR activity. Based on homology modeling and molecular docking, two amino acid residues (295 and 296) were selected as mutation sites, and two rounds of site-saturation mutagenesis were performed. Among the mutants, KlAKR-Y295W/W296L exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward 1a up to 12.37s(-1)mM(-1), which was 11.25-fold higher than that of wild-type KlAKR. Moreover, the majority of mutations have no negative impact on stereoselectivity. Using KlAKR-Y295W/W296L coupled with Exiguobacterium sibiricum glucose dehydrogenase (EsGDH) for cofactor regeneration, (R)-1b was accumulated up to 162.7mM with dep value above 99.5%. KlAKR-Y295W/W296L represents a robust tool for (R)-1b synthesis.

  13. Recyclable Strategy for the Production of High-Purity Galacto-oligosaccharides by Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaisheng; You, Shengping; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-20

    A recyclable strategy for the production of high-purity (>95%) galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) was developed using Kluyveromyces lactis in both the synthesis and purification steps. For the synthesis of GOS, ethanol-permeabilized cells (p-cells) of K. lactis were used because the enhanced permeability facilitated the mass transfer of the substrate and the release of oligosaccharide products. For the purification of GOS, non-permeabilized K. lactis cells (np-cells) were preferred as a result of their intrinsic cell membrane barrier toward GOS, which led to the selective consumption of carbohydrate. In this way, undesired glucose, galactose, and lactose in the raw GOS solution can be completely removed. This strategy is recyclable not only because of the high stability and reusability of p-cells and np-cells but also because the ethanol, which is simultaneously generated during the purification, can be reused for the preparation of p-cells. The strategy proposed in this study is a promising candidate for the efficient production of high-purity GOS.

  14. Two mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activities of Kluyveromyces lactis are differently expressed during respiration and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    1995-12-20

    The lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is an essentially aerobic organism in which both respiration and fermentation can coexist depending on the sugar concentration. Despite a low fermentative capacity as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four structural genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities are present in this yeast. Two of these activities, namely K1ADH III and K1ADH IV, are located within mitochondria and their presence is dependent on the carbon sources in the medium. In this paper we demonstrate by transcription and activity analysis that KlADH3 is expressed in the presence of low glucose concentrations and in the presence of respiratory carbon sources other than ethanol. Indeed ethanol acts as a strong repressor of this gene. On the other hand, KlADH4 is induced by the presence of ethanol and not by other respiratory carbon sources. We also demonstrate that the presence of KLADH III and KLADH IV in K. lactis cells is dependent on glucose concentration, glucose uptake and the amount of ethanol produced. As a consequence, these activities can be used as markers for the onset of respiratory and fermentative metabolism in this yeast.

  15. Statistical investigation of Kluyveromyces lactis cells permeabilization with ethanol by response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Janaína T.; Rocha, Pollyana F.; Converti, Attilio; Passos, Flávia M.L.; Minim, Luis A.; Sampaio, Fábio C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to select the optimal operating conditions to permeabilize Kluyveromyces lactis cells using ethanol as a solvent as an alternative to cell disruption and extraction. Cell permeabilization was carried out by a non-mechanical method consisting of chemical treatment with ethanol, and the results were expressed as β-galactosidase activity. Experiments were conducted under different conditions of ethanol concentration, treatment time and temperature according to a central composite rotatable design (CCRD), and the collected results were then worked out by response surface methodology (RSM). Cell permeabilization was improved by an increase in ethanol concentration and simultaneous decreases in the incubation temperature and treatment time. Such an approach allowed us to identify an optimal range of the independent variables within which the β-galactosidase activity was optimized. A maximum permeabilization of 2,816 mmol L−1 oNP min−1 g−1 was obtained by treating cells with 75.0% v/v of ethanol at 20.0 °C for 15.0 min. The proposed methodology resulted to be effective and suited for K. lactis cells permeabilization at a lab-scale and promises to be of possible interest for future applications mainly in the food industry. PMID:24688494

  16. KNQ1, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene encoding a transmembrane protein, may be involved in iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Emmanuela; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia

    2007-08-01

    The original purpose of the experiments described in this article was to identify, in the biotechnologically important yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, gene(s) that are potentially involved in oxidative protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which often represents a bottleneck for heterologous protein production. Because treatment with the membrane-permeable reducing agent dithiothreitol inhibits disulfide bond formation and mimics the reducing effect that the normal transit of folding proteins has in the ER environment, the strategy was to search for genes that conferred higher levels of resistance to dithiothreitol when present in multiple copies. We identified a gene (KNQ1) encoding a drug efflux permease for several toxic compounds that in multiple copies conferred increased dithiothreitol resistance. However, the KNQ1 product is not involved in the excretion of dithiothreitol or in recombinant protein secretion. We generated a knq1 null mutant, and showed that both overexpression and deletion of the KNQ1 gene resulted in increased resistance to dithiothreitol. KNQ1 amplification and deletion resulted in enhanced transcription of iron transport genes, suggesting, for the membrane-associated protein Knq1p, a new, unexpected role in iron homeostasis on which dithiothreitol tolerance may depend.

  17. Use of continuous lactose fermentation for ethanol production by Kluveromyces marxianus for verification and extension of a biochemically structured model.

    PubMed

    Sansonetti, S; Hobley, T J; Curcio, S; Villadsen, J; Sin, G

    2013-02-01

    A biochemically structured model has been developed to describe the continuous fermentation of lactose to ethanol by Kluveromyces marxianus and allowed metabolic coefficients to be determined. Anaerobic lactose-limited chemostat fermentations at different dilution rates (0.02-0.35h(-1)) were performed. Species specific rates of consumption/formation, as well as yield coefficients were determined. Ethanol yield (0.655 C-mol ethanol(∗)C-mol lactose(-1)) was as high as 98% of theoretical. The modeling procedure allowed calculation of maintenance coefficients for lactose consumption and ethanol production of m(s)=0.6029 and m(e)=0.4218 (C-mol) and (C-molh)(-1), respectively. True yield coefficients for biomass, ethanol and glycerol production were calculated to be Y(true)(sx)=0.114, Y(true)(ex)=0.192 and Y(sg)=2.250 (C-mol) and (C-mol)(-1), respectively. Model calculated maintenance and true yield coefficients agreed very closely with those determined by regressions of the experimental data. The model developed provides a solid basis for the rational design of optimised fermentation of cheese whey. PMID:23334030

  18. Dual mutations reveal interactions between components of oxidative phosphorylation in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Walker, G D; Chen, X J

    2001-01-01

    Loss of mtDNA or mitochondrial protein synthesis cannot be tolerated by wild-type Kluyveromyces lactis. The mitochondrial function responsible for rho(0)-lethality has been identified by disruption of nuclear genes encoding electron transport and F(0)-ATP synthase components of oxidative phosphorylation. Sporulation of diploid strains heterozygous for disruptions in genes for the two components of oxidative phosphorylation results in the formation of nonviable spores inferred to contain both disruptions. Lethality of spores is thought to result from absence of a transmembrane potential, Delta Psi, across the mitochondrial inner membrane due to lack of proton pumping by the electron transport chain or reversal of F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase. Synergistic lethality, caused by disruption of nuclear genes, or rho(0)-lethality can be suppressed by the atp2.1 mutation in the beta-subunit of F(1)-ATPase. Suppression is viewed as occurring by an increased hydrolysis of ATP by mutant F(1), allowing sufficient electrogenic exchange by the translocase of ADP in the matrix for ATP in the cytosol to maintain Delta Psi. In addition, lethality of haploid strains with a disruption of AAC encoding the ADP/ATP translocase can be suppressed by atp2.1. In this case suppression is considered to occur by mutant F(1) acting in the forward direction to partially uncouple ATP production, thereby stimulating respiration and relieving detrimental hyperpolarization of the inner membrane. Participation of the ADP/ATP translocase in suppression of rho(0)-lethality is supported by the observation that disruption of AAC abolishes suppressor activity of atp2.1. PMID:11729142

  19. Cloning, Expression, Characterization, and Mutagenesis of a Thermostable Exoinulinase From Kluyveromyces cicerisporus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun-Yan; Cao, Hai-Long; Tan, Hai-Dong; Hu, Xue-Jun; Liu, Wu-Jun; Du, Yu-Guang; Yin, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Inulinase is an enzyme that belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 32. It converts inulin into high-fructose syrups and fructoligosaccharides, both of which are widely used in pharmaceutical and food industries. In this study, the kcINU1 gene (GenBank accession number AF178979) encoding an exoinulinase was cloned from Kluyveromyces cicerisporus CBS4857 and expressed in Pichia pastoris X-33, yielding a maximum of 45.2 ± 0.6 U mL(-1) of inulinase activity of culture supernatant. The expressed inulinase was purified and characterized. The enzyme had an optimum temperature of 55 °C and an optimum pH of 4.5. It had a K m of 0.322 mM and a V max of 4317 μM min(-1) mg(-1) protein when inulin was used as a substrate. It retained nearly 90 % of the maximal activity after pre-incubation at 50 °C for 1 h or at pH ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 at 4 °C for 24 h, demonstrating that KcINU1 was stable at high temperature and low pH. Moreover, we constructed two KcINU1 mutants, Asp30Ala and Glu215Ala, by site-directed mutagenesis and confirmed via zymogram analysis that Asp-30 and Glu-215 of the enzyme were the catalytic active center. The present study has provided important information for understanding the catalytic mechanism of exoinulinase. PMID:26446826

  20. Dual mutations reveal interactions between components of oxidative phosphorylation in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Clark-Walker, G D; Chen, X J

    2001-11-01

    Loss of mtDNA or mitochondrial protein synthesis cannot be tolerated by wild-type Kluyveromyces lactis. The mitochondrial function responsible for rho(0)-lethality has been identified by disruption of nuclear genes encoding electron transport and F(0)-ATP synthase components of oxidative phosphorylation. Sporulation of diploid strains heterozygous for disruptions in genes for the two components of oxidative phosphorylation results in the formation of nonviable spores inferred to contain both disruptions. Lethality of spores is thought to result from absence of a transmembrane potential, Delta Psi, across the mitochondrial inner membrane due to lack of proton pumping by the electron transport chain or reversal of F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase. Synergistic lethality, caused by disruption of nuclear genes, or rho(0)-lethality can be suppressed by the atp2.1 mutation in the beta-subunit of F(1)-ATPase. Suppression is viewed as occurring by an increased hydrolysis of ATP by mutant F(1), allowing sufficient electrogenic exchange by the translocase of ADP in the matrix for ATP in the cytosol to maintain Delta Psi. In addition, lethality of haploid strains with a disruption of AAC encoding the ADP/ATP translocase can be suppressed by atp2.1. In this case suppression is considered to occur by mutant F(1) acting in the forward direction to partially uncouple ATP production, thereby stimulating respiration and relieving detrimental hyperpolarization of the inner membrane. Participation of the ADP/ATP translocase in suppression of rho(0)-lethality is supported by the observation that disruption of AAC abolishes suppressor activity of atp2.1. PMID:11729142

  1. How recombinant swollenin from Kluyveromyces lactis affects cellulosic substrates and accelerates their hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to generate biofuels, insoluble cellulosic substrates are pretreated and subsequently hydrolyzed with cellulases. One way to pretreat cellulose in a safe and environmentally friendly manner is to apply, under mild conditions, non-hydrolyzing proteins such as swollenin - naturally produced in low yields by the fungus Trichoderma reesei. To yield sufficient swollenin for industrial applications, the first aim of this study is to present a new way of producing recombinant swollenin. The main objective is to show how swollenin quantitatively affects relevant physical properties of cellulosic substrates and how it affects subsequent hydrolysis. Results After expression in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the resulting swollenin was purified. The adsorption parameters of the recombinant swollenin onto cellulose were quantified for the first time and were comparable to those of individual cellulases from T. reesei. Four different insoluble cellulosic substrates were then pretreated with swollenin. At first, it could be qualitatively shown by macroscopic evaluation and microscopy that swollenin caused deagglomeration of bigger cellulose agglomerates as well as dispersion of cellulose microfibrils (amorphogenesis). Afterwards, the effects of swollenin on cellulose particle size, maximum cellulase adsorption and cellulose crystallinity were quantified. The pretreatment with swollenin resulted in a significant decrease in particle size of the cellulosic substrates as well as in their crystallinity, thereby substantially increasing maximum cellulase adsorption onto these substrates. Subsequently, the pretreated cellulosic substrates were hydrolyzed with cellulases. Here, pretreatment of cellulosic substrates with swollenin, even in non-saturating concentrations, significantly accelerated the hydrolysis. By correlating particle size and crystallinity of the cellulosic substrates with initial hydrolysis rates, it could be shown that the swollenin

  2. Enzymatic synthesis and characterization of hydroquinone galactoside using Kluyveromyces lactis lactase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Go-Eun; Lee, Jin-Ha; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Seo, Eun-Seong; Jin, Sheng-De; Kim, Ghahyun J; Cha, Jaeho; Kim, Eui-Joong; Park, Ki-Deok; Kim, Doman

    2010-09-01

    Hydroquinone galactoside (HQ-Gal) as a potential skin whitening agent was synthesized by the reaction of lactase (beta-galactosidase) from Kluyveromyces lactis, Aspergillus oryzae, Bacillus circulans, and Thermus sp. with lactose as a donor and HQ as an acceptor. Among these lactases, the acceptor reaction involving HQ and lactose with K. lactis lactase showed a higher conversion ratio to HQ-Gal (60.27%). HQ-Gal was purified using butanol partitioning and silica gel column chromatography. The structure of the purified HQ-Gal was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance, and the ionic product was observed at m/z 295 (C12H16O7Na)+ using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. HQ-Gal was identified as 4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside. The optimum conditions for HQ-Gal synthesis by K. lactis determined using response surface methodology were 50 mM HQ, 60 mM lactose, and 20 U mL(-1) lactase. These conditions produced a yield of 2.01 g L(-1) HQ-Gal. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of diphenylpicrylhydrazyl scavenging activity was 3.31 mM, indicating a similar antioxidant activity compared to beta-arbutin (IC50=3.95 mM). The Ki value of HQ-Gal (0.75 mM) against tyrosinase was smaller than that of beta-arbutin (Ki=1.97 mM), indicating its superiority as an inhibitor. HQ-Gal inhibited (23%) melanin synthesis without being significantly toxic to the cells, while beta-arbutin exhibited only 8% reduction of melanin synthesis in B16 melanoma cells compared with the control. These results indicate that HQ-Gal may be a suitable functional component in the cosmetics industry.

  3. Ethanol and xylitol production from glucose and xylose at high temperature by Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Singh, Surendra P; Mishra, Indra M; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2009-12-01

    A yeast strain Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 (MTCC 5314), isolated from soil samples collected from dumping sites of crushed sugarcane bagasse in Sugar Mill, showed growth and fermentation efficiency at high temperatures ranging from 45 degrees C to 50 degrees C. The yeast strain was able to use a wide range of substrates, such as glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, sucrose, and cellobiose, either for growth or fermentation to ethanol. The strain also showed xylitol production from xylose. In batch fermentation, the strain showed maximum ethanol concentration of 82 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) (10.4% v/v) on initial glucose concentration of 200 g l(-1), and ethanol concentration of 1.75 +/- 0.05 g l(-1) as well as xylitol concentration of 11.5 +/- 0.4 g l(-1) on initial xylose concentration of 20 g l(-1) at 50 degrees C. The strain was capable of simultaneously using glucose and xylose in a mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1), achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 38 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 14.5 +/- 0.2 g l(-1) in batch fermentation. High stability of the strain was observed in a continuous fermentation by feeding the mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1) by recycling the cells, achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 30.8 +/- 6.2 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 7.35 +/- 3.3 g l(-1) with ethanol productivity of 3.1 +/- 0.6 g l(-1) h(-1) and xylitol productivity of 0.75 +/- 0.35 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  4. Comparison between immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis and saccharomyces cerevisiae coimmobilized with. beta. -galactosidase, with respect to continuous ethanol production from concentrated whey permeate

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn-Haegerdal, B.

    1985-06-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis immobilized in calcium alginate gel was compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae coimmobilized with ..beta..-galactosidase, for continuous ethanol production from whey permeate in packed-bed-type columns. Four different whey concentrations were studied, equivalent to 4.5, 10, 15 and 20% lactose, respectively. In all cases the coimmobilized preparation produced more ethanol than Kluyveromyces fragilis. The study went on for more than 5 weeks. Kluyveromyces fragilis showed a decline in activity after 20 days, while the coimmobilized preparation was stable during the entire investigation. Under experimental conditions theoretical yields of ethanol were obtained from 4.5 and 10% lactose substrates with the coimmobilized system. Using 15% lactose substrate, theoretical yields were only obtained when a galactose-adapted immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae column was run in series with the coimmobilized column. Then a maximum of 71 g/l ethanol was produced with a productivity of 2.5 g/l hour. The coimmobilized column alone gave a maximum ethanol concentration of 52 g/l with a productivity of 4.5 g/l hour, whereas immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis only produced 13 g/l ethanol with a productivity of 1.1 g/l hour. It was not possible to obtain theoretical yields of ethanol from the highest substrate concentration. 13 references.

  5. The Rag4 glucose sensor is involved in the hypoxic induction of KlPDC1 gene expression in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Micolonghi, C; Wésolowski-Louvel, M; Bianchi, M M

    2011-01-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis is a yeast which cannot grow under strict anaerobiosis. To date, no factors responsible for oxygen sensing and oxygen-dependent regulation of metabolism have been identified. In this paper we present the identification of the glucose sensor Rag4 as a factor essential for oxygen-dependent regulation of the fermentative pathway.

  6. Secretion and properties of a hybrid Kluyveromyces lactis-Aspergillus niger β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ángel Pereira; Leiro, Rafael Fernández; Trillo, M Cristina; Cerdán, M Esperanza; Siso, M Isabel González; Becerra, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background The β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis is a protein of outstanding biotechnological interest in the food industry and milk whey reutilization. However, due to its intracellular nature, its industrial production is limited by the high cost associated to extraction and downstream processing. The yeast-system is an attractive method for producing many heterologous proteins. The addition of a secretory signal in the recombinant protein is the method of choice to sort it out of the cell, although biotechnological success is not guaranteed. The cell wall acting as a molecular sieve to large molecules, culture conditions and structural determinants present in the protein, all have a decisive role in the overall process. Protein engineering, combining domains of related proteins, is an alternative to take into account when the task is difficult. In this work, we have constructed and analyzed two hybrid proteins from the β-galactosidase of K. lactis, intracellular, and its Aspergillus niger homologue that is extracellular. In both, a heterologous signal peptide for secretion was also included at the N-terminus of the recombinant proteins. One of the hybrid proteins obtained has interesting properties for its biotechnological utilization. Results The highest levels of intracellular and extracellular β-galactosidase were obtained when the segment corresponding to the five domain of K. lactis β-galactosidase was replaced by the corresponding five domain of the A. niger β-galactosidase. Taking into account that this replacement may affect other parameters related to the activity or the stability of the hybrid protein, a thoroughly study was performed. Both pH (6.5) and temperature (40°C) for optimum activity differ from values obtained with the native proteins. The stability was higher than the corresponding to the β-galactosidase of K. lactis and, unlike this, the activity of the hybrid protein was increased by the presence of Ni2+. The affinity for

  7. Cloning and characterization of a NADH-dependent aldo-keto reductase from a newly isolated Kluyveromyces lactis XP1461.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-09-01

    An aldo-keto reductase gene (klakr) from Kluyveromyces lactis XP1461 was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The aldo-keto reductase KlAKR was purified and found to be NADH-dependent with a molecular weight of approximately 36 kDa. It is active and stable at 30 °C and pH 7.0. The maximal reaction rate (vmax), apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) for NADH and t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a) and catalytic number (kcat) were calculated as 7.63 U mg(-1), 0.204 mM, 4.42 mM and 697.4 min(-1), respectively. Moreover, the KlAKR has broad substrate specificity to a range of aldehydes, ketones and keto-esters, producing chiral alcohol with e.e. or d.e. >99% for the majority of test substrates.

  8. Ethanol fermentation from molasses at high temperature by thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 and energy assessment for recovery.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Diptarka; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Debashish; Suman, Sunil Kumar; Khan, Rashmi; Agrawal, Deepti; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2014-10-01

    High temperature ethanol fermentation from sugarcane molasses B using thermophilic Crabtree-positive yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 was carried out in batch bioreactor system. Strain was found to have a maximum specific ethanol productivity of 0.688 g/g/h with 92 % theoretical ethanol yield. Aeration and initial sugar concentration were tuning parameters to regulate metabolic pathways of the strain for either cell mass or higher ethanol production during growth with an optimum sugar to cell ratio 33:1 requisite for fermentation. An assessment of ethanol recovery from fermentation broth via simulation study illustrated that distillation-based conventional recovery was significantly better in terms of energy efficiency and overall mass recovery in comparison to coupled solvent extraction-azeotropic distillation technique for the same.

  9. Promoter and signal sequence from filamentous fungus can drive recombinant protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Aravind; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-08-01

    Cross-recognition of promoters from filamentous fungi in yeast can have important consequences towards developing fungal expression systems, especially for the rapid evaluation of their efficacy. A truncated 510bp inducible Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter was tested for the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Kluyveromyces lactis after disrupting its native β-galactosidase (lac4) promoter. The efficiency of the CBH1 secretion signal was also evaluated by fusing it to the lac4 promoter of the yeast, which significantly increased the secretion of recombinant protein in K. lactis compared to the native α-mating factor secretion signal. The fungal promoter is demonstrated to have potential to drive heterologous protein production in K. lactis; and the small sized T. reesei cbh1 secretion signal can mediate the protein secretion in K. lactis with high efficiency. PMID:24661814

  10. Autoregulation of the Kluyveromyces lactis pyruvate decarboxylase gene KlPDC1 involves the regulatory gene RAG3.

    PubMed

    Ottaviano, Daniela; Micolonghi, Chiara; Tizzani, Lorenza; Lemaire, Marc; Wésolowski-Louvel, Micheline; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Ranieri, Danilo; Bianchi, Michele M

    2014-07-01

    In the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the pyruvate decarboxylase gene KlPDC1 is strongly regulated at the transcription level by different environmental factors. Sugars and hypoxia act as inducers of transcription, while ethanol acts as a repressor. Their effects are mediated by gene products, some of which have been characterized. KlPDC1 transcription is also strongly repressed by its product--KlPdc1--through a mechanism called autoregulation. We performed a genetic screen that allowed us to select and identify the regulatory gene RAG3 as a major factor in the transcriptional activity of the KlPDC1 promoter in the absence of the KlPdc1 protein, i.e. in the autoregulatory mechanism. We also showed that the two proteins Rag3 and KlPdc1 interact, co-localize in the cell and that KlPdc1 may control Rag3 nuclear localization.

  11. Isolation and characterization of linear deoxyribonucleic acid plasmids from Kluyveromyces lactis and the plasmid-associated killer character.

    PubMed Central

    Gunge, N; Tamaru, A; Ozawa, F; Sakaguchi, K

    1981-01-01

    Two linear deoxyribonucleic acid plasmids, designated pGK11 and pGK12, were isolated from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis IFO 1267. pGK11 and pGK12 had molecular weights of 5.4 X 10(6) and 8.4 X 10(6), respectively. Both plasmids possessed the same density of 1.687 g/cm3, lighter than the densities of mitochondrial (1.692 g/cm3) and nuclear (1.699 g/cm3) deoxyribonucleic acids. A restriction map of pGK11 was constructed from digestions by EcoRI, HindIII, PstI, and BamHI. pGK12 was cleaved by EcoRI into seven fragments and by BamHI into two fragments K. lactis IFO 1267 killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae sensitive and killer strains and certain strains of Saccharomyces italicus, K. lactis, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans, and K. vanudenii. All K. lactis strains lacking the pGK1 plasmids were nonkillers. A hybrid was constructed between K. lactis IFO 1267 and a nonkiller K. lactis strain lacking the plasmids and subjected to tetrad analysis after sporulation. The killer character was extrachromosomally transmitted in all tetrads in association with the pGK1 plasmids. The double-stranded ribonucleic acid killer plasmid could not be detected in any K. lactis killer strains. It is thus highly probable that the killer character is mediated by the linear deoxyribonucleic acid plasmids. A single chromosomal gene was found which was responsible for the resistance to the K. lactis killer. Images PMID:6257636

  12. Improved ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed cultures with Kluyveromyces lactis on high-sugar fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Chizuru; Kurita, Osamu; Kubo, Tomoko

    2014-12-01

    The influence of non-Saccharomyces yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, on metabolite formation and the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed cultures was examined on synthetic minimal medium containing 20% glucose. In the late stage of fermentation after the complete death of K. lactis, S. cerevisiae in mixed cultures was more ethanol-tolerant than that in pure culture. The chronological life span of S. cerevisiae was shorter in pure culture than mixed cultures. The yeast cells of the late stationary phase both in pure and mixed cultures had a low buoyant density with no significant difference in the non-quiescence state between both cultures. In mixed cultures, the glycerol contents increased and the alanine contents decreased when compared with the pure culture of S. cerevisiae. The distinctive intracellular amino acid pool concerning its amino acid concentrations and its amino acid composition was observed in yeast cells with different ethanol tolerance in the death phase. Co-cultivation of K. lactis seems to prompt S. cerevisiae to be ethanol tolerant by forming opportune metabolites such as glycerol and alanine and/or changing the intracellular amino acid pool.

  13. An autoselection system in recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis enhances cloned gene stability and provides freedom in medium selection.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H P; Da Silva, N A

    1998-02-01

    An autoselection system for increasing plasmid stability in Kluyveromyces lactis, based on the blockage of the pyrimidine de novo and salvage pathways, was investigated. In a manner analogous to that used in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a putative "fur 1" mutation was selected in a uraA K. lactis strain using 5-fluorouracil and 5-fluorocytosine plates. Survival of the mutant required expression of a plasmid-borne URA3 gene regardless of the culture medium employed, verifying the efficacy of this autoselection system in K. lactis. The expression of heterologous invertase, encoded by the S. cerevisiae SUC2 gene, was studied during long-term sequential batch cultures (70 generations) in complex yeast/peptone/glucose medium. The fur 1 mutant successfully retained the plasmid; invertase specific activity remained above 90% of the initial level. Furthermore, no mutation reversion was observed. In contrast, for the control non-fur 1 strain, only 4% of the cells retained the plasmid after 70 generations, and invertase specific activity dropped to less than 10% of the initial level. Experiments comparing growth and activity in different media indicated the potential for improving productivity through medium enrichment using this autoselection system.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of hexokinase KlHxk1 from Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Keim, Antje; Naumann, Manfred; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Glucose acts as both a carbon source and a hormone-like regulator of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to man. Phosphorylation of glucose is executed by hexokinases, which represent a class of multifunctional enzymes that, in addition to their contribution to the uptake and initiation of metabolism of glucose, fructose and mannose, are involved in glucose signalling. The genome of the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis encodes a single hexokinase (KlHxk1) and a single glucokinase (KlGlk1). KlHxk1 exists in a monomer–homodimer equilibrium which is presumed to play a role in metabolic regulation. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of KlHxk1 dimerization on a molecular level, the enzyme was crystallized and subjected to X-ray structure analysis. Crystallization employing ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate or polyethylene glycol 6000 at pH values of 8.0–9.5 gave seven different crystal forms of KlHxk1. Crystallographic data to 1.66 Å resolution were obtained using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination of KlHxk1 in various packing environments will reveal the full architecture of the homodimeric enzyme and complete our mechanistic understanding of the catalytic and regulatory functions of the enzyme. PMID:17565189

  15. Pyrimidine motif triple helix in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA pseudoknot is essential for function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cash, Darian D; Cohen-Zontag, Osnat; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Shefer, Kinneret; Brown, Yogev; Ulyanov, Nikolai B; Tzfati, Yehuda; Feigon, Juli

    2013-07-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that extends the 3' ends of linear chromosomes. The specialized telomerase reverse transcriptase requires a multidomain RNA (telomerase RNA, TER), which includes an integral RNA template and functionally important template-adjacent pseudoknot. The structure of the human TER pseudoknot revealed that the loops interact with the stems to form a triple helix shown to be important for activity in vitro. A similar triple helix has been predicted to form in diverse fungi TER pseudoknots. The solution NMR structure of the Kluyveromyces lactis pseudoknot, presented here, reveals that it contains a long pyrimidine motif triple helix with unexpected features that include three individual bulge nucleotides and a C(+)•G-C triple adjacent to a stem 2-loop 2 junction. Despite significant differences in sequence and base triples, the 3D shape of the human and K. lactis TER pseudoknots are remarkably similar. Analysis of the effects of nucleotide substitutions on cell growth and telomere lengths provides evidence that this conserved structure forms in endogenously assembled telomerase and is essential for telomerase function in vivo.

  16. In vivo and in vitro effects of rifampicin and streptolydigin on transcription of Kluyveromyces lactis in the presence of nystatin.

    PubMed Central

    Plevani, P; Badaracco, G; Marmiroli, N; Cassani, G

    1975-01-01

    Rifampicin and streptolydigin, if used in conjunction with nystatin, depress the growth of Kluyveromyces lactis. The incorporation of labeled leucine into protein is inhibited by nystatin whereas the incorporation of labeled uracil into RNA is inhibited by rifampicin in nystatin-treated cells. In order to study the mechanism of inhibition of RNA synthesis we purified by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography four forms of RNA polymerase from K.lactis cells. The general properties of these enyzmes are similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of other eukaryotic RNA polymerases. In particular, enzymes IA, IB and III are more active with poly[d(A-T)] template and Mn-2+ than with native or denatured calf thymus DNA. Enzyme II shows optimal activity with denatured calf thymus DNA and Mn2+. When challenged with native calf thymus DNA all enzymes prefer Mg-2+ as a divalent cation whereas with denatured calf thymus DNA all enzymes are more active with Mn-2+. Enzyme II is inhibited by lambda-amanitin but no enzyme is sensitive to rifampicin and streptolydigin. The inhibition of growth and uracil uptake observed when rifampicin is added to nystatin treated cells is probably not caused by a specific inhibition of transcription. PMID:1091916

  17. Immobilization of β-d-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis on functionalized silicon dioxide nanoparticles: characterization and lactose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Madan Lal; Barrow, Colin James; Kennedy, J F; Puri, Munish

    2012-03-01

    β-D-Galactosidase (BGAL) from Kluyveromyces lactis was covalently immobilized to functionalized silicon dioxide nanoparticles (10-20 nm). The binding of the enzyme to the nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Functionalized nanoparticles showed 87% immobilization yield. Soluble and immobilized enzyme preparation exhibited pH-optima at pH 6.5 and 7.0, respectively, with temperature optima at 35 and 40°C, respectively. Michaelis constant (K(m)) was 4.77 and 8.4mM for free and immobilized BGAL, respectively. V(max) for the soluble and immobilized enzyme was 12.25 and 13.51 U/ml, respectively. Nanoparticle immobilized BGAL demonstrated improved stability after favoring multipoint covalent attachment. Thermal stability of the immobilized enzyme was enhanced at 40, 50 and 65°C. Immobilized nanoparticle-enzyme conjugate retained more than 50% enzyme activity up to the eleventh cycle. Maximum lactose hydrolysis by immobilized BGAL was achieved at 8h.

  18. An alternative, arginase-independent pathway for arginine metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis involves guanidinobutyrase as a key enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, G; Verhoeven, M D; Mans, R; Fleury Rey, Y; Bel-Rhlid, R; van den Broek, M; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; Thompson, M; Müller, V; Wahl, S A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2014-01-01

    Most available knowledge on fungal arginine metabolism is derived from studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which arginine catabolism is initiated by releasing urea via the arginase reaction. Orthologues of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the first three enzymes in the arginase pathway were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis and shown to functionally complement the corresponding deletion in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, deletion of the single K. lactis arginase gene KlCAR1 did not completely abolish growth on arginine as nitrogen source. Growth rate of the deletion mutant strongly increased during serial transfer in shake-flask cultures. A combination of RNAseq-based transcriptome analysis and 13C-15N-based flux analysis was used to elucidate the arginase-independent pathway. Isotopic 13C15N-enrichment in γ-aminobutyrate revealed succinate as the entry point in the TCA cycle of the alternative pathway. Transcript analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements indicated increased expression in the Klcar1Δ mutant of a guanidinobutyrase (EC.3.5.3.7), a key enzyme in a new pathway for arginine degradation. Expression of the K. lactis KLLA0F27995g (renamed KlGBU1) encoding guanidinobutyrase enabled S. cerevisiae to use guanidinobutyrate as sole nitrogen source and its deletion in K. lactis almost completely abolish growth on this nitrogen source. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this enzyme activity is widespread in fungi. PMID:24912400

  19. Induction by glucose of an antimycin-insensitive, azide-sensitive respiration in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, I; Viola, A M; Goffeau, A

    1981-03-01

    Increasing the glucose concentration from 0.1 to 10% in exponentially growing cultures of Kluyveromyces lactis CBS 2359 does not repress the antimycin-sensitive respiration (QO2 of 80 microliter O2 . h-1 . mg-1 dry weight) but raises the antimycin-insensitive respiration from 3 to 12 microliter O2 . h-2 . mg-1 dry weight. Antimycin A inhibits the growth of K. lactis on a variety of substrates with the exception of glucose at concentrations equal to or higher than 1% where substantial antimycin-insensitive respiratory rates are induced. It can be concluded that a minimal antimycin-insensitive QO2 is necessary for cellular growth when the normal respiratory pathway is not functional. The antimycin-insensitive respiration elicited by growth in high glucose concentrations is poorly inhibited by hydroxamate and is inhibited by 50% by 90 microM azide or 1 mM cyanide. These concentrations are much higher than those necessary to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase which is not involved in the antimycin-insensitive respiration as was demonstrated by spectral measurements. A pigment absorbing at 555 nm is specifically reduced after addition of glucose to antimycin-inhibited cells. The same pigment is reoxidized by further addition of high concentrations of sodium azide indicating its participation in the antimycin-insensitive, azide-sensitive respiration.

  20. Immobilization of lactase from Kluyveromyces lactis greatly reduces the inhibition promoted by glucose. full hydrolysis of lactose in milk.

    PubMed

    Mateo, César; Monti, Rubens; Pessela, Benevides C C; Fuentes, Manuel; Torres, Rodrigo; Guisán, José Manuel; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The kinetic constants (Km, Vmax, and inhibition constants for the different products) of soluble and different immobilized preparations of beta-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis were determined. For the soluble enzyme, the Km was 3.6 mM, while the competitive inhibition constant by galactose was 45 mM and the noncompetitive one by glucose was 758 mM. The immobilized preparations conserved similar values of Km and competitive inhibition, but in some instances much higher values for the noncompetitive inhibition constants were obtained. Thus, when glyoxyl or glutaraldehyde supports were used to immobilize the enzyme, the noncompetitive inhibition was greatly reduced (Ki approximately 15,000 and >40,000 mM, respectively), whereas when using sugar chains to immobilize the enzyme the behavior had an effect very similar to the soluble enzyme. These results presented a great practical relevance. While using the soluble enzyme or the enzyme immobilized via the sugar chain as biocatalysts in the hydrolysis of lactose in milk only around 90% of the substrate was hydrolyzed, by using of these the enzyme immobilized via the glyoxyl or the glutaraldehyde groups, more than 99% of the lactose in milk was hydrolyzed.

  1. The Deletion of the Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene KlSDH1 in Kluyveromyces lactis Does Not Lead to Respiratory Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Saliola, Michele; Bartoccioni, Paola Chiara; De Maria, Ilaria; Lodi, Tiziana; Falcone, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    We have isolated a Kluyveromyces lactis mutant unable to grow on all respiratory carbon sources with the exception of lactate. Functional complementation of this mutant led to the isolation of KlSDH1, the gene encoding the flavoprotein subunit of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, which is essential for the aerobic utilization of carbon sources. Despite the high sequence conservation of the SDH genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and K. lactis, they do not have the same relevance in the metabolism of the two yeasts. In fact, unlike SDH1, KlSDH1 was highly expressed under both fermentative and nonfermentative conditions. In addition to this, but in contrast with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis strains lacking KlSDH1 were still able to grow in the presence of lactate. In these mutants, oxygen consumption was one-eighth that of the wild type in the presence of lactate and was normal with glucose and ethanol, indicating that the respiratory chain was fully functional. Northern analysis suggested that alternative pathway(s), which involves pyruvate decarboxylase and the glyoxylate cycle, could overcome the absence of SDH and allow (i) lactate utilization and (ii) the accumulation of succinate instead of ethanol during growth on glucose. PMID:15189981

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of hexokinase KlHxk1 from Kluyveromyces lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Keim, Antje; Naumann, Manfred; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-05-01

    Crystals of the enzyme hexokinase 1 from the yeast K. lactis (KlHxk1) suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained in various space groups. Glucose acts as both a carbon source and a hormone-like regulator of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to man. Phosphorylation of glucose is executed by hexokinases, which represent a class of multifunctional enzymes that, in addition to their contribution to the uptake and initiation of metabolism of glucose, fructose and mannose, are involved in glucose signalling. The genome of the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis encodes a single hexokinase (KlHxk1) and a single glucokinase (KlGlk1). KlHxk1 exists in a monomer–homodimer equilibrium which is presumed to play a role in metabolic regulation. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of KlHxk1 dimerization on a molecular level, the enzyme was crystallized and subjected to X-ray structure analysis. Crystallization employing ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate or polyethylene glycol 6000 at pH values of 8.0–9.5 gave seven different crystal forms of KlHxk1. Crystallographic data to 1.66 Å resolution were obtained using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination of KlHxk1 in various packing environments will reveal the full architecture of the homodimeric enzyme and complete our mechanistic understanding of the catalytic and regulatory functions of the enzyme.

  3. Cloning, Production, and Functional Expression of the Bacteriocin Enterocin A, Produced by Enterococcus faecium T136, by the Yeasts Pichia pastoris, Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, and Arxula adeninivorans

    PubMed Central

    Borrero, Juan; Kunze, Gotthard; Jiménez, Juan J.; Böer, Erik; Gútiez, Loreto; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriocin enterocin A (EntA) produced by Enterococcus faecium T136 has been successfully cloned and produced by the yeasts Pichia pastoris X-33EA, Kluyveromyces lactis GG799EA, Hansenula polymorpha KL8-1EA, and Arxula adeninivorans G1212EA. Moreover, P. pastoris X-33EA and K. lactis GG799EA produced EntA in larger amounts and with higher antimicrobial and specific antimicrobial activities than the EntA produced by E. faecium T136. PMID:22685156

  4. Secretory expression of a phospholipase A2 from Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2015-12-01

    The pla2 gene encoding a phospholipase A2 (EC 3.1.1.4) of Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 was cloned and expressed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 successfully for the first time. The structural pla2 gene fused in frame with the K. lactis secretion signal α-mating factor was integrated into the LAC4 locus and expressed under the control of the LAC4 promoter. sPLA2 activity was detected in the culture supernatant during shake flask culture of K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2. In comparison with the control strain K. lactis/pKLAC1, SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a 17-kDa recombinant protein band in K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2, which was consistent with the predicted molecular weight of the mature protein. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the copy number of the integrated pla2 gene ranged from 2 to 6 and positively correlated with sPLA2 activity. When the inducer galactose was used as the carbon source, the sPLA2 activity in the culture supernatant of the recombinant that harbored six pla2 gene copies reached 1.96 ± 0.15 U/mL. The influence of the culture composition and conditions on the recombinant sPLA2 activity in shake flask culture were also studied. When the recombinant was cultured at 30°C in a YPD medium culture volume of 70 mL in a 250-mL shake flask with an initial pH of 7.0, the sPLA2 activity reached 2.16 ± 0.18 U/mL.

  5. Secretory expression of a phospholipase A2 from Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2015-12-01

    The pla2 gene encoding a phospholipase A2 (EC 3.1.1.4) of Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 was cloned and expressed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 successfully for the first time. The structural pla2 gene fused in frame with the K. lactis secretion signal α-mating factor was integrated into the LAC4 locus and expressed under the control of the LAC4 promoter. sPLA2 activity was detected in the culture supernatant during shake flask culture of K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2. In comparison with the control strain K. lactis/pKLAC1, SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a 17-kDa recombinant protein band in K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2, which was consistent with the predicted molecular weight of the mature protein. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the copy number of the integrated pla2 gene ranged from 2 to 6 and positively correlated with sPLA2 activity. When the inducer galactose was used as the carbon source, the sPLA2 activity in the culture supernatant of the recombinant that harbored six pla2 gene copies reached 1.96 ± 0.15 U/mL. The influence of the culture composition and conditions on the recombinant sPLA2 activity in shake flask culture were also studied. When the recombinant was cultured at 30°C in a YPD medium culture volume of 70 mL in a 250-mL shake flask with an initial pH of 7.0, the sPLA2 activity reached 2.16 ± 0.18 U/mL. PMID:26108160

  6. Fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by yeasts. [Candida wickerhamii; C. guiliermondii; C. molischiana; Debaryomyces polymorphus; Pichia guilliermondii; Clavispora lusitaniae; Kluyveromyces lactis; Brettanomyces claussenii; Rhodotorula minuta; Dekkera intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, S.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by 14 yeast species or strains was monitored. When grown aerobically, Candida wickerhamii, C. guilliermondii, and C. molischiana metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization 3 to 6. C. wicherhamii and C. molischiana also fermented these substrates, while C. guilliermondii fermented only cellodextrins of degree of polymerization {<=} 3. Debaryomyces polymorphus, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, and one of two strains of Kluyveromyces lactis metabolized glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose when grown aerobically. These yeasts also fermented these substrates, except for K. lactis, which fermented only glucose and cellobiose. The remaining species/strains tested, K. lactis, Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces anomalus, Kluyveromyces dobzhanskii, Rhodotorula minuta, and Dekkera intermedia, both fermented and aerobically metabolized glucose and cellobiose. Crude enzyme preparations from all 14 yeast species or strains were tested for ability to hydrolyze cellotriose and cellotretose. Most of the yeasts produced an enzyme(s) capable of hydrolyzing cellotriose. However, with two exceptions, R. minuta and P. guilliermondii, only the yeasts that metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization >3 produced an enzyme(s) that hydrolyzed cellotretose.

  7. Flavour formation in fungi: characterisation of KlAtf, the Kluyveromyces lactis orthologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases Atf1 and Atf2.

    PubMed

    Van Laere, Stijn D M; Saerens, Sofie M G; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2008-04-01

    Volatile aroma-active esters are responsible for the fruity character of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. In the brewers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the major part of these esters is formed by two alcohol acetyltransferases, Atf1 and Atf2. In this paper, the existence of orthologues of these S. cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases in several ascomycetous fungi was investigated. Bioinformatic analysis of sequenced fungal genomes revealed the presence of multiple orthologues. The Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeasts all have two genes coding for orthologues. More distantly related fungi like Saccharomyces castelii, Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces waltii and Kluyveromyces lactis have only one orthologue in their genome. The homology between the identified proteins and the S. cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases suggests a role for these orthologues in the aroma-active ester formation. To verify this, the K. lactis orthologue KlAtf was cloned and expressed in S. cerevisiae. Gas chromatographic analysis of small-scale fermentations with the transformant strains showed that, while S. cerevisiae ATF1 overexpression resulted in a substantial increase in acetate ester levels, S. cerevisiae ATF2 and K. lactis ATF overexpression only caused a moderate increase in acetate esters. This study is the first report of the presence of an ester synthesis gene in K. lactis.

  8. Role of Snf1p in regulation of intracellular sorting of the lactose and galactose transporter Lac12p in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Wiedemuth, Christian; Breunig, Karin D

    2005-04-01

    The protein kinase Snf1/AMPK plays a central role in carbon and energy homeostasis in yeasts and higher eukaryotes. To work out which aspects of the Snf1-controlled regulatory network are conserved in evolution, the Snf1 requirement in galactose metabolism was analyzed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. Whereas galactose induction was only delayed, K. lactis snf1 mutants failed to accumulate the lactose/galactose H+ symporter Lac12p in the plasma membran,e as indicated by Lac12-green fluorescent protein fusions. In contrast to wild-type cells, the fusion protein was mostly intracellular in the mutant. Growth on galactose and galactose uptake could be restored by the KHT3 gene, which encodes a new transporter of the HXT subfamily of major facilitators These findings indicate a new role of Snf1p in regulation of sugar transport in K. lactis. PMID:15821131

  9. Prevention of Aerobic Spoilage of Maize Silage by a Genetically Modified Killer Yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, Defective in the Ability To Grow on Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, H. K.; Hasebe, A.; Ohmomo, S.; Suto, E. G.; Muraki, M.; Iimura, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we propose a new process of adding a genetically modified killer yeast to improve the aerobic stability of silage. Previously constructed Kluyveromyces lactis killer strain PCK27, defective in growth on lactic acid due to disruption of the gene coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key enzyme for gluconeogenesis, inhibited the growth of Pichia anomala inoculated as an aerobic spoilage yeast and prevented a rise in pH in a model of silage fermentation. This suppressive effect of PCK27 was not only due to growth competition but also due to the killer protein produced. From these results, we concluded that strain PCK27 can be used as an additive to prolong the aerobic stability of maize silage. In the laboratory-scale experiment of maize silage, the addition of a killer yeast changed the yeast flora and significantly reduced aerobic spoilage. PMID:10508111

  10. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of delignified lignocellulosic biomass at high solid loadings by a newly isolated thermotolerant Kluyveromyces sp. for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Narra, Madhuri; James, Jisha P; Balasubramanian, Velmurugan

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation studies were carried out using thermotolerant newly isolated Kluyveromyces sp. with three different delignified lignocellulosic biomass viz. rice straw, wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse at 5-15% solid loading and 6-12 FPU g(-1) substrate enzyme loading for different time intervals 0-72 h at 42°C. Maximum ethanol achieved from rice straw, wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse with in-house crude cellulases from Aspergillus terreus was 23.23, 18.29 and 17.91 mg mL(-1) at 60 h with 10% solid load and 9 FPU g(-1) substrate enzyme loading. Tween 80 1% (v/v) enhanced the ethanol yield by 8.39%, 9.26% and 8.14% in rice straw, wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse, respectively. External supplementation of β-glucosidase to the crude as well commercial cellulases produced maximum theoretical ethanol yield of 71.76%, 63.77%, 57.15% and 84.56%, 72.47%, 70.55% from rice straw, wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse, respectively.

  11. Establishing the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as an Expression Host for Production of the Saposin-Like Domain of the Aspartic Protease Cirsin

    PubMed Central

    Curto, Pedro; Lufrano, Daniela; Pinto, Cátia; Custódio, Valéria; Gomes, Ana Catarina; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Bakás, Laura; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra; Faro, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Typical plant aspartic protease zymogens comprise a characteristic and plant-specific insert (PSI). PSI domains can interact with membranes, and a role as a defensive weapon against pathogens has been proposed. However, the potential of PSIs as antimicrobial agents has not been fully investigated and explored yet due to problems in producing sufficient amounts of these domains in bacteria. Here, we report the development of an expression platform for the production of the PSI domain of cirsin in the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. We successfully generated K. lactis transformants expressing and secreting significant amounts of correctly processed and glycosylated PSI, as well as its nonglycosylated mutant. A purification protocol with protein yields of ∼4.0 mg/liter was established for both wild-type and nonglycosylated PSIs, which represents the highest reported yield for a nontagged PSI domain. Subsequent bioactivity assays targeting phytopathogenic fungi indicated that the PSI of cirsin is produced in a biologically active form in K. lactis and provided clear evidence for its antifungal activity. This yeast expression system thereby emerges as a promising production platform for further exploring the biotechnological potential of these plant saposin-like proteins. PMID:24123748

  12. Bioethanol production from sodium hydroxide/hydrogen peroxide-pretreated water hyacinth via simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with a newly isolated thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianu strain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinping; Wei, Zhilei; Wang, Qiaoping; He, Manman; Li, Shumei; Irbis, Chagan

    2015-10-01

    In this study, bioethanol production from NaOH/H2O2-pretreated water hyacinth was investigated. Pretreatment of water hyacinth with 1.5% (v/v) H2O2 and 3% (w/v) NaOH at 25 °C increased the production of reducing sugars (223.53 mg/g dry) and decreased the cellulose crystallinity (12.18%), compared with 48.67 mg/g dry and 22.80% in the untreated sample, respectively. The newly isolated Kluyveromyces marxianu K213 showed greater ethanol production from glucose (0.43 g/g glucose) at 45 °C than did the control Saccharomyces cerevisiae angel yeast. The maximum ethanol concentration (7.34 g/L) achieved with K. marxianu K213 by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) from pretreated water hyacinth at 42 °C was 1.78-fold greater than that produced by angel yeast S. cerevisiae at 30 °C. The present work demonstrates that bioethanol production achieved via SSF of NaOH/H2O2-pretreated water hyacinth with K. marxianu K213 is a promising strategy to utilize water hyacinth biomass.

  13. Deletion of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene KlZWF1 Affects both Fermentative and Respiratory Metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Saliola, Michele; Scappucci, Gina; De Maria, Ilaria; Lodi, Tiziana; Mancini, Patrizia; Falcone, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    In Kluyveromyces lactis, the pentose phosphate pathway is an alternative route for the dissimilation of glucose. The first enzyme of the pathway is the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), encoded by KlZWF1. We isolated this gene and examined its role. Like ZWF1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KlZWF1 was constitutively expressed, and its deletion led to increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide on glucose, but unlike the case for S. cerevisiae, the Klzwf1Δ strain had a reduced biomass yield on fermentative carbon sources as well as on lactate and glycerol. In addition, the reduced yield on glucose was associated with low ethanol production and decreased oxygen consumption, indicating that this gene is required for both fermentation and respiration. On ethanol, however, the mutant showed an increased biomass yield. Moreover, on this substrate, wild-type cells showed an additional band of activity that might correspond to a dimeric form of G6PDH. The partial dimerization of the G6PDH tetramer on ethanol suggested the production of an NADPH excess that was negative for biomass yield. PMID:17085636

  14. Growth kinetics and physiological behavior of co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, fermenting carob sugars extracted with whey.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B; Lima-Costa, M E; Constantino, A; Raposo, S; Felizardo, C; Gonçalves, D; Fernandes, T; Dionísio, L; Peinado, J M

    2016-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentation of carob waste sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) extracted with cheese whey, by co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis has been analyzed. Growth and fermentation of S. cerevisiae in the carob-whey medium showed an inhibition of about 30% in comparison with water-extracted carob. The inhibition of K. lactis on carob-whey was greater (70%) when compared with the whey medium alone, due to osmolarity problems. Oxygen availability was a very important factor for K. lactis, influencing its fermentation performance. When K. lactis was grown alone on carob-whey medium, lactose was always consumed first, and glucose and fructose were consumed afterwards, only at high aeration conditions. In co-culture with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis was completely inhibited and, at low aeration, died after 3 days; at high aeration this culture could survive but growth and lactose fermentation were only recovered after S. cerevisiae became stationary. To overcome the osmolarity and K. lactis' oxygen problems, the medium had to be diluted and a sequential fermentative process was designed in a STR-3l reactor. K. lactis was inoculated first and, with low aeration (0.13vvm), consumed all the lactose in 48h. Then S. cerevisiae was inoculated, consuming the total of the carob sugars, and producing ethanol in a fed-batch regime. The established co-culture with K. lactis increased S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerance. This fermentation process produced ethanol with good efficiency (80g/l final concentration and a conversion factor of 0.4g ethanol/g sugar), eliminating all the sugars of the mixed waste. These efficient fermentative results pointed to a new joint treatment of agro-industrial wastes which may be implemented successfully, with economic and environmental sustainability for a bioethanol industrial proposal.

  15. Growth kinetics and physiological behavior of co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, fermenting carob sugars extracted with whey.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B; Lima-Costa, M E; Constantino, A; Raposo, S; Felizardo, C; Gonçalves, D; Fernandes, T; Dionísio, L; Peinado, J M

    2016-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentation of carob waste sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) extracted with cheese whey, by co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis has been analyzed. Growth and fermentation of S. cerevisiae in the carob-whey medium showed an inhibition of about 30% in comparison with water-extracted carob. The inhibition of K. lactis on carob-whey was greater (70%) when compared with the whey medium alone, due to osmolarity problems. Oxygen availability was a very important factor for K. lactis, influencing its fermentation performance. When K. lactis was grown alone on carob-whey medium, lactose was always consumed first, and glucose and fructose were consumed afterwards, only at high aeration conditions. In co-culture with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis was completely inhibited and, at low aeration, died after 3 days; at high aeration this culture could survive but growth and lactose fermentation were only recovered after S. cerevisiae became stationary. To overcome the osmolarity and K. lactis' oxygen problems, the medium had to be diluted and a sequential fermentative process was designed in a STR-3l reactor. K. lactis was inoculated first and, with low aeration (0.13vvm), consumed all the lactose in 48h. Then S. cerevisiae was inoculated, consuming the total of the carob sugars, and producing ethanol in a fed-batch regime. The established co-culture with K. lactis increased S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerance. This fermentation process produced ethanol with good efficiency (80g/l final concentration and a conversion factor of 0.4g ethanol/g sugar), eliminating all the sugars of the mixed waste. These efficient fermentative results pointed to a new joint treatment of agro-industrial wastes which may be implemented successfully, with economic and environmental sustainability for a bioethanol industrial proposal. PMID:27542743

  16. Cysteine residues in the zinc finger and amino acids adjacent to the finger are necessary for DNA binding by the LAC9 regulatory protein of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Witte, M M; Dickson, R C

    1988-01-01

    LAC9 is a positive regulatory protein that controls transcription of the lactose-galactose regulon in Kluyveromyces lactis. LAC9 is homologous to the GAL4 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both proteins have a single "zinc finger" which plays a role in DNA binding. We previously hypothesized (L. V. Wray, M. M. Witte, R. C. Dickson, and M. I. Riley, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:1111-1121, 1987) that the DNA-binding domain of the LAC9 protein consisted of the zinc finger as well as a region of amino acids on the carboxyl-terminal side of the zinc finger. In this study we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to introduce 13 single-amino-acid changes into the proposed DNA-binding domain of the LAC9 protein. Variant LAC9 proteins carrying an amino acid substitution in any one of the four highly conserved Cys residues of the zinc finger had reduced DNA-binding activity, suggesting that each Cys is necessary for DNA binding. Three of four variant LAC9 proteins with amino acid substitutions located on the carboxyl-terminal side of the zinc finger had reduced DNA-binding activity. These results support our hypothesis that the DNA-binding domain of the LAC9 protein is composed of the zinc finger and the adjacent region on the carboxyl side of the zinc finger, a region that has the potential to form an alpha-helix. Finally, LAC9 proteins containing His residues substituted for the conserved Cys residues also had reduced DNA-binding activity, indicating that His residues are not equivalent to Cys residues, as had been previously thought. Images PMID:3146691

  17. Ineffective Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1p in Response to High Osmotic Stress in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Zavala, Nancy; Rodríguez-González, Miriam; Navarro-Olmos, Rocío; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Kawasaki, Laura; Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Coria, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    When treated with a hyperosmotic stimulus, Kluyveromyces lactis cells respond by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) K. lactis Hog1 (KlHog1) protein via two conserved branches, SLN1 and SHO1. Mutants affected in only one branch can cope with external hyperosmolarity by activating KlHog1p by phosphorylation, except for single ΔKlste11 and ΔKlste50 mutants, which showed high sensitivity to osmotic stress, even though the other branch (SLN1) was intact. Inactivation of both branches by deletion of KlSHO1 and KlSSK2 also produced sensitivity to high salt. Interestingly, we have observed that in ΔKlste11 and ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutants, which exhibit sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress, and contrary to what would be expected, KlHog1p becomes phosphorylated. Additionally, in mutants lacking both MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) present in K. lactis (KlSte11p and KlSsk2p), the hyperosmotic stress induced the phosphorylation and nuclear internalization of KlHog1p, but it failed to induce the transcriptional expression of KlSTL1 and the cell was unable to grow in high-osmolarity medium. KlHog1p phosphorylation via the canonical HOG pathway or in mutants where the SHO1 and SLN1 branches have been inactivated requires not only the presence of KlPbs2p but also its kinase activity. This indicates that when the SHO1 and SLN1 branches are inactivated, high-osmotic-stress conditions activate an independent input that yields active KlPbs2p, which, in turn, renders KlHog1p phosphorylation ineffective. Finally, we found that KlSte11p can alleviate the sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress displayed by a ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutant when it is anchored to the plasma membrane by adding the KlSho1p transmembrane segments, indicating that this chimeric protein can substitute for KlSho1p and KlSsk2p. PMID:26150414

  18. Ineffective Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1p in Response to High Osmotic Stress in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Zavala, Nancy; Rodríguez-González, Miriam; Navarro-Olmos, Rocío; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Kawasaki, Laura; Torres-Quiroz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    When treated with a hyperosmotic stimulus, Kluyveromyces lactis cells respond by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) K. lactis Hog1 (KlHog1) protein via two conserved branches, SLN1 and SHO1. Mutants affected in only one branch can cope with external hyperosmolarity by activating KlHog1p by phosphorylation, except for single ΔKlste11 and ΔKlste50 mutants, which showed high sensitivity to osmotic stress, even though the other branch (SLN1) was intact. Inactivation of both branches by deletion of KlSHO1 and KlSSK2 also produced sensitivity to high salt. Interestingly, we have observed that in ΔKlste11 and ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutants, which exhibit sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress, and contrary to what would be expected, KlHog1p becomes phosphorylated. Additionally, in mutants lacking both MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) present in K. lactis (KlSte11p and KlSsk2p), the hyperosmotic stress induced the phosphorylation and nuclear internalization of KlHog1p, but it failed to induce the transcriptional expression of KlSTL1 and the cell was unable to grow in high-osmolarity medium. KlHog1p phosphorylation via the canonical HOG pathway or in mutants where the SHO1 and SLN1 branches have been inactivated requires not only the presence of KlPbs2p but also its kinase activity. This indicates that when the SHO1 and SLN1 branches are inactivated, high-osmotic-stress conditions activate an independent input that yields active KlPbs2p, which, in turn, renders KlHog1p phosphorylation ineffective. Finally, we found that KlSte11p can alleviate the sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress displayed by a ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutant when it is anchored to the plasma membrane by adding the KlSho1p transmembrane segments, indicating that this chimeric protein can substitute for KlSho1p and KlSsk2p. PMID:26150414

  19. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food

    PubMed Central

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  20. 21 CFR 184.1685 - Rennet (animal-derived) and chymosin preparation (fermentation-derived).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., from a nonpathogenic and nontoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli K-12 containing the prochymosin gene... nontoxigenic strain of Kluyveromyces marxianus variety lactis, containing the prochymosin gene. The prochymosin... prochymosin gene. Chymosin is recovered from the fermentation broth after acid treatment. All materials...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1685 - Rennet (animal-derived) and chymosin preparation (fermentation-derived).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., from a nonpathogenic and nontoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli K-12 containing the prochymosin gene... nontoxigenic strain of Kluyveromyces marxianus variety lactis, containing the prochymosin gene. The prochymosin... prochymosin gene. Chymosin is recovered from the fermentation broth after acid treatment. All materials...

  2. Identification and assessment of kefir yeast potential for sugar/ethanol-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, M.G.C.P.; Cardoso, P.G.; Magalhães-Guedes, K.T.; Schwan, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular analysis was used for identification of different kefir yeasts species from Brazil, Canada and the United States of America. The sugar/ethanol-resistant activity of the yeasts was evaluated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus had the highest growth rates, suggesting biotechnological applications possible for these strains. PMID:24159292

  3. Galactokinase encoded by GAL1 is a bifunctional protein required for induction of the GAL genes in Kluyveromyces lactis and is able to suppress the gal3 phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J; Walker-Jonah, A; Hollenberg, C P

    1991-11-01

    We have analyzed a GAL1 mutant (gal1-r strain) of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis which lacks the induction of beta-galactosidase and the enzymes of the Leloir pathway in the presence of galactose. The data show that the K. lactis GAL1 gene product has, in addition to galactokinase activity, a function required for induction of the lactose system. This regulatory function is not dependent on galactokinase activity, as it is still present in a galactokinase-negative mutant (gal1-209). Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cervisiae show that K. lactis GAL1 and gal1-209, but not gal1-r, complement the gal3 mutation. We conclude that the regulatory function of GAL1 in K. lactis soon after induction is similar to the function of GAL3 in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1922058

  4. Unsaturated fatty acids-dependent linkage between respiration and fermentation revealed by deletion of hypoxic regulatory KlMGA2 gene in the facultative anaerobe-respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Ottaviano, Daniela; Montanari, Arianna; De Angelis, Lorenzo; Santomartino, Rosa; Visca, Andrea; Brambilla, Luca; Rinaldi, Teresa; Bello, Cristiano; Reverberi, Massimo; Bianchi, Michele M

    2015-08-01

    In the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the inactivation of structural or regulatory glycolytic and fermentative genes generates obligate respiratory mutants which can be characterized by sensitivity to the mitochondrial drug antimycin A on glucose medium (Rag(-) phenotype). Rag(-) mutations can occasionally be generated by the inactivation of genes not evidently related to glycolysis or fermentation. One such gene is the hypoxic regulatory gene KlMGA2. In this work, we report a study of the many defects, in addition to the Rag(-) phenotype, generated by KlMGA2 deletion. We analyzed the fermentative and respiratory metabolism, mitochondrial functioning and morphology in the Klmga2Δ strain. We also examined alterations in the regulation of the expression of lipid biosynthetic genes, in particular fatty acids, ergosterol and cardiolipin, under hypoxic and cold stress and the phenotypic suppression by unsaturated fatty acids of the deleted strain. Results indicate that, despite the fact that the deleted mutant strain had a typical glycolytic/fermentative phenotype and KlMGA2 is a hypoxic regulatory gene, the deletion of this gene generated defects linked to mitochondrial functions suggesting new roles of this protein in the general regulation and cellular fitness of K. lactis. Supplementation of unsaturated fatty acids suppressed or modified these defects suggesting that KlMga2 modulates membrane functioning or membrane-associated functions, both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial.

  5. A dual signalling pathway for the hypoxic expression of lipid genes, dependent on the glucose sensor Rag4, is revealed by the analysis of the KlMGA2 gene in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Micolonghi, Chiara; Ottaviano, Daniela; Di Silvio, Eva; Damato, Giuseppe; Heipieper, Hermann J; Bianchi, Michele M

    2012-07-01

    In the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, little is known about the factors regulating the metabolic response to oxygen shortage. After searching for homologues of characterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulators of the hypoxic response, we identified a gene that we named KlMGA2, which is homologous to MGA2. The deletion of KlMGA2 strongly reduced both the fermentative and respiratory growth rate and altered fatty acid composition and the unsaturation index of membranes. The reciprocal heterologous expression of MGA2 and KlMGA2 in the corresponding deletion mutant strains suggested that Mga2 and KlMga2 are functional homologues. KlMGA2 transcription was induced by hypoxia and the glucose sensor Rag4 mediated the hypoxic induction of KlMGA2. Transcription of lipid biosynthetic genes KlOLE1, KlERG1, KlFAS1 and KlATF1 was induced by hypoxia and was dependent on KlMga2, except for KlOLE1. Rag4 was required for hypoxic induction of transcription for both KlMga2-dependent (KlERG1) and KlMga2-independent (KlOLE1) structural genes.

  6. The immobilization of microbial cells, subcellular organelles, and enzymes in calcium alginate gels. Reprinted from Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Vol. XIX, No. 3, Pages 387-397 (1977).

    PubMed

    Kierstan, M; Bucke, C

    2000-03-20

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, Kluyveromyces marxianus cells, inulase, glucose oxidase, chloroplasts, and mitochondria were immobilized in calcium alginate gels. Ethanol production from glucose solutions by an immobilized preparation of S. cerevisiae was demonstrated over a total of twenty-three days, and the half-life of such a preparation was shown to be about ten days. Immobilized K. marxianus, inulase, and glucose oxidase preparations were used to demonstrate the porosity and retraining properties of calcium alginate gels. Calcium alginate-immobilized chloroplasts were shown to perform the Hill reaction. Some experiments with immobilized mitochondria are reported.

  7. Cloning, production, and functional expression of the bacteriocin sakacin A (SakA) and two SakA-derived chimeras in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and the yeasts Pichia pastoris and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan J; Borrero, Juan; Diep, Dzung B; Gútiez, Loreto; Nes, Ingolf F; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M; Hernández, Pablo E

    2013-09-01

    Mature sakacin A (SakA, encoded by sapA) and its cognate immunity protein (SakI, encoded by sapiA), and two SakA-derived chimeras mimicking the N-terminal end of mature enterocin P (EntP/SakA) and mature enterocin A (EntA/SakA) together with SakI, were fused to different signal peptides (SP) and cloned into the protein expression vectors pNZ8048 and pMG36c for evaluation of their production and functional expression by different lactic acid bacteria. The amount, antimicrobial activity, and specific antimicrobial activity of SakA and its chimeras produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000 depended on the SP and the expression vector. Only L. lactis NZ9000 (pNUPS), producing EntP/SakA, showed higher bacteriocin production and antimicrobial activity than the natural SakA-producer Lactobacillus sakei Lb706. The lower antimicrobial activity of the SakA-producer L. lactis NZ9000 (pNUS) and that of the EntA/SakA-producer L. lactis NZ9000 (pNUAS) could be ascribed to secretion of truncated bacteriocins. On the other hand, of the Lb. sakei Lb706 cultures transformed with the pMG36c-derived vectors only Lb. sakei Lb706 (pGUS) overproducing SakA showed a higher antimicrobial activity than Lb. sakei Lb706. Finally, cloning of SakA and EntP/SakA into pPICZαA and pKLAC2 permitted the production of SakA and EntP/SakA by recombinant Pichia pastoris X-33 and Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 derivatives although their antimicrobial activity was lower than expected from their production.

  8. Ethanol production from fodder beet

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaric, M.; Wieczorek, A.; Kliza, S.

    1983-07-01

    Various yeasts such as two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces diastaticus, and Kluyveromyces marxianus were investigated for their ability to ferment fodder beet juice to alcohol. Juice extracted from fodder beet roots without any additives was used as a fermentation substrate. The fermentation kinetic parameters were determined and compared for each species of yeast tested. The best species for fodder beet juice fermentation was chosen and products obtained by fermentation of one hectare of fodder beet plants are given. (Refs. 8).

  9. A new search for thermotolerant yeasts, its characterization and optimization using response surface methodology for ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Richa; Behera, Shuvashish; Sharma, Nilesh K.; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    The progressive rise in energy crisis followed by green house gas (GHG) emissions is serving as the driving force for bioethanol production from renewable resources. Current bioethanol research focuses on lignocellulosic feedstocks as these are abundantly available, renewable, sustainable and exhibit no competition between the crops for food and fuel. However, the technologies in use have some drawbacks including incapability of pentose fermentation, reduced tolerance to products formed, costly processes, etc. Therefore, the present study was carried out with the objective of isolating hexose and pentose fermenting thermophilic/thermotolerant ethanologens with acceptable product yield. Two thermotolerant isolates, NIRE-K1 and NIRE-K3 were screened for fermenting both glucose and xylose and identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 and K. marxianus NIRE-K3. After optimization using Face-centered Central Composite Design (FCCD), the growth parameters like temperature and pH were found to be 45.17°C and 5.49, respectively for K. marxianus NIRE-K1 and 45.41°C and 5.24, respectively for K. marxianus NIRE-K3. Further, batch fermentations were carried out under optimized conditions, where K. marxianus NIRE-K3 was found to be superior over K. marxianus NIRE-K1. Ethanol yield (Yx∕s), sugar to ethanol conversion rate (%), microbial biomass concentration (X) and volumetric product productivity (Qp) obtained by K. marxianus NIRE-K3 were found to be 9.3, 9.55, 14.63, and 31.94% higher than that of K. marxianus NIRE-K1, respectively. This study revealed the promising potential of both the screened thermotolerant isolates for bioethanol production. PMID:26388844

  10. A new search for thermotolerant yeasts, its characterization and optimization using response surface methodology for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Arora, Richa; Behera, Shuvashish; Sharma, Nilesh K; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    The progressive rise in energy crisis followed by green house gas (GHG) emissions is serving as the driving force for bioethanol production from renewable resources. Current bioethanol research focuses on lignocellulosic feedstocks as these are abundantly available, renewable, sustainable and exhibit no competition between the crops for food and fuel. However, the technologies in use have some drawbacks including incapability of pentose fermentation, reduced tolerance to products formed, costly processes, etc. Therefore, the present study was carried out with the objective of isolating hexose and pentose fermenting thermophilic/thermotolerant ethanologens with acceptable product yield. Two thermotolerant isolates, NIRE-K1 and NIRE-K3 were screened for fermenting both glucose and xylose and identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 and K. marxianus NIRE-K3. After optimization using Face-centered Central Composite Design (FCCD), the growth parameters like temperature and pH were found to be 45.17°C and 5.49, respectively for K. marxianus NIRE-K1 and 45.41°C and 5.24, respectively for K. marxianus NIRE-K3. Further, batch fermentations were carried out under optimized conditions, where K. marxianus NIRE-K3 was found to be superior over K. marxianus NIRE-K1. Ethanol yield (Y x∕s ), sugar to ethanol conversion rate (%), microbial biomass concentration (X) and volumetric product productivity (Q p ) obtained by K. marxianus NIRE-K3 were found to be 9.3, 9.55, 14.63, and 31.94% higher than that of K. marxianus NIRE-K1, respectively. This study revealed the promising potential of both the screened thermotolerant isolates for bioethanol production. PMID:26388844

  11. A new search for thermotolerant yeasts, its characterization and optimization using response surface methodology for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Arora, Richa; Behera, Shuvashish; Sharma, Nilesh K; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    The progressive rise in energy crisis followed by green house gas (GHG) emissions is serving as the driving force for bioethanol production from renewable resources. Current bioethanol research focuses on lignocellulosic feedstocks as these are abundantly available, renewable, sustainable and exhibit no competition between the crops for food and fuel. However, the technologies in use have some drawbacks including incapability of pentose fermentation, reduced tolerance to products formed, costly processes, etc. Therefore, the present study was carried out with the objective of isolating hexose and pentose fermenting thermophilic/thermotolerant ethanologens with acceptable product yield. Two thermotolerant isolates, NIRE-K1 and NIRE-K3 were screened for fermenting both glucose and xylose and identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 and K. marxianus NIRE-K3. After optimization using Face-centered Central Composite Design (FCCD), the growth parameters like temperature and pH were found to be 45.17°C and 5.49, respectively for K. marxianus NIRE-K1 and 45.41°C and 5.24, respectively for K. marxianus NIRE-K3. Further, batch fermentations were carried out under optimized conditions, where K. marxianus NIRE-K3 was found to be superior over K. marxianus NIRE-K1. Ethanol yield (Y x∕s ), sugar to ethanol conversion rate (%), microbial biomass concentration (X) and volumetric product productivity (Q p ) obtained by K. marxianus NIRE-K3 were found to be 9.3, 9.55, 14.63, and 31.94% higher than that of K. marxianus NIRE-K1, respectively. This study revealed the promising potential of both the screened thermotolerant isolates for bioethanol production.

  12. Yeast diversity in a traditional French cheese "Tomme d'orchies" reveals infrequent and frequent species with associated benefits.

    PubMed

    Ceugniez, Alexandre; Drider, Djamel; Jacques, Philippe; Coucheney, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    This study is aimed at unrevealing the yeast diversity of handmade cheese, Tomme d'orchies, produced and marketed in the north of France. A total of 185 yeast colonies were isolated from the surface and core of this cheese. From these, 80 morphologically different colonies were selected and subjected to rep-PCR analysis. The isolates were clustered into six distinct groups based on their DNA fingerprints. From each group, at least 30% of isolates were selected and identified to species level by biochemical characteristics (ID32C Api system) and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 26S rDNA regions. The isolates belonged to Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus, frequently isolated, and less frequently isolated Saturnispora mendoncae and Clavispora lusitaniae. Two isolates designated as Kluyveromyces lactis (isolate S-3-05) and Kluyveromyces marxianus (isolate S-2-05) were non-hemolytic, sensitive to antifungal compounds and able to inhibit the growth of pathogens including Candida albicans, Listeria monocytogenes and some bacilli.

  13. Dynamics of yeast immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors systems in ethanol fermentation from lactose-hydrolyzed whey and whey permeate.

    PubMed

    Gabardo, Sabrina; Pereira, Gabriela Feix; Klein, Manuela P; Rech, Rosane; Hertz, Plinho F; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of ethanol production on lactose-hydrolyzed whey (LHW) and lactose-hydrolyzed whey permeate (LHWP) in batch fluidized-bed bioreactors using single and co-cultures of immobilized cells of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-industrial strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Although the co-culture of S. cerevisiae CAT-1 and K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced two- to fourfold the ethanol productivity of single cultures of S. cerevisiae, the single cultures of the K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced the best results in both media (Y EtOH/S = 0.47-0.49 g g(-1) and Q P = 1.39-1.68 g L(-1) h(-1), in LHW and LHWP, respectively). Ethanol production on concentrated LHWP (180 g L(-1)) reached 79.1 g L(-1), with yields of 0.46 g g(-1) for K. marxianus CCT 4086 cultures. Repeated batches of fluidized-bed bioreactor on concentrated LHWP led to increased ethanol productivity, reaching 2.8 g L(-1) h(-1).

  14. Dynamics of yeast immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors systems in ethanol fermentation from lactose-hydrolyzed whey and whey permeate.

    PubMed

    Gabardo, Sabrina; Pereira, Gabriela Feix; Klein, Manuela P; Rech, Rosane; Hertz, Plinho F; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of ethanol production on lactose-hydrolyzed whey (LHW) and lactose-hydrolyzed whey permeate (LHWP) in batch fluidized-bed bioreactors using single and co-cultures of immobilized cells of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-industrial strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Although the co-culture of S. cerevisiae CAT-1 and K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced two- to fourfold the ethanol productivity of single cultures of S. cerevisiae, the single cultures of the K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced the best results in both media (Y EtOH/S = 0.47-0.49 g g(-1) and Q P = 1.39-1.68 g L(-1) h(-1), in LHW and LHWP, respectively). Ethanol production on concentrated LHWP (180 g L(-1)) reached 79.1 g L(-1), with yields of 0.46 g g(-1) for K. marxianus CCT 4086 cultures. Repeated batches of fluidized-bed bioreactor on concentrated LHWP led to increased ethanol productivity, reaching 2.8 g L(-1) h(-1). PMID:26527573

  15. Hydrolysis of whey lactose using CTAB-permeabilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manav B; Kumar, Harish

    2009-01-01

    Disposal of lactose in whey and whey permeates is one of the most significant problems with regard to economics and environmental impact faced by the dairy industries. The enzymatic hydrolysis of whey lactose to glucose and galactose by beta-galactosidase constitutes the basis of the most biotechnological processes currently developed to exploit the sugar content of whey. Keeping this in view, lactose hydrolysis in whey was performed using CTAB permeabilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells. Permeabilization of K. marxianus cells in relation to beta-galactosidase activity was carried out using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to avoid the problem of enzyme extraction. Different process parameters (biomass load, pH, temperature, and incubation time) were optimized to enhance the lactose hydrolysis in whey. Maximum hydrolysis (90.5%) of whey lactose was observed with 200 mg DW yeast biomass after 90 min of incubation period at optimum pH of 6.5 and temperature of 40 degrees C.

  16. Selection of thermotolerant yeasts for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, I; Ballesteros, M; Cabañas, A; Carrasco, J; Martín, C; Negro, M J; Saez, F; Saez, R

    1991-01-01

    A total of 27 yeast strains belonging to the groups Candida, Saccharomyces, and Kluyveromyces were screened for their ability to grow and ferment glucose at temperatures ranging 32-45 degrees C. K. marxianus and K. fragilis were found to be the best ethanol producing organisms at the higher temperature tested and, so, were selected for subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) studies. SSF experiments were performed at 42 and 45 degrees C, utilizing Solkafloc (10%) as cellulose substrate and a cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g substrate. Best results were achieved at 42 degrees C with K. marxianus L. G. and K. fragilis L. G., both of which produced close to 38 g/L ethanol and 0.5 ethanol yield, in 78 h.

  17. Selection of thermotolerant yeasts for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, I.; Ballesteros, M.; Cabanas, A.

    1991-12-31

    A total of 27 yeast strains belonging to the groups Candida, Saccharomyces, and Kluyveromyces were screened for their ability to grow and ferment glucose at temperatures ranging 32-45{degrees}C. K. marxianus and K. fragilis were found to be the best ethanol producing organisms at the higher temperature tested and, so, were selected for subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) studies. SSF experiments were performed at 42 and 45{degrees}C, utilizing Solkafloc (10%) as cellulose substrate and a cellulose loading of 15 FPU/g substrate. Best results were achieved at 42{degrees}C with K. marxianus L. G. and K. fragilis L. G., both of which produced close to 38 g/L ethanol and 0.5 ethanol yield, in 78 h.

  18. Fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from fermenting musts of Mezcal.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Fructanase and fructosyltransferase are interesting for the tequila process and prebiotics production (functional food industry). In this study, one hundred thirty non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from "Mezcal de Oaxaca" were screened for fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity. On solid medium, fifty isolates grew on Agave tequilana fructans (ATF), inulin or levan. In liquid media, inulin and ATF induced fructanase activities of between 0.02 and 0.27U/ml depending of yeast isolate. High fructanase activity on sucrose was observed for Kluyveromyces marxianus and Torulaspora delbrueckii, while the highest fructanase activity on inulin and ATF was observed for Issatchenkia orientalis, Cryptococcus albidus, and Candida apicola. Zygosaccharomyces bisporus and Candida boidinii had a high hydrolytic activity on levan. Sixteen yeasts belonging to K. marxianus, T. delbrueckii and C. apicola species were positive for fructosyltransferase activity. Mezcal microbiota proved to showed to be a source for new fructanase and fructosyltransferases with potential application in the tequila and food industry.

  19. Fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from fermenting musts of Mezcal.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Fructanase and fructosyltransferase are interesting for the tequila process and prebiotics production (functional food industry). In this study, one hundred thirty non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from "Mezcal de Oaxaca" were screened for fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity. On solid medium, fifty isolates grew on Agave tequilana fructans (ATF), inulin or levan. In liquid media, inulin and ATF induced fructanase activities of between 0.02 and 0.27U/ml depending of yeast isolate. High fructanase activity on sucrose was observed for Kluyveromyces marxianus and Torulaspora delbrueckii, while the highest fructanase activity on inulin and ATF was observed for Issatchenkia orientalis, Cryptococcus albidus, and Candida apicola. Zygosaccharomyces bisporus and Candida boidinii had a high hydrolytic activity on levan. Sixteen yeasts belonging to K. marxianus, T. delbrueckii and C. apicola species were positive for fructosyltransferase activity. Mezcal microbiota proved to showed to be a source for new fructanase and fructosyltransferases with potential application in the tequila and food industry. PMID:22336744

  20. The Bioconversion of Pretreated Cashew Apple Bagasse into Ethanol by SHF and SSF Processes.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tigressa Helena S; de Barros, Emanuel Meneses; de Sá Brígido, Jeferson; da Silva, Winne M; Rocha, Maria Valderez P; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha B

    2016-03-01

    Ethanol production from acidic-alkaline pretreated cashew apple bagasse (CAB-OH) was investigated using separated hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes. First, a screening of Kluyveromyces strains was conducted by SHF and a maximum ethanol concentration of 24.1 g L(-1) was obtained using Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC36907, which presented similar profiles when compared to results obtained by a Saccharomyces strain. The effect of temperature on ethanol production conducted by SHF using K. marxianus ATCC36907 was investigated, and the maximum ethanol yield (YE/G) was obtained at 40 °C (0.46 g g(-1)) using a synthetic medium. In the SHF using CAB-OH hydrolysate, the maximum ethanol concentration obtained was 24.9 g L(-1), 5.92 g L(-1) h(-1) of productivity, and ethanol yield of 0.43 g g(-1) at 40 °C. Afterwards, K. marxianus ATCC36907 was used in the bioconversion of CAB-OH by SSF, and an ethanol concentration of 41.41 ± 0.2 g L(-1) was obtained using 10 % CAB-OH at 40 °C, 150 rpm and 24 h, resulting in a Y'E/G of 0.50 gE gG (-1) and an efficiency of 98.4 %, in the process conducted with cellobiase supplementation. SHF and SSF processes using CAB-OH and K. marxianus ATCC36907 can be used to ethanol production, but the SSF process required only one step to achieve the same production. PMID:26634842

  1. A mathematical model of ethanol fermentation from cheese whey. II. Simulation and comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen-Jen; Bajpai, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    A cybernetic model for microbial growth on mixed substrates was used to simulate the anaerobic fermentation of cheese whey and multiple sugars in semisynthetic media by Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 397. The model simulations quite successfully predicted the observed behavior in batch and during transients in continuous operation, in single-substrate systems as well as in media involving multiple substrates, and in semisynthetic and reconstituted cheese whey solutions. The results of simulations and their comparison with the experimental data are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A new method to determine optimum temperature and activation energies for enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, M; Miłek, J

    2016-08-01

    A new method for determination of the optimum temperature and activation energies based on an idea of the average rate of enzymatic reaction has been developed. A mathematical model describing the effect of temperature on a dimensionless activity for enzyme deactivation following the first-order kinetics has been derived. The necessary condition for existence of the function extreme of the optimal temperature has been applied in the model. The developed method has been verified using the experimental data for inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus. PMID:27066801

  3. Optimization of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process using thermotolerant yeasts.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, I; Oliva, J M; Ballesteros, M; Carrasco, J

    1993-01-01

    Different treatments to improve the thermotolerance of fermenting yeasts for simultaneous ethanol saccharification and fermentation process of cellulosic materials have been examined. Yeasts of the genera Saccharomyces and Kluyveromyces were tested for growth and fermentation at progressively higher temperatures in the range of 42-47 degrees C. The best results were obtained with K. marxianus LG, which was then submitted to different treatments in order to achieve thermotolerant clones. A total of 35 new clones were obtained that dramatically improved the SSF of 10% Solka-floc substrate at 45 degrees C when compared to the original strain, some with ethanol concentrations as high as 33 g/L.

  4. A new method to determine optimum temperature and activation energies for enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, M; Miłek, J

    2016-08-01

    A new method for determination of the optimum temperature and activation energies based on an idea of the average rate of enzymatic reaction has been developed. A mathematical model describing the effect of temperature on a dimensionless activity for enzyme deactivation following the first-order kinetics has been derived. The necessary condition for existence of the function extreme of the optimal temperature has been applied in the model. The developed method has been verified using the experimental data for inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus.

  5. Appropriate sampling for intracellular amino acid analysis in five phylogenetically different yeasts.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Christoph J; Wittmann, Christoph

    2008-11-01

    Methanol quenching and fast filtration, the two most common sampling protocols in microbial metabolome analysis, were validated for intracellular amino acid analysis in phylogenetically different yeast strains comprising Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. With only few exceptions for selected amino acids, all yeasts exhibited negligible metabolite leakage during quenching with 60% cold buffered methanol. Slightly higher leakage was observed with increasing methanol content in the quenching solution. Fast filtration resulted in identical levels for intracellular amino acids in all strains tested. The results clearly demonstrate the validity of both approaches for leakage-free sampling of amino acids in yeast.

  6. Modeling the microbial growth and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Christian L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Salau, Nina P G

    2014-10-01

    Aiming to scale up and apply control and optimization strategies, currently is required the development of accurate plant models to forecast the process nonlinear dynamics. In this work, a mathematical model to predict the growth of the Kluyveromyces marxianus and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor for solid-state fermentation using sugarcane bagasse as substrate was built up. A parameter estimation technique was performed to fit the mathematical model to the experimental data. The estimated parameters and the model fitness were evaluated with statistical analyses. The results have shown the estimated parameters significance, with 95 % confidence intervals, and the good quality of process model to reproduce the experimental data.

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 secretes peptides that inhibit the growth of some non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, Helena; Francisco, Diana; Gori, Klaus; Arneborg, Nils; Gírio, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The nature of the toxic compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 that induce the early death of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii during mixed fermentations, as well as their ability to inhibit the growth of other non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains, was investigated. The killing effect of mixed supernatants towards H. guilliermondii was inactivated by protease treatments, thus revealing the proteinaceous nature of the toxic compounds. Analysis of the protein pattern of mixed supernatants on Tricine SDS-PAGE showed that this S. cerevisiae strain secretes peptides (<10 kDa), which were detected only when death of H. guilliermondii was already established. Death-inducing supernatants were ultrafiltrated by 10 and 2 kDa membranes, respectively, and the inhibitory effect of those permeates were tested in H. guilliermondii cultures. Results indicated that the (2-10) kDa protein fraction of those supernatants seemed to contain antimicrobial peptides active against H. guilliermondii. Thus, the (2-10) kDa protein fraction was concentrated and its inhibitory effect tested against strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans, Torulaspora delbrueckii and H. guilliermondii. Under the growth conditions used for these tests, the (2-10) kDa protein fraction of S. cerevisiae CCMI 885 supernatants exhibited a fungistatic effect against all the strains and a fungicidal effect against K. marxianus.

  8. Gene expression and biochemical analysis of cheese-ripening yeasts: focus on catabolism of L-methionine, lactate, and lactose.

    PubMed

    Cholet, Orianne; Hénaut, Alain; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2007-04-01

    DNA microarrays of 86 genes from the yeasts Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica were developed to determine which genes were expressed in a medium mimicking a cheese-ripening environment. These genes were selected for potential involvement in lactose/lactate catabolism and the biosynthesis of sulfur-flavored compounds. Hybridization conditions to follow specifically the expression of homologous genes belonging to different species were set up. The microarray was first validated on pure cultures of each yeast; no interspecies cross-hybridization was observed. Expression patterns of targeted genes were studied in pure cultures of each yeast, as well as in coculture, and compared to biochemical data. As expected, a high expression of the LAC genes of K. marxianus was observed. This is a yeast that efficiently degrades lactose. Several lactate dehydrogenase-encoding genes were also expressed essentially in D. hansenii and K. marxianus, which are two efficient deacidifying yeasts in cheese ripening. A set of genes possibly involved in l-methionine catabolism was also used on the array. Y. lipolytica, which efficiently assimilates l-methionine, also exhibited a high expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs BAT2 and ARO8, which are involved in the l-methionine degradation pathway. Our data provide the first evidence that the use of a multispecies microarray could be a powerful tool to investigate targeted metabolism and possible metabolic interactions between species within microbial cocultures. PMID:17308183

  9. Gene Expression and Biochemical Analysis of Cheese-Ripening Yeasts: Focus on Catabolism of l-Methionine, Lactate, and Lactose▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cholet, Orianne; Hénaut, Alain; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarrays of 86 genes from the yeasts Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica were developed to determine which genes were expressed in a medium mimicking a cheese-ripening environment. These genes were selected for potential involvement in lactose/lactate catabolism and the biosynthesis of sulfur-flavored compounds. Hybridization conditions to follow specifically the expression of homologous genes belonging to different species were set up. The microarray was first validated on pure cultures of each yeast; no interspecies cross-hybridization was observed. Expression patterns of targeted genes were studied in pure cultures of each yeast, as well as in coculture, and compared to biochemical data. As expected, a high expression of the LAC genes of K. marxianus was observed. This is a yeast that efficiently degrades lactose. Several lactate dehydrogenase-encoding genes were also expressed essentially in D. hansenii and K. marxianus, which are two efficient deacidifying yeasts in cheese ripening. A set of genes possibly involved in l-methionine catabolism was also used on the array. Y. lipolytica, which efficiently assimilates l-methionine, also exhibited a high expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs BAT2 and ARO8, which are involved in the l-methionine degradation pathway. Our data provide the first evidence that the use of a multispecies microarray could be a powerful tool to investigate targeted metabolism and possible metabolic interactions between species within microbial cocultures. PMID:17308183

  10. Physiological characterization of thermotolerant yeast for cellulosic ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniela A; de Souza, Carlos J A; Costa, Patrícia S; Rodrigues, Marina Q R B; dos Santos, Ancély F; Lopes, Mariana R; Genier, Hugo L A; Silveira, Wendel B; Fietto, Luciano G

    2014-04-01

    The conversion of lignocellulose into fermentable sugars is considered a promising alternative for increasing ethanol production. Higher fermentation yield has been achieved through the process of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). In this study, a comparison was performed between the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus for their potential use in SSF process. Three strains of S. cerevisiae were evaluated: two are widely used in the Brazilian ethanol industry (CAT-1 and PE-2), and one has been isolated based on its capacity to grow and ferment at 42 °C (LBM-1). In addition, we used thermotolerant strains of K. marxianus. Two strains were obtained from biological collections, ATCC 8554 and CCT 4086, and one strain was isolated based on its fermentative capacity (UFV-3). SSF experiments revealed that S. cerevisiae industrial strains (CAT-1 and PE-2) have the potential to produce cellulosic ethanol once ethanol had presented yields similar to yields from thermotolerant strains. The industrial strains are more tolerant to ethanol and had already been adapted to industrial conditions. Moreover, the study shows that although the K. marxianus strains have fermentative capacities similar to strains of S. cerevisiae, they have low tolerance to ethanol. This characteristic is an important target for enhancing the performance of this yeast in ethanol production.

  11. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Burris, N.; Woodward, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyes fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 hours to less than 60 hours. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production were determined. (Refs. 23).

  12. Fuel ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke stalks using different yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.; Bajpai, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    The inulin-type sugars present in the stalks of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) were extracted with hot water and were used as a substrate to produce fuel EtOH. Seven different yeasts were used to obtain batch kinetic data. The medium consisted of stalk extract from Jerusalem artichoke containing 7.3% total sugars, supplemented with 0.01% oleic acid, 0.01% corn steep liquor, and 0.05% Tween 80. All batch fermentations were carried out in a 1-L bioreactor at 35 degrees and pH 4.6, and the following parameters were measured as a function of time: total sugars, EtOH and biomass concentration, maximum specific growth rate, and biomass and EtOH yields. The best EtOH producer was Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 which gave an EtOH-to-sugar yield 97% of the theoretical maximum value, with almost 100% sugar utilization.

  13. Selection of Error-Less Synthetic Genes in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hoshida, Hisashi; Yarimizu, Tohru; Akada, Rinji

    2017-01-01

    Conventional gene synthesis is usually accompanied by sequence errors, which are often deletions derived from chemically synthesized oligonucleotides. Such deletions lead to frame shifts and mostly result in premature translational terminations. Therefore, in-frame fusion of a marker gene to the downstream of a synthetic gene is an effective strategy to select for frame-shift-free synthetic genes. Functional expression of fused marker genes indicates that synthetic genes are translated without premature termination, i.e., error-less synthetic genes. A recently developed nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated DNA cloning method in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is suitable for the selection of frame-shift-free synthetic genes. Transformation and NHEJ-mediated in-frame joining of a synthetic gene with a selection marker gene enables colony formation of only the yeast cells containing synthetic genes without premature termination. This method increased selection frequency of error-less synthetic genes by 3- to 12-fold. PMID:27671945

  14. The effect of different ethoxylations for sorbitan monolaurate on enhancing simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of wheat straw to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Badawi, A M; Fahmy, A A; Mohamed, Karima A; Noor El-Din, M R; Riad, M G

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, four nonionic surfactants with different hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) based on sorbitan monolaurate were synthesized by introducing ethylene oxide gas (n = 20, 40, 60, and 80 ethylene oxide units). The chemical structure of the prepared ethoxylated surfactants was confirmed using Fourier transform-infrared and (1)H NMR spectroscopes. The surface tension and thermodynamic properties of the prepared surfactants have been studied. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process for ethanol production from microwave/alkali pretreated wheat straw has been assayed using nonionic surfactants have different ethylene oxide units. Ethanol yield was 82% and 61% for Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, with the addition of 2.5 g/l of the prepared nonionic surfactant (HLB = 18.2). Results show that the production of ethanol from microwave/alkali pretreated wheat straw increased with increasing the (HLB) value of the nonionic surfactant. PMID:21984384

  15. [Research of UV-Induced Changes in the Structural and Functional Properties of Inulinases].

    PubMed

    Holyavka, M G; Narozhnaya, M N; Ostankova, I V; Artyukhov, V G

    2015-01-01

    UV-induced changes in the catalytic activity and radiuses of inulinases molecules from various producers (plants, fungy, yeast) are studied. It is established that specific enzymes activity and the sizes of inulinases molecules from Helianthus tuberosus and Kluyveromyces marxianus under the influence of UV-light in the ranges of doses 4530-6040 and 755-6040 J/m2, respectively, are subjected to changes more than structural and functional characteristics of inulinase fromAspergillus niger. It is probably connected with lower contents in it of aromatic amino acids such as tyrosine and phenylalanine. The most expressed loss of functional properties of inulinase from Helianthus tuberosus can be caused by the'existence of significantly more numbers of cysteine in plant fructan-exohydrolases in relation to microbic enzymes. A scheme for the stages of response of inulinases of various origins on the influence of UV-light in a certain range of radiation doses is offered. PMID:26601544

  16. Development of a hybrid fermentation-enzymatic bioprocess for the production of ethyl lactate from dairy waste.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Michalis; Menelaou, Maria; Nicolaou, Evrydiki N

    2014-08-01

    This work explores the potential for the development of a hybrid fermentation-enzymatic process for the production of ethyl lactate from dairy waste. Cheese whey was used in Kluyveromyces marxianus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus batch cultures to produce ethanol and lactic acid respectively. Subsequently, the fermentation products were transferred into an organic phase through liquid-liquid extraction and ethyl lactate was formed in an esterification reaction catalyzed by lipases. The production of ethanol and lactic acid achieved under different conditions was 23gL(-1) and 29gL(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the efficiency of various organic solvents for the esterification reaction was evaluated and toluene was chosen for application in the process. The effect of water content was determined aiming to maximize the product yield and 40mgml(-1) was the optimal enzyme concentration. The bioprocess achieved maximum conversion of 33% constituting a valuable alternative to the application of energy demanding chemically derived methods. PMID:24785788

  17. Cell lysis induced by membrane-damaging detergent saponins from Quillaja saponaria.

    PubMed

    Berlowska, Joanna; Dudkiewicz, Marta; Kregiel, Dorota; Czyzowska, Agata; Witonska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to determine the effect of Quillaja saponaria saponins on the lysis of industrial yeast strains. Cell lysis induced by saponin from Q. saponaria combined with the plasmolysing effect of 5% NaCl for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus yeasts biomass was conducted at 50 °C for 24-48 h. Membrane permeability and integrity of the yeast cells were monitored using fluorescent techniques and concentrations of proteins, free amino nitrogen (FAN) and free amino acids in resulting lysates were analyzed. Protein release was significantly higher in the case of yeast cell lysis promoted with 0.008% Q. saponaria and 5% NaCl in comparison to plasmolysis triggered by NaCl only. PMID:26047915

  18. Phytase-producing capacity of yeasts isolated from traditional African fermented food products and PHYPk gene expression of Pichia kudriavzevii strains.

    PubMed

    Greppi, Anna; Krych, Łukasz; Costantini, Antonella; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Arneborg, Nils; Cocolin, Luca; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-07-16

    Phytate is known as a strong chelate of minerals causing their reduced uptake by the human intestine. Ninety-three yeast isolates from traditional African fermented food products, belonging to nine species (Pichia kudriavzevii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Clavispora lusitaniae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Millerozyma farinosa, Candida glabrata, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii and Debaryomyces nepalensis) were screened for phytase production on solid and liquid media. 95% were able to grow in the presence of phytate as sole phosphate source, P. kudriavzevii being the best growing species. A phytase coding gene of P. kudriavzevii (PHYPk) was identified and its expression was studied during growth by RT-qPCR. The expression level of PHYPk was significantly higher in phytate-medium, compared to phosphate-medium. In phytate-medium expression was seen in the lag phase. Significant differences in gene expression were detected among the strains as well as between the media. A correlation was found between the PHYPk expression and phytase extracellular activity. PMID:25910031

  19. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; AbdulWahab, Atqah; Kolecka, Anna; Deshmukh, Anand; Meis, Jacques F; Boekhout, Teun

    2014-07-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species included Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Lindnera fabianii, Candida dubliniensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Candida intermedia, Pichia kudriavzevii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Clavispora lusitaniae, Candida pararugosa, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry provided correct identifications compared with molecular analysis testing of the same isolates. Low minimal inhibitory concentrations were found when isavuconazole and voriconazole were used for all uncommon yeast species evaluated in this study. Resistance to antifungal drugs was low and remained restricted to a few species. PMID:24934803

  20. A mathematical model of ethanol fermentation from cheese whey. I: Model development and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen-Jen; Bajpai, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    The cybernetic approach to modeling of microbial kinetics in a mixed-substrate environment has been used in this work for the fermentative production of ethanol from cheese whey. In this system, the cells grow on multiple substrates and generate metabolic energy during product formation. This article deals with the development of a mathematical model in which the concept of cell maintenance was modified in light of the specific nature of product formation. Continuous culture data for anaerobic production of ethanol by Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 397 on glucose and lactose were used to estimate the kinetic parameters for subsequent use in predicting the behavior of microbial growth and product formation in new situations. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Continuous ethanol fermentation of lactose by a recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, L.; Dantas, M.M.; Lima, N.; Teixeira, J.A.

    1999-09-20

    Alcohol fermentation of lactose was investigated using a recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cetevisiae, expressing the LAC4 (coding the {beta}-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Data on yeast fermentation and growth on a medium containing lactose as the sole carbon source are presented. In the range of studied lactose concentrations, total lactose consumption was observed with a conversion yield of ethanol close to the expected theoretical value. For the continuously operating bioreactor, an ethanol productivity of 11 g L{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1} (corresponding to a feed lactose concentration of 50 g L{sup {minus}1} and a dilution rate of 0.55 h{sup {minus}1}) was obtained, which is 7 times larger than the continuous conventional systems. The system stability was confirmed by keeping it in operation for 6 months.

  2. Application of Fenton's reaction to steam explosion prehydrolysates from poplar biomass.

    PubMed

    Oliva, J M; Manzanares, P; Ballesteros, I; Negro, M J; González, A; Ballesteros, M

    2005-01-01

    The application of Fenton's reaction to enhance the fermentability of prehydrolysates obtained from steam explosion pretreatment of poplar biomass was studied. Reaction conditions of temperature and H2O2 and Fe(II) concentrations were studied. The fermentability of prehydrolysate treated by Fenton's reaction was tested by using different inoculum sizes of thermotolerant strain Kluyveromyces marxianus CECT 10875. The highest percentages of toxic compound degradation (ranging from 71 to 93% removal) were obtained at the highest H2O2 concentration tested (50 mM). However, a negative effect on fermentability was observed at this H2O2 concentration at the lower inoculum loading. An increase in inoculum size to 0.6 g/L resulted in an enhanced ethanol fermentation yield of 95% relative to control.

  3. Construction of a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting lactose.

    PubMed

    Domingues, L; Teixeira, J A; Lima, N

    1999-05-01

    A flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with the ability to express both the LAC4 (coding for beta-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus was constructed. This recombinant strain is not only able to grow on lactose, but it can also ferment this substrate. To our knowledge this is the first time that a recombinant S. cervisiae has been found to ferment lactose in a way comparable to that of the existing lactose-fermenting yeast strains. Moreover, the flocculating capacity of the strain used in this work gives the process several advantages. On the one hand, it allows for operation in a continuous mode at high cell concentration, thus increasing the system's overall productivity; on the other hand, the biomass concentration in the effluent is reduced, thus decreasing product separation/purification costs. PMID:10390820

  4. Short communication: Identification and technological characterization of yeast strains isolated from samples of water buffalo Mozzarella cheese.

    PubMed

    Aponte, M; Pepe, O; Blaiotta, G

    2010-06-01

    Sixty yeast cultures were isolated from samples of water buffalo Mozzarella, a popular "pasta filata" cheese, originating on 16 farms located in the provinces of Salerno, Caserta, and Frosinone (Italy). Strains were identified by means of 5.8S internal transcribed spacer rDNA PCR-RFLP combined with 26S rRNA gene partial sequencing and characterized for their ability to exert biochemical properties of technological interest. The recorded dominance of fermenting yeasts such as the lactose-fermenting Kluyveromyces marxianus (38.3% of the total isolates) and the galactose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae (21.6% of the total isolates) suggests that these yeasts contribute to the organoleptic definition of the water buffalo Mozzarella. The speciographic analysis revealed the presence of 7 other species rarely or never reported in a dairy environment belonging to the genera Pichia and Candida, whose role in Mozzarella cheese organoleptic properties need to be further investigated.

  5. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production from cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jessyca Aline; Marques, José Edvan; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte

    2015-03-01

    The effect of combinations and ratios between different enzymes has been investigated in order to assess the optimal conditions for hydrolysis of cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (the solids named CAB-AHP). The separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes were evaluated in the ethanol production. The enzymatic hydrolysis conducted with cellulase complex and β-glucosidase in a ratio of 0.61:0.39, enzyme loading of 30FPU/g(CAB-AHP) and 66CBU/g(CAB-AHP), respectively, using 4% cellulose from CAB-AHP, turned out to be the most effective conditions, with glucose and xylose yields of 511.68 mg/g(CAB-AHP) and 237.8 mg/g(CAB-AHP), respectively. Fermentation of the pure hydrolysate by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 led to an ethanol yield of 61.8kg/ton(CAB), corresponding to 15 g/L ethanol and productivity of 3.75 g/( Lh). The ethanol production obtained for SSF process using K. marxianus ATCC 36907 was 18 g/L corresponding to 80% yield and 74.2kg/ton(CAB).

  6. Discarded oranges and brewer's spent grains as promoting ingredients for microbial growth by submerged and solid state fermentation of agro-industrial waste mixtures.

    PubMed

    Aggelopoulos, Theodoros; Bekatorou, Argyro; Pandey, Ashok; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2013-08-01

    The exploitation of various agro-industrial wastes for microbial cell mass production of Kluyveromyces marxianus, kefir, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reported in the present investigation. Specifically, the promotional effect of whole orange pulp on cell growth in mixtures consisting of cheese whey, molasses, and potato pulp in submerged fermentation processes was examined. A 2- to 3-fold increase of cell mass was observed in the presence of orange pulp. Likewise, the promotional effect of brewer's spent grains on cell growth in solid state fermentation of mixtures of whey, molasses, potato pulp, malt spent rootlets, and orange pulp was examined. The cell mass was increased by 3-fold for K. marxianus and 2-fold for S. cerevisiae in the presence of these substrates, proving their suitability for single-cell protein production without the need for extra nutrients. Cell growth kinetics were also studied by measurements of cell counts at various time intervals at different concentrations of added orange pulp. The protein content of the fermented substrates was increased substantially, indicating potential use of mixed agro-industrial wastes of negligible cost, as protein-enriched livestock feed, achieving at the same time creation of added value and waste minimization. PMID:23780341

  7. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production from cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jessyca Aline; Marques, José Edvan; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte

    2015-03-01

    The effect of combinations and ratios between different enzymes has been investigated in order to assess the optimal conditions for hydrolysis of cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (the solids named CAB-AHP). The separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes were evaluated in the ethanol production. The enzymatic hydrolysis conducted with cellulase complex and β-glucosidase in a ratio of 0.61:0.39, enzyme loading of 30FPU/g(CAB-AHP) and 66CBU/g(CAB-AHP), respectively, using 4% cellulose from CAB-AHP, turned out to be the most effective conditions, with glucose and xylose yields of 511.68 mg/g(CAB-AHP) and 237.8 mg/g(CAB-AHP), respectively. Fermentation of the pure hydrolysate by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 led to an ethanol yield of 61.8kg/ton(CAB), corresponding to 15 g/L ethanol and productivity of 3.75 g/( Lh). The ethanol production obtained for SSF process using K. marxianus ATCC 36907 was 18 g/L corresponding to 80% yield and 74.2kg/ton(CAB). PMID:25545094

  8. Structure-based Analyses Reveal Distinct Binding Sites for Atg2 and Phosphoinositides in Atg18*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Hayashi; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Noda, Nobuo N.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system by which cytoplasmic materials are enclosed by an autophagosome and delivered to a lysosome/vacuole. Atg18 plays a critical role in autophagosome formation as a complex with Atg2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P). However, little is known about the structure of Atg18 and its recognition mode of Atg2 or PtdIns(3)P. Here, we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces marxianus Hsv2, an Atg18 paralog, at 2.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a seven-bladed β-propeller without circular permutation. Mutational analyses of Atg18 based on the K. marxianus Hsv2 structure suggested that Atg18 has two phosphoinositide-binding sites at blades 5 and 6, whereas the Atg2-binding region is located at blade 2. Point mutations in the loops of blade 2 specifically abrogated autophagy without affecting another Atg18 function, the regulation of vacuolar morphology at the vacuolar membrane. This architecture enables Atg18 to form a complex with Atg2 and PtdIns(3)P in parallel, thereby functioning in the formation of autophagosomes at autophagic membranes. PMID:22851171

  9. Utilization of Cheese Whey Using Synergistic Immobilization of β-Galactosidase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Dual Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kokkiligadda, Anusha; Beniwal, Arun; Saini, Priyanka; Vij, Shilpa

    2016-08-01

    Whey is a byproduct of the dairy industry, which has prospects of using as a source for production of various valuable compounds. The lactose present in whey is considered as an environmental pollutant and its utilization for enzyme and fuel production, may be effective for whey bioremediation. The dairy yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus have the ability to utilize lactose sharply as the major carbon source for the production of the enzyme. Five strains were tested for the production of the β-galactosidase using whey. The maximum β-galactosidase activity of 1.74 IU/mg dry weight was achieved in whey using K. marxianus MTCC 1389. The biocatalyst was further immobilized on chitosan macroparticles and exhibited excellent functional activity at 35 °C. Almost 89 % lactose hydrolysis was attained for concentrated whey (100 g/L) and retained 89 % catalytic activity after 15 cycles of reuse. Finally, β-galactosidase was immobilized on chitosan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on calcium alginate, and both were used together for the production of ethanol from concentrated whey. Maximal ethanol titer of 28.9 g/L was achieved during fermentation at 35 °C. The conclusions generated by employing two different matrices will be beneficial for the future modeling using engineered S. cerevisiae in scale-up studies. PMID:27059625

  10. Production of bioactive protein hydrolysate using the yeasts isolated from soft chhurpi.

    PubMed

    Rai, Amit Kumar; Kumari, Reena; Sanjukta, Samurailatpam; Sahoo, Dinabandhu

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the production of bioactive protein hydrolysates using yeasts isolated from chhurpi. For this, a total of 125 proteolytic yeasts were isolated and molecular identification was carried out by analysis of the restriction digestion pattern generated by digesting the PCR amplified internal transcribed spacer region and 5.8S rRNA gene (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) using three endonucleases (HaeIII, CfoI and HinfI). The results obtained showed that different proteolytic yeasts were dominant in marketed products (Kluyveromyces marxianus and Issatchenkia orientalis) and samples from production centers (Trichosporon asahii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Exophiala dermatitidis). Proteolytic strains in individual groups showed their ability to hydrolyze milk protein and enhance antioxidant property. Among the isolates, fermentation using K. marxianus YMP45 and S. cerevisiae YAM14 resulted in higher antioxidant activity. This is the first report on application of yeast isolated from fermented food of North-East India for the production of bioactive protein hydrolysate. PMID:27494105

  11. Utilization of Cheese Whey Using Synergistic Immobilization of β-Galactosidase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Dual Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kokkiligadda, Anusha; Beniwal, Arun; Saini, Priyanka; Vij, Shilpa

    2016-08-01

    Whey is a byproduct of the dairy industry, which has prospects of using as a source for production of various valuable compounds. The lactose present in whey is considered as an environmental pollutant and its utilization for enzyme and fuel production, may be effective for whey bioremediation. The dairy yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus have the ability to utilize lactose sharply as the major carbon source for the production of the enzyme. Five strains were tested for the production of the β-galactosidase using whey. The maximum β-galactosidase activity of 1.74 IU/mg dry weight was achieved in whey using K. marxianus MTCC 1389. The biocatalyst was further immobilized on chitosan macroparticles and exhibited excellent functional activity at 35 °C. Almost 89 % lactose hydrolysis was attained for concentrated whey (100 g/L) and retained 89 % catalytic activity after 15 cycles of reuse. Finally, β-galactosidase was immobilized on chitosan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on calcium alginate, and both were used together for the production of ethanol from concentrated whey. Maximal ethanol titer of 28.9 g/L was achieved during fermentation at 35 °C. The conclusions generated by employing two different matrices will be beneficial for the future modeling using engineered S. cerevisiae in scale-up studies.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic diversity of yeasts isolated from water-buffalo Mozzarella cheese.

    PubMed

    Suzzi, G; Lombardi, A; Lanorte, M T; Caruso, M; Andrighetto, C; Gardini, F

    2000-01-01

    Water-buffalo Mozzarella (WBM) cheese is one of the several 'pasta filata' or stretched curd cheeses that originated in southern Italy, traditionally manufactured from raw milk employing natural whey starter cultures. Lactose- and galactose-fermenting yeasts isolated from WBM were studied to evaluate their role in the ripening of this cheese. The kinetic parameters of the growth of the yeasts as well as their principal metabolic end-products showed a great variability depending on the species. Moreover, the genetic polymorphism of the yeasts was studied for their differentiation at species level by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis. While the differentiation based on metabolic traits was not able to discriminate Kluyveromyces marxianus, Candida kefyr and C. sphaerica, the PCR analysis with primers M13 and RF2 resulted in a reliable and rapid method for differentiating at species level Saccharomyces cerevisiae, K. marxianus, K. lactis and their anamorphic species. Furthermore, mtDNA analysis proved to be more discriminating at strain level.

  13. Yeast communities associated with artisanal mezcal fermentations from Agave salmiana.

    PubMed

    Verdugo Valdez, A; Segura Garcia, L; Kirchmayr, M; Ramírez Rodríguez, P; González Esquinca, A; Coria, R; Gschaedler Mathis, A

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this work were to characterize the fermentation process of mezcal from San Luis Potosi, México and identify the yeasts present in the fermentation using molecular culture-dependent methods (RFLP of the 5.8S-ITS and sequencing of the D1/D2 domain) and also by using a culture-independent method (DGGE). The alcoholic fermentations of two separate musts obtained from Agave salmiana were analyzed. Sugar, ethanol and major volatile compounds concentrations were higher in the first fermentation, which shows the importance of having a quality standard for raw materials, particularly in the concentration of fructans, in order to produce fermented Agave salmiana must with similar characteristics. One hundred ninety-two (192) different yeast colonies were identified, from those present on WL agar plates, by RFLP analysis of the ITS1-5.8S- ITS2 from the rRNA gene, with restriction endonucleases, HhaI, HaeIII and HinfI. The identified yeasts were: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia kluyveri, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Candida ethanolica and Saccharomyces exiguus. These identifications were confirmed by sequencing the D1-D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. With the PCR-DGGE method, bands corresponding to S. cerevisiae, K. marxianus and T. delbrueckii were clearly detected, confirming the results obtained with classic techniques.

  14. Susceptibility of species within the Sporothrix schenckii complex to a panel of killer yeasts.

    PubMed

    Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; Heidrich, Daiane; Sorrentino, Julia Medeiros; Vieira, Fabiane Jamono; Landell, Melissa Fontes; Valente, Patrícia; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2014-06-01

    The Sporothrix schenckii complex is the etiologic agent of sporotrichosis, a subacute or chronic mycosis which can affect humans and animals. Killer yeasts have been used in the medical field for development of novel antimycotics and biotyping of pathogenic fungi. The action of 18 killer yeasts on the growth of 88 characterized S. schenckii, Sporothrix globosa, Sporothrix brasiliensis, and Sporothrix mexicana clinical and environmental isolates was evaluated. Killer studies were performed on Petri dishes containing cheese black starch agar. The yeasts Candida catenulata (QU26, QU31, QU127, LV102); Trichosporon faecale (QU100); Trichosporon japonicum (QU139); Kluyveromyces lactis (QU30, QU99, QU73); Kazachstania unispora (QU49), Trichosporon insectorum (QU89), and Kluyveromyces marxianus (QU103) showed activity against all strains of the S. schenckii complex tested. Observation by optical microscopy of S. brasiliensis 61 within the inhibition haloes around the colonies of the killer yeasts QU100, QU139, and LV102 showed that there was no conidiation, but there was hyphal proliferation. The toxins were fungistatic against S. brasiliensis 61. There was no difference in susceptibility to the toxins among the S. schenckii species complex. Further investigations are necessary to clearly establish the mechanism of action of the toxins.

  15. Yeasts from Water Buffalo Mozzarella, a traditional cheese of the Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    Romano, P; Ricciardi, A; Salzano, G; Suzzi, G

    2001-09-19

    Countries of the Mediterranean area are characterized by production of artisanal cheeses, obtained from goat, sheep, cow and buffalo raw milk. The numbers and species of yeasts in the different cheeses are variable, but some species are more frequently detected than others. Kluyveromyces marxianus, K. lactis with their anamorph, Candida kefir, Debaryomyces hansenii and C. famata, C. colliculosa and C. catenulata are dominant species in several cheeses. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often detected in pasta filata cheeses, such as Water Buffalo Mozzarella (WBM) or Cacio Cavallo Podolico. Recently, a comprehensive study of yeasts isolated from Mozzarella cheese produced in Basilicata (Southern Italy) has been carried out. The study has focused on lactose and/or galactose fermenting species (Kluyveromyces and Saccharomyces) to evaluate their role on the functional and sensory properties of the product. End products in milk were evaluated and the biodiversity in terms of production of sulphur dioxide, higher alcohols, ethyl acetate, and acetaldehyde was studied. In particular, S. cerevisiae strains from Water Buffalo Mozzarella cheese, compared to strains isolated from different habitats, such as wine, exhibited considerable difference in the production of some volatile compounds. The diversity observed could be related to the particular microhabitat of S. cerevisiae occurring in whey cheese of water buffalo milk. PMID:11589559

  16. Progress in the microbial production of S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hailong; Wang, Zhilai; Cai, Haibo; Zhou, Changlin

    2016-09-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), which exists in all living organisms, serves as an activated group donor in a range of metabolic reactions, including trans-methylation, trans-sulfuration and trans-propylamine. Compared with its chemical synthesis and enzyme catalysis production, the microbial production of SAM is feasible for industrial applications. The current clinical demand for SAM is constantly increasing. Therefore, vast interest exists in engineering the SAM metabolism in cells for increasing product titers. Here, we provided an overview of updates on SAM microbial productivity improvements with an emphasis on various strategies that have been used to enhance SAM production based on increasing the precursor and co-factor availabilities in microbes. These strategies included the sections of SAM-producing microbes and their mutant screening, optimization of the fermentation process, and the metabolic engineering. The SAM-producing strains that were used extensively were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Candida utilis, Scheffersomyces stipitis, Kluyveromyces lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Escherichia coli, in addition to others. The optimization of the fermentation process mainly focused on the enhancement of the methionine, ATP, and other co-factor levels through pulsed feeding as well as the optimization of nitrogen and carbon sources. Various metabolic engineering strategies using precise control of gene expression in engineered strains were also highlighted in the present review. In addition, some prospects on SAM microbial production were discussed. PMID:27465853

  17. Yeasts from Water Buffalo Mozzarella, a traditional cheese of the Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    Romano, P; Ricciardi, A; Salzano, G; Suzzi, G

    2001-09-19

    Countries of the Mediterranean area are characterized by production of artisanal cheeses, obtained from goat, sheep, cow and buffalo raw milk. The numbers and species of yeasts in the different cheeses are variable, but some species are more frequently detected than others. Kluyveromyces marxianus, K. lactis with their anamorph, Candida kefir, Debaryomyces hansenii and C. famata, C. colliculosa and C. catenulata are dominant species in several cheeses. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often detected in pasta filata cheeses, such as Water Buffalo Mozzarella (WBM) or Cacio Cavallo Podolico. Recently, a comprehensive study of yeasts isolated from Mozzarella cheese produced in Basilicata (Southern Italy) has been carried out. The study has focused on lactose and/or galactose fermenting species (Kluyveromyces and Saccharomyces) to evaluate their role on the functional and sensory properties of the product. End products in milk were evaluated and the biodiversity in terms of production of sulphur dioxide, higher alcohols, ethyl acetate, and acetaldehyde was studied. In particular, S. cerevisiae strains from Water Buffalo Mozzarella cheese, compared to strains isolated from different habitats, such as wine, exhibited considerable difference in the production of some volatile compounds. The diversity observed could be related to the particular microhabitat of S. cerevisiae occurring in whey cheese of water buffalo milk.

  18. Bioethanol production from Scenedesmus obliquus sugars: the influence of photobioreactors and culture conditions on biomass production.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J R; Passarinho, P C; Gouveia, L

    2012-10-01

    A closed-loop vertical tubular photobioreactor (PBR), specially designed to operate under conditions of scarce flat land availability and irregular solar irradiance conditions, was used to study the potential of Scenedesmus obliquus biomass/sugar production. The results obtained were compared to those from an open-raceway pond and a closed-bubble column. The influence of the type of light source and the regime (natural vs artificial and continuous vs light/dark cycles) on the growth of the microalga and the extent of the sugar accumulation was studied in both PBRs. The best type of reactor studied was a closed-loop PBR illuminated with natural light/dark cycles. In all the cases, the relationship between the nitrate depletion and the sugar accumulation was observed. The microalga Scenedesmus was cultivated for 53 days in a raceway pond (4,500 L) and accumulated a maximum sugar content of 29 % g/g. It was pre-treated for carrying out ethanol fermentation assays, and the highest ethanol concentration obtained in the hydrolysate fermented by Kluyveromyces marxianus was 11.7 g/L. PMID:22899495

  19. Yeast Biomass Production in Brewery's Spent Grains Hemicellulosic Hydrolyzate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Luís C.; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Lopes, Sónia; Neves, Ines; Gírio, Francisco M.

    Yeast single-cell protein and yeast extract, in particular, are two products which have many feed, food, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological applications. However, many of these applications are limited by their market price. Specifically, the yeast extract requirements for culture media are one of the major technical hurdles to be overcome for the development of low-cost fermentation routes for several top value chemicals in a biorefinery framework. A potential biotechnical solution is the production of yeast biomass from the hemicellulosic fraction stream. The growth of three pentose-assimilating yeast cell factories, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Pichia stipitis was compared using non-detoxified brewery's spent grains hemicellulosic hydrolyzate supplemented with mineral nutrients. The yeasts exhibited different specific growth rates, biomass productivities, and yields being D. hansenii as the yeast species that presented the best performance, assimilating all sugars and noteworthy consuming most of the hydrolyzate inhibitors. Under optimized conditions, D. hansenii displayed a maximum specific growth rate, biomass yield, and productivity of 0.34 h-1, 0.61 g g-1, and 0.56 g 1-1 h-1, respectively. The nutritional profile of D. hansenii was thoroughly evaluated, and it compares favorably to others reported in literature. It contains considerable amounts of some essential amino acids and a high ratio of unsaturated over saturated fatty acids.

  20. Utilization and Transport of L-Arabinose by Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Franden, M. A.; Stambuk, B. U.; Zhang, M.; Singh, A.

    2009-01-01

    L-Arabinose is one of the sugars found in hemicellulose, a major component of plant cell walls. The ability to convert L-arabinose to ethanol would improve the economics of biomass to ethanol fermentations. One of the limitations for L-arabinose fermentation in the current engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is poor transport of the sugar. To better understand L-arabinose transport and use in yeasts and to identify a source for efficient L-arabinose transporters, 165 non-Saccharomyces yeast strains were studied. These yeast strains were arranged into six groups based on the minimum time required to utilize 20 g/L of L-arabinose. Initial transport rates of L-arabinose were determined for several species and a more comprehensive transport study was done in four selected species. Detailed transport kinetics in Arxula adeninivorans suggested both low and high affinity components while Debaryomyces hansenii var. fabryii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii possessed a single component, high affinity active transport systems.

  1. Isolation of thermotolerant ethanologenic yeasts and use of selected strains in industrial scale fermentation in an Egyptian distillery.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, W R; Fadil, M; Nigam, P; Banat, I M

    2000-06-01

    An enrichment and isolation program for new ethanol-producing thermotolerant yeasts as well as a screening program of some known thermotolerant strains resulted in the selection of several strains capable of growth at 40-43 degrees C. Among these strains four grew and fermented sugar cane molasses at 43 degrees C under batch conditions with sugar-conversion efficiencies >94% and ethanol concentrations 6.8-8.0% (w/v). The two best-performing strains, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae F111 and a Kluyveromyces marxianus WR12 were used in eight 87.5 m(3) fermentation runs (four using each strain) for industrial ethanol production in an Egyptian distillery using sugar cane molasses. Mean ethanol production was 7.7% and 7.4% (w/v), respectively, with an added advantage of cooling elimination during fermentation and higher ethanol yields compared to the distillery's S. cerevisiae SIIC (ATCC 24855) strain in use. The isolate S. cerevisiae F111 was subsequently adopted by the distillery for regular production with significant economical gains and water conservation.

  2. The influence of presaccharification, fermentation temperature and yeast strain on ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos J A; Costa, Daniela A; Rodrigues, Marina Q R B; dos Santos, Ancély F; Lopes, Mariana R; Abrantes, Aline B P; dos Santos Costa, Patrícia; Silveira, Wendel Batista; Passos, Flávia M L; Fietto, Luciano G

    2012-04-01

    Ethanol can be produced from cellulosic biomass in a process known as simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The presence of yeast together with the cellulolytic enzyme complex reduces the accumulation of sugars within the reactor, increasing the ethanol yield and saccharification rate. This paper reports the isolation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae LBM-1, a strain capable of growth at 42 °C. In addition, S. cerevisiae LBM-1 and Kluyveromyces marxianus UFV-3 were able to ferment sugar cane bagasse in SSF processes at 37 and 42 °C. Higher ethanol yields were observed when fermentation was initiated after presaccharification at 50°C than at 37 or 42° C. Furthermore, the volumetric productivity of fermentation increased with presaccharification time, from 0.43 g/L/h at 0 h to 1.79 g/L/h after 72 h of presaccharification. The results suggest that the use of thermotolerant yeasts and a presaccharification stage are key to increasing yields in this process.

  3. Enhancement of ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of rice straw using ethoxylated span 20.

    PubMed

    Badawi, A M; Fahmy, A A; Mohamed, Karima A; Noor El-Din, M R; Riad, M G

    2012-01-01

    In this work, four nonionic surfactants based on sorbitan monolaurate (Span 20) were synthesized by introducing ethylene oxide gas (n = 20, 40, 60, 80 ethylene oxide units) into Span 20 to give four new surfactants with different hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB), namely, E(20), E(40), E(60), and E(80). The structures of the prepared nonionic surfactants were elucidated using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The surface-tension measurements were recorded. The effects of the prepared nonionic surfactants on the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of microwave/alkali-pretreated rice straw to produce ethanol were investigated. From the obtained data, it was found that the addition of the nonionic surfactants at 2.5 g/L had a positive effect on SSF. The maximum ethanol yield (76 and 55%) was obtained after 72 hr for rice straw using Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. Also, it was found that the ethanol yield increases with increasing HLB of the prepared nonionic surfactants by increasing ethylene oxide units. The adsorption of nonionic surfactants on lignocelluloses is proposed to be due to hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions between nonionic surfactants and the lignin part in the lignocelulose. It can be concluded that additions of surface-active compounds, such as nonionic surfactants, increase enzymatic conversion of rice straw for bioethanol purposes. PMID:22239707

  4. Determination of yeast diversity in ogi, mawè, gowé and tchoukoutou by using culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    PubMed

    Greppi, Anna; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Padonou, Wilfrid; Hounhouigan, Joseph; Jespersen, Lene; Jakobsen, Mogens; Cocolin, Luca

    2013-07-15

    The maize based ogi and mawè and the sorghum based gowé and tchoukoutou are traditional, spontaneously fermented products widely consumed by the population of Benin (West Africa). Yeast occurrence in the products, as sold on local markets at different locations, was studied using a combination of culture-dependent and independent methods. Number of yeasts is varied from 3.75 log10 colony forming units (cfu)/g for ogi to 5.60 log10 cfu/g for tchoukoutou. Isolated yeasts (236) were identified based on different migration profiles on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 26S rRNA gene sequencing. Candida krusei was the yeast most frequently isolated with strongest predominance in the maize based products. Other predominant yeast present at equal or lower incidence were Clavispora lusitaniae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in ogi and mawè, Cl. lusitaniae, Candida tropicalis and Kluyveromyces marxianus in gowè and Cl. lusitaniae, S. cerevisiae and Candida rugosa in tchoukoutou. Grouping of C. krusei isolates (164) by rep-PCR analysis indicated that several biotypes were involved in fermentation of the four products. The DGGE analysis on the DNA directly extracted from the food matrices demonstrated the presence of Dekkera bruxellensis and Debaryomyces hansenii, not detected by the culture-based approach. This is the first study combining culture-dependent and independent methods to reveal predominant yeast species and biotypes in traditional foods from Benin.

  5. Bioethanol production from Scenedesmus obliquus sugars: the influence of photobioreactors and culture conditions on biomass production.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J R; Passarinho, P C; Gouveia, L

    2012-10-01

    A closed-loop vertical tubular photobioreactor (PBR), specially designed to operate under conditions of scarce flat land availability and irregular solar irradiance conditions, was used to study the potential of Scenedesmus obliquus biomass/sugar production. The results obtained were compared to those from an open-raceway pond and a closed-bubble column. The influence of the type of light source and the regime (natural vs artificial and continuous vs light/dark cycles) on the growth of the microalga and the extent of the sugar accumulation was studied in both PBRs. The best type of reactor studied was a closed-loop PBR illuminated with natural light/dark cycles. In all the cases, the relationship between the nitrate depletion and the sugar accumulation was observed. The microalga Scenedesmus was cultivated for 53 days in a raceway pond (4,500 L) and accumulated a maximum sugar content of 29 % g/g. It was pre-treated for carrying out ethanol fermentation assays, and the highest ethanol concentration obtained in the hydrolysate fermented by Kluyveromyces marxianus was 11.7 g/L.

  6. Yeast ecology in French cider and black olive natural fermentations.

    PubMed

    Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Levert, Delphine; Casaregola, Serge; Sohier, Danièle

    2006-04-15

    In this study, rDNA ITS restriction analysis was used to identify yeasts from two naturally fermented products: French ciders and black olives. In cider musts and bottled ciders, the PCR-RFLP method generated 15 different ITS/RFLP profiles for a total of 208 isolates. The predominant yeasts corresponded to Saccharomyces bayanus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lachancea cidri and Dekkera anomala. Three identified species: Candida sake, Candida tropicalis and Kluyveromyces marxianus had never been described before in ciders. For the black olive fermentation, the method allowed for identification of 11 profiles for a total of 137 isolates. A sequential apparition of yeasts was observed with Pichia anomala, Candida boidinii and Debaryomyces etchellsii being the predominant species. Four isolates did not correspond to any known species based on the sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. By using the rDNA ITS method, valuable information on yeast population biodiversity and dynamics in the naturally fermented food products studied was obtained. PMID:16380183

  7. Isolation and characterisation of lactic acid bacteria from donkey milk.

    PubMed

    Soto Del Rio, Maria de Los Dolores; Andrighetto, Christian; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Lombardi, Angiolella; Civera, Tiziana; Bottero, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    During the last years the interest in donkey milk has increased significantly mainly because of its compelling functional elements. Even if the composition and nutritional properties of donkey milk are known, its microbiota is less studied. This Research Communication aimed to provide a comprehensive characterisation of the lactic acid bacteria in raw donkey milk. RAPD-PCR assay combined with 16S rDNA sequencing analysis were used to describe the microbial diversity of several donkey farms in the North West part of Italy. The more frequently detected species were: Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactococcus lactis and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. Less abundant genera were Leuconostoc, Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was also isolated. The bacterial and biotype distribution notably diverged among the farms. Several of the found species, not previously detected in donkey milk, could have an important probiotic activity and biotechnological potential. This study represents an important insight to the ample diversity of the microorganisms present in the highly selective ecosystem of raw donkey milk. PMID:27600975

  8. Yeasts from Colombian Kumis as source of peptides with Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity in milk.

    PubMed

    Chaves-López, Clemencia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-09-17

    This study investigated the possibility of using yeast strains in fermented milks to obtain products with high Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and low bitter taste. Ninety-three yeast strains isolated from Colombian Kumis in different geographic regions were molecularly identified, and their milk fermentation performances were determined. Molecular identification evidenced that Galactomyces geotrichum, Pichia kudriavzevii, Clavispora lusitaniae and Candida tropicalis, were the dominant species. Eighteen out of 93 strains produced fermented milk with ACE-inhibitory (ACEI) activity values ranging from 8.69 to 88.19%. Digestion of fermented milk samples by pepsin and pancreatin demonstrated an increase in ACEI activity, with C. lusitaniae KL4A as the best producer of ACEI peptides. Moreover, sensory analysis of the products containing the major ACE-inhibitory activity pointed out that P. kudriavzevii KL84A and Kluyveromyces marxianus KL26A could be selected as potential adjunct starter cultures in Kumis, since they made a considerable contribution to the ACE inhibitory activity and produced fermented milk without bitter taste. In this study we observed that Colombian Kumis can be an excellent vehicle for the isolation of yeasts with a potential to enhance bioactive peptides produced during milk fermentation. PMID:22938834

  9. Looking beyond Saccharomyces: the potential of non-conventional yeast species for desirable traits in bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Radecka, Dorota; Mukherjee, Vaskar; Mateo, Raquel Quintilla; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Thevelein, Johan M

    2015-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in the production of food and beverages and is by far the most studied yeast species. Currently, it is also the most used microorganism in the production of first-generation bioethanol from sugar or starch crops. Second-generation bioethanol, on the other hand, is produced from lignocellulosic feedstocks that are pretreated and hydrolyzed to obtain monomeric sugars, mainly D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose. Recently, S. cerevisiae recombinant strains capable of fermenting pentose sugars have been generated. However, the pretreatment of the biomass results in hydrolysates with high osmolarity and high concentrations of inhibitors. These compounds negatively influence the fermentation process. Therefore, robust strains with high stress tolerance are required. Up to now, more than 2000 yeast species have been described and some of these could provide a solution to these limitations because of their high tolerance to the most predominant stress conditions present in a second-generation bioethanol reactor. In this review, we will summarize what is known about the non-conventional yeast species showing unusual tolerance to these stresses, namely Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (osmotolerance), Kluyveromyces marxianus and Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha (thermotolerance), Dekkera bruxellensis (ethanol tolerance), Pichia kudriavzevii (furan derivatives tolerance) and Z. bailii (acetic acid tolerance). PMID:26126524

  10. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics. PMID:24462702

  11. Selection of enhanced antimicrobial activity posing lactic acid bacteria characterised by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Šalomskienė, Joana; Abraitienė, Asta; Jonkuvienė, Dovilė; Mačionienė, Irena; Repečkienė, Jūratė

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was a detail evaluation of genetic diversity among the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains having an advantage of a starter culture in order to select genotypically diverse strains with enhanced antimicrobial effect on some harmfull and pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial activity of LAB was performed by the agar well diffusion method and was examined against the reference strains and foodborne isolates of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium. Antifungal activity was tested against the foodborne isolates of Candida parapsilosis, Debaromyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia guilliermondii, Yarowia lipolytica, Aspergillus brasiliensis, Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium herbarum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. A total 40 LAB strains representing Lactobacillus (23 strains), Lactococcus (13 strains) and Streptococcus spp. (4 strains) were characterised by repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting which generated highly discriminatory profiles, confirmed the identity and revealed high genotypic heterogeneity among the strains. Many of tested LAB demonstrated strong antimicrobial activity specialised against one or few indicator strains. Twelve LAB strains were superior in suppressing growth of the whole complex of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. These results demonstrated that separate taxonomic units offered different possibilities of selection for novel LAB strains could be used as starter cultures enhancing food preservation.

  12. Microbial flora and some chemical properties of ersho, a starter for teff (Eragrostis tef) fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ashenafi, M

    1994-01-01

    Ersho is a clear, yellow liquid that accumulates on the surface of fermenting teff-flour batter and is collected to serve as an inoculum for the next fermentation. The pH of ersho samples was about 3.5 and titratable acidity ranged between 3.1% and 5.7%. The mean aerobic mesophilic counts from four households varied between 6.9×10(6) and 1.3×10(8) c.f.u./ml and the aerobic bacterial flora consisted of Bacillus spp. Mean yeast counts ranged between 5.2×10(5) and 1.8×10(6) c.f.u./ml and comprised, in order of abundance, Candida milleri, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia naganishii and Debaromyces hansenii. Candida milleri was the most dominant isolate in all samples. About 90% of the teff flour samples had aerobic mesophilic counts ≥10(5) c.f.u./g and Gram-positive bacteria constituted about 71% of the total isolates. About 80% of samples had Enterobacteriaceae counts of 10(4) c.f.u./g.

  13. Steam explosion treatment for ethanol production from branches pruned from pear trees by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Chizuru; Okumura, Ryosuke; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the production of ethanol from unutilized branches pruned from pear trees by steam explosion pretreatment. Steam pressures of 25, 35, and 45 atm were applied for 5 min, followed by enzymatic saccharification of the extracted residues with cellulase (Cellic CTec2). High glucose recoveries, of 93.3, 99.7, and 87.1%, of the total sugar derived from the cellulose were obtained from water- and methanol-extracted residues after steam explosion at 25, 35, and 45 tm, respectively. These values corresponded to 34.9, 34.3, and 27.1 g of glucose per 100 g of dry steam-exploded branches. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation experiments were done on water-extracted residues and water- and methanol-extracted residues by Kluyveromyces marxianus NBRC 1777. An overall highest theoretical ethanol yield of 76% of the total sugar derived from cellulose was achieved when 100 g/L of water- and methanol-washed residues from 35 atm-exploded pear branches was used as substrate.

  14. Lipid Production from Hemicellulose and Holocellulose Hydrolysate of Palm Empty Fruit Bunches by Newly Isolated Oleaginous Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Tampitak, Srikanya; Louhasakul, Yasmi; Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Prasertsan, Poonsuk

    2015-07-01

    Palm empty fruit bunches (EFBs) are abundant lignocellulosic wastes from palm oil mills. They are potential sources of sugars which can be converted to microbial lipids by oleaginous yeasts. To produce sugars from EFB, two-step and one-step hydrolysis reactions were performed. In the first step, the use of diluted sulfuric acid (0.5 % w/v) hydrolyzed hemicelluloses and released mainly pentoses, and in the second step of hydrolysis of residual pulp using 2.5 % (w/v), sulfuric acid released more hexoses. The use of 2.5 % (w/v) sulfuric acid in one-step hydrolysis of holocelluloses released the highest amount of sugars (38.3 g/L), but it also produced high concentration of potential inhibitors (>1 g/L). Three oleaginous yeasts, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Candida tropicalis, were isolated and screened for their ability to convert EFB hydrolysates into lipids. These yeasts grew well and produced lipids from EFB hemicellulose and holocellulose hydrolysate after potential inhibitors were removed. This study shows that EFB can be used for lipid production.

  15. Evaluation of hyper thermal acid hydrolysis of Kappaphycus alvarezii for enhanced bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ra, Chae Hun; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2016-06-01

    Hyper thermal (HT) acid hydrolysis of Kappaphycus alvarezii, a red seaweed, was optimized to 12% (w/v) seaweed slurry content, 180mM H2SO4 at 140°C for 5min. The maximum monosaccharide concentration of 38.3g/L and 66.7% conversion from total fermentable monosaccharides of 57.6g/L with 120gdw/L K. alvarezii slurry were obtained from HT acid hydrolysis and enzymatic saccharification. HT acid hydrolysis at a severity factor of 0.78 efficiently converted the carbohydrates of seaweed to monosaccharides and produced a low concentration of inhibitory compounds. The levels of ethanol production by separate hydrolysis and fermentation with non-adapted and adapted Kluyveromyces marxianus to high concentration of galactose were 6.1g/L with ethanol yield (YEtOH) of 0.19 at 84h and 16.0g/L with YEtOH of 0.42 at 72h, respectively. Development of the HT acid hydrolysis process and adapted yeast could enhance the overall ethanol fermentation yields of K. alvarezii seaweed. PMID:26950757

  16. Modelling thermal stability and activity of free and immobilized enzymes as a novel tool for enzyme reactor design.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M P; Oliveira, M G; Maugeri, F

    2007-11-01

    In this work, a novel method is proposed to establish the most suitable operational temperature for an enzyme reactor. The method was based on mathematical modelling of the thermal stability and activity of the enzyme and was developed using thermodynamic concepts and experimental data from free and immobilized inulinases (2,1-beta-D fructan frutanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.7) from Kluyveromyces marxianus, which were used as examples. The model was, therefore, designed to predict the enzyme activity with respect to the temperature and time course of the enzymatic process, as well as its half-life, in a broad temperature range. The knowledge and information provided by the model could be used to design the operational temperature conditions, leading to higher enzyme activities, while preserving acceptable stability levels, which represent the link between higher productivity and lower process costs. For the inulinase used in this study, the optimum temperature conditions leading to higher enzyme activities were shown to be 63 degrees C and 57.5 degrees C for the free and immobilized inulinases, respectively. However, according to the novel method of approach used here, the more appropriate operating temperatures would be 52 degrees C for free and 42 degrees C for immobilized inulinases, showing that the working temperature is not necessarily the same as the maximum reaction rate temperature, but preferably a lower temperature where the enzyme is much more stable.

  17. Super life--how and why 'cell selection' leads to the fastest-growing eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, Philip; Stouthamer, Adriaan H; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2009-01-01

    What is the highest possible replication rate for living organisms? The cellular growth rate is controlled by a variety of processes. Therefore, it is unclear which metabolic process or group of processes should be activated to increase growth rate. An organism that is already growing fast may already have optimized through evolution all processes that could be optimized readily, but may be confronted with a more generic limitation. Here we introduce a method called 'cell selection' to select for highest growth rate, and show how such a cellular site of 'growth control' was identified. By applying pH-auxostat cultivation to the already fast-growing yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus for a sufficiently long time, we selected a strain with a 30% increased growth rate; its cell-cycle time decreased to 52 min, much below that reported to date for any eukaryote. The increase in growth rate was accompanied by a 40% increase in cell surface at a fairly constant cell volume. We show how the increase in growth rate can be explained by a dominant (80%) limitation of growth by the group of membrane processes (a 0.7% increase of specific growth rate to a 1% increase in membrane surface area). Simultaneous activation of membrane processes may be what is required to accelerate growth of the fastest-growing form of eukaryotic life to growth rates that are even faster, and may be of potential interest for single-cell protein production in industrial 'White' biotechnology processes. PMID:19087200

  18. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality. PMID:26341209

  19. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality.

  20. [Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by a genetically-modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain capable of secreting inulinase].

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Yuan, Wenjie; Wang, Na; Xin, Chengxun; Ge, Xumeng; Bai, Fengwu

    2011-07-01

    Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing the inulinase gene (inu) from Kluyveromyces marxianus was investigated. The inu native and pgk promoters were used to drive the expression of the inu gene, and the inulinase was expressed as an extracellular enzyme. All positive clones (confirmed by PCR) were able to express inulinase as measured by enzyme activity in the culture supernatant, among which two clones HI6/6 and HPI6/3 were selected, and their inulinase activity and ethanol fermentation performance were compared with their wild type. The inulinase activities of 86 and 23.8 U/mL were achieved, which were 4.6-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that of the wild type. Furthermore, ethanol fermentation was carried out with the recombinants and medium containing 200 g/L raw Jerusalem artichoke meal, and ethanol concentrations of 55 g/L and 52 g/L were obtained, with ethanol yields of 0.495 and 0.453, respectively, equivalent to 96.9% and 88.6% of the theoretical value. PMID:22016987

  1. Sequence analysis and structural characterization of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from the phytopathogenic fungus Eremothecium ashbyi.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Chandra, T S

    2011-02-01

    Eremothecium ashbyi is a phytopathogenic fungus infesting cotton, soybeans and several other plants. This highly flavinogenic fungus has been phylogenetically characterized, but the genetic aspects of its central metabolic and riboflavin biosynthetic pathways are unknown. An ORF of 996 bp was obtained from E. ashbyi by using degenerate primers for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and 5'-3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). This nucleotide sequence had a high similarity of 88% with GPD sequence of Ashbya gossypii. The putative GPD peptide of 331-aa had a high similarity of 85% with the GPD sequence from other ascomycetes. The ORF had an unusually strong codon bias with 5 amino acids showing strict preference of a single codon. The theoretical molecular weight for the putative peptide was 35.58 kDa with an estimated pI of 5.7. A neighbor-joining tree showed that the putative peptide from E. ashbyi displayed the highest similarity to GPD of A. gossypii. The gene sequence is available at the GenBank, accession number EU717696. Homology modeling done with Kluyveromyces marxianus GPD (PDB: 2I5P) as template indicated high structural similarity. PMID:20820924

  2. Overexpression of the trichodiene synthase gene tri5 increases trichodermin production and antimicrobial activity in Trichoderma brevicompactum.

    PubMed

    Tijerino, Anamariela; Cardoza, R Elena; Moraga, Javier; Malmierca, Mónica G; Vicente, Francisca; Aleu, Josefina; Collado, Isidro G; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2011-03-01

    Trichoderma brevicompactum produces trichodermin, a simple trichothecene-type toxin that shares the first steps of the sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway with other phytotoxic trichothecenes from Fusarium spp. Trichodiene synthase catalyses the conversion of farnesyl pyrophosphate to trichodiene and it is encoded by the tri5 gene that was cloned and analysed functionally by homologous overexpression in T. brevicompactum. tri5 expression was up-regulated in media with glucose, H(2)O(2) or glycerol. tri5 repression was observed in cultures supplemented with the antioxidants ferulic acid and tyrosol. Acetone extracts of tri5-overexpressing transformants displayed higher antifungal activity than those from the wild-type. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses revealed that tri5 overexpression led to an increased production of trichodermin and tyrosol. Agar diffusion assays with these two purified metabolites from the tri5-overexpressing transformant T. brevicompactum Tb41tri5 showed that only trichodermin had antifungal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Aspergillus fumigatus, in most cases such activity being higher than that observed for amphotericin B and hygromycin. Our results point to the significant role of tri5 in the production of trichodermin and in the antifungal activity of T. brevicompactum. PMID:21145409

  3. Strategy for biotechnological process design applied to the enzymatic hydrolysis of agave fructo-oligosaccharides to obtain fructose-rich syrups.

    PubMed

    García-Aguirre, Mauricio; Sáenz-Alvaro, Victor A; Rodríguez-Soto, Mayra A; Vicente-Magueyal, Francisco J; Botello-Alvarez, Enrique; Jimenez-Islas, Hugo; Cárdenas-Manríquez, Marcela; Rico-Martínez, Ramiro; Navarrete-Bolaños, Jose L

    2009-11-11

    A strategy to optimize biotechnological process design is illustrated for the production of fructose-rich syrups via enzymatic hydrolysis of agave fructo-oligosaccharides. The optimization process includes ecological studies from natural fermentations leading to the selection of a strain with capacity for inulinase synthesis, and variable optimization for the synthesis, and enzymatic hydrolysis using the response surface methodology. The results lead to the selection of Kluyveromyces marxianus , endogenous strains isolated from aguamiel (natural fermented sugary sap from agave plants), as the main strain with high capacity for enzyme synthesis with inulinase activity. Production optimization at bioreactor level revealed that operation at 30.6 degrees C, 152 rpm, 1.3 VVM of aeration, and pH 6.3 leads to maximum inulinase synthesis, whereas 31 degrees C, 50 rpm, and pH 6.2 leads to maximum hydrolysis of agave fructo-oligosaccharides. HPLC analysis of the fructose-rich syrups obtained at these optimal conditions showed an average composition of 95% of fructose and 5% of glucose and the absence of sucrose. The analysis also revealed that the syrups are free of residues and toxic compounds, an undesirable occurrence often present when traditional methods based on thermal or acid hydrolysis are applied for their obtainment. Therefore, the product may be suitable for use as additive in many applications in the food and beverage industries.

  4. Looking beyond Saccharomyces: the potential of non-conventional yeast species for desirable traits in bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Radecka, Dorota; Mukherjee, Vaskar; Mateo, Raquel Quintilla; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Thevelein, Johan M

    2015-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in the production of food and beverages and is by far the most studied yeast species. Currently, it is also the most used microorganism in the production of first-generation bioethanol from sugar or starch crops. Second-generation bioethanol, on the other hand, is produced from lignocellulosic feedstocks that are pretreated and hydrolyzed to obtain monomeric sugars, mainly D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose. Recently, S. cerevisiae recombinant strains capable of fermenting pentose sugars have been generated. However, the pretreatment of the biomass results in hydrolysates with high osmolarity and high concentrations of inhibitors. These compounds negatively influence the fermentation process. Therefore, robust strains with high stress tolerance are required. Up to now, more than 2000 yeast species have been described and some of these could provide a solution to these limitations because of their high tolerance to the most predominant stress conditions present in a second-generation bioethanol reactor. In this review, we will summarize what is known about the non-conventional yeast species showing unusual tolerance to these stresses, namely Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (osmotolerance), Kluyveromyces marxianus and Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha (thermotolerance), Dekkera bruxellensis (ethanol tolerance), Pichia kudriavzevii (furan derivatives tolerance) and Z. bailii (acetic acid tolerance).

  5. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics.

  6. Maximization of beta-galactosidase production: a simultaneous investigation of agitation and aeration effects.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fernanda Germano; Filho, Francisco Maugeri; de Medeiros Burkert, Janaína Fernandes; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the agitation and aeration effects in the maximization of the beta-galactosidase production from Kluyveromyces marxianus CCT 7082 were investigated simultaneously, in relation to the volumetric enzyme activity and the productivity, as well as the analysis of the lactose consumption and production of glucose, and galactose of this process. Agitation and aeration effects were studied in a 2 L batch stirred reactor. A central composite design (2(2) trials plus three central points) was carried out. Agitation speed varied from 200 to 500 rpm and aeration rate from 0.5 to 1.5 vvm. It has been shown in this study that the volumetric enzyme production was strongly influenced by mixing conditions, while aeration was shown to be less significant. Linear models for activity and productivity due to agitation and aeration were obtained. The favorable condition was 500 rpm and 1.5 vvm, which lead to the best production of 17 U mL(-1) for enzymatic activity, 1.2 U mL(-1) h(-1) for productivity in 14 h of process, a cellular concentration of 11 mg mL(-1), and a 167.2 h(-1) volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient. PMID:19517069

  7. Whey valorisation: a complete and novel technology development for dairy industry starter culture production.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Athanasios A; Papapostolou, Harris; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Katechaki, Eleftheria; Bekatorou, Argyro; Bosnea, Loulouda A

    2009-08-01

    Whey is the major by-product of the dairy industry, produced in large quantities and usually disposed off causing major environmental pollution, due to its high organic load that makes treatment cost prohibitive. This paper comprises a contribution on the valorisation of this high polluting liquid waste of the dairy industry, based on research for the production of novel dairy starter cultures using whey as raw material. Starter cultures are used for cheese ripening in order to: (i) accelerate ripening, (ii) improve quality and (iii) increase shelf-life. The developed technology involves biomass production from whey followed by thermal drying of cultures. Specifically, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and kefir yeasts were thermally dried, and their efficiency in lactose and milk whey fermentations was studied. The most suitable culture regarding its technological properties was kefir, which was used for cheese ripening in freeze-dried and thermally dried form. Besides the reduction of production cost, which is an essential requirement for the food industry, the use of thermally dried kefir displayed several other advantages such as acceleration of ripening, increase of shelf-life, and improvement of hard-type cheese quality.

  8. Super life--how and why 'cell selection' leads to the fastest-growing eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, Philip; Stouthamer, Adriaan H; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2009-01-01

    What is the highest possible replication rate for living organisms? The cellular growth rate is controlled by a variety of processes. Therefore, it is unclear which metabolic process or group of processes should be activated to increase growth rate. An organism that is already growing fast may already have optimized through evolution all processes that could be optimized readily, but may be confronted with a more generic limitation. Here we introduce a method called 'cell selection' to select for highest growth rate, and show how such a cellular site of 'growth control' was identified. By applying pH-auxostat cultivation to the already fast-growing yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus for a sufficiently long time, we selected a strain with a 30% increased growth rate; its cell-cycle time decreased to 52 min, much below that reported to date for any eukaryote. The increase in growth rate was accompanied by a 40% increase in cell surface at a fairly constant cell volume. We show how the increase in growth rate can be explained by a dominant (80%) limitation of growth by the group of membrane processes (a 0.7% increase of specific growth rate to a 1% increase in membrane surface area). Simultaneous activation of membrane processes may be what is required to accelerate growth of the fastest-growing form of eukaryotic life to growth rates that are even faster, and may be of potential interest for single-cell protein production in industrial 'White' biotechnology processes.

  9. Effects of fed-batch and continuous fermentations on human lysozyme production by Kluyveromyces lactis K7 in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Lysozyme is a lytic enzyme, which has antimicrobial activity. It has been used for food and pharmaceutical applications. This study was undertaken to evaluate fed-batch and continuous fermentations for the human lysozyme production in biofilm reactor. Results showed that addition of lactose the mid-log phase to make the concentration back to the initial level generates higher lysozyme production (177 U/ml) compared with lactose addition in late-log phase (174 U/ml) (p < 0.05). Moreover, fed-batch fermentation with glucose as initial carbon source and continuous addition of lactose with 0.6 ml/min for 10 h demonstrated significantly higher lysozyme production (187 U/ml) compared to the batch fermentation (173 U/ml) (p < 0.05). In continuous fermentation, biofilm reactor provided significantly higher productivity (7.5 U/ml/h) compared to the maximum productivity in suspended cell bioreactor (4 U/ml/h), because the biofilm reactor provided higher cell density at higher dilution rate compared to suspended cell reactor (p < 0.05).

  10. Alcohol from whey permeate: strain selection, temperature, and medium optimization. [Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces fragilis, and K. lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Vienne, P.; Von Stockar, U.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of shaken flask cultures of some yeast strains capable of fermenting lactose showed no significant differences in alcohol yield among the four best strains. Use of whey permeate concentrated three times did not affect the yields. An optimal growth temperature of 38/sup 0/C was determined for K. fragilis NRRL 665. Elemental analysis of both the permeate and the dry cell mass of two strains indicated the possibility of a stoichiometric limitation by nitrogen. Batch cultures in laboratory fermentors confirmed this finding and revealed in addition the presence of a limitation due to growth factors. Both types of limitations could be overcome by adding yeast extract. The maximum productivity of continuous cultures could thus be improved to 5.1 g/l-h. The maximum specific growth rate was of the order of 0.310 h/sup -1/. 15 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 Aminotransferases Have Functionally Diverged from the Ancestral-Like Kluyveromyces lactis Orthologous Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Maritrini; Hernández, Fabiola; López, Karla; Quezada, Héctor; González, James; López, Geovani; Aranda, Cristina; González, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene duplication is a key evolutionary mechanism providing material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The fate of duplicated gene copies has been amply discussed and several models have been put forward to account for duplicate conservation. The specialization model considers that duplication of a bifunctional ancestral gene could result in the preservation of both copies through subfunctionalization, resulting in the distribution of the two ancestral functions between the gene duplicates. Here we investigate whether the presumed bifunctional character displayed by the single branched chain amino acid aminotransferase present in K. lactis has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae, and whether this conservation has impacted S. cerevisiae metabolism. Principal Findings Our results show that the KlBat1 orthologous BCAT is a bifunctional enzyme, which participates in the biosynthesis and catabolism of branched chain aminoacids (BCAAs). This dual role has been distributed in S. cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 paralogous proteins, supporting the specialization model posed to explain the evolution of gene duplications. BAT1 is highly expressed under biosynthetic conditions, while BAT2 expression is highest under catabolic conditions. Bat1 and Bat2 differential relocalization has favored their physiological function, since biosynthetic precursors are generated in the mitochondria (Bat1), while catabolic substrates are accumulated in the cytosol (Bat2). Under respiratory conditions, in the presence of ammonium and BCAAs the bat1Δ bat2Δ double mutant shows impaired growth, indicating that Bat1 and Bat2 could play redundant roles. In K. lactis wild type growth is independent of BCAA degradation, since a Klbat1Δ mutant grows under this condition. Conclusions Our study shows that BAT1 and BAT2 differential expression and subcellular relocalization has resulted in the distribution of the biosynthetic and catabolic roles of the ancestral BCAT in two isozymes improving BCAAs metabolism and constituting an adaptation to facultative metabolism. PMID:21267457

  12. Effect of benzoic acid on metabolic fluxes in yeasts: a continuous-culture study on the regulation of respiration and alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Verduyn, C; Postma, E; Scheffers, W A; Van Dijken, J P

    1992-07-01

    Addition of benzoate to the medium reservoir of glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS 8066 growing at a dilution rate (D) of 0.10 h-1 resulted in a decrease in the biomass yield, and an increase in the specific oxygen uptake rate (qO2) from 2.5 to as high as 19.5 mmol g-1 h-1. Above a critical concentration, the presence of benzoate led to alcoholic fermentation and a reduction in qO2 to 13 mmol g-1 h-1. The stimulatory effect of benzoate on respiration was dependent on the dilution rate: at high dilution rates respiration was not enhanced by benzoate. Cells could only gradually adapt to growth in the presence of benzoate: a pulse of benzoate given directly to the culture resulted in wash-out. As the presence of benzoate in cultures growing at low dilution rates resulted in large changes in the catabolic glucose flux, it was of interest to study the effect of benzoate on the residual glucose concentration in the fermenter as well as on the level of some selected enzymes. At D = 0.10 h-1, the residual glucose concentration increased proportionally with increasing benzoate concentration. This suggests that modulation of the glucose flux mainly occurs via a change in the extracellular glucose concentration rather than by synthesis of an additional amount of carriers. Also various intracellular enzyme levels were not positively correlated with the rate of respiration. A notable exception was citrate synthase: its level increased with increasing respiration rate. Growth of S. cerevisiae in ethanol-limited cultures in the presence of benzoate also led to very high qO2 levels of 19-21 mmol g-1 h-1. During growth on glucose as well as on ethanol, the presence of benzoate coincided with an increase in the mitochondrial volume up to one quarter of the total cellular volume. Also with the Crabtree-negative yeasts Candida utilis, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Hansenula polymorpha, growth in the presence of benzoate resulted in an increase in qO2 and

  13. Indigenous Georgian Wine-Associated Yeasts and Grape Cultivars to Edit the Wine Quality in a Precision Oenology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vigentini, Ileana; Maghradze, David; Petrozziello, Maurizio; Bonello, Federica; Mezzapelle, Vito; Valdetara, Federica; Failla, Osvaldo; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In Georgia, one of the most ancient vine-growing environment, the homemade production of wine is still very popular in every rural family and spontaneous fermentation of must, without addition of chemical preservatives, is the norm. The present work investigated the yeast biodiversity in five Georgian areas (Guria, Imereti, Kakheti, Kartli, Ratcha-Lechkhumi) sampling grapes and wines from 22 different native cultivars, in 26 vineyards and 19 family cellars. One hundred and eighty-two isolates were ascribed to 15 different species by PCR-ITS and RFLP, and partial sequencing of D1/D2 domain 26S rDNA gene. Metschnikowia pulcherrima (F’ = 0.56, I’ = 0.32), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (F’ = 0.49, I’ = 0.27), and Cryptococcus flavescens (F’ = 0.31, I’ = 0.11) were the dominant yeasts found on grapes, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed the highest prevalence into wine samples. Seventy four isolates with fermentative potential were screened for oenological traits such as ethanol production, resistance to SO2, and acetic acid, glycerol and H2S production. Three yeast strains (Kluyveromyces marxianus UMY207, S. cerevisiae UMY255, Torulaspora delbrueckii UMY196) were selected and separately inoculated in vinifications experiments at a Georgian cellar. Musts were prepared from healthy grapes of local varieties, Goruli Mtsvane (white berry cultivar) and Saperavi (black berry cultivar). Physical (°Brix) and microbial analyses (plate counts) were performed to monitor the fermentative process. The isolation of indigenous S. cerevisiae yeasts beyond the inoculated strains indicated that a co-presence occurred during the vinification tests. Results from quantitative GC-FID analysis of volatile compounds revealed that the highest amount of fermentation flavors, such as 4-ethoxy-4-oxobutanoic acid (monoethyl succinate), 2-methylpropan-1-ol, ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate, and 2-phenylethanol, were significantly more produced in fermentation conducted in Saperavi variety

  14. Indigenous Georgian Wine-Associated Yeasts and Grape Cultivars to Edit the Wine Quality in a Precision Oenology Perspective.

    PubMed

    Vigentini, Ileana; Maghradze, David; Petrozziello, Maurizio; Bonello, Federica; Mezzapelle, Vito; Valdetara, Federica; Failla, Osvaldo; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In Georgia, one of the most ancient vine-growing environment, the homemade production of wine is still very popular in every rural family and spontaneous fermentation of must, without addition of chemical preservatives, is the norm. The present work investigated the yeast biodiversity in five Georgian areas (Guria, Imereti, Kakheti, Kartli, Ratcha-Lechkhumi) sampling grapes and wines from 22 different native cultivars, in 26 vineyards and 19 family cellars. One hundred and eighty-two isolates were ascribed to 15 different species by PCR-ITS and RFLP, and partial sequencing of D1/D2 domain 26S rDNA gene. Metschnikowia pulcherrima (F' = 0.56, I' = 0.32), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (F' = 0.49, I' = 0.27), and Cryptococcus flavescens (F' = 0.31, I' = 0.11) were the dominant yeasts found on grapes, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed the highest prevalence into wine samples. Seventy four isolates with fermentative potential were screened for oenological traits such as ethanol production, resistance to SO2, and acetic acid, glycerol and H2S production. Three yeast strains (Kluyveromyces marxianus UMY207, S. cerevisiae UMY255, Torulaspora delbrueckii UMY196) were selected and separately inoculated in vinifications experiments at a Georgian cellar. Musts were prepared from healthy grapes of local varieties, Goruli Mtsvane (white berry cultivar) and Saperavi (black berry cultivar). Physical (°Brix) and microbial analyses (plate counts) were performed to monitor the fermentative process. The isolation of indigenous S. cerevisiae yeasts beyond the inoculated strains indicated that a co-presence occurred during the vinification tests. Results from quantitative GC-FID analysis of volatile compounds revealed that the highest amount of fermentation flavors, such as 4-ethoxy-4-oxobutanoic acid (monoethyl succinate), 2-methylpropan-1-ol, ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate, and 2-phenylethanol, were significantly more produced in fermentation conducted in Saperavi variety inoculated

  15. Diversity of culturable yeasts in phylloplane of sugarcane in Thailand and their capability to produce indole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Kawasaki, Hiroko

    2014-06-01

    Yeasts were isolated by the enrichment technique from the phylloplane of 94 samples of sugarcane leaf collected from seven provinces in Thailand. All sugarcane leaf samples contained yeasts and 158 yeast strains were obtained. On the basis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene sequence analysis, 144 strains were identified to 24 known species in 14 genera belonging to the Ascomycota viz. Candida akabanensis, Candida dendronema, Candida mesorugosa, Candida michaelii, Candida nivariensis, Candida rugosa, Candida orthopsilosis, Candida quercitrusa, Candida tropicalis, Candida xylopsoci, Cyberlindnera fabianii, Cyberlindnera rhodanensis, Debaryomyces nepalensis, Hannaella aff. coprosmaensis, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lachancea thermotolerans, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Metschnikowia koreensis, Meyerozyma caribbica, Millerozyma koratensis, Pichia kudriavzevii, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Wickerhamomyces edaphicus, and 12 species in six genera of the Basidiomycota viz . Cryptococcus flavescens, Cryptococcus laurentii, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Kwoniella heveanensis, Rhodosporidium fluviale, Rhodosporidium paludigenum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Rhodotorula sesimbrana, Rhodotorula taiwanensis, Sporidiobolus ruineniae, Sporobolomyces carnicolor and Sporobolomyces nylandii. Seven strains were identical or similar to four undescribed species. Another seven strains represented four novels species in the genus Metschnikowia, Nakazawaea, Wickerhamomyces and Yamadazyma. The results revealed 69 % of the isolated strains were ascomycete yeasts and 31 % were basidiomycete yeast. The most prevalent species was M. caribbica with a 23 % frequency of occurrence followed by Rh. taiwanensis (11 %) and C. tropicalis (10 %). All strains were assessed for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing capability showing that 69 strains had the capability of producing IAA when cultivated in yeast extract peptone dextrose broth supplemented with 1

  16. Isotope labeling pattern study of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Young; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Determination of fluxes by (13)C tracer experiments depends on monitoring the (13)C labeling pattern of metabolites during isotope experiments. In metabolome-based (13)C metabolic flux analysis, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS or LC/MS/MS, respectively) has been mainly used as an analytical platform for isotope pattern studies of central carbon metabolites. However, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has several advantages over LC/MS, such as high sensitivity, low cost, ease of operation, and availability of mass spectra databases for comparison. In this study, analysis of isotope pattern for central carbon metabolites using GC/MS was demonstrated. First, a proper set of mass ions for central carbon metabolites was selected based on carbon backbone information and structural isomers of mass fragment ions. A total of 34 mass fragment ions was selected and used for the quantification of 25 central carbon metabolites. Then, to quantify isotope fractions, a natural mass isotopomer library for selected mass fragment ions was constructed and subtracted from isotopomer mass spectra data. The results revealed a surprisingly high abundance of partially labeled (13)C intermediates, such as 56.4% of fructose 6-phosphate and 47.6% of dihydroxyacetone phosphate at isotopic steady state, which were generated in the pentose phosphate pathway. Finally, dynamic changes of isotope fragments of central metabolites were monitored with a U-(13)C glucose stimulus response experiment in Kluyveromyces marxianus. With a comprehensive study of isotope patterns of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS, 25 central carbon metabolites and their isotopic fractions were successfully quantified. Dynamic and precise acquisition of isotope pattern can then be used in combination with proper kinetic models to calculate metabolic fluxes.

  17. Impact of microbial cultures on proteolysis and release of bioactive peptides in fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Chaves-López, Clemencia; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Martuscelli, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating co-cultures of selected microorganisms for their proteolytic activity and capability to produce fermented milk enriched with ACE-inhibitory (ACEI) peptides. Selected yeasts (Torulaspora delbruekii KL66A, Galactomyces geotrichum KL20B, Pichia kudriavzevii KL84A and Kluyveromyces marxianus KL26A) and lactic acid bacteria strains (Lactobacillus plantarum LAT03, Lb. plantarum KLAT01 and the not virulent Enterococcus faecalis KE06) were screened as single cultures for their capacity of releasing ACEI peptides without producing bitter taste. Three strains cultures (yeast, Lb. plantarum and E. faecalis) were performed to evaluate the combined impact on microbial growth, lactic acid production, citric acid consumption, proteolysis, ACEI activity, and bitter taste after 36 h of fermentation at 28 °C. While G. geotrichum KL20B showed a strong stimulating effect on Lb. plantarum strains and the production of peptides with ACEI activity, the presence of T. delbruekii KL26A in the cultures was deleterious both to ACEI activity and product taste. The most effective combination was P. kudriavzevii KL84A, Lb. plantarum LAT3, E. faecalis KL06, which showed the highest ACEI activity (IC50 = 30.63 ± 1.11 μg ml(-1)) and gave no bitter taste for 7 days at 6 °C. Our results highlight the importance of choosing the strains combination carefully, to obtain a high yield of ACEI activity without bitter taste.

  18. The microbiota of Lafun, an African traditional cassava food product.

    PubMed

    Wilfrid Padonou, Sègla; Nielsen, Dennis S; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Thorsen, Line; Nago, Mathurin C; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2009-07-31

    Lafun is a fermented cassava food product consumed in parts of West Africa. In the present work the microorganisms (aerobic bacteria (AB), lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts) associated with the fermentation of Lafun under traditional conditions have for the first time been studied using a combination of pheno- and genotypic methods. During Lafun fermentation the AB count ranged from 6-7 log(10) CFU/g at the beginning to 9 log(10) CFU/g at the end. Similarly, the number of LAB increased from 5 log(10) CFU/g to 9 log(10) CFU/g during the process while the yeast load increased from 3 log(10) CFU/g at the onset of the fermentation to 5-6 log(10) CFU/g at the end of the fermentation. A total of 168 isolates (31 AB, 88 LAB, and 49 yeasts) were isolated and identified by means of phenotypic tests, PCR-based methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The aerobic bacteria were mostly identified as belonging to the Bacillus cereus group (71%). The B. cereus isolates lacked the genetic determinant specific for cereulide producers but harboured several genes encoding the heat-labile toxins hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin as detected by PCR. The other aerobic bacteria isolated were Gram negative and identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pantoea agglomerans. The dominant LAB were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum (42% of LAB isolates) followed by Lactobacillus plantarum (30%) and Weissella confusa (18%). Seven isolates remained unidentified and constitute probably a novel LAB species. The predominant yeast species associated with Lafun fermentation were Saccharomyces cerevisiae (22% of yeast isolates), Pichia scutulata (20%), Kluyveromyces marxianus (18%), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (12%), Pichia rhodanensis (8%) and Candida glabrata (8%) as well as Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida tropicalis and Trichosporon asahii at lower incidence (<5% each). PMID:19493582

  19. Bioprospecting of thermo- and osmo-tolerant fungi from mango pulp-peel compost for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Dandi, N D; Dandi, B N; Chaudhari, A B

    2013-04-01

    The persistent edaphic stress on microbial succession due to dynamic changes during composting was explored for selection of multi-stress tolerant microbe(s) desirable for ethanol production. A total of 23 strains were isolated from mango compost using four successive enrichments in YP broth (g l(-1)): glucose, 100; 150; 250 with ethanol (40) and cycloheximide (0.4) at 40 °C, pH 6.0. Based on multi-gene ribotyping, 14 yeasts (61 %) of Saccharomycetaceae, 2 filamentous fungi (8.6 %) and 7 bacteria (30.4 %) were obtained. Phenetic and phylogenetic analysis of the 14 yeasts revealed 64.3 % tolerant to 500 g l(-1) glucose, growth at 45 °C and resemblance to Candida sp. (14.3 %), Kluyveromyces marxianus (35.7 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (21.4 %) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (28.6 %). Assessment of the 14 yeasts in glucose fermentation medium (pH 4.5 at 40 °C) showed ethanol productivity of ≥92 % by 12 yeasts with theoretical yields of 90-97 %. Fermentation of molasses (150 g l(-1) glucose equivalent) by P. kudriavzevii D1C at 40 °C resulted in 73.70 ± 0.02 g l(-1) ethanol and productivity of 4.91 ± 0.01 g l(-1) h(-1). Assessment of P. kudriavzevii D1C revealed multi-stress tolerance towards 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, ethanol (20 %, v/v), high gravity and H2O2 (0.3 M) indicating suitability for ethanol production using high gravity molasses and pre-treated lignocellulosic biomass fermentation. PMID:23180376

  20. Diversity of culturable yeasts in phylloplane of sugarcane in Thailand and their capability to produce indole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Kawasaki, Hiroko

    2014-06-01

    Yeasts were isolated by the enrichment technique from the phylloplane of 94 samples of sugarcane leaf collected from seven provinces in Thailand. All sugarcane leaf samples contained yeasts and 158 yeast strains were obtained. On the basis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene sequence analysis, 144 strains were identified to 24 known species in 14 genera belonging to the Ascomycota viz. Candida akabanensis, Candida dendronema, Candida mesorugosa, Candida michaelii, Candida nivariensis, Candida rugosa, Candida orthopsilosis, Candida quercitrusa, Candida tropicalis, Candida xylopsoci, Cyberlindnera fabianii, Cyberlindnera rhodanensis, Debaryomyces nepalensis, Hannaella aff. coprosmaensis, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lachancea thermotolerans, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Metschnikowia koreensis, Meyerozyma caribbica, Millerozyma koratensis, Pichia kudriavzevii, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Wickerhamomyces edaphicus, and 12 species in six genera of the Basidiomycota viz . Cryptococcus flavescens, Cryptococcus laurentii, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Kwoniella heveanensis, Rhodosporidium fluviale, Rhodosporidium paludigenum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Rhodotorula sesimbrana, Rhodotorula taiwanensis, Sporidiobolus ruineniae, Sporobolomyces carnicolor and Sporobolomyces nylandii. Seven strains were identical or similar to four undescribed species. Another seven strains represented four novels species in the genus Metschnikowia, Nakazawaea, Wickerhamomyces and Yamadazyma. The results revealed 69 % of the isolated strains were ascomycete yeasts and 31 % were basidiomycete yeast. The most prevalent species was M. caribbica with a 23 % frequency of occurrence followed by Rh. taiwanensis (11 %) and C. tropicalis (10 %). All strains were assessed for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing capability showing that 69 strains had the capability of producing IAA when cultivated in yeast extract peptone dextrose broth supplemented with 1

  1. Impact of microbial cultures on proteolysis and release of bioactive peptides in fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Chaves-López, Clemencia; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Martuscelli, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating co-cultures of selected microorganisms for their proteolytic activity and capability to produce fermented milk enriched with ACE-inhibitory (ACEI) peptides. Selected yeasts (Torulaspora delbruekii KL66A, Galactomyces geotrichum KL20B, Pichia kudriavzevii KL84A and Kluyveromyces marxianus KL26A) and lactic acid bacteria strains (Lactobacillus plantarum LAT03, Lb. plantarum KLAT01 and the not virulent Enterococcus faecalis KE06) were screened as single cultures for their capacity of releasing ACEI peptides without producing bitter taste. Three strains cultures (yeast, Lb. plantarum and E. faecalis) were performed to evaluate the combined impact on microbial growth, lactic acid production, citric acid consumption, proteolysis, ACEI activity, and bitter taste after 36 h of fermentation at 28 °C. While G. geotrichum KL20B showed a strong stimulating effect on Lb. plantarum strains and the production of peptides with ACEI activity, the presence of T. delbruekii KL26A in the cultures was deleterious both to ACEI activity and product taste. The most effective combination was P. kudriavzevii KL84A, Lb. plantarum LAT3, E. faecalis KL06, which showed the highest ACEI activity (IC50 = 30.63 ± 1.11 μg ml(-1)) and gave no bitter taste for 7 days at 6 °C. Our results highlight the importance of choosing the strains combination carefully, to obtain a high yield of ACEI activity without bitter taste. PMID:24929726

  2. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  3. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis. PMID:27164865

  4. Sustainable conversion of coffee and other crop wastes to biofuels and bioproducts using coupled biochemical and thermochemical processes in a multi-stage biorefinery concept.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Jones, Marjorie A; Moser, Bryan R; Cox, Elby J; Lindquist, Mitch; Galindo-Leva, Luz Angela; Riaño-Herrera, Néstor M; Rodriguez-Valencia, Nelson; Gast, Fernando; Cedeño, David L; Tasaki, Ken; Brown, Robert C; Darzins, Al; Brunner, Lane

    2014-10-01

    The environmental impact of agricultural waste from the processing of food and feed crops is an increasing concern worldwide. Concerted efforts are underway to develop sustainable practices for the disposal of residues from the processing of such crops as coffee, sugarcane, or corn. Coffee is crucial to the economies of many countries because its cultivation, processing, trading, and marketing provide employment for millions of people. In coffee-producing countries, improved technology for treatment of the significant amounts of coffee waste is critical to prevent ecological damage. This mini-review discusses a multi-stage biorefinery concept with the potential to convert waste produced at crop processing operations, such as coffee pulping stations, to valuable biofuels and bioproducts using biochemical and thermochemical conversion technologies. The initial bioconversion stage uses a mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast strain to produce bioethanol from sugars. The resulting sugar-depleted solids (mostly protein) can be used in a second stage by the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica to produce bio-based ammonia for fertilizer and are further degraded by Y. lipolytica proteases to peptides and free amino acids for animal feed. The lignocellulosic fraction can be ground and treated to release sugars for fermentation in a third stage by a recombinant cellulosic Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which can also be engineered to express valuable peptide products. The residual protein and lignin solids can be jet cooked and passed to a fourth-stage fermenter where Rhodotorula glutinis converts methane into isoprenoid intermediates. The residues can be combined and transferred into pyrocracking and hydroformylation reactions to convert ammonia, protein, isoprenes, lignins, and oils into renewable gas. Any remaining waste can be thermoconverted to biochar as a humus soil enhancer. The integration of multiple technologies for treatment of coffee waste has the potential to

  5. The structure of DesR from Streptomyces venezuelae, a β-glucosidase involved in macrolide activation

    PubMed Central

    Zmudka, Matthew W; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have, indeed, altered the course of human history as is evidenced by the increase in human life expectancy since the 1940s. Many of these natural compounds are produced by bacteria that, by necessity, must have efficient self-resistance mechanisms. The methymycin/pikromycin producing species Streptomyces venezuelae, for example, utilizes β-glucosylation of its macrolide products to neutralize their effects within the confines of the cell. Once released into the environment, these compounds are activated by the removal of the glucose moiety. In S. venezuelae, the enzyme responsible for removal of the sugar from the parent compound is encoded by the desR gene and referred to as DesR. It is a secreted enzyme containing 828 amino acid residues, and it is known to be a retaining glycosidase. Here, we describe the structure of the DesR/d-glucose complex determined to 1.4-Å resolution. The overall architecture of the enzyme can be envisioned in terms of three regions: a catalytic core and two auxiliary domains. The catalytic core harbors the binding platform for the glucose ligand. The first auxiliary domain adopts a “PA14 fold,” whereas the second auxiliary domain contains an immunoglobulin-like fold. Asp 273 and Glu 578 are in the proper orientation to function as the catalytic base and proton donor, respectively, required for catalysis. The overall fold of the core region places DesR into the GH3 glycoside hydrolase family of enzymes. Comparison of the DesR structure with the β-glucosidase from Kluyveromyces marxianus shows that their PA14 domains assume remarkably different orientations. PMID:23225731

  6. Assembling a cellulase cocktail and a cellodextrin transporter into a yeast host for CBP ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many microorganisms possess enzymes that can efficiently degrade lignocellulosic materials, but do not have the capability to produce a large amount of ethanol. Thus, attempts have been made to transform such enzymes into fermentative microbes to serve as hosts for ethanol production. However, an efficient host for a consolidated bioprocess (CBP) remains to be found. For this purpose, a synthetic biology technique that can transform multiple genes into a genome is instrumental. Moreover, a strategy to select cellulases that interact synergistically is needed. Results To engineer a yeast for CBP bio-ethanol production, a synthetic biology technique, called “promoter-based gene assembly and simultaneous overexpression” (PGASO), that can simultaneously transform and express multiple genes in a kefir yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus KY3, was recently developed. To formulate an efficient cellulase cocktail, a filter-paper-activity assay for selecting heterologous cellulolytic enzymes was established in this study and used to select five cellulase genes, including two cellobiohydrolases, two endo-β-1,4-glucanases and one beta-glucosidase genes from different fungi. In addition, a fungal cellodextrin transporter gene was chosen to transport cellodextrin into the cytoplasm. These six genes plus a selection marker gene were one-step assembled into the KY3 genome using PGASO. Our experimental data showed that the recombinant strain KR7 could express the five heterologous cellulase genes and that KR7 could convert crystalline cellulose into ethanol. Conclusion Seven heterologous genes, including five cellulases, a cellodextrin transporter and a selection marker, were simultaneously transformed into the KY3 genome to derive a new strain, KR7, which could directly convert cellulose to ethanol. The present study demonstrates the potential of our strategy of combining a cocktail formulation protocol and a synthetic biology technique to develop a designer yeast host

  7. Candida utilis and Chlorella vulgaris Counteract Intestinal Inflammation in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    PubMed Central

    Grammes, Fabian; Reveco, Felipe Eduardo; Romarheim, Odd Helge; Landsverk, Thor; Mydland, Liv Torunn; Øverland, Margareth

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation, caused by impaired intestinal homeostasis, is a serious condition in both animals and humans. The use of conventional extracted soybean meal (SBM) in diets for Atlantic salmon and several other fish species is known to induce enteropathy in the distal intestine, a condition often referred to as SBM induced enteropathy (SBMIE). In the present study, we investigated the potential of different microbial ingredients to alleviate SBMIE in Atlantic salmon, as a model of feed-induced inflammation. The dietary treatments consisted of a negative control based on fish meal (FM), a positive control based on 20% SBM, and four experimental diets combining 20% SBM with either one of the three yeasts Candida utilis (CU), Kluyveromyces marxianus (KM), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) or the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (CV). Histopathological examination of the distal intestine showed that all fish fed the SC or SBM diets developed characteristic signs of SBMIE, while those fed the FM, CV or CU diets showed a healthy intestine. Fish fed the KM diet showed intermediate signs of SBMIE. Corroborating results were obtained when measuring the relative length of PCNA positive cells in the crypts of the distal intestine. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed decreased expression of amino acid, fat and drug metabolism pathways as well as increased expression of the pathways for NOD-like receptor signalling and chemokine signalling in both the SC and SBM groups while CV and CU were similar to FM and KM was intermediate. Gene expression of antimicrobial peptides was reduced in the groups showing SBMIE. The characterisation of microbial communities using PCR-DGGE showed a relative increased abundance of Firmicutes bacteria in fish fed the SC or SBM diets. Overall, our results show that both CU and CV were highly effective to counteract SBMIE, while KM had less effect and SC had no functional effects. PMID:24386162

  8. Characterization of Osmotolerant Yeasts and Yeast-Like Molds from Apple Orchards and Apple Juice Processing Plants in China and Investigation of Their Spoilage Potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huxuan; Hu, Zhongqiu; Long, Fangyu; Niu, Chen; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-08-01

    Yeasts and yeast-like fungal isolates were recovered from apple orchards and apple juice processing plants located in the Shaanxi province of China. The strains were evaluated for osmotolerance by growing them in 50% (w/v) glucose. Of the strains tested, 66 were positive for osmotolerance and were subsequently identified by 26S or 5.8S-ITS ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Physiological tests and RAPD-PCR analysis were performed to reveal the polymorphism of isolates belonging to the same species. Further, the spoilage potential of the 66 isolates was determining by evaluating their growth in 50% to 70% (w/v) glucose and measuring gas generation in 50% (w/v) glucose. Thirteen osmotolerant isolates representing 9 species were obtained from 10 apple orchards and 53 target isolates representing 19 species were recovered from 2 apple juice processing plants. In total, members of 14 genera and 23 species of osmotolerant isolates including yeast-like molds were recovered from all sources. The commonly recovered osmotolerant isolates belonged to Kluyveromyces marxianus, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Candida tropicalis, and Pichia kudriavzevii. The polymorphism of isolates belonging to the same species was limited to 1 to 3 biotypes. The majority of species were capable of growing within a range of glucose concentration, similar to sugar concentrations found in apple juice products with a lag phase from 96 to 192 h. Overall, Z. rouxii was particularly the most tolerant to high glucose concentration with the shortest lag phase of 48 h in 70% (w/v) glucose and the fastest gas generation rate in 50% (w/v) glucose. PMID:26130165

  9. Expression of inulinase gene in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica and single cell oil production from inulin-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Madzak, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 has been reported to be an oleaginous yeast and significant quantities of lipids were accumulated inside the yeast cells. In this study, the INU1 gene encoding exo-inulinase cloned from Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was ligated into the expression plasmid pINA1317 and expressed in the cells of the oleaginous yeast. The activity of the inulinase with 6 × His tag secreted by the transformant Z31 obtained was found to be 41.7U mL(-1) after cell growth for 78 h. After optimization of the medium and cultivation conditions for single cell oil production, the transformant could accumulate 46.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 11.6 g L(-1) within 78 h at the flask level. During the 2-L fermentation, the transformant could accumulate 48.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 13.3 g L(-1) within 78 h while the transformant could accumulate 50.6% (w/w) oil from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers in its cells and cell dry weight was 14.6 g L(-1) within 78 h. At the end of fermentation, most of the added sugar was utilized by the transformant cells. Over 91.5% of the fatty acids from the transformant cultivated in the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubercles was C(16:0), C(18:1) and C(18:2), especially C(18:1) (58.5%).

  10. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis.

  11. Characterization of Osmotolerant Yeasts and Yeast-Like Molds from Apple Orchards and Apple Juice Processing Plants in China and Investigation of Their Spoilage Potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huxuan; Hu, Zhongqiu; Long, Fangyu; Niu, Chen; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-08-01

    Yeasts and yeast-like fungal isolates were recovered from apple orchards and apple juice processing plants located in the Shaanxi province of China. The strains were evaluated for osmotolerance by growing them in 50% (w/v) glucose. Of the strains tested, 66 were positive for osmotolerance and were subsequently identified by 26S or 5.8S-ITS ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Physiological tests and RAPD-PCR analysis were performed to reveal the polymorphism of isolates belonging to the same species. Further, the spoilage potential of the 66 isolates was determining by evaluating their growth in 50% to 70% (w/v) glucose and measuring gas generation in 50% (w/v) glucose. Thirteen osmotolerant isolates representing 9 species were obtained from 10 apple orchards and 53 target isolates representing 19 species were recovered from 2 apple juice processing plants. In total, members of 14 genera and 23 species of osmotolerant isolates including yeast-like molds were recovered from all sources. The commonly recovered osmotolerant isolates belonged to Kluyveromyces marxianus, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Candida tropicalis, and Pichia kudriavzevii. The polymorphism of isolates belonging to the same species was limited to 1 to 3 biotypes. The majority of species were capable of growing within a range of glucose concentration, similar to sugar concentrations found in apple juice products with a lag phase from 96 to 192 h. Overall, Z. rouxii was particularly the most tolerant to high glucose concentration with the shortest lag phase of 48 h in 70% (w/v) glucose and the fastest gas generation rate in 50% (w/v) glucose.

  12. Studies on antimicrobial activities of solvent extracts of different spices.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Dilek; Toroglu, Sevil

    2011-03-01

    The antimicrobial activities of the ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extract of 12 plant species were studied. The extract of Capsicum annuum (red pepper) (fruit) Zingiber officinale (ginger) (root), Cuminum cyminum (cumin), Alpinia ficinarum (galingale), Coriandrum sativum (coriander), Cinnamomun zeylanicum Nees (cinnamomun), Origanum onites L. (thyme), Folium sennae (senna), Eugenia caryophyllata (cloves), Flos tiliae (lime), Folium menthae crispae (peppermint) and Piper nigrum (blackpepper) were tested in vitro against 2 fungi and 8 bacterial species by the disc diffusion method. Klebsiella pneumonia 13883, Bacillus megaterium NRS, Pseudomonas aeroginosa ATCC 27859, Staphylococcus aureus 6538 P, Escherichia coil ATCC 8739, Enterobacter cloaca ATCC 13047, Corynebacterium xerosis UC 9165, Streptococcus faecalis DC 74, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Rhodotorula rubra were used in this investigation. The results indicated that extracts of different spices has shown antibacterial activity in the range of 7-24 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Eugenia caryophyllata (clove), 7-20 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Capsicum annum (red pepper) and Cinnamomun zeylanicum (cinnamon) bark, 7-18 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Folium sennae (senna) leaves, 7-16 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Zingiber officinale (ginger) root, 7-15 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Cuminum cyminum (cumin) seed, 7-14 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Folium menthae crispae (peppermint), Origanum onites (thyme) leaves and Alpinia ficinarum (galingale) root, 7-12 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibiton zone Piper nigrum (blackpepper), 7-11 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Flos tiliae (lime) leaves, 7-8 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Coriandrum sativum (coriander) to the microorganisms tested.

  13. Expression of inulinase gene in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica and single cell oil production from inulin-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Madzak, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 has been reported to be an oleaginous yeast and significant quantities of lipids were accumulated inside the yeast cells. In this study, the INU1 gene encoding exo-inulinase cloned from Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was ligated into the expression plasmid pINA1317 and expressed in the cells of the oleaginous yeast. The activity of the inulinase with 6 × His tag secreted by the transformant Z31 obtained was found to be 41.7U mL(-1) after cell growth for 78 h. After optimization of the medium and cultivation conditions for single cell oil production, the transformant could accumulate 46.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 11.6 g L(-1) within 78 h at the flask level. During the 2-L fermentation, the transformant could accumulate 48.3% (w/w) oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight was 13.3 g L(-1) within 78 h while the transformant could accumulate 50.6% (w/w) oil from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers in its cells and cell dry weight was 14.6 g L(-1) within 78 h. At the end of fermentation, most of the added sugar was utilized by the transformant cells. Over 91.5% of the fatty acids from the transformant cultivated in the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubercles was C(16:0), C(18:1) and C(18:2), especially C(18:1) (58.5%). PMID:20883812

  14. Bioprospecting of thermo- and osmo-tolerant fungi from mango pulp-peel compost for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Dandi, N D; Dandi, B N; Chaudhari, A B

    2013-04-01

    The persistent edaphic stress on microbial succession due to dynamic changes during composting was explored for selection of multi-stress tolerant microbe(s) desirable for ethanol production. A total of 23 strains were isolated from mango compost using four successive enrichments in YP broth (g l(-1)): glucose, 100; 150; 250 with ethanol (40) and cycloheximide (0.4) at 40 °C, pH 6.0. Based on multi-gene ribotyping, 14 yeasts (61 %) of Saccharomycetaceae, 2 filamentous fungi (8.6 %) and 7 bacteria (30.4 %) were obtained. Phenetic and phylogenetic analysis of the 14 yeasts revealed 64.3 % tolerant to 500 g l(-1) glucose, growth at 45 °C and resemblance to Candida sp. (14.3 %), Kluyveromyces marxianus (35.7 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (21.4 %) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (28.6 %). Assessment of the 14 yeasts in glucose fermentation medium (pH 4.5 at 40 °C) showed ethanol productivity of ≥92 % by 12 yeasts with theoretical yields of 90-97 %. Fermentation of molasses (150 g l(-1) glucose equivalent) by P. kudriavzevii D1C at 40 °C resulted in 73.70 ± 0.02 g l(-1) ethanol and productivity of 4.91 ± 0.01 g l(-1) h(-1). Assessment of P. kudriavzevii D1C revealed multi-stress tolerance towards 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, ethanol (20 %, v/v), high gravity and H2O2 (0.3 M) indicating suitability for ethanol production using high gravity molasses and pre-treated lignocellulosic biomass fermentation.

  15. Sustainable conversion of coffee and other crop wastes to biofuels and bioproducts using coupled biochemical and thermochemical processes in a multi-stage biorefinery concept.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Jones, Marjorie A; Moser, Bryan R; Cox, Elby J; Lindquist, Mitch; Galindo-Leva, Luz Angela; Riaño-Herrera, Néstor M; Rodriguez-Valencia, Nelson; Gast, Fernando; Cedeño, David L; Tasaki, Ken; Brown, Robert C; Darzins, Al; Brunner, Lane

    2014-10-01

    The environmental impact of agricultural waste from the processing of food and feed crops is an increasing concern worldwide. Concerted efforts are underway to develop sustainable practices for the disposal of residues from the processing of such crops as coffee, sugarcane, or corn. Coffee is crucial to the economies of many countries because its cultivation, processing, trading, and marketing provide employment for millions of people. In coffee-producing countries, improved technology for treatment of the significant amounts of coffee waste is critical to prevent ecological damage. This mini-review discusses a multi-stage biorefinery concept with the potential to convert waste produced at crop processing operations, such as coffee pulping stations, to valuable biofuels and bioproducts using biochemical and thermochemical conversion technologies. The initial bioconversion stage uses a mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast strain to produce bioethanol from sugars. The resulting sugar-depleted solids (mostly protein) can be used in a second stage by the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica to produce bio-based ammonia for fertilizer and are further degraded by Y. lipolytica proteases to peptides and free amino acids for animal feed. The lignocellulosic fraction can be ground and treated to release sugars for fermentation in a third stage by a recombinant cellulosic Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which can also be engineered to express valuable peptide products. The residual protein and lignin solids can be jet cooked and passed to a fourth-stage fermenter where Rhodotorula glutinis converts methane into isoprenoid intermediates. The residues can be combined and transferred into pyrocracking and hydroformylation reactions to convert ammonia, protein, isoprenes, lignins, and oils into renewable gas. Any remaining waste can be thermoconverted to biochar as a humus soil enhancer. The integration of multiple technologies for treatment of coffee waste has the potential to

  16. Genomic Evolution of the Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons in Hemiascomycetous Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Neuvéglise, Cécile; Feldmann, Horst; Bon, Elisabeth; Gaillardin, Claude; Casaregola, and Serge

    2002-01-01

    We identified putative long terminal repeat- (LTR) retrotransposon sequences among the 50,000 random sequence tags (RSTs) obtained by the Génolevures project from genomic libraries of 13 Hemiascomycetes species. In most cases additional sequencing enabled us to assemble the whole sequences of these retrotransposons. These approaches identified 17 distinct families, 10 of which are defined by full-length elements. We also identified five families of solo LTRs that were not associated with retrotransposons. Ty1-like retrotransposons were found in four of five species that are phylogenetically related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. uvarum, S. exiguus, S. servazzii, and S. kluyveri but not Zygosaccharomyces rouxii), and in two of three Kluyveromyces species (K. lactis and K. marxianus but not K. thermotolerans). Only multiply crippled elements could be identified in the K. lactis and S. servazzii strains analyzed, and only solo LTRs could be identified in S. uvarum. Ty4-like elements were only detected in S. uvarum, indicating that these elements appeared recently before speciation of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto species. Ty5-like elements were detected in S. exiguus, Pichia angusta, and Debaryomyces hansenii. A retrotransposon homologous with Tca2 from Candida albicans, an element absent from S. cerevisiae, was detected in the closely related species D. hansenii. A complete Ty3/gypsy element was present in S. exiguus, whereas only partial, often degenerate, sequences resembling this element were found in S. servazzii, Z. rouxii, S. kluyveri, C. tropicalis, and Yarrowica lipolytica. P. farinosa (syn. P. sorbitophila) is currently the only yeast species in which no LTR retrotransposons or remnants have been found. Thorough analysis of protein sequences, structural characteristics of the elements, and phylogenetic relationships deduced from these data allowed us to propose a classification for the Ty1/copia elements of hemiascomycetous yeasts and a model of LTR

  17. Microbial diversity and dynamics during the production of May bryndza cheese.

    PubMed

    Pangallo, Domenico; Saková, Nikoleta; Koreňová, Janka; Puškárová, Andrea; Kraková, Lucia; Valík, Lubomír; Kuchta, Tomáš

    2014-01-17

    paradoxus. The diversity of yeasts and fungi encompassed Alternaria alternata, "Ascomycete sp.", Aspergillus fumigatus, Beauveria brongniartii, Candida xylopsoci, C. inconspicua, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Debaromyces hansenii, Fomes fomentarius, Galactomyces candidus, Gymnoascus reesii, Chaetomium globosum, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Metarhizium anisopliae, Penicillium aurantiogriseum, P. camemberti, P. freii, P. polonicum, P. viridicatum, Pichia kudriavzevii, Sordaria alcina, Trichosporon lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica. PMID:24291178

  18. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  19. Thermotolerant and mesophylic fungi from sugarcane bagasse and their prospection for biomass-degrading enzyme production

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Bruna Silveira Lamanes; Gomes, Arthur Filipe Sousa; Franciscon, Emanuele Giuliane; de Oliveira, Jean Maikon; Baffi, Milla Alves

    2015-01-01

    Nineteen fungi and seven yeast strains were isolated from sugarcane bagasse piles from an alcohol plant located at Brazilian Cerrado and identified up to species level on the basis of the gene sequencing of 5.8S-ITS and 26S ribosomal DNA regions. Four species were identified: Kluyveromyces marxianus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus sydowii and Aspergillus fumigatus, and the isolates were screened for the production of key enzymes in the saccharification of lignocellulosic material. Among them, three strains were selected as good producers of hemicellulolitic enzymes: A. niger (SBCM3), A. sydowii (SBCM7) and A. fumigatus (SBC4). The best β-xylosidase producer was A. niger SBCM3 strain. This crude enzyme presented optimal activity at pH 3.5 and 55 °C (141 U/g). For β-glucosidase and xylanase the best producer was A. fumigatus SBC4 strain, whose enzymes presented maximum activity at 60 °C and pH 3.5 (54 U/g) and 4.0 (573 U/g), respectively. All these crude enzymes presented stability around pH 3.0–8.0 and up to 60 °C, which can be very useful in industrial processes that work at high temperatures and low pHs. These enzymes also exhibited moderate tolerance to ethanol and the sugars glucose and xylose. These similar characteristics among these fungal crude enzymes suggest that they can be used synergistically in cocktails in future studies of biomass conversion with potential application in several biotechnological sectors. PMID:26413077

  20. Thermotolerant and mesophylic fungi from sugarcane bagasse and their prospection for biomass-degrading enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Santos, Bruna Silveira Lamanes dos; Gomes, Arthur Filipe Sousa; Franciscon, Emanuele Giuliane; Oliveira, Jean Maikon de; Baffi, Milla Alves

    2015-01-01

    Nineteen fungi and seven yeast strains were isolated from sugarcane bagasse piles from an alcohol plant located at Brazilian Cerrado and identified up to species level on the basis of the gene sequencing of 5.8S-ITS and 26S ribosomal DNA regions. Four species were identified: Kluyveromyces marxianus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus sydowii and Aspergillus fumigatus, and the isolates were screened for the production of key enzymes in the saccharification of lignocellulosic material. Among them, three strains were selected as good producers of hemicellulolitic enzymes: A. niger (SBCM3), A. sydowii (SBCM7) and A. fumigatus (SBC4). The best β-xylosidase producer was A. niger SBCM3 strain. This crude enzyme presented optimal activity at pH 3.5 and 55 °C (141 U/g). For β-glucosidase and xylanase the best producer was A. fumigatus SBC4 strain, whose enzymes presented maximum activity at 60 °C and pH 3.5 (54 U/g) and 4.0 (573 U/g), respectively. All these crude enzymes presented stability around pH 3.0-8.0 and up to 60 °C, which can be very useful in industrial processes that work at high temperatures and low pHs. These enzymes also exhibited moderate tolerance to ethanol and the sugars glucose and xylose. These similar characteristics among these fungal crude enzymes suggest that they can be used synergistically in cocktails in future studies of biomass conversion with potential application in several biotechnological sectors.

  1. Contributions from the SuperKamiokande Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, R.J.; Fukuda, Y.; Inoue, K.

    1995-09-01

    This document consists of two reports contributed to the XXIV International Cosmic Ray Conference (Rome, Italy, August 28--September 8, 1995) from the SuperKamiokande Collaboration: one on the SuperKamiokande outer data acquisition system, and one on preliminary results from muon/electron identification tests at KEK of IMB3-detector phototubes and electronics.

  2. Construction of lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose fermentation into ethanol fuel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Guo, Xuewu; Shen, Tong; Dong, Jian; Zhang, Cuiying; Xiao, Dongguang

    2013-04-01

    Two lactose-consuming diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, AY-51024A and AY-51024M, were constructed by expressing the LAC4 and LAC12 genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus in the host strain AY-5. In AY-51024A, both genes were targeted to the ATH1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to abolish the activity of acid/neutral trehalase. In AY-51024M, both genes were respectively integrated into the MIG1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to relieve glucose repression. Physiologic studies of the two transformants under anaerobic cultivations in glucose and galactose media indicated that the expression of both LAC genes did not physiologically burden the cells, except for AY-51024A in glucose medium. Galactose consumption was initiated at higher glucose concentrations in the MIG1 deletion strain AY-51024M than in the corresponding wild-type strain and AY-51024A, wherein galactose was consumed until glucose was completely depleted in the mixture. In lactose medium, the Sp. growth rates of AY-51024A and AY-51024M under anaerobic shake-flasks were 0.025 and 0.067 h(-1), respectively. The specific lactose uptake rate and ethanol production of AY-51024M were 2.50 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 23.4 g l(-1), respectively, whereas those of AY-51024A were 0.98 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 24.3 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1), respectively. In concentrated cheese whey powder solutions, AY-51024M produced 63.3 g l(-1) ethanol from approximately 150 g l(-1) initial lactose in 120 h, conversely, AY-51024A consumed 63.7 % of the initial lactose and produced 35.9 g l(-1) ethanol. Therefore, relieving glucose repression is an effective strategy for constructing lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae.

  3. A highly efficient β-glucosidase from the buffalo rumen fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum W5

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellulose, which is the most abundant renewable biomass on earth, is a potential bio-resource of alternative energy. The hydrolysis of plant polysaccharides is catalyzed by microbial cellulases, including endo-β-1,4-glucanases, cellobiohydrolases, cellodextrinases, and β-glucosidases. Converting cellobiose by β-glucosidases is the key factor for reducing cellobiose inhibition and enhancing the efficiency of cellulolytic enzymes for cellulosic ethanol production. Results In this study, a cDNA encoding β-glucosidase was isolated from the buffalo rumen fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum W5 and is named NpaBGS. It has a length of 2,331 bp with an open reading frame coding for a protein of 776 amino acid residues, corresponding to a theoretical molecular mass of 85.1 kDa and isoelectric point of 4.4. Two GH3 catalytic domains were found at the N and C terminals of NpaBGS by sequence analysis. The cDNA was expressed in Pichia pastoris and after protein purification, the enzyme displayed a specific activity of 34.5 U/mg against cellobiose as the substrate. Enzymatic assays showed that NpaBGS was active on short cello-oligosaccharides from various substrates. A weak activity in carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) digestion indicated that the enzyme might also have the function of an endoglucanase. The optimal activity was detected at 40°C and pH 5 ~ 6, showing that the enzyme prefers a weak acid condition. Moreover, its activity could be enhanced at 50°C by adding Mg2+ or Mn2+ ions. Interestingly, in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) experiments using Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 or Kluyveromyces marxianus KY3 as the fermentation yeast, NpaBGS showed advantages in cell growth, glucose production, and ethanol production over the commercial enzyme Novo 188. Moreover, we showed that the KY3 strain engineered with the NpaNGS gene can utilize 2 % dry napiergrass as the sole carbon source to produce 3.32 mg/ml ethanol when Celluclast 1.5 L was

  4. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    in sample D. In relation to 26S pyrosequencing, our study revealed the presence of 3 main yeast species: Naumovozyma spp., Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Kazachastania khefir. For Naumovozyma, further studies are needed to assess the isolation of new species. In conclusion, this study has proved that it is possible to establish the patterns of bacterial and yeast composition of kefir and kefir grain. This was only achieved with the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques.

  5. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Mohamad Ali, Mohd Shukuri; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  6. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  7. Dregs of our forgotten ancestors: fermentative microorganisms in the prehistory of Europe, the steppes and Indo-Iranian Asia, and their contemporary use in traditional and probiotic beverages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentative microorganisms in the yeast genera Debaryomyces, Hyphopichia, Kluyveromyces, Lachancea, Saccharomyces, and Wickerhamomyces (and in the bacterial genus Lactobacillus) have been isolated from a variety of fermented beverages. These same microorganisms were very likely unknowingly utilized...

  8. Whole cells in enantioselective reduction of benzyl acetoacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Joyce Benzaquem; Ramos, Aline de Souza; Lopes, Raquel de Oliveira; da Silva, Gabriela Veloso Vieira; de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio Mendonça Alves

    2014-01-01

    The β-ketoester benzyl acetoacetate was enantioselectively reduced to benzyl (S)-3-hydroxybutanoate by seven microorganism species. The best result using free cells was obtained with the yeast Hansenula sp., which furnished 97% ee and 85% of conversion within 24 h. After immobilization in calcium alginate spheres, K.marxianus showed to be more stable after 2 cycles of reaction. PMID:25477927

  9. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... related yeast. K. lactis can exchange genetic material only with itself and in rare cases with other... Federal Register (75 FR 69687). No public comments were received regarding the proposal to certify K... the exception of rare reports of superficial skin disease with K. marxianus, a closely related...

  10. A serach for moderate- and high-energy neturino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker-Szendy, R.; Bratton, C. B.; Breault, J.; Casper, D.; Dye, S. T.; Gajewski, W.; Goldhaber, M.; Haines, T. J.; Halverson, P. G.; Kielczewska, D.

    1995-01-01

    A temporal correlation analysis between moderate- (60 Mev less than or equal to E(sub nu)greater than or equal to 2500 MeV) and high-energy (E(sub nu) greater than or equal to 2000 MeV) neutrino interactions consist of two types: the moderate-energy interactions that are contained within the volume of IMB-3 and the upward-going muons produced by high-energy nu(sub mu) interactions in the rock around the detector. No evidence is found for moderate- or high-energy neutrino emission from GRBs nor for any neutrino/neutrino correlation. The nonobservation of nu/GRB correlations allows upper limits to be placed on the neutrino flux associated with GRBs.

  11. Heterologous expression of human interleukin-6 in Streptomyces lividans TK24 using novel secretory expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Wang, Lifei; Du, Yu; Wang, Songmei; Yu, Tengfei; Hong, Bin

    2011-02-01

    Streptomyces is an attractive host for heterologous protein secretion. To further optimize its expression capacity, better expression vectors will be helpful. Here, based on pSGL1, a high copy number plasmid present in Streptomyces globisporus C-1027, we constructed a series of novel E. coli-Streptomyces shuttle expression vectors pIMB2-4. These vectors, which are compatible with pIJ-derived vectors, contain the strong promoter ermE*p and signal sequence SP (MelC1) of the first ORF of melanin operon in S. antibiotics (pIMB2), SP (CagA) of C-1027 apoprotein in S. globisporus C-1027 (pIMB3 and pIMB4). Using these vectors, human interleukin-6 (IL-6) could successfully be expressed and secreted using S. lividans TK24 as host. Furthermore, replacement of a rare leucine codon TTA with CTG in SP (CagA) enhanced IL-6 production.

  12. The occurrence of killer activity in yeasts isolated from natural habitats.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Monika; Kordowska-Wiater, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Yeast's ability to restrict the growth and kill other yeasts, fungi and bacteria has been known for over 50 years. Killer activity was detected in yeasts deposited in the world collections or isolated from natural habitats. In this study, isolates from the forest environment, leaves of fruit trees, flower petals, cereals and frozen fruit have been screened in terms of their killer activities. Killer activity was tested on strains belonging to six yeast species: Candida, Rhodotorula, Pichia, Pachysolen, Yarrowia, Trichosporon. The reference strains were Kluyveromyces lactis Y-6682 and Kluyveromyces marxinanus Y-8281, well-known to be sensitive to yeast killer toxins. Among one hundred and two tested strains, 24 (23.5% of isolates) showed positive killer action, and 10 (9.8% of the isolates) a weak killer action against at least one sensitive reference strain. The highest killer activity was observed among isolates from forest soil and flowers. PMID:26636138

  13. Production of alcohol from Jerusalem artichokes by yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Duvnjak, Z.; Kosaric, N.; Kliza, S.; Hayes, D.

    1982-11-01

    Various yeasts such as several strains of Saccharomyces diastaticus, S. cerevisiae, and Kluyveromyces fragilis were investigated for their ability to ferment the carbohydrates from Jerusalem artichokes to alcohol. Juice extracted from the artichokes was used as the fermentation substrate with and without prior hydrolysis of the carbohydrates. Fermentation was also carried out with raw artichokes without prior juice extraction. Results indicate that this raw material has good potential for fuel alcohol production by fermentation. (Refs. 15).

  14. Pilot scale fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tuber pulp mashes

    SciTech Connect

    Ziobro, G.C.; Williams, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Processing and fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber pulp mashes were successfully carried out at pilot scales of 60 gallons and 1000 gallons. Whole tubers were pulped mechanically into a thick mash and fermented, using commercially available Saccharomyces cerevisiae and selected strains of Kluyveromyces fragilis. EtOH fermentation yields ranging from 50-70% of theoretical maximum were obtained in 3-4 days. Several problems regarding the processing and direct fermentation of tuber pulp mashes are discussed.

  15. Extracellular Proteinases of Yeasts and Yeastlike Fungi1

    PubMed Central

    Ahearn, D. G.; Meyers, S. P.; Nichols, R. A.

    1968-01-01

    Approximately 800 yeasts and other fungi, representing over 70 species, were tested for extracellular caseinolysis. Isolates of a variety of genera, including Aureobasidium, Cephalosporium, Endomycopsis, Kluyveromyces, and numerous sporobolomycetes, demonstrated significant proteolytic activity. Caseinolysis was not necessarily correlated with gelatin liquefaction or with albuminolysis. Numerous fungi showed significant proteolysis at 5 C. The most active organisms were isolates of Candida lipolytica, Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida punicea, and species of Cephalosporium. Taxonomic and ecological implications of proteolytic activity are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:5692110

  16. Study of atmospheric neutrino interactions and search for nucleon decay in Soudan 2

    SciTech Connect

    Leeson, W.R.

    1995-12-14

    Contained event samples, including 30 single-track muon-like events, 35 single-shower electron-like events, and 34 multiprong events, have been obtained from a 1.0 kiloton-year exposure of the Soudan 2 detector. A sample of 15 multiprong events which are partially contained has also been isolated. Properties of these events are used to examine the verity of the atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio anomaly as reported by the Kamiokande and IMB-3 water Cherenkov experiments. The compatibility of the Soudan data with each of two `new physics` explanations for the anomaly, namely proton decay and neutrino oscillations, is investigated. We examine background processes which have not been explicitly treated by the water Cherenkov detectors. Chapters discuss underground non-accelerator particle physics, the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and its interpretation, the Soudan 2 detector and event selection, reconstruction of neutrino events, rock event contamination in Soudan `quasi-elastic` samples, contained multiprong events in Soudan 2, neutrino flavor composition of the multiprong sample, partially contained events in Soudan 2, nucleon decay in Soudan 2, and a summary and discussion. 12 refs., 124 figs., 28 tabs., 7 appendices.

  17. Split-Doa10: A Naturally Split Polytopic Eukaryotic Membrane Protein Generated by Fission of a Nuclear Gene

    PubMed Central

    Stuerner, Elisabeth; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Hochstrasser, Mark; Kreft, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Large polytopic membrane proteins often derive from duplication and fusion of genes for smaller proteins. The reverse process, splitting of a membrane protein by gene fission, is rare and has been studied mainly with artificially split proteins. Fragments of a split membrane protein may associate and reconstitute the function of the larger protein. Most examples of naturally split membrane proteins are from bacteria or eukaryotic organelles, and their exact history is usually poorly understood. Here, we describe a nuclear-encoded split membrane protein, split-Doa10, in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. In most species, Doa10 is encoded as a single polypeptide with 12–16 transmembrane helices (TMs), but split-KlDoa10 is encoded as two fragments, with the split occurring between TM2 and TM3. The two fragments assemble into an active ubiquitin-protein ligase. The K. lactis DOA10 locus has two ORFs separated by a 508-bp intervening sequence (IVS). A promoter within the IVS drives expression of the C-terminal KlDoa10 fragment. At least four additional Kluyveromyces species contain an IVS in the DOA10 locus, in contrast to even closely related genera, allowing dating of the fission event to the base of the genus. The upstream Kluyveromyces Doa10 fragment with its N-terminal RING-CH and two TMs resembles many metazoan MARCH (Membrane-Associated RING-CH) and related viral RING-CH proteins, suggesting that gene splitting may have contributed to MARCH enzyme diversification. Split-Doa10 is the first unequivocal case of a split membrane protein where fission occurred in a nuclear-encoded gene. Such a split may allow divergent functions for the individual protein segments. PMID:23071509

  18. [Autochthonous yeasts isolated in Tenerife wines and their influence on ethyl acetate and higher alcohol concentrations analyzed by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Salvadores, M P; Díaz, M E; Cardell, E

    1993-12-01

    A taxonomic study of yeasts present on Tenerife wines, (Tacoronte-Acentejo Specific Denomination) has been carried out. Nine species of the genera: Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Brettanomyces, Kluyveromyces, Debaryomyces, Saccharomycodes, Hansenula, Pichia and Candida have been isolated. Parallely we analysed volatile compounds of the wines such as ethyl acetate, methanol, isobutanol and amylic alcohols by gas chromatography. Appreciable quantities of ethyl acetate were detected due to the low fermentative power of species such as Candida glabrata and Debaryomyces hansenii. The greatest concentration of amylic alcohols were found in wines containing yeast with high alcohol producing power like Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  19. [Whey as a substrate for obtaining an edible yeast].

    PubMed

    Terra, N N

    1976-01-01

    Using a fermentative process of whey through Kluyveromyces fragilys, Jörgensen, the Author prepared two edible products: Biomass I (yeast) and Biomass II (yeast plus protein of whey). Biomass I offered 53% of protein, and the yield was 22,3 g/1 whey. Biomass II, 62% of protein and yield of 27,7 g/1 whey. The test of food efficiency for Biomass II was similar to that presented by casein; the protein eficiency ratio at the level of 5% was the same, both for Biomass I and II. More research is needed specially to determine the economical convenience of the process.

  20. Antifungal activity of chalcones: a mechanistic study using various yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Lahtchev, K L; Batovska, D I; Parushev, St P; Ubiyvovk, V M; Sibirny, A A

    2008-10-01

    We reported the synthesis, antifungal evaluation and study on substituent effects of 21 chalcones. A lot of genetically defined strains belonging to different yeast genera and species, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hansenula polymorpha and Kluyveromyces lactis, were used as test organisms. Concerning the mode of the antifungal action of chalcones it was shown that DNA was probably not the main target for the chalcones. It was revealed that the yeast's intracellular glutathione and cysteine molecules play significant role as defence barrier against the chalcone action. It was also shown that chalcones may react with some proteins involved in cell separation. PMID:18280009

  1. Microbial terroir and food innovation: The case of yeast biodiversity in wine.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Garofalo, Carmela; Chiriatti, Maria Assunta; Grieco, Francesco; Spano, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces represents a heterogeneous class in the grape/must/wine environments including several yeast genera (e.g., Saccharomyces, Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Candida, Metschnikowia, Kluyveromyces, Zygosaccharomyces, Torulaspora, Dekkera and Schizosaccharomyces) and species. Since, each species may differently contribute to the improvement/depreciation of wine qualities, it appears clear the reason why species belong to non-Saccharomyces are also considered a biotechnological resource in wine fermentation. Here, we briefly review the oenological significance of this specific part of microbiota associated with grapes/musts/wine. Moreover, the diversity of cultivable non-Saccharomyces genera and their contribute to typical wines fermentations will be discussed. PMID:26521127

  2. Microbial terroir and food innovation: The case of yeast biodiversity in wine.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Garofalo, Carmela; Chiriatti, Maria Assunta; Grieco, Francesco; Spano, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces represents a heterogeneous class in the grape/must/wine environments including several yeast genera (e.g., Saccharomyces, Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Candida, Metschnikowia, Kluyveromyces, Zygosaccharomyces, Torulaspora, Dekkera and Schizosaccharomyces) and species. Since, each species may differently contribute to the improvement/depreciation of wine qualities, it appears clear the reason why species belong to non-Saccharomyces are also considered a biotechnological resource in wine fermentation. Here, we briefly review the oenological significance of this specific part of microbiota associated with grapes/musts/wine. Moreover, the diversity of cultivable non-Saccharomyces genera and their contribute to typical wines fermentations will be discussed.

  3. Production of Palmitoleic and Linoleic Acid in Oleaginous and Nonoleaginous Yeast Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological nonoleaginous ones (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of dietetically important major fatty acids. The main objective was to examine the cultivation conditions that would induce a high ratio of dietary fatty acids and biomass. Though genus-dependent, the type of nitrogen source had a higher influence on biomass yield than the C/N ratio. The nitrogen source leading to the highest lipid accumulation was potassium nitrate, followed by ammonium sulfate, which is an ideal nitrogen source supporting, in both oleaginous and nonoleaginous species, sufficient biomass growth with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation. All yeast strains displayed high (70–90%) content of unsaturated fatty acids in total cell lipids. The content of dietary fatty acids of interest, namely, palmitoleic acid and linoleic acid, reached in Kluyveromyces and Trichosporon strains over 50% of total fatty acids and the highest yield, over 280 mg per g of dry cell weight of these fatty acids, was observed in Trichosporon with ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source at C/N ratio 70. PMID:27022398

  4. A critical three-way junction is conserved in budding yeast and vertebrate telomerase RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Yogev; Abraham, Mira; Pearl, Sivan; Kabaha, Majdi M.; Elboher, Elhanan; Tzfati, Yehuda

    2007-01-01

    The telomerase ribonucleoprotein copies a short template within its integral RNA moiety onto eukaryotic chromosome ends, compensating for incomplete replication and degradation. Non-template regions of telomerase RNA (TER) are also crucial for telomerase function, yet they are highly divergent in sequence among species and their roles are largely unclear. Using both phylogenetic and mutational analyses, we predicted secondary structures for TERs from Kluyveromyces budding yeast species. A comparison of these secondary structure models with the published model for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TER reveals a common arrangement into three long arms, a templating domain in the center and several conserved elements in the same positions within the structure. One of them, a three-way junction element, is highly conserved in budding yeast TERs. This element also shows sequence and structure similarity to the critical CR4-CR5 activating domain of vertebrate TERs. Mutational analysis in Kluyveromyces lactis confirmed that this element, and in particular the residues conserved across yeast and vertebrates, is critical for telomerase action both in vivo and in vitro. These findings demonstrate that despite the extreme divergence of TER sequences from different organisms, they do share conserved elements, which presumably carry out common roles in telomerase function. PMID:17855392

  5. The RNA polymerase III-dependent family of genes in hemiascomycetes: comparative RNomics, decoding strategies, transcription and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Marck, Christian; Kachouri-Lafond, Rym; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Westhof, Eric; Dujon, Bernard; Grosjean, Henri

    2006-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive analysis of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribed genes in ten yeast genomes. This set includes all tRNA genes (tDNA) and genes coding for SNR6 (U6), SNR52, SCR1 and RPR1 RNA in the nine hemiascomycetes Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces castellii, Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces waltii, Kluyveromyces lactis, Eremothecium gossypii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida albicans, Yarrowia lipolytica and the archiascomycete Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We systematically analysed sequence specificities of tRNA genes, polymorphism, variability of introns, gene redundancy and gene clustering. Analysis of decoding strategies showed that yeasts close to S.cerevisiae use bacterial decoding rules to read the Leu CUN and Arg CGN codons, in contrast to all other known Eukaryotes. In D.hansenii and C.albicans, we identified a novel tDNA-Leu (AAG), reading the Leu CUU/CUC/CUA codons with an unusual G at position 32. A systematic ‘p-distance tree’ using the 60 variable positions of the tRNA molecule revealed that most tDNAs cluster into amino acid-specific sub-trees, suggesting that, within hemiascomycetes, orthologous tDNAs are more closely related than paralogs. We finally determined the bipartite A- and B-box sequences recognized by TFIIIC. These minimal sequences are nearly conserved throughout hemiascomycetes and were satisfactorily retrieved at appropriate locations in other Pol III genes. PMID:16600899

  6. Production of Palmitoleic and Linoleic Acid in Oleaginous and Nonoleaginous Yeast Biomass.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological nonoleaginous ones (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of dietetically important major fatty acids. The main objective was to examine the cultivation conditions that would induce a high ratio of dietary fatty acids and biomass. Though genus-dependent, the type of nitrogen source had a higher influence on biomass yield than the C/N ratio. The nitrogen source leading to the highest lipid accumulation was potassium nitrate, followed by ammonium sulfate, which is an ideal nitrogen source supporting, in both oleaginous and nonoleaginous species, sufficient biomass growth with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation. All yeast strains displayed high (70-90%) content of unsaturated fatty acids in total cell lipids. The content of dietary fatty acids of interest, namely, palmitoleic acid and linoleic acid, reached in Kluyveromyces and Trichosporon strains over 50% of total fatty acids and the highest yield, over 280 mg per g of dry cell weight of these fatty acids, was observed in Trichosporon with ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source at C/N ratio 70.

  7. Bioprocessing of bagasse hydrolysate for ethanol and xylitol production using thermotolerant yeast.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Dheeran, Pratibha; Singh, Surendra P; Mishra, Indra M; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2015-01-01

    Fermentation of xylose-rich and glucose-rich bagasse hydrolysates, obtained from the two-stage acid hydrolysis was studied using the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453. The yeast could grow on xylose-rich hydrolysate at 50 °C with the dry cell weight, cell mass yield and maximum specific growth rate of 5.35 g l(-1), 0.58 g g(-1) and 0.13 h(-1), respectively. The yeast was found to be very promising for ethanol as well as xylitol production from the sugars obtained from the lignocellulosic biomass. Batch fermentations of xylose-rich and glucose-rich hydrolysates yielded 0.61 g g(-1) xylitol and 0.43 g g(-1) ethanol in the broth, respectively based on the sugars present in the hydrolysate. Overall ethanol yield of 165 g (210 ml) and 183 g xylitol per kg of bagasse was obtained, when bagasse hydrolysate was used as a substrate. Utilization of both the glucose and xylose sugars makes the process most economical by producing both ethanol and xylitol based on biorefinery concept. On validating the experimental data of ethanol fermentation, the modified Luong kinetic model for product inhibition as well as inhibition due to inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysate, the model was found to be the best fit for ethanol formation from bagasse hydrolysate using Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453.

  8. Production of Palmitoleic and Linoleic Acid in Oleaginous and Nonoleaginous Yeast Biomass.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological nonoleaginous ones (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of dietetically important major fatty acids. The main objective was to examine the cultivation conditions that would induce a high ratio of dietary fatty acids and biomass. Though genus-dependent, the type of nitrogen source had a higher influence on biomass yield than the C/N ratio. The nitrogen source leading to the highest lipid accumulation was potassium nitrate, followed by ammonium sulfate, which is an ideal nitrogen source supporting, in both oleaginous and nonoleaginous species, sufficient biomass growth with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation. All yeast strains displayed high (70-90%) content of unsaturated fatty acids in total cell lipids. The content of dietary fatty acids of interest, namely, palmitoleic acid and linoleic acid, reached in Kluyveromyces and Trichosporon strains over 50% of total fatty acids and the highest yield, over 280 mg per g of dry cell weight of these fatty acids, was observed in Trichosporon with ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source at C/N ratio 70. PMID:27022398

  9. Antimicrobial activity of six pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) varieties and their relation to some of their pomological and phytonutrient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Duman, Ahmet D; Ozgen, Mustafa; Dayisoylu, Kenan S; Erbil, Nurcan; Durgac, Coskun

    2009-01-01

    Arils from six pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) varieties grown in the Mediterranean region of Turkey were tested for their antimicrobial properties by the agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods against seven bacteria: (Bacillus megaterium DSM 32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSM 9027, Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1, Corynebacterium xerosis UC 9165, Escherichia coli DM, Enterococcus faecalis A10, Micrococcus luteus LA 2971), and threefungi (Kluvyeromyces marxianus A230, Rhodotorula rubra MC12, Candida albicans ATCC 1023). It has been observed that the pomegranate aril extracts had antimicrobial effect on all microorganisms, giving inhibition zones ranging in size from 13 to 26 mm. The MIC values for active pomegranate extracts ranged between 30 and >90 microg/mL. The results obtained appeared to confirm the antimicrobial potential of the Punica granatum varieties.

  10. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  11. Fuel alcohol from whey

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, T.P.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    According to the 'Report on alcohol fuels policy review', published in 1979 by the US Department of Energy, cheese whey had a very low net feedstock cost/gal of ethanol produced ($0.22) and the production potential in the USA is 90 million gal ethanol/yr. Three processes are described, i.e. the Milbrew whey fermentation process using Kluyveromyces fragilis with whey of 10-15% TS under sterile or non-sterile conditions and in batch, semi-continuous or continuous operation (primarily, designed for the production of single-cell protein), the continuous Carbery process in commercial operation in Ireland (DSA 42, 7856) and the Danish process (Dansk Gaerings-industri, Copenhagen) producing edible alcohol from whey permeate, and methane from distillation wastes for use as fuel for heating the distillation units.

  12. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lignocellulosic wastes to ethanol using a thermotolerant yeast.

    PubMed

    Hari Krishna, S; Janardhan Reddy, T; Chowdary, G V

    2001-04-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) studies were carried out to produce ethanol from lignocellulosic wastes (sugar cane leaves and Antigonum leptopus leaves) using Trichoderma reesei cellulase and yeast cells. The ability of a thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces fragilis NCIM 3358, was compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL-Y-132. K. fragilis was found to perform better in the SSF process and result in high yields of ethanol (2.5-3.5% w/v) compared to S. cerevisiae (2.0-2.5% w/v). Increased ethanol yields were obtained when the cellulase was supplemented with beta-glucosidase. The conversions with K. fragilis were completed in a short time. The substrates were in the following order in terms of fast conversions: Solka floc > A. leptopus > sugar cane.

  13. Influence of the soft X-ray plasma focus radiation on live microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapryanov, S.; Goltsev, V.; Galutsov, B.; Gelev, M.; Blagoev, A.

    2012-04-01

    A 3 kJ plasma focus device was used to study the influence of the soft X-ray on live microorganisms. When Saccharomyces cerevisiae - (yeast) was treated with a dose of 65 mSv of the X-ray radiation (14 shots), no difference in the fertility activity between the control probe and the sample was observed. Also no change in the survival enzyme activity was found after irradiation through a 100 μm Al foil of another type of yeast - Kluyveromyces marxiamus. The irradiation of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii samples by the PF-X-ray emission through 20 μm Al foil with a dose of 11 mSv produces a considerable change of the photosynthesis parameters. This result is similar to the results of previous studies with plasma focus radiation where strong effects were derived with low doses but with a high dose power.

  14. Emergence of Species-Specific Transporters During Evolution of the Hemiascomycete Phylum

    PubMed Central

    De Hertogh, Benoît; Hancy, Frédéric; Goffeau, André; Baret, Philippe V.

    2006-01-01

    We have traced the evolution patterns of 2480 transmembrane transporters from five complete genome sequences spanning the entire Hemiascomycete phylum: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Yarrowia lipolytica. The use of nonambiguous functional and phylogenetic criteria derived from the TCDB classification system has allowed the identification within the Hemiascomycete phylum of 97 small phylogenetic transporter subfamilies comprising a total of 355 transporters submitted to four distinct evolution patterns named “ubiquitous,” “species specific,” “phylum gains and losses,” or “homoplasic.” This analysis identifies the transporters that contribute to the emergence of species during the evolution of the Hemiascomycete phylum and may aid in establishing novel phylogenetic criteria for species classification. PMID:16118182

  15. Fermentation of lactose in direct-acid-set cottage cheese whey

    SciTech Connect

    Demott, B.J.; Draughon, F.A.; Herald, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis was more suitable than Candida pseudotropicalis or K. lactis for production of EtOH from whey. Direct-acid-set cottage cheese whey and the supernatant fluid resulting from heat treatment of the whey at 95 degrees for 20 min showed similar rates of fermentation when inoculated with K. fragilis. Inoculation rates of 10, 12 and 14 mL of active K. fragilis culture/100 mL of media were not different in rate of EtOH production. Samples incubated with K. fragilis at 35, 37, 40 and 42 degrees showed more rapid reduction in specific gravity than samples incubated at room temperature or 30 degrees. Lactose conversion in whey was 83% complete and in whey supernatant fluid, 77%.

  16. Alcohol from membrane processed concentrated cheese whey

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, K.; Kosikowskik, F.V.

    1982-01-01

    A fermentable whey substrate in the form of a high solids permeate was obtained by reconstituting spray-dried whey powder to 36% total solids followed by ultrafiltration to separate the protein. The high solids permeate was demineralized to permit rapid yeast growth. The final permeate with 24% lactose and at pH 4.8 gave high yields of EtOH rapidly upon inoculation with lactose-fermenting yeasts. One yeast species, Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL Y 2415, yielded 108.8 g of EtOH/L, giving 84.3% of the theoretical maximum. Batch EtOH productivity was 3.2 g/L/h. The cost analysis of the ultrafiltration-fermentation process is highly favorable, if evaporation instead of the widely used reverse osmosis is employed for preconcentration of whey.

  17. Ethanol from whey: continuous fermentation with cell recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Bernard, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    The production of ethanol from cheese whey lactose has been demonstrated using a single-stage continuous culture fermentation with 100% cell recycle. In a two-step process, an aerobic fed batch operation was used initially to allow biomass buildup in the absence of inhibitory ethanol concentrations. In the anaerobic ethanol-producing second step, a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis selected on the basis of batch fermentation data had a maximum productivity of 7.1 g ethanol/L/h at a dilution rate of 0.15 h/sup -1/, while achieving the goal of zero residual sugar concentration. The fermentation productivity diminished when the feed sugar concentration exceeded 120 g/L despite the inclusion of a lipid mixture previous shown to enhance batch fermentation productivities.

  18. The Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi has an active phosphoglycerate mutase: a candidate target for anti-filarial therapies.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeremy M; Raverdy, Sylvine; Ganatra, Mehul B; Colussi, Paul A; Taron, Christopher H; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2009-04-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutases (PGM) interconvert 2- and 3-phosphoglycerate in the glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. A putative cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase gene (iPGM) was identified in the genome sequence of the Wolbachia endosymbiont from the filarial nematode, Brugia malayi (wBm). Since iPGM has no sequence or structural similarity to the cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM) found in mammals, it may represent an attractive Wolbachia drug target. In the present study, wBm-iPGM cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli was mostly insoluble and inactive. However, the protein was successfully produced in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis and the purified recombinant wBm-iPGM showed typical PGM activity. Our results provide a foundation for further development of wBm-iPGM as a promising new drug target for novel anti-filarial therapies that selectively target the endosymbiont.

  19. Production of a bioactive sweetener steviolbioside via specific hydrolyzing ester linkage of stevioside with a β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-ming; Ding, Li; Sui, Xiao-chen; Xia, Yong-mei; Wan, Hui-da; Lu, Tong

    2016-04-01

    A β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis was found to specifically catalyze hydrolysis of the glycosyl ester linkage of stevioside to yield steviolbioside, a rare sweetener that also exists in Stevia rebaudiana leaves. In a packed bed reactor, a reaction coupling separation was realized and a production yield of steviolbioside reached 90% in 6 h. The hydrolysis product steviolbioside presented higher cytoxicity on human normal cells (hepatocytes cell L02 and intestinal epithelial cell T84) than stevioside did. Comparing to the typical chemotherapy agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), steviolbioside presents much lower cytotoxicity on all assayed human normal cells; it presented notable inhibition on human hepatocarcinoma cell Hep3B, human breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 and human pancreatic cancer cell BxPC-3. The remarkable inhibition on MDA-MB-231 cells makes steviolbioside a potential remedy for human breast cancer, when steviolbioside is served as a natural sweetener. PMID:26593477

  20. Trehalose levels and survival ratio of freeze-tolerant versus freeze-sensitive yeasts.

    PubMed

    Hino, A; Mihara, K; Nakashima, K; Takano, H

    1990-05-01

    Five freeze-tolerant yeast strains suitable for frozen dough were compared with ordinary commercial bakers' yeast. Kluyveromyces thermotolerans FRI 501 cells showed high survival ability after freezing when their resting cells were fermented for 0 to 180 min in modified liquid medium, and they grew to log and stationary phases. Among the freeze-tolerant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, FRI 413 and FRI 869 showed higher surviving and trehalose-accumulating abilities than other S. cerevisiae strains, but were affected by a prolonged prefermentation period and by growth phases. The freeze tolerance of the yeasts was, to some extent, associated with the basal amount of intracellular trehalose after rapid degradation at the onset of the prefermentation period. In the freeze-sensitive yeasts, the degree of hydrolysis of trehalose may thus be affected by the kind of saccharide, unlike in freeze-tolerant yeasts. PMID:2339891

  1. Production of a bioactive sweetener steviolbioside via specific hydrolyzing ester linkage of stevioside with a β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-ming; Ding, Li; Sui, Xiao-chen; Xia, Yong-mei; Wan, Hui-da; Lu, Tong

    2016-04-01

    A β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis was found to specifically catalyze hydrolysis of the glycosyl ester linkage of stevioside to yield steviolbioside, a rare sweetener that also exists in Stevia rebaudiana leaves. In a packed bed reactor, a reaction coupling separation was realized and a production yield of steviolbioside reached 90% in 6 h. The hydrolysis product steviolbioside presented higher cytoxicity on human normal cells (hepatocytes cell L02 and intestinal epithelial cell T84) than stevioside did. Comparing to the typical chemotherapy agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), steviolbioside presents much lower cytotoxicity on all assayed human normal cells; it presented notable inhibition on human hepatocarcinoma cell Hep3B, human breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 and human pancreatic cancer cell BxPC-3. The remarkable inhibition on MDA-MB-231 cells makes steviolbioside a potential remedy for human breast cancer, when steviolbioside is served as a natural sweetener.

  2. Cloning of the transketolase gene from erythritol-producing yeast Candida magnoliae.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Boung-Hyuk; Park, Eun-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-10-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the TKL1 gene encoding transketolase (TKL) in an erythritolproducing yeast of Candida magnoliae was determined by degenerate polymerase chain reaction and genome walking. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of C. magnoliae TKL1 (CmTKL1) that spans 2,088 bp and encodes 696 amino acids, sharing 61.7% amino acid identity to Kluyveromyces lactis TKL. Functional analysis showed that CmTKL1 complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tkl1 tkl2 double mutant for growth in the absence of aromatic amino acids and restored transketolase activity in this mutant. An enzyme activity assay and RT-PCR revealed that the expression of CmTKL1 is induced by fructose, H2O2, and KCl. The GenBank accession number for C. magnoliae TKL1 is KF751756.

  3. Controlled Microbial Cenoses in Closed Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, Lydia; Mikheeva, Galina

    Controlled microbial cenoses have good prospects in closed spaces: for air treatment in LSS and cellars industrial premises; for sewage treatment in LSS; for increase of productivity and protect of plants from infections in LSS. Possible methods of formation of microbiocenoses are: selection, autoselection, artificial formation taking into account their biochemical properties and metabolic interactions. Experimental microbiocenoses, has been produced on the basis of natural association of microorganisms by long cultivation on specially developed medium. Dominating groups are bacteria of genera: Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bidobac-terium, Rhodopseudomonas and yeast of genera: Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces and Torulop-sis. Microbiocenoses do not contain pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microorganisms, they possess opposing and probiotic properties. Different examples of microbial cenoses actions are to be presented in the paper.

  4. NEM1 acts as a suppressor of apoptotic phenotypes in LSM4 yeast mutants.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vanessa; Stirpe, Mariarita; Torella, Mirko; Falcone, Claudio; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants in the essential gene LSM4, involved in messenger RNA decapping, and expressing a truncated form of the LSM4 gene of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (Kllsm4Δ1), show premature aging accompanied by the presence of typical markers of apoptosis and high sensitivity to oxidative stressing agents. We isolated multicopy extragenic suppressors of these defects, transforming the Kllsm4Δ1 mutant with a yeast DNA library and selecting clones showing resistance to acetic acid. Here we present one of these clones, carrying a DNA fragment containing the NEM1 gene (Nuclear Envelope Morphology protein 1), which encodes the catalytic subunit of the Nem1p-Spo7p phosphatase holoenzyme. Nem1p regulates nuclear growth by controlling phospholipid biosynthesis and it is required for normal nuclear envelope morphology and sporulation. The data presented here correlate the mRNA metabolism with the biosynthesis of phospholipids and with the functionality of the endoplasmic reticulum.

  5. Transgalactosylation and hydrolytic activities of commercial preparations of β-galactosidase for the synthesis of prebiotic carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cecilia; Vera, Carlos; Conejeros, Raúl; Illanes, Andrés

    2015-03-01

    β-Galactosidases exhibit both hydrolytic and transgalactosylation activities; the former has been used traditionally for the production of delactosed milk and dairies, while the latter is being increasingly used for the synthesis of lactose-derived oligosaccharides: balance between both activities was highly dependent on the enzyme origin: β-galactosidases from Aspegillus oryzae and Bacillus circulans exhibited high transgalactosylation activity, while those from one from Kluyveromyces exhibited high hydrolytic activity but quite low transgalactosylation activity. Also the affinity for the donors (lactose or lactulose) and the acceptors (lactose, lactulose or fructose) of transgalactosylated galactose was dependent on the enzyme origin, as reflected by the Michaelis constants obtained in the synthesis of galacto-oligosaccharides, fructosyl-galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose. Finally, the balance between transgalactosylation and hydrolytic activities of β-galactosidases could be tuned by changing the concentration of galactose donor.

  6. Evolution of the carboxylate Jen transporters in fungi.

    PubMed

    Lodi, Tiziana; Diffels, Julie; Goffeau, André; Baret, Philippe V

    2007-08-01

    Synteny analysis is combined with sequence similarity and motif identification to trace the evolution of the putative monocarboxylate (lactate/pyruvate) transporters Jen1p and the dicarboxylate (succinate/fumarate/malate) transporters Jen2p in Hemiascomycetes yeasts and Euascomycetes fungi. It is concluded that a precursor form of Jen1p, named here preJen1p, arose by the duplication of an ancestral Jen2p, during the speciation of Yarrowia lipolytica, which was transferred into a new syntenic context. The Jen1p transporters differentiated from preJen1p in Kluyveromyces lactis, before the Whole Genome Duplication (WGD), and are conserved as a single copy in the Saccharomyces species. In contrast, the ancestral Jen2p was definitively lost just prior to the WGD and is absent in Saccharomyces.

  7. Synthetic biology and molecular genetics in non-conventional yeasts: Current tools and future advances.

    PubMed

    Wagner, James M; Alper, Hal S

    2016-04-01

    Coupling the tools of synthetic biology with traditional molecular genetic techniques can enable the rapid prototyping and optimization of yeast strains. While the era of yeast synthetic biology began in the well-characterized model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is swiftly expanding to include non-conventional yeast production systems such as Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. These yeasts already have roles in the manufacture of vaccines, therapeutic proteins, food additives, and biorenewable chemicals, but recent synthetic biology advances have the potential to greatly expand and diversify their impact on biotechnology. In this review, we summarize the development of synthetic biological tools (including promoters and terminators) and enabling molecular genetics approaches that have been applied in these four promising alternative biomanufacturing platforms. An emphasis is placed on synthetic parts and genome editing tools. Finally, we discuss examples of synthetic tools developed in other organisms that can be adapted or optimized for these hosts in the near future.

  8. Yeast systems for the commercial production of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Buckholz, R G; Gleeson, M A

    1991-11-01

    Yeasts are attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. Unlike prokaryotic systems, their eukaryotic subcellular organization enables them to carry out many of the post-translational folding, processing and modification events required to produce "authentic" and bioactive mammalian proteins. In addition, they retain the advantages of a unicellular microorganism, with respect to rapid growth and ease of genetic manipulation. The vast majority of yeast expression work has focused on the well-characterized baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, with the development of DNA transformation technologies, a growing number of non-Saccharomyces yeasts are becoming available as hosts for recombinant polypeptide production. These include Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Schwanniomyces occidentalis and Yarrowia lipolytica. The performance of these alternative yeast expression systems is reviewed here relative to S. cerevisiae, and the advantages and limitations of these systems are discussed.

  9. Domesticated transposase Kat1 and its fossil imprints induce sexual differentiation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rajaei, Naghmeh; Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Lin, Feng; Åström, Stefan U.

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have had a major influence on shaping both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, largely through stochastic events following random or near-random insertions. In the mammalian immune system, the recombination activation genes1/2 (Rag1/2) recombinase has evolved from a transposase gene, demonstrating that TEs can be domesticated by the host. In this study, we uncovered a domesticated transposase, Kluyveromyces lactis hobo/Activator/Tam3 (hAT) transposase 1 (Kat1), operating at the fossil imprints of an ancient transposon, that catalyzes the differentiation of cell type. Kat1 induces mating-type switching from mating type a (MATa) to MATα in the yeast K. lactis. Kat1 activates switching by introducing two hairpin-capped DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the MATa1–MATa2 intergenic region, as we demonstrate both in vivo and in vitro. The DSBs stimulate homologous recombination with the cryptic hidden MAT left alpha (HMLα) locus resulting in a switch of the cell type. The sites where Kat1 acts in the MATa locus most likely are ancient remnants of terminal inverted repeats from a long-lost TE. The KAT1 gene is annotated as a pseudogene because it contains two overlapping ORFs. We demonstrate that translation of full-length Kat1 requires a programmed −1 frameshift. The frameshift limited Kat1 activity, because restoring the zero frame causes switching to the MATα genotype. Kat1 also was transcriptionally activated by nutrient limitation via the transcription factor mating type switch 1 (Mts1). A phylogenetic analysis indicated that KAT1 was domesticated specifically in the Kluyveromyces clade of the budding yeasts. We conclude that Kat1 is a highly regulated transposase-derived endonuclease vital for sexual differentiation. PMID:25313032

  10. IBS-associated phylogenetic unbalances of the intestinal microbiota are not reverted by probiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Maccaferri, Simone; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Centanni, Manuela; Severgnini, Marco; Consolandi, Clarissa; Cavina, Piero; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    IBS is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, in which the microbiota has been demonstrated to play a role. An increasing number of studies have suggested how probiotics may alleviate IBS symptoms and several mechanisms of action have been proposed.   In the present study we characterized the intestinal microbiota of 19 subjects suffering from diagnosed IBS using a fully validated High Taxonomic Fingerprint Microbiota Array (HTF-Microbi.Array). We demonstrated that the IBS microbiota is different from that of healthy individuals due to an unbalance in a number of commensal species, with an increase in relative abundance of lactobacilli, B. cereus and B. clausii, bifidobacteria, Clostridium cluster IX and E. rectale, and a decrease in abundance of Bacteroides/Prevotella group and Veillonella genus. Additionally, we demonstrated that some bacterial groups of the human intestinal microbiota, recently defined as pathobionts, are increased in concentration in the IBS microbiota. Furthermore, we aimed at investigating if the daily administration of a novel probiotic yogurt containing B. animalis subsp lactis Bb12 and K. marxianus B0399, recently demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the management of IBS symptoms, could impact on the biostructure of IBS microbiota, modulating its composition to counteract putative dysbiosis found in IBS subjects. Notably, we demonstrated that the beneficial effects associated to the probiotic preparation are not related to significant modifications in the composition of the human intestinal microbiota. PMID:22713265

  11. Novel high-performance metagenome β-galactosidases for lactose hydrolysis in the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Erich, Sarah; Kuschel, Beatrice; Schwarz, Thilo; Ewert, Jacob; Böhmer, Nico; Niehaus, Frank; Eck, Jürgen; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz

    2015-09-20

    The industrially utilised β-galactosidases from Kluyveromyces spp. and Aspergillus spp. feature undesirable kinetic properties in praxis, such as an unsatisfactory lactose affinity (KM) and product inhibition (KI) by galactose. In this study, a metagenome library of about 1.3 million clones was investigated with a three-step activity-based screening strategy in order to find new β-galactosidases with more favourable kinetic properties. Six novel metagenome β-galactosidases (M1-M6) were found with an improved lactose hydrolysis performance in original milk when directly compared to the commercial β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis (GODO-YNL2). The best metagenome candidate, called "M1", was recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) in a bioreactor (volume 35 L), resulting in a total β-galactosidase M1 activity of about 1100 μkatoNPGal,37 °C L(-1). Since milk is a sensitive and complex medium, it has to be processed at 5-10 °C in the dairy industry. Therefore, the β-galactosidase M1 was tested at 8 °C in milk and possessed a good stability (t1/2=21.8 d), a desirably low apparent KM,lactose,8 °C value of 3.8±0.7 mM and a high apparent KI,galactose,8 °C value of 196.6±55.5 mM. A lactose hydrolysis process (milk, 40 nkatlactose mLmilk,8 °C(-1)) was conducted at a scale of 0.5L to compare the performance of M1 with the commercial β-galactosidase from K. lactis (GODO-YNL2). Lactose was completely (>99.99%) hydrolysed by M1 and to 99.6% (w/v) by K. lactis β-galactosidase after 25 h process time. Thus, M1 was able to achieve the limit of <100 mg lactose per litre milk, which is recommended for dairy products labelled as "lactose-free".

  12. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases.

    PubMed

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry.

  13. Lachancea thermotolerans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in simultaneous and sequential co-fermentation: a strategy to enhance acidity and improve the overall quality of wine.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Mirko; Comitini, Francesca; Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    In the last few years there is an increasing interest on the use of mixed fermentation of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts for inoculation of wine fermentations to enhance the quality and improve complexity of wines. In the present work Lachancea (Kluyveromyces) thermotolerans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated in simultaneous and sequential fermentation with the aim to enhance acidity and improve the quality of wine. In this specific pairing of yeast strains in mixed fermentations (S. cerevisiae EC1118 and L. thermotolerans 101), this non-Saccharomyces yeast showed a high level of competitiveness. Nevertheless the S. cerevisiae strain dominated the fermentation over the spontaneous S. cerevisiae strains also under the industrial fermentation conditions. The different condition tested (modalities of inoculum, temperature of fermentation, different grape juice) influenced the specific interactions and the fermentation behaviour of the co-culture of S. cerevisiae and L. thermotolerans. However, some metabolic behaviours such as pH reduction and enhancement of 2-phenylethanol and glycerol, were shown here under all of the conditions tested. The specific chemical profiles of these wines were confirmed by the sensory analysis test, which expressed these results at the tasting level as significant increases in the spicy notes and in terms of total acidity increases. PMID:23200661

  14. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  15. Utilization of concentrated cheese whey for the production of protein concentrate fuel alcohol and alcoholic beverages

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurti, R.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to recover the major components of whey and to develop food applications for their incorporation/conversion into acceptable products of commercial value. Reconstituted dried sweet whey with 36% solids was ultrafiltered to yield a protein concentrate (WPC) and a permeate containing 24% lactose and 3.7% ash. Orange juice fortified up to 2.07% and chocolate milks fortified up to 5.88% total protein levels with WPC containing 45% total protein were acceptable to about 90% of a panel of 24 individuals. Fermentation of demineralized permeate at 30/sup 0/C with Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL Y 2415 adapted to 24% lactose levels, led to 13.7% (v/v) ethanol in the medium at the end of 34 hours. Batch productivity was 3.2 gms. ethanol per liter per hour and conversion efficiency was 84.26% of the theoretical maximum. Alcoholic fermentation of permeate and subsequent distillation produced compounds with desirable aroma characters in such products. This study suggests that there is potential for the production of protein fortified non-alcoholic products and alcoholic beverages of commercial value from whey, thus providing a cost effective solution to the whey utilization problem.

  16. Lachancea thermotolerans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in simultaneous and sequential co-fermentation: a strategy to enhance acidity and improve the overall quality of wine.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Mirko; Comitini, Francesca; Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    In the last few years there is an increasing interest on the use of mixed fermentation of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts for inoculation of wine fermentations to enhance the quality and improve complexity of wines. In the present work Lachancea (Kluyveromyces) thermotolerans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated in simultaneous and sequential fermentation with the aim to enhance acidity and improve the quality of wine. In this specific pairing of yeast strains in mixed fermentations (S. cerevisiae EC1118 and L. thermotolerans 101), this non-Saccharomyces yeast showed a high level of competitiveness. Nevertheless the S. cerevisiae strain dominated the fermentation over the spontaneous S. cerevisiae strains also under the industrial fermentation conditions. The different condition tested (modalities of inoculum, temperature of fermentation, different grape juice) influenced the specific interactions and the fermentation behaviour of the co-culture of S. cerevisiae and L. thermotolerans. However, some metabolic behaviours such as pH reduction and enhancement of 2-phenylethanol and glycerol, were shown here under all of the conditions tested. The specific chemical profiles of these wines were confirmed by the sensory analysis test, which expressed these results at the tasting level as significant increases in the spicy notes and in terms of total acidity increases.

  17. Selected non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are metabolically active during spontaneous and inoculated must fermentations, and by producing a plethora of by-products, they can contribute to the definition of the wine aroma. Thus, use of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for inoculation of wine fermentations is of increasing interest for quality enhancement and improved complexity of wines. We initially characterized 34 non-Saccharomyces yeasts of the genera Candida, Lachancea (Kluyveromyces), Metschnikowia and Torulaspora, and evaluated their enological potential. This confirmed that non-Saccharomyces yeasts from wine-related environments represent a rich sink of unexplored biodiversity for the winemaking industry. From these, we selected four non-Saccharomyces yeasts to combine with starter cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed fermentation trials. The kinetics of growth and fermentation, and the analytical profiles of the wines produced indicate that these non-Saccharomyces strains can be used with S. cerevisiae starter cultures to increase polysaccharide, glycerol and volatile compound production, to reduce volatile acidity, and to increase or reduce the total acidity of the final wines, depending on yeast species and inoculum ratio used. The overall effects of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on fermentation and wine quality were strictly dependent on the Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio that mimicked the differences of fermentation conditions (natural or simultaneous inoculated fermentation).

  18. A DNA replication origin and a replication fork barrier used in vivo in the circular plasmid pKD1.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, L; Irene, C; Aragona, M; Newlon, C S

    2001-10-01

    As in other yeasts, ARS-containing plasmids can be maintained extrachromosomally in Kluyveromyces lactis. Although some fragments of K. lactis DNA have ARS activity in both K. lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it appears that the sequences required for ARS activity in the two yeasts are different. As an approach to a better understanding of ARS structure and function in K. lactis, we analyzed the replication of the circular plasmid pKD1. We identified a 159-bp sequence able to promote autonomous replication of pKD1 in both yeasts; this fragments contains both a sequence related to the S. cerevisiae ARS consensus sequence and a region of 53% identity to the 40-bp sequence essential for K. lactis KARS101 function. By the analysis of in vivo replication intermediates we provide the first direct evidence that DNA replication initiates at or near the K. lactis ARS element. Replication terminates at the cisacting stability locus of pKD1, which functions as a replication fork barrier (RFB) and is necessary for proper plasmid segregation. RFB activity requires the pKDI gene products that are important for plasmid segregation, suggesting a link between DNA replication termination and plasmid segregation in a eukaryotic organism.

  19. Genetic Modification of the Marine-Isolated Yeast Aureobasidium melanogenum P16 for Efficient Pullulan Production from Inulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zai-Chao; Liu, Nan-Nan; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2015-08-01

    In this study, in order to directly and efficiently convert inulin into pullulan, the INU1 gene from Kluyveromyces maximum KM was integrated into the genomic DNA and actively expressed in the high pullulan producer Aureobasidium melanogenum P16 isolated from the mangrove ecosystem. After the ability to produce pullulan from inulin by different transformants was examined, it was found that the recombinant strain EI36, one of the transformants, produced 40.92 U/ml of inulinase activity while its wild-type strain P16 only yielded 7.57 U/ml of inulinase activity. Most (99.27 %) of the inulinase produced by the recombinant strain EI36 was secreted into the culture. During the 10-l fermentation, 70.57 ± 1.3 g/l of pullulan in the fermented medium was attained from inulin (138.0 g/l) within 108 h, high inulinase activity (42.03 U/ml) was produced within 60 h, the added inulin was actively hydrolyzed by the secreted inulinase, and most of the reducing sugars were used by the recombinant strain EI36. This confirmed that the genetically engineered yeast of A. melanogenum strain P16 was suitable for direct pullulan production from inulin.

  20. The human and mouse homologs of the yeat RAD52 gene: cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, assignment to human chromosome 12p12.2-p13, and mRNA expression in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, D.J.; Denison, K.

    1995-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 gene is involved in DNA double-strand break repair and mitotic/meiotic recombination. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of yeast S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Kluyveromyces lactis and chicken is highly conserved. Using the technology of mixed oligonucleotide primed amplification of cDNA (MOPAC), two mouse RAD52 homologous cDNA fragments were amplified and sequenced. Subsequently, we have cloned the cDNA of the human and mouse homologs of yeast RAD52 gene by screening cDNA libraries using the identified mouse cDNA fragments. Sequence analysis of cDNA derived amino acid revealed a highly conserved N-terminus among human, mouse, chicken, and yeast RAD52 genes. The human RAD52 gene was assigned to chromosome 12p12.2-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, R-banding, and DNA analysis of somatic cell hybrids. Unlike chicken RAD52 and mouse RAD51, no significant difference in mouse RAD52 mRNA level was found among mouse heart, brain, spleen, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and testis. In addition to an {approximately}1.9-kb RAD52 mRNA band that is present in all of the tested tissues, an extra mRNA species of {approximately}0.85 kb was detectable in mouse testis. 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Production of recombinant proteins by yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Celik, Eda; Calık, Pınar

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts are widely used in production of recombinant proteins of medical or industrial interest. For each individual product, the most suitable expression system has to be identified and optimized, both on the genetic and fermentative level, by taking into account the properties of the product, the organism and the expression cassette. There is a wide range of important yeast expression hosts including the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Yarrowia lipolytica and Arxula adeninivorans, with various characteristics such as being thermo-tolerant or halo-tolerant, rapidly reaching high cell densities or utilizing unusual carbon sources. Several strains were also engineered to have further advantages, such as humanized glycosylation pathways or lack of proteases. Additionally, with a large variety of vectors, promoters and selection markers to choose from, combined with the accumulated knowledge on industrial-scale fermentation techniques and the current advances in the post-genomic technology, it is possible to design more cost-effective expression systems in order to meet the increasing demand for recombinant proteins and glycoproteins. In this review, the present status of the main and most promising yeast expression systems is discussed. PMID:21964262

  2. Genetic Modification of the Marine-Isolated Yeast Aureobasidium melanogenum P16 for Efficient Pullulan Production from Inulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zai-Chao; Liu, Nan-Nan; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2015-08-01

    In this study, in order to directly and efficiently convert inulin into pullulan, the INU1 gene from Kluyveromyces maximum KM was integrated into the genomic DNA and actively expressed in the high pullulan producer Aureobasidium melanogenum P16 isolated from the mangrove ecosystem. After the ability to produce pullulan from inulin by different transformants was examined, it was found that the recombinant strain EI36, one of the transformants, produced 40.92 U/ml of inulinase activity while its wild-type strain P16 only yielded 7.57 U/ml of inulinase activity. Most (99.27 %) of the inulinase produced by the recombinant strain EI36 was secreted into the culture. During the 10-l fermentation, 70.57 ± 1.3 g/l of pullulan in the fermented medium was attained from inulin (138.0 g/l) within 108 h, high inulinase activity (42.03 U/ml) was produced within 60 h, the added inulin was actively hydrolyzed by the secreted inulinase, and most of the reducing sugars were used by the recombinant strain EI36. This confirmed that the genetically engineered yeast of A. melanogenum strain P16 was suitable for direct pullulan production from inulin. PMID:25985744

  3. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases

    PubMed Central

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry. PMID:26587283

  4. Intracellular β-glucosidases CEL1a and CEL1b are essential for cellulase induction on lactose in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jintao; Zhao, Guolei; Kou, Yanbo; Zhang, Weixin; Zhou, Qingxin; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2014-08-01

    Lactose (1,4-O-β-d-galacto-pyranosyl-d-glucose) induces cellulolytic enzymes in Trichoderma reesei and is in fact one of the most important soluble carbon sources used to produce cellulases on an industrial level. The mechanism underlying the induction is, however, not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the cellular functions of the intracellular β-glucosidases CEL1a and CEL1b in the induction of cellulase genes by lactose in T. reesei. We demonstrated that while CEL1a and CEL1b were functionally equivalent in mediating the induction, the simultaneous absence of these intracellular β-glucosidases abolished cbh1 gene expression on lactose. d-Galactose restored the efficient cellulase gene induction in the Δcel1a strain independently of its reductive metabolism, but not in the Δcel1a Δcel1b strain. A further comparison of the transcriptional responses of the Δcel1a Δcel1b strain complemented with wild-type CEL1a or a catalytically inactive CEL1a version and the Δcel1a strain constitutively expressing CEL1a or the Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidase LAC4 showed that both the CEL1a protein and its glycoside hydrolytic activity were indispensable for cellulase induction by lactose. We also present evidence that intracellular β-glucosidase-mediated lactose induction is further conveyed to XYR1 to ensure the efficiently induced expression of cellulase genes.

  5. Enzymatic hydrolysis of inulin to fructose by glutaraldehyde fixed yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Workman, W E; Day, D F

    1984-08-01

    Inulin, a polyfruction, is found as the reserve carbohydrate in the roots and tubers of various plants (i.e. Jerusalem artichoke, chicory, and dahlia tubers). The beta-fructofuranosidase (inulase) from the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis is of interest because of its industrial potential in fructose syrup and alcohol production from inulin containing plants. We have found that the inulase of K. fragilis can be immobilized in the yeast cells by glutaraldehyde treatment. These cells are resistant to physical and enzymatic destruction. Although the exact nature of the immobilization is not fully understood, the kinetic parameters of the immobilized enzyme are similar to those of the soluble enzyme. No reduction of enzyme activity was observed after glutaraldehyde treatment and glutaraldehyde concentration did not affect enzyme activity. A 96% hydrolysis of dahlia inulin was achieved in 10.5 h with a 9.5% (w/v) fixed enzyme suspension. A Jerusalem artichoke extract containing 16.8%polyfructan was completely hydrolyzed in 3.5 h with a 0.24% (w/v)fixed enzyme suspension. This is a time frame feasible for industrial consideration. PMID:18553476

  6. A novel killer protein from Pichia kluyveri isolated from an Algerian soil: purification and characterization of its in vitro activity against food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Labbani, Fatima-Zohra Kenza; Turchetti, Benedetta; Bennamoun, Leila; Dakhmouche, Scheherazad; Roberti, Rita; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Meraihi, Zahia; Buzzini, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    A novel killer protein (Pkkp) secreted by a Pichia kluyveri strain isolated from an Algerian soil was active against food and beverage spoilage yeasts of the genera Dekkera, Kluyveromyces, Pichia, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Wickerhamomyces and Zygosaccharomyces. After purification by gel filtration chromatography Pkkp revealed an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa with SDS-PAGE. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of purified Pkkp exhibited a high in vitro activity against Dekkera bruxellensis (MICs from 64,000- to 256,000-fold lower than that exhibited by potassium metabisulphite) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MICs from 32,000- to 64,000- fold lower than potassium sorbate). No in vitro synergistic interactions (calculated by FIC index - Σ FIC) were observed when Pkkp was used in combination with potassium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, or ethanol. Pkkp exhibited a dose-response effect against D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae in a low-alcoholic drink and fruit juice, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that Pkkp could be proposed as a novel food-grade compound useful for the control of food and beverage spoilage yeasts. PMID:25618417

  7. Comparative Genomics Reveals Chd1 as a Determinant of Nucleosome Spacing in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Amanda L; Rando, Oliver J

    2015-07-14

    Packaging of genomic DNA into nucleosomes is nearly universally conserved in eukaryotes, and many features of the nucleosome landscape are quite conserved. Nonetheless, quantitative aspects of nucleosome packaging differ between species because, for example, the average length of linker DNA between nucleosomes can differ significantly even between closely related species. We recently showed that the difference in nucleosome spacing between two Hemiascomycete species-Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis-is established by trans-acting factors rather than being encoded in cis in the DNA sequence. Here, we generated several S. cerevisiae strains in which endogenous copies of candidate nucleosome spacing factors are deleted and replaced with the orthologous factors from K. lactis. We find no change in nucleosome spacing in such strains in which H1 or Isw1 complexes are swapped. In contrast, the K. lactis gene encoding the ATP-dependent remodeler Chd1 was found to direct longer internucleosomal spacing in S. cerevisiae, establishing that this remodeler is partially responsible for the relatively long internucleosomal spacing observed in K. lactis. By analyzing several chimeric proteins, we find that sequence differences that contribute to the spacing activity of this remodeler are dispersed throughout the coding sequence, but that the strongest spacing effect is linked to the understudied N-terminal end of Chd1. Taken together, our data find a role for sequence evolution of a chromatin remodeler in establishing quantitative aspects of the chromatin landscape in a species-specific manner.

  8. One-step separation of β-galactosidase from β-lactoglobulin using water-in-oil microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Mazı, Bekir G; Hamamcı, Haluk; Dungan, Stephanie R

    2012-05-01

    Solubilisation of β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis in Aerosol-OT water-in-isooctane microemulsions was measured as a function of buffer type and concentration, pH, and protein concentration. For buffer concentrations above ∼40mM, the enzyme was largely excluded from the droplets. Based on these results, a one-step separation was developed. A protein-containing aqueous feed was injected into an AOT/isooctane solution, with the feed volume slightly in excess of the predicted water solubility. Impurity proteins were entrapped inside the microemulsion droplets that then formed in the organic phase, while the high MW target protein was excluded and entered a newly formed, excess aqueous phase. The separation of β-galactosidase from the test protein β-lactoglobulin was most complete at 100mM KCl salt concentration, where the droplets were large enough to carry β-lactoglobulin but too small for β-galactosidase. At 100mM [KCl], 92% of the total enzyme activity was recovered in a concentrated and virtually pure form. PMID:26434297

  9. Sporadic Distribution of Prion-Forming Ability of Sup35p from Yeasts and Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Edskes, Herman K.; Khamar, Hima J.; Winchester, Chia-Lin; Greenler, Alexandria J.; Zhou, Albert; McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Gorkovskiy, Anton; Wickner, Reed B.

    2014-01-01

    Sup35p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can form the [PSI+] prion, an infectious amyloid in which the protein is largely inactive. The part of Sup35p that forms the amyloid is the region normally involved in control of mRNA turnover. The formation of [PSI+] by Sup35p’s from other yeasts has been interpreted to imply that the prion-forming ability of Sup35p is conserved in evolution, and thus of survival/fitness/evolutionary value to these organisms. We surveyed a larger number of yeast and fungal species by the same criteria as used previously and find that the Sup35p from many species cannot form prions. [PSI+] could be formed by the Sup35p from Candida albicans, Candida maltosa, Debaromyces hansenii, and Kluyveromyces lactis, but orders of magnitude less often than the S. cerevisiae Sup35p converts to the prion form. The Sup35s from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Ashbya gossypii clearly do not form [PSI+]. We were also unable to detect [PSI+] formation by the Sup35ps from Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Magnaporthe grisea, Ustilago maydis, or Cryptococcus neoformans. Each of two C. albicans SUP35 alleles can form [PSI+], but transmission from one to the other is partially blocked. These results suggest that the prion-forming ability of Sup35p is not a conserved trait, but is an occasional deleterious side effect of a protein domain conserved for another function. PMID:25081567

  10. Construction of lactose-assimilating and high-ethanol-producing yeasts by protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Farahnak, F.; Seki, T.; Ryu, D.D.Y.; Ogrydziak, D.

    1986-02-01

    The availability of a yeast strain which is capable of fermenting lactose and at the same time is tolerant to high concentrations of ethanol would be useful for the production of ethanol from lactose. Kluyveromyces fragilis is capable of fermenting lactose, but it is not as tolerant as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high concentrations of ethanol. In this study, the authors have used the protoplast fusion technique to construct hybrids between auxotrophic strains of S. cerevisiae having high ethanol tolerance and an auxotrophic strain of lactose-fermenting K. fragilis isolated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis. The fusants obtained were prototrophic and capable of assimilating lactose and producing ethanol in excess of 13% (vol/vol). The complementation frequency of fusion was about 0.7%. Formation of fusants was confirmed by the increased amount of chromosomal DNA per cell. Fusants contained 8 x 10/sup -9/ to 16 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell as compared with about 4 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell for the parental strains, suggesting that multiple fusions had taken place.

  11. Design and analysis of an immobilized cell reactor with simultaneous product separation: ethanol from whey lactose

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The simultaneous separation of volatile fermentation products from product inhibited fermentations can increase the productivity of a bioreactor by reducing the product concentration in the bioreactor. In this work, a simultaneous tubular reactor separator is developed in which the volatile product is removed from the reacting broth by an inert gas phase. The immobilized cell reactor separator (ICRS) consists of two column reactors: a cocurrent enriching column followed by an countercurrent stripping column. The application of the ICRS concept to the ethanol from whey lactose fermentation was investigated using the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis 2415. An equilibrium stage model of the ICRS was developed including a surface renewal term for an adsorbed monolayer of reacting cells. This model demonstrated the effect of important operational parameters including temperature, pressure, and gas flow rates. Experimental results using yeast adsorbed to 1/4'' ceramic saddles were somewhat unsatisfactory but very high productivities, cell densities, and separation efficiency were obtained using an absorbant column packing in a gas continuous operating mode.

  12. Identification of base and backbone contacts used for DNA sequence recognition and high-affinity binding by LAC9, a transcription activator containing a C6 zinc finger

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, Yuan-Di C.; Nandabalan, K.; Dickson, R.C. )

    1991-04-01

    The LAC9 protein of Kluyveromyces lactis is a transcriptional regulator of genes in the lactose-galactose regulon. To regulate transcription, LAC9 must bind to 17-bp upstream activator sequences (UASs) located in front of each target gene. LAC9 is homologous to the GAL4 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the two proteins must bind DNA in a very similar manner. In this paper the authors show that high-affinity, sequence-specific binding by LAC9 dimers is mediated primarily by 3 bp at each end of the UAS. In addition, at least one half of the UAS must have a GC or CG base pair at position 1 for high-affinity binding; LAC9k binds preferentially to the half containing the GC base pair. Hydroxyl radical footprinting shows that a LAC9 dimer binds an unusually broad region on one face of the DNA helix. Because of the data, they suggest that LAC9 contacts positions 6, 7, and 8, both plus and minus, of the UAS, which are separated by more than one turn of the DNA helix, and twists part way around the DNA, thus protecting the broad region of the minor groove between the major-groove contacts.

  13. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-09-20

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant proteins derived from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The contacts of Scm3 with Cse4 explain its selectivity for the centromere-specific histone; key residues at the interface are conserved in HJURP, indicating a common mechanism for centromeric-histone deposition. We also report the structure of a (Cse4 : H4)2 heterotetramer; comparison with the structure of the Scm3:Cse4:H4 complex shows that tetramer formation and DNA-binding require displacement of Scm3 from the nucleosome core. The two structures together suggest that specific contacts between the chaperone and Cse4, rather than an altered overall structure of the nucleosome core, determine the selective presence of Cse4 at centromeres.

  14. Isolation of fungi from bats of the Amazon basin.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, W Y; Luizão, R C; Barreto da Silva, M do S

    1982-01-01

    A total of 2,886 bats captured in the Amazon Basin of Brazil were processed for the isolation of fungi. From the livers, spleens, and lungs of 155 bats (5.4%), 186 fungal isolates of the genera Candida (123 isolates), Trichosporon (26 isolates), Torulopsis (25 isolates), Kluyveromyces (11 isolates), and Geotrichum (1 isolate) were recovered. Seven known pathogenic species were present: Candida parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, C. albicans, C. stellatoidea, C. pseudotropicalis, Trichosporon beigelii, and Torulopsis glabrata. Twenty-three culture-positive bats showed identical fungal colonization in multiple organs or mixed colonization in a single organ. The fungal isolation rates for individual bat species varied from 1 fungus per 87 bats to 3 fungi per 13 bats, and the mycoflora diversity for members of an individual fungus-bearing bat species varied from 16 fungi per 40 bats to 7 fungi per 6 bats. Of the 38 fungal species isolated, 36 had not been previously described as in vivo bat isolates. Of the 27 culture-positive bat species, 21 had not been previously described as mammalian hosts for medically or nonmedically important fungi. PMID:6890326

  15. Novel features of ARS selection in budding yeast Lachancea kluyveri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The characterization of DNA replication origins in yeast has shed much light on the mechanisms of initiation of DNA replication. However, very little is known about the evolution of origins or the evolution of mechanisms through which origins are recognized by the initiation machinery. This lack of understanding is largely due to the vast evolutionary distances between model organisms in which origins have been examined. Results In this study we have isolated and characterized autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in Lachancea kluyveri - a pre-whole genome duplication (WGD) budding yeast. Through a combination of experimental work and rigorous computational analysis, we show that L. kluyveri ARSs require a sequence that is similar but much longer than the ARS Consensus Sequence well defined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, compared with S. cerevisiae and K. lactis, the replication licensing machinery in L. kluyveri seems more tolerant to variations in the ARS sequence composition. It is able to initiate replication from almost all S. cerevisiae ARSs tested and most Kluyveromyces lactis ARSs. In contrast, only about half of the L. kluyveri ARSs function in S. cerevisiae and less than 10% function in K. lactis. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a replication initiation system with novel features and underscore the functional diversity within the budding yeasts. Furthermore, we have developed new approaches for analyzing biologically functional DNA sequences with ill-defined motifs. PMID:22204614

  16. Development of hypoallergenic galacto-oligosaccharides on the basis of allergen analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Watanabe, Yoko; Kimura, Kazumasa; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Mizobuchi, Takahiro; Onoue, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOSs) are recognized as prebiotics beneficial to human health through their abilities to modulate gut microbiota. On the other hand, it has been reported that immediate allergic reactions are caused by a GOS product (Bc-GOS) produced by treating lactose with β-galactosidase derived from Bacillus circulans. The objective of this study was to create a safer GOS product that is less likely to cause GOS-induced allergy (GOS-AL). First, we identified two derivatives of tetrasaccharide sugar chains in Bc-GOS as the factors responsible for GOS-AL by histamine release test (HRT) using blood samples obtained from two GOS-AL patients. Through our search for non-allergic GOS, we developed a new GOS product, SK-GOS, which was produced by catalyzing lactose with β-galactosidase derived from Sporobolomyces singularis and Kluyveromyces lactis. We regard it as a hypoallergic and safe GOS product that does not cause GOS-AL.

  17. Biotransformation of volatile fatty acids by oleaginous and non-oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Schreiberová, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of utilizing volatile fatty acids (VFA)-containing waste substrates from biotechnological and industrial processes was investigated by cultivating both oleaginous (Candida sp., Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, Yarrowia lipolytica) and non-oleaginous (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii) yeast species on acetic acid, propionic acid and a combination of either acid with glucose as carbon and energy sources. Both oleaginous and non-oleaginous yeasts grew on VFA. Oleaginous yeasts accumulated lipids to 15-48% of dry cell weight, non-oleaginous yeasts also grew on VFA and showed comparable biomass yields but the lipid content was only 2-5%. Biomass and lipid yield increased in cultivations on VFA plus glucose. The lipid composition was comparable to plant-derived oils and therefore might be exploitable in biodiesel production; nearly all species, when cultured on propionate, showed a high content of the desirable odd-chain unsaturated FA, especially 17:1 acid. This study points at the wide array of possible applications of many yeasts, even non-oleaginous strains, for biovalorization of industrial wastes. Despite their low lipid content these species are useful because they can readily utilize VFA from waste products and, since they are not biologically hazardous, their biomass can be afterwards used, e.g. as livestock fodder.

  18. Lipid accumulation by oleaginous and non-oleaginous yeast strains in nitrogen and phosphate limitation.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological non-oleaginous ones characterized by high biomass yield (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of biofuel-utilizable and nutritionally valuable lipids. The main objective was to increase lipid accumulation by increasing C/P ratio together with higher C/N ratio, while maintaining high biomass yield. The C/N ratio of 30 was found to lead to higher biomass content and the total lipid content increased significantly with higher C/P ratio. With higher ratios of both C/N and C/P, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids (FAs) in cell lipids increased while polyunsaturated FAs decreased. Oleaginous yeast species had a lower proportion of unsaturated FAs (approx. 80 %) than non-oleaginous strains (approx. 90 %). At a C/N ratio of 30 and C/P ratio 1043, T. cutaneum produced a high amount of ω-6 unsaturated linoleic acid, the precursor of some prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and thromboxanes, while Candida sp. and K. polysporus accumulated a high content of palmitoleic acid.

  19. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  20. The role of PaAAC1 encoding a mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier in the biosynthesis of extracellular glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, in the basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Ito, Emi; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2010-07-01

    Pseudozyma antarctica produces large amounts of the glycolipid biosurfactants known as mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which show not only excellent surface-active properties but also versatile biochemical actions. A gene homologous with a mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier was dominantly expressed in P. antarctica under MEL-producing conditions on the basis of previous gene expression analysis. The gene encoding the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier of P. antarctica (PaAAC1) contained a putative open reading frame of 954 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 317 amino acids. The deduced translation product shared high identity of 66%, 70%, 69%, 74%, 75% and 52% with the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AAC1), S. cerevisiae (AAC2), S. cerevisiae (AAC3), Kluyveromyces lactis (KlAAC), Neurospora crassa (NcAAC) and human (ANT1), respectively, and conserved the consensus sequences of all ADP/ATP carrier proteins. The gene expression by introducing a plasmid pUXV1-PaAAC1 into the yeast cells increased the MEL production. In addition, the expression of PaAAC1 in which the conserved arginine and leucine required for ATP transport activity were replaced with isoleucine and serine, respectively, failed to increase MEL production. Accordingly, these results suggest that PaAAC1 encoding a mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier should be involved in MEL biosynthesis in the yeast. PMID:20146402

  1. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3.

    PubMed

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C

    2011-06-01

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant proteins derived from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The contacts of Scm3 with Cse4 explain its selectivity for the centromere-specific histone; key residues at the interface are conserved in HJURP, indicating a common mechanism for centromeric-histone deposition. We also report the structure of a (Cse4 : H4)(2) heterotetramer; comparison with the structure of the Scm3:Cse4:H4 complex shows that tetramer formation and DNA-binding require displacement of Scm3 from the nucleosome core. The two structures together suggest that specific contacts between the chaperone and Cse4, rather than an altered overall structure of the nucleosome core, determine the selective presence of Cse4 at centromeres. PMID:21606327

  2. Ndc10 is a platform for inner kinetochore assembly in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    Kinetochores link centromeric DNA to spindle microtubules and ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In point-centromere yeasts, the CBF3 complex Skp1-Ctf13-(Cep3)(2)-(Ndc10)(2) recognizes a conserved centromeric DNA element through contacts made by Cep3 and Ndc10. We describe here the five-domain organization of Kluyveromyces lactis Ndc10 and the structure at 2.8 Å resolution of domains I-II (residues 1-402) bound to DNA. The structure resembles tyrosine DNA recombinases, although it lacks both endonuclease and ligase activities. Structural and biochemical data demonstrate that each subunit of the Ndc10 dimer binds a separate fragment of DNA, suggesting that Ndc10 stabilizes a DNA loop at the centromere. We describe in vitro association experiments showing that specific domains of Ndc10 interact with each of the known inner-kinetochore proteins or protein complexes in budding yeast. We propose that Ndc10 provides a central platform for inner-kinetochore assembly. PMID:22139014

  3. Autoselection of cytoplasmic yeast virus like elements encoding toxin/antitoxin systems involves a nuclear barrier for immunity gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kast, Alene; Voges, Raphael; Schroth, Michael; Schaffrath, Raffael; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-05-01

    Cytoplasmic virus like elements (VLEs) from Kluyveromyces lactis (Kl), Pichia acaciae (Pa) and Debaryomyces robertsiae (Dr) are extremely A/T-rich (>75%) and encode toxic anticodon nucleases (ACNases) along with specific immunity proteins. Here we show that nuclear, not cytoplasmic expression of either immunity gene (PaORF4, KlORF3 or DrORF5) results in transcript fragmentation and is insufficient to establish immunity to the cognate ACNase. Since rapid amplification of 3' ends (RACE) as well as linker ligation of immunity transcripts expressed in the nucleus revealed polyadenylation to occur along with fragmentation, ORF-internal poly(A) site cleavage due to the high A/T content is likely to prevent functional expression of the immunity genes. Consistently, lowering the A/T content of PaORF4 to 55% and KlORF3 to 46% by gene synthesis entirely prevented transcript cleavage and permitted functional nuclear expression leading to full immunity against the respective ACNase toxin. Consistent with a specific adaptation of the immunity proteins to the cognate ACNases, cross-immunity to non-cognate ACNases is neither conferred by PaOrf4 nor KlOrf3. Thus, the high A/T content of cytoplasmic VLEs minimizes the potential of functional nuclear recruitment of VLE encoded genes, in particular those involved in autoselection of the VLEs via a toxin/antitoxin principle. PMID:25973601

  4. Repeated capture of a cytoplasmic linear plasmid by the host nucleus in Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Satwika, Dhira; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2012-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a halotolerant yeast species that has been shown to carry various nuclear genes of plasmid or viral origin (NUPAVs). However, a recent ancestor of such NUPAVs has not been identified. Here we determined for the first time the molecular structure of an entire cytoplasmic linear plasmid, pDH1A, indigenous to this species. The element is related to non-autonomous killer plasmids from Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia acaciae and carries a B-type DNA polymerase as well as remnants of a killer toxin system, a secreted chitin-binding protein. Other essential toxin subunits or an immunity function, however, appear to be lost, while two additional small open reading frames are present. Transcripts for all four genes located on pDH1A could be verified by RT-PCR. Interestingly, all genes from pDH1A could be identified as ancestors of NUPAVs located at different chromosomes within the nucleus of D. hansenii, suggesting repeated nuclear capture of fragments originating from pDH1A. PMID:22434608

  5. DNA damage induced by the anticodon nuclease from a Pichia acaciae killer strain is linked to ribonucleotide reductase depletion.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-02-01

    Virus like element (VLE) encoded killer toxins of Pichia acaciae and Kluyveromyces lactis kill target cells through anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activity directed against tRNA(Gln) and tRNA(Glu) respectively. Not only does tRNA cleavage disable translation, it also affects DNA integrity as well. Consistent with DNA damage, which is involved in toxicity, target cells' mutation frequencies are elevated upon ACNase exposure, suggesting a link between translational integrity and genome surveillance. Here, we analysed whether ACNase action impedes the periodically and highly expressed S-phase specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and proved that RNR expression is severely affected by PaT. Because RNR catalyses the rate-limiting step in dNTP synthesis, mutants affected in dNTP synthesis were scrutinized with respect to ACNase action. Mutations elevating cellular dNTPs antagonized the action of both the above ACNases, whereas mutations lowering dNTPs aggravated toxicity. Consistently, prevention of tRNA cleavage in elp3 or trm9 mutants, which both affect the wobble uridine modification of the target tRNA, suppressed the toxin hypersensitivity of a dNTP synthesis mutant. Moreover, dNTP synthesis defects exacerbated the PaT ACNase sensitivity of cells defective in homologous recombination, proving that dNTP depletion is responsible for subsequent DNA damage. PMID:26247322

  6. DNA repair defects sensitize cells to anticodon nuclease yeast killer toxins.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Roland; Wemhoff, Sabrina; Krause, Jens; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2011-03-01

    Killer toxins from Kluyveromyces lactis (zymocin) and Pichia acaciae (PaT) were found to disable translation in target cells by virtue of anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities on tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Gln), respectively. Surprisingly, however, ACNase exposure does not only impair translation, but also affects genome integrity and concomitantly DNA damage occurs. Previously, it was shown that homologous recombination protects cells from ACNase toxicity. Here, we have analyzed whether other DNA repair pathways are functional in conferring ACNase resistance as well. In addition to HR, base excision repair (BER) and postreplication repair (PRR) promote clear resistance to either, PaT and zymocin. Comparative toxin sensitivity analysis of BER mutants revealed that its ACNase protective function is due to the endonucleases acting on apurinic (AP) sites, whereas none of the known DNA glycosylases is involved. Because PaT and zymocin require the presence of the ELP3/TRM9-dependent wobble uridine modification 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl (mcm(5)) for tRNA cleavage, we analyzed toxin response in DNA repair mutants additionally lacking such tRNA modifications. ACNase resistance caused by elp3 or trm9 mutations was found to rescue hypersensitivity of DNA repair defects, consistent with DNA damage to occur as a consequence of tRNA cleavage. The obtained genetic evidence promises to reveal new aspects into the mechanism linking translational fidelity and genome surveillance. PMID:21188417

  7. Recovery and purification of a Kluyvermyces lactis β-galactosidase by Mixed Mode Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lima, Micael de Andrade; de Freitas, Maria de Fátima Matos; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; da Silva Junior, Ivanildo José

    2016-03-15

    Mixed Mode Chromatography (MMC) is a potential separation technique that allows simultaneous ionic and hydrophobic interactions between the adsorbent and the adsorbate. The aim of this work was to assess the recovery and purification of a Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidase employing MMC. Protein precipitation and dialysis were performed in order to concentrate the enzyme of interest and eliminate cell debris and other interferences inherent in the fermentation medium. The best conditions for both adsorption and desorption were attained by a non-factorial Central Composite Experimental Design and employed in the chromatographic runs with resin CAPTO MMC. Fermentation yielded mean values of total enzyme concentration of 0.44 mg/mL, enzymatic activity (employing lactose as a substrate) of 74 U/mL and specific activity of 168 U/mg. The Purification Factor (PF) obtained was of 1.17. After precipitation and dialysis, the subsequent chromatographic run resulted in recovery values ​​of 41.0 and 48.2% of total protein concentration and enzymatic activity, respectively. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis confirmed the purification evolution throughout the unit operations employed, attesting the feasibility of the technique to obtain enzymes with not only considerable degree of purity but also possessing high-added value.

  8. Manipulation of nanofiber-based β-galactosidase nanoenvironment for enhancement of galacto-oligosaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Misson, Mailin; Dai, Sheng; Jin, Bo; Chen, Bing H; Zhang, Hu

    2016-03-20

    The nanoenvironment of nanobiocatalysts, such as local hydrophobicity, pH and charge density, plays a significant role in optimizing the enzymatic selectivity and specificity. In this study, Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidase (Gal) was assembled onto polystyrene nanofibers (PSNFs) to form PSNF-Gal nanobiocatalysts. We proposed that local hydrophobicity on the nanofiber surface could expel water molecules so that the transgalactosylation would be preferable over hydrolysis during the bioconversion of lactose, thus improve the galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) yield. PSNFs were fabricated by electro-spinning and the operational parameters were optimized to obtain the nanofibers with uniform size and ordered alignment. The resulting nanofibers were functionalized for enzyme immobilization through a chemical oxidation method. The functionalized PSNF improved the enzyme adsorption capacity up to 3100 mg/g nanofiber as well as enhanced the enzyme stability with 80% of its original activity. Importantly, the functionalized PSNF-Gal significantly improved the GOS yield and the production rate was up to 110 g/l/h in comparison with 37 g/l/h by free β-galactosidase. Our research findings demonstrate that the localized nanoenvironment of the PSNF-Gal nanobiocatalysts favour transgalactosylation over hydrolysis in lactose bioconversion.

  9. Structure of yeast Argonaute with guide RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Kotaro; Weinberg, David E.; Bartel, David P.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-06-26

    The RNA-induced silencing complex, comprising Argonaute and guide RNA, mediates RNA interference. Here we report the 3.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of Kluyveromyces polysporus Argonaute (KpAGO) fortuitously complexed with guide RNA originating from small-RNA duplexes autonomously loaded and processed by recombinant KpAGO. Despite their diverse sequences, guide-RNA nucleotides 1-8 are positioned similarly, with sequence-independent contacts to bases, phosphates and 2{prime}-hydroxyl groups pre-organizing the backbone of nucleotides 2-8 in a near-A-form conformation. Compared with prokaryotic Argonautes, KpAGO has numerous surface-exposed insertion segments, with a cluster of conserved insertions repositioning the N domain to enable full propagation of guide-target pairing. Compared with Argonautes in inactive conformations, KpAGO has a hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes an expanded and repositioned loop, which inserts an invariant glutamate into the catalytic pocket. Mutation analyses and analogies to ribonuclease H indicate that insertion of this glutamate finger completes a universally conserved catalytic tetrad, thereby activating Argonaute for RNA cleavage.

  10. Thermodynamic characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA pseudoknot domain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Kim, Yoora; Cruickshank, Charmion; Theimer, Carla A

    2012-05-01

    Recent structural and functional characterization of the pseudoknot in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA (TLC1) has demonstrated that tertiary structure is present, similar to that previously described for the human and Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNAs. In order to biophysically characterize the identified pseudoknot secondary and tertiary structures, UV-monitored thermal denaturation experiments, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and native gel electrophoresis were used to investigate various potential conformations in the pseudoknot domain in vitro, in the absence of the telomerase protein. Here, we demonstrate that alternative secondary structures are not mutually exclusive in the S. cerevisiae telomerase RNA, tertiary structure contributes 1.5 kcal mol(-1) to the stability of the pseudoknot (≈ half the stability observed for the human telomerase pseudoknot), and identify additional base pairs in the 3' pseudoknot stem near the helical junction. In addition, sequence conservation in an adjacent overlapping hairpin appears to prevent dimerization and alternative conformations in the context of the entire pseudoknot-containing region. Thus, this work provides a detailed in vitro characterization of the thermodynamic features of the S. cerevisiae TLC1 pseudoknot region for comparison with other telomerase RNA pseudoknots.

  11. In vivo continuous evolution of genes and pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Nathan; Abatemarco, Joseph; Sun, Jie; Wagner, James M.; Schmitz, Alexander; Alper, Hal S.

    2016-01-01

    Directed evolution remains a powerful, highly generalizable approach for improving the performance of biological systems. However, implementations in eukaryotes rely either on in vitro diversity generation or limited mutational capacities. Here we synthetically optimize the retrotransposon Ty1 to enable in vivo generation of mutant libraries up to 1.6 × 107 l−1 per round, which is the highest of any in vivo mutational generation approach in yeast. We demonstrate this approach by using in vivo-generated libraries to evolve single enzymes, global transcriptional regulators and multi-gene pathways. When coupled to growth selection, this approach enables in vivo continuous evolution (ICE) of genes and pathways. Through a head-to-head comparison, we find that ICE libraries yield higher-performing variants faster than error-prone PCR-derived libraries. Finally, we demonstrate transferability of ICE to divergent yeasts, including Kluyveromyces lactis and alternative S. cerevisiae strains. Collectively, this work establishes a generic platform for rapid eukaryotic-directed evolution across an array of target cargo. PMID:27748457

  12. Biotransformation of volatile fatty acids by oleaginous and non-oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Schreiberová, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of utilizing volatile fatty acids (VFA)-containing waste substrates from biotechnological and industrial processes was investigated by cultivating both oleaginous (Candida sp., Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, Yarrowia lipolytica) and non-oleaginous (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii) yeast species on acetic acid, propionic acid and a combination of either acid with glucose as carbon and energy sources. Both oleaginous and non-oleaginous yeasts grew on VFA. Oleaginous yeasts accumulated lipids to 15-48% of dry cell weight, non-oleaginous yeasts also grew on VFA and showed comparable biomass yields but the lipid content was only 2-5%. Biomass and lipid yield increased in cultivations on VFA plus glucose. The lipid composition was comparable to plant-derived oils and therefore might be exploitable in biodiesel production; nearly all species, when cultured on propionate, showed a high content of the desirable odd-chain unsaturated FA, especially 17:1 acid. This study points at the wide array of possible applications of many yeasts, even non-oleaginous strains, for biovalorization of industrial wastes. Despite their low lipid content these species are useful because they can readily utilize VFA from waste products and, since they are not biologically hazardous, their biomass can be afterwards used, e.g. as livestock fodder. PMID:26323601

  13. Precursor directed biosynthesis of odd-numbered fatty acids by different yeasts.

    PubMed

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Kolouchová, Irena; Sigler, Karel

    2015-09-01

    Precursor-directed biosynthesis was used for directed preparation of positional isomers of heptadecanoic acid (17:1), which have convenient pharmacological properties. Cultivation of Candida sp., Kluyveromyces polysporus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Yarrowia lipolytica on 20 g/L glucose, 4 g/L acetic, or 4 g/L propionic acids yielded different proportions of 17:1. Cultivation on carbon sources with even numbers of carbon atoms (glucose and acetic acid) produced preferentially 8Z- and 10Z-heptadecenoic acids in about equal amounts, in agreement with the proposed biosynthesis of fatty acids, whereas cultivation on propionic acid as the only carbon source produced over 90 % of total fatty acids of 9-17:1 out of all possible positional isomers. The structures of positional isomers of 17:1 acid were determined using dimethyl disulfides of fatty acid methyl esters. In cultivation of Candida sp. on propionic acid, the yield of heptadecenoic acid reached 111 mg/L cultivation medium. Principal component analysis was used for identifying the effect of cultivation conditions on the production of the 17:1 acid by individual yeast strains. PMID:25813199

  14. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, David E.; Nakanishi, Kotaro; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Bartel, David P.

    2011-09-20

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  15. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    D Weinberg; K Nakanishi; D Patel; D Bartel

    2011-12-31

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  16. Phenylpropanoid Glycoside Analogues: Enzymatic Synthesis, Antioxidant Activity and Theoretical Study of Their Free Radical Scavenger Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    López-Munguía, Agustín; Hernández-Romero, Yanet; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Miranda-Molina, Alfonso; Regla, Ignacio; Martínez, Ana; Castillo, Edmundo

    2011-01-01

    Phenylpropanoid glycosides (PPGs) are natural compounds present in several medicinal plants that have high antioxidant power and diverse biological activities. Because of their low content in plants (less than 5% w/w), several chemical synthetic routes to produce PPGs have been developed, but their synthesis is a time consuming process and the achieved yields are often low. In this study, an alternative and efficient two-step biosynthetic route to obtain natural PPG analogues is reported for the first time. Two galactosides were initially synthesized from vanillyl alcohol and homovanillyl alcohol by a transgalactosylation reaction catalyzed by Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidase in saturated lactose solutions with a 30%–35% yield. To synthesize PPGs, the galactoconjugates were esterified with saturated and unsaturated hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives using Candida antarctica Lipase B (CaL-B) as a biocatalyst with 40%–60% yields. The scavenging ability of the phenolic raw materials, intermediates and PPGs was evaluated by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH•) method. It was found that the biosynthesized PPGs had higher scavenging abilities when compared to ascorbic acid, the reference compound, while their antioxidant activities were found similar to that of natural PPGs. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to determine that the PPGs antioxidant mechanism proceeds through a sequential proton loss single electron transfer (SPLET). The enzymatic process reported in this study is an efficient and versatile route to obtain PPGs from different phenylpropanoid acids, sugars and phenolic alcohols. PMID:21674039

  17. RWD domain: a recurring module in kinetochore architecture shown by a Ctf19-Mcm21 complex structure

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitzberger, Florian; Harrison, Stephen C

    2012-04-30

    The proteins Ctf19, Okp1, Mcm21 and Ame1 are the components of COMA, a subassembly of budding-yeast kinetochores. We have determined the crystal structure of a conserved COMA subcomplex - the Ctf19 - Mcm21 heterodimer - from Kluyveromyces lactis. Both proteins contain 'double-RWD' domains, which together form a Y-shaped framework with flexible N-terminal extensions. The kinetochore proteins Csm1, Spc24 and Spc25 have related single RWD domains, and Ctf19 and Mcm21 associate with pseudo-twofold symmetry analogous to that in the Csm1 homodimer and the Spc24-Spc25 heterodimer. The double-RWD domain core of the Ctf19-Mcm21 heterodimer is sufficient for association with Okp1-Ame1; the less conserved N-terminal regions may interact with components of a more extensive 'CTF19 complex'. Our structure shows the RWD domain to be a recurring module of kinetochore architecture that may be present in other kinetochore substructures. Like many eukaryotic molecular machines, kinetochores may have evolved from simpler assemblies by multiplication of a few ancestral modules.

  18. Carbohydrate and energy-yielding metabolism in non-conventional yeasts.

    PubMed

    Flores, C L; Rodríguez, C; Petit, T; Gancedo, C

    2000-10-01

    Sugars are excellent carbon sources for all yeasts. Since a vast amount of information is available on the components of the pathways of sugar utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae it has been tacitly assumed that other yeasts use sugars in the same way. However, although the pathways of sugar utilization follow the same theme in all yeasts, important biochemical and genetic variations on it exist. Basically, in most non-conventional yeasts, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, respiration in the presence of oxygen is prominent for the use of sugars. This review provides comparative information on the different steps of the fundamental pathways of sugar utilization in non-conventional yeasts: glycolysis, fermentation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and respiration. We consider also gluconeogenesis and, briefly, catabolite repression. We have centered our attention in the genera Kluyveromyces, Candida, Pichia, Yarrowia and Schizosaccharomyces, although occasional reference to other genera is made. The review shows that basic knowledge is missing on many components of these pathways and also that studies on regulation of critical steps are scarce. Information on these points would be important to generate genetically engineered yeast strains for certain industrial uses.

  19. [Rapid identification and susceptibility to killer toxins of yeasts isolated from non-systemic mycoses].

    PubMed

    Sangorrín, M P; Lopes, C A; Rivero, A; Caballero, A C

    2007-01-01

    Rapid identification and susceptibility to killer toxins of yeasts isolated from non-systemic mycoses. The use of quick and reliable yeast identification methods, as well as the development of new antifungal agents with more specific targets, will enable a more efficient treatment of mycoses. In the present work, a total of 53 clinical isolates obtained from non-systemic infections in Neuquén Hospitals and an ophthalmologic clinic in Buenos Aires during 2005, were identified by means of a rapid molecular method (ITS1-5.8S ADNr-ITS2 PCR-RFLP). Additionally, the killer susceptibility of the isolates was tested against reference and indigenous killer yeasts on plate tests. Eight yeast species were identified among the clinical isolates: Candida albicans (52%), Candida parapsilosis (17%), Candida tropicalis (10%), Candida krusei (5%), Candida glabrata (4%), Candida guilliermondii (4%), Kluyveromyces lactis (4%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4%). Sixty-nine percent of the isolates corresponding to the predominant species (C. albicans) were related to vaginal infections. On the other hand, 61% of the yeasts associated with ocular infections were identified as C. parapsilosis. Two indigenous killer isolates DVMais5 and HCMeiss5, belonging to Pichia anomala and P. kluyveri respectively, exhibited the broadest killer spectrum against clinical isolates.

  20. Galactooligosaccharides formation during enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose: towards a prebiotic-enriched milk.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Colinas, Barbara; Fernandez-Arrojo, Lucia; Ballesteros, Antonio O; Plou, Francisco J

    2014-02-15

    The formation of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) in skim milk during treatment with several commercial β-galactosidases (Bacillus circulans, Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae) was analysed in detail, at 4 and 40°C. The maximum GOS concentration was obtained at a lactose conversion of approximately 40-50% with B. circulans and A. oryzae β-galactosidases, and at 95% lactose depletion for K. lactis β-galactosidase. Using an enzyme dosage of 0.1% (v/v), the maximum GOS concentration with K. lactis β-galactosidase was achieved in 1 and 5h at 40 and 4 °C, respectively. With this enzyme, it was possible to obtain a treated milk with 7.0 g/L GOS - the human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) concentration is between 5 and 15 g/L--and with a low content of residual lactose (2.1g/L, compared with 44-46 g/L in the initial milk sample). The major GOS synthesised by this enzyme were 6-galactobiose [Gal-β(1 → 6)-Gal], allolactose [Gal-β(1 → 6)-Glc] and 6'-O-β-galactosyl-lactose [Gal-β(1 → 6)-Gal-β(1 → 4)-Glc].

  1. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases.

    PubMed

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry. PMID:26587283

  2. Probiotics for animal nutrition in the European Union. Regulation and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Anadón, Arturo; Martínez-Larrañaga, Maria Rosa; Aranzazu Martínez, Maria

    2006-06-01

    Probiotics are alive micro-organisms, generally bacteria but also yeasts than, when ingested alive in sufficient amount, they have a positive effect on the health going beyond the nutritional ones commonly known. Probiotics may operate through a nutritional and/or health or sanitary effect. Micro-organisms used in animal feed in the EU are mainly bacterial strains of Gram-positive bacteria belonging to the types Bacillus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and strains of yeast belonging to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae species and kluyveromyces. While most of the species and genera are apparently safe, certain micro-organisms may be problematic, particularly the enterococci, which may harbour transmissible antibiotic resistance determinants and bacilli, specially those belonging to the Bacillus cereus group that are known to produce enterotoxins and an emetic toxin. The history and the current legislation in the European Union on probiotics feed additives including the requirements for the safety assessment for the target animal species, consumers, workers, and environment are presented. PMID:16563585

  3. Chemical composition and in vitro antimicrobial activities of the essential oils from endemic Psiadia species growing in mauritius.

    PubMed

    Govinden-Soulange, Joyce; Magan, Naresh; Gurib-Fakim, Ameenah; Gauvin, Anne; Smadja, Jaqueline; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2004-11-01

    The composition of the leaf oils, obtained by hydrodistillation, of five endemic Psiadia species of the Asteraceae family were studied by GC/MS on both polar and non-polar columns. The analysis showed that the volatile components of the oils were made up essentially of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, aliphatics and other shikimic acid derivatives. With respect to the non-volatile components, great variations were observed: P. lithospermifolia contained (E)-isoasarone (51.5%); P. penninervia: eugenol (5.1%); P. terebinthina: eugenyl-acetate (4.0%); P. viscosa: pentyl-4-(1-methylethyl benzoate) (25.8%); P. arguta: isoeugenol (56.5%). In vitro antimicrobial assays using the agar-well diffusion method, revealed that most of the oils were not very active against the tested microorganisms except for that of P. lithospermifolia, which significantly inhibited the growth of Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Aspergillus ochraceus, Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces lactis and Fusarium moniliforme. This activity has been attributed to the presence of delta-elemene, (E)-farnesene, alpha-curcumene, selina-4,7(11)-diene, (E,Z)-alpha-farnesene, beta-bisabolene some of which have established antimicrobial profiles. Likewise, the fungi toxic action of the oil of P. arguta against Aspergillus ochraceus, Candida pseudotropicalis, and Fusarium moniliforme, may be attributed to the presence of isoeugenol, eugenol being known to be mycotoxic especially against Aspergillus species. PMID:15516729

  4. An Effective Big Data Supervised Imbalanced Classification Approach for Ortholog Detection in Related Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Galpert, Deborah; Del Río, Sara; Herrera, Francisco; Ancede-Gallardo, Evys; Antunes, Agostinho; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin

    2015-01-01

    Orthology detection requires more effective scaling algorithms. In this paper, a set of gene pair features based on similarity measures (alignment scores, sequence length, gene membership to conserved regions, and physicochemical profiles) are combined in a supervised pairwise ortholog detection approach to improve effectiveness considering low ortholog ratios in relation to the possible pairwise comparison between two genomes. In this scenario, big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance between ortholog and nonortholog pair classes allow for an effective scaling solution built from two genomes and extended to other genome pairs. The supervised approach was compared with RBH, RSD, and OMA algorithms by using the following yeast genome pairs: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Schizosaccharomyces pombe as benchmark datasets. Because of the large amount of imbalanced data, the building and testing of the supervised model were only possible by using big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance. Evaluation metrics taking low ortholog ratios into account were applied. From the effectiveness perspective, MapReduce Random Oversampling combined with Spark SVM outperformed RBH, RSD, and OMA, probably because of the consideration of gene pair features beyond alignment similarities combined with the advances in big data supervised classification. PMID:26605337

  5. Survival of cheese-ripening microorganisms in a dynamic simulator of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Adouard, Nadège; Magne, Laurent; Cattenoz, Thomas; Guillemin, Hervé; Foligné, Benoît; Picque, Daniel; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    A mixture of nine microorganisms (six bacteria and three yeasts) from the microflora of surface-ripened cheeses were subjected to in vitro digestive stress in a three-compartment "dynamic gastrointestinal digester" (DIDGI). We studied the microorganisms (i) grown separately in culture medium only (ii) grown separately in culture medium and then mixed, (iii) grown separately in culture medium and then included in a rennet gel and (iv) grown together in smear-ripened cheese. The yeasts Geotrichum candidum, Kluyveromyces lactis and Debaryomyces hansenii, were strongly resistant to the whole DIDGI process (with a drop in viable cell counts of less than <1 log CFU mL(-1)) and there were no significant differences between lab cultures and cheese-grown cultures. Ripening bacteria such as Hafnia alvei survived gastric stress less well when grown in cheese (with no viable cells after 90 min of exposure of the cheese matrix, compared with 6 CFU mL(-1) in lab cultures). The ability of Corynebacterium casei and Staphylococcus equorum to withstand digestive stress was similar for cheese and pure culture conditions. When grow in a cheese matrix, Brevibacterium aurantiacum and Arthrobacter arilaitensis were clearly more sensitive to the overall digestive process than when grown in pure cultures. Lactococcus lactis displayed poorer survival in gastric and duodenal compartments when it had been grown in cheese. In vivo experiments in BALB/c mice agreed with the DIDGI experiments and confirmed the latter's reliability.

  6. Spectroscopic studies, antimicrobial activities and crystal structures of N-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzalidene)1-aminonaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünver, Hüseyin; Yıldız, Mustafa; Dülger, Başaran; Özgen, Özen; Kendi, Engin; Durlu, Tahsin Nuri

    2005-03-01

    Schiff base N-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzalidene)1-aminonaphthalene has been synthesized from the reaction of 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde with 1-aminonaphthalene. The compound were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-visible techniques. The UV-visible spectra of the Schiff base were studied in polar and nonpolar solvents in acidic and basic media. The structure of the compound has been examined cyrstallographically. There are two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. It crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with unit cell parameters: a=14, 602(2), b=5,800(1), c=16, 899(1) Å, V=1394.4(2) Å 3, Dx=1.321 g cm -3 and Z=4. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods and refined by full-matrix least squares to a find R=0.041 of for 1179 observed reflections. The title compound's antimicrobial activities also have been studied. The antimicrobial activities of the ligand has been screened in vitro against the organisms Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Klebsiella pneumoniae UC57, Micrococcus luteus La 2971, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 8427, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Mycobacterium smegmatis CCM 2067, Bacillus cereus ATCC 7064 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313, the yeast cultures Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL 2415, Rhodotorula rubra DSM 70403, Debaryomyces hansenii DSM 70238 and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii DSM 3432.

  7. The use of controlled microbial cenoses in producers' link to increase steady functioning of artificial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, Lydia; Mikheeva, Galina; Somova, Lydia

    The life support systems (LSS) for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems, including biological recycling. Simple ecosystems include 3 links: producers (plants), consumers (man, animals) and reducers (microorganisms). Microorganisms are substantial component of every link of LSS. Higher plants are the traditional regenerator of air and producer of food. They should be used in many successive generations of their reproduction in LSS. Controlled microbiocenoses can increase productivity of producer's link and protect plants from infections. The goal of this work was development of methodological bases of formation of stable, controlled microbiocenoses, intended for increase of productivity of plants and for obtaining ecologically pure production of plants. Main results of our investigations: 1. Experimental microbiocenoses, has been produced in view of the developed methodology on the basis of natural association of microorganisms by long cultivation on specially developed medium. Dominating groups are bacteria of genera: Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Rhodopseudomonas and yeast of genera: Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces, Torulopsis. 2. Optimal parameters of microbiocenosis cultivation (t, pH, light exposure, biogenic elements concentrations) were experimentally established. Conditions of cultivation on which domination of different groups of microbiocenosis have been found. 3. It was shown, that processing of seeds of wheat, oats, bulbs and plants Allium cepa L. (an onions) with microbial association raised energy of germination of seeds and bulbs and promoted the increase (on 20-30 %) of growth green biomass and root system of plants in comparison with the control. This work is supported by grant, Yenissey , 07-04-96806

  8. Ndc10 is a platform for inner kinetochore assembly in budding yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2012-01-10

    Kinetochores link centromeric DNA to spindle microtubules and ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In point-centromere yeasts, the CBF3 complex Skp1-Ctf13-(Cep3){sub 2}-(Ndc10){sub 2} recognizes a conserved centromeric DNA element through contacts made by Cep3 and Ndc10. We describe here the five-domain organization of Kluyveromyces lactis Ndc10 and the structure at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution of domains I-II (residues 1-402) bound to DNA. The structure resembles tyrosine DNA recombinases, although it lacks both endonuclease and ligase activities. Structural and biochemical data demonstrate that each subunit of the Ndc10 dimer binds a separate fragment of DNA, suggesting that Ndc10 stabilizes a DNA loop at the centromere. We describe in vitro association experiments showing that specific domains of Ndc10 interact with each of the known inner-kinetochore proteins or protein complexes in budding yeast. We propose that Ndc10 provides a central platform for inner-kinetochore assembly.

  9. Biochemical Characterization of Kat1: a Domesticated hAT-Transposase that Induces DNA Hairpin Formation and MAT-Switching

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Rajaei, Naghmeh; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Hofer, Anders; Åström, Stefan U.

    2016-01-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis hAT-transposase 1 (Kat1) generates hairpin-capped DNA double strand breaks leading to MAT-switching (MATa to MATα). Using purified Kat1, we demonstrate the importance of terminal inverted repeats and subterminal repeats for its endonuclease activity. Kat1 promoted joining of the transposon end into a target DNA molecule in vitro, a biochemical feature that ties Kat1 to transposases. Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecule analysis revealed that Kat1 can form hexamers when complexed with DNA. Kat1 point mutants were generated in conserved positions to explore structure-function relationships. Mutants of predicted catalytic residues abolished both DNA cleavage and strand-transfer. Interestingly, W576A predicted to be impaired for hairpin formation, was active for DNA cleavage and supported wild type levels of mating-type switching. In contrast, the conserved CXXH motif was critical for hairpin formation because Kat1 C402A/H405A completely blocked hairpinning and switching, but still generated nicks in the DNA. Mutations in the BED zinc-finger domain (C130A/C133A) resulted in an unspecific nuclease activity, presumably due to nonspecific DNA interaction. Kat1 mutants that were defective for cleavage in vitro were also defective for mating-type switching. Collectively, this study reveals Kat1 sharing extensive biochemical similarities with cut and paste transposons despite being domesticated and evolutionary diverged from active transposons. PMID:26902909

  10. Enhancement of lactase activity in milk by reactive sulfhydryl groups induced by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guzmán, J; Cruz-Guerrero, A E; Rodríguez-Serrano, G; López-Munguía, A; Gómez-Ruiz, L; García-Garibay, M

    2002-10-01

    The effects of heat treatments of milk and whey prior to lactose hydrolysis with Kluyveromyces lactis beta-galactosidase were studied. It was observed that heat treatment of milk significantly increases lactase activity, with a maximum activity increase found when milk was heated at 55 degrees C. In whey from 55 up to 75 degrees C, beta-galactosidase activity decreased slightly. Nevertheless, heating whey at 85 degrees C for 30 min raised the rate of hydrolysis significantly. Electrophoretic patterns and UV spectra proved that the activity change correlated with milk protein denaturation, particularly that of beta-lactoglobulin. Heating whey permeate did not increase the enzyme activity as heating whole whey; but heating whey prior to ultrafiltration also resulted in enzyme activation. Measurement of free sulfhydryl (SH) groups in both whey and heated whey permeate showed that the liberation of free SH is highly correlated to the change of the activity. Furthermore, this activation can be reversed by oxidizing the reactive sulfhydryl groups, proving that the observed effect may be related to the release of free SH to the medium, rather than to the denaturation of a thermolabile protein inhibitor.

  11. Advances in Gene Expression in Non-Conventional Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, Sanet; Labuschagne, Michel; Albertyn, Jacobus

    Yeast has been a favoured lower eukaryotic system for the expression and production of recombinant proteins for both basic research and practical applications, and the demand for foreign-gene expression systems is increasing rapidly. Despite the vast amount of information on the molecular biology and physiology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has consequently been the first choice as host system for recombinant protein production in the past, several limitations have been identified in this expression system. These limitations have recently been relieved by the development of expression systems in other yeast species known as ‘ non-conventional yeasts’ or ‘non-Saccharomyces ’ yeasts. With the increasing interest in the biotechnological applications of these yeasts in applied and fundamental studies and processes, the term ‘ non-conventional ’ yeast may well soon become redundant. As there is no universal expression system for heterologous protein production, it is necessary to recognize the merits and demerits of each system in order to make a right choice. This chapter will evaluate the competitive environment of non-conventional expression platforms represented by some of the best-known alternative yeasts systems including Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris and more recently, Arxula adeninivorans.

  12. X-Ray Structure of the Amidase Domain of AtzF, the Allophanate Hydrolase from the Cyanuric Acid-Mineralizing Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Balotra, Sahil; Newman, Janet; Cowieson, Nathan P.; French, Nigel G.; Campbell, Peter M.; Briggs, Lyndall J.; Warden, Andrew C.; Easton, Christopher J.; Peat, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    The activity of the allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, AtzF, provides the final hydrolytic step for the mineralization of s-triazines, such as atrazine and cyanuric acid. Indeed, the action of AtzF provides metabolic access to two of the three nitrogens in each triazine ring. The X-ray structure of the N-terminal amidase domain of AtzF reveals that it is highly homologous to allophanate hydrolases involved in a different catabolic process in other organisms (i.e., the mineralization of urea). The smaller C-terminal domain does not appear to have a physiologically relevant catalytic function, as reported for the allophanate hydrolase of Kluyveromyces lactis, when purified enzyme was tested in vitro. However, the C-terminal domain does have a function in coordinating the quaternary structure of AtzF. Interestingly, we also show that AtzF forms a large, ca. 660-kDa, multienzyme complex with AtzD and AtzE that is capable of mineralizing cyanuric acid. The function of this complex may be to channel substrates from one active site to the next, effectively protecting unstable metabolites, such as allophanate, from solvent-mediated decarboxylation to a dead-end metabolic product. PMID:25362066

  13. A novel killer protein from Pichia kluyveri isolated from an Algerian soil: purification and characterization of its in vitro activity against food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Labbani, Fatima-Zohra Kenza; Turchetti, Benedetta; Bennamoun, Leila; Dakhmouche, Scheherazad; Roberti, Rita; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Meraihi, Zahia; Buzzini, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    A novel killer protein (Pkkp) secreted by a Pichia kluyveri strain isolated from an Algerian soil was active against food and beverage spoilage yeasts of the genera Dekkera, Kluyveromyces, Pichia, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Wickerhamomyces and Zygosaccharomyces. After purification by gel filtration chromatography Pkkp revealed an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa with SDS-PAGE. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of purified Pkkp exhibited a high in vitro activity against Dekkera bruxellensis (MICs from 64,000- to 256,000-fold lower than that exhibited by potassium metabisulphite) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MICs from 32,000- to 64,000- fold lower than potassium sorbate). No in vitro synergistic interactions (calculated by FIC index - Σ FIC) were observed when Pkkp was used in combination with potassium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, or ethanol. Pkkp exhibited a dose-response effect against D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae in a low-alcoholic drink and fruit juice, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that Pkkp could be proposed as a novel food-grade compound useful for the control of food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

  14. Initiation of Translation by Cricket Paralysis Virus IRES Requires Its Translocation in the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Israel S.; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Murshudov, Garib; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cricket paralysis virus internal ribosome entry site (CrPV-IRES) is a folded structure in a viral mRNA that allows initiation of translation in the absence of any host initiation factors. By using recent advances in single-particle electron cryomicroscopy, we have solved the structure of CrPV-IRES bound to the ribosome of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis in both the canonical and rotated states at overall resolutions of 3.7 and 3.8 Å, respectively. In both states, the pseudoknot PKI of the CrPV-IRES mimics a tRNA/mRNA interaction in the decoding center of the A site of the 40S ribosomal subunit. The structure and accompanying factor-binding data show that CrPV-IRES binding mimics a pretranslocation rather than initiation state of the ribosome. Translocation of the IRES by elongation factor 2 (eEF2) is required to bring the first codon of the mRNA into the A site and to allow the start of translation. PMID:24792965

  15. Effect of magnesium cations on the activity and stability of β-galactosidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Pilipenko, O. S.; Poltorak, O. M.; Chukhrai, E. S.

    2007-07-01

    It was shown that the presence of magnesium cations in the reaction mixture increases, approximately twofold, the activity of bacterial Escherichia coli and yeast Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidases but does not affect the activity of bovine liver and fungous Penicillium canescens β-galactosidases. The catalytic constants for E. coli and yeast K. lactis β-galactosidases in the presence of 0.01 M and in the absence of Mg2+ cations were determined (490 and 220 s-1 and 59.8 and 37.4 s-1, respectively). It was shown that the Michaelis constants for these two enzymes are higher in the presence of Mg2+ cations, that the thermal stability of E. coli and K. Lactis β-galactosidases is higher in the presence of 0.01 M Mg2+, and that the effective rate constants of thermal inactivation of the enzymes are two-to eightfold lower, depending on conditions, in the presence of Mg2+ cations. The maximum stabilizing effect of magnesium cations was observed at weak alkaline pH values (7.5-8.5).

  16. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, may not directly regulate nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of spliced tRNAs in response to nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jacqueline B; Mangroo, Dev

    2011-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells adapt to changes in nutrient levels by regulating key processes, such as gene transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and protein translation. Several studies have shown that nuclear export of tRNAs is also regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and rat hepatoma H4IIE cells during nutrient stress. However, recent studies suggest that nutrient stress does not affect nuclear tRNA export in several mammalian cell lines, including rat hepatoma H4IIE. Furthermore, in contrast to previous studies, data reported more recently established that nuclear export of mature tRNAs derived from intron-containing pre-tRNAs, but not mature tRNAs made from intronless precursors, is affected by nutrient stress in several species of Saccharomyces, but not in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis . Here, we provide evidence suggesting that Schizosaccharomyces pombe, like mammalian cells and K. lactis, but unlike Saccharomyces, do not directly regulate nuclear export of mature tRNAs made from intron-containing pre-tRNAs in response to nutrient stress. These studies collectively suggest that regulation of nuclear export of spliced tRNAs to the cytoplasm in response to nutrient availability may be limited to the genus Saccharomyces, which unlike other yeasts and higher eukaryotes produce energy for fermentative growth using respiration-independent pathways by downregulating the citric acid cycle and the electron transport chain.

  17. Survival of cheese-ripening microorganisms in a dynamic simulator of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Adouard, Nadège; Magne, Laurent; Cattenoz, Thomas; Guillemin, Hervé; Foligné, Benoît; Picque, Daniel; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    A mixture of nine microorganisms (six bacteria and three yeasts) from the microflora of surface-ripened cheeses were subjected to in vitro digestive stress in a three-compartment "dynamic gastrointestinal digester" (DIDGI). We studied the microorganisms (i) grown separately in culture medium only (ii) grown separately in culture medium and then mixed, (iii) grown separately in culture medium and then included in a rennet gel and (iv) grown together in smear-ripened cheese. The yeasts Geotrichum candidum, Kluyveromyces lactis and Debaryomyces hansenii, were strongly resistant to the whole DIDGI process (with a drop in viable cell counts of less than <1 log CFU mL(-1)) and there were no significant differences between lab cultures and cheese-grown cultures. Ripening bacteria such as Hafnia alvei survived gastric stress less well when grown in cheese (with no viable cells after 90 min of exposure of the cheese matrix, compared with 6 CFU mL(-1) in lab cultures). The ability of Corynebacterium casei and Staphylococcus equorum to withstand digestive stress was similar for cheese and pure culture conditions. When grow in a cheese matrix, Brevibacterium aurantiacum and Arthrobacter arilaitensis were clearly more sensitive to the overall digestive process than when grown in pure cultures. Lactococcus lactis displayed poorer survival in gastric and duodenal compartments when it had been grown in cheese. In vivo experiments in BALB/c mice agreed with the DIDGI experiments and confirmed the latter's reliability. PMID:26611167

  18. Selection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains for reducing alcohol levels in wine by sugar respiration.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Manuel; Rojas, Virginia; Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar

    2014-07-01

    Respiration of sugars by non-Saccharomyces yeasts has been recently proposed for lowering alcohol levels in wine. Development of industrial fermentation processes based on such an approach requires, amongst other steps, the identification of yeast strains which are able to grow and respire under the relatively harsh conditions found in grape must. This work describes the characterization of a collection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains in order to identify candidate yeast strains for this specific application. It involved the estimation of respiratory quotient (RQ) values under aerated conditions, at low pH and high sugar concentrations, calculation of yields of ethanol and other relevant metabolites, and characterization of growth responses to the main stress factors found during the first stages of alcoholic fermentation. Physiological features of some strains of Metschnikowia pulcherrima or two species of Kluyveromyces, suggest they are suitable for lowering ethanol yields by respiration. The unsuitability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for this purpose was not due to ethanol yields (under aerated conditions they are low enough for a significant reduction in final ethanol content), but to the high acetic acid yields under these growth conditions. According to results from controlled aeration fermentations with one strain of M. pulcherrima, design of an aeration regime allowing for lowering ethanol yields though preserving grape must components from excessive oxidation, would be conceivable.

  19. Application of high-resolution melting analysis for differentiation of spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Mine; Kesmen, Zülal; Özbekar, Esra; Çetin, Bülent; Yetim, Hasan

    2016-09-01

    A new method based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation and classification of the yeast species that cause food spoilage. A total 134 strains belonging to 21 different yeast species were examined to evaluate the discriminative power of HRM analysis. Two different highly variable DNA regions on the 26 rRNA gene were targeted to produce the HRM profiles of each strain. HRM-based grouping was compared and confirmed by (GTG)5 rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis. All of the yeast species belonging to the genera Pichia, Candida, Kazachstania, Kluyveromyces, Debaryomyces, Dekkera, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Ustilago, and Yarrowia, which were produced as species-specific HRM profiles, allowed discrimination at species and/or strain level. The HRM analysis of both target regions provided successful discrimination that correlated with rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis. Consequently, the HRM analysis has the potential for use in the rapid and accurate classification and typing of yeast species isolated from different foods to determine their sources and routes as well as to prevent contamination. PMID:27572511

  20. Genetic and physiological variants of yeast selected from palm wine.

    PubMed

    Ezeronye, O U; Okerentugba, P O

    2001-01-01

    Genetic screening of 1200-palm wine yeasts lead to the selection of fourteen isolates with various genetic and physiological properties. Nine of the isolates were identified as Saccharamyces species, three as Candida species, one as Schizosaccharomyces species and one as Kluyveromyces species. Five of the isolates were wild type parents, two were respiratory deficient mutants (rho) and nine were auxotrophic mutants. Four isolates were heterozygous diploid (alphaa) and two were homozygous diploid (aa/alphaalpha) for the mating a mating types were further identified on mating with type loci. Four Mat alpha and four Mat a types were further identified on mating with standard haploid yeast strains. Forty-five percent sporulated on starvation medium producing tetrads. Fifty-two percent of the four-spored asci contained four viable spores. Maximum specific growth rate [micromax] of the fourteen isolates range from 0.13-0.26, five isolates were able to utilize exogenous nitrate for growth. Percentage alcohol production range between 5.8-8.8% for palm wine yeast, 8.5% for bakers' yeast and 10.4% for brewers yeast. The palm wine yeast were more tolerant to exogenous alcohol but had a low alcohol productivity. Hybridization enhanced alcohol productivity and tolerance in the palm wine yeasts.

  1. Expression and Evolution of the Non-Canonically Translated Yeast Mitochondrial Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Hfa1p

    PubMed Central

    Suomi, Fumi; Menger, Katja E.; Monteuuis, Geoffray; Naumann, Uta; Kursu, V. A. Samuli; Shvetsova, Antonina; Kastaniotis, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes two sequence related acetyl-CoA carboxylases, the cytosolic Acc1p and the mitochondrial Hfa1p, required for respiratory function. Several aspects of expression of the HFA1 gene and its evolutionary origin have remained unclear. Here, we determined the HFA1 transcription initiation sites by 5′ RACE analysis. Using a novel “Stop codon scanning” approach, we mapped the location of the HFA1 translation initiation site to an upstream AUU codon at position −372 relative to the annotated start codon. This upstream initiation leads to production of a mitochondrial targeting sequence preceding the ACC domains of the protein. In silico analyses of fungal ACC genes revealed conserved “cryptic” upstream mitochondrial targeting sequences in yeast species that have not undergone a whole genome duplication. Our Δhfa1 baker's yeast mutant phenotype rescue studies using the protoploid Kluyveromyces lactis ACC confirmed functionality of the cryptic upstream mitochondrial targeting signal. These results lend strong experimental support to the hypothesis that the mitochondrial and cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylases in S. cerevisiae have evolved from a single gene encoding both the mitochondrial and cytosolic isoforms. Leaning on a cursory survey of a group of genes of our interest, we propose that cryptic 5′ upstream mitochondrial targeting sequences may be more abundant in eukaryotes than anticipated thus far. PMID:25503745

  2. From grape berries to wine: population dynamics of cultivable yeasts associated to "Nero di Troia" autochthonous grape cultivar.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Carmela; Tristezza, Mariana; Grieco, Francesco; Spano, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the biodiversity of yeasts isolated from the autochthonous grape variety called "Uva di Troia", monitoring the natural diversity from the grape berries to wine during a vintage. Grapes were collected in vineyards from two different geographical areas and spontaneous alcoholic fermentations (AFs) were performed. Different restriction profiles of ITS-5.8S rDNA region, corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Issatchenkia orientalis, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Candida zemplinina, Issatchenkia terricola, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Metschnikowia chrysoperlae, Pichia fermentans, Hanseniaspora opuntiae and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, were observed. The yeast occurrences varied significantly from both grape berries and grape juices, depending on the sampling location. Furthermore, samples collected at the end of AF revealed the great predominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a high intraspecific biodiversity. This is the first report on the population dynamics of 'cultivable' microbiota diversity of "Uva di Troia" cultivar from the grape to the corresponding wine ("Nero di Troia"), and more general for Southern Italian oenological productions, allowing us to provide the basis for an improved management of wine yeasts (with both non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces) for the production of typical wines with desired unique traits. A certain geographical-dependent variability has been reported, suggesting the need of local based formulation for autochthonous starter cultures, especially in the proportion of the different species/strains in the design of mixed microbial preparations. PMID:26925621

  3. Exploring the yeast biodiversity of green table olive industrial fermentations for technological applications.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Barrio, E; Querol, A; Garrido-Fernández, A; Arroyo-López, F N

    2011-05-27

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in identifying and characterizing the yeast populations associated with diverse types of table olive elaborations because of the many desirable technological properties of these microorganisms. In this work, a total of 199 yeast isolates were directly obtained from industrial green table olive fermentations and genetically identified by means of a RFLP analysis of the 5.8S-ITS region and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the 26S rDNA gene. Candida diddensiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia membranifaciens were the most abundant yeast species isolated from directly brined Aloreña olives, while for Gordal and Manzanilla cultivars they were Candida tropicalis, Pichia galeiformis and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. In the case of Gordal and Manzanilla green olives processed according to the Spanish style, the predominant yeasts were Debaryomyces etchellsii, C. tropicalis, P. galeiformis and Kluyveromyces lactis. Biochemical activities of technological interest were then qualitatively determined for isolates belonging to all yeast species. This preliminary screening identified two isolates of W. anomalus with interesting properties, such as a strong β-glucosidase and esterase activity, and a moderate catalase and lipolytic activity, which were also confirmed by quantitative assays. The results obtained in this survey show the potential use that some yeast species could have as starters, alone or in combination with lactic acid bacteria, during olive processing. PMID:21497408

  4. Yeasts in table olive processing: desirable or spoilage microorganisms?

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F N; Romero-Gil, V; Bautista-Gallego, J; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Jiménez-Díaz, R; García-García, P; Querol, A; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2012-11-01

    Yeasts are unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms isolated from many foods, and are commonly found in table olive processing where they can play a double role. On one hand, these microorganisms can produce spoilage of fruits due to the production of bad odours and flavours, the accumulation of CO(2) leading to swollen containers, the clouding of brines, the softening of fruits and the degradation of lactic acid, which is especially harmful during table olive storage and packaging. But on the other hand, fortunately, yeasts also possess desirable biochemical activities (lipase, esterase, β-glucosidase, catalase, production of killer factors, etc.) with important technological applications in this fermented vegetable. Recently, the probiotic potential of olive yeasts has begun to be evaluated because many species are able to resist the passage through the gastrointestinal tract and show beneficial effects on the host. In this way, yeasts may improve consumers' health by decreasing cholesterol levels, inhibiting pathogens, degrading non assimilated compounds, producing antioxidants and vitamins, adhering to intestinal cells or by maintaining epithelial barrier integrity. Many yeast species, usually also found in table olive processing, such as Wicherhamomyces anomalus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranifaciens and Kluyveromyces lactis, have been reported to exhibit some of these properties. Thus, the selection of the most appropriate strains to be used as starters, alone or in combination with lactic acid bacteria, is a promising research line to develop in a near future which might improve the added value of the commercialized product. PMID:23141644

  5. Efficient Multiplexed Integration of Synergistic Alleles and Metabolic Pathways in Yeasts via CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Andrew A; Walter, Jessica M; Schubert, Max G; Kung, Stephanie H; Hawkins, Kristy; Platt, Darren M; Hernday, Aaron D; Mahatdejkul-Meadows, Tina; Szeto, Wayne; Chandran, Sunil S; Newman, Jack D

    2015-07-29

    CRISPR-Cas genome engineering in yeast has relied on preparation of complex expression plasmids for multiplexed gene knockouts and point mutations. Here we show that co-transformation of a single linearized plasmid with multiple PCR-generated guide RNA (gRNA) and donor DNA cassettes facilitates high-efficiency multiplexed integration of point mutations and large constructs. This technique allowed recovery of marker-less triple-engineering events with 64% efficiency without selection for expression of all gRNAs. The gRNA cassettes can be easily made by PCR and delivered in any combination. We employed this method to rapidly phenotype up to five specific allele combinations and identify synergistic effects. To prototype a pathway for the production of muconic acid, we integrated six DNA fragments totaling 24 kb across three loci in naive Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a single transformation. With minor modifications, we integrated a similar pathway in Kluyveromyces lactis. The flexibility afforded by combinatorial gRNA delivery dramatically accelerates complex strain engineering for basic research and industrial fermentation. PMID:27135688

  6. Construction of a lactose-assimilating strain of baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Adam, A C; Prieto, J A; Rubio-Texeira, M; Polaina, J

    1999-09-30

    A recombinant strain of baker's yeast has been constructed which can assimilate lactose efficiently. This strain has been designed to allow its propagation in whey, the byproduct resulting from cheese-making. The ability to metabolize lactose is conferred by the functional expression of two genes from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC12 and LAC4, which encode a lactose permease and a beta-galactosidase, respectively. To make the recombinant strain more acceptable for its use in bread-making, the genetic transformation of the host baker's yeast was carried out with linear fragments of DNA of defined sequence, carrying as the only heterologous material the coding regions of the two K. lactis genes. Growth of the new strain on cheese whey affected neither the quality of bread nor the yeast gassing power. The significance of the newly developed strain is two-fold: it affords a cheap alternative to the procedure generally used for the propagation of baker's yeast, and it offers a profitable use for cheese whey.

  7. An Effective Big Data Supervised Imbalanced Classification Approach for Ortholog Detection in Related Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Galpert, Deborah; del Río, Sara; Herrera, Francisco; Ancede-Gallardo, Evys; Antunes, Agostinho; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin

    2015-01-01

    Orthology detection requires more effective scaling algorithms. In this paper, a set of gene pair features based on similarity measures (alignment scores, sequence length, gene membership to conserved regions, and physicochemical profiles) are combined in a supervised pairwise ortholog detection approach to improve effectiveness considering low ortholog ratios in relation to the possible pairwise comparison between two genomes. In this scenario, big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance between ortholog and nonortholog pair classes allow for an effective scaling solution built from two genomes and extended to other genome pairs. The supervised approach was compared with RBH, RSD, and OMA algorithms by using the following yeast genome pairs: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Schizosaccharomyces pombe as benchmark datasets. Because of the large amount of imbalanced data, the building and testing of the supervised model were only possible by using big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance. Evaluation metrics taking low ortholog ratios into account were applied. From the effectiveness perspective, MapReduce Random Oversampling combined with Spark SVM outperformed RBH, RSD, and OMA, probably because of the consideration of gene pair features beyond alignment similarities combined with the advances in big data supervised classification. PMID:26605337

  8. An Effective Big Data Supervised Imbalanced Classification Approach for Ortholog Detection in Related Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Galpert, Deborah; Del Río, Sara; Herrera, Francisco; Ancede-Gallardo, Evys; Antunes, Agostinho; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin

    2015-01-01

    Orthology detection requires more effective scaling algorithms. In this paper, a set of gene pair features based on similarity measures (alignment scores, sequence length, gene membership to conserved regions, and physicochemical profiles) are combined in a supervised pairwise ortholog detection approach to improve effectiveness considering low ortholog ratios in relation to the possible pairwise comparison between two genomes. In this scenario, big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance between ortholog and nonortholog pair classes allow for an effective scaling solution built from two genomes and extended to other genome pairs. The supervised approach was compared with RBH, RSD, and OMA algorithms by using the following yeast genome pairs: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Schizosaccharomyces pombe as benchmark datasets. Because of the large amount of imbalanced data, the building and testing of the supervised model were only possible by using big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance. Evaluation metrics taking low ortholog ratios into account were applied. From the effectiveness perspective, MapReduce Random Oversampling combined with Spark SVM outperformed RBH, RSD, and OMA, probably because of the consideration of gene pair features beyond alignment similarities combined with the advances in big data supervised classification.

  9. A dual approach for improving homogeneity of a human-type N-glycan structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Piirainen, Mari A; Boer, Harry; de Ruijter, Jorg C; Frey, Alexander D

    2016-04-01

    N-glycosylation is an important feature of therapeutic and other industrially relevant proteins, and engineering of the N-glycosylation pathway provides opportunities for developing alternative, non-mammalian glycoprotein expression systems. Among yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most established host organism used in therapeutic protein production and therefore an interesting host for glycoengineering. In this work, we present further improvements in the humanization of the N-glycans in a recently developed S. cerevisiae strain. In this strain, a tailored trimannosyl lipid-linked oligosaccharide is formed and transferred to the protein, followed by complex-type glycan formation by Golgi apparatus-targeted human N-acetylglucosamine transferases. We improved the glycan pattern of the glycoengineered strain both in terms of glycoform homogeneity and the efficiency of complex-type glycosylation. Most of the interfering structures present in the glycoengineered strain were eliminated by deletion of the MNN1 gene. The relative abundance of the complex-type target glycan was increased by the expression of a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine transporter from Kluyveromyces lactis, indicating that the import of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine into the Golgi apparatus is a limiting factor for efficient complex-type N-glycosylation in S. cerevisiae. By a combination of the MNN1 deletion and the expression of a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine transporter, a strain forming complex-type glycans with a significantly improved homogeneity was obtained. Our results represent a further step towards obtaining humanized glycoproteins with a high homogeneity in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26983412

  10. Microbial D-xylonate production.

    PubMed

    Toivari, Mervi H; Nygård, Yvonne; Penttilä, Merja; Ruohonen, Laura; Wiebe, Marilyn G

    2012-10-01

    D-Xylonic acid is a versatile platform chemical with reported applications as complexing agent or chelator, in dispersal of concrete, and as a precursor for compounds such as co-polyamides, polyesters, hydrogels and 1,2,4-butanetriol. With increasing glucose prices, D-xylonic acid may provide a cheap, non-food derived alternative for gluconic acid, which is widely used (about 80 kton/year) in pharmaceuticals, food products, solvents, adhesives, dyes, paints and polishes. Large-scale production has not been developed, reflecting the current limited market for D-xylonate. D-Xylonic acid occurs naturally, being formed in the first step of oxidative metabolism of D-xylose by some archaea and bacteria via the action of D-xylose or D-glucose dehydrogenases. High extracellular concentrations of D-xylonate have been reported for various bacteria, in particular Gluconobacter oxydans and Pseudomonas putida. High yields of D-xylonate from D-xylose make G. oxydans an attractive choice for biotechnical production. G. oxydans is able to produce D-xylonate directly from plant biomass hydrolysates, but rates and yields are reduced because of sensitivity to hydrolysate inhibitors. Recently, D-xylonate has been produced by the genetically modified bacterium Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis. Expression of NAD(+)-dependent D-xylose dehydrogenase of Caulobacter crescentus in either E. coli or in a robust, hydrolysate-tolerant, industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain has resulted in D-xylonate titres, which are comparable to those seen with G. oxydans, at a volumetric rate approximately 30% of that observed with G. oxydans. With further development, genetically modified microbes may soon provide an alternative for production of D-xylonate at industrial scale.

  11. Isolation of an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene (ZbACS2) from Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Cardoso, Helena; Sousa, Maria João; Steensma, H Yde; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2004-03-01

    A gene homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACS genes, coding for acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been cloned from the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307, by using reverse genetic approaches. A probe obtained by PCR amplification from Z. bailii DNA, using primers derived from two conserved regions of yeast ACS proteins, RIGAIHSVVF (ScAcs1p; 210-219) and RVDDVVNVSG (ScAcs1p; 574-583), was used for screening a Z. bailii genomic library. Nine clones with partially overlapping inserts were isolated. The sequenced DNA fragment contains a complete ORF of 2027 bp (ZbACS2) and the deduced polypeptide shares significant homologies with the products of ACS2 genes from S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis (81% and 82% identity and 84% and 89% similarity, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the sequence of Zbacs2 is more closely related to the sequences from Acs2 than to those from Acs1 proteins. Moreover, this analysis revealed that the gene duplication producing Acs1 and Acs2 proteins has occurred in the common ancestor of S. cerevisiae, K. lactis, Candida albicans, C. glabrata and Debaryomyces hansenii lineages. Additionally, the cloned gene allowed growth of S. cerevisiae Scacs2 null mutant, in medium containing glucose as the only carbon and energy source, indicating that it encodes a functional acetyl-CoA synthetase. Also, S. cerevisiae cells expressing ZbACS2 have a shorter lag time, in medium containing glucose (2%, w/v) plus acetic acid (0.1-0.35%, v/v). No differences in cell response to acetic acid stress were detected both by specific growth and death rates. The mode of regulation of ZbACS2 appears to be different from ScACS2 and KlACS2, being subject to repression by a glucose pulse in acetic acid-grown cells. PMID:15042592

  12. Fuel ethanol and high protein feed from corn and corn-whey mixtures in a farm-scale plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    Distiller's wet grain (DWG) and 95% ethanol were produced from corn in a farm-scale process involving batch cooking-fermentation and continuous distillation-centrifugation. The energy balance was 2.26 and the cost was $1.86/gal (1981 cost). To improve the energy balance and reduce costs, various modifications were made in the plant. The first change, back-end (after liquefaction) serial recycling of stillage supernatant at 20 and 40% strengths, produced beers with 0.2 and 0.4% (v/v) more ethanol, respectively, than without recycling. This increased the energy balance by 0.22-0.43 units and reduced costs by $0.07-$0.10/gal. The DWGs from back-end recycling had increased fat. The second change, increasing the starch content from 17-19% to 27.5%, increased the ethanol in the beer from 10.5-14.9% at a cost savings of $0.41/gal. The energy balance increased by 1.08 units. No significant change was seen in DWG composition. The third change, using continuous cascade rather than batch fermentation, permitted batch-levels of ethanol (10%) in the beer but only at low dilution rates. Both the cost and energy balance were decreased slightly. The DWG composition remained constant. The last change, replacing part of the corn and all of the tap water in the mash with whole whey and using Kluyveromyces fragilis instead of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation, resulted in an energy balance increase of 0.16 units and a $0.27/gal cost reduction. Here, 10% ethanolic beers were produced and the DWGs showed increased protein and fat. Recommendations for farm-scale plants are provided.

  13. Fuel ethanol and high protein feed from corn and corn-whey mixtures in a farm-scale plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    Distiller's wet grain (DWG) and 95% ethanol were produced from corn in a farm-scale process involving batch cooking-fermentation and continuous distillation-centrifugation. The energy balance was 2.26 and the cost was $1.86/gal (1981 cost). To improve the energy balance and reduce costs, various modifications were made in the plant. The first change, back-end (after liquefaction) serial recycling of stillage supernatant at 20 and 40% strengths, produced beers with 0.2 and 0.4% (v/v) more ethanol, respectively, than without recycling. This increased the energy balance by 0.22-0.43 units and reduced costs by $0.07-$0.10/gal. The DWGs from back-end recycling had increased fat. The second change, increasing the starch content from 17-19% to 27.5%, increased the ethanol in the beer from 10.5-14.9% at a cost savings of $0.41/gal. The energy balance increased by 1.08 units. No significant change was seen in DWG composition. The third change, using continuous cascade rather than batch fermentation, permitted batch-levels of ethanol (10%) in the beer but only at low dilution rates. Both the cost and energy balance were decreased slightly. The DWG composition remained constant. The last change, replacing part of the corn and all of the tap water in the mash with whole whey and using Kluyveromyces fragilis instead of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation, resulted in an energy balance increase of 0.16 units and a $0.27/gal cost reduction. Here, 10% ethanolic beers were produced and the DWGs showed increased protein and fat. Recommendations for farm-scale plants are provided. (Refs. 46).

  14. Isolation, characterization and cloning of a cDNA encoding a new antifungal defensin from Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Games, Patrícia D; Dos Santos, Izabela S; Mello, Erica O; Diz, Mariângela S S; Carvalho, André O; de Souza-Filho, Gonçalo A; Da Cunha, Maura; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Ferreira, Beatriz Dos S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2008-12-01

    The PvD1 defensin was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris (cv. Pérola) seeds, basically as described by Terras et al. [Terras FRG, Schoofs HME, De Bolle MFC, Van Leuven F, Ress SB, Vanderleyden J, Cammue BPA, Broekaer TWF. Analysis of two novel classes of plant antifungal proteins from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seeds. J Biol Chem 1992;267(22):15301-9], with some modifications. A DEAE-Sepharose, equilibrated with 20mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, was initially utilized for the separation of peptides after ammonium sulfate fractionation. The basic fraction (the non-retained peak) obtained showed the presence of one unique band in SDS-Tricine gel electrophoresis with a molecular mass of approximately 6kDa. The purification of this peptide was confirmed after a reverse-phase chromatography in a C2/C18 column by HPLC, where once again only one peak was observed and denominated H1. H1 was submitted to N-terminal sequencing and the comparative analysis in databanks revealed high similarity with sequences of different defensins isolated from other plants species. The N-terminal sequence of the mature defensin isolated was used to produce a degenerated primer. This primer allowed the amplification of the defensin cDNA by RT-PCR from mRNA of P. vulgaris seeds. The sequence analysis of the cloned cDNA, named PVD1, demonstrated 314bp encoding a polypeptide of 47 amino acids. The deduced peptide presented high similarity with plant defensins of Vigna unguiculata (93%), Cicer arietinum (95%) and Pachyrhizus erosus (87%). PvD1 inhibited the growth of the yeasts, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxiannus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvD1 also presented an inhibitory activity against the growth of phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium lateritium and Rizoctonia solani. PMID:18786582

  15. Disruption of seven hypothetical aryl alcohol dehydrogenase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and construction of a multiple knock-out strain.

    PubMed

    Delneri, D; Gardner, D C; Bruschi, C V; Oliver, S G

    1999-11-01

    By in silicio analysis, we have discovered that there are seven open reading frames (ORFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose protein products show a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the aryl alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Yeast cultures grown to stationary phase display a significant aryl alcohol dehydrogenase activity by degrading aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols. To study the biochemical and the biological role of each of the AAD genes, a series of mutant strains carrying deletion of one or more of the AAD-coding sequences was constructed by PCR-mediated gene replacement, using the readily selectable marker kanMX. The correct targeting of the PCR-generated disruption cassette into the genomic locus was verified by analytical PCR and by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) followed by Southern blot analysis. Double, triple and quadruple mutant strains were obtained by classical genetic methods, while the construction of the quintuple, sextuple and septuple mutants was achieved by using the marker URA3 from Kluyveromyces lactis, HIS3 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and TRP1 from S. cerevisiae. None of the knock-out strains revealed any mutant phenotype when tested for the degradation of aromatic aldehydes using both spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Specific tests for changes in the ergosterol and phospholipids profiles did not reveal any mutant phenotype and mating and sporulation efficiencies were not affected in the septuple deletant. Compared to the wild-type strain, the septuple deletant showed an increased resistance to the anisaldehyde, but there is a possibility that the nutritional markers used for gene replacement are causing this effect.

  16. Biological control as a strategy to reduce the impact of mycotoxins in peanuts, grapes and cereals in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Chulze, S N; Palazzini, J M; Torres, A M; Barros, G; Ponsone, M L; Geisen, R; Schmidt-Heydt, M; Köhl, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins including aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, fumonisins and ochratoxin A are among the main fungal secondary metabolites detected as natural contaminants in South America in different commodities such as peanuts (aflatoxins), cereals (deoxynivalenol and fumonisins) or grapes (ochratoxin A). Different strategies including crop rotation, tillage practices, fungicide application and planting less susceptible cultivars are used in order to reduce the impact of these mycotoxins in both food and feed chains. The development of fungicide resistance in many fungal pathogens as well as rising of public concern on the risks associated with pesticide use led to the search for alternative environmentally friendly methods. Biological control of plant pathogens and toxigenic fungi offers an alternative that can complement chemical control in the frame of an integrated pest management to reduce the impact of mycotoxins in the food and feed chains. The advances made in Argentina on reducing the impact of toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins in peanut, grapes and cereals using the biocontrol strategy are summarised. Native bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi have been selected to evaluate them as potential biocontrol agents. Field trials showed that Bacillus subtilis RC 218 and Brevibacillus sp. RC 263 were effective at reducing deoxynivalenol accumulation in wheat. The application of Clonostachys rosea isolates on wheat stubble reduced Fusarium colonisation on the stubble. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Microbacterium oleovorans showed good activity to control both Fusarium verticillioides growth and the accumulation of fumonisins at pre-harvest stage in maize. Control of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin accumulation in peanuts was achieved using a native atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain based on competitive exclusion of the toxigenic strains. Kluyveromyces thermotolerans strains were used as biocontrol agents to reduce the impact of Aspergillus section Nigri and

  17. Sequencing-Based Analysis of the Bacterial and Fungal Composition of Kefir Grains and Milks from Multiple Sources

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Alan J.; O’Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk-based beverage to which a number of health-promoting properties have been attributed. The microbes responsible for the fermentation of milk to produce kefir consist of a complex association of bacteria and yeasts, bound within a polysaccharide matrix, known as the kefir grain. The consistency of this microbial population, and that present in the resultant beverage, has been the subject of a number of previous, almost exclusively culture-based, studies which have indicated differences depending on geographical location and culture conditions. However, culture-based identification studies are limited by virtue of only detecting species with the ability to grow on the specific medium used and thus culture-independent, molecular-based techniques offer the potential for a more comprehensive analysis of such communities. Here we describe a detailed investigation of the microbial population, both bacterial and fungal, of kefir, using high-throughput sequencing to analyse 25 kefir milks and associated grains sourced from 8 geographically distinct regions. This is the first occasion that this technology has been employed to investigate the fungal component of these populations or to reveal the microbial composition of such an extensive number of kefir grains or milks. As a result several genera and species not previously identified in kefir were revealed. Our analysis shows that the bacterial populations in kefir are dominated by 2 phyla, the Firmicutes and the Proteobacteria. It was also established that the fungal populations of kefir were dominated by the genera Kazachstania, Kluyveromyces and Naumovozyma, but that a variable sub-dominant population also exists. PMID:23894461

  18. The Composition of Camembert Cheese-Ripening Cultures Modulates both Mycelial Growth and Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Marie-Hélène; Bélanger, Gaétan; St-Gelais, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The fungal microbiota of bloomy-rind cheeses, such as Camembert, forms a complex ecosystem that has not been well studied, and its monitoring during the ripening period remains a challenge. One limitation of enumerating yeasts and molds on traditional agar media is that hyphae are multicellular structures, and colonies on a petri dish rarely develop from single cells. In addition, fungi tend to rapidly invade agar surfaces, covering small yeast colonies and resulting in an underestimation of their number. In this study, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method using TaqMan probes to quantify a mixed fungal community containing the most common dairy yeasts and molds: Penicillium camemberti, Geotrichum candidum, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Kluyveromyces lactis on soft-cheese model curds (SCMC). The qPCR method was optimized and validated on pure cultures and used to evaluate the growth dynamics of a ripening culture containing P. camemberti, G. candidum, and K. lactis on the surface of the SCMC during a 31-day ripening period. The results showed that P. camemberti and G. candidum quickly dominated the ecosystem, while K. lactis remained less abundant. When added to this ecosystem, D. hansenii completely inhibited the growth of K. lactis in addition to reducing the growth of the other fungi. This result was confirmed by the decrease in the mycelium biomass on SCMC. This study compares culture-dependent and qPCR methods to successfully quantify complex fungal microbiota on a model curd simulating Camembert-type cheese. PMID:22247164

  19. Submerged yeast fermentation of acid cheese whey for protein production and pollution potential reduction.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, A E; Kamal, M A

    2004-02-01

    Bench-scale batch bioreactors were used to study the effectiveness of cheese whey fermentation for single-cell protein production using the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis in reducing the pollution potential of whey as measured by solids, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogenous compounds concentrations. The four principal phases (lag, exponential, stationary and death) encountered in the history of a microbial culture grown under batch conditions were clearly recognized in the growth, temperature and dissolved oxygen curves. The lactose concentration and soluble COD displayed three distinct phases corresponding to the lag, exponential and stationary phases of the yeast growth. The minimum dissolved oxygen and maximum temperature observed in this study (at an air flow of 3 VVM, a mixing speed of 400 rpm and an ambient temperature) were 2.49 mg/L and 31.6 degrees C, respectively. About 99% of lactose (90.6% of soluble COD) was utilized after 28 h. The total COD continued to decline due to cell death resulting in a reduction of 42.98%. The total nitrogen concentration remained unchanged while the organic nitrogen increased during the exponential phase and then declined during the death phase. The ash content remained unchanged while a substantial reduction (56%) of the volatile solids was observed. These results indicated that sufficient oxygen for yeast growth was present in the medium and no cooling system was needed for this type of fermenter under similar experimental conditions. Recovering the yeast biomass with ultrafiltration reduced the total COD by 98% of its initial value in the raw whey. PMID:14723932

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of the heterotrimeric killer toxin zymocin identifies residues required for early steps in toxin action.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-10-01

    Zymocin is a Kluyveromyces lactis protein toxin composed of αβγ subunits encoded by the cytoplasmic virus-like element k1 and functions by αβ-assisted delivery of the anticodon nuclease (ACNase) γ into target cells. The toxin binds to cells' chitin and exhibits chitinase activity in vitro that might be important during γ import. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying k1-derived hybrid elements deficient in either αβ (k1ORF2) or γ (k1ORF4) were generated. Loss of either gene abrogates toxicity, and unexpectedly, Orf2 secretion depends on Orf4 cosecretion. Functional zymocin assembly can be restored by nuclear expression of k1ORF2 or k1ORF4, providing an opportunity to conduct site-directed mutagenesis of holozymocin. Complementation required active site residues of α's chitinase domain and the sole cysteine residue of β (Cys250). Since βγ are reportedly disulfide linked, the requirement for the conserved γ C231 was probed. Toxicity of intracellularly expressed γ C231A indicated no major defect in ACNase activity, while complementation of k1ΔORF4 by γ C231A was lost, consistent with a role of β C250 and γ C231 in zymocin assembly. To test the capability of αβ to carry alternative cargos, the heterologous ACNase from Pichia acaciae (P. acaciae Orf2 [PaOrf2]) was expressed, along with its immunity gene, in k1ΔORF4. While efficient secretion of PaOrf2 was detected, suppression of the k1ΔORF4-derived k1Orf2 secretion defect was not observed. Thus, the dependency of k1Orf2 on k1Orf4 cosecretion needs to be overcome prior to studying αβ's capability to deliver other cargo proteins into target cells. PMID:25128337

  1. Protein kinase Ymr291w/Tda1 is essential for glucose signaling in saccharomyces cerevisiae on the level of hexokinase isoenzyme ScHxk2 phosphorylation*.

    PubMed

    Kaps, Sonja; Kettner, Karina; Migotti, Rebekka; Kanashova, Tamara; Krause, Udo; Rödel, Gerhard; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme ScHxk2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a dual-function hexokinase that besides its catalytic role in glycolysis is involved in the transcriptional regulation of glucose-repressible genes. Relief from glucose repression is accompanied by the phosphorylation of the nuclear fraction of ScHxk2 at serine 15 and the translocation of the phosphoenzyme into the cytosol. Different studies suggest different serine/threonine protein kinases, Ymr291w/Tda1 or Snf1, to accomplish ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation. The current paper provides evidence that Ymr291w/Tda1 is essential for that modification, whereas protein kinases Ydr477w/Snf1, Ynl307c/Mck1, Yfr014c/Cmk1, and Ykl126w/Ypk1, which are co-purified during Ymr291w/Tda1 tandem affinity purification, as well as protein kinase PKA and PKB homolog Sch9 are dispensable. Taking into account the detection of a significantly higher amount of the Ymr291w/Tda1 protein in cells grown in low-glucose media as compared with a high-glucose environment, Ymr291w/Tda1 is likely to contribute to glucose signaling in S. cerevisiae on the level of ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation in a situation of limited external glucose availability. The evolutionary conservation of amino acid residue serine 15 in yeast hexokinases and its phosphorylation is illustrated by the finding that YMR291W/TDA1 of S. cerevisiae and the homologous KLLA0A09713 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis allow for cross-complementation of the respective protein kinase single-gene deletion strains.

  2. Protein Kinase Ymr291w/Tda1 Is Essential for Glucose Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the Level of Hexokinase Isoenzyme ScHxk2 Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Kaps, Sonja; Kettner, Karina; Migotti, Rebekka; Kanashova, Tamara; Krause, Udo; Rödel, Gerhard; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kriegel, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme ScHxk2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a dual-function hexokinase that besides its catalytic role in glycolysis is involved in the transcriptional regulation of glucose-repressible genes. Relief from glucose repression is accompanied by the phosphorylation of the nuclear fraction of ScHxk2 at serine 15 and the translocation of the phosphoenzyme into the cytosol. Different studies suggest different serine/threonine protein kinases, Ymr291w/Tda1 or Snf1, to accomplish ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation. The current paper provides evidence that Ymr291w/Tda1 is essential for that modification, whereas protein kinases Ydr477w/Snf1, Ynl307c/Mck1, Yfr014c/Cmk1, and Ykl126w/Ypk1, which are co-purified during Ymr291w/Tda1 tandem affinity purification, as well as protein kinase PKA and PKB homolog Sch9 are dispensable. Taking into account the detection of a significantly higher amount of the Ymr291w/Tda1 protein in cells grown in low-glucose media as compared with a high-glucose environment, Ymr291w/Tda1 is likely to contribute to glucose signaling in S. cerevisiae on the level of ScHxk2-S15 phosphorylation in a situation of limited external glucose availability. The evolutionary conservation of amino acid residue serine 15 in yeast hexokinases and its phosphorylation is illustrated by the finding that YMR291W/TDA1 of S. cerevisiae and the homologous KLLA0A09713 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis allow for cross-complementation of the respective protein kinase single-gene deletion strains. PMID:25593311

  3. L-methionine degradation potentialities of cheese-ripening microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bonnarme, P; Lapadatescu, C; Yvon, M; Spinnler, H E

    2001-11-01

    Volatile sulphur compounds are major flavouring compounds in many traditional fermented foods including cheeses. These compounds are products of the catabolism of L-methionine by cheese-ripening microorganisms. The diversity of L-methionine degradation by such microorganisms, however, remains to be characterized. The objective of this work was to compare the capacities to produce volatile sulphur compounds by five yeasts, Geotrichum candidum, Yarrowia lipolytica, Kluyveromyces lactis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and five bacteria, Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Arthrobacter sp., Micrococcus lutens and Staphylococcus equorum of technological interest for cheese-ripening. The ability of whole cells of these microorganisms to generate volatile sulphur compounds from L-methionine was compared. The microorganisms produced a wide spectrum of sulphur compounds including methanethiol, dimethylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide, dimethyltrisulfide and also S-methylthioesters, which varied in amount and type according to strain. Most of the yeasts produced methanethiol, dimethylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide and dimethyltrisulfide but did not produce S-methylthioesters, apart from G. candidum that produced S-methyl thioacetate. Bacteria, especially Arth. sp. and Brevi. linens, produced the highest amounts and the greatest variety of volatile sulphur compounds includling methanethiol, sulfides and S-methylthioesters, e.g. S-methyl thioacetate, S-methyl thiobutyrate, S-methyl thiopropionate and S-methyl thioisovalerate. Cell-free extracts of all the yeasts and bacteria were examined for the activity of enzymes possibly involved in L-methionine catabolism, i.e. L-methionine demethiolase, L-methionine aminotransferase and L-methionine deaminase. They all possessed L-methionine demethiolase activity, while some (K. lactis, Deb. hansenii, Arth. sp., Staph. equorum) were deficient in L-methionine aminotransferase, and none produced L-methionine deaminase

  4. Spectroscopic study, antimicrobial activity and crystal structures of N-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzalidene)4-aminomorpholine and N-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene)4-aminomorpholine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Mustafa; Ünver, Hüseyin; Dülger, Başaran; Erdener, Diğdem; Ocak, Nazan; Erdönmez, Ahmet; Durlu, Tahsin Nuri

    2005-03-01

    Schiff bases N-(2-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzalidene)4-aminomorpholine ( 1) and N-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene)4-aminomorpholine ( 2) were synthesized from the reaction of 4-aminomorpholine with 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde. Compounds 1 and 2 were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-Visible techniques. The UV-Visible spectra of the Schiff bases with OH group in ortho position to the imino group were studied in polar and nonpolar solvents in acidic and basic media. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 have been examined cyrstallographically, for two compounds exist as dominant form of enol-imines in both the solutions and solid state. The title compounds 1 and 2 crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2 1/ c and P2 1/ n with unit cell parameters: a=8.410(1) and 11.911(3), b=6.350(9) and 4.860(9), c=21.728(3) and 22.381(6) Å, β=90.190(1) and 95.6(2)°, V=1160.6(3) and 1289.5(5) Å 3, Dx=1.438 and 1.320 g cm -3, respectively. The crystal structures were solved by direct methods and refined by full-matrix least squares. The antimicrobial activities of compounds 1 and 2 have also been studied. The antimicrobial activities of the ligands have been screened in vitro against the organisms Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Klebsiella pneumoniae UC57, Micrococcus luteus La 2971, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 8427, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Mycobacterium smegmatis CCM 2067, Bacillus cereus ATCC 7064, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL 2415, Rhodotorula rubra DSM 70403, Debaryomyces hansenii DSM 70238 and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii DSM 3432.

  5. Characterization of yeasts isolated from artisanal short-ripened cows' cheeses produced in Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Atanassova, M R; Fernández-Otero, C; Rodríguez-Alonso, P; Fernández-No, I C; Garabal, J I; Centeno, J A

    2016-02-01

    A total of 143 presumptive yeast isolates were obtained from the predominant microflora of 21 short-ripened starter-free raw cow's milk cheeses made in Galicia (NW Spain), and the following 68 isolates were identified by both genotyping and sequencing methods: Yarrowia lipolytica (21 isolates), Kluyveromyces lactis (18), Debaryomyces hansenii (11), Pichia guilliermondii (11), Pichia fermentans (4) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3). Of these, Y. lipolytica and K. lactis displayed the strongest extracellular proteolytic activity on skim milk agar, and none of the D. hansenii isolates showed any activity on this medium. Y. lipolytica also displayed the highest lipolytic activity on Tween 80 and on tributyrin. This species, which was characterized by production of butanoic acid, free fatty acid esters and sulfur compounds in pasteurized whole milk, was responsible for rancid and cheesy flavors. K. lactis mainly produced acetaldehyde, ethanol, branched chain aldehydes and alcohols, and acetic acid esters, which were responsible for alcoholic, fruity and acetic notes. The volatile profiles of D. hansenii were rather limited and characterized by high levels of methyl ketones. Most of the yeast isolates were described as tryptamine producers, although low concentrations of histamine were produced by five Y. lipolytica and two P. fermentans isolates. We conclude that selected Y. lipolytica strains could be used as adjunct cultures in the manufacture of Arzúa-Ulloa and Tetilla cheeses, and selected K. lactis strains could be used as co-starters in the manufacture of acid curd Cebreiro cheese, thus contributing to the sensory quality and typicality of the cheeses.

  6. Characterization of yeasts involved in the ripening of Pecorino Crotonese cheese.

    PubMed

    Gardini, F; Tofalo, R; Belletti, N; Iucci, L; Suzzi, G; Torriani, S; Guerzoni, M E; Lanciotti, R

    2006-10-01

    The aims of this work were to identify and characterize for some important technological properties the yeast species present throughout the ripening process of Pecorino Crotonese, a traditional cheese produced in a well defined area of Southern Italy. In particular, the strain technological properties considered include fermentation/assimilation of galactose and lactose, assimilation of lactate and citrate in the presence of different NaCl concentrations, hydrolysis of butter fat, skim milk, gelatine and casein, production of brown pigments in cheese agar and ability to produce biogenic amines. High yeast levels were recorded in cheese samples already after 5 h of brining (about 5 log cfu/g) and these concentration remained constant during ripening. The yeast isolates belonged to restrict number of yeast species. While Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated prevalently in the first stages of Pecorino Crotonese production, Yarrowia lipolytica and Debaryomyces hansenii dominated during the later stages of maturation. Otherwise, the latter two were very NaCl resistant species. In fact, D. hansenii strains conserved the ability to assimilate lactose and galactose in the presence of 10% NaCl, while almost all the strains of Y. lipolytica isolated assimilated citrate and lactate up to 7.5% NaCl. Y. lipolytica isolates evidenced also the highest proteolytic and lipolytic activities and the capability to catabolize tyrosine producing brown pigment. In addition they resulted in the highest aminobiogenic potential decarboxylating ornithine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and lysine. However, they were not able to produce histamine, biogenic amine produced by three strains of D. hansenii.

  7. Sequencing-based analysis of the bacterial and fungal composition of kefir grains and milks from multiple sources.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Alan J; O'Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Cotter, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk-based beverage to which a number of health-promoting properties have been attributed. The microbes responsible for the fermentation of milk to produce kefir consist of a complex association of bacteria and yeasts, bound within a polysaccharide matrix, known as the kefir grain. The consistency of this microbial population, and that present in the resultant beverage, has been the subject of a number of previous, almost exclusively culture-based, studies which have indicated differences depending on geographical location and culture conditions. However, culture-based identification studies are limited by virtue of only detecting species with the ability to grow on the specific medium used and thus culture-independent, molecular-based techniques offer the potential for a more comprehensive analysis of such communities. Here we describe a detailed investigation of the microbial population, both bacterial and fungal, of kefir, using high-throughput sequencing to analyse 25 kefir milks and associated grains sourced from 8 geographically distinct regions. This is the first occasion that this technology has been employed to investigate the fungal component of these populations or to reveal the microbial composition of such an extensive number of kefir grains or milks. As a result several genera and species not previously identified in kefir were revealed. Our analysis shows that the bacterial populations in kefir are dominated by 2 phyla, the Firmicutes and the Proteobacteria. It was also established that the fungal populations of kefir were dominated by the genera Kazachstania, Kluyveromyces and Naumovozyma, but that a variable sub-dominant population also exists.

  8. Separable Crossover-Promoting and Crossover-Constraining Aspects of Zip1 Activity during Budding Yeast Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Voelkel-Meiman, Karen; Johnston, Cassandra; Thappeta, Yashna; Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V.; Hochwagen, Andreas; MacQueen, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on the presence of crossover events distributed among all chromosomes. MutSγ and MutLγ homologs (Msh4/5 and Mlh1/3) facilitate the formation of a prominent group of meiotic crossovers that mature within the context of an elaborate chromosomal structure called the synaptonemal complex (SC). SC proteins are required for intermediate steps in the formation of MutSγ-MutLγ crossovers, but whether the assembled SC structure per se is required for MutSγ-MutLγ-dependent crossover recombination events is unknown. Here we describe an interspecies complementation experiment that reveals that the mature SC is dispensable for the formation of Mlh3-dependent crossovers in budding yeast. Zip1 forms a major structural component of the budding yeast SC, and is also required for MutSγ and MutLγ-dependent crossover formation. Kluyveromyces lactis ZIP1 expressed in place of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ZIP1 in S. cerevisiae cells fails to support SC assembly (synapsis) but promotes wild-type crossover levels in those nuclei that progress to form spores. While stable, full-length SC does not assemble in S. cerevisiae cells expressing K. lactis ZIP1, aggregates of K. lactis Zip1 displayed by S. cerevisiae meiotic nuclei are decorated with SC-associated proteins, and K. lactis Zip1 promotes the SUMOylation of the SC central element protein Ecm11, suggesting that K. lactis Zip1 functionally interfaces with components of the S. cerevisiae synapsis machinery. Moreover, K. lactis Zip1-mediated crossovers rely on S. cerevisiae synapsis initiation proteins Zip3, Zip4, Spo16, as well as the Mlh3 protein, as do the crossovers mediated by S. cerevisiae Zip1. Surprisingly, however, K. lactis Zip1-mediated crossovers are largely Msh4/Msh5 (MutSγ)-independent. This separation-of-function version of Zip1 thus reveals that neither assembled SC nor MutSγ is required for Mlh3-dependent crossover formation per se in budding yeast. Our data

  9. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  10. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mehlgarten, Constance; Krijger, Jorrit-Jan; Lemnian, Ioana; Gohr, André; Kasper, Lydia; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Grosse, Ivo; Breunig, Karin D

    2015-01-01

    Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive) while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative), which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and KlCat8, to

  11. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  12. A fungal anticodon nuclease ribotoxin exploits a secondary cleavage site to evade tRNA repair.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Birthe; Kast, Alene; Schwer, Beate; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Shuman, Stewart; Klassen, Roland

    2012-09-01

    PaOrf2 and γ-toxin subunits of Pichia acaciae toxin (PaT) and Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin are tRNA anticodon nucleases. These secreted ribotoxins are assimilated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wherein they arrest growth by depleting specific tRNAs. Toxicity can be recapitulated by induced intracellular expression of PaOrf2 or γ-toxin in S. cerevisiae. Mutational analysis of γ-toxin has identified amino acids required for ribotoxicity in vivo and RNA transesterification in vitro. Here, we report that PaOrf2 residues Glu9 and His287 (putative counterparts of γ-toxin Glu9 and His209) are essential for toxicity. Our results suggest a similar basis for RNA transesterification by PaOrf2 and γ-toxin, despite their dissimilar primary structures and distinctive tRNA target specificities. PaOrf2 makes two sequential incisions in tRNA, the first of which occurs 3' from the mcm(5)s(2)U wobble nucleoside and depends on mcm(5). A second incision two nucleotides upstream results in the net excision of a di-nucleotide. Expression of phage and plant tRNA repair systems can relieve PaOrf2 toxicity when tRNA cleavage is restricted to the secondary site in elp3 cells that lack the mcm(5) wobble U modification. Whereas the endogenous yeast tRNA ligase Trl1 can heal tRNA halves produced by PaOrf2 cleavage in elp3 cells, its RNA sealing activity is inadequate to complete the repair. Compatible sealing activity can be provided in trans by plant tRNA ligase. The damage-rescuing ability of tRNA repair systems is lost when PaOrf2 can break tRNA at both sites. These results highlight the logic of a two-incision mechanism of tRNA anticodon damage that evades productive repair by tRNA ligases. PMID:22836353

  13. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Mehlgarten, Constance; Krijger, Jorrit-Jan; Lemnian, Ioana; Gohr, André; Kasper, Lydia; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Grosse, Ivo; Breunig, Karin D.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive) while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative), which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and KlCat8, to

  14. Recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing Old Yellow Enzymes from non-conventional yeasts: an easy system for selective reduction of activated alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Old Yellow Enzymes (OYEs) are flavin-dependent enoate reductases (EC 1.6.99.1) that catalyze the stereoselective hydrogenation of electron-poor alkenes. Their ability to generate up to two stereocenters by the trans-hydrogenation of the C = C double bond is highly demanded in asymmetric synthesis. Isolated redox enzymes utilization require the addition of cofactors and systems for their regeneration. Microbial whole-cells may represent a valid alternative combining desired enzymatic activity and efficient cofactor regeneration. Considerable efforts were addressed at developing novel whole-cell OYE biocatalysts, based on recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing OYE genes. Results Recombinant S. cerevisiae BY4741∆Oye2 strains, lacking endogenous OYE and expressing nine separate OYE genes from non-conventional yeasts, were used as whole-cell biocatalysts to reduce substrates with an electron-poor double bond activated by different electron-withdrawing groups. Ketoisophorone, α-methyl-trans-cinnamaldehyde, and trans-β-methyl-β-nitrostyrene were successfully reduced with high rates and selectivity. A series of four alkyl-substituted cyclohex-2-enones was tested to check the versatility and efficiency of the biocatalysts. Reduction of double bond occurred with high rates and enantioselectivity, except for 3,5,5-trimethyl-2-cyclohexenone. DFT (density functional theory) computational studies were performed to investigate whether the steric hindrance and/or the electronic properties of the substrates were crucial for reactivity. The three-dimensional structure of enoate reductases from Kluyveromyces lodderae and Candida castellii, predicted through comparative modeling, resulted similar to that of S. cerevisiae OYE2 and revealed the key role of Trp116 both in substrate specificity and stereocontrol. All the modeling studies indicate that steric hindrance was a major determinant in the enzyme reactivity. Conclusions The OYE biocatalysts, based on

  15. Carbohydrate utilization in Streptococcus thermophilus: characterization of the genes for aldose 1-epimerase (mutarotase) and UDPglucose 4-epimerase.

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, B; Royer, T J; Mainzer, S E; Schmidt, B F

    1990-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding aldose 1-epimerase (mutarotase) (galM) and UDPglucose 4-epimerase (galE) and flanking regions of Streptococcus thermophilus have been determined. Both genes are located immediately upstream of the S. thermophilus lac operon. To facilitate the isolation of galE, a special polymerase chain reaction-based technique was used to amplify the region upstream of galM prior to cloning. The galM protein was homologous to the mutarotase of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, whereas the galE protein was homologous to UDPglucose 4-epimerase of Escherichia coli and Streptomyces lividans. The amino acid sequences of galM and galE proteins also showed significant similarity with the carboxy-terminal and amino-terminal domains, respectively, of UDPglucose 4-epimerase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that the yeast enzymes contain an additional, yet unidentified (mutarotase) activity. In accordance with the open reading frames of the structural genes, galM and galE were expressed as polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 39 and 37 kilodaltons, respectively. Significant activities of mutarotase and UDPglucose 4-epimerase were detected in lysates of E. coli cells containing plasmids encoding galM and galE. Expression of galE in E. coli was increased 300-fold when the gene was placed downstream of the tac promoter. The gene order for the gal-lac gene cluster of S. thermophilus is galE-galM-lacS-lacZ. The flanking regions of these genes were searched for consensus promoter sequences and further characterized by primer extension analysis. Analysis of mRNA levels for the gal and lac genes in S. thermophilus showed a strong reduction upon growth in medium containing glucose instead of lactose. The activities of the lac (lactose transport and beta-galactosidase) and gal (UDPglucose 4-epimerase) proteins of lactose- and glucose-grown S. thermophilus cells matched the mRNA levels. Images PMID:1694527

  16. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  17. Biodiversity of the Surface Microbial Consortia from Limburger, Reblochon, Livarot, Tilsit, and Gubbeen Cheeses.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Timothy M; Goerges, Stefanie; Gelsomino, Roberto; Larpin, Sandra; Hohenegger, Markus; Bora, Nagamani; Jamet, Emmanuel; Rea, Mary C; Mounier, Jérôme; Vancanneyt, Marc; Guéguen, Micheline; Desmasures, Nathalie; Swings, Jean; Goodfellow, Mike; Ward, Alan C; Sebastiani, Hans; Irlinger, Françoise; Chamba, Jean-Francois; Beduhn, Ruediger; Scherer, Siegfried

    2014-02-01

    Comprehensive collaborative studies from our laboratories reveal the extensive biodiversity of the microflora of the surfaces of smear-ripened cheeses. Two thousand five hundred ninety-seven strains of bacteria and 2,446 strains of yeasts from the surface of the smear-ripened cheeses Limburger, Reblochon, Livarot, Tilsit, and Gubbeen, isolated at three or four times during ripening, were identified; 55 species of bacteria and 30 species of yeast were found. The microfloras of the five cheeses showed many similarities but also many differences and interbatch variation. Very few of the commercial smear microorganisms, deliberately inoculated onto the cheese surface, were reisolated and then mainly from the initial stages of ripening, implying that smear cheese production units must have an adventitious "house" flora. Limburger cheese had the simplest microflora, containing two yeasts, Debaryomyces hansenii and Geotrichum candidum, and two bacteria, Arthrobacter arilaitensis and Brevibacterium aurantiacum. The microflora of Livarot was the most complicated, comprising 10 yeasts and 38 bacteria, including many gram-negative organisms. Reblochon also had a very diverse microflora containing 8 yeasts and 13 bacteria (excluding gram-negative organisms which were not identified), while Gubbeen had 7 yeasts and 18 bacteria and Tilsit had 5 yeasts and 9 bacteria. D. hansenii was by far the dominant yeast, followed in order by G. candidum, Candida catenulata, and Kluyveromyces lactis. B. aurantiacum was the dominant bacterium and was found in every batch of the 5 cheeses. The next most common bacteria, in order, were Staphylococcus saprophyticus, A. arilaitensis, Corynebacterium casei, Corynebacterium variabile, and Microbacterium gubbeenense. S. saprophyticus was mainly found in Gubbeen, and A. arilaitensis was found in all cheeses but not in every batch. C. casei was found in most batches of Reblochon, Livarot, Tilsit, and Gubbeen. C. variabile was found in all batches of

  18. The transfer of aflatoxin M1 in milk of ewes fed diet naturally contaminated by aflatoxins and effect of inclusion of dried yeast culture in the diet.

    PubMed

    Battacone, G; Nudda, A; Palomba, M; Mazzette, A; Pulina, G

    2009-10-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate 1) the transfer of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) into the milk of dairy ewes fed diets naturally contaminated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1); 2) the effect of the addition of dried yeast culture in the diet on this transfer; and 3) the alteration of enzymatic activities in the liver of ewes fed diets contaminated with AFB1. Twenty-four Sarda dairy ewes were divided in 4 groups and fed a concentrate mix containing 4 amounts of wheat meal naturally contaminated with aflatoxins. The diet of the control group had no wheat meal, whereas that of treated groups had low, medium, or high amounts of contaminated wheat, which corresponded to 1.13, 2.30, and 5.03 microg of AFB1/kg of feed, respectively. The experiment lasted 14 d. On d 8 to 14 from the beginning of the trial, 12 g/d of a commercial dried yeast product (DYP) of Kluyveromyces lactis was added to the diet of each ewe. The AFM1 concentration in individual milk samples and the blood serum metabolites were measured periodically. The presence of AFM1 was first detected in milk on d 1 of administration, and then its concentration increased and approached a steady-state condition on d 3 simultaneously in all treated groups. The AFM1 in milk at the steady-state condition, which was linearly related to the AFB1 intake, was 39.72, 50.38, and 79.29 ng/L in the low-aflatoxin, medium-aflatoxin, and high-aflatoxin groups, respectively. The AFM1 concentration in milk of the high-aflatoxin group was approximately 1.5-fold greater than the European Commission maximum tolerance level (50 ng/kg). The addition of DYP to the diet did not affect the AFM1 concentration in milk. After the withdrawal of the contaminated concentrate mix, the AFM1 mean concentrations decreased quickly and were no longer detected after 3 d in all treated groups. Daily milk yield and composition did not differ because of aflatoxin treatment. Blood serum parameters (creatinine, glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic

  19. Biochemical conversions of lignocellulosic biomass for sustainable fuel-ethanol production in the upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeur-Campbell, Michael J.

    species results. Chapter 4 is an evaluation of the potential for producing Trichoderma reesei cellulose hydrolases in the Kluyveromyces lactis yeast expression system. The exoglucanases Cel6A and Cel7A, and the endoglucanase Cel7B were inserted separately into the K. lactis and the enzymes were analyzed for activity on various substrates. Recombinant Cel7B was found to be active on carboxymethyl cellulose and Avicel powdered cellulose substrates. Recombinant Cel6A was also found to be active on Avicel. Recombinant Cel7A was produced, but no enzymatic activity was detected on any substrate. Chapter 5 presents a new method for enzyme improvement studies using enzyme co-expression and yeast growth rate measurements as a potential high-throughput expression and screening system in K. lactis yeast. Two different K. lactis strains were evaluated for their usefulness in growth screening studies, one wild-type strain and one strain which has had the main galactose metabolic pathway disabled. Sequential transformation and co-expression of the exoglucanase Cel6A and endoglucanase Cel7B was performed, and improved hydrolysis rates on Avicel were detectable in the cell culture supernatant. Future work should focus on hydrolysis of natural substrates, developing the growth screening method, and utilizing the K. lactis expression system for directed evolution of enzymes.